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Full text of "Compute! Magazine Issue 143"

^^.^ 




AUGUST 1992 



lASTER HARD DRIVES 

• EXPERT ADVICE ON 
SUPERCHARGING YOUR DISK 

FASTER VIDEO 

» WE TEST SUPER VGA MONITORS 
AND ACCELERATOR CARDS 
FASTER COMMUNICATIONS 

• CHEAPER, QUICKER 
DATA TRANSFERS 

HOME BUSINESS 
SURVIVAL GUIDE 

• VOICE MAIL FROM A TO Z 
HO TIPS FROM THE PROS 

PLUS! 

• PACKRAT 
•MAKE FRIENDS ONLINE 

• SUPER TETRIS 




I 





We just exploded the myth that all drawing programs are expensive, 
hard to master, and for art school graduates only. 

More than 2,600 ready-to-use clip art images make Windows Draw perfect 
for business graphics, home office projects, even presentations. 

Cut and paste images. Customize them. Or draw up your own ideas 
with a box full of smart tools and special effects. 

In no time, youll be confidently creating great-looking logos, illustra- 
tions, charts, posters, memos, newsletters and more. 

Helpful on-screen hints keep you drawing in the right direction. 
Bui if you need to talk, we're here 24 hours every weekday, and most of the 
weekend. 

Best of all Windows Draw won't blow your budget. Along with being fun, 
fast and friendly, it's affordable -just $149.95 suggested retail. According 
to InfoWorld, "...a real steal." So get your copy today. And have a blast! 

MiCROGRAFX* 



Visit your locai software dealer or call us toll-free at 1 -800-34 7-3715 for the narrie of a store near you. 

© 1991, Micrografx. Inc. All rights rcser\'ed. Micrografx and the Micrograf.\ logo are registered trademarks and Windows Draw 

is a tradcinark of Micrografx. hic. 

Circle Reader Service Number 180 



COfUIPUTE 



VOLUME 14, NO. 7, ISSUE 143 



AUGUST 1992 



FEATURES 
6 

HOW TO FINE-TUNi 
YOUR HARD DISK 

By Mark Minasi 

All the tools you need to 

supercharge your hard disk 

for top speed and capacity 

14 

TEST LAB 

Edited by Mike Hudnall 

Video monitors and 

accelerator cards that 

deliver super speed, deep 

color, and high resolution. 

60 

THE TAPROOTS OF SUCCESS 

By Rosalind Resnick 

Ten tips from small 

businesses that turned crisis 

into opportunity. 

73 

PRESS ONE FOR GREGG 

By Gregg Keizer 

Have your own electronic 

receptionist with voice mail. 

90 

THE ELEGRONICMEn MARKET 

By Rosalind Resnick 

You'll meet the nicest 

people online. Find out how. 

COLUMNS 

4 
EDITORIAL LICENSE 

By Clifton Karnes 

What is bandwidth, and 

where can I get some? 

34 

NEWS & NOTES 

By Jill Champion 

Top computer news. 

38 

FEEDBACK 

Readers write, 

and we answer. 

42 

POINT & CLICK 

By Clifton Karnes 

Five Windows utilities I 

couldn't live without. 




Cover photo by Steven Krongard 



44 

TIPS & TOOLS 

Edited by 
Richard C. Leinecker 
Tips from our readers. 

48 

COMPUTE/NET 

By Troy Tucker 

What's new online. 

50 

INTRODOS 

By Tony Roberts 
FDISK revealed! 

52 
HARDWARE CLINIC 

By Mark Minasi 

An inexpensive chip can 

speed up file transfers. 



56 

PROGRAMMING POWER 

By Tom Campbell 

Development environments. 

58 

SHAREPAK 

By Steve Draper 
Shareware treasures. 

128 

NEWS BITS 

By Jill Champion 
Top stories at press time. 

DEPARTMENTS 

68 

PRODUaiVITY CHOICE 

By Peter Scisco ' 
PackRat 4.0. 



TO 

PERSONAL PRODUCTIVITY 

By Daniel Janal 

Don't be left out: 

Try no-fax fax. 

76 

ART WORKS 

By Robert Bixby 

Alternative publishing may 

be for you. 

78 

DISCOVERY CHOICE 

By Steven Anzovin 
Disney Animation Studio, 

80 

PATHWAYS 

By Steven Anzovin 

The gizmonic home: 

Build your own robots. 

82 

MULTIMEDIA PC 

By David English 

This year's multimedia and 

CD-ROM conference. 

84 

ENTERTAINMENT CHOICE 

By David Sears 

Super Tetris. 

86 

GAMEPLAY 

By Orson Scott Card 

The best direction for 

Windows entertainment. 

REVIEWS 
97 

The Norton Antivirus, 

AST Advantage!, 

Hare Raising Havoc, 

Canon BJ-5, 

MicroCamp 2.0, 

Quantum Passport XL, 

MyBusinessCheckbook, 

Epson NB3s, 

Hoyle's Official 

Book of Games — Volume 3, 

Diconix Color 4, 

Design Your Own Home, 

Lexica, 

Speedball 2, and 

PC Partner LX. 



COMPUTE (ISSN 0194-367X) is published monthly in the Uniled SSates and Canada by COMPUTE Publicaiions International Ltd.. 1965 Broadway. New York. NY 10023-5965, Volume 14. 
Number 7. Issue 143 Copyriglil ® 1992 by COMPUTE Publlcalians Internalional Ud All rights reserved. COMPUTE is a registered trademark of COMPUTE Publications International Ltd, 
Printed in ihe USA by R H. [Jonnellay & Sons Inc. and distributed vjorldwice (except Australia and the UK) by Curls Circulation Company, RO Box 9102, Pennsauken, MJ 08109 Dislribuled 
in Australia by Ttie Horwitz Group, PO. Box 306. Cammeray NSW 2062 Australia and in ihe UK by Northern and Snell Pic. PO. Box 381 , Millharbour. London EM 9rw Second<lass postage 
paid at New York. NY and at additional mailing otiices POSTMASTER: Send address changes to COMPUTE Magazine, PO Box 3245. Harlan, lA 51537-3041 Tel (SCO) 727-6937. Entire 
contents copyrighted. All rights reserved. Nottiing may be reproduced in whole or in part withoul written permission from the publisher Subscriptions: US. AFO - S19 94 one year. Canada 
and elsewhere -S25.94 one year. Single copies ^.95 in US. The publisher disclaims all responsibilily to return unsolicited mailer, and all rights in portions published Ihereol remain Ihe sole 
property ol COMPUTE Publications International Lid. Letters senl 10 COMPUTE 0/ its editors become the propert/ ol Ihe magazine. Editorial otfices are located at 324 W. Wendover Ave.. 
Ste. 200. Greensboro. NC 274(M. Tel. (919) 275-9809. 



2 COMPUTE AUGUST 1992 





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EDITORIAL LICENSE 



Clifton Karnes 



When a syslent Es 

designed with 

perinherals on the 

local bus, they 

can nin with a data 

path of 32 bits 

and at the CPU's 

speed. 



W' hat is bandwidth, and 
where can I get some? 
That's the computer 
user's cry of the nine- 
ties. Though the term was orig- 
inally coined to describe the 
frequency range of a communi- 
cations channel, it's now 
used to describe the capaci- 
ty of any channel to transmit 
information. 

In the PC, there are sever- 
al channels where bandwidth 
is an issue. The most impor- 
tant are those that connect 
the CPU to its peripherals (vid- 
eo, hard disk, and so on) and 
to networks (dial-up networks 
like GEnie, CompuServe, Del- 
phi, and America Online as 
well as local area networks). 

Unfortunately, simply in- 
creasing CPU speed won't 
solve the PC's bandwidth prob- 
lem. Modern 33- and 50-MH2 
CPUs are certainly amazing 
speed demons that can trans- 
form raw data into useful infor- 
mation in a lightning flash, but 
the time it takes to move this 




data across a network or to 
your screen or hard disk is 
still geological in comparison. 

How do you increase band- 
width? There are three princi- 
pal ways; You can make the 
channel wider, you can make 
it faster, or you can compress 
the information that travels 
through it. 

Making the channel wider 
was the big innovation of the 
AT's 16-bit bus over the origi- 
nal PC's 8-bit bus. Although 
there have been other bus de- 
signs that offered wider chan- 
nels (Micro Channel and EI- 
SA), none have really caught 
on, and most of us are still us- 
ing the 16-bit AT bus de- 
signed ten years ago. And 
the fact that this bus is limited 
to 16 bits is not its worst prob- 
lem. No matter how fast your 
CPU, your bus is running at 8 
or 10 MHz, so information 
may fly out of the CPU at 33 
MHz, but it nearly comes to a 
halt when it hits the bus. 

One solution to the system 
bus problem is the local bus, 
which is hooked directly to 
the CPU. When a system is de- 
signed with peripherals on 
the local bus, they can run 
with a data path of 32 bits 
and at the CPU's speed— 25, 
33, or 50 MHz. Local bus 
promises to increase the 
speed of video and hard 
disks dramatically, and it 
does seem to be the solution 
to the PC's internal bandwidth 
crisis, indeed, the local bus 
fights the bandwidth gremlin 
on two fronts because it 
makes the bus both wider 
and faster. 

Although the local bus may 
be the solution for the future, 
what can we do now to in- 
crease bandwidth and im- 
prove our systems' perform- 
ance? The best solution is 
compression. In telecommuni- 
cations, which has had the 
most severe bandwidth prob- 
lem of any channel, compres- 
sion has been used since the 



beginning. If you download or 
upload files from telecommu- 
nications services, you know 
what I'm talking about. To 
make transfers faster, a file or 
group of files is compressed 
before it's uploaded. Then, 
it's downloaded in its com- 
pressed state and decom- 
pressed so it can be used. 
This compression-decompres- 
sion process effectively in- 
creases the bandwidth of the 
channel by moving more data 
in less time. 

Although you may not 
have thought of it this way, 
your hard disk is a channel, 
too, just like your machine's lo- 
cal bus and system bus. 
Most of the time, however, da- 
ta sits on your hard disk, so 
it's iess dynamic than these 
other channels. But the size 
of your disk dictates the 
amount of data you can ac- 
cess via that disk, which 
makes it a channel. Compres- 
sion can help here, too. With 
programs like Stacker, data is 
compressed and decom- 
pressed on the fly. Since the 
data is stored in a com- 
pressed format, the disk can 
hold more, hence increasing 
its bandwidth. 

In this issue, you'll see the 
bandwidth problem ad- 
dressed in hands-on, real- 
world terms in several places. 
First, check out Mark Minasi's 
"How to Fine-Tune Your Hard 
Disk" for ways to improve the 
speed, width, and capacity of 
that channel. The same au- 
thor talks about communica- 
tions bandwidth in his regular 
"Hardware Clinic" column. 
This issue's Test Lab looks at 
VGA systems, including accel- 
erator cards that increase vid- 
eo speed — one of the PC's 
greatest bandwidth bottle- 
necks. And next issue, we'll 
take a look at hardware and 
software add-ons to help you 
blast through the most intrac- 
table bandwidth barrier of 
all — phnters. □ 



COMPUTE AUGUST 1992 



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Circle BB&der 5«rvlce Nutnber 231 




HOW TO 

FINE-TUNE YOUR 

HARD DISK 

FOUR EASX INEXPENSIVE 

WAYS TO MAKE YOUR HARD DISK 

BIGGER AND FASTER 

BYAAARKMINASI 





•^^^i^i^^m^mm-r:' 




eed a faster 
disk? You could spend a pile of money on a 
new drive, but there may be a better way. 
Your PC's disk subsystem is characterized 
by bottlenecks, redundancy, and other 
inefficiencies. To enable you to fix those 
problems, we'll discuss four techniques for 
tuning your disk: using disk caches and track 
buffers, directory-structure caching with 
FASTOPEN, rearranging the order of your 
directories, and unfragmenting your disks. 

Amazingly, a good part of the PC world 
still doesn't use a cache (pronounced "cash") 
program, though caches and track buffers 
have been around the computer world nearly 
since its inception. The reason may be that 
many people don't know what caches are. 
They're included in a class of programs that 
perform speed matching; that is, they try to 
imbue the relatively slow disk drive with the 
relatively high speed of the computer's RAM. 
You probably know that disks are slower 
than memory, but do you know how slow? 
When your PC requests data from the hard 
disk, the disk must deliver the data in 512- 



1/ 



byte chunks called sectors. The disk 
typically locates and reads a particular 
sector In 10-100 rrtlliseconds (ms); 
this number is the average seek time 
of the disk. 

Ancient XT 10MB hard disks seek 
in around 100 ms. Newer drives 
typically seek in 10-20 ms. So if we 
say, for example, that a disk can 
transfer 512 bytes of data into the 
computer's RAM in 20 ms, how much 
time is required to transfer 512 bytes 
of data from RAM to RAM? In other 
words, what's the corresponding seek 
time for a block of data in RAM? A 
best-case scenario would be about 
0.05 ms on a 20-MHz 386 computer, 
or 400 times faster. So every disk 
access seems painfully slow — 
geological, in fact — to the processor. 
This is where track buffers and 
caches come in. 

Making Tra<lcs 

Look at the diagram labeled Tracks 
and Sectors; you'll see that sectors 
are grouped together into a structure 
called a track. The disk head floats 
over the track as the track spins 
beneath it at 3600 rpm. The disk spins 
whether or not the head is reading the 
disk's data. 

The notion of a track buffer grows 
out of the idea that since sectors fly by 
the disk head while the head is 
waiting for the right one, we might as 
well read them. It's generally true that 
when DOS needs sector x on a 
particular track, the next sector it will 
need will be sector x+1 on that same 
track. So track buffer programs like 
Microsoft's SMARTDrive 3.0 and 
earlier (SMARTDrive 4.0, shipped with 
Windows 3.1, is a real cache) 



WHAT NOT TO 
WORRY ABOUT: 
INTERLEAVES 

If you've read anything about disk 
optimization, you've probably heard 
of the notion of setting the right 
interleave tor your drive. Interleaving 
is the process of arranging sectors 
on a track in such a way that the 
entire track can be read quickly. PC 
gurus used to worry quite a bit about 
how to interleave a disk, largely 
because the period from 1 983 
through 1989 saw vendors selling 
computers with incorrectly 
interleaved disks. You won't need to 
worry about it for two reasons, 
however. First, today's drives are 
already interleaved in such a fashion 
that they provide data-transfer rates 
far in excess of what older drives 
could even hope for. The original 
XT's hard disk couldn't provide data 
to the system at a rate any faster 
than about 80K per second. Hard 



disks nowadays commonly transfer 
data at rales of around 1 200K per 
second and up, so there's no point in 
trying to improve things by tinkering 
with the interleave. 

But the second reason to forget 
about interleaving is the really telling 
one. Today's drives tend to use a 
technology called IDE, or Imbedded 
Drive Electronics. (No, imbedded 
isn't spelled as you normally see it; 
this is the way the drive folks spell 
it.) IDE packs a lot of drive into a 
small and inexpensive package, but 
in doing so it cuts a few corners. 
One of those corners concerns 
reinterleaving. You can actually 
permanently damage some IDE 
drives by reinterleaving them, so 
don't get an interleave program off 
your local bulletin board and start 
messing with your drive. 

If you really want a program that 
will adjust interleaves but can first 
determine whether or not it's safe to 
adjust them, get Spinrite II from 
Gibson Research. Spinrite has a 
street price of about $70. 



intercept the DOS request for a single 
sector and reformulate it into a 
request for all of the sectors on that 
track. When the disk hardware returns 
with all of the sectors on the track, the 
track buffer puts the copies of the disk 
data into an area of memory and 
passes to DOS the sector originally 
requested. Soon thereafter, DOS will 
probably want the next sector on that 
track. The track buffer, monitoring all 
disk activity, sees this request and 
shields the disk hardware from it. 
Then, it grabs the sector that already 



SECTORS 




ROTATIONAL 



—TRACK 



Tracks and Settors: Sectors are grouped together into a structure called a track. 

8 COMPUTE AUGUST 1992 



has been read into its buffer area and 
passes the data to DOS. DOS has no 
idea that this has happened, only that 
the disk drive is suddenly fast. 
Obviously, track buffers work best 
when data is accessed in a nice, 
orderly, sequential fashion. 

Caching Programs 

There's a class of programs that are 
more generic in the way that they use 
extra RAM to increase apparent disk 
speed: disk cache software. Disk 
caches don't worry about sector and 
track read-aheads, although they may 
implement a bit of read-ahead for best 
performance. Instead, they focus on 
what, exactly, you use your disk for. If 
you're like most people, you use the 
same areas on your disk over and 
over. Say you get in and out of 
WordPerfect several times a day; that 
implies that your disk must reread the 
WP.EXE program and its attendant 
files every single time you start 
WordPerfect. 

A disk cache improves on things in 
a manner similar to that of a track 
buffer by sitting quietly in memory and 
monitoring disk activity. As a file — say 
WP.EXE— is read, the disk cache 
makes a copy of the data that's been 
read from disk and puts it in the 
cache's memory area, Then, the next 
time that DOS needs WP.EXE, the 
disk cache program steps in, removing 
the need for the hardware to reread 
the WP.EXE file. 






^•-i. 




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II should be obvious that cache 
programs need a fair amount of 
memory in order to do any real good, 
fvlost cache programs use either 
expanded or extended memory. If you 
have RAM to burn, I'd recommend a 
cache of at least 51 2K. 

If you're running Windows, don't 
put your cache in expanded memory; 
put it in extended memory, fylemory- 
manager conflicts with Windows can 
cause any program that uses 
expanded memory to lose its data in 
expanded memory. If the program is a 
disk cache, parts of the disk may be 
affected, corrupting the disk's data. I 
found this out the hard way: Running 
an early memory manager with 
Windows caused the system to 
overwrite the first sector of my D 
drive's file allocation table. In common 
parlance, that means DOS no longer 
knew how to find the first 250 or so 
files on my D drive. Fortunately, I'd 
just finished writing a book on bringing 
dead hard drives back to life (The 
Hard Disk Survival Guide, published 
by Sybex), or those files would've 
been gone forever. So stick your 
cache in extended memory if you use 
Windows. 

What to Cache 

This leads to the next question about 
caches. If I allocate 1024K (1MB) of 
RAM to a cache (that's tiny when 
compared to the capacity of my hard 
disk), how does the cache program 
know what to put in the cache? 
Simple: It just keeps copying 
everything that you read into the 
cache until it runs out of cache space. 
Then it's got to make some decisions. 
In order to accommodate new 
stuff, a cache throws out old stuff 
according to either LRU or LFU 
algorithms. With LRU (Least Recently 
Used), the cache throws out the 
oldest stuff. With LFU (Least 
Frequently Used), it figures how often 
something is used. Which is better? 
Truthfully, that's like asking. How 
many angels can dance on the head 
of a pin? Experts can argue the merits 
of one method over another, but for 
normal PC usage, there's no 
difference. I just mention LRU and 
LFU because you'll see references to 
them in the cache documentation or in 
marketing literature. 

Three to Consider 

OK, that's the techie stuff — how about 
some solid recommendations? First, 
there's SMARTDrive 4.0, the newest 
version of the cache that ships with 
Windows 3.1. In this incarnation, 
SfvlARTDrive is an EXE file that you 
10 COMPUTE AUGUST 1992 



load in your AUTOEXEC.BAT file 
(previous versions of SMARTDrive 
are SYS files loaded in 
CONFIG.SYS), and it's a real cache. 
Not only does it allow you to change 
the size of the cache block, but it also 
caches writes (which gives it a big 
performance boost over previous 
versions), offers a raft ol new 
configuration features, and comes 
free with Windows. If you opt to use 
the new SMARTDrive and cache 
writes, be sure to flush your cache 
before turning your machine off. To 
run SMARTDrive without caching 
writes, simply follow the 
SMARTDRV.EXE command with your 
drive letters. 

Super PC-Kwik Disk Accelerator 
from Multisoft is my overall favorite, 
and it's under $100. Unlike many 
other caches, it has been specifically 
designed to work with Windows and 
even includes a small Windows 
program that monitors what 
percentage of disk accesses have 
been satisfied from the cache. You'll 
typically find that 80-85 percent of 
your disk accesses are intercepted 
and handled by the cache. You can 
contact Multisoft at 15100 Southwest 
Koll Parkway, Suite L, Beaverton, 
Oregon 97006; (800) 274-5945. 

The other cache to consider is 
HyperDisk, from HyperWare. When I 
last checked, it was a shareware 
product found on CompuServe, 
GEnie, and the like. 



Cheap Caches 

Suppose you don't want to spend any 
money. (Yes, you're supposed to 
register — read pay — for shareware 
such as HyperDisk.) Assuming you've 
got DOS 5.0, there are three 
commands that will help. First is good 
old BUFFERS, a very simple system 
that, well, buffers sectors. Once upon 
a time, we all tried to keep our 
BUFFERS values to a minimum 
because each of them took a little 
over 500 byles apiece from our 
precious conventional memory. But 
with DOS 5.0 and a 286 or higher, you 
just load the HIMEM.SYS device 
driver and specify DOS=HIGH in your 
CONFIG.SYS file, and all the buffers 
go live far away from your 640K 
conventional memory. Crank up your 
BUFFERS number as large as you 
like. It won't do much, but it may help 
some applications. On older, slower 
computers, this advice doesn't apply, 
as too many BUFFERS will slow 
things down. 

Since version 3.3, DOS also has 
had a very small cache program that 
caches just one thing: the directory 
structure. FASTOPEN's only job is to 
prestore the information that DOS 
needs to traverse the subdirectory 
structure. You see, subdirectory 
information — what files are in a 
subdirectory, how big the files are, 
when they were created — is all kept in 
a special kind of file. Accessing a data 
file in a subdirectory, then, requires 



ENLARGE 
"yOUR DISK WITH 
STACKER 

On the topic of running out of disk 
space, here's a quick and easy way 
to enlarge your disk: Stacker. This 
program works by compressing and 
decompressing files on your disk on 
the fly. For years, computer experts 
have used programs like PKZIP, 
LHARC, and ARC to compress 
computer files. Such programs can 
be quite effective, converting a file 
from, say, 100K down to 30K. That 
converted file cannot be used 
directly and must be decompressed 
to its original size of 100K. 

The value of file compression is 
that you can store a lot of little-used 
stuff on your disk in compressed 
format, decompressing it as you 
need it. But the compression- 
decompression cycle 
takes time and is an 
annoying extra step. 



That's where Stacker comes in. It 
compresses and decompresses 
transparently— you don't even know 
it's working, save that your disk 
accesses slow down a bit due to the 
compression-decompression 
overhead. And you can eliminate 
that delay by buying the Stacker disk 
coprocessor board. 

Stacker is available from Stac at 
5993 Avenida Encinas, Carlsbad, 
California 92008; (800) 522-7822. 
And, by the way, the latest versions 
come with a free file-unfragmenter 
program. The experience of my staff 
when installing Stacker indicates that 
it's best to start with a clean hard 
disk, install Stacker, and then reload 
your files rather than let the 
installation program install and 
squeeze all in one step. 






Citizen's Notebook Printer. It also fits in your briefcase. 



Callahan knows that a successful business often uses teamwork to make the sale. So he goes where the customers 
are, and he makes points. His teammate is the Citizen Notebook Printer. It's an exercise in good business: 
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circle Reader Service Number 166 



# CITIZEN" 

e 1992 CliuftnAnuMlcaCivpM'Blon.PN'ie.Thfrnn^J Fusion pn^ 
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reading a bunch of files to understand 
tlie directory structure before we even 
get close to reading the data file. By 
prereading the directory structure into 
RAM, FASTOPEN speeds up the liie- 
access process noticeably. A word to 
the wise, however: Be careful about 
using FASTOPEN in conjunction with 
disk caches, file unfragmenters, or 
any other disk utility. Check the disk 
utility's documentation before you use 
it with FASTOPEN. 

In addition to BUFFERS and 
FASTOPEN, DOS also has, as 
already mentioned, the track buffer 
program SMARTDRV.SYS. If 
you're running SMARTDrive 
with Windows, be aware that 
the Windows and DOS 
installation programs are fairly 
dumb about the amount of 
memory they grant to 
SMARTDrive. On a 4MB 
system, the Windows 3.0 
installation program gives 
2MB to SMARTDrive— way 
too much, particularly since 
Windows desperately needs 
that memory. 

Sort Your Direitories 

Reading files in 

subdirectories involves 
reading the files that are the 
subdirectory structure, and 
that brings up another 
problem. DOS doesn't keep 
files including subdirectories, 
in any particular order; it just 
puts them wherever seems 
good at the time the tiles are 
created. Then, when DOS 
needs a file or needs to find a 
subdirectory, it starts at the 
top of the directory and 
sequentially works down until 
it finds the file. 

Note that word 
sequentially: It points out a 
weakness in the DOS disk 
structure. Say you've got 500 items in 
your root directory — 495 files of 
various kinds and five subdirectories. 
Suppose further that the 495 files 
come before the five subdirectories. 
The result is that every time you need 
a file that's in one of those 
subdirectories, DOS must first find the 
subdirectory itself. To do that, it has 
to look through the 495 files. All of 
that searching takes time, and that's 
one reason why Microsoft wrote 
FASTOPEN and included it with 
DOS. But there's another way. 

The Norton Utilities includes a 
program called DIRSORT, which is 
intended to sort your directories. 
There's really no point in sorting your 

12 COMPUTE AUGUST 1982 



directories — who needs alphabetized 
subdirectory names? DIRSORT's 
value is that it allows you to throw out 
the alphabetizing nonsense and 
rearrange your directories by hand. 
When rearranging your directories, 
use two simple rules: Put the 
subdirectories above the files, and 
place the most-used subdirectories at 
the top. 

Unfragment Your Files 

Running out of disk space? Hey, who 
isn't? Most of us have hard disks that 
are packed to the gills. It's a pain to 




A FRAGiyiENTEp FIU^ 




THE SAME FILE,UNFRAGiVlENTED 



constantly have to remove one thing 
in order to put another on a disk. 
Worse yet, there's a nasty side effect; 
Your files get fragmented. Take a 
look at the accompanying figure to 
see what that means. 

If it doesn't have enough room in 
one place, DOS scatters a file's data 
all over the disk. 

You see, when you ask DOS to 
put a new file on a mostly full disk, 
DOS would like to put the file all in 
one place, but it probably can't. 
Because the free space largely 
consists of empty spaces left behind 
by deleted files, it's not all one nice 
pool of unused space; rather, it's 
scattered all over the disk. So DOS 



has no choice but to scatter your file; 

such a tile is said to be fragmented. 
This isn't an error, as DOS can 
retrieve fragmented files when 
needed. But it's undesirable because 
reading fragmented files requires that 
the disk head move to and fro, 
requiring more time than would be 
necessary othenwise. 

To alleviate this problem, software 
manufacturers have produced a slew 
of programs that will unfragment the 
data on your disk. The first was a 
program called Disk Optimizer, from 
SoftLogic Solutions. Although it's still 
available, the Big Three disk 
utility packages (Norton, 
Mace, and PC Tools) all now 
incorporate unfragmenter 
programs. Norton's is called 
Speed Disk, PC Tools has 
Compress, and Mace has 
Unfragment. 

The best unfragmenter of 
all, however, is no longer 
available, as far as I know. 
Called FastTrax, this program 
first examines the dates on 
your files. Then, reasoning 
that the older files are the 
ones that won't be changed, 
it puts those files near the 
"bottom" of the disk space, 
leaving at the top a single 
pool ot free space. As the 
newer files— that is, the ones 
most likely to change — all 
reside near the top, they 
aren't fragmented as much or 
as quickly when they grow. 
It's too bad that there doesn't 
seem to be a way to get in 
touch with the program's 
makers; FastTrax is a nice 
utility, and there's nothing on 
the market that works quite 
like it. 

In any case, be sure to 
unfragment your disk now 
and then. But don't do it to 
improve your disk's speed — you won't 
see that great an increase. You'll see 
the difference if you ever need to do 
some kind of data recovery on your 
disk. Think about it; If you had to use 
Norton or a similar program to piece a 
file back together, would you rather 
do so with the fragmented file pictured 
or with an unfragmented one? The 
unfragmented file would be much 
easier to reassemble'. 

There you have it — ^four ways to 
speed up your disk and save space. 
So get started: Unfragment your disk, 
rearrange your directories, and spend 
some cash on more memory so you 
can spend some extra memory on 
some cache. □ 




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TEST LAB 



Faster, sharper, and [ess ex- 
pensive new video technolo- 
gy is here. This a great time 
to upgrade to a new monitor 
and graphics adapter. 

Gone are the days of boring 
monochrome displays and blocl<y, 
hard-to-read CGA graphics. To- 
day's monitors and graphics adapt- 
ers display hundreds of colors at 
once, brilliantly rendered and at sur- 
prisingly high resolutions. 

Software manufacturers are tak- 
ing advantage of new video tech- 
nology to make their products 
more exciting than ever. Entertain- 
ment software is faster and more 
realistic, presentation software is 
more persuasive, and applica- 
tions of all kinds are more attrac- 
tive and interesting. And you can 
use your monitor with less eye- 
strain, too. 

The sometimes baffling statis- 
tics from manufacturers tell only 
part of the story. This month's 
Test Lab gives you the whole pic- 
ture, so to speak, running an im- 
pressive series of benchmark 
tests on two categories of prod- 
ucts. Super VGA monitors and ac- 
celerator cards. 

With most modern software de- 
manding more from your video 
system, a Super VGA monitor will 
be a logical upgrade for many of 
you. In this Test Lab, we examine 
Amdek, Mitsubishi, NEC, and So- 
ny monitors, products with a vari- 
ety of features and prices. 

Video accelerator cards are hot 
because of the pervasiveness of 
Microsoft Windows. With these 
cards, you can increase your pro- 
ductivity and decrease the frus- 
tration that comes with waiting for 
Windows screen refreshes. 

Here, too, you'll see a variety 
of features and prices from ATI 
Technologies, CSS Laboratories, 
Glad Systems, Number Nine Com- 
puter, STB Systems, and Weitek. 
It's not enough to look at video 
technologies. You have to know 
what to look for. With this month's 
reviews, benchmark tests, and 
sidebars, you can do just that. 

MIKE HUDNALL 

14 COMPUTE AUGUST 1992 



WYSE TECHNOLOGY 
3471 N. First St 
San Jose, CA 95134 
(408) 473-1208 
List price: $599 



AMDEK AM/738+^ 

If your needs are moderate, the 14- 
inch Amdel< AM/738-i- may well be 
the Super VGA monitor for you. 

The monitor is a multiplatform 
unit, which means you can use it 
for IBM-compatible PCs as well 
as the newer Macintosh ll-series 
computers. 

You'll find no controls mounted 
on the front of the monitor; in 
fact, the only adornments on the 
unit's face are a small Amdek lo- 
go and a green LED power indi- 
cator in the lower left corner. 
Look for the power switch and the 
brightness and contrast controls 
on the right side of the monitor, 
close to the front. Instead of hav- 
ing the knob-type controls usual- 
ly found on monitors, the AM/ 
738+ uses rounded "trackball" 
controls for the contrast and bright- 
ness adjustments, while the pow- 
er switch is a flush-mounted but- 
ton about the size of a nickel. 

At the rear of the unit, you'll 
find standard slotted-knob con- 
trols for adjusting vertical size, 
horizontal size, and horizontal po- 
sition. There are no other user- 
accessible controls or adjustment 
mechanisms. 

Amdek has a very stable and 
highly adjustable tilt-swivel base 
for altering the monitor's position 
so that it provides optimal view- 
ing. However, the tilt-swivel base 
isn't detachable on the AM/738+ 
as It is with most other monitors 
I'm familiar with. 

While in general the color and 
resolution of the AM/738-h video 
are very good, I did notice moire 
patterns any time a fine dot pattern 
was present (as with the standard 
Windows Program Manager 
screen or in Microsoft Works' 
toolbars and borders). "Blooming" 
(thin lines getting thicker at their 




ends, resulting in a nonuniform 
and slightly defocused image at 
these points) was another undesir- 
able trait the AM/738+ exhibited in 
some applications. This was par- 
ticularly noliceablewhenevergroup- 
ings of fine lines appeared in the 
video image, such as with intricate 
graphics or paint files. 

I also found it impossible to run 
Windows 3.0 with the AM/738+ in 
the 1024 X 768 256-color mode 
when using my Truevision Video 
with VGA Overlay board; in this 
mode, what I saw was an unac- 
ceptable, severely darkened im- 
age devoid of color. I didn't have 
a problem, however, with the 800 
X 600 mode. While this 1MB 
board with its Tseng 4000 chip 
set does incorporate some non- 
standard timings at the higher 
resolutions, other monitors I've 
used it with don't have any prob- 
lem in the 1024 x 768 mode. The 
AM/738-1- runs in the interlaced 
mode at 1024 x 768 resolution, 
but it runs in the noninterlaced 
mode at 800 x 600 resolution, 
which is undoubtedly the reason 
for the incompatibility I experi- 
enced at the higher resolution 
with this noninterlaced board. If 
you intend to use a noninterlaced 
video adapter in 1024 x 768 res- 
olution, be forewarned that this 
monitor isn't capable of noninter- 
laced displays at that resolution. 

If you're on a budget, work pre- 
dominantly in text and numerical 
applications rather than graphics, 
and don't need 1024 x 768 non- 
interlaced resolution, the AM/ 
738-i- is worth a closer look. 

TOM BENFORD 

Circle Reader Service Number 304 



ATI GRAPHICS 
ULTRA 

ATI's products have enjoyed a well- 
deserved reputation for hiigh qual- 
ity, high performance, and 
innovation since the company first 
started. This reputation for excel- 
lence is more deserved than ever 
w/ith its current series of graphics 
accelerator boards, especially the 
ATI Graphics ULTRA board. 

This half-length graphics 
board is chock-full of features, 
starting with ATI's proprietary 
Mach 8 coprocessor, which re- 
lieves the PC's CPU of many of the 
normal video tasks and routines it 
usually performs. This dedicated 
graphics coprocessor contributes 
to significant speed increases in 
Windows applications. 

The Graphics ULTRA contains 
separate memory sections for the 
coprocessor and the Super VGA 
video. You can buy the board 
with either 512K or 1M8 of 
coprocessor '\/RAfvl memory; if 
you buy the 512K version and de- 
cide to upgrade to 1fvlB later, you 
can handle the job with SIPP (Sin- 
gle In-line Pin Package} RAM mod- 
ules. The separate VGA RAM sec- 
tion comes outfitted with 256K of 
dedicated VGA RAM, which can 
be expanded to 512K. 

A 400-dpi Microsoft-compatible 
mouse included with the Graphics 
ULTRA plugs into the bus port on 
the card's mounting bracket. The 
mouse is a three-button unit with 
a curved shape and flush-mount- 
ed buttons; while it may be Micro- 
soft-compatible in operation, it's no 
match for the Microsoft mouse 
when it comes to comfort, control, 
and overall hand-shape ergonom- 
ics. The mouse may be a pur- 
chase point worth considering for 
some users, however, if they need 
a mouse and are interested in up- 
grading their system's video graph- 
ics capabilities at the same time. 

One of the most unique and note- 
worthy features of the Graphics UL- 
TRA package is ATI's Crystal Font 
package. Crystal Fonts are scaia- 



ATI TECHNOLOGIES 

3761 Victoria Park Ave. 

Scarborough, ON, Canada M1W 3S2 

(416)756-0718 

List price: $599 witH 51 2K, $699 

with 1MB 



ble compact font outlines that gen- 
erate font images "on the fly" at 
incredibly fine resolutions and ultra- 
fast speeds (up to 40,000 charac- 
ters per second). The video dis- 
play refreshes itself almost instant- 
ly, and the definition and legibility 
of these fonts are truly impressive. 
According to ATI, using the Crys- 
tal Fonts technology is like having 
near-300-dpi laser resolution on 
the video display; after using Crys- 
tal Fonts, I must agree that this is 
an accurate analogy 

Driver, utility, and Crystal Font 
software comes supplied on two 
SVa-inch floppies only; no S'/s- 
inch disks are included in the 
package. Installing drivers for Win- 
dows as well as AutoCAD and sev- 
eral other popular application 
packages is a simple, almost to- 
tally automatic procedure requir- 
ing the user to answer a couple 
of questions or accept default an- 
swers throughout the process. 

While I still preferred to use my 
Microsoft mouse during my re- 
view, I was very impressed with 
the Crystal Fonts and the overall 
speed of the board both in Win- 
dows applications and in DOS — 
the board is a screamer. Of all the 
boards reviewed here, the ATI 
Graphics ULTRA is my first 
choice for overall performance, fea- 
tures, and video fonts resolution. 

TOM BENFORD 

Circle Reader ServJce Number 305 

CSS 
MAXGRAPHKS/16 

The three-quarter-length CSS 
MaxGraphics/16 graphics accel- 
erator card is American-made 
and comes with either 512K or 
1MB of VRAM in SIPP (Singie In- 
line Pin Package) RAM modules. 




Each of the two four- 
socket banks on the board can ac- 
cept 128K SIPP modules, so fill- 
ing all eight sockets brings the 
available VRAM configuration to 
its 1MB maximum. It's important 
to note that this board, as well as 
some of the others reviewed 
here, imposes some video mode 
restrictions when only 512K of 
VRAM is available on the board. 
With the MaxGraphics/16, the re- 
strictions of the 51 2K configura- 
tion are that the board won't func- 
tion in 1280 X 1024 (16-coior) 
mode, 1280 x 960 (16-color) 
mode, 1024 x 768 (256-color— 
the 512K version supports 16 col- 
ors) mode, 800 x 600 (256-col- 
or — the 512K version supports 16 
coiors) mode, high-color (16-bits 
per pixel) mode, and two-page 
mode. Adding the additional 
512K of VRAM eliminates these 
problems, so if you want to use 
this board in the extended or high- 
color mode, plan on spending 
more for the extra memory. 

One of the first things I noticed 
about this board was an edge con- 
nector at the top, which made me 
hope that the MaxGraphics/16 
might have capabilities similar to 
those of the #9 board for coupling 
to and working with an existing Su- 
per VGA card. Generally an edge 
connector such as this one is put 
on a board for just such a pur- 
pose, but I could find no mention 
of this con nector or its purpose any- 
where in the user's manual. It was 
merely referred to as "feature con- 
nector" in the manual diagrams. 

Although it lacks an index and 

AUGUST 1992 COMPUTE 15 



; 



TEST LAB 



information about the feature con- 
nector, thie manual is otherwise ad- 
equately written. At the end of the 
manual, you'll find a quasi-useful 
glossary of terms tied to video 
technology (such as bitmap, driv- 
er, and palette). 

I found the installation of the driv- 
er and utility software (on BVj-inch 
disks) straightforward and uncom- 
plicated for the most part, although 
not an automatic process. The fin- 
er points of configuration require 
a considerable amount of user in- 
teractivity. In addition to a driver for 
Windows, the package provides 
drivers for AutoCAD, Lotus 1-2-3, 
WordPerfect, Microsoft Word, Ge- 
neric CAD, and other applications. 

The board has several jumpers 
that may require resetting if the fac- 
tory defaults cause conflicts with 
other devices. The manual warns 
of such incompatibilities, stating 
that they're due to certain design 
characteristics of IBM AT-compat- 
ible systems, which require all 
boards to use a certain area of 
memory While ! didn't experience 
any problem using the board on a 
fairly "plain vanilla" 386SX/16, the 
documentation warns that "you 
may experience problems using 
the MaxGraphics/16 along with oth- 
er penpheral cards." This would 
tend to make me feel uneasy 
about installing this board on a sys- 
tem with multiple peripherals like 
sound cards, a hand scanner, a vid- 
eo capture board, a SCSI or pro- 
prietary CD-ROM controller, or oth- 
er such devices. With these 



CSS LABORATORIES 

1641 McGaw Ave. 

Irvine, CA 92714 

(714) 852-8161 

List price: $325 for 51 2K 

configuratian; $395 for 1MB 

Gonllguration 



devices in your system, you'd 
need to be ready to resolve inter- 
rupt and other conflicts that might 
arise with this card. 

With the CSS MaxGraphics/16, 
as with the other boards, you 
need to assess your needs, study 
our Test Lab results, and deter- 
mine how willing and able you are 
to tinker with the hardware. 

TOM BENFORD 

Circle Reader Service Number 306 

GLAD SYSTEMS 
FLASH VIEW 

A three-quarter-length American- 
made board with 1MB of video 
RAM already installed, the Glad 
Systems Flash View offers afford- 
able Windows/GUI acceleration. 
Like the CSS MaxGraphic/16, 
the Glad Systems Flash View has 
an extra-edge connector on its top 
side. According to the Flash View 
documentation, thisfeatureconnec- 
tor is an "auxiliary video connec- 
tor which provides support for 
future video applications." A bold 
notation in the system-require- 
ments section of the manual advis- 
es that any other VGA or non-VGA 

GLAD SYSTEMS 
404 S. Abbot Ave. 
Mllpltas, CA 95035 
(408) 456-8888 
List price: S295 





video board in the 
computer system must be 
removed or disabled prior to install- 
ing the Flash View, thus confirming 
that it cannot be used in concert 
with another video adapter. A sin- 
gle 15-pin D connector is located 
on the board's metal mounting 
bracket. 

The software includes drivers 
for Windows as well as for Au- 
toCAD, AutoShade, VersaCAD, 
Generic CAD, Microsoft Word 
5,0, Ventura Publisher, WordPer- 
fect 5.1, Lotus 1-2-3, Symphony, 
GEM 2.XI3.X, and several other ap- 
plications. Setting up the drivers 
for Windows is simple and straight- 
forward. But installing drivers for 
some of the other applications 
may require manually copying 
the required files from the driver 
disk into the application's subdi- 
rectory and then running the ap- 
plication's configuration utility to ac- 
tivate the newly installed drivers. 

Jumpers are provided for adjust- 
ing configuration parameters to 
optimize the monitor and other sys- 
tem components and to resolve 
any device conflicts that might 
arise. To install the board, you sim- 
ply insert it into any available three- 
quarter-length 16-bit slot and load 
the driver software. 

The user's manual provided 
with the Flash View is among the 
best of those for all the boards cov- 
ered here. It's well written, excep- 
tionally well organized, and great 
in its troubleshooting advice. 
You'll also appreciate the plenti- 
ful technical information, compo- 
nent illustrations, and jumper-set- 
ting diagrams and charts. 

With regard to performance, the 
Flash View was a pleasant sur- 
prise. Applications under Win- 




^u can get your feet wet, or 
plumb unimaginable depths. 

In a way, its a lot like CompuServe. 

CompuServe members who join for the basics 
quickly discover an ocean of opportunity. Like at- 
home shopping, financial data, travel information 
and reservations, entertainment, and free time to 
sharpen their online skills. 

Computer professionals who join to access a 
wealth of high-tech expertise find much more. Like 
sophisticated research tools, hardware and software 
support forums, and lots of free software and share- 
ware. In fact, no other information service offers the 
number and quality of choices that CompuServe does. 



Now, for just 57.9S a month, and a one-time 
membership fee, you get alt the basics as often as 
you like: news, sports, weather, shopping, a com- 
plete encyclopedia, and much more, plus up to 60 
E-mail messages a month. And, there are lots of 
other valuable services available on a nominal pay- 
as-you-use basis. 

To make the right choice in selecting an inter- 
active service, pick the one that will always help you 
get the most out of your computer. For more infor- 
mation or to order CompuServe, see your computer 
dealer or call 1 800 848-8199. Outside the United 
States, call 614 4S7-0802. 

CompuServe'^ 

The informadon service you won't outgrow. 



Circle Reader Service Number 103 



TEST LAB 




dows 3.0 typically ran two to three 
times faster with the Flash View 
card than with the review system's 
Oak Technology VGA board. 
Flash View is a no-frilis board that 
comes in a plain package and 
does exactly what it claims: It sig- 
nificantly speeds up video process- 
ing and provides excellent image 
resolution without flicker even in 
the superextended video modes. 
These factors make the Glad Sys- 
tems Flash View a highly attractive 
and affordable choice for those 
looking for more speed in Win- 
dows and other GUI applications. 

TOM BENFORD 

Circle Reader Service Number 307 



MITSUBISHI ELECTRONICS 

AMERICA 

5757 Plaza Dr., P.O. Box 6007 

Cypress, CA 90630-0007 

(800) B43-ZS15 

List price: $599 



MITSUBISHI 
DIAMOND SCAN 14 

Mitsubishi's monitors have 
grown more attractive over the 
years, both in physical styling 
and technical advancement. The 
Diamond Scan 14 is a represen- 
tative example of this continuing 
form-and-function evolution, 

While the monitor makes a 
good viewing choice for the inter- 
mediate user, it also offers the 
superhigh resolutions often 
required by power users. The 14- 
inch monitor uses Mitsubishi's Dia- 
mond Scan screen-matrix technol- 
ogy to produce excellent color 
rendition and screen contrast, 
and it's mounted atop a remova- 
ble tilt-swivel base that makes it 
easy to adjust the screen for the 
best viewing position and angle. 

You'll find the power switch con- 
veniently located at the lower right 



corner of the screen and all of the 
viewing adjustment controls nes- 
tled comfortably under the video 
display The usual complement of 
knobs to control horizontal size, hor- 
izontal position, vertical size, and 
vertical position are all located 
right up front for easy access. 

The system I used with the Dia- 
mond Scan 14 was an 1486- 
based PC running at 33 MHz 
with a 1 MB Truevision Video VGA 
with Overlay board. The Truevi- 
sion board is a high-end Super 
VGA card capable of the 1280 x 
768 256-color mode as well as 
support for NTSC recordable vid- 
eo and overlay. 

The Diamond Scan 14 had no 
problems running my Windows 
3.0 applications with this hard- 
ware configuration in 1024 x 768 
256-color mode, 800 x 600 
mode, or other modes. Image clar- 
ity was very good, as was the 
color saturation and separation. 

Moire patterns were quite evi- 
dent anytime a close grouping of 
vertical lines appeared on the 
screen, and this condition also af- 
fected the corner resolution on 
some images as well. The moire 
patterns were particularly notice- 
able and visually annoying with 



TIMED TESTS OF ACCELERATOR CARD PERFORMANCE 

We ran this series of tests under Windows 3.0 in 640 x 480 mode. The Trident card is included by way of contrast 
to show how much faster our featured accelerator boards are. In these tests, trie lower the numbers, the better the 
performance. 



TEST 


ATI Graphics 
ULTRA 


CSS 

MaxGraphics 16 


Glad Syslems 
Rash View 


Number Nine 
#9GXi LITE 


STB 
WINDX 


Tridenl 256K 
VGA (detault) 


Weitek Power 
lor Windows 


Windows Write 


4.50 


4.57 


4.63 


4.62 


4.60 


10.28 


5.28 


Works Fiyer 


7.69 


8.03 


7.13 


7.81 


7.80 


9.18 


8.18 


Works Spreadsheet 


3.59 


3.85 


3.94 


4.34 


3.75 


5.50 


4,68 


Spreadsheet 
Pie Chart 


2.53 


2.75 


2.78 


2,69 


2.72 


4.06 


2.97 


Spreadsheet 
Bar Chart 


2.22 


2.38 


2.60 


2.32 


2.44 


2.85 


2.66 


Desktop Published 
Document 


7.06 


7.25 


7.59 


7,47 


7.35 


15,60 


7,47 


Averaged 
Performance Index 


4.60 


4.81 


4.78 


4.88 


4.78 


7,91 


5.21 



18 COMPUTE AUGUST 1992 



DISPLAYMATE TESTS OF ACCELERATOR CARD PERFORMANCE 

The figures below are display-speed indexes for text and grapfiics; tfiey are weighted averages of a variety of video 
operations. These indexes indicate how quickly images can be accessed and drawn on the display. They also 
indicate performance relative to the performance of three systems: an IBM PG with CGA, an IBIvl AT (8 ivlHz) with 
EGA, and a PS/2 Model 70 (25 f^/lHz) with VGA. Higher numbers indicate better performance. 



PERFORMANCE 
RELATIVE TO 



IBIvl PC with CGA 
Text 
Graphics 



ATI Graphics CSS Glad Systems Number Nine 

ULTRA MaxGfaphicsie Flash View #9GXi LITE 



Trident 256K Weitek Power 
VGA Ide(aull) tor Windows 



11.7 
6.0 



12.7 
4.5 



12.4 
4.1 



g.o 

4.8 



16.1 
5.2 



8.8 
4.1 



11.3 
5.7 



IBfvl AT with EGA 
Text 
Graphics 



4.1 
2.7 



3.5 
1.9 



3.4 
1.7 



2,8 

2.1 



4.1 
2.3 



2.0 
1.7 



3.6 
2.6 



PS/2 Model 70 
with VGA 

Text 

Graphics 



2.5 
1.9 



2.0 
1.2 



1.9 
1.0 



1.6 

1.3 



2,2 

1.4 



0.9 
1.0 



2.1 
1.8 



fine dot patterns, as in the bor- 
ders of many Windows applica- 
tions such as Microsoft Works or 
Word. Screen flicker, otfierwise 
unnoticeable, made these gray- 
border areas "strobe," which is a 
major cause of eye fatigue. 

The fvlitsubishi monitor also 
showed some image persistence 
with fast-moving, high-contrast 
graphics. Simply described, 
when a light-colored object 
moved quickly across a dark back- 
ground (as in moving the mouse 
pointer), a slight ghost image, 
something like a short tail on a 
comet, followed the object. 

Quickly switching from text to 
graphics mode and vice versa 
caused a noticeable screen 




bounce, especially when switch- 
ing from one view to another 
inside an application. With DOS 
applications such as f^icrosoft 
Works, this screen bounce was 
quite pronounced when switch- 
ing a spreadsheet view from the 
worksheet to a bar graph repre- 
sentation of the same information 
in another window. Since every- 
thing runs under graphics mode 
in Windows, however, screen 
bounce wasn't a problem there. 
If you're in the market for a 
good-looking Super VGA monitor 
capable of running in the extend- 
ed video modes, take a look at 
the fvlitsubishi Diamond Scan 14. 

TOM BENFORD 

circle Reader Service Number 303 

NEC MULTISYNC 4FG 

The Multisync 4FG features a 15- 
inch 'flat square" screen that is 
certainly one of the best comput- 
er video displays I've ever seen. 
The 4FG's screen is almost flat 
(or at least much less curved 



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(708) 860-9500 
List price: $949 



than those of other monitors), and 
the screen's corners are at right 
angles rather than rounded as on 
other monitors, Consequently, 
you have a viewing perspective 
quite different from that of tradi- 
tional CRTs with their curved 
screens and rounded corners. 

Viewed directly from the cen- 
ter, the screen appears to bow in 
slightly at both sides, but if you 
move your head slightly to the 
right or left of center, the sides 
then appear to be perfectly 
straight, I found the video display 
very easy to view from any angle. 
A built-in, nonremovable tilt-swiv- 
el base facilitates positioning the 
monitor at the ideal viewing angle 
for any user. 

You'll find all controls on the 
4FG front-mounted for easy ac- 
cess. Look for the power switch 
with illuminated indicator at the low- 
er right, front corner; knobs for ad- 
justing the brightness and contrast 
are bottom-mounted next to it. 
NEC provides 11 other controls for 
configuring the display; these are 
hidden from sight behind a door 
on the lower left portion of the 
front panel. Soft-touch push-button 
controls allow you to adjust the im- 
age size and position; four buttons 
laid out like a cursor keypad are 
provided for these functions. 

AUGUST1992 COIVIPUTE 19 



TEST LAB 



A special degauss button instant- 
ly demagnetizes the CRT, eliminat- 
ing any accumulated static electri- 
cal charges that may have collect- 
ed. A three-position N-1-2 switch, 
located next to the degauss but- 
ton, selects normal, amber, or rose- 
tinted screen backgrounds to aid 
visibility under certain lighting con- 
ditions. To compensate for some 
nonstandard video adapters, you 
can use the monitor's sync 
switch, which adjusts the 
screen's synchronization signals. 

I found the overall image qual- 
ity of the 4FG superb, with very lit- 
tle "strobing" on those trouble- 
some fine dot patterns and abso- 
lutely no moire patterning at all. Al- 
though there was some slight 
image lag (also referred to as 
persistence) with fast-moving 
graphics on high-contrast back- 
grounds, this was negligible and 
much less noticeable than on 
most of the other monitors re- 
viewed in this month's Test Lab. 

The MultiSync 4FG can handle 
all video modes and resolutions up 
to and including 1024 x 768 with 
256 colors, interlaced or noninter- 
laced, which makes it compatible 
with just about any video adapter 
available. I used a Truevision Vid- 
eo VGA with Overlay card which 
has 1MB of RAM and a Tseng 
4000 chip set on it during my re- 
view of the NEC, and the video 
from this card never looked better. 

The MultiSync 4FG's excellent 
color and resolution, luxurious 15- 
inch screen, and innovative tech- 
nological features make it an ex- 
cellent choice for anyone who 
needs — or wants — outstanding vid- 
eo even in the Super VGA modes. 

TOM BENFORD 

circle Reader Service Number 309 



All Benchmark/Performance Test- 
ing is conducted by Computer Prod- 
uct Testing Services (CRTS), an 
independent testing and evalua- 
tion laboratory based in Ma- 
nasquan, New Jersey Every effort 
has been made to ensure the ac- 
curacy and completeness of this da- 
ta as of the date of testing. Perform- 
ance may vary among samples. 



20 COMPUTE AUGUST 1992 



DISPLAYMATE MONITOR EVALUATION TESTS 


Amdek Mitsubishi NEC Sony 
AM 738+ Diamond MultiSync CPD-1304S 

Scan 14 4FG 


Pass=l Fail=0 


Screen unilormity and flicker 1111 


Freedom from background interference 1 11 1 


Dark screen 1111 


Geometric linearity 1111 


Circular test pattern 1111 


Horizontal vs. vertical line ttiickness 1111 


Line brigtitness vs. ttiickness 1111 


Defocusing and blooming test 111 


Raster visibrltty 1111 


Resolution 10 11 


Corner resolution 10 11 


Normal and reverse video resolution 1111 


Line moir6 pattern 111 


Fine line moirS pattern 10 11 


Dot moirfe pattern 10 11 


Fine dot moir^ pattern 1111 


Horizontal color registration 1111 


Vertical color registration l l l l 


Horizontal color registration blink test 1111 


Vertical color registration blink test 1111 


64 intensities for primary colors 1111 


Color timing 1111 


Digital color timing 11 


White-level shift 1111 


Black-level shift i i 1 1 


Two-dimensional streaking 1111 


Streaking and gliosting 11 1 1 


f^rsistence test 


Screen regulation 


Local regulation distortion ' 


Screen snow test 111 


Scroll flicker test till 


Text-graphics mode switching i 


TOTAL TEST SCORES 25 24 30 29 



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Circle Reader Service Number 1B2 



21 



TEST LAB 



NUMBER NINE 
#9GXi LITE 

Number Nine's #9GXi LITE is tine 
most technically sophisticated 
graphiics accelerator board re- 
viewed here: it's intended for the 
serious power user wtio needs 
the advanced capabilities it deliv- 
ers, particularly for CAD applica- 
tions. With a price tag that starts 
at $995 for the basic configura- 
tion, it's not for the casual or budg- 
et-conscious PC user. The review 
unit had a RAM option installed, 
adding to the price of the board. 
Innovative is perhaps the best 
word for an overall description of 
the #9GXi LITE. At the heart of 
this half-length board is the Tex- 
as Instruments Tl 34020 graphics 



A NOTE ON PRICES 

With computer products changing 
more rapidly ttian ever and with op- 
tions more plentiful than ever, com- 
puter prices can be a tricky busi- 
ness. 

It pays to keep the following 
points in mind: 

Street prices can be consider- 
ably lower ttian list prices. Shop- 
ping around helps you find the 
best price. 

Because computer technology 
evolves so rapidly, a product may 
have changed by the time our re- 
view sees print. Verify configura- 
tion details with manufacturers or 
vendors before you buy. 

Because consumers are more 
sophisticated than ever about 
what they want in computer prod- 
ucts and because manufacturers 
have responded with more options 
and configurations than ever, one 
computer model may be subject to 
dozens of variations, each with a 
slightly different price. 

At COMPUTE, we make every 
effort to verify prices and differen- 
tiate between the price for a re- 
view configuration and the price 
for a standard configuration. It's 
still a good idea, however, to call 
the nnanufacturer or vendor to 
make sure that the configuration 
you want matches the price you 
have in mind. 



22 COMPUTE AUGUST 1992 



NUMBER NINE COMPUTER 

IBHaitwell Ave. 

Lexington, MA 02173 

(800) GET NINE 

(617) 674-0009 

List orice: $395 lor Level 20 (1MB 

VRAM); $1,024 lor Level 21 (1MB 

VRAM and 1MB DRAM) 



coprocessor chip. This special 
graphics processing unit (GPU) 
is optimized for graphics func- 
tions: At 10 MIPS (Millions of In- 
structions Per Second), it's faster 
than the CPU of the IBM PC, 
which runs at 9 MIPS. Because 
the GPU frees the CPU to do its 
work, your system can move 
right along. 

The graphics processor is sup- 
ported by several other proces- 
sors and support chips, including 
the Tl 40 MFLOP (Math Floating 
Logical Operations Processor) 
and 128K static RAM. The board 
supports up to 4MB of DRAM for 
offscreen bitmaps and instruction 
memory as well as up to 2MB of 
high-speed VRAM. Two proprie- 
tary Number Nine ASICs (Appli- 
cation Specific Integrated Cir- 
cuits) and flash BIOS memory 
contribute to the overall speed of 
the board and make its amazing 
zoom, pan, scroll, and virtual 
screen capabilities possible. 

In addition to being a high- 
speed graphics coprocessor, the 
#9GXi LITE has its own on-board 
Super VGA chip, so it can be 
used as the sole video board in 
a PC. One of the features I par- 
ticularly like about the #9GXi 
LITE is its VGA pass-through con- 
nector, which permits you to use 
your own favorite VGA card in- 
stead of the on-board VGA, so 
your current video board doesn't 
have to become obsolete. This fea- 
ture is especially appealing to 
me, since my standard video 
board is an expensive (about 
$1,000} Truevision Video VGA 
with Overlay. 

By using the included VGA 
loop-through ribbon cable to con- 
nect the #9GXi LITE to my Truevi- 




sion board, I have the best of 
both worlds: the dazzling speed 
and unparalleled image-manipu- 
lation capabilities of the #9GXi 
LITE and the Super VGA resolu- 
tion and recordable video output 
of my Truevision. 

The unique features of the 
#9GXi LITE don't stop there, how- 
ever. In addition to the 15-pinDcon- 
nector, a multicolored status LED 
is located on the mounting brack- 
et. This LED indicates flash mem- 
ory loading as well as proper op- 
erational condition of the board. 

A monitor cable provided with 
the #9GXi LITE facilitates connect- 
ing the card to monitors with four 
discrete BNC jacks (a type of 
shielded cable connector). You al- 
so get a VGA terminator plug 
that works with the pass-through 
connector when it's used. Soft- 
ware comes on both 3y2-inch 
and 5y4-inch disks. The user's 
manual is excellent. 

Without a doubt, the video-ma- 
nipulation features of the #9GXi 
LITE make it unique among this 
month's boards. For example, the 
board supports a superfast hard- 
ware zoom feature that increases 
or decreases screen magnifica- 
tion by two, four, or eight times; 
it takes but a single keystroke to 
activate the zoom and only Veo 
second for the screen to regen- 
erate at the desired zoom level. 
Virtual screen panning and scroll- 
ing are also possible, since the 
board supports resolutions up to 
2048 X 1024. In these resolu- 
tions, the screen becomes a mov- 
able "viewport" on a much larger 
picture that you can see by mov- 
ing the cursor beyond the screen 
edge to scroll, 

AutoCAD users will appreciate 




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TEST LAB 



TESTING METHODOLOGY 
FOR ACCELERATOR CARDS AND MONITORS 



To test our accelerator boards, we used a 16-MHz 
80386SX PC equipped with 5y4-inch and SVj-incli Slop- 
py drives, a 40MB hard drive, 4MB of RAM, and a multi- 
frequency Super VGA monitor. We used MS-DOS 5.0 
and Windows 3.0 in Enhanced mode, and, for all tests, 
we used 640 x 480 16-color mode. For baseline com- 
parison purposes, we ran our video adapter test suite 
on an Oak Technology VGA card with 256K of on-board 
RAM, Following are the results of our baseline testing: 



Windows Write Test; 
Flyer Document Test: 
Spreadsheet Preview Test: 
Pie Chart Graphics Test: 
Bar Chart Graphics Test: 
DTP Document Test: 



10.28 seconds 
9.18 seconds 
5.50 seconds 
4.06 seconds 
2.85 seconds 
15.60 seconds 



Averaged Performance Index for the default sys- 
tem board: 7.91 seconds 

The Windows Write Test measures the time required to 
create a WYSIWYG display of a Windows Write docu- 
ment incorporating one dozen Bitstream Facelift fonts 
of various sizes. First we loaded the document into RAM, 
then we switched windows, and finally we timed the cre- 
ation of the WYSIWYG display. The Flyer Document Test 
measures the time required to create a page view (full- 
page print preview) of a sample flyer document with bor- 
ders, numerous Bitstream FaceLift fonts in several point 
sizes, and some bitmapped clip art. 

The Spreadsheet Preview Test measures the time re- 
quired to re-create a printed-page preview display after 
the spreadsheet data was already loaded in worksheet 
format. For this test we used a very dense spreadsheet 
with cell data created in six-point type. 

The Pie Chart Graphics Test measures the time re- 
quired to create a pie chart graphical representation of 
the numeric information. For this test we used a corpo- 
rate profitfloss balance sheet spreadsheet file. 

The Bar Chart Graphics Test measures the time re- 
quired to create a bar graph representation of the data 
in a personal assets/liabilities spreadsheet file. 

The DTP Document Test measures the time required 
to generate a page view of a single-page document 
incorporating multiple typefaces, type sizes, and nine 
bitmapped graphics, along with rules and filled-pattern 
boxes. 

The Averaged Performance Index is an average of the 
elapsed times for these six tests. This average serves 
as an overall performance index number for comparison 
purposes. 

Sonera Technology's Displayl\/late Video Utilities soft- 
ware was also used for establishing software-independ- 
ent performance indexes for text and graphics with the 
test adapters. The DisplayMate Speed Performance Test 
utility is a compendium of scores of various tests which 
run in fully automated mode. The 35-second test suite pro- 
vides performance index measurements for both text and 
graphics operations relative to an IBM PC (4.77 IVIHz) 



with CGA, an IBM AT (8 MHz) with EGA, and an IBM PS/2 
Model 70 (80386 at 25 MHz) with VGA. Running Display- 
Mate frofn the DOS prompt, we used this test utility to meas- 
ure the video adapter's ability and speed in processing 
text and graphics. These tests are useful for determining 
the hardware's raw processing power at the base level 
without any application software intervention. 

To test the four SVGA monitors in this month's lineup, 
we used a 33-MHz i486-based PC equipped with dual 
S'A-inch and a'/s-inch high-density drives, an 85MB 
hard disk, a 105MB Plus HardCard IIXL, an internal NEC 
CDR-83 CD-ROM drive, a Tranter 8-bit SCSI interface 
card, a Creative Labs Sound Blaster Pro audio card, 8MB 
of RAM, 64K internal caching, a Computer Eyes/RT vid- 
eo capture card, and a Truevision Video VGA with Over- 
lay board. The Truevision card has 1MB of video RAM 
and uses the popular Tseng 4000 chip set. In addition 
to generating all standard and extended VGA modes, 
including 1024 x 768 256-color, the Truevision board is 
also capable of generating recordable NTSC video (tel- 
evision) output as well as combining computer VGA vid- 
eo with NTSC video input. 

All monitor tests were subjective in nature and were 
conducted using the DisplayMate Video Obstacle 
Course test suite. The Video Obstacle Course is a series 
of 33 test patterns designed to uncover video anomalies 
or substandard performance. Common video irregulari- 
ties, including blooming, defocusing, geometric lineari- 
ty, moir6 patterns, flicker, streaking, ghosting, and other 
conditions, are diagnosed using the test patterns dis- 
played. A "jury" of three CPTS staff members scrutinized 
each monitor for each lest and voted either 1 , signifying 
the monitor passed the test, or 0, designating failure. The 
votes of these three testers were compiled for all of the 
tests, and the results were totaled. A perfect score for 
the Video Obstacle Course is 33; none of the monitors 
tested achieved a perfect score, although two (the NEC 
and Sony) came close to achieving perfect marks. 

Additionally, we put all the monitors through the Dis- 
playMate Video Modes Test Suite to establish their abil- 
ity to display the following modes correctly; 

Modes 0, 1 : 40-column color text 

Modes 2, 3: 80-column color text 

Modes 4, 5: 320 x 200 4-color graphics 

Mode 6: 640 x 200 2-color graphics 

Mode 7: 80-column monochrome text 

Mode 13: 320 x 200 -16-color graphics 

Mode 14: 640 x 200 16-color graphics 

Mode 15: 640 x 350 monochrome graphics 

Mode 16: 640 x 350 4- or 16-color graphics 

Mode 17; 640 x 480 2-color graphics 

Mode 18: 640 X 480 16-color graphics 

Mode 19; 320 x 200 256-color graphics 

All of the monitors tested passed these tests satisfacto- 
rily and without incident, 

^TOM BENFORD. PRESIDENT 
COMPUTER PRODUCT TESTING SERVICES 



24 COMPUTE AUGUST 1992 



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CIrcl* Readm Servlcs Number tS4 



TEST LAB 




the included Power9 software fea- 
tures, which present a menu of dis- 
play options including pans and 
zooms, system fonts, definable 
macros, and much more. 

For any power user with high- 
level graphic application de- 
mands, the #9GXi LITE is the 
card of choice. 

TOM BENFORO 

Circle Reader Service Number 310 

SOKYCPD-!304S 

Sony brings its Trinitron video tech- 
nology, SO popular with consum- 
er televisions, to the world of PC 
computing with its 14-inch CPD- 
1304S Multiscan HG model. As 
with a Trinitron tube-based tele- 
vision, the CPD-1304S is a real 
treat for the eyes. 

This Sony monitor is similar to 
the NEC Multisync 4FG, also re- 
viewed here, in that its screen is al- 
most flat and features squared cor- 
ners rather than rounded ones. 
Afso, as with the NEC, the sides of 
the video image seem to bow in 
slightly, but this is the result of the 
nonstandard screen curvature 
and actually improves viewing. 

The removable tilt-swivei base 
makes adjusting the viewing an- 
gle easy, and you'll find all of the 
CPD-1304S's controls convenient- 
ly front-mounted. 

The CPD-1304S appears very 
clean and uncluttered, with mini- 
mal adornments and controls to 
detract from its sleek look. Look for 
two knobs at the lower left front cor- 
ner of the monitor, one for bright- 
ness and one for contrast. In the 



26 



COMPUTE AUGUST 1992 



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lower right corner you'll find the 
power switch and illuminated indi- 
cator. These are the only controls 
provided on the front of the unit. 
The lower left side of the monitor 
houses the control knobs for adjust- 
ing horizontal size, horizontal shift 
(centering), vertical centering, and 
vertical size. An "auto size" switch 
is also located on this panel for 
use with PS/2 models. This switch, 
when set to the lock position, au- 
tomatically adjusts the timing to the 
current VGA mode, thus locking 
out any manual adjustments to the 
picture size or position. 

As with the other monitors cov- 
ered here, I used a Truevision Vid- 
eo VGA with Overlay board in a 
486 system running at 33 MHz as 
the test platform. The Truevision 
card has 1MB of video RAM on 
board and is capable of 1024 x 
768, 256-color resolution. The CPD- 
13048 had no problems whatsoev- 
er in this mode, In 800 x 640 
mode, or in any of the lower-reso- 
lution video modes. I found image 
clarity and color to be excellent 
throughout the various modes. 

The CPD-1304S is capable of 
running the 1024 x 768 high-res- 
olution video mode in either inter- 
laced or noninterlaced mode, 
which makes it capable of simu- 
lating the IBM 8514a (interlaced) 
monitor standard as well as ac- 
commodating the numerous 
adapters designed to run in non- 
interlaced mode at this extreme 
resolution. Having this flexibility is 
a nice comfort feature, especial- 
ly for PC owners who want to use 
the stock Windows 8514a drivers 
or who may be changing their vid- 
eo cards in the near future. 

I noticed some image persis- 
tence with high-contrast, fast-mov- 
ing subjects, although it was so 
slight as to be almost negligible. 



Switching from text to graphics 
modes under DOS also caused 
some slight image bouncing, al- 
though I experienced no prob- 
lems of this kind running applica- 
tions under Windows. 

Moir6s weren't a problem with 
the CPD-1304S at any of the res- 
olutions. Even tightly spaced ver- 
tical and horizontal line and dot 
patterns didn't produce moires. 
"Strobing" occurred with some 
fine dot backgrounds, but it 
wasn't serious or pronounced 
enough to consider it a problem, 
since virtually every monitor re- 
viewed here displayed some strob- 
ing with these patterns. 

Overall, the CPD-1304S 
deserves very high marks. I 



SOIWE NOTES ABOUT 
WINDOWS/GRAPHICS 
SPEEDS 

While our tests show the relative 
improvement of changing from a 
standard Super VGA card to a Win- 
dows/GUI accelerator card, this is 
not the only way to improve the per- 
formance of Windows and other 
graphical applications. 

A software product, WinSpeed, 
claims to increase display speed 
performance under Windows by 
200-500 percent. This product 
works with over 85 percent of the 
Super VGA cards on the market, in- 
cluding cards from ATI, Paradise, 
and Trident, as well as all cards us- 
ing Tseng 4000 video controllers. 
WinSpeed ($79 list) comes from 
Panacea (800-729-7420). 

A faster CPU also significantly 
increases video-processing 
speed under Windows and other 
GUIs. For example, an 1486- 
based PC with a Super VGA card 
will, in most cases, actually be fast- 
er Itian a 386 machine with a GUI 
accelerator. This point is worth con- 
sidering if you intend 1o upgrade 
to a more powerful PC platform in 
the near future. If, after upgrading, 
you decide you still want faster 
performance from Windows and 
other graphical applications, you 
can always install a GUI 
accelerator at that time, 

—TOM BENFORD 




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TEST LAB 



would select it as my second 
choice, after the NEC Multisync 
4FG, for extended VGA and pow- 
er user graphical applications. 

TOM BENFORD 

Circle Reader Service Number 311 

STBWIND/X 

The WIND/X is a half-length Win- 
dows and GUI (Graphical User 
Interface) adapter card from STB. 
The review unit came populated 
with 51 2K of on-board video RAM 
(VRAM), which can be upgraded 
to 1MB by adding four 128K 
SIPP modules to the vacant sock- 
ets on the board. The accompa- 
nying installation, driver, and util- 
ity software is supplied on 5%- 
inch media along with a well- 
written user's manual. 

The straightforward hardware 
installation consists principally of 
replacing the current video card 
with the WIND/X unit and install- 
ing the software. There are no 
switch settings to contend with on 
the board, although several jump- 
ers are provided to change the de- 
fault configurations if you find it 
necessary to resolve special hard- 
ware conflicts that may occur on 
some systems or with other periph- 
eral devices. I didn't encounter 
any problems with the default set- 
tings on the review unit, but the 
excellent diagrams and explana- 
tions in the manual would've 
been invaluable in correcting 
them had they occurred. 

The WIND/X card has a built- 
in bus mouse port on its mount- 
ing bracket, which also holds the 
15-pin D connector for attaching 
the monitor cable. A Logitech 
MouseMan three-button bus 
mouse and Logitech mouse driv- 
er software are packed with the 
WIND/X card. The bus mouse 
port can be disabled by pin-cap 
position of jumper J8; I opted to 
disable the port in order to use 
my Microsoft mouse (connected 
via COM 1) for review purposes. 
(This also eliminated the need to 
change all my software configu- 
rations to tell them to look for the 



28 



COMPUTE AUGUST 1992 



STB SYSTEMS 

P.O. Box 850957 

Richardson, TX 75085-0957 

(214) 234-8750 

List price: $339 (or HC version; 

$399 for Ultra version witii port 

and Logitech MouseMan 



mouse at the bus port instead of 
the serial port.) 

The WIND/X board is a fast 
and capable performer, deliver- 
ing excellent resolution and sig- 
nificant graphics speed improve- 
ment for Windows applications, 
although text-based applications 
didn't reflect the accelerated 
speeds as much. I didn't experi- 
ence any performance improve- 
ments that even remotely ap- 
proached STB's claim of speeds 
"up to 20 times faster than Super 
VGA for Windows 3.0 functions." 
It should be noted, however, that 
the WIND/X board was indeed 
faster than some of the more ex- 
pensive boards reviewed here. 

Like the other Windows and 
GUI accelerators covered here, 
the WIND/X is capable of support- 
ing 640 X 480, 800 x 600, and 
1024x 768 resolutions without flick- 
er. The WIND/X board also sup- 
ports the high-color option of 
65,536 colors at 640 x 480 reso- 
lution with the insertion of a special 
DAG (Digital-to-Analog Converter) 
chip into the socket on the board. 
The upgrade chip, sold separate- 
ly, allows for a 16-bit or CEG (Con- 
tinuous Edge Graphics) extended- 
range color palette. 

You get an abundance of driv- 
ers, including those for Windows, 
AutoCAD, Microsoft Word, 
WordPerfect, Lotus 1-2-3, CAD- 
VANCE 3.50, Generic CAD 1.1, 
and other applications. Installing 
the drivers is an automated proc- 
ess for Windows and some of the 
applications, while others require 
you to manually copy the desired 
video display drivers into the ap- 
propriate application's subdirec- 
tory Although they arrived too 
late to be part of testing and eval- 
uation, new optimized drivers for 




Windows 3.0 and 3.1 are availa- 
ble for this card. 

The STB WIND/X makes a 
good choice for many users de- 
siring faster performance for Win- 
dows or other graphics-intensive 
applications. 

TOM BENFORD 

Circle Reader Service Number 312 

WEITEK POWER FOR 
WINDOWS 

Weitek is probably best known for 
its line of math coprocessor chips 
that speed up numeric calcula- 
tions hy several orders of magni- 
tude, But Weitek is also a leading 
developer and manufacturer of 
graphics coprocessors, and the 
Weitek Power for Windows graph- 
ics board is its latest offering. 

The half-slot board contains 
Weitek's single-chip graphics 
controller, the W50B6, which effec- 
tively off-loads the PC's CPU op- 
erations dealing with certain 
graphics operations. It does this 
by incorporating the Microsoft Win- 
dows Graphic Device Interface 
(GDI), Bit-Block Transfer 
(BitBLT), and LineDraw functions 
in hardware (rather than system 
RAM) to increase performance. 

The board by itself can signifi- 
cantly speed up all Windows and 
AutoDesk applications (Au- 
toCAD, AutoShade, and others), 
and it comes supplied with an 
assortment of drivers for Win- 
dows 3.0, ADI (AutoDesk), and 
other popular applications such 
as WordPerfect 5.0 and 5.1, Mi- 
crosoft Word 5.0 and 5.5, Lotus 
1-2-3, and Ventura Publisher 
(GEM version). Although they did 
not arrive in time for testing and 
review, new drivers for Windows 



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Photographic 
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Are you forgetful? 

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Phone notes 



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TEST LAB 



3.0 and 3.1 are now available. 

The Power for Windows card 
comes equipped with 512K of vid- 
eo RAM, and it's a fully functional 
and completely compatible VGA 
board. While video cards with 
1MB of RAM are quite common, 
the Weitek board actually outper- 
forms Super VGA cards with dou- 
ble the RAM, thanks to its dedi- 
cated W5086 User Interface Con- 
troller chip, even with DOS appli- 
cations. Under Windows, the 
card typically runs applications 
from two to four times faster. 

Installing the board consists of 
removing or disabling the present 
video card and replacing it with 
Power for Windows, connecting 
the monitor, and loading the sup- 
plied drivers. A single 15-pin D 
connector is provided on the 
board's mounting bracket. 

The Weitek package includes 
driver software on both S'/z-inch 
and 5V4-inch media. An automat- 
ed installation program makes 



WEITEK 

1060E. Arques Ave. 
Sunnyvale. CA 94086 
(408) 738-8400 
List price: $299 



copying tfie required drivers and 
support files to the appropriate 
Windows directories a foolproof 
process, and a driver-removal pro- 
gram {for uninstalling the drivers) 
is also included. Along with the 
software, you get an excellent 58- 
page user's manual with all of the 
information that you'll need to get 
optimal performance for all Win- 
dows applications with this high- 
performance graphics board. 

Although the disk-based READ- 
ME file warns of the possibility of 
mouse incompatibilities that may 
exist with some mice in the super- 
extended video modes (800 x 
600 and 1024 x 768) because of 
nonstandardized mouse driver 
implementations, I didn't encoun- 




ter any problems whatsoever in 
any video mode using a Microsoft 
serial mouse. 

The Weitek board was a joy to 
use, producing crisp, flicker-free 
displays in 640 x 480, 800 x 
600, and 1024 x 768 video 
modes, with excellent color and 
image resolution even when us- 
ing a relatively inexpensive multi- 
frequency analog monitor. The 
product also lived up to Weitek's 
claims by producing a speed in- 
crease of more than 200 percent 
in the applications I used it with. 

TOM BENFORD 

Circle Reader Service Number 313 



CGA. The IBM Color Graphics Adapt- 
er, One of the first video adapter stan- 
dards to support color monitors, it dis- 
plays as many as 16 colors (at 160 
X 200 resolution); however, 4-color 
implementation is more common. 
These colors include black, dark 
gray, light gray, and while. 

color depth. The maximum number 
of colors that a video board can dis- 
play simultaneoiisiy. For example, a 
VGA card can display as many as 
256 colors at a time, 

driver. A series of instructions that 
the computer follows to reformat da- 
ta for transfer to and from a particu- 
lar device or expansion board. The 
specific requirements differ from one 
kind of device to another and from 
one application package to another. 

EGA. Enhanced Graphics Adapter. 
The graphics standard that replaced 
CGA (Color Graphics Adapter) in the 
1980s as the predominant color stan- 
dard. With EGA, resolution is 
pushed up to 640 x 350 pixels, and 
64 colors are available. EGA had a 



GLOSSARY 

rather short life as the major video 
standard, as VGA soon replaced it, 

interlaced display. A monitor that re- 
freshes every other scan line on eve- 
ry other pass of the screen, thus re- 
quiring two scans to completely re- 
fresh the screen. Interlaced displays 
characteristically shov** more flicker 
and "strobing" as a result of the 
extra passes. Contrast with 
noninterlaced display. 

moir§. Shimmering waves of display 
distortion. 

multisync display. Also known as var- 
iable frequency display (VFD). A mon- 
itor that is capable of displaying a 
wide range of resolutions because of 
its ability to scan at various horizon- 
tal and vertical frequencies. 

noninterlaced display. A monitor that 
refreshes the entire screen (every 
scan line) on every pass of the 
screen. This feature greatly reduces 
flicker, "strobing," and user eyestrain. 
Noninterlaced displays are tiighly pref- 
erable to interlaced displays. 



palette. The total number of colors 
that your computer's video board 
can take advantage of. Typically, a 
video board can display only a por- 
tion of its palette at one time. See al- 
so color depth. 

resolution. The number of dots, or pix- 
els, on the screen. The more pixels 
there are on the screen, ttie sharper 
the image. VGA can display 640 pix- 
els horizontally by 480 pixels vertical- 
ly SVGA is capable of even higher 
resolution. 

Super VGA. Also known as Extend- 
ed VGA- The video standard that 
goes beyond the maximum resolu- 
tion of standard VGA (640 x 480). 
Such modes as 800 x 600, 1024 x 
768, and the new 1280 x 1024 are 
all in SVGA range. 

VGA. Video Graphics Array, the vid- 
eo standard developed by IBM that 
supersedes EGA, pushing resolu- 
tions to 640 X 480. 

— DAViD ENGLISH 

AND THE STAFF OF COtJlPUTEfi PRODUCT 

TESTiNG SERVICES 



30 COIwlPUTE AUGUST 1992 



THE 






ULTIMATE 
POWER DISK 

Start getting the absolute most from your PC and COMPUTE! 
Subscribe to COMPUTE's PC Disk today! 

Every otiier month— six times a year— you'll receive COMPUTE's PC Disk chocl<- 
full of ready-to-run programs, including the very best dazzling applications, 
powerful utilities, and eye-popping graphics. And each disk contains special pro- 
grams that tie in with the Tech Support section of the magazine. 
You'll get a direct connection to commercial-quality, free programs and the very 
best in shareware, all painstakingly debugged and fine-tuned by our experts. 

Here's a list of the must-have programs coming on the September PC Disk. 

n instantADDRESS — No more envelope-addressing blues. 
D MultiConfig — Select your configuration at boot-up, 
n SetEnv — Change your environment on the fly 
a WinClock— The ultimate Windows clock. 
D Qfind— Superfast file search. 

SUPER BONUS! 

And that's not all. To make PC Disk as easy to usi 
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Operating System — a special menuing program th 
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view and print documentation, get special 
tips on program requirements, and more. 

So don't delay! Subscribe now! 
Super programs and our special 
menu can be yours. 



Al orders musi be paid in U.S. funds by check dfiwn Ofl a 
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Itt ordas over S20.00. This offef will only be (iHed at the 
above address and is nol rnade in coniunction with 
any other magaiine or disk-subscription ofler. ^ 

Please allow 4-B weeks lor delivery of single ^ 

issues or lor subscnplion to begin. Sorry, but ^^ 

telephone orders cannot be accepted. . ▼ 

Dsks available only for f6M PC ^^ 



and compatible compvleis. 
Current subscribers to COMPUTE 
or COMPUTES PC Uagiim 
wll have thetr subscnp- 
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Menu 



TEST LAB 



Sonera Technologies' DisplayMate 
was a valuable testing tool in this 
month's Test Lab. As you can tell from 
the grids on monitor and accelerator 
card testing, DisplayMate allowed us 
to compile detailed information. For 
those of you in search of this kind of 
detailed information on video perform- 
ance, here's a rundown of the product. 

Displayf\/late is a set of utilities, 
tests, and performance benchmarks 
for checking the overall video 
performance of PC systems. 
Some of the tests are especial- 
ly useful for rafing the speed per- 
formance of video adapter 
cards in both text and graphics 
modes, while other tests are pri- 
marily intended for evaluating 
the image clarity, integrity, and 
resolution on video monitors. 

The DisplayMate software is 
supplied on both 5%- and S'/s- 
inch disks and is accompa- 
nied by an outstanding 370- 
page user's manual. 

Though truly industrial- 
strength in its capabilities, Dis- 
playfvlate is also very easy to 
use, thanks to excellent func- 
tion layout and strong online 
help. The program is so easy 
to use, in fact, that the manual 
is really more of a technical 
reference guide and primer on 
video technology in general 
than a user's manual. And, 
while it's a huge repository of 
information on the tests and util- 
ities which comprise the soft- 
ware, many users will probably 
want to skip the pedantic ma- 
terial in the manual and get 
right into using the program. 

Installation is an almost com- 
pletely automated procedure 
which requires you to answer a few 
question prompts to establish which 
hard drive you wish to install to, wheth- 
er the default subdirectory is satisfac- 
tory, whether you'd like a path state- 
ment added to your AUTOEXEC.BAT 
file, and whether you'd like a Display- 
Mate video test pattern autonnatically 
displayed for 20 seconds when the 
system is booted. Once you've an- 
swered these queries, the installation 
is complete, and you're ready to start 
using DisplayMate. 

Two levels of tests are available: non- 
technical and technical. The differ- 



ABOUT DISPLAYMATE 

ence between the two levels is the 
amount of user intervention required. 
For example, the nontechnical perfomv 
ance test set is a fully automatic op- 
eration that conducts several hundred 
tests over a 35-second time period, 
compiles the data, and displays a com- 
parative reference index of your sys- 
tem's overall performance for text and 
graphics. Your system's performance 
is compared to the performance of 




three standard IBM platforms: an 181^4 
PC, an 8-MHz IBM PC AT, and a PS/2 
Model 70 (80386) running at 25 MHz. 
On the other hand, the technical per- 
formance tests require that you speci- 
fy the desired video mode and other 
data. The detailed test results require 
four full screens to display, but unless 
there's a specific measurement you're 
looking for and you have very sophis- 
ticated technical knowledge, these 
tests will be more than you need. The 
nontechnical section provides plenty 
of meaningful information to compare 
with the three IBM configurations. 



The performance tests are particu- 
larly useful in evaluating the perform- 
ance of different video cards, while 
the video obstacle course and differ- 
ent mode tests are especially useful 
for diagnosing monitor problems and 
gauging display quality. Though the 
performance tests produce objective 
performance data on the video hard- 
ware's speed performance, the mon- 
itor tests require the subjective evalua- 
tion of the user's own eyes. 

The monitor tests are com- 
posed of scores of different 
test patterns at different res- 
olutions to check the monitor's 
convergence, resolution, fo- 
cus, edge clarity, ghosting/im- 
age lag, video refresh rates, 
and more. Different patterns 
are used to test for moires, flick- 
ering, line bowing, reverse vid- 
eo, and other color/intensity/ 
clarity attributes. The excellent 
online messages explain what 
each test does and how to in- 
terpret the results. If you pre- 
fer, the extended help screens 
can be toggled off with the F10 
key once you become familiar 
with the program. 

If you're shopping for a new 
video card, a Windows accel- 
erator card, or a monitor, you'll 
be in a much better position to 
make an educated purchase if 
you use DisplayMate for your 
comparisons. Since the pro- 
gram is contained on a single 
floppy disk, it's easy to take 
along to your dealer for check- 
ing out your potential pur- 
chase. And if you're shopping 
for a laptop or notebook PC, 
DisplayMate is outstanding for 
testing and evaluating LCD 
and gas plasma displays as wetl. 

DisplayMate is also excellent for di- 
agnosing potential monitor problems 
that- may become progressively 
worse with age. It can be invaluable 
for directing a service technician to cor- 
rect a particular problem as well. In oth- 
er words, DisplayMate is an indispen- 
sable video evaluation and diagnostic 
tool that can do it all. To order Display- 
Mate (SI 49), contact Sonera Technol- 
ogies in Rumson, New Jersey, at 
(800) 932-6323 or (908) 747-6886. 
TOM BENFORD 
Circle Reader Service Number 314 



32 COMPUTE AUGUST 1992 




Work at your peak potential! 
Break free of cumbersome MS-DOS 
restrictions and limitations! 

Single keypresses or mouse clicks do 
it all for you with COMPUTE'S super 
new PC Productivity Manager. 

Packed with 38 PC batch-file extensions 
and power utilities, this easy-to-use disk 
includes individual help menus for every 
program. You don't have to be a computer 
maven — just press F1 for Help anytime! 

The power utilities alone are worth 
many times the cost of this disk. Imag- 
ine! Programs to speed up your keyboard, 
edit disk files, edit and search memory, 
find a specific text string in disk files — plus 
memory-resident programs such as a pop- 
up calculator, a programmer's reference 
tool, an editable macro key program, and 
a graphic screen-capture utility, and more 
all included on this jam-packed disk. 

Our batch-fite extensions add new com- 
mands to standard batch-file language. 
Now you can easily create menus, draw 
boxes, and write strings in your choice 
of colors anywhere on the screen — all 
with simple, easy-to-use commands. 
Then, add some zest to your batch files 
with a command that lets you play a se- 
ries of notes I 

Plus handy system tools let you delete 
an entire subdirectory with one command, 
find out if the system has enough memory 
for an application before it runs, cause the 
computer to remember the current direc- 
tory so that you can come back to it later, 
and much, much, more. 

QRtiER YOUl 

yTPMoucTimY 

/MANAGER TODAY! 



J, 




J '■■■ ■ t .. 





^F""! 


Set Colon 1 


^^^^^^^^^H 


C«lc tUf.M 

hnclleia-.li- 

C.1C UMsi:lt 


^^^^^^^^^H 


niitelU«Mi:ir 



Ml , , , , Jje Ihcit Colflft 




dufe Ue alw: kdri nn Ink to Oe •»• icletltw 





DYES! Please send me _ 5% inch disk(s) ($14.95 each) ^ 3H inch disk(s) ($15.95 each). 



Subtotal 

Safes Tax (Residents of NC and NY please add appropriate 
sales tax for your area.Canadian orders, add 7% goods and 
services tax. ) 

Shipping and Handling {S2.00 U.S. and Canada, S3.00 surface 
mail, S5.00 airmail per disk.) 

Total Enclosed 



Credit Can] No. . 
Signatm 



Oaytinie TelepliorB No. . 
Name 



Mdress. 
City. 



_ Check or Money Order _ MasterCard _ VISA 
(MasterCard and Visa accepted on orders with subtotal over $20.J 



SWe/ 
Province _ 



ZIP/ 
. Postal Code . 



Send your order to COMPUTE'S PC Productivity Manager. 
324 W. Wendovsr A/e., Suite 200, Greensboro, NC 27408. 



I 

I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 



NEWS & NOTES 



Jill Champion 



Smart cars lake 

the worry out 

ot driving, find the 

best route, and 

alert you to hazards 

on the road ahead. 



Not Your Father's Oldsmobile 

Highway travel of the future, 
or at least how some envision 
it, is getting a test run in Orlan- 
do, Florida, this year. Last 
March, the American Automo- 
bile Association, General Mo- 
tors, the Federal Highway Ad- 
ministration, the Florida Depart- 
ment of Transportation, and 
the city of Orlando launched 
TravTek, a project involving 
the nation's most advanced in- 
telligent vehicle/highway sys- 
tem (IVHS), on a one-year ex- 
perimental basis. 

IVHSs. also called smart car/ 
smart highway systems, apply 



am^msm 


^-"= ^5^ 




19 




«»it 







electronics, computer, and com- 
munications technology both 
in cars and on highways to 
guide motorists via sight and 
sound and. simultaneously, to 
inform area traffic managers of 
travel conditions. Drivers then 
receive up-to-the-minute infor- 
mation from the area's traffic 
management center. 

The TravTek project in 
Orlando involves 100 Oldsmo- 
bi!e Toronados equipped 
with built-in microcomputers. 
Fingertip controls are located 
on the steering column and 
dashboard. When the driver 
selects a destination, TravTek 
calculates the fastest route, 
providing both visual and au- 
dio driving instructions. A mon- 



itor built into the car's dash- 
board displays a map along 
with the driver's current loca- 
tion. The screen shows the 
fastest route to the destination 
chosen, turn-by-turn driving in- 
structions, and realtime infor- 
mation on traffic jams, acci- 
dents, detours, weather, and 
road conditions. 

TravTek Toronados commu- 
nicate with "smart highway" 
apparatus, highway video cam- 
eras, traffic sensors, emergen- 
cy vehicles, construction re- 
ports, and other TravTek cars, 
while magnetic compasses, 
satellite communications, and 
wheel sensors operate in tan- 
dem to pinpoint the car's loca- 
tion on the map display. 

AAA members interested in 
participating in TravTek while 
in the Orlando area may con- 
tact their travel agents for in- 
formation on renting a Trav- 
Tek Toronado through the 
Avis rental car agency. 

Have CD-ROM, Will Trovel 

Speaking of modern transpor- 
tation, you can journey 
through ten of the globe's 
most interesting cities without 
ever leaving home. All you 
need is a CD-ROM-equipped 
PC and InterOptica's Great Cit- 
ies of the World, Volume 2, to 
get moving through Berlin, 
Buenos Aires. Chicago, Jeru- 
salem. Johannesburg, Rome, 
San Francisco, Seoul, Sin- 
gapore, or Toronto, 

Over two hours of audio, 
300 photographs, 300 maps, 
music, narration, examples of 
spoken languages, and text 
equivalent to ten travel guide- 
books make up this multime- 
dia package. 

For more information, con- 
tact InlerOptica Publishing, 
300 Montgomery Street, San 
Francisco, California 94104; 
(415) 788-8788. 

Number Crunching Made Easy 

Professors, engineers, and oth- 
ers who use complicated math- 



ematical equations take note: 
TK Solver 2.0 is an equation 
processor that does for equa- 
tions what a word processor 
does for writing. The program 
taps the number-crunching 
power of virtually any major 
brand of PC running nearly 
any software. 

Once your variables, rules, 
tables, and plots are organ- 
ized into sheets, the Presenta- 
tion View feature allows you 
to use any number and com- 
bination of sheets to create a 
presentation-quality interface. 
Release 2.0 is an update of 
TK Solver Plus 1.1. Suggest- 
ed retail price is $595. Up- 
grades for prior versions are 
available at a lower cost. For 
more information, contact Uni- 
versal Technical Systems, 
1220 Rock Street, Rockford, Il- 
linois 61101; (800) 435-7887. 

Interactive TV 

Pretty soon your TV will be 
watching you. Interactive TV, 
two-way communication be- 
tween the television set and 
viewer, recently crept from 
the Sacramento area into the 
San Francisco Bay area of Cal- 
ifornia. Eventually, it will find 
its way into TV viewing areas 
all over the country. 

Interactive Network (IN) is 
a two-way television entertain- 
ment system that allows TV 
viewers to play along with 
game shows, live sports 
events, and dramas, and to 
participate in polls and voice 
their opinions during live 
news shows and talk shows. 
The IN system uses a simple 
wireless, hand-held control 
unit that receives FM radio sig- 
nals transmitted from the com- 
pany's headquarters, where 
the information is produced 
and simulcast with local televi- 
sion signals. 

IN's programs include ma- 
jor sporting events (NBA bas- 
ketball and major-league foot- 
ball and baseball), game 
shows ("Wheel of Fortune" 



34 COMPUTE AUGUST 1992 



ADVERTISEMENT 



JOIN THE COMPUTE SEARCHSTAKES 




WIN THIS DUAL STANDARD MODEM 
FROM U5. ROBOnCS AND COMPUSERVE 
CONNEa-TIME! DIAL 1-900-454-8681! 

Cost for coll $ 130 first minute, $ 1 .00 eadi oddiikNial minuie. 
Must be 1 8 or older. liMidrione phMie reqinred. 



The Courier Dual Standard modem from U.S. Robotics is one 
of tfie fastest, most reliable modems in the world. With data 
throughput of up to 57,600 bits per second, the Dual Standard 
supports both the worldwide high speed \/.32bis standard and 
USR's proprietary HST standard, used by thousands of 
electronic billboards worldwide, Also, win $200 in CompuServe 
connect-time, the worldwide service that transforms your 
computer into a personal communications center, reference 
library, shopping mall, investment tool, and travel agent! 

IT'S GRAND TO WIN 

Every month, from now until November, you'll have the 
chance to win fabulous prizes by playing the Compute 
SearchStakes. You'll also have the chance to win the 
SearchStakes Grand Prize by submitting the solution to any 
two monthly SearchStakes, plus the solution to the Grand 
Prize SearchStakes, to be featured in our upcoming 
December issue. 

IT'S FUN TO PLAY 

Each of the six picture disks displayed below is a portion of 
a photo or illustration taken from an ad in this issue. To 



solve the August SearchStakes, locate the ads from which 
these disks were taken and note the page number for 
each. If the ad has no page number, simply count that 
page or cover as zero. Then add up all six page numbers. 
That is the solution to this month's SearchStakes. 

IT'S EASY TO ENTER 

Once you find the solution, you may enter the August 
SearchStakes automatically on a touch-tone phone by 
calling 1-900-454-8681 by 9/30/92. The cost for the 
call is $1.50 for the first minute, $1.00 for each 
additional minute. Average call is estimated to be 2-3 
minutes. Callers must be 18 or older. You may also enter 
by mailing your answer on a 3" x 5" piece of paper, along 
with your name, address, and phone number, to: "August 
Compute SearchStakes," 324 West Wendover Avenue, 
Suite 200, Greensboro, N.C. 27408 by 9/30/92. No 
purchase necessary. For more information on how you 
may win this month's prize, valued at more than $1,500, 
turn to page 40. 

U.S. Robotics, CompuServe and Compute magazine! So 
enter early. ..and enter often! 









Sponsored by Compute Int'l Ltd., N.Y., N.Y. 



NEWS & NOTES 



Interaclive Network 

lets you Interact 

Witt! your television. 

Coming soon 

to selected viewing 

areas. 



and "Jeopardy!"), drama 
(CBS's "Murder, She Wrote"), 
and documentary and news 
programs ("60 Minutes" and 
"NBC Nightly News"). 

The Mountain View, Califor- 
nia, company that developed 
the system says the patented 
technology is capable of even- 
tually reaching every home in 
the United States. It you hap- 
pen to be a couch potato in 
the Sacramento or San Fran- 
cisco Bay area, however, 
price is something to consid- 
er: The control unit costs 
$199, in addition to a $15-per- 
month subscriber fee, which al- 
lows you to interact with what- 
ever's offered. To compete 









i^.- '■'" - 














"'»Wtttf:^....< U 




^^^m^mam^ 





against other subscribers 
costs an additional 50 cents 
per game for freestanding 
games, $1 per game for 
game shows, and $2 per 
game for sporting events. An 
extra $30 per month buys un- 
limited competitive play. 

If you would like more infor- 
mation, contact Interactive Net- 
work, 1991 Landings Drive, 
Mountain View, California 
94043; (415)960-1000. 

Video Blaster 

You're probably already famil- 
iar with Sound Blaster, the 
sound system for PCs from 
Creative Labs. Now the same 
company brings you Video 
Blaster for displaying, editing, 
and frame-capturing full-mo- 
tion video on standard PC 



monitors. Competitively priced 
at $495, Video Blaster lets 
you combine full-motion video 
from NTSC or PAL with com- 
puter-generated graphics 
and animations. The resulting 
images are captured in 
freeze frame; saved in one of 
a variety of formats, including 
bitmap, Targa, M-motion, TIF, 
and encapsulated PostScript; 
manipulated by adding titles 
or changing colors; and export- 
ed to other applications. 

For more information, con- 
tact Creative Labs, 1901 Mc- 
Carthy Boulevard, Milpitas, Cal- 
ifornia 95035; (408) 428-6600. 

Future Naders of Anterka 

Fed up with the feds? Then 
take a closer look at Personal 
Advocate, a new program 
from Parsons Technology for 
the consumer advocate in 
you. The software is designed 
to help you cut through red 
tape to get action, receive in- 
formation, and express your 
views. Designed in conjunc- 
tion with a team of attorneys. 
Personal Advocate generates 
nearly 40 of the most common- 
ly written letters to creditors, 
corporations, elected officials, 
consumer organizations, and 
government agencies. A free- 
form letter lets you create per- 
sonalized documents. 

Personal Advocate also pro- 
vides an expandable address 
book of approximately 2500 
consumer contacts; names, 
addresses, and telephone 
numbers of major corpora- 
tions, Better Business Bu- 
reaus, offices of attorneys gen- 
eral, consumer groups, and 
numerous other organiza- 
tions. A small built-in word 
processor lets you record de- 
tails each time you make a 
contact. By tagging notes to 
address book entries, you 
can chronicle the date of a 
conversation, what the out- 
come was, and future actions 
still required. 

Suggested retail price is 



$69. For more information, con- 
tact Parsons Technology, 
One Parsons Drive, P.O. Box 
100, Hiawatha, Iowa 52233- 
0100; (319) 395-9626. 

What Price Speed? 

You can get fast for less, if 
you're looking for 50-MHz per- 
formance. Intel's speed de- 
mon chip, the Intel486 DX2 
microprocessor, makes lower- 
priced systems perform like 
50-MHz machines. Intel's 
"speed-doubler" technology al- 
lows the internal frequency of 
the processor to operate at 
double that of the rest of the 
system, combining the high 
performance of the advanced 
50-MHz Intel486 DX CPU 
with the cost-effective 25- 
MHz system design. 

The DX2 comprises an inte- 
grated central processing 
unit, a floating-point unit, and 
a complete on-chip cache, all 
of which execute at a rate 
twice that of the CPU bus due 
to the speed-doubler technol- 
ogy. CPU performance in- 
creases significantly without re- 
quiring a new generation of 
supporting components. If 
you're in the market for a new 
computer, look for competitive- 
ly priced systems based on 
the Intel486 DX2. They're pop- 
ping up all over the place. 

For more information con- 
tact intel at (BOO) 548-4725 or 
write for the Intel Literature 
Packet #JB-47, PO. Box 
7641, Mount Prospect, Illinois 
60056-7641. 



Companies with items of inter- 
est suitable for "News & 
Notes" should send Informa- 
tion along with a color slide or 
color transparency to News & 
Notes. Attn: Jill Champion, 
COMPUTE. 324 West Wen- 
dover Avenue. Suite 200, 
Greensboro. North Carolina 
27408. Although space is lim- 
ited, all items will be consid- 
ered for publication. O 



36 COMPUTE AUGUST 1992 



New from Mallard Software - Scenery from all the Islands for MicrosofT'Flight Simulator! 

Spend an Afternoon 
on the Islands* 



Hawm 

Scenery Upgrade Series 
for Microsoft^ flight Simulator® 




fc* 



'<L.' f^- 



m^ 






J.lCTUiJ.l^lJL -N^ 



Experience the spectacular scenery of tlie 
Hawaiian Islands as never before with the greatest 
possible accuracy and realism. 

This new Hawaiian scenery designed by 
MicroScene brings you topographies, highway and city 
maps at an entirely new level of detail. 

Bring the beauty of Hawaii right into your home 
through your Flight Simulator experiences. 

You'!! discover ships, lighthouses, mountain roads, 
piers, port facilities, factories, beaches, 
resort hotels and much, much more. 



And at dusk the discoveries start over again as 
the scenery changes to display dramatic night effects. 
Scenery from all the islands — from the big island 
of Hawaii to Kure Atoll beyond Midway — is included. 
Predefined modes start you out at Hilo, Keahole, 
Kahului, USS Ranger, Mololcai; Lanai, Honolulu, 
Lihue, French Frigate Shoals or Midway. 

If youVe never been to Hawaii, or even if you're a 
frequent visitor, you shouldn't miss this opportunity to 
see the islands from their most 
spectacular vantage point — the air. 



Mallaid 

To find out more, call 1-800 -WEB -FEET. 

CdfjTTg^© 1992 MaHmri So/iCiKtTE. AHproduci noma imi rra^^marh axe die propetty of iheir rapiCDve otiiu^ 

FLYING SOON TO TAHITI 



circle Reader Service Number 258 



FEEDBACK 



Pttctiing VGA dots, 

writing random 

sentences, cluinglng 

your Image, 

updating your medical 

advisor, and 

finding the liest price 



Tlie RIglit Pitch 

I am still a novice and am plan- 
ning to upgrade soon to VGA. 
I called a local discount deal- 
er regarding buying a 28-dpi 
standard VGA monitor. He 
told me I would have a hard 
time finding a 28-dpi, yet I 
see plenty of big mail-order 
companies with reasonably 
priced 28-dpi monitors. Does 
a standard VGA get 16 colors 
or 260 colors? 

JOHN R. MAHONEY 
LINCOLN PARK, HJ 

Actually, the measurement for 
a monitor screen is dot pitcti, 
not dots per inch (dpi). You 
would use dpi to express how 
many distinct dots a printer 
can lay side by side. You'll al- 
so see dpi applied to mouse 
resolution, though we prefer 
the emerging term fvlickeys to 
indicate the distance the 
mouse pointer moves on the 
screen and points per inch 
(ppi) to Indicate the minimum 
motion of the mouse that can 
be detected by the software. 
Dot pitch (dp) refers to the di- 
agonal distance between 
dots of the same color on a 
monitor screen. 

We don't know why your 
dealer is having a hard time 
finding a 28- dp monitor It's 
not hard. Go with a mail-order 
company you already l<now 
about and skip your dealer. 
And stick to your guns — 28 
dp is definitely the way to go, 
especially if you do a lot of 
text work. 

As you probably know, the 
color image on your screen is 
made up of individual pixels, 
or dots, and each of these 
dots Is made up of three small- 
er colored dots (one each of 
red, green, and blue). In 
most monitors these pixels 
are laid out diagonally so that 
the individual pixels don't 
form vertical stacks. 

Imagine trying to cover the 
bottom of a rectangular box 
with Ping-Pong bails. If you 



line them up horizontally and 
vertically in a Cartesian pat- 
tern, there'll be large spaces 
where you can see the bot- 
tom of the box between 
them. If you allow the Ping- 
Pong balls to lake their natu- 
ral positions, they'll come to 
rest in a sort of honeycomb 
pattern. You'll see far less of 
the bottom of the box and 
pack more balls into the 
same space if you align them 
this way. That's why dot pitch 
measures the diagonal dis- 
tance rather than the vertical 
or horizontal distance. 

Standard VGA provides 16 
colors at 640 x 480 resolution 
and 256 colors at 320 x 200 
resolution. Anything higher 
than that is called Super 
VGA, and there are untold 
numbers of Super VGA stan- 
dards and resolutions. There 
was some hope that IBM's 
XGA or 8514A standard 
would replace Super VGA 
and result in a new standard, 
but that hope was in vain. 

Life Sentence 

I want to write a program to 
generate random sentences 
from small lists of words. It 
should pull a verb from a 
verb list, a noun from a noun 
list, and so on, and then link 
them into a sentence. Could 
you talk about the RANDOf^- 
IZE command? 

J. p. MYERS 
DOWNEY. CA 

RANDOMIZE is used to pre- 
pare the computer to gener- 
ate random numbers. Keying 
this command to the timer 
causes whatever value is cur- 
rently in the hardware clock 
to be the seed value. If you 
don't use RANDOMIZE be- 
fore generating random num- 
bers, you'll generate the 
same list of random numbers 
each time the program runs. 
The numbers are really ran- 
dom, but they're generated 
by a formula. If you use the 



same seed value to start the 
process, the numbers will al- 
ways be the same sequence. 

RND is then used in a for- 
mula. fl/VD will give you a ran- 
dom value between and 1. 
You multiply this by the range 
you want and then add to it 
the lowest value you want. 
For example. If you want ran- 
dom integers between 5 and 
20, you would use this formu- 
la: INT(RND ' 15 + 5). 

The following program 
goes a step further Defining 
a function (DEFFN) in the sec- 
ond line allows you to use fna 
anywhere in the program 
where you want a random in- 
teger between and 10. This 
saves space and typing. 

The first value in the pa- 
renthesis in the string array 
wordSO is the part of 
speech (0 = adjective, 1 = 
noun [person], 2 = verb, 3 = 
adverb, 4 = preposition, 5 = 
noun [thing]). To keep the sen- 
tence simple, one of each 
part of speech is used, the 
nouns are always singular, 
and the verb is always intran- 
sitive and past tense. 

You can easily make this 
sentence-generating program 
as complex as you desire. In- 
creasing its vocabulary 
would be the simplest improve- 
ment. Note that the way It's 
currently designed, there 
have to be equal numbers of 
each part of speech, but this 
was done to keep the pro- 
gram short. There's no reason 
why you couldn't have differ- 
ent numbers of nouns and 
verbs, for example. Just cre- 
ate separate loops to load the 
different parts of speech into 
their respective arrays. 

RANDOMIZE TIMER 

DIM word$(5, 10):DEFfna = 

INT(RND * 11) 
FOR i = TO 5 
FOR j = D TO 10 
READ wordframlfst$ 
word${i, i) = wordfrornlislS + ' ' 
NEXT 



38 COMPUTE AUGUST 1992 







IN 218 B.C., Hannibal needed more 
than 300 elephants to cross the Alps and 
confront the Romans. 









TODAY, a single mouse is all you need 
to e:q)lore the most elaborate civilization 
in computer gaming — and confront the 
essence of evil. 



^'•^^^-:r-^^^"^ 




ijO^iS^K^^^flS^^t^ _ S i ' ^T\ 


'With the new mouse interface 
playing Ultima has never been 
easier. The left button controh 
your hands and the right button 
controls your feet-yon never 
have to touch the keyboard" 

(Richard Garriott, 
Ultima VII designer) 

'. . . one of the few games that 
emphasizes femoral develop- 
ment of your cbaracters. . . the 
nature ofgaod and evU set the 
tone for this adventure in 
ethical dilemmas. " 

(MPC World, April/May 1992) 


^^^^^S^Kj 1^1, 1 u I..II..J s^ 


'■. ''M Ittaffi' ISi:;,, J 


111 1' "n 

ir^SWffv' ^ff^^^ jl^BKSS 



V 


■ 




',-; 


.'^-ri;^ 






i 


\ £ 


4 
1 


1 'e.« 


'^' 


luybSi^^^i 


^^HdBV ' 






i 


-■ii; 


^^m^ 


1P';V" »"»*»;crK<-.>^l!l 


■1 


^' 


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1 

in 


» -.f 


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■-ife ■:. 


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J 



'"The world holds such beauty and complexity, 
•uiith so many potential leads tofolloia and inter- 
esting places to poke into, that you 'II hardly know 
what to do first. I couldn 't resist playing the 
tourist and taking a long look around. 
Ins still looking." 

(PC Games: The Complete PC Gamer's Guide, 
_^^ Spring/Summer 1992) 



VOLUNTARILY 
RATED MP-1 3 
[For Mature Players) 



%slneei|uii«riaih:IBM&1CI0%caii|iolilih38iS!C,386<>r4S6srslw<i - i meg, RAM: hard Ami; 234 color VGA/HCGA grc 



Available at a refailer near you or 
coil 1-800-999-4939 



< .11 J 



■ I K I 4T/*/#Ai 



/^^j^^^ M^c4^' 



P.O. Box 161750 • Ausrin TX 78716 



THE BLACK GATE 



>'cd. ilhii 

'- -\ of OKIGIN Si^ic..,.* ..r 



atks of Richard CjUTWtt. The d 



Circle Reader Servtee Number 19Z 



COMPUTE SEARCHSTAKES! 

No purchase or phone call required. For automatic 
entry, call 1-900-^54-6681 on a louch-lone phone, The 
cosf^for the call is $1.50 for the first minute and St .00 
per minLite thereafter: average call is est'mated to be 2- 
3 min'itec. Cftajpes for calls to the above number will 
appear on your phone bill Calleis must be 18 or older. 
To enter June SeatchSta.'<es drawing cail from 9 AM, 
EDT on 4126/32 through midnight EDT 7/31/92, to enter 
July SearctiStakes drawing call Irom 9 A,M- EDT on 
aste through midnight EDT &'3M92. to enter August 
SearchStakes drav^irrocall from 9 AM, EDT on &2B92 
through midhiqhl EDT 9/30/92, to enter September 
SearchStakes arawing call from 9 hU. EDT on 7/26/92 
through midnight EST 10/30/92, to enter October 
SearchStakes drawirvgcall from 9 AM. EDT on 8/2&92 
through midnight EST 1 1/30/92.lo enter November 
SeartJiStakes diawngcall from 9 A.M. EDT on a'2&92 
through midnight EST 12/31/92. to give your name, 
atidress, telephone numlKr, the Compute issue date 
(nronth), and the solution tor the montfi you select To 
enter the Grand Prize drawing, call from 9:00 A.M. EST 
12/1/92 through midnight EST 1/29/93 to give your 
name, address, telephone number, the solution to ttie 
Grarvd Prize SearchStaises tius the solution to any two 
of the previous monthly SearchStakes. All call-in 
entrants will receive a Ss.OO savings coupon toward 
caller's choice of: (1) Kathy Keelon's newest book, 
Lorygevity. or (2) a two-year subscription to Compute. 
Muifiple coupons may not t)e combined on a single 
book or subscription purchase. Coupon expires 
2/15/93.Call as often as you wish; each call is a 
separate entry. Call-in entiy option is void in GA i-A, 
MN, OR. NJ and wtiere prohibited. 
Allernate Entry Method; Print your name, address, 
and phone number on a 3" x 5" piece of paper. (1) To 
enter the monthly drawings, print the Compute issue 
date (month) and solutionlor mat tnonlti on your entry 
and address your envefcipe to include the issue date 
(month), for eicarnpie: 'June Compute SearchStakes." 
(21 To enter the Grand Prize dfavring print the words 
Grand Prize," the Grand Prize solution, gkjs the 
solution to any two previous monthly SearchStakes 
on your entry. Address your envefopB: "Compute 
SearchStakes Grand Prize." Mail all enlries, 
addressed as directed above, to: 324 West Wendover 
Avenue, Suite 200, Greensboro, N.C. 27403. Enter 
as often as you wish; each entry must be mailed 
separatel'/. m write-in entries must be postmarked by 
1/31/93 and received by S'lSSS. 

For the salution(5), complete rules, and detailed 

description of prizes including prize values, send a 
self-addressed stamped envelope to Compute 
SearchStakes Solutions, Depl RRS,1965 Broadway, 
NY, N.Y. 10023-5965 by 1OT1/92: no rtstum postage 
required for residents of VT and WA, Solutions and 
prize infonnaBon will be provided through ttie issue 
date in whKh the request is received. 

Odds determined by number of entries received, for 
example 10.000 entries make odds 10,000 to 1. 
Prizes/Values: Grand Prize (1), minimum value 
S15,000-maximum value $40,000. Monthly prizes 
(6), one for each of the following Compute 1992 
issue dales: June, July, August, September, 
October, and November, minimum value SI ,500- 
maximum value $7,500. fjlaximum total prize 
value: $85,000, A description of each prize, 
including its approximate value, will appear in 
Compute prior to the first entry date for that pnze. 
Prizes are not transferable or redeemable for cash. 
No substitution of prizes except as necessary, due 
to availability. Licensing, transportation, 
registration, and dealer charges, if applicable, are 
winner's responsibility. Winners may be required 
to pick up some prizes from the nearest dealership. 
Travel prizes must be from a major airport nearest 
winner's home and must be used within 12 months 
of award date. Additional restrictions may apply, 
i.e., local ordinances. Taxes are the winners 
responsibility. 

Open only to U.S. residents 18 and older, except 
employees and their families of Compute Inl'l Ltd., 
POWER GROUP, INC., their respective subsidiaries, 
affiliates, and advertising agencies. All federal, state, 
tocal laws and regulations ai^ly, Void where prohibited. 
This proqram is sponsored by Compute International 
Ltd., 19B5 Broadway, NY, N.Y. 10023, (212)496- 
6100. Monthly winners will be selected at random 
from among all eligible entries received by the iudges 
by the following drawing dates: June issuB-7/31/s2, 
July issue*31?92. August lssue-a'30/92, September 
issue-10/30/92, October issue-11/30/92. November 
issue-12/31/92. Grand Prize winner will be selected at 
random from among all eligible entnes received bv 
2/15/93. Winners will be selected by POWER 
GROUP, INC., an independent judging organization 
whose decisions are final. Winners v/ill be notified by 
mail and required to execute and return an affidavit of 
eligibility and release within 21 days of date on 
nomication letter or alternates v/ill be selected at 
ranciom. limit one winner per household. 
This sweepstakes is subject to the Official Rules 
and Regulations. For a list of winners, send a self- 
addressed stamped envelope to: Compute 
SearchStakes Winners, Depl RRW, 1965 Broadway, 
NY, N.Y. 10023-5965 by 3*31/93. Requests will be 
fulfilled after the sweepstakes ends. 



FEEDBACK 



NEXT 

FORi = 0TO10 

PRINT 'The ' + wor()S(0, fna) + 

word$(1, Ina} + wordS(Z, fna) + 

word$(3, Ina) -i- word$(4, fna) + 

'tfie ' + word$(5, Ina) 
NEXT 
END 
DATA red,blue,ta[l,fat,smart, 

worried, fiungry, persistent, 

wet, elegant, happy 
DATA man,chlld,tenor,accountant, 

plumber,dog,gorilla, machinist, 

florist.wlndow washer.fry cook 
DATA ate,sang, worked, liid, 

paraded, read, tiew.ran, 

harvested.welded, talked 
DATA loudly, quieily.proudly, 

unceasingly, frantically, 

inethodically,!ntently, 

poignantly, sloppJIy.hesitantly, 

paintlessiy 
DATA in, under,Qver, around, out 

of,inside,wtth,beside,far 

froni,thraugh,along with 
DATA airplane, house,car,diner, 

college dormitory, machine 

shop,school,fool,cellar, 

attic, barn 

Capturing the Image 

I have a computer card designed to dis- 
play images captured from video record- 
ers. I have several image-capturing pro- 
grams for capturing PCX and TIF imag- 
es, such as PC Partner from DAK, but 
none of them can capture images in 
VGA mode. I contacted DAK, but PC 
Partner is several years old, and the 
technician told me it won't capture imag- 
es at VGA resolution. Are you aware of 
any other capturing software that can 
capture images al VGA resolution? 

Another question I have concerns 
hardware and software for my internal 
fax/modem. Each time I load the fax soft- 
ware, I get problems such as neither the 
mouse nor the fax working properly. I've 
written the manufacturer, but it's been 
three weeks, and I've not heard from the 
company. Can internal fax/modems 
work with other fax software, or are they 
restricted to their own software? 

LEO FRENCH 
MODESTO. CA 

HiJaak (Inset Systems, 71 Commerce 
Drive, Brookfleld, Connecticut 06804; 
203-740-2400) can capture a maximum 
resolution of 1024 x 768 pixels in 256 col- 
ors. Collage Plus (inner Media, 60 Plain 
Road. Mollis, New Hampshire 03049; 
603-465-3216) can capture up to 800 x 
600 pixels in 16 colors in DOS. 

Ttie maximum resolution and num- 
ber of colors for a Windows capture 



Editor 

Senior Arl Director 

Art Director 

Managing Editor 

Features Editor 

Reviews Editor 

Edllor, Gazelle 

Editor, Amiga Resource 

Copy Editors 

Editorial Assistant 
Conlrlbuting Editors 



Clitton Kames 

Dwaytie Fiinchum 

Robin C. Case 

DaviO English 

Robert BsKby 

Mike Hudnall 

Tom Neisei 

Denny Atkin 

Karen Hullrran 

Margaret Ramsey 

Pofly Cillpam 

Syiwa Gratiam, Eddie Huffman. 

Gregg Keizer. Tony Roberts. 

Karen Siepai^ 



ART 

Assistant An Director Kenneth A. Hardy 

Designer Jr^ Boykin 

Copy Produclton Manager Terry Cash 

Copy Production Assistant Katie Taylc^r 

PRODUCTION 
Production Manager Dg Potter 

Traffic Manager BarbarsA Willianns 

PROGRAMMlrJG & ONLINE SERVICES 

Manager Troy Tucker 
Programmers Bruce M. Bowdeo 
Sieve Dfaper 
Bradley M. Small 

ADMINISTRATION 



President, COO 

Execjtlve Vice President, 

Operations 

Editorial Director 

Operations Manager 

Office Manager 

Sr, Administrative Assistant 

Administrative Assistant 

Receptionist 



Kathy Keelon 
William Tynan 

Keilh Ferroil 
David Hensiey Jr 
Sybil Agee 
Julia Fleming 
Lisa Williams 
LeWanda Fox 



ADVERTISING 
Vice President, Peter T Johnsmeyer 
Associate Publisher (212)196-6100 

Vice President, James B. Marlisa 
Sales Development 

ADVERTISING SALES OFFICES 
East Coast: Full-Page and Standard Display Ads— Peler T Johns- 
meyef. Chris Coelho; COMPUTE Publications inteinalional Ltd.. 
1965 Broadway. New York, NY 10023; (212)496-6100 Soulh- 
east-Harriet Rogers. 503 A St-. SE. Washington, D.C 20OO3; 
(202) 546-6926 Florida— J. M. Remer Associates. 3300 NE 
192nd St . Suite 192. Aveolura, FL 33180: (305) 933.1467, (306) 
933-8302 (FAX), Midwesl— Full-Page and Ssandard Display 
Ads— Siarr Lane. National Accounts Manager, 1 1 1 East Wack- 
er Dr.. Suite 508. Chicago. IL 60601: (312) ai9 0900. (3i2) 819- 
0813 (FAX) Norihwesi — lerfy Thompson, juies E, Thompson 
Co , 1290 Howard Ave , Suite 303, Burlingame. CA 94010: [415) 
34B-B222.Lucilie Dennis. (707) 451-3209 SouthAest— Ian Ling 
woDd. 6728 Eton Ave , Canoga Park, CA 91303: (BIB) 992- 
4777 Product Marl Ads— Lucille Dennis. JuFes E Thompson 
Co . 1290 Hoviard Ave.. Suite 303. Burlingarae, CA 94010: (707) 
451-B209. U K a Europe— Beverly Wardale. M Lisgar Terr,, Lon- 
don WI4. England, 011-441.602-3296 Japan -Iniecgroup Cora- 
municaiions. Lid, ; Jiro Semba. President: 3F Ttgar BIdg 5-22 Shi- 
ba-koen. a-Chome. Minalo ku, Tokyo 105 Japan, 03-434- 
2607. Classilied Ads— Maria Manaseri, 1 Woods CI,. Huntington. 

NY 11743: (TEL/FAX) (516) 767-9562. 

THE CORPORATION 

B06 Gucccne (chairn^an ar-d CEO) 

Kathy Keelon (vice-criairman) 

David J Myerson (president and CEO) 

William F. Maflieb [president, marketing, sales and circulation) 

Patrick J Gavin (senior vice president and CFO) 

Anthony J Guccione [secretary and treasurer) 

John Evans (president, foreign gdilions and manulactunng) 

Jeri Winston [senior vice president, adminrstrative services) 

ADVERTtSING AND MARKETING 

Sr. VP/Corp. Dir , New Business Developmenl: Beverly 
Wardale: VPyDir , Group Advertising Sales tslancy Kestenbaum 
Sr VPjrSoulhern and MidwesI Advertising Dir : Ffeter Goldsmith 
Ollices: New York 1965 Broadway. New York. rJY 10023-5966, 
Tel (212) 496-6100. Telax 23712B (ulidwost: 111 East Wackei 
Dr. SuHe 508, Chicago IL 60601: (312) B19-D900 (312) 819. 
0813 (FAX) Soulh: 1725 K SI. NW, Suile 903, Washington, DC 
2O0O6. Tel (202) 728-0320, West Coast: 6728 Eton Ave., Can- 
oga Rark, CA 91303, Tel, (SIB) 992-4777 UK and Europe: 14 
Lisgar Terrace. London Wi 4. England. Tel, (} 1 .828-3336. Japan . 
Inlergroijo Jiro Semba. Telex J234691GLTY0. =a« 434-5970. Ko- 
rea Kaya Advtsng.. Inc . Rm 402 Kur^shin Annex B/D 251-1. 
DohwaDong, Mapo-Ku. Seoul. Korea (121). Tel. 719-6906. Tel- 
ex K32144Kayaad 

ADMINISTRATION 

Sr, VP, CFO Patrick J. Gavin. Sr. VP/Adminislrative Servir;es: 
Jeri Winston: Sr VP/Arl & Graphics: Frank Oeuino: VP/ 
Circulation; Marcia Orovilz; VP Director Sales Promotions: Bev- 
erly Greiper: VP Production: Hal Halpner: Dir Newsstand Cir- 
culation: Paul Roinick: Din, Newsstand Operalions; Joe Gallo; 
Dir Subscription Circulaiion: Marcia Schuitz: vp Director of Fte- 
search: Robert Rattner. Advertising f^oductron Direclor: Char- 
lena Smith. Advertising Production Tralfic Mgr Mark Williams, 
Traffic Dir. William Harbutt; Production Mgr.: Tom Stinson: 
Asst Production f^gr fjancy Rice; Foreign Edittons t*1gr : Mi- 
chael Stevens, Exec Asst- to Bob Guccione: Diane O'Conneil; 
Exec. Asst, to David J, Myerson: Teri Pisani; Special ASSE. 10 [3ob 
Guccione: Jane Homlish. 



40 COMPUTE AUGUST 1992 



with Collage Plus is a little more com- 
plicated. If you're running In 386-en- 
hanced 386 mode, it can capture what- 
ever is on the screen, regardless of the 
resolution or number of colors. In real 
or standard mode, you'll need to have 
about 1MB of free RAI^ above whatev- 
er programs you're running to capture 
a 1024 X 768 256-color screen. 

None of these programs should 
have any trouble saving to disk what- 
ever is captured by your card. 

Your fax problem is probably due to 
a serial-port conflict between your 
mouse and your fax card. If you have 
at least two serial ports, try moving 
your mouse to the other serial port. 
(This will require rerunning your 
mouse setup in DOS and Windows.) 

If that doesn't work or if you have on- 
ly one serial port, you'll have to dig 
through your fax/modem manuals to fig- 
ure out how to set your DIP switches 
and jumpers so the devices aren't trying 
to use the same IRQ. Remember that 
serial port 1 is interrupt 4 and serial 
port 2 is Interrupt 3. Technically you can 
have two additional serial ports, but se- 
rial port 3 must use interrupt 4 and se- 
rial port 4 must use interrupt 3. There's 
probably a reason for this other than to 
mystify and confuse people. 

Regarding your question about fax 
software, there's hope but only If your 
fax supports a common file format. 
Many older fax machines don 't — they 
employ their own file formats and thus 
force you to use their software. Many, 
however, can create PCX or TIF files, 
so any fax software that reads these 
files should work. Also, give the manu- 
facturer a call (or fax your question in, 
if there's a fax number in the manual). 
Most manufacturers are responsive to 
telephone contact. 

The Doctor Is In 

We'd like to update our item Getting Bet- 
ter on Dr. Schueler's Home Medical Ad- 
visor that ran in the June 1992 issue's 
"News & Notes." According to Pixel Per- 
fect, the program's publisher, the refer- 
ral database mentioned in the article 
has been discontinued and, due to pop- 
ular demand, is being replaced with a 
health and diet section in the data- 
base. Second, although the story high- 
lights some of the new version's fea- 
tures, there are several others the com- 
pany thinks our readers might like to 
know about. The program now has full 
print capability, first-letter-sensitive men- 
us for fast referencing, a newly formed 
specialty review board consisting of 40 
Board Certified f^yiedicai Specialists, 
and continuing updates for registered 
users at cost. A major new version of 
Schueler's Home fviedical Advisor is al- 
so in the works. 



This is for every hard disk 
diat's lost its drive. 



File fragmentation. 
It shifts your hard disk 
into low gear. And 
takes the "varoom" 
out of your PC's 
performance. 

Restore your hard 
disk to its youthful 
speed, with Disk 
Optimizer. The 
utility software 
that lets you retrieve 
your files up to three times /aster. 

Disk Optimizer undoes nasty file 
fragmentation that occurs naturally 
under EXDS. It puts your files back 
in one piece. So your hard disk 
doesn't bum up your precious time 
or itself retrieving bits of data 
scattered all over the place. 



nSK OPTMZEir TOOLS /7 

WnVDAnEUARIUN 'iaj 




It's the little 
utility that's a big 
time saver. Get Disk 
Optimizer today and 
give your hand disk 
a real power boost 
under the hood. 

Disk Optimizer 
is just $69.95. 

See your dealer. 
Or call 

800-272-9900 
to order. 



SoftLogic 

SOLUTIONS 

One Perimeter Road, MancKester, NH 03103 
603-627-9900 • 800-272-9900 

® 1990 Soaock Sobliau, liK. 



Circle Reader Service Number 1B9 



ZEOS 486-33 Pricing 

A number of COMPUTE readers have 
called ZEOS hoping to purchase the 
486 system featured in the April Test 
Lab section of the magazine for the 
price listed, only to be told that the sys- 
tem isn't available for that price. The 
$1,795 list price that appeared in our 
product box was supplied by ZEOS, but 
It isn't the price for the review configura- 
tion. Also, the review refers to a hard 
drive that's no longer available from 
ZEOS. We at COMPUTE regret the confu- 
sion and offer the following explanation. 

A footnote at the beginning of Test 
Lab explains the difficulty of coming up 
with a list price for a "standard" system: 
"Prices for this computer system and the 
others vary according to the configura- 
tion/options chosen. Contact the man- 
ufacturer for further information." Be- 
cause consumers are more sophisticat- 
ed than ever, companies like ZEOS offer 
a menu approach to pricing. Even 
when a manufacturer offers a "standard" 
system, there are usually a number of op- 
tions. The price ZEOS supplied us is for 
the base configuration, which includes, 
for example, a monochrome monitor rath- 
er than an S'\/GA monitor. 

In the future, we will make every at- 
tempt to indicate whether the price is 
for the base configuration or for the re- 



view configuration. However, our ad- 
vice still stands: You should call the 
company in question for current pric- 
ing on the configuration of your 
choice. Computer technology is chang- 
ing more rapidly than ever, and occa- 
sionally, despite ail our efforts, a sys- 
tem configuration will change between 
the time we receive a system and the 
time the issue hits the stands. Also, pric- 
es for components like hard drives and 
microprocessors can change accord- 
ing to market demands. 

Finally, remember that street prices 
{for products not sold directly by the 
manufacturer) are frequently well be- 
low list prices. For current pricing, it 
pays to consult our advertisements 
and make some calls. 



Readers whose letters appear in "Feed- 
back" will receive a free COMPUTE's 
PC clock radio while supplies last. Do 
you have a question about hardware or 
software? Or have you discovered 
something that could help other PC us- 
ers? If so, we want to hear from you. 
Write to COMPUTE'S Feedback. 324 
West Wendover Avenue, Suite 200. 
Greensboro, North Carolina 27408. We 
regret that we cannot provide person- 
al replies to technical questions. □ 

AUGUST 1992 COMPUTE 41 



POINT & CLICK 



Clifton Karnes 



FIVE ALIVE 



With ABC 

Flowcliarter, your 

ciiarls will 

get some respect, 

and they'll 

look so good tliat 

people might 

even read them. 



There are five Windows utili- 
ties that 1 couldn't live without. 
I use three of these constant- 
ly, so they're all but invisible to 
me, I use one of the others 
just a few times a week, and 
the last one I only use a few 
times a year. Buy they're all es- 
sential to my productivity and 
well-being. 

The first of these must- 
haves is Stacker AT/16 (Stac 
Eiectronics, 5993 Avenida 
Encinas, Carlsbad, Califor- 
nia 92008; 800-522-7822; 
$249.00). Stacker AT/16 is a 




16-bit coprocessor card and 
software driver that uses on- 
the-fly compression and de- 
compression to effectively dou- 
ble the size of your hard disk, 
it's turned my 1 10MB disk into 
a 220fv1B jumbo and made it 
easy for me to live with the 
mega sizes of most Windows 
programs. And with the 16-bit 
coprocessor version of the 
product, there's no perform- 
ance degradation. Stacker is 
completely transparent, and it 
works with all my Norton and 
PC Tools disk utilities. Stack- 
er's something of a miracle. 

Next on my list is ATIvl, the 
Adobe Type Manager (Adobe 
Systems, 1585 Charleston 
Road, P.O. Box 7900, fvtoun- 
tain View, California 94039; 
415-961-4400; $99.00). As the 
name suggests, ATfvl is a type 
manager. It uses PostScript 
fonts and prints in any point 



size for any font I have. And it 
gives me real WYSIWYG on- 
screen display for these fonts. 
Version 2.0 of this outstanding 
program uses 32-bit access in 
386-enhanced mode, and it's 
fast. A type manager is essen- 
tial if you do anything beyond 
the simplest document format- 
ling. It's true that Windows 3.1 
comes with its own font man- 
ager, TrueType, but ATM is for 
PostScript fonts, and I, like 
many others, already have a 
large investment in PostScript. 
Also, PostScript is what sen/ice 
bureaus use. ATM has turned 
my inexpensive HP LaserJet 

into a printer 

that offers most 
of the benefits 
of a PostScript 
printer. 

The last of 
the three all- 
but-invisible 
products I use 
is Software 
Workshop's 
Icon Paks (Soft- 
ware Work- 
shop, 75 South 
Mountain Way, 
Orem, Utah 84058; 800- 
762-9550; Icon Pak I, $39,95; 
Icon Pak II, $99.95; both, 
S135.95). These two packag- 
es contain beautiful, handcraft- 
ed icons for almost every imag- 
inable application. They're nat- 
urals for DOS apps, and with 
an editor that can edit icons in- 
side EXEs and DLLs (such as 
the same company's Icon 
Creator), you can actually re- 
place a Windows applica- 
tion's original icon with one 
that you like better from an 
Icon Pak. Most of the DOS 
apps on my desktop are rep- 
resented with Software Work- 
shop icons. If you get in the 
mood to redecorate your desk- 
top, these two icon collec- 
tions are the place to start. 

The essential utility that I on- 
ly use a few times a week is 
WinFax Pro (Delrina, 6830 Via 
del Oro, Suite 240, San Jose, 



California 95119; 800-268- 
6082; 119.00). This program 
is a special Windows printer 
driver that, combined with a 
supported fax modem, lets 
you send a fax by simply print- 
ing from any Windows app. 
It's a snap to use, and since 
the faxes don't have to be 
scanned before they're sent, 
the output is the highest qual- 
ity you can get with a fax. 

WinFax Pro also receives fax- 
es (with boards that support 
this option), and it offers 
scads of neat features includ- 
ing a phone book, scheduled 
calling, send and receive 
logs, and page preview. The lat- 
est version of the program sup- 
ports a very large number of 
fax modems. If you've used 
DOS fax programs, you'll be 
amazed at just how easy it re- 
ally can be, I don't fax from my 
PC every day, but when I do, 
I use WinFax Pro. 

The last utility I can't live with- 
out is one that I don't use very 
often, but when I need it, it's a 
superb performer. I'm talking 
about ABC Flowcharter (Micro- 
grafx, 1303 Arapaho. Richard- 
son, Texas 75081; 800-733- 
3729; $295.00). This program 
makes it a snap to design all 
kinds of flow charts, organiza- 
tional charts, and so on. It sup- 
ports all your fonts (it works per- 
fectly with ATM), and it has 
automatic drop shadows, intel- 
ligent connections between 
flow-charting objects, page pre- 
view, and lots of other func- 
tions that make designing 
charts quick and easy. You 
can even fax your flowcharts di- 
rectly from ABC Flowcharter 
with WinFax Pro. And the re- 
sults are stunning. You can 
use conventional drawing pro- 
grams to create a flow chart, 
but it can be a frustrating expe- 
rience. Don't try it. Get ABC 
Flowcharter and have some 
fun. Your charts will get some 
respect, and they'll look so 
good that people might even 
read them. □ 



42 COMPUTE AUGUST 1992 



We've just extended 




Now Falcon 3.0"takes you places youVe never flown before. 



Operation: Fighting Tiger "takes you on action-packed 
missions in three new Asian campaigns. Fly your F-16 
to Korea, to the Pakistan/India border, to Japan and 
the disputed Kurile Islands, where you can also fly 




Operation: Fighting Tiger requires Falcon 3.0 

For Visa/MasterCard orders call 24 hours a day, 7 days a weak: 1 -BOO-edS-GAMEfOnJers Only). 
For tochnical questions and availability call: t-510-522-1164{M-F-. 9am-5pm PST) 

Opwtuvi: FlgMhfl Tig4) amj Falcon 30 ore trM«'T!Vks and SpcdrumHatofiyUkltnflltUradtttifenuik of SpfHia. Ifk 

Circle Reader Service Number 103 



the advanced FSX, The incredible scope of Falcon 3-0 
delivers everything from Instant Action arcade excite- 
ment to plotting your own Red Flag training missions 
to engaging in a dramatically different campaign 
every time you play. The flight models and terrain are 
real. The radar and weapons are real. The enemies, 
missions and campaigns nothing less than spine- 
tingling. Joining forces with the most sophisticated 
fUght simulation of all time, Operation: Fighting Tiger 
broadens your horizons as never before. And makes 
the wild blue yonder a whole lot wilder. 

Spectrum HohByte^ 

A Division of Sphere, Inc. 2061 Challenger Drive, Alameda, CA 94501 



TIPS & TOOLS 



Edited by Richard C. Leinecker 



Read consecutive 

files with a 

single command, and 

use your precious 

hard disl( space more 

efficiently. 



Easy Viewing 

Now you can display several 
files consecutively using two 
batch files. Tfie main batch 
file is called SEE. BAT. To use 
it, type SEE and the files you 
want to view (you can use wild- 
cards in your file list). The 
SEE. BAT file calls a second 
batch file named SEE_TYPE 
.BAT to type the file. 

©ECHO OFF 

IF (%1)==() GOTO ERROR 

:BEGIN 

FDR %%F IN (%1) DO CALL 

SEE_TYPE%%F 
ECHO" 
SHIFT 

IF(%1)=()G0T0END 
GOTO BEGIN 
:ERROR 

ECHO Usage: SEE <file> 
ECHO" 
ECHO You can specify as many 

files as you want and use 

wildcards, too. 
:END 

The second part of tlie sys- 
tem is SEE^TYPE.BAT 

©ECHO OFF 

ECHO %1 > TEMP.$$$ 

ECHO » TEMP.SSS 

TYPE %1 » TEMP.SSS 

TYPE TEMP.SSS I IVIORE 

DEL TEIVIP.$$$ 

ECHO" 

PAUSE 

The character before the 
MORE command in line 5 is 
the vertical bar. 

GIAMPAOLO LADOMATO 
SCOTTSDALE. AZ 

Conserving Disk Space 

If you don't mind a short wait 
while running some pro- 
grams, you can save as 
much as 50 percent of your 
drive space with a batch file, 
PKZIP. and PKUNZIP 

Every time you run a pro- 
gram using this method, 
there'll be a delay. The 
amount of delay depends up- 
on the size of the program 



and its support files. For exam- 
ple, 3fvlB will usually decom- 
press in about ten seconds. 

First, make sure you have 
a copy of PKZIP and PKUN- 
ZIP in your path. Then, create 
a directory called ARCHIVES. 
Next, use PKZIP to compress 
each directory into a single 
file, copy the ZIP tiles to the 
ARCHIVES directory, and de- 
lete the contents of the direc- 
tories of the files you just com- 
pressed, You should also re- 
move the directories. 

Here is an example batch 
file. The routines :SQ, ;XY. 
and :TP decompress and run 
Space Quest IV, XyWrite, and 
TurboPaint, respectively 

©ECHO OFF 

IF (%1) = (} GOTO ERROR 

IF "%1" = "SO" GOTO SQ 

IF "%1" == "sq" GOTO SQ 

IF "%1" == "XY" GOTO XY 

IF "%r == "xy" GOTO XY 

IF "%1" = "TP" GOTO TP 

IF"%1"=="tp" GOTOTP 

GOTO NOTFOUNO 

:SQ 

CD\ 

MO SIERRA 

CD SIERRA 

IVIDSQ4 

CDSQ4 

PKUNZIP C:\ARCHI\/ES\SQA.ZIP 

SQ4 

CD \SIERRA\SQ4 

ECHO Y I DEL*.* 

REM The cfiaracter before DEL is 

the vertical bar. 
CD .. 
RDS04 

ECHO Y I DEL *.* 
REM The character before DEL is 

the vertical bar. 
CO.. 

RD SIERRA 
GOTO END 
:XY 
CD\ 
IVIDXY 
CDXY 

PKUNZIP C:\ARCHIVES\XYA.ZIP 
EDITOR 
CD\XY 

DEL C:\ARCHIVES\XYA.ZIP 
PKZIP C:\ARCHIVES\XYA.ZIP *.* 



ECHO Y I DEL*.* 
CD .. 
RDXY 
GOTO END 
TP 
CD\ 

MD TPAINT 
CD TPAINT 

PKUNZIP C:\ARCHIVES\TPA.ZIP 
TPAINT 
CD \TPA1NT 

DEL C:\ARCH1VES\TPA.ZIP 
PKZIP C:\ARCHIVES\TPA.ZIP *.* 
ECHO Y IDEL'.* 
CD .. 
RD TPAINT 
GOTO END 
:NOTFOUND 

ECHO Incorrect specification. 
GOTO :VALIDARG 
:ERROR 

ECHO Usage: USEPACK <com- 
pressed archive name> 
:VALIDARGS 

ECHO Type SQ for Space Quest IV. 
ECHO Type XY for XyWrite. 
ECHO Type TP lor TurboPaint. 
:END 

GORDON B. NEWSTROM 
LAKEWOOD. CA 

Copy from Drive to Drive 

Copying files from one floppy 
disk to another is easy 
enough, unless you're using 
the same drive. When I need 
to copy several files from one 
3y2-inch disk to another, it 
takes several steps. I copy the 
files from the source disk into 
the temporary directory Then, 
I swap disks and copy the 
files to the destination drive. 

You can avoid this hassle 
by using DOS's DRIVER.SYS. 
Here's how you load it in your 
CONFIG.SYS file for the four 
floppy disk types. 

Low-density 5V4-inch drives: 

DEV!CE=C:\DOS\DRIVER 
.SYS/d:0/(:0/h:2/s:9/<:4D 

High-density 5y4-inch drives: 

DEUICE=C:\DOS\DRIVER 
.SYS/it:0/l:1/li;2/s:15;1:80 



44 COMPUTE AUGUST 1992 




i 


U- 


m 


W' 



gfflHtfiiia 




SIMUlATlONt 



Up against enemy fighters and aces, you'll intercept bombers, d» 
bomb enemy carriers, launch ground attacks to cripple the enem^r- 
bases and experience the terror and exhilaration of carrier landingS_ 



iuigle with tcgendaiy aces such as Greg i 
merica's hi^est-ranking age, Richard Bon_ 



, Htroyoshi Nishazawa and 



''■" '" — ■" 'ousiy researched vintage aircraft, l!l^dlR|} lUf JI6M Zero, die F4U 

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* Fly for cither America or japan, experiencing the sights and sounds of iir combat in the 
Pacific: (.una deck landings and lake-oft's, torpedo dive bombingiinjd-air explosions and 
billowingdoid^imoKc. v 

♦ Play a quick sin^ mission or enlist for the raU (our bcrweeu 



* A powerfol Mission Rccoidcr lets you save an enti, 
""■*-» the simulation at any point to begin playing a 



; magnificent 240 page manuatf 
l^oios, war maps, pilot profiles, 
aircraft illustrations. 



verviewofthew'ar, 
25 color pages of 




ofdlt '90'ifor Fli^il Simulation. " 
Sf«^^3am, Simnktiam!" Magazine 

"Aces of the Pacific is to Red Baren what the Corsair 

mtt "• li" Poller Tri-Plaite" 

'«; WorU 



-r PtsrCF Tilt 5lFBRftFSMlir 



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For ordmng intornution. visit your favcvritf sotrivarc More or cill SiLrr.i Oii-I iiie ,ii l-K(l(>-326-(i(i'ii. (luisidt thf U.S.. till 209-68.1-4468. 

Circle Reader Service Number 224 



#003.^4 



TIPS & TOOLS 



Copy files from 

disk to disk 

on a single drive, and 

access 2S6-color 

l*CX graptiics files 

from BASIC. 



Low-density SVa-inch drives: 

DEVICE=C:\DOS\DRIVER 
.SYS /d:0 /f:2 /h:2 /s:9 ^■M 

Higli-density 3y2-inch drives: 

DEVICE=C:\DOS\DRIVER 
.SYS/tl:0/t:7/h:2/s:18yl:8D 

The /d:0 sw/itch specifies the 
device number. For drive A 
it's /d:0; for drive B it's /d:1. 
DRIVER. SYS uses the next 
empty logical drive it finds for 
DRIVER. SYS. If I load it for 
drive A on my system, drive D 
becomes the logical equiva- 
lent of drive A, The first time I 
call for a directory of drive D, 
DOS gives me the prompt In- 
sert diskette for drive D: and 
press ar)y f<:ey wiien ready. 
DOS uses my first drive as 
drive D until I access A. 
When that happens, I will see 
the prompt Insert diskette for 
drive A: and press any key 
when ready 

If I add another DRIV- 
ER. SYS in my CONFIG.SYS 
file for the second drive, it be- 
comes drive E. Don't worry if 
you've already got a drive D; 
the system will keep looking 
until it finds a logical drive 
that's available. DOS defaults 
to five available drives: A-E. If 
you plan to use a disk drive be- 
yond drive E, you'll have to 
add a line to your CON- 
FIG.SYS file (before you load 
DRIVER. SYS) that tells DOS 
the last drive you'll be using. 
If, for instance, drive H is the 
last drive you need, you'll 
have to add the line LAST- 
DRIVE=H. 

Now you can use the 
COPY command without the 
need for a temporary directo- 
ry on your hard drive. If I want- 
ed to copy ali EXE files from 
one disk to another, I would 
type COPY A:*. EXE D:-.EXE. 
I'd be prompted for the appro- 
priate times to swap disks. 

MIKE CHATEL 
WALLACEBURG, ON 



BASIC PCX Files 

This program loads a PCX 
file in BASIC. It works only for 
320 X 200 256-color MCGA 
pictures. You'll have to make 
changes for other picture 
types and video modes. 

The major points of the 
PCX file format are the 128- 
byte header, the picture data, 
a single byte indicating that a 
palette follows (in MCGA and 
Super VGA), and a 768-byte 
palette. 

The picture data uses a sim- 
ple encoding system called 
run length encoding. There 
are two signals you get when 
decoding a PCX file: single 
bytes and repeating bytes. 

If the highest two bits of a 
byte are set, then the lowest 
six bits contain the number of 
repetitions of a repeat se- 
quence, The next byte in the 
file is the data that's put into 
screen memory multiple times. 
Othenwise, each byte is a sin- 
gle bit of data that goes direct- 
ly into screen memory. 

After the picture data, 
MCGA or Super VGA has a 
single byte followed by 768 
bytes of palette data. 

You should be aware that 
PCX pictures can contain im- 
ages that are smaller or larg- 
er than the visual screen. For 
these you'll have to examine 
the 128-byte header and ad- 
just the code. 

I'm opening a file called 
TESTPCX. Change this to 
match your filename. 

REM PT will count the 

pokes into screen memory until 

we get to 64000. 
PT=0 

a$ ^ SPACES(128) 
DEF SEG = &HA0OO 
REM Open the file TEST.PCX. 
OPEN "TEST.PCX" FOR 

BINARY AS #1 

REM Get tlie lieader (126 liytes). 
GET#1, ,a$ 
REM Set a$ to a length of 1 so we 

can read one byte at a time. 
a$ = " " 



REM Set MCGA mode. 
SCREEN 13 
WHILE PT < 64000 
GET#1, , a$ 
CT% = ASC(a$) 
IF (CT% AND 19Z) <> 

192 THEN 
POKE PT CT% 
PT = PT + 1 
ELSE 

CT% = (CT% AND 63) 
REM Gel the byte to repeat. 
GET#1, , a$ 
DAT% = ASC(a$) 
WHILE CT% AND (PT < 64000) 
CT% = CT% - 1 
REM Poke data into memory. 
POKE PT DAT7o 
PT = PT + 1 
WEND 
END IF 
WEND 
REM Get the byte that tells us a 

palette fallows. It should 

be 192. 
GET#1, ,a$ 
REM Tell the hardware to start 

with palette register 0. 
OUT &H3C8, 
REM Read and set 768 palette 

registers. 

FOR 1% = 1 TO 768 
GET #1 , , aS 
OUT &H3Cg, ASC(a$) 
NEXT 1% 
CLOSE #1 
a$ = "" 
WHILE 3$ = "": a$ 

= INKEY$: WEND 
SCREEN 
WIDTH 80 



RICHARD C, LEINECKER 
MIAMI, FL 



If you have an interesting tip 
that you think would help oth- 
er PC users, send it along 
with your name, address, and 
Social Security number to 
COMPUTE'S Tips & Tools. 
324 West Wendover Avenue, 
Suite 200, Greensboro, North 
Carolina 27408. For each tip 
we publish, we 'II pay you $25- 
$50 and send you a COM- 
PUTE'S PC clock radio while 
supplies last. D 



46 COMPUTE AUGUST 1992 




Take the Carl Lewis Challenge and select, manage, train and control a team of athletes in their all-out attempts to win 
gold in Javelin. 100m Sprint, 110m Hurdles, High Jump and Long Jump. 

*''J*'^/^'*''"'/^^f , , ,_, , ,^, , Follow in Carl Lewis' footsteps and go for gold I 

• Digitized animation of real world class athletes, r n s 

• Up to four player simultaneous action, each managing 
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• 256 Color VGA ^r y pevrMnQiQ 

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• Up to five different control options. ^d Telephone: (617) 731-3553 i 

• Adiib, PC Speaker and Soundblaster sound support. ^SmnoL Pax: (617) 731-8379 I 




mS^^ 



COMPUTE/NET 



Troy Tucker 



As technology 

Improves, so do the 

benefits of online 

services. Vbu may be 

amazed at wliat 

the fubire holds for 

this up-ctose 

and personal area 

of computing. 



GROWING BY 
LEAPS AND 
BOUNDS 

Electronic publishing is fast be- 
coming a commonplace in our 
tijgh-tech world of computers. 
Many popular publications, 
such as COfvlPUTE, have 
turned to this emerging medi- 
um to broaden their coverage. 

Progress has been relative- 
ly slow in past years because 
the technology wasn't in 
place and because people sim- 
ply didn't think of modems as 
necessary computer peripher- 
als. But things have changed. 
Now, with high-speed data 
communications and ad- 
vanced computer hardware, 
anyone can quickly connect 
to thousands of popular publi- 
cations and databases. 
Where will this new technolo- 
gy take us? We've already 
heard metaphors like "global 
village" and "electronic mall." 
As the online world expands, 
it will bring everyone closer. I 
think we've only scratched the 
surface. 

Video telephony and multi- 
media technology could easi- 
ly become parts of online sen/- 
ices. Imagine interactive video- 
games featuring high-resolu- 
tion graphics and digitized 
sounds being transmitted via 
modem or perhaps a slick 
chat line that allows you to 
view the person on the other 
end — in realtime! These ideas 
aren't as farfetched as they 
sound. Video telephones are 
already in place in Europe. In- 
teractive online videogames 
are also in operation. Both, 
though in early stages of de- 
velopment, could mark the be- 
ginning of things to come. 
Who knows what to expect 
from online services in the fu- 
ture? You can bet that whatev- 
er comes along, COMPUTE 
will be in the thick of it. 

This month on COMPUTE/ 



NET we're featuring a large va- 
riety of programs in our soft- 
ware library. You'll find every- 
thing from games to virus 
checkers. Here's what to look 
for in the New Uploads library: 
Directory Master, Quick Type, 
Skullduggery MathMagic. Fast- 
buffer, Flu Shot. PC-KWIK, 
and Cshow. All of these pro- 
grams have been pretested. 
Some of the programs are 
shareware, so ) ask that you 
please honor the hardworking 
developers by paying the reg- 
istration fees. 

To find these programs, log 
on to GEnie or America On- 
line, Use the menus or type 
the keyword COMPUTElo get 
to the COMPUTE/NET area. 
Once in COMPUTE/NET en- 
ter the software library (it's 
called Files from COMPUTE 
on America Online). From 
there, enter the New Uploads 
area. If you have trouble find- 
ing the programs, please 
drop me a line, and I'll be 
glad to help you. 

For all you power users, we 
have a healthy collection of pro- 
grams that will add muscle to 
your computing. First up is Di- 
rectory Master. This full-fea- 
tured DOS shell ailows you to 
customize an interface that in- 
cludes 30 programmable 
keys. You can access com- 
mands such as COPY, MOVE, 
and DELETE with a single key- 
stroke or program hot keys to 
perform multiple operations. 

Next, if you're tired of wait- 
ing for slow key repeats, then 
we have just the remedy Fast- 
buffer speeds up key-repeat 
rates and saves your monitor 
from burnout with a screen 
blanker. This memory-resident 
program comes complete 
with source code. While you're 
at it, you may want to speed 
up your hard drive, too. PC- 
KWIK is a transparent pro- 
gram that turbocharges file ac- 
cess by keeping frequently 
used files in memory, wfiich re- 
sults in fewer delays. 



If you're in the market for ed- 
ucational programs, look no fur- 
ther Quick Type is a valuable 
tool for those who are all 
thumbs when it comes to typ- 
ing. Unique graphics entertain 
you while you Improve your typ- 
ing skills. Varying levels pro- 
vide a challenge for all typists. 
Are you a little rusty on your 
math? Try MathMagic. This pro- 
gram tests your mathematical 
abilities with four educational 
games: MathCatch, MathRun, 
MathLander, and MathShoot. 
They'll hone your skills in addi- 
tion, subtraction, multiplica- 
tion, and division. 

Looking for a new way to 
view all our popular online 
graphics files? Cshow is just 
the ticket. This high-quality 
GIF viewer will show pictures 
in Hercules. CGA, EGA, and 
VGA graphic modes. Cshow 
automatically adjusts to use 
the graphics card that you 
have installed. 1 use this pro- 
gram all the time — it's great! 

Looking for mystery and ad- 
venture? Skullduggery is a 
game of intrigue that provides 
hours of brain-teasing entertain- 
ment. Look for clues in various 
text-based maps and dia- 
grams, and then solve the 
puzzles that reveal the secret 
of Skullduggery, 

Last but not least, we have 
a superb virus-checker pro- 
gram for you. Ward off comput- 
er viruses and the anxiety 
they cause with Flu Shot, It 
checks hard drives for uninvit- 
ed code. Just add a line to 
your AUTOEXEC.BAT file, and 
you're protected. Suspected vi- 
ruses are reported not only at 
boot-up but also while the pro- 
gram is running. 

If you have any questions or 
comments about COMPUTE/ 
NET, you can write to me here 
at COMPUTE in Greensboro 
or send E-mail to me on GE- 
nie, address TROYGT, or on 
America Online, screen name 
TROY GT (that's with a zero). 
See you online! D 



A8 COMPUTE AUGUST 1992 



Serious About CoMPunNG? 

Try America's Most Exciting 

Online Shwice-Fur Free! 



Get Tie Utest From COMPUTE/NET 
ON Ameriu Online. 

Sign on to America Online and use keyword COMPUTE froo^P^^A^!^— -- 

to reach COMPUTE/NET, the online service from 

COMPUTE magazine. COMPUTE/NET brings you art and 

software featured in the pages of the magazine, a product 

ordering area where you can purchase COMPUTE books, 

a customer service bulletin board, and much more. And 

the COMPUTE/NET software libraries are full of new 

uploads! There's also a program submission area where 

you can contribute your own public-domain software to 

the COMPUTE/NET software libraries. 



In addition to COMPUTE/NET, America Online has 
hundreds of other offerings that make it everything an 
online service was meant to be. Download from a 
selection of more than 45,000 programs — all carefully 
reviewed for quality and thoroughly tested. Get fast 
answers about software from the experts, and participate 
in live conferences and message boards specializing in 
games, graphics, educational programs, business and 
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Easy To Use, Vet Powerfol 

The award-winning PC/GEOS* graphical interface lets 
anyone — novice or pro — discover America Online's 
many services with just a point and a click. There are no 
puzzling prompts or commands to get in the way. 

Get resume advice and career counseling. Manage your 
investments. Get the latest news and wqather. Get 
homework help for the kids and use a searchable, up-to- 
date encyclopedia. Join special interest groups and 
clubs. Save time and money shopping. Find and book 
the lowest airfares. Entertain yourself with multiplayer 
games, quizzes, movie and book reviews, horoscopes, 
soap opera news, and much more. 



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There-5 soBieWirg 



Microsoft* 



find "i-l '>"'",""■'' 



11 Cflnle'" 



B«t Is"*' 



BooM 
Online 









See whaf s available, 

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I Free Software! Free Online Time! 

n YES! Send me the free software and trial 
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further obligation. 




NAME 


ADDRESS 


CIT>- 


STATE 
( ) 


ZIP 



HOME PHONE 



Computer Type and Disk Size: 

DOS Compatible* Apple 

ns.2S Da.S D Macintosh 

*The DOS-compatible version of America Online requires 512K RAM memory, 
J Hercules or KGA mnnilor or higher, a hard drive, and a mouse. 

1-800-827-6364, EXT. 5908 

Clip and mail to: 

America Online 

8619 Westwood Center Drive 

Vienna, VA 22182 59084C 



INTRODOS 



Tony Roberts 



BIgger's not always 

better. There 

are advantages to 

breaking up 

hard disk space. 



ORGANIZE YOUR 
DISK WITH FDISK 

DOS's FDISK is the utility 
that's used to examine and 
change hard disk partition in- 
formation. FDISK doesn't get 
the kind of everyday use that 
commands like DIR and TYPE 
get, but it has its purposes. 

In earlier versions, DOS 
was able to access only hard 
disk partitions of 32 mega- 
bytes or less in size. DOS 4.01 
and DOS 5.0 have eliminated 
that barrier, permitting hun- 
dreds of megabytes of hard 
disk storage in a single 
partition. 

Although this appears to be 
an advantage, there are good 
reasons for breaking a large 
hard disk into smaller seg- 
ments. You may want to isolate 
game files from business files, 
or Bob's files from Mary's. If you 
have a large hard disk that 
needs partitioning — or a parti- 
tioned hard disk that you'd like 
reorganized — FDISK is the tool 
to use. 

First, be warned that FDISK 
is a powerful utility. It's de- 
signed to give you a olean 
siate — to wipe out everything 
on your hard disk. Before you 
undertake any FDISK experi- 
mentation, make sure you 
have a full and verified back- 
up of all your hard disk's data. 

Also, make sure you have 
plenty of time. Repartitioning a 
hard disk requires backing up 
the data, repartitioning, format- 
ting the new partitions, and 
then restoring all the data. 

FDISK is careful, though, 
about not destroying informa- 
tion without demanding your 
confirmation. You can run 
FDISK and display partition in- 
formation, for example, with- 
out being concerned about 
wiping out your disk. 

Let's say that you want to par- 
tition your hard disk into three 
logical drives — C:, D:, and E:. 
Make your backups and create 



a boot-up disk that includes the 
operating system files as well 
as FORMAT, FDISK. CHKDSK. 
and whatever programs you'll 
need to restore your backups. 
Then run FDISK. 

Let's assume that we have 
a 100-megabyte disk that 
needs to be partitioned into 
these areas: 50 megabytes for 
C:, 25 megabytes for D:, and 
25 megabytes for E:. Start by 
selecting the Delete option to 
remove the current partitions. 
This will render the data on 
your hard disk useless, so dou- 
ble-check those backups. 

Once all the partitions are 
deleted, choose the option to 
create a primary DOS parti- 
tion. This is the partition that 
will contain your DOS startup 
files — your boot drive. When 
you're asked whether this par- 
tition should be made the max- 
imum possible size, answer 
no. Select a 50-megabyte par- 
tition. The partition you've just 
created will be known as drive 
C:, the name given to the pri- 
mary partition on the first hard 
disk in any system. 

Follow the FDISK menu se- 
lections to create an extended 
DOS partition. FDISK will sug- 
gest using all of the remaining 
space for the extended parti- 
tion, and you should agree. 
Even though you're going to 
create two more logical 
drives, you're permitted to cre- 
ate only one extended DOS 
partition per drive. 

Once the extended DOS par- 
tition is created, you can 
choose the option to create log- 
ical drives. You can have as 
many as 23 logical drives, but 
all the logical drives you cre- 
ate will exist within the one ex- 
tended DOS partition. Specify 
sizes for the logical drives, 
and FDISK will assign a drive 
letter in sequence to each log- 
ical drive you create. 

Once the disk is parti- 
tioned, there's one final step to 
take. You must use option 2 
from the main FDISK menu — 



Set Active Partition — to make 
your primary DOS partition ac- 
tive. This is crucial; without it, 
you won't be able to boot from 
the hard disk. 

When all the changes are 
made, exit FDISK, restart the 
system from the startup floppy 
and reformat each of your new 
drives. Use the FORMAT com- 
mand with the system switch 
(FORMAT G: IS) to copy the sys- 
tem files to the C: drive and to 
make it bootable. Then format 
the other drives normally. 

After formatting, restore 
your programs and data files 
from the backups, and you're 
in business. If you add a sec- 
ond hard drive to your system, 
be prepared for some confu- 
sion with logical drive names 
on your first hard disk's extend- 
ed DOS partition. 

As I mentioned earlier, the 
primary DOS partition on the 
first hard disk is always desig- 
nated with the C: label. Simi- 
larly a primary DOS partition 
on a second hard disk is al- 
ways designated with the D: la- 
bel. If your first hard disk orig- 
inally included logical drives 
D; and E:, those designators 
will be changed to E: and F: 
when the D: designator is as- 
signed to the primary DOS par- 
tition on the second drive. 

This change in d rive desig nat- 
ors will cause you to rework any 
batch files, scripts, or program 
startup icons that refer to the 
original names. 

You can avoid this problem 
of logical drive name switching 
by not creating a primary DOS 
partition on the second hard 
disk. Just create an extended 
DOS partition and fill it up with 
as many logical drives as you 
want. These new storage areas 
will be given names that follow 
the names of the logical drives 
on the first hard disk. 

It isn't easy to repartition a 
hard drive. It's worth doing if 
the resulting setup will make it 
easier for you to do your work 
or protect your data. □ 



50 COMPUTE AUGUST 1992 



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ENTERTAINMENT . SOFTWARE 
®t992 MieraProse Software, Inc. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. 

1-800-879-PLAY 

CIrcIs Raader Sarvica Number 212 



HARDWARE CLINIC 



Mark Minasi 



How data 

compression, faster 

protocols, and 

the 16550 UART chip 

can affect your 

online communications 



HOW MODEMS 
WORK, PART 3 

For the last two months, we've 
looked at some of the things 
we need to know in order to 
get the fastest, most reliable 
file transfers out of our existing 
modems. This month, I want to 
wrap up the topic of improved 
protocols, talk about setting mo- 
dems and software to handle 
varying error climates, and 
look at modems that are inex- 
pensive and fast. 

We saw last month that a 
checksum is calculated for eve- 
ry block of data sent via 
XMODEM. The receiver uses 
that checksum to ensure that 
the data in the block was trans- 
mitted without damage from 
phone noise. The checksum's 
a good tool, but there are 
some cases where line noise 
could change two bits in a 128- 
byte message but the noise 
wouldn't be detected by the 
checksum procedure on the re- 
ceiver side. While such a 
thing is unlikely, it's still too like- 
ly for my taste. The checksum 
is only 99 percent effective — 
that is, it only detects line 
noise in 99 percent of the cas- 
es where it occurs. Most mod- 
ern protocols don't use check- 
sum but instead employ a 
more complex mathematical 
function called a cyclical redun- 
dancy check (CRC). which is 
99.9926 percent effective. 

It would often be nice to 
use a wildcard character 
when transferring data. Unfor- 
tunately, with XMODEM you 
have to specify each file, one 
by one. YMODEM Batch and 
ZMODEM are among the new- 
er protocols that offer batch 
transfer. I particularly like 
ZMODEM; it lets me specify a 
list of files and then asks if it 
should hang up after the trans- 
fer. I then walk away for a 
while, return, and find that 
ZMODEM has transferred all 
of the files for me. 



Even more amazing, if 
ZMODEM detects that one of 
the files was only partially trans- 
ferred, perhaps because I 
was disconnected in midtrans- 
fer during my last transfer ses- 
sion, ZMODEM will actually 
pick up where it previously left 
off! Late at night, when phone 
charges are at their lowest, I 
can queue up several mega- 
bytes for transfer and go off to 
bed without worrying about 
staying connected all night. 
Along the same lines, 
XMODEM requires that you 
specify twice the name of the 
file you want to transfer — 
once for the sender and once 
for the receiver, YMODEM and 
later protocols transfer not on- 
ly the file but also the filename. 
All you need to do is to tell 
your communications soft- 
ware to receive the file, and 
it gets the filename from 
the sending BBS. 

Squeezing tlie Last Bit 

There are many data-compres- 
sion techniques in use these 
days; the most popular are 
the ones used by the PKZIP, 
ARC, PAK, and LHARC pro- 
grams. If you've ever pulled a 
file off a computer bulletin 
board system (BBS), it proba- 
bly had a ZIP. ARC, PAK, or 
LZH extension, requiring that 
you have the appropriate 
decompressing program. 

The idea with file-compres- 
sion programs is simple: The 
more time required to do a 
file transfer, the more the trans- 
fer costs, whether from Com- 
puServe charges, long dis- 
tance charges, or whatever. 
File-compression programs 
can often compress files to 
one-tenth of their original 
size, so a 1 MB file would com- 
press to a 100K file. 

That's why many of today's 
modems include the ability to 
compress and uncompress da- 
ta on the fly. With such a sys- 
tem, you'd never have to both- 
er with the whole compres- 



sion and decompression proc- 
ess; you'd just leave bloated, 
uncompressed files on your 
BBS and let the modems han- 
dle the compression. You'll re- 
call from last month that two 
terms stand out in the error- 
correction area: MNP, for Mi- 
crocom Networking Protocol, 
and V.42, an international stan- 
dard. Both standards have 
been augmented to include 
data compression in addition 
to error correction. MNP's Lev- 
el 5 includes data compres- 
sion, as does V.42 bis, These 
days, many modems come 
with these features. 

If you download images 
from bulletin boards, you've 
probably heard of GIF (Graph- 
ic Interchange Format). GIF 
files don't benefit from mo- 
dem compression, because 
GIF files are already 
compressed. 

Since Zip ARC, PAK, LZH, 
and GIF files are in formats 
that don't lend themselves to 
further compression with nor- 
mal compression techniques, 
it should be obvious that mo- 
dems with built-in compres- 
sion capabilities are of very lit- 
tle value to most of us. Not 
only are they of little value, 
but they're often downright 
undesirable, since modems 
with built-in compression can 
waste time trying to compress 
uncompressible data, slowing 
down file transfers. Given 
that ZIPs and GIFs are what 
most of us are downloading, 
look for a modem with the abil- 
ity to turn off compression. 

Communications Coprocessor 

An inexpensive chip that can 
increase the speed of your 
file transfers has been around 
for years. Called the 16550, 
it's a member of the class of 
chips called UARTs (Univer- 
sal Asynchronous Receiver/ 
Transmitters). A UART is the 
heart of any serial port. If 
you're curious, pop the top on 
your PC and pull out the 



52 COMPUTE AUGUST 1992 



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ns 1942. Setting for a series of ngyal confrontaB^Jhet would 
crronge the course of World War W: And the setting for the first iri a new - •-■_,- 
series of spectacular Pacific War simulations from MicroPros©. 



Task Force 1942 is your chance to command a fleet of destroyei^lg^*"" 
cruisers, and battleships against aggressive enemy fotces in thp>.: ..^ "— '• 

South Pacific, •*».r^''^ ■ • - 

"i* _ 
No detail has been overlooked in this painstakingly researcf 

simulation. Torpedo wakes. Thrilling night combat. Blinding e 
Flares. Even harsh weather conditions. All presented in 
breathtaking realism. '" * 

Issue commonds to ships and convoys. Fire torpedos into enemy 

backsides. Control crucial battle positions. Shell enemy targets. 

Confront enemy ships head-on. And, if you choose, lead the Japanese forces into battle, .'li. 

Task Force 1942 from MicroProse. it's the on/y way to experience the thrills. ..and risks.. .of naval 
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I BO Lokeffoni Drive, riunl Valley. Moryland 21030-2245. 

«D 1992 MIcroPfose Softwore, Inc. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED, 

For IBM-PC/Tondy/compQtibl ■■" --^"" 



Orcle Reader Service Number 224 



':s^mssm^- 



HARDWARE CLINIC 



Given the 

cholGB, let the 

modem do 

the eiTor checking. 



board that has your serial 
port on it, (Some computers 
may have the serial-port elec- 
tronics right on the comput- 
er's motherboard.) You'li prob- 
ably see a large 40-pin chip 
on the board. Look for the 
numbers 8250, 16450, or 
16550. They may be 
wrapped up in some other 
characters, such as 
INS8250AP or the like. 

The 8250 was the original 
UART used in PCs and XTs. It 
was fine for communications 
up to 2400 bps, but it 
couldn't keep up with faster 
computers and communica- 
tions. So the 16450 was devel- 
oped, and it's fairly prominent 
on the serial ports of comput- 
ers in the 286 and higher 
class. A complete internal re- 
design makes it up to ten 
times faster than the 8250 for 
some applications. Part of 
that speed comes from a one- 
byte buffer that makes life eas- 
ier for multitasking systems. 
Mul!itaskers like buffers be- 
cause serial devices need 
nearly constant attention or da- 
ta gets lost. Buffers hold the 
data for a few extra millisec- 
onds, making the process of 
juggling tasks a bit simpler. 
OS/2, in fact, insists on 16450 
UARTs, and serial ports with 
8250s aren't recognized at 
all. Fortunately, the 8250 and 
16450 are pin compatible, so 
I've been able to convert a 
number of old parallel/serial 
cards to OS/2 compatibility 
by just swapping a single 
chip. The task is further simpli- 
fied by the happy fact 
that many UARTs are sock- 
eted, removing the need for 
soldering. 

OS/2 wor!<s well with the 
16450 because it has to deal 
only with well-behaved pro- 
grams that were designed to 
be multitasked. Unfortunately, 
DOS multitaskers such as 
DESQview and Windows 
don't have that luxury. It can 
take so much time to swap 



multiple DOS applications 
that background communica- 
tions can be a real pain under 
most DOS multitaskers; in 
fact, I use background file 
transfers as one of nny basic 
tests of DOS multitaskers. 
There's where the 16550 
comes in. The next member 
of the UART family, it includes 
a 16-byte buffer that turns out 
to be just perfect for commu- 
nicating with DOS multi- 
taskers. It even smooths out 
file transfers at 9600+ bps for 
slower PCs. And, best of all, 
it's pin compatible with its old- 
er siblings, the 8250 and the 
16450, so you can upgrade 
easily if your current UART 
is socketed. And you'll 
need just one more thing: 
a program to turn on 
the 16550. Some applica- 
tions do that automatically, 
but just to be sure, you can 
grab a program called 16550 
off CompuServe. 

But all isn't good news 
here. You'd think that a multi- 
tasking platform such as Win- 
dows would benefit from the 
16550 and would use it if pre- 
sent. To the contrary, Win- 
dows will likely lock up if your 
16550 buffers are enabled. 
The Windows COfvlM.DRV 
and virtual driver "combuff 
must be rewritten in order to 
use the 16550; Microsoft 
says it will take care of this "in 
a future release of Windows." 

Ups for Maximum Transfers 

Assuming you have a fast 
computer and 9600-bps or 
faster modem, how do you 
squeeze the maximum file- 
transfer rate out of your sys- 
tem? First and foremost, 
choose a protocol that allows 
large block sizes, as that will 
net the greatest transfer rate. 
Make sure only one part of 
the system handles error 
checking: either the modem 
or the protocol. That means ei- 
ther diving into your modem 
manual to find the code to 



turn error checking off or leav- 
ing the modem alone and find- 
ing and using a protocol that 
won't try to do error checking. 
The preferred protocol here 
from my experience is 
YfvlODEM-G. The G is the im- 
portant part; regular old 
YMODEM does error check- 
ing. Given the choice, let the 
modem do the error check- 
ing. It's faster, more robust in 
the case of noisy lines, and 
more thorough in its discov- 
ery of transmission errors. The 
main problem is finding a host 
that supports YMODEM-G. 

Install a 16550 if you can, 
or think about replacing your 
current parallel/serial board 
with one that sports the new- 
er chips. You won't see a dif- 
ference with a 16550 unless 
you're multitasking, transfer- 
ring data at 9600+ bps, or 
both. 

And whenever possible, 
use C0rvl2 rather than C0M1 . 
Why? You'll get a slightly bet- 
ter response from COM2 be- 
cause it's driven off interrupt 
3 (so is COM4, so you could 
alternatively use COM4), 
whereas C0M1 and COM3 
are driven by interrupt 4. The 
interrupts in the PC are priori- 
tized, meaning the items with 
the lower interrupts get high- 
er priority. Assuming your PC 
is monitoring both C0M1 and 
COM2 — if, for example, you 
had a serial mouse on one 
COM port and a modem on 
the other — you'd do better to 
put the mouse on C0M1 and 
the modem on COM2. 

If you're using Windows, 
that's the preferred arrange- 
ment anyway, since Windows 
deals best with communica- 
tions ports when it sees them 
in order. It sees the mouse 
first, so put that on C0M1. 
Then it sees the modem on 
COM2 whenever you get 
around to starting up the com- 
munications application. And 
remember to turn off compres- 
sion in most cases. □ 



54 COMPUTE AUGUST 1992 



Become a legend before 
your own time. 




what becomes a legend most? Find out for yourself as 
you pilot the legendary B-T7 Flying Fortress and lead a 
1 0-man crew through the same flak-infested skies that 
menaced the legendary flyboys of the Memphis Belle. 

The most complete and accurate bomber simulation 
ever produced, the B-1 7 Flying Fortress will have you 
negotiating 25 perilous daylight missions over Nazi- 
occupied Europe. 

You'll allocate crew members to their specific tasks. 
You'll devastate strategic targets in dangerous bombing 
runs. You'll take control of crew positions from pilot to 
bombardier. And you'll even customize your own Flying 
Fortress with histoncally accurate nose art. 

So pick up your copy of B-1 7 Flying Fortress today. And 
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For IBM PC compatibles! 

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call1-800-879.PLAY 

© 1992 MicroProse Software, inc. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. 



Circle Reader Service Numbw 225 



55 



PROGRAMMING POWER 



Tom Campbell 



Vdu can create 

complex itata- 

validation procedures 

and filters without 

any programmins at all. 



56 COMPUTE 



DEVELOPMENT 
ENVIRONMENTS 
FOR WINDOWS 

This month we'll walk through a 
couple of significant Borland 
products, Borland C++ & Ap- 
plication Frameworks 3.0 and 
ObjectVision 2.0. Each will prob- 
ably have a column of its own in 
the future, as each has a wildly 
divergent means of creating 
applications. 

Because there's so much to 
cover, this column won't have 
any code this month. Check 
out COf^PUTE/NET anyway be- 
cause I've uploaded the 
source code to a number of util- 
ities 1 use constantly. 

Borland pulverized its com- 
petition when it entered the 
C++ market last year, simulta- 
neously legitimizing what 
was — hard as it is to believe 
now — an uncertain future for 
that language. The company's 
flagship product is now 
Borland C++ & Application 
Frameworks 3.0, a gigantic de- 
velopment system for both 
DOS and Windows. It includes 
the latest version of Turbo De- 
bugger, Turbo Assembler, Tur- 
bo Profiler, a C compiler, a 
C++ compiler, integrated en- 
vironments for both DOS and 
Windows (finally), the Turbo Vi- 
sion (for DOS} and ObjectWin- 
dows (for Windows) develop- 
ment libraries, the Whitewater 
Resource Toolkit, a Windows 
help compiler, a G++ contain- 
er class library, support for 
C++ version 2.1 including 
some proposed extensions (no- 
tably templates), a ton of utili- 
ties, and the best example pro- 
grams in the business. 

It's become my preferred 
development environment for 
both C and C++, but it's not 
without problems. The integrat- 
ed Windows environment is ac- 
tually Turbo C++ for Windows, 
which also sells as a $149.95 
product on its own; more on it 
AUGUST 1992 



in a moment. You still don't get 
a Windows-style debugger; 
Turbo Debugger runs under 
Windows, true, but in charac- 
ter mode. While it's a vast im- 
provement over Ivlicrosoft's 
CodeView, which is no fun to 
use in Windows unless you 
have two monitors, it's no fun 
to snap in and out of graphics 
mode each time you step over 
a function call. 

Debugging Windows apps 
is hard enough as it is. Turbo 
C++ for Windows, which is the 
first C++ integrated editor/com- 
piler that runs under Windows, 
is a wonderful development en- 
vironment. It has everything 
you'd expect in a Windows- 
based editor and the increas- 
ingly trendy toolbar for quick 
selection of common actions, 
but my favorite part is the Ob- 
jectBrowser. It's a visual rep- 
resentation of your program's 
function calls in a tree format, 
the programmer's equivalent 
of an outliner. fvly version of Tur- 
bo C++ is much buggier than 
a first release should be; I 
hope a .01 release fixes some 
of the bugs. Plan on saving 
your files all the time. 

If you're on a budget, either 
Turbo C++ for Windows or Tur- 
bo C++ 2.0 for DOS is a great 
buy. Another recent Borland re- 
lease is ObjectVision 2.0, a Win- 
dows database builder that 
straddles an uncomfortable 
line between being an end- 
user tool and a development 
environment — but it straddles 
it well. Nowhere does Borland 
have a quotable sentence or 
two describing just what. Ob- 
jectVision is, so I'll try to do it. 

ObjectVision is a visual de- 
sign tool that lets you create 
Windows data-entry forms 
and the databases behind 
them with little or no program- 
ming. A form isn't limited to 
one database or even one 
format. Unbeknownst to you, 
a single form window can simul- 
taneously be updating 
dBASF, Paradox, Btrieve, and 



ASCII databases while you en- 
ter data. OV lets you create 
stand-alone Windows databas- 
es, and you're allowed to dis- 
tribute all the support files re- 
quired to create turnkey sys- 
tems for redistribution. 

Whew! While that para- 
graph may not be pretty, it 
does the job. OV looks some- 
what like a drawing program 
or forms-design program, but 
what you draw is the "live" da- 
ta-entry form itself. Borland 
tends to view this as a front 
end to other databases, but I 
have nothing but praise for its 
use on a single-user system. 

You can create complex da- 
ta-validation procedures and 
filters without any program- 
ming at all, and a nqvel (if you 
haven't used such Macintosh 
products as Double Helix) vis- 
ual "decision tree" lets you pro- 
gram using 1-2-3- or Quattro 
Pro-style ©functions as a ru- 
dimentary, foolproof program- 
ming language. As a program- 
mer, I found it a less-than-per- 
fect environment; as a user, I 
must confess it's easy to learn 
and very fast to program in. A 
poorly documented but effec- 
tive DLL interface allows plen- 
ty of access to OV's innards 
and a seamless way of extend- 
ing its already considerable 
abilities. An obvious idea 
would be a DLL that lets you 
modify the access to dBASE 
memo fields, which are limited 
to 4096 characters through 
OV's editor. OV doesn't pre- 
tend to create reports or offer 
debugging facilities, but what 
it does, it does magnificently. 

Should you buy it? At $100 
(street price), if you need to cre- 
ate Windows data-entry forms 
of simple-to-medium complex- 
ity, it can't be beat. I imagine for- 
ward-thinking fVllS departments 
are going wild about Ob- 
jectVision because it allows a 
naive user to update many, dis- 
parate databases from what ap- 
pears and behaves like any oth- 
er data-entry form. O 



Earth has had 2 World Wars. 
\bu can have 4 billion. 

Introducing Global CONQUEST: The classic strategy 
engagement that's never the same game twice. 

Do you crave a strategy game where the 
only thing you can expect is the 
unexpected? Then you're ready for 
Global Conquest from award- winning 
designer Dan Bunten! 

From a state-of-the-art mobile command 

center, you'll direct land, sea, and 

air forces against 3 other military aggressors that ore 

bent on planetar/ dominance! 

You'll wage war on 4 billion unknown worlds vdiere 
your troops must learn the terrain while battling the 
enemy! You'll overcome random events like earthquakes and time 
warps! And, with modem-play capabilities, you'll 

experience gameplay that's ever-changing and 
always exciting! 

It's a thrilling challenge! But what 
else would you expect from the 
mind of Dan Bunten, the man who 
re- wrote the rules on strategy 
gaming with Command H.Q/" 
andM.U.L.E™? 

Global Conquest. It has m.ore world 
wars than you could experience in a 
thousand lifetimes! 




Actual screens may vary. 




^ 



MASTERS OF STRATEGY SERIES 



t) 




Marketed by MicroProse Software, Inc. 

180 Lakefront Drive • Hunt Valley, MD 21030-2245 

(410)771-1151 

© 1992 MicroProse Software, Inc. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. 
Available far IBM-PC/Compatibles. 

Circle Flaed«r Setvica Numtier 144 



SHAREPAK 



Steve Draper 



August's SharePak 

features fun 

and functionality. 



A WINNING 
COMBINATION 

The long days of summer are 
winding down, and fall is ap- 
proaching. To help all you 
sportsmen out there get 
through this winter, we pre- 
sent Tournament Golf 1.5. 
This simulation is so much like 
the real thing that you'll feel 
the hot sun beating down on 
you even on the coldest day 
And to help you keep up with 
Tournament Golf and all the oth- 
er files on your computer, we 
offer QFILER 3.2A. It's one of 




Easily manage files with QFILER. 



Put your golf skills to a real test 
witli Tournament Golf. 

the best file managers we've 
ever seen. 

Each month, COMPUTE's 
SharePak brings you the best 
programs on the shareware 
market. You don't need to 
spend long hours and hard- 
earned dollars browsing the 
boards for great programs; we 
do it for you. Consequently, 
you get top-of-the-line pro- 
grams at a huge savings. 

QFILER 3.2A 

QFILER is designed to make 
the management of your hard 



disk files much easier. Two dif- 
ferent, sorted directories are 
displayed side by side, allow- 
ing you to select both individ- 
ual files and groups of files for 
QFILER to act on. You can 
easily copy and delete files, 
find a file on any drive, re- 
name files and directories, 
move files from one directory 
to another, run other pro- 
grams from within QFILER, dis- 
play files in sorted order, de- 
fine a file mask to display only 
certain files, back up files, 
and much more. 

Most of the features in this 
impressive list can be per- 
fornned from the DOS com- 
mand prompt. However, with 
QFILER's dual directory dis- 
play, tasks become much eas- 
ier than with DOS, and more in- 
tuitive. You don't have to wor- 
ry about the confusing syntax 
of DOS commands or about 
not being sure of what each 
command will do. You can 
see exactly what you're doing 
as it happens. 

For the advanced DOS us- 
er, QFILER offers a number of 
file-management tools, allow- 
ing you to set or clear file at- 
tributes, change the file time 
and date stamps of files, re- 
name disk volume labels, use 
file-compression utilities, and 
locate duplicate files. You 
may never want to use DOS 
again. 

QFILER runs on any IBM 
PC or compatible with 256K 
RAM and any monitor The reg- 
istration price is $20. 

TOURNAMENT GOLF 1.5 

Tournament Golf is an excel- 
lent simulation of one of the 
world's most popular sports. 
The game is very easy to 
learn, with only a few keys 
used to control all of the op- 
tions, yet it's challenging 
enough to keep you involved 
for months. This game surpass- 
es many of the commercial 
golf games in quality, ease of 
use, and playability. 



The action takes place on 
the Augusta International 
course, the site of the Mas- 
ters golf tournament. The 
course is beautifully rendered 
with 3-D graphics, and the mo- 
tions of the player's swing 
and the ball's flight are smooth- 
ly and realistically animated. 

Up to four players can play 
at a time, or you can practice 
your golfing skills solo. Either 
way you'll see why the tourna- 
ment that is played on this 
course is called the Masters. 
There are numerous obsta- 
cles to overcome. Trees line 
the fairways, sand surrounds 
many of the greens, and wa- 
ter hazards are abundant and 
strategically placed. These ob- 
stacles combine to make eve- 
ry shot a challenge. 

When you're ready to play, 
the program gives you an over- 
head view of the hole that 
you're currently on. Use this 
view to plan your strategy for 
the hole. 'When you're done, 
hit the space bar and you're 
ready to tee off. Select the 
club you want to use and get 
ready to start swinging. Use 
the space bar to control the 
swing Power Meter. The Pow- 
er Meter determines how 
hard you hit the shot and also 
how accurate the shot will be. 
Be careful when you make 
contact with the ball; it's easy 
to put a slice or hook in your 
shot — just like in the real 
thing. 

Another great feature of 
Tournament Golf is the com- 
puter's realistic scorecard, 
which frees you from having 
to keep track of bogies and 
birdies. You can relax and con- 
centrate on the game itself, in- 
stead of worrying about hang- 
ing on to the little pencil. 

To run this program, you'll 
need an IBM PC or compati- 
ble, a monitor with EGA or bet- 
ter, and a hard disk or a high- 
density floppy drive. The reg- 
istration price for Tournament 
Golf is $9.50. D 



58 COMPUTE AUGUST 1992 



With CannPUTE's SharePak, You'll 



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Important Notice: COMPUTE's SharePak is not associated with COMPUTE's 
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IT TAKES MORE THAN TALENT 

SWEAT AND IRON 
DETERMINATION TO SUCCEED. 



hen it comes to 
running a busi- 
ness from home, 
there's no sure- 
fire recipe for success. Al- 
though computerization is vir- 
tually essential to compete, 
it takes a lot more than a 
trusty PC to start a success- 
ful business. Toss in raw am- 
bition, add hard work, stir in 
a pinch of market savvy, and 
in the end you could still be 
stuck with a money-losing 
flop. That's because no 
amount of ambition, hard 
work, and market savvy can 
guarantee that your biggest 
customer won't go belly up. 
your competitors won't 
slash their prices, or some- 
body else won't come along 
with a better mousetrap. 

Even so, these unavoid- 
able business problems 
aren't always the things that 
sink a new company. More 
often than not. small busi- 
nesses tail not because 
they lack good prodiicts but 
because their owners lose 
sight of the fundamentals: 
cash flow, marketing, collec- 
tions, and long-ierm plan- 
ning. Interestingly, not only 
shortsighted businesses run 
into trouble. Successful com- 



BY ROSALIND RESNICK 

panies have the same kinds 
of problems. The difference 
is that successful business- 
es tend to spot these prob- 
lems early on and correct 
them long before they get 
too big to handle. 

Of course, it's entirely pos- 
sible to sidestep many of 
these pitfalls if you know 
what to expect beforehand. 
To that end. we've inter- 
viewed three successful 
home-based entrepreneurs. 
We asked them to talk 
about some of the mistakes 
they made along the way— 
and how they managed to 
turn lemons into lemonade. 
Essentially, what we've 
asked them is this: If you 
had it to do all over again, 
what do you wish you had 
known before you took the 
plunge and started your own 
business? 

How to market my servic- 
es. Robert McElwain. 51. 
once a stockbroker with 
some of the nation's leading 
brokerage firms, dropped 
out of the corporate rat race 
in 1984 to launch North Amer- 
ican Capita! Management in 
Shawnee Mission. Kansas. 
Though Shawnee Mission is 
a long way from Wall Street. 



the Kansas money manager 
and his stock-picking prow- 
ess have rated favorable 
mentions in Money. Wealth. 
and other national maga- 
zines. McElwain now manag- 
es more than Si 2 million for 
clients nationwide and says 
his company's annual bill- 
ings are comfortably "in the 
six figures, " 

When McElwain first went 
out on his own. he very near- 
ly became a victim of his 
own success, "In the begin- 
ning, we were very fortunate 
because we were featured 
in Money. U.S. News & 
World Report. Wealth, even 
the local newspaper." the 
money manager recalls, 
"The effect was that I got 
spoiled, and I forgot that 
you're supposed to market 
your services. It was not un- 
til a year or so ago that we re- 
alized we needed to get 
back to tfie basics and start 
doing some marketing." 

fvlcElwain's solution: an 
information-packed newslet- 
ter targeted at affluent individ- 
uals and pension managers 
nationwide. Thanks to McEI- 
wain's renewed emphasis 
on marketing, he's seen his 
business grow from S10 mil- 




Getting on the customer's wavelength was key to Turkel Advertising's success. 



lion in assets under management — the 
commonly used benchmark for ttie mon- 
ey-management field — to over $12 mil- 
lion since he launched the newsletter 
in November. 

How to speak my customers' lan- 
guage. Bruce Turkel, 34, quit a good 
job at a Miami advertising agency to 
freelance from home eight years ago. 
Today, Turkel is president of Turkel 
Advertising, which employs 14 staffers 
and racked up $8.6 million in billings 
last year, thanks to clients like Ameri- 
can Express and Turbana, one of the 
world's largest fruit companies. Turkel 
says that his billings are up 42 percent 
over last year and that his company 
now ranks 32nd out of approximately 
260 fvliami-area ad agencies. 

When Turkel quit his job as an art di- 
rector to start his own agency, he often 
found himself trying to explain to his 
business-owner clients the creative con- 
cepts behind his ads. It wasn't long be- 
fore he realized that he was wasting 
his breath. "Advertising is not what 
they know," Turkel says. "They know 
about widgets. Now, I speak to what 
my clients want to know: that we're go- 
ing to boost their image and expand 
their business. How we do it doesn't 
matter to them." 

With a bit of chagrin, Turkel notes 
that, while his ad agency has snared a 
number of prestigious industry awards, 
many of his clients remain unimpressed. 
"One client said to me, 1 just want you 
to win me green awards,'" Turkel re- 
calls, '"As long as you win me green 
awards, I don't care what you do.'" 

62 COMPUTE AUGUST 1992 



How to diversify my customer base. 
Donna Partow, 30, owner of Syntax 
Services in Barrington, New Jersey, is 
a marketing consultant and freelance 
copywriter. Partow, who had previous- 
ly worked at a bank, opened her 
home business shortly before her 
daughter, Leah, was born three years 
ago. Working from home allov/s Partow 
to spend the day with her child without 
sacrificing her career. Last year, she 
raked in $22,000 in revenues— not bad 
for 20 hours a week of work. 

Partow says it's easy to get hooked 
on a single client, especially when 
you're just starting out. But, while that 
regular income stream can be a life- 
line, it can also become a dangerous 
addiction that saps the strength of a 
growing company. Partow recalls, 
"One client wanted me to call on cli- 
ents, do business development, all 
kinds of things, i began spending 
most of my time developing his busi- 
ness, not mine. One day, I actually 
heard myself referring to him as my 
boss. That's when I knew the relation- 
ship was over." 

Partow's solution: informing the cli- 
ent that she wouldn't be available to 
work more than five to ten hours a 
week for him, "It's better to have multi- 
ple clients rather than just one big 
one," Partow says now. "I think that's a 
mistake a lot of people make. You get 
one client and just lean on him. That's 
not wise." 

How to get my customers to pay me. 
Early on, Turkel, who started his busi- 
ness at the tender age of 25, also 



learned some costly lessons about han- 
dling receivables. "I believed that if 
you do the work, you get paid," Turkel 
recalls. "It was what my dad called 'the 
confidence of ignorance.' " At the begin- 
ning of his second year in business, Tur- 
kel got a rude awakening: A client that 
had always paid on time before stuck 
the fledgling agency with $40,000 in un- 
paid bills. Though Turkel took the client 
to court and won, he wasn't able to col- 
lect his judgment. That left Turkel on 
the hook to pay all the outside vendors 
he had hired to help him with the job. 

Now, Turkel says, his agency esti- 
mates every job up front and sets a 
"comfort level" for unpaid receivables 
beyond which the agency will call a 
halt to its work. With one client, that lev- 
el may be as low as $2,000: with anoth- 
er, $10,000 or higher. "It has nothing to 
do with trust; it has to do with busi- 
ness," Turkel says. "It's a lot better to 
do it this way than to do the work and 
have the client not pay us." 

But Turkel admits he still occasional- 
ly gets burned. Recently, a client filed 
for bankruptcy protection — owing Tur- 
kel's company $20,000. 

How to manage my cash flow. In the 
burst of excitement that comes with fi- 
nally going out on their own, many 
home business newcomers forget that 
they probably won't see any money 
from their labors for at least 30 to 60 
days. That's how long customers typi- 
cally take to pay their outside vendors 
(often longer in these recessionary 
times). A good strategy is to moonlight, 
as Turkel did, before quitting your job 
to go out on your own or, at least, to 
sock away enough cash to get you 
through a couple of lean months. 

Advises Partow: "Don't quit your day 
job until you have thoroughly re- 
searched your business, analyzed 
your market, and completed a detailed 
business plan. I quit my job, opened 
up shop, bought a computer, and 
said, 'Now what?' As a result, I had to 
wait months before seeing any cash 
flow." Also, she adds, "Don't bank on 
showing a profit the first year" 

How to find my niche. Some of the 
more fortunate home-based entrepre- 
neurs have a skill or a customer base 
that they can take with them from their 
old office jobs. McElwain, for example, 
had spent years as a stockbroker, and 
Turkel had three years' experience at 
various ad agencies. But for people 
without those ready-made connec- 
tions, finding a niche can be much 
more difficult. 

Partow was an English major who 
had honed her writing skills by writing 
booklets, brochures, and articles while 
an investment banking rep at fv^leilon 
Bank. But when she launched her mar- 



INTRODUCING 



connpuTE 



cannpuTE 





T 



***************** 
******************* 
*** 
*** 
*** 
*** 
*** 

***********:******** 
***************** 

COMPUTE RountfTable 



Welcome to Compute/NET 

Hosted by Rick Leinecker 

with assislanls 

Tom Campbell 

Stephen Levy 

Peer Plaui 



GEnie 

1. COMPUTE Bulletin Board 

2. COMPUTE Realtime Conference 

3. COMPUTE Software Libraries 

4. About the RoundTable 

5. RoundTable News (910702) 

6. About COUdPUTE and the COMPUTE Editors 

7. Feedback to the Sysops 

8. RoundTable and Library Help 

9. COMPUTE Products 

10- Coming Soon in COMPUTE 

1 1 . COMPUTE Back Issue Database 

12.C0MPUTE Test Lab 

13. Software Publishers' Catalogs 

14. COMPUTE Online Game 



COMPUTE/NET on GEnic had a terrific 
grand opening. The comments ranged 
from "I've never seen a RoundTable open 
up with so much information" to This 
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worth their price." 

This month we're sponsoring some 
contests. Do you know j'our computer 
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And that's only one of the games we have 
ready There's a scavenger hunt and a logic 
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magazine subscriptions, disks, books, or 
connect dmc. 

Above all, though, when you visit 
COMPUTE/NET, stop in at die 
COMPUTE Bulletin Board and participate 
in some of the most stimulating 
conversations online. 



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keting and copywriting firm, she real- 
ized she needed to be more of a spe- 
cialist to get where she wanted to go. 
While she hasn't reached her goal yet, 
she's gaining a reputation as a home 
business expert by teaching a class at 
a local university, writing books on the 
subject, and contributing to a newslet- 
ter for people who work from home. 
Her book on starting a home business. 
Homemade Business: A Woman 's Step- 
by-Step Guide to Earning Money at 
Home, is now available: ordehng infor- 
mation can be found in the product 
box accompanying this article. 

"You need to find your niche and 
stay focused," Partow says. "Clients 
are willing to pay you more if you're a 
specialist." 

When to reach out for help. Running 
a home-based business doesn't neces- 
sarily mean going it alone. Though the 
work force of the typical home busi- 
ness consists of a self-employed indi- 
vidual or couple, farming work out to in- 
dependent contractors with different 
but complementary skills isn't unusual. 

McElwain, the money manager, is un- 
usual in that he has four part-time em- 
ployees, including his wife, who all 
work in his home office. One is a 
freelance computer programmer; anoth- 
er customizes software for Harvard 




Technology is leverage in a small business, letting a few workers do the work of many. 



Graphics. McElwain's wife works at the 
company two days a week to handle 
the bookkeeping. Fortunately for McEl- 
wain, his office is large enough to ac- 
commodate a staff that size. It meas- 
ures 1400 square feet, has its own 
entrance, and houses five desks and 
three computers. 

"The employees can come in in 



YOU'RE NOT ALONE 



11 you're thinking of starting a liome busi- 
ness (or have done so already), it's reas- 
suring to know you're not alone. 

LINK Resources, a New York-based re- 
search and consulting firm, estimates that 
close to 12 million self-employed people 
work from home ttiese days. Part of ttie phe- 
nomenon can be attributed to advances in 
personal computers, modems, and fax ma- 
chines that let people create tfieir own of- 
fices outside Itie corporate wfiirl. In 1991. 
nearly half of all homeworker tiouseholds 
owned a personal computer, compared to 
fewer than 25 percent five years ago. 

Here are some of ttie findings of LINK'S 
latest (1991) homeworker survey: 

• Of the 122,9 million Americans in the 
adult work force, some 38.4 million (31 
percent) work from home at least some 
of the time, and that number is expect- 
ed to grow at a 12.7-percent annual 
clip. Roughly one-third of the United 
States' 94.4 million households have at 
least one person earning a living — or try- 
ing to^ai home. 

• There are 11.8 million people running full- 
time businesses from home, up 5.4 per- 
cent from 1990. 

• People juggling multiple jobs by working 
part-time, or moonlighting, from a home 
office number 10.5 million. This seg- 
ment, composed primarily of baby boom- 
ers looking for extra income, grew by 12 
percent from 9.4 million in 1990. 

• The telecommuting population has 



reached 5.5 million people. These work- 
ers are company employees who work 
at home part- or full-time during normal 
business hours. This figure is up 38 per- 
cent from 1990. Roughly 900,000 tele- 
commuters now log 35 or more hours a 
week at home, thanks to corporate belt- 
tightening and shifting management atti- 
tudes, 

• People routinely bringing work home 
from the office to do after hours number 
10,6 million. Actually LINK estimates 
that closer to 29 million employees 
bring work home at least some of the 
time but don't meet the "homeworker" 
definition. 

• By 1995, 50 million or more Americans 
may do some or all of their work at 
home, LINK predicts. 

How does LINK know all of this? LINK col- 
lects data by conducting its National Work- 
at-Home Survey each year, polling a ran- 
domly selected group of 2500 households 
nationwide. To qualify for "homeworker" 
status according to the criteria in LINK'S sur- 
vey, households must indicate that one or 
more adults age 18 or older either "per- 
form income-producing or job-related 
work at home, part- or full-time," and/or 
"use one or more of the following for busi- 
ness purposes at home: persona! comput- 
er, modem, fax, multiple phone lines." 

For more information, contact LINK Re- 
sources at 79 Fifth Avenue, New York, 
New York 10003, or call (212) 627-1500. 



blue jeans and fix themselves a cup of 
tea or have a Coke," fvlcElwain says. 
"It's very informal and relaxed," 
How to leverage my business 
through technology. These days, it's 
hard to imagine a home business that 
doesn't have a personal computer. 
Add on a printer, modem, fax machine, 
and some basic desktop publishing soft- 
ware, and your fledgling business has 
most of the tools it takes to compete 
with the pros. Nevertheless, how 
much technology to buy, which technol- 
ogies you need, and how to get them 
to do what you want them to can still 
be a struggle. 

"I wish I'd known more about com- 
puters before I started my business," 
says Partow, who still has the same 
IBfvt XT clone she started out with. "I 
think the people at WordPerfect know 
me by name." 

Keeping up with technological 
change can also be a challenge for 
more sophisticated users like McEl- 
wain, who runs his business on an old 
IBM PC and tv/o newer 286 AT clones. 
"Each time I've bought a computer, 
I've bought it based on what I thought 
I needed at the time, but each time the 
software packages have been upgrad- 
ed to operate at far greater speeds. 
Now, I'm planning to get a 486 ma- 
chine with a math coprocessor to help 
me crunch the numbers." 

How to delegate responsibility. 
Once you get your home business up 
and running, you may find that it liter- 
ally spills across your living room and 
out the door. Unlike McElwain, who em- 
ploys people at his home, most home 
business owners who hire employees 
eventually break down and lease office 
space. But while hired workers can 
help expand your business by multiply- 



64 COKdPUTE AUGUST 1992 



Learn to troubleshoot and 
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Your hands-on training continues as you install a powerful 
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i^ Check one FREE catalog only 

Zl MICROCOMPUTER SERVICING 

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Z] Intiustrial Electronics & Robotics 

Zl Security Electronics 

n Electronic Music Tcchnologs' 

D Home Inspection 



m 



n Computer Programming 

□ I'C .Applications Specialist 
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kpptovtd under Gl Biil, 
check lot deulls. 



Name 



(please print) 



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L. 



Cih/State/Zip Accredited Member, Nilional f iome Study Council m QQ„nQp f 



ing the amount of work you can take 
on, thiey can also pose new problems 
as the Individualist entrepreneur is 
forced to become a team player again, 
this time as the boss. 

"When I started hiring creative peo- 
ple. I would give them the concept of 
a job, and they would give me back 
the copy," Turkel says. "I learned that 
it doesn't have to be done the way I 
would do it. It just has to be done 
well." 

One of Turkel's main challenges, he 
says, has been keeping his employees 
motivated. "I think I spend more of my 
time getting my people excited than 
anything else," he says. "People love 
to work if they're doing something 
they believe in," 

How much I'd enjoy having my own 
business. Though the prospect of cut- 
ting the corporate umbilical cord and 
starting your own business may seem 
scary at first, it's amazing how many 
home business people say they wish 
they'd gathered the courage to strike 
out on their own long before. fvlcEI- 
wain, for one, says he wishes he'd tak- 
en the plunge ten years ago. Partow, 
too, says she wishes she'd started her 
home business sooner. 

"Now I can work where I want and 
when I want," she says. "That's about 
as good as life gets." O 



RESOURCE BOX 


Thinking of starting your own home busi- 


How to Run Your Own Home Business 


ness? Here are some helpful resources to 


Edited 


speed you on your way: 


$7.95 




ISBN 0-8442-6666-3 


Working from Home: Everything You 


VGM Career Horizons 


Need to Know About Living and Working 


A Division of NTC Publishing Group 


Under the Same Roof 


4255 W. Touhy Ave. 


Paul and Sarah Edwards 


Lincolnwood, iL 60646 


$14.95 




ISBN 0-87477-582-5 


The New Small Business Survival Guide: 


Jeremy P. Tarcher 


Winning at Business in the '90s 


5858 Wilshire Blvd., Ste. 200 


Bob Coleman 


Los Angetes, CA 90036 


$10.95 




ISBN 0-393-30750-6 


The Self-Employed Woman: How to Start 


W. W, Norton & Co, 


Your Own Business and Gain Control of 


500 Fifth Ave. 


Your Life 


New York. NY 10110 


Jeannette R. Scollard 




$7.95 


The Working from Home Forum 


ISBN 0-671-68407-8 


Available on CompuServe 


Simon & Schuster Trade Books 


P.O. Box 20212 


A Division of Simon & Schuster 


Columbus, OH 43220 


1230 Avenue ot the Americas 


(800) 848-8990 


New York, NY 10020 


Provides a place for online networking 




among home office entrepreneurs. Also 


HorDerrmde Business: A V\foman's Step-by- 


contains information about home office 


Step Guide to Earning Ivloney at Home 


management tips, resources, laws, tax ben- 


Donna Partow 


efits, and marketing approaches. Paul and 


$11.00 


Sarah Edwards (coauthors of the book 


ISBN 1-56179-043-5 


Working from Home listed above) are 


Syntax Services 


sysops. The Working from Home Forum is 


P.O. Box 82 


not surcharged, though CompuServe Itself 


Barrington, NJ 08007 


charges an access fee. 




66 COMPUTE AUGUST 1992 




A HardBsll lit takes a lutlcula! major league realism. A power line-up that includes printable stats, standings and 
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A HartBail til thrusts you into the heat of a pennant 
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CJrcte Readef Servlw Numbef 232 



PRODUCTIVITY CHOICE 



Say goodbye to clutter and confusing 
notes: This P!M will organize your home 
office and streamline your business. 

Peter Scisco 



PACKRAT 4.0 

PackRat 4.0 from Polaris Soft- 
ware stores, organizes, and 
provides easy access to eve- 
ry detail of your office. While 
several personal information 
managers (Plfvls) fly thie Win- 
dows banner, PackRat 4.0 
ranks as the premier imple- 
mentation of this application 
group. No other PIM quite 
matches its scope or capabil- 
ities, yet it doesn't ask you to 
sacrifice a lifetime in learning. 
The program's overall integra- 
tion, intuitive functionality, and 
Vifell-developed links to other 
Windows applications make it 
a natural leader. 

Comprising 15 separate ac- 
tivities, called facilities, Pack- 
Rat can be configured to be 
as simple or as complex as 
you want. This eases the way 
for first-lime users, while offer- 
ing the expandability that a 
growing business requires. 

For users who fear such an 
armada of applications, one 
of Paci<Rat's best features is 
its ability to display only 
those facilities that you want 
or use regularly. Customize 
the interface to streamline it 
and keep the screen simpli- 
fied. This is especially impor- 
tant in the beginning, for too 
many options at the start may 
intimidate you too much to al- 
low you to make the most of 
PackRat's many features. 

The facility to which most 
users will immediately gravitate 
is Phone Book, an excellent 
database for telephone num- 
bers, addresses, and contact 
names. PackRat even access- 
es your fax software — so you 
don't have to keep a separate 
directory of fax numbers. Win- 
dows word processors can 
use macros to gain access to 
addresses stored in Phone 
Book. These are simple exam- 




ples of how the DDE links in 
PackRat manage information 
across all of your applications. 

Phone Book's companion 
is Phone Log, which tracks 
calls you make or receive. 
You'll find such a log invalua- 
ble if you must track phone 
costs from a home business 
or bill a client for phone calls 
related to a particular project. 

PackRat's To Do and Agen- 
da facilities are comparable 
to similar features in most oth- 
er Plfy/ls. Each keeps track of 
appointments and projects, 
supports repetitive and cus- 
tom scheduling, and displays 
scheduling conflicts. 

Besides these fairly straight- 
fora/ard facilities, PackRat of- 
fers more exotic but still useful 
options. For example, the Finan- 
cial module lets you track ex- 
penses and account balances 
for any number of accounts. 
While not a replacement for a 
dedicated financial package, 
the Financial module can be de- 
signed to perform most of 
your accounting functions. 

Index Card is a free-form 
card file for storing miscellane- 
ous information. Use Index 
Card to store information for 
proposals, for brainstorming 
ideas, or for lists. Think of it 



as an electronic equivalent of 
Post-it Notes. 

Tracts the history of docu- 
ments created in other Win- 
dows applications and 
launch documents with their 
associated applications with 
Disk File, '/ou can also 
launch DOS files with accom- 
panying applications, provid- 
ed you've defined the docu- 
ment extension and its accom- 
panying application in your 
WIN. INI file. 

PackRat's Resource Manage- 
ment facility is designed for 
people who monitor the use of 
company equipnnent or bill cli- 
ents for the use of special re- 
sources. You may define each 
resource item (conference 
room, computer, and so on) 
and its billing amount. As you 
attach a particular resource to 
a project, the billed amount is 
automatically calculated for the 
accrued time of the project. 

F^ckRat attachments are par- 
ticularly significant, for they gov- 
ern the way information can be 
retrieved and linked. A Phone 
Book item linked to a project 
gives you a means of tracking 
who has been contacted for 



68 COMPUTE AUGUST 1992 



each stage of a project. Any 
facility item can be linl<ed to 
any other. 

Project Management tracks 
projects and the tasl<s associ- 
ated witfi them. Tasks can 
show dependencies, and pro- 
spective completion dates 
can be calculated and re- 
fined as the project pro- 
ceeds. Like the Financial facil- 
ity, Project Manager isn't 
meant for large projects bet- 
ter served by dedicated appli- 
cations. But for small projects 
requiring the completion of 
smaller tasks, this manager 
performs nicely. 

PackRat's Time Manage- 
ment module tracks the 
elapsed time spent on user- 
defined projects, tasks, cli- 
ents — anything to which you 
want to assign a timed task. 
This facility can double as a 
time/billing module, as each 
Time item can be assigned a re- 
source rate, which is then mul- 
tiplied by the elapsed time for 
billing purposes. It's a very 
workable and elegant solution 
for home office workers or 
small businesses that want to 
track the amount of billable 
time spent on particular tasks. 

An Alert facility allows you 
to schedule reminders for any 
task, call, or appointment. A 
pop-up window will occur in 
any other Windows applica- 
tion once an Alert has been ac- 
tivated. If you're using a DOS 
application in a windowed en- 
vironment, the program will au- 
tomatically be minimized, and 
you'll drop to the PackRat 
Alert screen. 

A Global facility allows in- 
stant access to a variety of in- 
formational tidbits stored 
throughout PackRat. This can 
be very helpful when you're try- 
ing to pult together all of the in- 
formation for a particular 
task. You can also use 



Scratch Pad to assimilate infor- 
mation from different databas- 
es as you work toward the 
next stage in a project. 

Essentially, all of these sep- 
arate facilities act as modules 
for a simplified, intuitive data- 
base. As such, PackRat pro- 
vides ample opportunity for 
you to define each entry you 
make in a way that allows you 
to search and retrieve that in- 
formation easily. 

For example, in a simple 
module like Phone Book, you 
can enter all the basic informa- 
tion: name, address, title, po- 
sition, company, business 
phone, and so on. In addition, 
you can fill four User Key 
fields to refine your entry If 
you needed a report on all of 
your suppliers located in the 
Northeast, you'd type supplier 
in one of the User Key fields 
and northeast in another. 
Then, before traveling to the 
Northeast, you'd search using 
those criteria and the Boolean 
search routines that PackRat 
provides. The intuitive and pow- 
erful search routines are a ma- 
jor part of PackRat's power. 

As another indication of its 
powerful database activities, 
PackRat can issue a variety of 
reports based on parameters 
defined in a similar way to the 
search parameters. It includes 
several standard reports and 
provides tools for defining and 
designing your own. You can 
save your reports as a Print Cat- 
alog that you can call up lat- 
er — so you have to define the 
report only once. 

Is PackRat the perfect per- 
sonal information manager? Al- 
most. There's still room for 
improvement, especially in 
the program's manuals. A 
more thorough examination of 
each of the intricate and var- 
ied functions is needed. Cer- 
tainly instructions for report- 



POLARIS 



fahrmttioa MaoMger 



MM 




ing functions, printing, and 
the Resource and Project Man- 
agement modules all need to 
be more detailed. 

A second caveat is the pow- 
er you really need for this in- 
credibly disk-intensive applica- 
tion. I've been using the pro- 
gram for several months on a 
machine with 4MB of memo- 
ry, but I feel the distinct need 
to double that amount of RAM 
to accommodate this pro- 
gram, the Windows environ- 
ment, and Ami Pro 2.0. 

Still, you'll have to look pret- 
ty hard to find a program that 
does so many things so well. 
PackRat is billed as a "com- 
plete information manager," 
and it lives up to this claim in 
grand style. If your work re- 
quires you to balance several 
projects, think creatively, and 
stay in contact, PackRat 4.0 
might be as perfect as it gets 
in this world. D 



IBM PC and 
compatibles (80286 or 
lasler); TM8 RAM; 
EGA, VfiA, or Hercules; 
Windows 3.0 or higher 
(running in standard 
or enhanced mode)— 
$395; netwoift version 
(three users)— $695; 
each additional node— 
$175 

POLARIS SOFTWARE 
17150 Via Del Campo, 
Sle. 307 

San Diego, CA 92127 
(800) PACKRAT 



Circle Reader Service Number 303 



AUGUST 1992 COMPUTE 69 



PERSONAL PRODUCTIVITY 



Daniel Janal 



If you have a PC, you 

have most of your 

faxing needs covered, 

Send and receive 

faxes without a fax 

maciiine, tlianl(S 

to modems, special 

software, and 

online services. 



FAX FROM 
ANYWHERE 

"What's your fax number?" 
seems to be the catch phrase 
of the 1990s among business 
people. II you have a comput- 
er, you don't need to buy a fax 
machine to jump on the fax 
bandwagon. All you need is a 
modem, a phone fine, and soft- 
ware — and perhaps an ac- 
count with an online service 
like IVICI or CompuServe. 

Like a fax machine, most 
computer alternatives can 

• Send any ASCII, graphics, 
or binary file 

• Keep a directory of people 
you send faxes to 

• Provide a transcript of faxes 
you have sent 

• Broadcast faxes to groups 
of people in your directory, 
so you don't have to retype 
all the information 

• Rediai the number if the re- 
cipient's machine is busy 

However, these alternatives 
do have drawbacks. Software 
and online solutions won't re- 
ceive faxes. Hardware solu- 




tions will eat a lot of disk 
space and could monopolize 
your computer. !n all cases, if 
you want to transmit hard- 
copy, such as newspaper ar- 
ticles and contracts, you'll 
have to buy a scanner. 

Here is a look at several 
popular alternatives to help 
you join the fax vanguard 

Online services, like MCI 
and CompuServe, will send 
your ASCII document to any 
fax machine. You establish an 
account with the service, sign 
on, upload the files, and pro- 
vide the recipient's fax num- 
ber. The service will send the 
file to the fax machine. 

CompuServe Information 
Services (CIS) charges a $7.95 
monthly connect charge, for 
which you receive a nine-hour 
credit for basic services (includ- 
ing faxes). After the nine-hour 
credit is exhausted, Compu- 
Serve charges SO. 75 for the 
first 1000 characters faxed and 
$0.25 for each additional 1000 
characters. Joining the service 
costs $39.95 (free member- 
ships are available with sever- 
al modem and software pack- 
ages). CompuSeri/e can send 
ASCII files only and can't 
broadcast faxes. 

With MCI, you pay only the 
cost of sending the message 
inside the U.S. There's no an- 
nual fee or startup charge. 
And with IvlCI you can broad- 
cast faxes. 

On the GoFAX from Ibis Soft- 
ware is a software alternative. 
You send the files to a service 
bureau, as you do with f\/lCI 
and CIS, which in turn trans- 
mits the files to the recipient. 
But unlike N/ICI and CIS, On 
the GoFAX will transmit virtual- 
ly any file format, including pic- 
tures and spreadsheets. 

fvlastering the software 
takes about ten minutes, You 
need only seven keystrokes to 
navigate through tfie system, 
The phone call is free, but 
your credit card will be billed 
$2 for each page. 



On the GoFAX saves you 
time on file conversions. Imag- 
ine having to spend several 
minutes converting a file and 
then hearing the busy signal 
when you finally reach the re- 
cipient's line, You'l! have to do 
it alt over again later — with no 
guarantee that the line will be 
free then. A system that 
doesn't require file conversion 
has a major advantage over 
hardware systems, which tie 
up your machine while convert- 
ing text and graphics files. 

If you want to receive faxes 
as well as send them, you 
must have a fax card and soft- 
ware, Consider the Frecom 
Fax96 from Fremont Commu- 
nications, which allows you to 
send and receive faxes direct- 
ly through its combination of 
fax/modem and software. One 
caveat: fvlost fax/modems are 
not regular modems. Unless 
you see a statement on the box 
that the modem will function as 
both a fax/modem and a stan- 
dard modem, it won't let you 
sign on to your favorite online 
service to send E-mail. The Fre- 
com Fax96 has both modem 
and fax/modem, thus freeing a 
slot on your machine. 

The hardware alternative is 
less expensive than a fax ma- 
chine. The Frecom Fax96 
costs about $150, discounted 
from $250. Another advan- 
tage is that you will receive the 
file into your computer, so you 
can print the fax onto plain pa- 
per instead of flimsy fax paper 
offered by fax machines. 

Each system offers advan- 
tages and disadvantages, so 
determine what your needs 
are. If you send only ASCII 
files, MCI does the job at the 
lowest price. If you send many 
graphics flies, then the On the 
GoFAX software might be the 
way to go. If you need to send 
and receive, the hardware op- 
tion is most viable. In any 
case, if you can't afford a stand- 
alone fax machine, let your com- 
puter do the dialing. □ 



70 COMPUTE AUGUST 1992 



[lMMEfM« 




circle Raeder Servlc* Number 186 



RUN, JUMP, 
SWIM, KICK 

NOW YOU'RE LEARNING 
HOW TO TYPE! 

Mario's not jusc the world's king of adventure — 
he's your personal typing teacher! 

All the great Mario characters and scenes that 
you've come to know are here. Start by choosing your 
own identity — Mario, Luigi or The Princess. Then go 
at your own pace through each adventurous level: 

Level I — Hit the blocks, kick the turtles, and jump as 
high as you can while graphic hand visuals 
help you leam to find all of the letters on the 
keyboard without looking. 

Level 2 — Plunge underwater to escape the chasing fish 
while you learn to easily type full words. 






Convenient on-screen 
and picture-oriented 
icons 

Individually charts and 
records progress for 
entire family 

Follows progress from 
beginning through 
advanced levels 

Straight typing tutor 
option to elimiruite game 
elements 

Full 256 color VGA 
graphics 

Sound effects 
tlirougfiout, inciiding 
famous Mario music 



Level 3 — Head for the castle — but watch for falling 
blocks and treacherous quicksand — as you 
quickly become skilled at typing complete 
sentences and paragraphs. 

And when you reach the 
end, Mario says congra- 
tulations by printing out ^^_"'MiHf Tj 
his special completion 
certificate — ^just for you! fcj V^J 

Learning how to type is 
boring ...notl At least not 
with Mario and /■ ■,/•"' •' '-■-'•■-:?-■-■-:- '^^.^-i-vi 

the gang. 




To order Uario Teaches Typing™ , call 1-800-969-4263, 
or see your local retailer. Available on MS-DOS and 
compatibles for $39.95. Coming soon on Macintosh. 




MS-DOS Screens Pictured. 



Interplay Productions 
3710 S.Susan, Suite 100 
Santa Ana, CA 92704 
(714)549-2411 



© 1992 tntafhy Preducrioiu. AM riEdc moved. 
Mflrio" IS c tmdfmarfco/Nimowfo. a99ZNmi£ndo 



Circle Readar Service Number 237 



EVER SO HUMBLE. YOUR HOME 
BUSINESS CAN SOUND LIKE 
JTUNE 500 COMPANY, IF YOU INSTALL 
A VOICE-MAIL SYSTEM. 








■;r:.5:-;^\^'^'i5F 



"Hello. Welcome to Wordcraft's automat- 
ed voice-mail system. If you know ttie 
extension of the party you wistn to 
reacti, enter ttiat number now on your 
touch-tone telephone. If you would 
like to leave a message for the Editori- 
al Services Group, press 1. For Re- 
search, press 2. For Mairl<eting and Pub- 
lic Relations, press 3. Press 4 if you'd 
like to send a fax. If you wish to speak 
with an attendant, press now. If you 
have a rotary-dia! phone, stay on the 
line, and an attendant will pick up short- 
ly. Thank you, and have a nice day." 

Callers to large companies — partic- 
ularly in the world of electronics— hear 
messages like that all the time. Byzan- 
tine in their layers, obscure in their op- 
eration, voice-mail systems have cap- 
tured the imagination of corporate Amer- 
ica and the attention of cost-cutters. 
It's hard not to run into such automat- 
ed phone services. 

Now you can have your own voice 
mail, making incoming callers think 
your operation is huge, though it may 
be only you and your computer By add- 
ing voice mail with its around-the- 
clock efficiency, your business can ben- 
efit from multitudes of options and ap- 
pear to be as large as any downtown 
corporation. 

Ail you need is a PC with an empty 
slot in the expansion bus. 

The Silkon Receptionist 

No question about it — voice mail can 
be impersonal. And it can be frustrat- 
ing to navigate, if it's improperly de- 
signed. But if you keep voice mail cour- 
teous and succinct, it can actually 
draw in business, not turn off potential 
customers. Its potential payoffs for the 
small business or home office can be 
dramatic. 

Answering machines, the iow-tech so- 
lution to catching calls, may spout a 
message, record incoming calls, and 
even mark calls with the time and 
date, but they're limited. An answering 
machine can play only one outgoing 
message at any given time: it can't or- 
ganize incoming calls; and if you don't 
work alone, its replay isn't private. A 
voice-mail system, however, lets you 
compose multiple messages, direct 
calls to specific mailboxlike destina- 
tions, and route calls to other exten- 
sions; it can even sen/e as an automat- 
ed telemarketer. 

While your answering machine has a 
single personality, a voice-mail system 
is a veritable Proteus, ready to take on 
any number of personae. If, for in- 
stance, part of your home office time is 
spent providing desktop publishing 
services and another part is spent in or- 
ganizing motivational seminars, a PC- 
based voice-mail system can assume 

74 COMPUTE AUGUST 1992 



a different personality for each busi- 
ness activity you engage in. 

Hello, This Is the Home Office 

Most voice-mail systems try to do two 
things: replace an answering machine 
with a feature-packed digital substitute 
and distribute voice messages within a 
company. 

It's unlikely that you'll need the latter 
within a home office, Even in a small 
business, such voice memos may be 
overkill. Concentrate, then, on the an- 
swering machine-like qualities of a 
voice-mail board. 

You have to factor other considera- 
tions into the voice-mail equation, too. 
Some boards require a dedicated com- 
puter as a robotic receptionist while oth- 
ers work in the background on your pri- 
mary PC. If you have only one system 
in the office, your decision is simple. 
But if you've recently upgraded to a 
more powerful PC and have an older 
model gathering dust, you can opt for 
a dedicated voice-mail system. What 
better way to put that lazy computer to 
work? 

Does your home office rely on more 
than one phone line? Because the 
most affordable voice-mail boards are 
single-line devices, you'll have to limit 
incoming calls to one number if you 
want things to work. 

And though you can set up a voice- 
mail system to transfer fax calls, don't 
expect it to automatically route faxes di- 
rectly to the machine. You may have to 
eschew automatic fax reception if you 
don't have a separate telephone line 
committed to the fax. This might be pref- 
erable anyway, since people tend to be- 
come confused when you list the 
same number for telephone and fax. 

Can I Take a Message? 

Among the voice-mail systems that 
make sense for the home office, three 
stand out: Natural Microsystems' Wat- 
son, Talking Technology's BigMouth, 
and The Complete PC's The Complete 
Answering Machine. Ranging in price 
from $249 to $399, these three single- 
line voice-mail cards snap into your PC 
and turn it into a telephone assistant 
without peer. 

Watson, the least expensive voice- 
mail board, works in the background, 
a boon to single-PC offices. Based on 
a card-file system, Watson's software 
not only plays outgoing messages and 
records incoming messages but also of- 
fers a phone book for autodialing, a dic- 
tation file for recording voice memos, 
and an appointment calendar 

You can set up as many as 750 mail- 
boxes for people calling in, each with 
its own ID code and message. You 
give potential callers the codes you've 



assigned, they call and enter their 
codes, and they're immediately trans- 
ferred to their mailboxes. Incoming 
calls are recorded to your PC's hard 
drive (Watson can store about an hour 
of messages in 10MB) and then dis- 
played in chronological order when 
you later retrieve them. If you want, Wat- 
son wili even switch the outgoing mes- 
sage based on the current time accord- 
ing to the PC's internal clock. 

Watson's card-style interface makes 
it easy to set up and use as either a sin- 
gle-mailbox answering machine or a mul- 
timailbox voice-retrieval system. 

BigMouth may cost a bit more than 
Watson, but it provides far more voice- 
mail flexibility. It easily handles the ba- 
sics — setting up a single-user answer- 
ing system with several personal mail- 
boxes is a snap — but the card really 
struts its stuff when you begin explor- 
ing its more advanced features. Want 
to create an automated telemarketer? 
Simple. You can configure BigMouth to 
ask your callers questions and then re- 
cord their answers, a godsend if you 
want the computer to take orders for 
the products you sell. Want to set up 
an outbound calling system to contact 
your clients periodically and send 
them a personalized spiel about your 
new services? You can do that with 
BigMouth, too. 

BigMouth's biggest home office prob- 
lem is that it demands the full attention 
of a PC. You can't run voice mail and 
work with the computer at the same 
time. That effectively adds the price of a 
PC to the cost of setting up voice mail. 

The Complete Answering Machine 
may, as its name implies, be only a re- 
placement for your telephone's answer- 
ing machine, but its ease of use — es- 
pecially to people calling in for messag- 
es — marks it as an ideal home office 
add-on. Like Watson, The Complete An- 
swering Machine (CAM) operates be- 
hind the scenes, letting you keep to 
one PC. In fact, CAM can set a limit on 
the amount of hard drive space it uses 
for messages so that you won't return 
from a trip and find a packed drive 
with no room for other applications. 

Out of the box, CAM works as a sin- 
gle-mailbox answering system, com- 
plete with a prerecorded greeting and 
voice prompts. You can, of course, 
add more mailboxes — up to 999 — as 
you grow into the system. 

One of CAM'S most impressive fea- 
tures is its voice prompting, which 
greets mailbox owners and steps 
them through such things as remote 
message retrieval and recording. It 
sure beats memorizing commands, 
Something else to note is CAM's con- 
nection to The Complete Fax, a fax 
board sold by fhe same company. As- 



sign The Complete Fax its own mail- 
box, and callers can send faxes 
through CAM to the board, so you get 
double use from a single phone line. 

Voice-IVlail Etiquette 

Whatever voice-mail system you 
choose, you'll want to mal<e it friendly. 
One of the most important attributes of 
voice mail — its professional distance — 
is also its principal weakness. Here are 
some ways to avoid malting your an- 
swering system into voice-mail hell for 
your callers. 

• Personalize messages whenever pos- 
sible. Although voice-mail boards 
generally come equipped with pre- 
recorded messages, personalize 
them whenever you can. It adds 
your personality to an inherently imper- 
sonal technology. 

• Keep menu choices to a minimum. 
You'll lose callers {and prospective cli- 
ents) if they have to listen to long 
lists of possible choices. Pare the pos- 
sibilities to the minimum. 

• Don't hide behind voice maii. Callers 
should still be able to get through to 
you, either by pressing a button on 
their touch-tone phones or by briefly 
waiting. If you're out, make sure that 
your own mailbox is ready to take 
messages. 

• Return calls. There's nothing more 
infuriating to a caller or potential cus- 
tomer than an unreturned call. 

• Keep your messages up-to-date. It's 
rude to make people listen to out-of- 
date messages. If you're pushing a 
seasonal sale in an informational mail- 
box, change or delete the message 
as soon as the sale's over. 

Avoid Voice-Mail Pitfalls 

Moving to voice mail is a big change, 
almost like hiring a new employee. And 
like any foray into the unknown, using 
voice mail presents its share of risks. 
Here are some ideas that will make 
voice mail simpler and more practical. 

• Get a big hard drive. Digitizing incom- 
ing and outgoing messages takes a 
lot of disk space. If your PC has a 
hard drive with less than 60MB, 
voice mail will cramp your regular 
work. 

• Don't try too much too soon. Set up 
a simple voice-mail system at first — 
a standard greeting and perhaps a 
couple of personalized mailboxes. 
As you become familiar with the 
voice-mail system, gradually expand 
its capabilities. 

• Try out any changes. Whenever you 
change the voice-mail prompts or 
the paths that lead to new mailbox- 
es, try them out yourself. See if there 



are any dead ends and ensure that 
all calls will be captured. 

• Erase old messages. Although voice 
mail makes it easy to store the mes- 
sages you've received, those messag- 
es will quickly eat hard drive space. 
If you want to keep old messages, 
get a tape recorder. Cassette stor- 
age is much less expensive than 
hard disk storage. 

• Consider a dedicated voice-mail ma- 
chine if calls pour in. The typical 
home office may be able to get by 
with The Complete Answering Ma- 
chine or Watson running in the back- 
ground, but set aside a PC for voice 
mail if the call volume starts affecting 
your ability to get work done on the 
computer. Frequent background 
voice-mail activity will slow down 
your PC and your work. 

Putting It to Work 

As with every technological advance, 
the users of voice mail have shown 
themselves to be more creative than 
the developers, putting it to work in un- 
expected ways. For example, voice 
mail eliminates telephone tag if proper- 
ly used. When you contact someone, 
you can leave much more than your 
name and number. Many software com- 
panies accept beta test results via 
voice mail. Contracts have been nego- 
tiated this way, too, with representa- 
tives from both sides leaving messag- 
es on each other's voice mail to indi- 
cate unacceptable language and to 
make changes. 

Writing in COMPUTE, Daniel Janal 
quotes Terry Kaiil, public relations man- 
ager of Great Plains Software, observ- 
ing that voice mail can be an important 
adjunct to communications. When it 
comes to adoption of technology and 
the changes it causes in the corporate 
structure, "a lot depends on corporate 
culture. The company must be flexible 
and informal." Kalil's supervisor even 
conducted her performance review 
through voice mail. "It was not uncom- 
fortable because our communication 
skills have adapted. It feels like we are 
talking face to face." 

As it grows ever harder to catch a 
person at the right time and place to 
talk on the telephone, voice mail can 
take up the slack. It allows the parties 
to think things through before replying, 
more like the process of actual letter 
writing, but conducted over telephone 
lines, and with the added value of 
your being able to hear the speaker's 
inflection, which can be as important 
as the words themselves. 

Hold On 

Which voice-mail system is the best 
one for you and your home office? 



For single-PC home offices that re- 
ceive relatively few calls. The Complete 
Answering Machine is the best 
choice. It works in the background, 
sets up simply, and has advanced op- 
tions to cover everything but telemarket- 
ing tasks. It may carry the highest list 
price, but you can buy it by mail for 
roughly the same price as the others — 
$235-$245. 

Once the number of calls climbs, 
though, you're going to hate The Com- 
plete Answering Machine. It steals 
RAM (about 8QK is needed for the mem- 
ory-resident answering module) and 
drive time as it answers calls and proc- 
esses messages. You'll want a dedicat- 
ed system on a separate PC. 

If that's the case, then BigMouth is 
your voice-mail maven. Any of these 
three programs can work as a dedicat- 
ed voice-mail system, of course, but 
BigMouth's extraordinary flexibility guar- 
antees that you can accomplish any 
voice-mail task. It's especially attractive 
if you want an inbound or outbound au- 
tomated telemarketer to take and (if 
you're really audacious) make calls. 

No matter what voice-mail system 
you decide to add, you'll boost the im- 
age of your home office in the world out- 
side. No one will ever suspect that 
you're running the next highflying mul- 
tinational corporation from the back cor- 
ner of the downstairs bedroom. D 



VOICE-IMAIL PRODUCTS 

Here are the products you need to set 
up your first voice-mail system. 

The Complete Answering 
Machine— $399 
The Complete PC 
1983 Concourse Dr. 
San Jose, CA 95131 
(800)229-1753 
(408) 434-0145 

IBM PC or compatible, 512K RAM, hard 
disk, analog touch-tone phone, full- 
length expansion s!ot 

Watson— $249 
Natural Microsystems 
8 Erie Dr. 
Natick, MA 01760 
(800) 533-6120 
(508) 650-1300 

IBM. PC or compatible, 256K RAM, 
20M'B or larger hard drive, full-length ex- 
pansion slot 

BigMoutti— S295 
Talking Technology 
1125 Atlantic Ave., Ste. 101 
Alameda, CA 94501 
(800) 934-4884 
(510) 522-3800 

IBM PC or compatible, 256K RAM, 
1.5MB hard disk space, full-length expan- 
sion slot 



AUGUST 1992 COMPUTE 75 



/ 



ARTWORKS 



Robert Bixby 



Ken and Airne 
Mlkolowshl wlH) 
their low- 
tech lenerpress. 



PUBLISHMG 
PROJECTS 

I've run across many interest- 
ing publishing projects, and I 
tinought August would be a 
good time to talk about a cou- 
ple of them. Many of the ideas 
I'll be talking about in this and 
future columns are appropri- 
ate for use in schools. Others 
would be fun for families look- 
ing for computer activities, 

The first is the compiled 
book. As nearly as I can deter- 
mine, this idea was invented 
by Richard Kostelanetz. Be- 
linda Subraman, whose Ver- 
gin' Press publishes Gypsy 
magazine, has updated the 
form in two compilation issues 
of that magazine. The tech- 
nique is to contact a number 
of writers and artists and re- 
quest from each of them 300 
copies of a page with literary 
work or artwork printed on 
both sides. (A class couid do 
with a much smailer number — 
perhaps 50-100 copies,) 

fvlany simply sent in 300 cop- 
ies of a page of poetry run 
through a mimeograph, a 
copy machine, or an offset 




press. But some, such as 
Joan Payne Kincaid and I, 
took the time to paint each of 
the 300 copies individualiy, 
v/hich makes each book some- 
thing midway between a 
unique artwork and a mass- 
produced item. Since the art- 
ists were left to choose their 
own work, some of it is very ris- 
que, verging on the objectiona- 
ble. Subraman collated the 
worl< as it came in; created a 
cover, table of contents, and 
copyright page; perfect- 
bound the bookiets; and sold 
them as publications of her 
press. "When I flip through the 
compilation issues, it's like vis- 
iting a museum of modern 
art," Subraman says, "All dif- 
ferent colors and textures. 
There's a feeling of excite- 
ment," In fact, she's thinking of 
putting together another is- 
sue. If you'd like more informa- 
tion about past compilations 
or if you'd like to be consid- 
ered for publication in a future 
compilation, send a stamped, 
self-addressed envelope and 
a sample of your work to 
Vergin' Press, 10708 Gay Brew- 
er, El Paso, Texas 79935. 

Another unique publishing 
venture is the Alternative 
Press, run by Ken Mikolowski, 
who is currently teaching at 
the University of Michigan. 
Mikolowski purchased an old- 
fashioned letterpress in the 
late 1960s. He uses it to cre- 
ate beautifully designed broad- 
sides (poems suitable for fram- 
ing), bookmarks, and post- 
cards. By purchasing ding- 
bats and typefaces from other 
presses that are moving from 
letterpress to electronic and 
other printing media, he has 
been able to assemble an im- 
pressive array of obsolete ty- 
pographic elements, includ- 
ing the buffalo that serves as 
the press's colophon. Anne 
Mikolowski, Ken's wife, is a 
graphic artist. She often de- 
signs beautiful wood engrav- 
ings and linoleum blocks for 



use in the press (one of her cur- 
rent projects outside of the 
press is a graphic for an Ab- 
solut vodka advertisement). 

A few times a year, Ken 
Mikolowski sends 500 post- 
card blanks (with the "busi- 
ness side" — the side for the 
stamp and address — preprint- 
ed on his letterpress) to poets 
like Robert Greeley and Faye 
Kicknosway and to graphic art- 
ists like Archie Rand and Bren- 
da Goodman. The writers and 
artists prepare something for 
the back of each individual 
postcard — a poem, an idea, 
an essay, a pen-and-ink 
sketch — and return the post- 
cards to the Alternative Press. 
Twice a year, subscribers re- 
ceive mailings which include 
these unique artworks in addi- 
tion to the current run of other 
Alternative Press offerings (the , 
rate is £15 per year). You nev- 
er know what you're going to 
get, but you can bet it will be 
absolutely unique and 
astounding. 

Art in use seems to be the 
guiding principle of the Alter- 
native Press, Mikolowski says 
that sometimes these post- 
cards are mailed by subscrib- 
ers to friends or to the originat- 
ing artist and then returned to 
him for archival purposes, com- 
pleting a cycle of creativity. If 
you'd like more information 
about this, write to the Alterna- 
tive Press, 1207 Henry, Ann Ar- 
bor, Michigan 48104. 

Following this model, a 
teacher might have each stu- 
dent in a class of 25 make 25 
greetings. The teacher could 
then collate the cards and 
give each student a folder 
that contains work from all of 
the other members of the 
class. It would be easy to in- 
corporate the electronic as- 
pect into the project by design- 
ing (or having the group de- 
sign) different kinds of cards 
on the computer, printing 
them out, and then distributing 
them for painting. □ 



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Circle Reader Service Number 119 



DISCOVERY CHOICE 



Create cartoons — complete with sound — that 
surpass Saturday morning favorites 
with this beginning animator's paci<age. 

Steven Anzovin 



DISNEY 

ANIMATION 

STUDIO 



78 



"An unending voyage of dis- 
covery in the realms of color, 
sound, and motion," That's 
what Walt Disney called the 
art of animation, this vision of 
animation as an adventure 
led Disney to make some of 
the greatest animated clas- 
sics of all time. 

Now you can use your PC 
to learn the master's tech- 
niques — without the tedium. 
Disney Animation Studio, 
from Walt Disney Computer 
Software, uses a tightly knit 
group of four modules — Pen- 
cil Test, Exposure Sheet, Ink 
& Paint, and a supervisor pro- 
gram called DAS — to re-cre- 
ate the traditional process of 
eel animation used in all Dis- 
ney cartoons. 

The Pencil Test module in- 
cludes drawing tools for creat- 
ing black-and-white outline 
drawings of your characters. 
But instead of drawing on piec- 
es of paper, you work on a 
succession of screens, called 
eels (after the pieces of clear 
celluloid that animators paint 
on in traditional animation). A 
click of the mouse button al- 
lows you to move back and 
forth between eels and play 
your pencil test at any time. 

One of the best parts of 
Pencil Test is the Onionskin- 
ning feature. With Onionskin- 
ning turned on, you can see 
the faint outlines of previous 
eels behind the current eel as 
though you were looking 
through tracing paper at oth- 
er drawings beneath, This is in- 
credibly helpful in aligning 
your drawings from eel to eel 
so your characters move 
smoothly and believably. 

COMPUTE AUGUST 1992 




Another useful Pencil Test 
feature is Cleanup. At Dis- 
ney's Mouse Factory, this 
task was assigned to appren- 
tice animators, who tediously 
cleaned up pencil tests by 
tracing over them to eliminate 
unnecessary lines. In Disney 
Animation Studio, however, 
removing extra pixels can be 
achieved with a single mouse 
click. 

Disney Animation Studio's 
Exposure Sheet, accessible 
from the Pencil Test, works rath- 
er like an animation spread- 
sheet. Each eel in the anima- 
tion is given a line in the Expo- 
sure Sheet, showing the eel 
number, assigned sounds, 
timing, and other information. 
You can rearrange eels of an 
animation in the Exposure 
Sheet by cutting, pasting, or de- 
leting their lines, which is 
much easier than cutting and 
pasting eels in Pencil Test. 

The Exposure Sheet is also 
where you can add sound to 
your cartoon. Disney Anima- 
tion Studio supports Sound 
Blaster, Sound Source, and 
Tandy sound. With one of 
these, you can attach digitized 
or synthesized sounds to any 



eel or block of eels using the 
Exposure Sheet to synchronize 
sound and motion. 

Syncing simple sound ef- 
fects isn't too difficult, but draw- 
ing a character so that it actu- 
ally appears to be speaking 
takes a lot of practice. The ex- 
cellent manuals give some help- 
ful hints for drawing mouth 
movements and matching 
them to the phonetic elements 
of your character's speech. 
However, because you can 
hear sound only when playing 
back your animation in the in- 
cluded Flick player utility pro- 
gram, not in Disney Animation 
Studio, adjusting sounds re- 
quires jumping back and forth 
between the two programs. 

Disney Animation Studio's 
Ink & Paint module is where 
you add color to your pencil 
test and put it over a back- 
ground. The program's exten- 
sive palette and area fill tools 
make it easy to define new col- 
ors and apply them, without 
having to worry about accu- 
rate mixing or painting over 
the outlines. Every eel can 
have its own palette of colors, 
though in most cases you'll 
use one palette throughout. 



Backgrounds can be created 
right in Ink & Paint, or tliey 
can be imported from otiier 
paint programs and inserted 
beliind your cliaracters by 
using the Frisket feature. Ihls 
masl<s the colors in your char- 
acters so they won't be affect- 
ed by the background or any 
thing done to it, If the colors 
in an imported background 
don't match the ones in your 
animation, the colors can be 
quickly remapped. 

Once you've assembled all 
the elements, you're ready to 
play your cartoon. Animations 
run entirety from memory, so 
they play fast — up to 30 
frames per second. Playback 
is smooth, without the flicker in 
large moving objects seen in 
some other animation pro- 
grams. Hov/ever, the length of 
an animation is determined by 
the amount of expanded mem- 
ory in your system. Even with 
640K standard RAM and 1MB 
expanded memory in my 386, 
there still wasn't enough mem- 
ory to play the color Donald 
Duck sample cartoon that 
comes with the program. You'll 
want at least 3fvlB of expand- 
ed memory to do substantial 
color animations. 

Disney Animation Studio is 
well thought out and a pleas- 
ure to use. But that doesn't 
mean it's the perfect anima- 
tion environment for every- 
body Because it adheres so 
closely to the traditional proc- 
ess of film animation, it 
doesn't take advantage of all 
the possibilities of computer 
animation. Even though it man- 
ages eels, mixes colors, and 
allows easy cutting and past- 
ing of images, you still have 
to do a lot of repetitive manu- 
al labor, just as Disney's ani- 
mators did (and do). In Ink & 
Paint, for example, you have 
to color every part of- every 



character in every frame by 
hand — a real chore for long, 
complex animations. 

Experienced computer ani- 
mators will chafe at the pro- 
gram's other limitations, too. I 
know [ was disappointed 
when I discovered that 
there's no way to move char- 
acters automatically along 
paths or turn them smoothly in- 
to other shapes. I also wish 
that the program provided a 
storyboarding feature or a 
more powerful scripting utility 
for playing completed anima- 
tions in sequence, complete 
with wipes, dissolves, and oth- 
er transitions. These capabili- 
ties, which can be found in oth- 
er animation and presentation 
programs, make it easier to 
create more professional-look- 
ing 'toons. 

Even if you accept that the 
traditional film-animation proc- 
ess makes sense for comput- 
er animation, Disney Anima^ 
tion Studio doesn't give you 
everything you need to make 
your own Bambi. There's no 
way to do camera moves — 
the zooms, pans, trucks, and 
scrolling backgrounds that 
give film animations the feel- 
ing of taking place in a real 
three-dimensional world. Nor 
can you achieve multiplane ef- 
fects in which layers of anima- 
tion appear to be taking 
place at various distances 
from the audience. Part of the 
problem, of course, is that 
few home PCs have the pow- 
er and speed to perform 
such calculation-intensive ef- 
fects at typical animation 
speeds. 

But a lot of these criticisms 
are beside the point for this 
program's main audience, be- 
ginning animators. With that 
in mind, I asked my ten-year- 
old son, Raf, an animation en- 
thusiast, to evaluate the pro- 




gram. He quickly taught him- 
self to use the software and in- 
formed me that Disney Anima- 
tion Studio passed muster. 
He especially liked the Onion- 
skinning effect and the fact 
that he could work in VGA res- 
olution (640 X 480), which 
some other animation pro- 
grams don't support. The oth- 
er day he spent three happy 
hours in front of the screen, an- 
imating his own creations and 
planning future cartoon epics. 
Disney Animation Studio 
may not make everyone an 
ace cartoonist; you still have to 
know how to draw and be will- 
ing to work hard. But it's defi- 
nitely the best way to learn at 
home the techniques of charac- 
ter animation that have 
brought the world so much en- 
joyment since Steamboat Wilfie 
first whistled a tune. D 

circle Reader Service Njmber 301 



IBM PC and 
compatibles; 640K 
RAM t2MB or more 
expanded memory 
recommended); CGA, 
EGA, MCGA. VGA, Or 
Tandy; hard disk with 
at least 3MB tree; 
mouse or other 
pointing device; 
supports Sound 
Source, Sound 
Blaster, and Tandy 
Digital sound boards— 
$129.95 

WALT DISNEY 
COMPUTER SOFTWARE 
500 S. Buena Vista SL 
Burbanh, CA 91521 
(800) 688-1520 



AUGUST 1992 COMPUTE 79 



PATHWAYS 



Steven Anzovin 



THE RUG 
WARRiOR 



niis build-it- 

yourself robot has 

a brain and the 

ability to find its 

way around. 



In Czech playwright Karel 
Capek's 1922 satire R.U.R. 
(the work in which Capek 
coined the term robot and in- 
vented many of the other 
ideas about robots that we 
take for granted today), a 
young, idealistic woman visits 
a company that builds human- 
like artificial workers, 

"What sort of worker do you 
think is the best from a practi- 
cal point of view?" a company 
executive asks her, 




"The one who is 
most honest and 
hardworking?" she 
guesses. 

"No," says the executive, 
"the one that is cheapest. 
Young Rossum [the robots' in- 
ventor] rejected everything 
that makes man more expen- 
sive. In faot, he rejected man 
and made the Robot. Mechan- 
ically they are more perfect 
than we are, they have an 
enormously developed intelli- 
gence, but they have no 
souls." But later it turns out 
that the robots do have souls, 
and in anger over being exploit- 
ed they rise up and destroy 
their masters. 

The fear of vengeful robots 
has been around since well be- 



fore the Terminator movies or 
even Mary Shelley's Franken- 
stein. In Jewish folklore, an ar- 
tificial man called a golem pro- 
tected the Jews of sixteenth- 
century Prague, but he had to 
be destroyed when he could 
no longer be controlled. 

For all our anxiety about ro- 
bots, in the real world they 
aren't at all like us, nor are 
they ready to rebel against 
their creators. Given the cur- 
rent level of robot research, 
that future, if it ever comes, is 
comfortably far away. But if 
you're a handy hardware hack- 
er, you can do mobile robot re- 
search at home— and possibly 
bring that future a step closer. 
One source to check out is 
the book Mobile Robots: 
Inspiration to Implementa- 
tion by Anita Flynn and 
Joseph Jones (Jones & 
Bartlett Publishers, 1 Ex- 
eter Plaza. Boston, Mas- 
sachusetts 02116; 800- 
832-0034; $29-95; slated 
for a fall 1992 release). It 
contains complete in- 
structions for creating 
an autonomous mo- 
bile robot from parts 
costing about $200, all 
of which can be pur- 
chased at your local Ra- 
dio Shack and electrical sup- 
ply store. For readers less fa- 
miliar with a soldering iron, the 
authors plan to offer both a kit 
and a fully assembled 'bot. 
The little beast, called the Rug 
Warrior, will zip around obstruc- 
tions, tag after you as you 
move around the room, and 
come when you call. 

I talked with coauthor Jo- 
seph Jones, who works at Ar- 
tificial Creatures, a division of 
Intelligent Systems Robotics 
(238 Broadway, Cambridge, 
Massachusetts 02139; 617- 
876-2999). He described 
some of the issues involved in 
making robots truly autono- 
mous and mobile. Interestingly 
the problems aren't so much 
mechanical as conceptual. 



Most autonomous mobile ro- 
bots work by comparing the 
current environment as per- 
ceived by the robot's sensors 
with a software-based "world 
model" contained in its control- 
ling computer. The more com- 
plete and detailed the rules 
contained in the world model 
are, the more autonomy the ro- 
bot can achieve, but checking 
every movement against the 
rules requires lots of process- 
ing power and slows the robot 
down. It's as if you had to 
think about the global conse- 
quences of every step when- 
ever you walked around the 
house, Jones, however, is work- 
ing with a different model of ro- 
bot autonomy called subsump- 
tive behavior, which was devel- 
oped at Rod Brooks's Mobot 
Lab at MIT Mobile robots us- 
ing subsumptlve behavior 
don't follow a world model at 
all; instead, each sensor di- 
rectly triggers a behavior. 

Jones believes that building 
such reflex behaviors into ro- 
bots is the way to create respon- 
sive mobile 'bots capable of 
practical tasks. What's the one 
innovation that Jones thinks 
will bring us into the Robotic 
Age? "There are plenty of prob- 
lems to work on," he chuckles, 
"but I've got a little kid, and a 
robot that could clean up under 
the kitchen table would make a 
big difference." 

Another useful resource is 
The Robot Builder's Bonanza 
by Gordon McComb (TAB 
Books, 13311 Monterey Ave- 
nue, Blue Ridge Summit, Penn- 
sylvania 17294; 717-794- 
2191; $14.95). This book in- 
cludes tips on choosing mo- 
tors, building power supplies, 
constructing metal and plastic 
bodies, and designing locomo- 
tion and arm systems. 

Bear in mind that one day 
our mechanical creations 
might refuse to clean up after 
us and head out the door to 
join others of their kind. Let's 
hopethey think well of us. O 



80 COMPUTE AUGUST 1992 



Andrew Visscher's and Bruce Williams Zaccagnino's ... 



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* * 



* * 




4. 



'■W 



|k.^£^| 



.rrj^: 



'"TiT^nT~_Tiyi:!£^^Y%^'?: 



The greatest collection of 
solitaire games everl In addition 
to the 1 05 individual games, 
there are tournarnents, quests 
and cross country journeys for a 
lifetime of gaming entertainment. 
"Solitaire's Journey" ranges from 
the simple and easy all the way 
up to the strategic and 
challenging. 



105 SOLITAIRE GAMES Wtm 

(Most Of the world's best] W^^ 

TOURNAMENT PLAY 9^ 

(Set tournaments or create your own) 

4 INTRIGUING QUESTS. 

SEVERAL CROSS-COUNTRY TOURING 

COMPETITIONS. 

COMPLETE HISTORY AND OVERALL 

AVERAGES FOR EACH GAME 

circle Read«f Seivlce Number 238 



Quality Pfoduclioris inc. 

The "Solitaire's Journey" computer 
game is IBM PC and scon to be 
Amiga compatible. It can be 
obtained through your favorite 
retailer or ordered direct by calling: 
1-908-788-2799 
©1992 Q.Q.P. All rights reserved. 
[BM is a trademark ot International 
Business Machines. 
Amiga is a trademark of Commordore. 



MULTIMEDIA PC 



David English 



TRIPPING THE 
LIGHT FANTASTIC 

Where's the best place to learn 
what's hot and what's not in mul- 
timedia? The seventh annual 
CD-ROM conference (now 
called The International Confer- 
ence & Exposition on Multime- 
dia and CD-ROM). Over the 
past seven years, many of the 
major CD-ROM announce- 
ments have been made at this 
event. It's also a great place to 
tap into emerging technolo- 
gies, such as realtime video 
compression, home delivery of 



Sony unveiled a 

pDitable CD-ROM XA 

player at The 

International Conlerence 

& Exposition on 

Multimedia and CD-ROM. 




multimedia using fiberoptic ca- 
bles, and commercial applica- 
tions for virtual reality. 

Even though MPC is clearly 
thefastest-grow/ing CD-ROM for- 
mat, the conference provided 
equal time to the alphabet 
soup of competing platforms, in- 
cluding Mac CD-ROM. CD- 
ROM XA, CD-I, CDTV, Photo 
CD, and UNIX CO-ROM. The 
wide scope of today's multime- 
dia was reflected by the eclec- 
tic m ix of attendees . They inc lud- 
ed traditional information pub- 
lishers, such as Compton's, 
Grolier, and World Book; tra- 
ditional hardware manufactur- 
ers, such as Altec Lansing, 
Panasonic, and Sony; and tra- 



ditional computer-based con- 
sumer companies, such as 
Br0derbund, Access, and Cre- 
ative Labs. The products reflect- 
ed a similar divergence, includ- 
ing everything from a new $199 
parallel-port audio card {the 
Audioport from Media Vision) to 
$50,000 video-editing systems. 

Which were the most inter- 
esting new multimedia prod- 
ucts? In addition to the Audio- 
port, Media Vision announced 
its new 16-bit multimedia 
sound card, the Pro Audio- 
Spectrum 16 (Media Vision, 
47221 Fremont Boulevard, Fre- 
mont, California 94538; 800- 
348-7116; $349). This card 
has true 16-bit audio for CD- 
quality sound. The Pro Audio- 
Spectrum 16 also uses the 
new Yamaha OPL-3 chip for 
high-quality synthesized 
sounds and has full compati- 
bility with the Ad Lib, Sound 
Blaster, Windows 3.1, and 
MPC sound standards. 

Grolier announced its New 
Grolier Multimedia Encyclope- 
dia (Grolier Electronic Pub- 
lishing, Sherman Turnpike, 
Danbury Connecticut 06816; 
203-797-3500; $395), It con- 
tains all 21 volumes of the Ac- 
ademic American Encyclope- 
dia, plus high-quality maps, 
coior photographs, illustrations, 
sounds, video, and animation — 
all on a single CD-ROM. 

The marooned-on-a-desert- 
isle-and-can-choose-only-one- 
CD-ROM award would have to 
go to Library of the Future Se- 
ries Second Edition (World Li- 
brary, 12914 Master Street, Gar- 
den Grove, California 92640; 
714-748-7198: $399). It's a 
first-rate selection of 500 
great works of literature, relig- 
ion, science, and government. 
A close second for the same 
award would be the upcoming 
Oxford English Dictionary {Sec- 
ond Edition) on Compact Disc 
(Oxford University Press, 200 
Madison Avenue, New York, 
New York 10016; 212-679- 
7300; $895). With over 



2,400,000 illustrative quota- 
tions and a powerful search en- 
gine, it's the perfect gift for any 
PC-savvy word lover. 

Speaking of massive 
amounts of information in com- 
pact form, Sony displayed a pro- 
totype of its new portable CD- 
ROM XA player. Somewhat larg- 
er than the diminutive Discman 
(this one's seven inches wide, 
two inches high, and six inch- 
es deep), it plays standard XA 
discs that have been altered to 
accommodate the smaller 
screen (320 x 200 pixels). 

Interested in creating your 
own CD-ROMs? You can with 
Philips's new CDD 521 Com- 
pact Disc Recorder (Philips Con- 
sumer Electronics Company, 
One Philips Drive, Knoxville, 
Tennessee 37914; 800-722- 
6224; $5,995). Not only can it 
record standard CD-ROMs, 
but it can also write in XA, Pho- 
to CD, CD-I, and CD-audio for- 
mats. If $6,000 sounds like a 
lot, consider that this model 
sells for one-third the price of 
previous units. At this rate, 
you'll be able to afford your own 
CD-ROM recorder in just two or 
three years. 

IBM was also making a 
strong pitch for the high-end 
multimedia buyer. The compa- 
ny has turned its Ultimedia com- 
puter into yet another CD-ROM 
platform. In effect, it's a higher- 
level MPC, with a minimum IBM 
386 SLC processor, 4MB of 
RAM, CD-ROM XA drive, 
2.88MB 3y2 floppy, XGA graph- 
ics, and 16-bit audio card. Ac- 
cording to IBM, it can also run 
your MPC titles. As you can 
imagine, this is no home comput- 
er. Expect to pay $4,500- 
$10,000. On the other hand, 
once you've seen multimedia 
CD-ROMs designed specifical- 
ly for this platform (including 
such eye-popping titles as Co- 
lumbus: Encounter, Discovery, 
and Beyond), you can see why 
the future of multimedia will 
include a generous helping of 
wonder and excitement. □ 



82 COMPUTE AUGUST 1992 



A New Era In Flight! 







Flight Assignment: A.T.P. (Airline Transport Pilot) 

Now all computer users can experience ihe wonders of llighi. Watch ihc ingenious auiol'lighi mode ily a Boeing 7,^7, 7-47, 767, Airbus A-,'12() jei 
airliner or Shons 36(1 lurboprop across a scenery-filled United Stales. When you're ready to earn your uings as an Airline Transport Pilot, take 
the controls and fly any of 96 assignmenis between 26 major U.S. cities. Leading-edge features (full aulollight. .Air TrafTic Control, structured 
assignments with grading, user-adjustable .seenery complexity, time acceleration and much more) have been newly refined to make this ilie new 
standard of traditional flight simulation software. For IBM and conipalibles. Retjiil price: 569.9.1 



SCENERY AND SUPPORT PROGRAMS 

• California Scenery Collection 
• Great Britain Scenery Collection 

For IBM Microsoft Flight Simulator and Right Assignment: A.TJ. All 
new, highly detailed scenery covering California and Nevada 
(California Scenerj' Collection) or the United Kingdom and Republic 
of Ireland (Great Britain Scenery Collection). Each three-disk Scenery 
Collection provides an uninterrupted flow of visual scenery, hundreds 
of airports and radio navigation aids. Each includes large detailed 
three-color maps, representative approach charts, and a navigation 
plotter/quasi flight computer. Retail price: $59.95 each 

• New Facilities Locator 

Breeze your way around the worid of IBM Microsoft Right Simulator, 
Flight Assignment: A.T.P., ail SubLOGlC Scenery Disks and Scenery 
Collections. NFL instantly transports you to any location in any 
scenery area. Now all computer pilots can appreciate the extreme 

utility of this add-oti program for the special low price of only S24.95. 



See your dealer or call SubLOGlC to order. Circle the reader 
service number or call SubLOGlC to be placed on our 
"Computer Flight Newsbriefs" mailing list or to obtain 
additional product information. 

the Computer Flight people %> 



501 Kenyon Road 
Champaign. IL 61820 

TELEPHONE (217)359-8482 
FAX (2171352-147? 

ORDER L(Ne (8001637-4983 



COMING SOON! 
• Flight Assignment: Air Force 

The supreme flying experience! Progress from the easy to fly T-37 
trainer to the combat-capable T-38, dien advance lo the state-of-lhe-an 
F-16. Free flight plus structured lessons in basic aircraft control, 
aerobatics, formation flying, and visual and instrument navigation 
prov ide the ultimate in traditional flight simulal ion, and give you the 
skills 10 perform a variety of escort, strike and intercept practice 
missions. Retail price: $69.95 

• USA East 

• USA West 

A stunning achievement that you'll find indispensible! Every paved- 
runway airport and radio navigation aid in the continental U.S., 
combined with all major visuals (cities, roads, rivers, lakes and 
mountains) provide a complete, continuous flying environment for 
IBM Microsoft Flight Simulator and all SubLOGlC Flight 
.A.ssignment-series simulations. A simple keypress lets you overlay the 
USA visuals with ultra-detailed scenery from SubLOGlC Scenery 
Collections (available separately). Retail price: $69,95 each 

• Rudder Pedals 

Whether you're making a cross-country flight or trying to center an 
enemy target in your sights, SubLOGlC Rudder Pedals add a gut- 
stimulating realism to most IBM flight/combat simulations. Precision 
machined with steel tubing pivoting on metal bearing surfaces to 
e nsure a smooth response to your control inputs, for an unbe I ievable 
feel in aircraft control. Retail price: SI 29.00 



SubLOCilC. Flighi A^^i}:Ilmcl 
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Cif«l0 Reader Service Humber 179 



ENTERTAINMENT CHOICE 



Anything goes in this 
latest version of the famous 
falling blocks game. 

David Sears 



SUPER TETRIS 

Tetrts has captivated audienc- 
es of all ages ever since its ar- 
rival in this country in 1988 (it 
was designed in Russia). 
How appropriate that Super 
Tetris incorporates the Rus- 
sian Circus as a theme — like 
the circus, it's fun for children 
of all ages. Though Super Te- 
tris differs in presentation 
from Tetris only in its back- 
grounds and bouncy music, 
these differences will stun first- 
time players. Lions, clowns, 
and elephants — mainstays of 
the circus — enliven the 
screen. For you Super VGA 
owners, the 256-color paint- 
ings alone justify purchasing 
the game. 

Maybe you don't have Su- 
per VGA yet, and maybe you 
intend never to upgrade. For- 
get the sound card, too, 
while you're at it: Super Tetris 
doesn't need all the frills Spec- 
trum HoloByte generously of- 
fers. It's the quality of the 
gameplay that makes a 
game great, not the graphics 
and soundtrack. 

Like so many other incred- 
ulous Tetris veterans, you 
may wonder what could've 
changed. After all, haven't 
there been more than a few 
Telris sequels already? 
Blocks fall, you rotate them, 
you build lines, the machine 
beeps, and eventually blocks 
fall too fast for you to drop 
them into just the right slots. 
Play begins again, right? 

Besides the innumerable 
public domain clones, Tetris 
was officially reincarnated 
three times. First came 
Welltris, a truly perplexing 
twist on the fill-the-grid 
theme. Not only do players 
have to contend with the usu- 
al falling-block formations, but 




they have 
to look down 
a three-dimen- 
sional well — four 
walls and a bot- 
tom, too — while 
they do it. This ver- 
sion probably finds 
its most avid fans among the 
mathematically minded, 
though any Tetris pro can do 
well enough for a while. 

Faces showed up next. In- 
stead of fitting blocks, players 
mix and match strips contain- 
ing the eyes, noses, mouths, 
and so on of various historical 
figures. Many players thought 
that this went too far from the 
original design and reverted to 
playing the earlier versions. 

Then WordTris debuted, 
and wordmongers had a field 
day. Blocks were falling 
again, but this time they con- 
tained letters. Building words 
instead of horizontal lines 
■proves not only educational 
but surprisingly addictive. 
With the game's built-in 
60,000-word dictionary, play- 
ers can score points with all 
sorts of accidental spellings. 

The designers might have 
stopped there, and everyone 
could've been happy playing 
a favorite variation. After all, 
Tetris had expanded in three 
diverse areas: strategy, visual 
effects, and words. Like Tetris 
addicts, though, the design- 



ers couldn't 
stop. In an ingen- 
ious feat of redesigning. 
Spectrum HoloByte has deliv- 
ered a sequel tfiat does jus- 
tice to its auspicious title. 

What's different about Su- 
per Tetris? The playfield runs 
deeper, divided in half by a 
"water line." Each level be- 
gins with a pit of scattered 
blocks, none of which make 
complete lines. To clear this 
rubble away and move to the 
next level, you must find open 
spots for the descending 
blocks and neatly stack them 
above the water line. Piece 
by piece, you work your way 
through the debris: every time 
you complete a line, the rubble 
scrolls up to meet you. A 
small display window to the 
left of the actual Super Tetris ac- 
tion slowly reveals a pattern in 
the debris: when you complete 
this picture, you move on to 
the next challenge. 

Granted, ail the rubble 
might seem to pose a bit of 
trouble. In the original Tetris, a 
big pile of disconnected 
blocks means trouble and of- 
ten a quick end to the game. 
Don't worry, though; Super Te- 
tris is much more forgiving. For 



84 COMPUTE AUGUST 1992 



every line you complete, you're 
rewarded with a bomb cluster. 
The more lines you clear at a 
time, the more bombs you 
earn— and you'll certainly 
make use of them, blowing 
away obtrusive blocks or acti- 
vating special squares. 

The special squares can 
greatly affect play. One 
square fills all the empty spac- 
es between itself and the wa- 
ter line with blocks: another re- 
moves all the blocks above 
itself, Yet another square an- 
nihilates all the blocks within 
a 3 X 3 area. Blowing up a 
square with a bomb icon in it 
turns the next falling piece in- 
to a cluster of bombs shaped 
like that piece. Detonating 
still other squares can add 
blocks to the total number al- 
lotted to you per game; Super 
Tetris imposes a preset block' 
limit. In most games, you'll 
need to earn a few extra 
blocks to clear away all the 
rubble, so go for those spe- 
cial squares. 

Bombs and treasures 
make a tremendous differ- 
ence in the psychology of the 
game. Instead of being the 
hapless victim of poorly 
placed shapes, you can act 
on your frustration and re- 
move those bothersome piec- 
es. In the original Tetris, a mis- 
take can remain a mistake for 
a long while; in Super Tetris, 
it's just part of the gameplay. 

Ask Tetris players about 
strategy. You'd receive ready 
answers, perhaps something 
like "I try to fit pieces in the 
middle last" or "I tend to 
stack pieces on the left and 
right." They've rationalized 
long ago why the longest piec- 
es should remain vertical and 
why the perfect squares be- 
long on the left. In Super Te- 
tris, however, anything goes. 
Special blocks seem random- 



ly scattered throughout the rub- 
ble, and the bombs make pow- 
erful equalizers. The save- 
game feature works wonders 
for timid players, allowing 
room for some freewheeling 
gameplay. You can return to 
the same level again and 
again, to the same situation, 
just as you saved it. 

As mentioned earlier. Su- 
per Tetris has a competitive 
mode — you use your bombs 
and falling pieces to prevent 
your opponent from complet- 
ing lines. There's also a coop- 
erative option, which allows 
players to work together. 
Each of these two-player 
modes expands the width of 
the pit to increase block ma- 
neuverability. 

In the head-to-head compe- 
tition, you race against one 
another to clear away rubble 
This two-person mode re- 
quires two copies of Super Te- 
tris and a null modem cable or 
Novell local area network to 
function. Simpler single-player 
game variants include 5-, 10-, 
and 15-minute timed games. 

As super as Super Tetris is. 
however, you'll often wonder 
just when that vital long, skin- 
ny piece might turn up. Super 
Tetris can display an almost 
malicious streak in withhold- 
ing necessary pieces, and 
you might see eight red 
squares before you encoun- 
ter the long purple one you so 
desperately require. 

Also, l/Vindows users must 
consider whether they want 
the Windows or the DOS ver- 
sion. Super Tetris for Win- 
dows makes excellent use of 
a 640 X 480 256-color dis- 
play; the DOS-based display 
though still quite attractive, 
drops the resolution to 320 x 
200. Moreover, because of 
the problematic nature of Win- 
dows' relationship to sound 




cards, the Windows version 
of Super Tetris supports only 
Sound Blaster. And while the 
Windows version does multi- 
task properly, it doesn't offer 
a head-to-head play option. 
The differences between the 
two versions balance out,' forc- 
ing you to choose between 
two equally superb variants. 
Some players will no doubt 
gladly purchase both ver- 
sions and alternate play be- 
tween them. 

No computer gamer can 
live by Tetris alone, not even 
Super Tetris. But given Super 
Tetris's unadulterated appeal 
to all age groups, both sexes, 
and yes, even computer- 
phobes and computer haters, 
no one who sees it will want 
to live without it. D 



circle Reader Service Number 302 



IBM PC and 
compatibles; 64DK 
RAM (2MB (or 
Windows version): 
VGA, EGA, VGA, Tandy 
IB-color, or Hercules 
(VGA or Super VGA lor 
Windows version); 
supports Ad Lib, 
Sound Blaster, Tandy 
1000, or Roland sound 
(Windows version 
supports only Sound 
Blaster); joystick and 
mouse optional 
(Microsoft-compatible 
mouse required lor 
windows version)— 
$49.85 

SPECTRUM HOLOBYTE 
2061 Challenger Dr. 
Alameda, CA 84S01 
(800) 522-GAME 



AUGUST 1992 COMPUTE 85 



GAMEPLAY 



Orson Scott Card 



Risk promises the 

world— and 

provides It on a 

single screen 

In the windows 

version. 



ATTRACTIVE 
NUISANCES 

Last month I talked about ttie 
Windows games from Syman- 
tec (Symantec Game Pack) 
and Microsoft (Windows Enter- 
tainment Pack Two and Win- 
dows Entertainment Pack 
Three). All the games are fun, 
and some are wonderful. 

But these games can also 
be a problem. First, they're all 
quick. Some of them take no 
more than five minutes to play 
to the end. Memory Blocks, 
Tripeaks, and WordZap, for in- 




stance, can be played out in 
less than three minutes every 
time. Now, that should be a 
recommendation, especially if 
you tend to play these games 
at work. But it doesn't always 
end up that way. Because 
they take only a few minutes, 
it's easy to talk yourself into 
playing just once more. 

Second, because they're 
Windows games, they aren't 
hiding in some dark corner of 
DOS where you can forget 
they're there long enough to 
get some useful work done. In- 
stead, they're waiting a couple 
of mouse clicks av/ay every 
time you come back to your 
desktop. 

And there I am. three hours 
later, switching from FreeCell 
to Tetravex, from Tetris to 
Stones. Endlessly. Unproduc- 
tively. Heck, I've played these 
games instead of writing this 



column. In their quiet, pleas- 
ant little way, they're like time 
vampires, sucking away 
years of my life. 

I've come up with a name 
for games of this genre that re- 
flects their true character. I 
call them nuisance games. 
They're the Windows equiva- 
lent of a dish of M & M's. You 
never take more than a cou- 
ple, but before you know it, 
they're gone. And it was you 
who ate every one of them. 

Nuisance games, yes, but 
remember that in law there's a 
principle called attractive nui- 
sance. This is the concept in 
liability law that 
allows you to 
be sued when 
somebody Ires- 
passes on your 
property and 
gets hurt while 
sneaking a mid- 
night swim in 
your pool. Even 
though this per- 
son was tres- 
passing, you 
are considered 
liable because 
your pool is an attractive 
nuisance. 

Someday, I'm going to 
bring suit against Microsoft 
and Symantec, demanding 
that they pay me for all the 
hours of writing time they 
stole from me with their attrac- 
tive nuisances. I'll demand 
that they reimburse me for the 
novels I didn't write, the col- 
umns that were late, and my ill 
health because of sleep I 
missed. And I know I'll win. All 
I'll have to do is get the judge 
to let me provide the jury mem- 
bers with computers loaded 
with these games, and after 
they've had time to get 
hooked (20 minutes tops), 
they'll award me millions, 

Having said that, let me now 
tell you about my favorite Win- 
dows game, knowing full well 
that I'm leading my fellow com- 
pulsives to self-destruction. 



It's Risk, from Virgin Games 
(licensed from Parker Broth- 
ers). Much better than the 
DOS version, which only 
shows you a small part of the 
globe at any one time, the Win- 
dows version always shows a 
full view of the world map. You 
can decide whether your com- 
puter opponents are good, 
fair, or passive; or you can, 
with easy adjustments, play 
with a mix of human and com- 
puter opponents, Yet the Win- 
dows version faithfully repro- 
duces everything good about 
the board game. 

I never realized, in all my 
years of Risk piaying in my 
adolescence, how much of 
the game was taken up with 
the sheer mechanics of count- 
ing out armies and moving 
them from place to place 
around the board. Games 
would last hours. But this com- 
puter implementation is so 
smooth that you waste no 
time at all on housekeeping. 
It's all strategy and battle. It's 
the Platonic ideal of Risk. 

You can wipe out a comput- 
er opponent without worrying 
about making an enemy. So, 
for the first time, I get to play 
the game the way it was de- 
signed to be played. 

Risk is so much fun and so 
fast that I forgive little infelici- 
ties, such as the way that eve- 
ry now and then the game de- 
cides that you're a computer 
player, too, and plays all your 
turns for you or the way that 
the white numbers sometimes 
blend in with the white borders 
so that you can have 18 ar- 
mies in England but it looks 
like you have only 1. 

Do I recommend Risk? 
Sure. Just the way that I rec- 
ommend that you climb over 
the fence and swim in your 
neighbor's pool at 2:00 a.m., 
alone and in the dark. 

It's not my fault if it steals 
hours from your life. I'm not the 
one who programmed such 
an attractive nuisance. D 



B6 COMPUTE AUGUST 1992 



'^'^AILABLE, 



■™"«ICi(i,; 



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FABLES&FIENDS 



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THE LEGEND OF 



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BOOK ONE ^ 




Immerse yourselt in 

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Enter A 

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A land of dark mysterious forests and 
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ruLies and emeralds. A land or treatn- 
taking keaufy and secrets to unravel. 
Tke land of Kyrandia. 





Gorgeous scenes and realistic animation draw 
you into tnis fantasy adventure- Elegant point- 
and-click control maizes it easy to play. Tne fully 
orcnestrated soundtrack -will captivate you. 




DistriDuted exclusively by 

For pricing and orders, please call 800-VRG-1N07. Visa, Mastercard, American 
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Circle Readef Servlca Number 158 





44.4^ M 



For many of us, the idea of 
meeting new people can be 
a daunting prospect. Wlieth- 
er you're out on a date in 
liopes of putting tfie single 
life behind you or at a trade 
show trying to lasso new cus- 
tomers, in-person salesman- 
ship can be difficult for all 
but the most thick-skinned. 
Despite their much-vaunted 
reputation as social animals, 
most human beings would 
just as soon run, not walk, 
from any situation that in- 
volves someone other than 
the familiar circle of family, 
friends, and coworkers. Of- 
ten, we'd rather sit home 
and mope than risk an all- 
too-personal rejection. 

That's where online net- 
working comes in. A cross 
between oid-fashioned letter 
writing and high-tech elec- 
tronic communication, on- 
line networking lets you 
work a room without actually 
being there. By logging on 
to an online service or bul- 
letin board, you can use 
your computer and modem 
to send E-mail to that intri- 
guing person across the 
way, carry on uninhibited 
chats about the most inti- 
mate of topics, and log off if 
the situation gets too hot for 
you to handle. Not only is mo- 

90 COMPUTE AUGUST 1992 



THE 

ELECTRONIC 

MEET 

MARKET 

BY ROSALIND RESNICK 




dem-to-modem communica- 
tion a boon for the painfully 
shy, but it's also a great way 
to find a job, start a busi- 
ness, get free advice, and 
hobnob with like-minded peo- 
ple you'd never meet at the 
neighborhood block party. 
And, of course, there's no 
need to dress up, make 
small talk, or pass out busi- 
ness cards. 

Though online networking 
has been widely touted as a 
powerful home business 
tool, it's also gaining popular- 
ity with people looking for 
romantic and sexual liai- 
sons — in the age of AIDS 



and other sexually transmit- 
ted diseases, perhaps the 
riskiest of all interpersonal en- 
counters. By logging on to 
one of hundreds of bulletin 
boards, anyone with a PC 
and a modem can hook up 
with an interesting stranger 
without ever leaving the com- 
fort and safety of home. And 
if you do decide to make 
your fantasies a reality, you 
can always arrange to chat 
by phone or meet in person. 
In fact, dozens of online dal- 
liances have already led to 
matrimony. 

These days, romance is 
popping up all over the on- 



line world — on America On- 
line, with its racy realtime Ro- 
mance Connection, on DEL- 
PHI, GEnie, and Prodigy, 
the somewhat stuffier IBM- 
Sears venture, which has 
started to run personal ads 
in its classifieds. Then 
there's CompuServe's CB 
Simulator, another realtime 
chat channel that boasts the 
famous story of the couple 
that met online and eventual- 
ly married — with the bride, 
groom, and minister typing 
their parts of the ceremony in- 
to the communal PC. 

For those desiring less se- 
rious relationships, there are 
plenty of bulletin boards 
that offer electronic meeting 
places for people looking to 
explore their fantasies — and 
perhaps set up a rendez- 
vous later on. Penthouse, a 
sister publication of COM- 
PUTE'S, has launched an on- 
line service called Petline 
that lets you chat with Pent- 
house Pets and special 
guests from around the 
world, swap erotic E-mail 
with the service's other mem- 
bers, and download photos 
for private enjoyment, {Call 
212-254-3838 to download 
the software necessary to 
gain access to Petline. Re- 
member that you must be 



WHATEVER 

YOU 

NEED, WISH, 

OR 

DESIRE 



18 or older to use Petline.) 

Max K., 42, who's single 
and works as a consultant 
on the West Coast, says he 
logs on to America Online to 
find partners willing to 
share their fantasies over 
the phone. Though Max 
says he has been in a mo- 
nogamous relationship with 
the same woman for the last 
four years, he typically logs 
on to the service four or five 
times a week to find the fan- 
tasy partners that give his 
life spice. He says his girl- 
friend knows all about his on- 
line adventures and some- 
times joins in herself. 

"I'm living in sin in a [mo- 
nogamous] relationship," 
Max explains. "I've always 
been into fantasy, and this 
is the ultimate in safe sex." 
Not all online relation- 
ships are as risque as 
Max's, of course. Many are 
downright conventional — 
people exchange messag- 
es, meet in person, and de- 
cide to form an ongoing re- 
lationship — maybe even mar- 
ry. That's pretty much what 
happened to Kathie Fields 
and Kevin Morley, two nov- 
ice online networkers who 
met on Prodigy Kevin, 31, a 
never-married electrician in 
Spring, Texas, ran a classi- 



fied ad in September 1991 
that went like this: "White 
male, age 30, 6 foot 1, 210 
pounds, looking for a female 
with a sense of humor for 
companionship and possi- 
bly more? I like to read, 
watch movies, computers 
and many, many other 
things. I can't tap-dance or 
tightrope-walk, and skydiv- 
ing is against my religion. 
What? (Signed) Texas No 
Can't Dance." 

The ad soon piqued the in- 
terest of Kathie, 36, a long- 
haul trucker and divorced 
mother of one, and the rest 
is history. They tied the knot 
on New Year's Day "It start- 
ed with this friendly chit- 
chat," Kevin recalls, "We 
would go online and type let- 
ters back and forth," Says 
Kathie: "Then the letters got 
more intense. We found out 
that there was a lot we had 
in common." 

But online networking 
isn't limited to people look- 
ing for love. It's a medium 
that unites people of all ag- 
es, occupations, interests, 
lifestyies, and parts of the 
world. In the realm of busi- 
ness, CompuServe's Work- 
ing from Home Forum lets 
home office professionals 
swap notes on everything 



from marketing tips to 
health insurance. GEnie's 
Computer Press Association 
RoundTable features a bulle- 
tin board where editors can 
post help-wanted notices 
and writers can download 
business leads. America On- 
line posts job listings on its 
Teacher's Information Net- 
work and lets entrepreneurs 
get help from the Service 
Corps of Retired Executives 
at the Microsoft Small Busi- 
ness Center. 

Jeff Freeman, 25, of 
Front Porch Computers in 
Chatsworth, Georgia, says 
his fledgling business never 
could've taken off the way it 
has without the help of on- 
line networking and advertis- 
ing. Started as a home busi- 
ness in May 1991, Front 
Porch expects to rake in 
gross revenues of more 
than $500,000 this year and 
sell its homemade IBM 
clones to customers as far 
away as Europe and South 
America, Freeman, who 
says he has met a number 
of prospects through Com- 
puServe's Working from 
Home Forum, spends less 
than $200 a month on an ad 
in the CompuServe classi- 
fieds and reaches as many 
as 800,000 people world- 



wide. No one would com- 
piain about that kind of re- 
turn on an investment. 

Take away his online con- 
nections, Freeman says, 
and his booming business 
would be "nowhere." Chats- 
worth, population 5000, is 
100 miles north of Atlanta, 
he explains, and his comput- 
er store is the first and only 
one the town has ever had — 
and is ever likely to have. 
"With a store in a town like 
this, you may sell one com- 
puter at a time, but on Com- 
puServe you may meet some- 
body who wants to buy mul- 
tiple computers for his busi- 
ness. Our store is a small 
thing here, but with Com- 
puServe I can reach the 
world." 

Online networking is also 
becoming increasingly pop- 
ular with people who suffer 
from chronic illnesses and 
other disabilities— people 
who, in some cases, can't 
leave their homes or hospi- 
tal beds to find the support 
and companionship they des- 
perately need. For this pur- 
pose, CompuServe offers a 
wide variety of support 
groups and resource cen- 
ters, such as the Diabetes 
and Hypoglycemia Forum, 
the Cancer Forum, and the 

AUGUST 1992 COMPUTE 91 



Living with AIDS Section of the Human 
Sexuality Forum. 

"The typical reaction of new diabet- 
ics is basically one of horror and fear 
and uncertainty," says David Groves, 
46, a longtime diabetic and former 
bank executive in Bedford, Texas, who 
manages the Diabetes and Hypogly- 
cemia Forum. "Our typical reaction is 
to be comforting. What we tell people 
is that no matter what they've heard 
about diabetes, they can take care of 
it, and we'll help teach them how." 

Groves's forum appears to be attract- 
ing a wide following, fvlore than 5000 
people have visited the forum so far 



from places as far afield as France, 
New Zealand, Japan, and Belgium. 
Groves estimates that 30 percent of 
the new members are people who've re- 
cently been diagnosed with diabetes. 

The Kid Connection 

But online networking — with the excep- 
tion of Petline and other X-rated sen/- 
ices— isn't just for adults. Prodigy, for 
example, has the Club (for Kids), 
which lets the under-18 crowd swap 
notes about everything from the hottest 
rock groups to their feelings about the 
snooty cliques who rule the school. 
The good news for parents: Prodigy 



charges a flat monthly fee, so the kids 
can talk as long as they like without 
busting the family bank account. 

In the Club forum not long ago, a 
couple of junior high school kids be- 
came involved in a discussion about 
dissection, a hot topic in these days of 
animal-rights activism. "I oppose the 
dissection of animals," declared a mem- 
ber named Julie. "There is no reason 
to dissect many animals when the 
whole class could watch one on a vid- 
eo and possibly learn even more. It is 
understandable for medical students to 
dissect, but I really don't believe it's 
necessary to have seventh graders 



Online is the hottest new way to meet peo- 
ple. Friendships, business relationships, 
and even matrimony can result. But that's 
not all that can happen, Unscrupulous and 
unbalanced people sometimes work the on- 
line world, looking for vulnerable people to 
use and abuse. Don't be afraid of the on- 
tine world, but treat it as you'd treat the per- 
sonals in a big city newspaper: A certain 
amount of caution will pay off. 

What kinds of troubles can you expect on- 
line? Any service that provides for instant 
communication and E-mail also provides a 
channel for harassing communication that 
can be more trouble than fun. If your 
name and telephone number are known to 
many people online, then it won't be diffi- 
cult for an abusive person to get that infor- 
mation — after all, you can't count on a cas- 
ual acquaintance to protect your interests 
and privacy as carefully as you do. 

One day, knocking around on a BBS sen/- 
ice, I asked people whether they had 
been harassed online. Virtually all the peo- 
ple I contacted said either that they had 
been harassed or that they knew someone 
who had. Usually, the harassment takes 
the classic form of sexual harassment every- 
where — men pursuing women beyond the 
point that women want to be pursued. But 
there are plenty of female harassers, too. 

How can you protect yourself? 

1. Never, never reveal your password. 
Not even to a friend or to a spouse or to a 
loved one. It not only allows someone to 
use your account without your knowledge — 
perhaps racking up hundreds of dollars in 
Charges before you can detect the abuse- 
but also allows another person to speak as 
if he or she were you, making it look to oth- 
er members of the service as if you are be- 
ing abusive or inappropriate. 

2. If you're using a service that lets you 
hide behind a handle (a fictitious name), se- 
lect one in keeping with the kind of interac- 
tion you want to have, II sexy or foxy is 
part of the name, you're going to gel a fair- 
ly predictable stream of messages when- 
ever you log on. If you don't want that kind 
of message, change your handle to some- 
thing more sedate. I have it on good author- 
ity that any handle that sounds feminine in- 
vites abuse. And if you're in the habit of 
sending lewd messages to anyone with a 



DON'T GET BURNED 

feminine handle, remember that there are 
plenty of men online masquerading as wom- 
en and vice versa. 

3. Try not to get too involved with some- 
one you haven't gotten to know. Some peo- 
ple online tell too much about themselves 
too soon. One man said, "I couldn't believe 
how much some of these women were will- 
ing to reveal about themselves — their 
names, addresses, telephone numbers. I 
tell them that they shouldn't give out that in- 
formation the first time they talk to some- 
one. It's just plain dangerous." But also 
remember that the barrage of information 
might not be truthful. Just as you can't tell 
the sex of a person sending a message, 
it's difficult to check on whether a person 
is actually married and only pretending to 
be divorced, separated, or single 

4. Watch for red flags. If a person tells 
you one day that she is a florist and anoth- 
er day that she is a veterinarian, that per- 
son is probably lying to you and has prob- 
ably told you other lies, too. If information 
about a person doesn't add up, perhaps 
it's time to look for other interests online. 
When you stop responding to people and 
they continue to send you messages, 
that's another danger sign. Don't be sur- 
prised if the messages you receive be- 
come increasingly abusive. If that hap- 
pens, consider changing your handle or 
going to another online service. 

5. Don't forget that the sysop is your 
best friend. If you find yourself in an abu- 
sive relationship, let the sysop or someone 
in authority know. An abusive person is of- 
ten a compulsive person. It's likely that abus- 
ing you is part of a pattern of abuse and 
the abusive person might already be on 
probation for this behavior. The sysop will 
probably want to know that it's going on 
and should take measures to stop it. 

6. If you're getting information from some- 
one that's just too good to be true, check 
the person out with people you trust. Abu- 
sive people get reputations quickly in the 
small world online. One person I heard 
about used a macro to send salacious mes- 
sages to anyone online with a feminine han- 
dle. He made people so uncomfortable 
that they discussed his behavior among 
themselves and demanded his ouster. 

7. If you're even mildly famous— an au- 



thor, an actor, or an entertainer — you 
might run into fans online. If your handle is 
too transparent, you'll invite abuse, "People 
think they own you," one woman said. 
"Like you're their private celebrity" It's no 
secret that most of the computer and sci- 
ence-fiction publishing business is online, 
from freelancers to publishers. Other celeb- 
rities like William F. Buckley and Timothy 
Leary are also avid users of online servic- 
es. Romance and other genre writers are 
also discovering online services. As com- 
puters become more widespread, televi- 
sion and movie stars are appearing on the 
services. If you're famous, protect yourself 
with a well-chosen handle and a vague air 
of mystery. Don't let anyone pin you down. 
If you're a fan, remember that celebrities 
are just people like yourself and that unless 
you have something specific to impart, per- 
haps it's best not to send messages at all. 

8. You can avoid getting a reputation as 
a harasser by never saying anything online 
that you wouldn't want said to you, or to 
your mom. And never say anything that 
you can't take full responsibility for. Remem- 
ber that an E-mail message can be print- 
ed, copied, and sent to your boss or your 
spouse or the sysop. If the message is abu- 
sive, slanderous, or sexually inappropriate, 
it could be embarrassing later (and there 
might even be serious consequences — 
freedom of speech doesn't extend to 
threats). If you stop getting replies to your 
E-mail, stop sending it. Don't forget that oth- 
er people have lives, too. There may be 
very good reasons why you haven't heard 
from people. Let them go. You ser^^e no pur- 
pose by becoming hostile or abusive. 

9. Treat all messages in good humor, Re- 
member the adage "A soft answer tumeth 
away wrath." Just because someone has 
been beastly to you, that doesn't mean you 
have to respond in kind. And there's al- 
ways the possibility that you misinterpreted 
what the person was saying — that it was a 
joke or a simple miscommunication. 

10. If you find someone who interests 
you and you want to meet that person, 
plan to meet in a neutral location where 
there are plenty of people around— a res- 
taurant or mall, for example. Meeting at 
your residence is an enormous gamble. 

—ROBERT BIXBY 



92 COMPUTE AUGUST 1992 




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ere's the official hint 
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pair off and go at innocent frogs and 
worms. Wfiat important lesson does 
tfiat teach?" 

RiclieJIe, anottier member, disa- 
greed and didn't liesitate to say so, 
"Whiat is so wrong witfi dissecting?!!" 
she asl<ed, "It is the best way to ob- 
serve and learn the complexity of a 
multicellular organism." 

Like any other form of human inter- 
action, of course, online networking is 



not without its risks. One is the chance 
that, just as in offline relationships, the 
online pal you give your phone number 
or address to can harass you with late- 
night phone calls or visits and general- 
ly make your life miserable. There's al- 
so this danger: When you chat online, 
it's harder to tell if the people you're talk- 
ing to are realiy who they say they are. 
Larry Zinn, 39, a rock-'n'-roll tour man- 
ager who lives in New York City, says 



GETTING TOGETHER 



People who meet and get to know each 
other online like to get togettier in person. 
For example, the Trivia Club on America 
Online often holds parties so people in vari- 
ous parts of the country can meet, at 
least regionally. A general grouping like 
this is a perfect setting to meet a person 
you might hesitate to meet individually. 

Be prepared to meet people who don't 
match your impressions. The fact that you 
can't see a person's face when you inter- 
act online means that all you have to go 
on is your imagination. Don't be disappoint- 
ed. Getting to know a person face to face 
is a completely different experience — after 
all, that's the purpose of the meeting. 

Checking with the party animals on a 
couple of online services only turned up 
two online party horror stories. One in- 
volved a person who was "a stuffed shirt 
and a workaholic," and the other involved 
an obsessive character who later har- 
assed people on the telephone and in per- 
son. But the online crew is generally sta- 
ble, highly intelligent, and fun loving. Re- 
gardless of other specialized interests, 
they like conversation and wordplay. 

Share pictures, If you have a snapshot 
of yourself, scan it in, convert it to GF, and 
upload it to the people who will be com- 
ing. Get a commitment from the others to 
upload snapshots as well, so everyone 
will recognize each other on sight. Locat- 
ing a specific person in a public place 
might otherwise be difficult, 

Be honest, at least with people you're go- 
ing to become involved with. In the online 
world, it's so easy to mask your identity 
that people do it almost without thinking. 
When you meet people face to face, you 
won't be able to lie about your height, 
your weight, your age, or your IQ, though 
you might be able to prevaricate about at 
least a couple of these online. 

Meel in a neutral place. Since you prob- 
ably can't know in advance all of the pref- 
erences of the people attending, avoid 
bars or places that might offend the sen- 
sibilities of one of the members unless you 
have cleared it in advance with everyone 
who's expected to attend. 

A restaurant with a conference or ban- 
quet room would be a perfect meeting 
place except for one thing: You also want 
to make it easy for people not to join the 
group. A person who walks into a banquet 
room has to all intents and purposes com- 
mitted himself to joining the group. That 
fact alone might be enough to make him 
turn around and walk out of the restaurant. 



You want to make it possible for people 
to see the group as they approach. There- 
fore, it would be an even belter idea to 
meet in some open, public place before ad- 
journing to the restaurant at an appointed 
time. That way, latecomers will be able to 
locate the group, and more hesitant peo- 
ple will have the opportunity to approach 
or walk by, whichever they wish. There- 
fore, a mall or a large hotel lobby is a 
good initial meeting place. 

Arrange your meeting via E-mail. By not 
making a general announcement, you main- 
tain control over the guest list. Remember 
that there are very few really private areas 
online and a general announcement 
might attract people who aren't members 
of the group and people that you don't 
want to attend for whatever reason. 

Another approach would be to have a 
group grow from a small circle of friends. 
Limit the initial meeting to four people, or 
perhaps four couples. Then, as a group, 
put together a larger guest list. By first in- 
cluding people that you know well and 
then people that they know well, you re- 
duce the anxiety of the new people. 

Most groups coalesce around a specif- 
ic activity — online gaming, trivia, sports, 
politics, religion — and these activities dic- 
tate the locus of the group. But many 
groups of people have no central interest. 
Writers, for example, are a particularly cen- 
tnfugal group— independent, opinionated, 
and often egotistical — and any gathering 
not devoted to a single purpose might 
turn into a nightmare. Therefore, if there is 
no focus, you should give more thought to 
an agenda. 

You might consider inviting yourself to 
one of the parties being arranged at any 
given time. If you're interested In seeing 
how it's done, check out La Pub or use the 
keyword OUE on America Online to see 
the get-togethers being arranged and the 
conversation among the party-conscious. 
On DELPHI, create a custom forum to an- 
nounce a party GEnie doesn't have any 
specific area for announcing or finding out 
about parties online, but you can discuss 
anything you like in a chat area. In Com- 
puServe, parties are usually arranged with- 
in forums in conjunction with trade shows 
and events of special interest to forum 
members. For example, within the fvlacin- 
tosh forum (MAUG). the Club forum is 
used for arranging get-togethers and ac- 
commodations at Mac shows and often 
contains "official" party lists. 

—ROBERT BIXBV 



94 COMPUTE AUGUST 1992 



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he once fell hard for a woman he met 
on America Online only to discover — 
the day before he'd planned to fly to 
Florida to visit her— that she was mar- 
ried. Though he was upset at the time, 
he says he's gotten over it and has 
since gone out with someone else he 
met through the service. "The online 
thing can be extremely addictive if 
you're not careful," he says, explaining 
that his biggest problem so far with on- 
line networking has been trying to 
keep a lid on his monthly online charg- 
es. Currently, he spends several hun- 
dred dollars a month in access fees. 

The Online Thing 

As computers and modems continue 
to proliferate, it's possible that one day 
online networking will become as com- 
mon as business lunches and cocktail 
parties. Face-to-face business confer- 
ences will be replaced by forums and 
round tables. In the future, "What's 
your sign" may well give way to 
"What's your log-on?" 

For now, online networking offers a 
unique opportunity to reach out to a uni- 
verse of computer-literate strangers 
and find a friend, a lover, a customer, 
or even a fellow student with some 
strong feelings about dissecting frogs. 
Whatever your need, wish, or desire, 
from business relationships to human re- 
lationships, there's probably someone 
in front of a computer somewhere wait- 
ing to share it with you. □ 



Linking Up 

America Online 

8619 West wood Center Dr., Ste. 200 

Vienna, VA 22182 

(703) 448-8700 

CompuServe 
P.O. Box 20212 
Columbus, OH 43220 
(800) 848-8990 

DELPHI 

General Videotex 

1030 Massachusetts Ave. 

Cambridge, t\/lA 02138 

(800) 695-4005 

(617) 491-3393 

GEnie 

401 N. Washington St. 
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(800) 638-9636 

Pet line 

1965 Broadway 

New York, NY 10023-5965 

(212) 254-3838 (Modem) 

Prodigy 

445 Hamilton Ave. 
White Plains, NY 10601 
(800) 284-5933 



96 COMPUTE AUGUST 1992 



64/128 VIEW 



Define your computing goals. 

Then see if your computer — dinosaur 

or not — can get the job done. 

Tom Netsel 



Take time to flip tlirough 
the pages that surround 
Gazette in this issue, 
and you'll see a section 
comparing the latest Super 
VGA monitors and accelera- 
tor cards. 

If you're impressed by 
the sweeping changes in 
monitors, try keeping 
abreast of the latest features 
packed into computers them- 
selves. One COIMPUTE edi- 
tor is planning to buy a PC 
for use at home, but just as 
he decides on a system, 
something newer and faster 
pops over the silicon hori- 
zon. Prices are dropping, 
but buying a new system is 
still a major investment. Like 
any consumer, this editor 
would hate to decide on a 
computer, fork over the 
cash, and then find a new im- 
proved modei hitting the 
streets a few days later. 

The PC market is volatile. 
What's new and hot today 
soon becomes yesterday's 
technology As Bill Ihlenfeldt 
said recently in the The Wall 
Street Journal, "I bought the 
latest computer; it came com- 
pletely loaded. It was guar- 
anteed for 90 days, but in 
30 days it was outmoded." 
I spotted something simi- 
lar the other day as I 
browsed through some user 
group newsletters. I came 
across an article written by 
Bjo Ashwill in "The Comput- 
er Group" of Eugene, Ore- 
gon. Ashwill, in a vein simi- 
lar to his Journal col- 
league's, made a tongue-in- 
cheek gibe about the way to- 
day's technology changes 
so rapidly. He mentioned 
his old laptop computer. Peo- 
ple called his six-pound lap- 
top a dinosaur, a mere 8086 
with a 20-meg hard drive, 
poking along at a pedestri- 



an 8 MHz. "You couldn't 
prove it by me," Ashwill 
said. "I'm still starry-eyed 
about my Commodore 64." 

Ashwill knows how easy it 
is to get carried away by 
new toys and the latest 
megaspeed gizmo. SVGA 
monitors may appeal to 
many enthusiasts, but many 
64 owners still don't own 
monitors. They hook their 
computers to TV sets. 

No matter how unglamor- 
ous the 64 may seem when 
compared to today's elec- 
tronic speedsters, tfie little 8- 
bitter still gets the job done. 
That point was illustrated 
nicely by Max P. Feld, who's 
one of the Miami Individuals 
with Commodore Equipment 
(M.I.C.E.). He wrote in 
"M.I.C.E. News" about a 
member who was having 
trouble with her securities 
program. It wouldn't pro- 
duce the financial data she 
needed. Group members rec- 
ommended that she define 
her goals and then look for 
a way to accomplish them. 
Instead of trying to coax per- 
tinent data from a fancy but 
temperamental program, 
they suggested she use a 
simple spreadsheet to ac- 
complish the task. 

Feld sees a lesson in this 
for all of us. "What do we ex- 
pect to get out of our comput- 
ers?" he asks. "Just why do 
we use the 64 or 128?" 
Once we ask ourselves 
these questions and define 
our computing goals, we 
should take another look at 
our 64s and 128s. They may 
not be today's pride of Sili- 
con Valley, but can they still 
handle our needs? If so, it 
might come as a surprise to 
discover that our 64s and 
128s are not the dinosaurs 
soma folks say they are. lJ 



GAZETTE 



64/128 VIEW G-1 

So it's a dinosaur! Your 64 still works, doesn't it? 
By Tom Netsel. 

FEEDBACK G-2 

Questions and comments from our readers. 

BURIED TREASURE G-6 

It may take a little digging to find them, but some 
public domain programs can be real gems. 
By Henning Vahlenkamp. 

REVIEWS G-1 2 

Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles — The Arcade Game, 
The Simpsons Arcade Game, S.E.C. Check Register. 

PROGRAMMER'S PAGE G-T7 

To be a hot programmer, learn how your 64 works. 
By Randy Thompson. 

BEGINNER BASIC G-1 8 

Build this simple device to control appliances. 
By Larry Cotton. 

MACHINE LANGUAGE G-20 

Create unusual screen effects. By Jim Butterfield. 

WORLD VIEW G-21 

Here's the latest Commodore news from the U.K. 
By Steve Jarratt. 

GEOS G-22 

Old and new GEOS products. By Steve Vender Ark. 

DIVERSIONS G-24 

Body language speaks volumes. By Fred D'Ignazio. 



PROGRAMS 
SuperWirtdows 
Revelation 
Formatted List 
Blanker 
SuperSave 
Balloon Pop 
Sub Attack II 
Tag It 



G-25 
G-26 
G-28 
G-29 
G-31 
G-32 
G-34 
G-37 



AUGUST 1992 COMPUTE G-1 



FEEDBACK 



Questions and 

answers about 

machine 

language monitors, 

memory 

llmftations, and 

printouts of 

program listings 



Monitor or IVILX? 

What is the difference be- 
tween a machine language 
monitor and MLX, the Gazette 
utility program that we use for 
entering machine language 
programs? I have noticed 
that with a monitor we must en- 
ter eight codes, but in f^LX 
we must enter nine codes. 

MAURIZiOGEREVASI 
QUITO. ECUADOR 

A machine language monitor 
is a versatile program for en- 
tering and editing raw comput- 
er code. Its main feature is an 
assembler for writing pro- 
grams in assembly language. 

LDA #$41 ;load the accumulator 
registerwith the value 
65 ($41) 

JSR $FFD2 ;jump to the subrou- 
tine tor printing the 
accumulator value 

For example, the code 
above is a simple two-line as- 
sembly program for printing 
the tetter A. (The text follow- 
ing the semicolons consists of 
remarks and isn't part of the 
code.) 

The assembler takes these 
mnemonic instructions and 
turns them into machine 
code, a set of numbers that 
tells the processor what to 
do. LDA #$4 1 is converted to 
the numbers 169 and 65 ($A9 
and $4 1) and JSR SFFD2 be- 
comes 32, 210. and 255 
($20, SD2, and $FF). In addi- 
tion to letting you write assem- 
bly language programs, a ma- 
chine language monitor can 
move blocks of code, search 
for a specific string of values 
in memory, and display the 
assembly language equiva- 
lent of machine language. 

It also does one more 
thing. It can perform a hex 
dump. A hex dump displays 
the hexadecimal values in 
memory and allows you to al- 
ter them. In a sense, the f\^LX 
program works in the same 



manner as a hex dump. The 
difference is that f\ALX works 
with specific program data, 
while the monitor hex dump 
deals with data In a direct 
and raw form. Like the 40-col- 
umn machine language moni- 
tor, the 40-cotumn MLX dis- 
plays eight bytes at a time, 
too. The ninth byte is a check- 
sum, helping to ensure that 
the real program data in the 
other eight bytes was correct- 
ly entered. If you use the hex 
dump capability of a machine 
language monitor to enter 
MU( program listings from Ga- 
zette, just Ignore the ninth (fi- 
nal) character in each row. 

Out of Memory 

For the past few years I have 
been using a program called 
Free-Form Filer (June 1987). 
It has worked without a flaw 
since I first typed it in until 
now. When I try to add anoth- 
er file, I get a message that 
states I am low on memory. 
Checking the disk directory, I 
notice that I have 11 blocks 
of another program, 152 
blocks of the Free-Form Filer 
program, and 501 blocks of 
free space. How can I 
change the program in order 
to use the remaining blocks 
on the disk? 

G.P- WINDAU 
FOSTORtA, OH 

It's true that you have 152 
blocks of memory remaining 
on the disk, but you have ex- 
hausted your computer's mem- 
ory. Free -Form Filer grows it- 
self each time you add a re- 
cord, and you must load the 
entire program each time you 
use it. After five years, you 
have added enough material 
to fill the 64 's memory. 

If you notice your opening 
screen when you first turn on 
your 64, it says you have 
38911 BASIC bytes of free 
memory Now load your ver- 
sion of Free-Form Filer, but do 
not run it. Once the program 



has loaded, enter the follow- 
ing to determine how much 
RAtvl you have remaining. 

FRE(O) - (FRE(0)<0) * 65536 

You should see that you have 
less than 2K of free memory. 
You can add a few more 
files, but you've just about 
pushed the 64 to Its memory 
limit with all the records that 
you've added over time. You 
might consider either break- 
ing up your file into smaller 
sections or deleting records 
that you no longer need. 

Remember, you must use 
a separate copy of Free- 
Form Filer for each database 
you create, and you can use 
only one copy of the program 
on a disk. I hope you saved a 
master copy that contains no 
data. You can then use it to 
create working copies on any 
number of disks. 

BASIC Printouts 

I wish to point out a serious 
oversight which occurred in 
the December 1991 "Feed- 
back." The published tip for 
skipping folds in fanfold pa- 
per will not work with 
MPS801, IVIPS803, and 1525 
printers- These printers do not 
support paging. Six years 
ago, Gazette offered a solu- 
tion for skipping folds in com- 
puter paper that works with 
these printers. Check out List 
Pager, December 1985. I use 
this utility with my MPS803, 
and it works great. 

RANDY CLEMMONS 
SAN DIEGO. CA 

Thanks for the reminder. Ran- 
dy. Readers who don't have 
access to that back issue 
may want to try a similar utili- 
ty that's found in this issue. 
It's a type-in program called 
Formatted List. It's also avail- 
able on this month's Gazette 
Disk, which can be ordered 
for $9.95 plus $2.00 shipping 
and handling. 



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FEEDBACK 



Here's a way to 

detect moites 

of operation on any 

Commodore 

8-bit computer, and a 

lool( at what's 

happening while a 

program runs. 



Mode Detection 

You recently had a letter in 
"Feedback" (April 1992) ask- 
ing how to distinguish be- 
tween the various 128 modes 
of operation. I have compiled 
a list of PEEKS that can distin- 
guish between most 8-bit Com- 
modore computers. (See ta- 
ble printed at right.) 

Location 65288 is the 
place to start. This location 
can distinguish between all 
the major variations of the dif- 
ferent machines. After deter- 
mining the variation, you can 
then find out the specific 
ROM version it is using by 
checking other locations. Be- 
cause of hardware and soft- 
ware considerations native to 
certain machines, you must 
first poke in the values at the 
bottom of the table before 
peeking the addresses listed 
for those machines. 

WILLIAM LEVAK 
ANN ARBOR. Ml 

All at Once 

I've tried and tried to figure 
out how you can piay music 
in the background, move 
sprites around the screen, ani- 
mate background sprites, 
and read a user's joystick all 
at once in BASIC. It seems im- 
possible. Is machine lan- 
guage needed? 

JON LANE 
PU\NT CITY, FL 

Computer games might seem 
to be doing many things at 
once, but they're actually do- 
ing only one thing at a time. 
It's just that they do things 
quickly. Computers follow in- 
structions^ sequentialiy. 

To give your program the 
appearance of simultaneous 
action, you need to plan 
ahead. Separate the actions in- 
to subroutines. An IF-THEN 
statement can decide wheth- 
er or not you want to use 
GOSUB to go to the appropri- 
ate routine. It might help to 
write the conditions and their 



BASIC 


Version 






Add 


ress 










47727 


500D3 


50575 


58480 


65288 


6S408 


PET 


1.0 







1' 


238 


169 


64 


PET 


I.Or 







152^ 


238 


169 


64 


PET 


2.0 




1 


47 


72 


6 


167 


CBM 


2.0 




1 


47 


72 


6 


167 


CBfvl 


4.0 


4 


160 


135 


170 


170 


170 


PET 


4.0 


4 


160 


135 


170 


170 


170 


8032 


4.0r 


234 


160 


135 


176 


170 


170 


PET-12 


4.0r 


234 


160 


135 


196 


170 


170 


VIC-20 


2.0 




194 


32 


198 


16 


100 


B128 


4.0 


165^ 






2492 


722 


224^ 


64 


2-01 


133 






69 


147 


170 


64 


2-02 


133 






69 


149 





64 


2-03 


133 






69 


149 


3 


4064 


2.0 


133 






69 


149 


100 


SX-64 


2.0 


133 






69 


149 


67 


PLUS/4 


3.5 










255 




C128 


7.0 


1613 


143 


2113 


2293 


723 


03 


' POKE 1018,173: POKE 1021.133: 


POKE 1022,2: POKE 1023,96 




POKE 1019,143:POKE 1020,197:SYS 1018:PRINT PEEK(2) 






^ POKE 599.15 














3 POKE 931,15 















consequences in plain Eng- 
lish. For example, if the fire but- 
ton is pressed, then launch 
missile and set the missile 
flag. If the joystick moves, 
then move the ship sprite. If 
one second has passed, 
then play another note of the 
song. If the missile flag is set, 
then move the missile sprite 
again. Repeat the loop. 

First, you check for the joy- 
stick fire button. If it's 
pressed, use GOSUB to go to 
the appropriate routine. If it's 
not pressed, forget about 
launching the missile until the 
next time through the loop. 
Once you've launched the mis- 
sile, you want it to continue 
moving, which is the reason 
for the missile flag. Next. 
PEEK the joystick to see If the 
player wants to move. If so, up- 
date the ship's position. 
Third, check the jiffy clock, 
the variable Tl or Tl$, to see 
how much time has gone by 
if a second (or whatever time 
period you've chosen) has 
passed, play the next note of 
the song. Next, if the flag is 
still set, move the missile 
sprite. Then go back and do 
it all again. 

The program loops around 



and around, taking necessary 
actions one at a time. The 
computer works quickly, and 
If the individual actions are co- 
ordinated, they appear to hap- 
pen simultaneously. 

By the time you create a 
few more subroutines to 
make your game more playa- 
ble, the computer will have to 
execute numerous Instruc- 
tions. Converting these Instruc- 
tions from BASIC can take too 
much time for a fast-paced 
game. If you want speed, it's 
a good idea to switch to ma- 
chine language. 

Another technique, which 
is even closer to simultaneous 
action, requires an intermedi- 
ate-to-advanced knowledge 
of machine language. Sixty 
times a second, the computer 
stops what it's doing and re- 
draws the image on the 
screen. The main program is 
being constantly interrupted, 
tjsing a wedge, or redirec- 
tion, you can divert the inter- 
rupt to your own ML program, 
which could play music, 
move sprites, or whatever you 
choose. Such interrupt-drlven 
routines are sometimes diffi- 
cult to implement but can be 
very effective. D 



G-4 COMPUTE AUGUST 1992 






INTRDDDCING 



CDfUlPUTE/ M 

CDnnPUTE#NET ^ 




CDIUIPUTE 

About COMPUTE/NET 

Product Ordering 
Feedback Board 
Coming Events 
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books, super software, dazzling 
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magazine. Lots of surprises are 
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PUBLIC DOMAIN SOFTWARE IS A LOT LIKE PIRATE TREASURE. 

IT'S FREE FOR THE TAKING, BUT YOU'LL 
HAVE TO DO A LOT OF DIGGING BEFORE YOU FIND THE GEMS. 

BURIED TREASURE 



The wealth of public domain 
and shareware programs avail- 
able to 64 and 128 users can 
be accurately referred to as 
buried treasure. Thousands upon 
thousands of these programs 
have been written over the years, 
and they span the spectrum from 
entertainment to productivity. 
Best of all, these programs are 
available for the taking. 

Unfortunately, many 64/128 us- 
ers don't take advantage of these 
programs, since the sheer volume 
of them makes it difficult to sepa- 
rate the gems from the duds. Also, 
like finding buried treasure left by 
pirates of yesteryear, locating 
these treasures can sometimes be 
a problem. 

In this article, you'll find a sur- 
vey of what I've found to be excel- 
lent public domain and shareware 
programs. Don't simply take my 
word for it, however; download 
some of these programs and try 
them for yourself, Plus, HI show 
you where and how to dig up 
some of these treasures as well. 

PD or SW? 

First, let's clarify our terms, A pub- 
lic domain (PD) program is one 
which you can use and distribute 
freely. It's also the oldest type of 
noncommercial software available 
to the public. Like PD programs, 
shareware (SW) can be freely dis- 
tributed, but the author requests a 
donation (usually a modest one) if 
you find the software useful. In 
many cases, SW authors will pro- 
vide enhanced versions, written 



BY HENNING VAHLENKAMP 

documentation, and updates to us- 
ers in return for payment. 

Software Sources 

Both PD and SW programs are 
more readily available than you 
might think. F=or instance, most ma- 
jor online services have enormous 
selections of Commodore soft- 
ware. The only charge for the pro- 
grams is the service's connect- 
tinne charge. Many services have 
a listing of available programs 
that you can download to get an 
idea of what's available. Others 
may have a printed catalogue. If 
you need a program to do a spe- 
cific job, leave a message online, 
and someone will probably offer a 
suggestion or two. 

Local BBSs and user groups al- 
so can be treasure troves of won- 
derful programs. Even if a BBS is 
running on an Amiga or IBM, it 
may have a large selection of PD 
and SW programs for the 64 and 
128. Most user groups have hun- 
dreds of programs available, charg- 
ing only a modest fee to cover the 
cost of the disk. 

Downloading more than a few 
programs from a local BBS can 
take quite some time, even at 
2400 bps. Connect charges for on- 
line services and telephone bills 
for long-distance calls to BBSs 
can add up. If you're looking for a 
large number of programs to 
build your library in a hurry, mail- 
order disk services may make 
more sense. Disk services typical- 
ly offer hundreds of PD and SW 
disks at reasonable prices. The on- 



ly downside is that their collections 
are rarely as up-to-date as those 
of networks and BBSs. Check the 
listing at the end of this article for 
several popular commercial sourc- 
es for PD and SW programs. 

Best of the Bunch 

Now that we've touched on where 
to find programs, here are some 
outstanding ones to watch for. 
Since a significant number of PD 
and SW programs are of high qual- 
ity, it's impossible to mention all of 
Ihe outstanding ones in one arti- 
cle. Nevertheless, I've selected sev- 
eral in a variety of categories that 
are among the best. They are def- 
initely worth having. Now, on to 
the treasure! 

CREATIVITY 

Demo Designer 2 

If you've ever wanted to make a 
professional-quality graphics and 
sound demo on your 64, Demo De- 
signer 2 is an excellent choice. 
First, you select a font and musical 
selection from the many available 
ones and enter a Koala picture file- 
name. Next, write your scrolling 
message with the built-in editor. 
Your stand-alone demo is then 
saved to disk. What could be eas- 
ier than that? 

Fun Graphics Machine V3.42 

Fun Graphics Machine is unique 
SW for the 64. It's a powerful mono- 
chrome hi-res graphics editor, not 
a paint program. FGM features the 
ability to use Print Shop graphics. 



G-6 COMPUTE AUGUST 1992 



text fonts, rotation and flipping, reduc- 
tion and enlargement, reversing, scroll- 
ing, and rudimentary drawing. Tfie fin- 
isfied product can be exported to a 
paint program for further embellisfi- 
ment. 

Graphics Assault System 

GAS (by COMPUTE'S Bruce Bowden) 
provides more grapfiics-manipulation 
capabilities. This useful PD program 
can compress, magnify, flip, rotate, 
scroll, diagonally shiift, and invert hii- 
res and multicolor pictures. Best of all, 
it can convert hi-res to multicolor and 
vice versa. GAS is available in sepa- 
rate 64 and 128 40-column versions. If 
you're into graphics, you must have 
this one, 

DEMOS 

Balmanio 

This outstanding demo was inspired 
by the Batman movie of a few years 
ago, Batmania begins with an introduc- 
tion to the dark knight and then erupts 
with a wonderfully arranged sound- 
track from the movie. Minor animation 
plus topnotch graphics add the finish- 
ing touches to this fine demo. 

El Gato 

You need a 1764 or 1750 REU to run 
El Gato, an animation of a cat. The cat 
is shown walking in a rectangular 
plane, which simultaneously rotates 
about a vertical axis. This produces a 
realistic 3-D effect. Pressing various 
keys lets you change the speed of the 
animation. PD versions of this 141 K pro- 
graoi are available for both the 64 and 
the 40-CQlumn 128. 

Eyesoterk 

What mai<es this PD program for the 
64 unique is the subject. A large eye 
opens and closes as it bounces 
around the screen. Other spheres 
bounce, too, resulting in 20 sprites on- 
screen at once — an amazing accom- 
plishment! The music has a nice high- 
tech sound to it. 

Juggler 

Perhaps the finest 64 animation ever 
done. Juggler is based on the famous 
Amiga animation of the same name. 
Run this PD program on your 64, and 
you'll see a robotic figure standing on 
a checkerboard floor, juggling three re- 
flective glass spheres. Numerous su- 
perb multicolor frames make this animat- 
ed demonstration appear almost as 
impressive as its Amiga predecessor. 

Outspace 

Upon loading this PD program for the 
64, you'll be treated to a graphics and 

G-8 COMPUTE AUGUST 1992 



sound extravaganza. Highlights in- 
clude impressive use of sprites and ras- 
ter interrupts, creating all sorts of move- 
ment. On the final screen is an astro- 
naut/alien backed up by superb digit- 
ized music. You can select a picture 
and music with a joystick. 

Reticulate 

This PD program for the 64 does the 
seemingly impossible. It presents an 
unprecedented 320 x 400 pixel inter- 
lace on the composite screen. The ef- 
fect isn't fake, and interlace flickering 
is no worse than on the Amiga. A vari- 
ety of great pictures can be loaded by 
pressing the space bar after the intro- 
ductory screen. The program won't run 
from a 1581 because of its custom 
fastloader. The music is excellent as 
well. A must-have! 

Space Movie 

Space Movie is another classic demo 
for the 64, Although small in size (43 
blocks), it's a lengthy minimovie with 
an equally long soundtrack. It consists 
of a tribesman beating a drum while a 
space drama with aliens unfolds on the 
other side of the screen. All of this is in 
rhythm with the music. 

Swinth 

Swinth is by far the most well-known 64 
demo of all. A combination of Swish 
and Synth Sample, it features a color- 
ful, symmetrical kaleidoscope of lines 
synchronized to music. Most parame- 
ters such as colors, display attributes, 
and music are user-selectable. 'Viewing 
it is a relaxing, almost hypnotic, experi- 
ence that you shouldn't miss. 

GAMES 

128 Invaders 

Taking advantage of the 128's often ne- 
glected 80-column screen, 128 Invad- 
ers, a Space Invaders clone, delivers a 
lot of fun. This PD game also features 
smooth animation and full color! Al- 
though the theme is nothing new. its im- 
plementation makes 128 Invaders 
shine. 

Adventure/80 

Here's another superb 80-column PD 
game. Players can look forward to an 
excellent condensed version of the orig- 
inal mainframe Adventure game by Wil- 
liam Crowther. All the key elements are 
preserved in this text journey through 
Colossal Cave. Fans of the Infocom 
classics will especially like this one. 

Ceviuz 

Ceviuz is an automated helicopter as- 
signed to dangerous missions. With it 
you flyover large, detailed landscapes 



while avoiding enemy fire. Program op- 
tions in this SW pacioge for the 64 in- 
clude three day or night missions, sev- 
eral levels, high-score saves, an inde- 
structible mode, and a terrain editor for 
added replay value. 

Krokout 

Krakout, a commercial-quality game, at 
least equals its inspiration, Arkanoid. 
Distinguishing this PD 64 program are 
great graphics and sound, real playabil- 
ity, and a multitude of options such as 
bat speed, ball speed, number of 
bats, and type of background. This 
one's a winner. 

Mah-Jongg 

Mah-Jongg is a high-quality clone of 
Shanghai by Activision. The object of 
this 128 PD game is to remove all the 
tiles by clicking on matching pairs 
with the onscreen pointer. This ancient 
Chinese game is addicting and re- 
quires good strategy, It runs in 40-col- 
umn mode and supports a joystick or 
mouse. 

Qlx 

This PD clone of a Taito hit scores 
high marks for fun with a 64. You 
guide a diamond and try to cut off sec- 
tions of the screen to trap the enemy in 
the smallest space possible. You must 
also avoid two little bugs that try to get 
you. The time limit makes Qix all the 
more challenging. 

Rotations! 

Once again, a commercial game (Te- 
tris) inspires a good PD clone for the 
64. In Rotations!, you manipulate differ- 
ent falling pieces to form horizontal 
lines on the playfield. Graphics are 
clean, multiple levels add challenge, 
and the pause feature comes in handy. 

GEOS 

Blue Pencil 

If you do a lot of writing at home, 
school, or work, you need Blue Pencil, 
a PD program for the 64. It's a com- 
plete geoWrite document analyzer 
that counts words, sentences, para- 
graphs, pages, and graphics. Plus, it 
figures a variety of averages to help 
you analyze your writing. The only short- 
coming is that it has trouble working 
with very large documents. 

Combiner 

Combiner is a SW program that lets 
you combine two geoWrite documents 
in many different ways. If you're work- 
ing on one document, for example, a 
second document can be appended 
to it, inserted, or merged as part of 
your original document. Versatility and 




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^^TIME 

/»%S AND 

^ MONEY 

Yes, save time and money! Subscribe to the Gazette 
Disk and get all the exciting, fun-filled Gazette pro- 
grams for your Commodore 64 or 128— already on 
disk! 

Subscribe today, and month after month you'll 
get all the latest, most challenging, and fascinating 
programs published in the corresponding issue of 
COMPUTE. 

New on the Gazette Disk! In addition to the 
programs that appear in the magazine, you'll also 
get outstanding bonus programs. These programs, 
which are often too large to offer as type-ins, are 
available only on disk— they appear nowhere else. 

As another Gazette Disk extra, check out 



"Gazette Gallery," where each month we present the 
very best in original 64 and 128 artwork. 

So don't waste another moment. Subscribe to- 
day to COMPUTE'S Gazette Disk and get 12 issues 
for only $49.95. You save almost 60% off the single- 
issue price. Clip or photocopy and mail completed 
coupon today. 

Individual issues of the disk are available for 
$9.95 (plus $2.00 shipping and handling) by writing 
to COMPUTE, 324 West Wendover Avenue, Suite 
200, Greensboro, North Carolina 27408. 



T ta! start my one-year subscription 
to COMPUTE'S Gazette Disk right away 
for only $49.95.* 

n Payment enclosed (check or money order) 
D Charge D Mastei^lariJ D Visa 



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' ResKtents of NC and NY, please ackt appropriate sales tax lor your area, Canadian 

orders, add 7'.* goods and services lax. 



the ability to handle different geoWrite 
versions make Combiner for 64 users 
an indispensable utility around thie 
home, scfiool, or office. 

Convert 2.5 

Witfi tfiis PD program, 64 users can con- 
vert documents from GEOS format to 
SEQ or PRG text files and vice versa. 
Conversion is a snap. It's a must-fiave 
for serious writers who use multiple 
word processors or GEOS fans who 
want to send text on disk to people 
who don't use GEOS. 

Graphic Storm 

A graphics importer. Graphic Storm 
will convert standard hi-res screens or 
Doodle pictures into geoPaint format. 
This SW program converts Print Shop, 
Print fvlaster, and Newsroom graphics 
into photo album graphics like Graph- 
ics Grabber does. This is another use- 
ful program that should be in every 
GEOS user's library. 

GRAPHICS 

CSIideS 

This SW viewer displays both com- 
pressed and uncompressed Koala and 
Doodle pictures. CSIideS also com- 
presses and decompresses them, 
which is a very useful feature, and it's 
lightning fast. 

Disp/Lace 

Imagine a 640 x 600 pixel interlace on 
the 80-column screen! That's what 
this incredible PD program can accom- 
plish if you have 64K VDC RAf^/l in 
your 128. It takes any six Doodle pic- 
tures and displays them simultaneous- 
ly with their colors intact. Graphics 
fans shouldn't miss this unbelievable 
feat of programming. 

Artwork 

Here's a sampling of beautiful Commo- 
dore artwork to watch for. Each of 
these compressed Doodle files has a 
GG prefix: BOTTLE. CABIN, 
CASTLEJS, EGO, FROG.LILY.PAD, 
GRAYLIBR, HALOWAYN, IGARDEN, 
KINGFISHER, SERENE, LiNCOLN, 
SCHLOS.CASTLE, SPAZOZ, and URCHI- 
NOD. These pictures and JJ fvllDDLE 
EARTH, which is a Koala file, reflect the 
talent of a few of the best artists in the 
Commodore community. 

MUSIC 

StereoPloyer 10.3 

Without a doubt, this is the best SID 
player available in the public domain. 
A huge program, StereoPlayer plays 
both mono and stereo SIDs, features a 
keyboard and animated band, and has 

G-10 COMPUTE AUGUST 1992 



almost every conceivable musical op- 
tion. The opening screen is spectacu- 
lar. In fact, this whole program is thor- 
oughly professional. It's PD software at 
its best. 

SID Player Music 

There are many outstanding SID play- 
er songs. These songs usually have a 
MUS suffix. Here are a select few: 
BACK FUTURE, BADMEDICINE, BLAZ- 
ER THEfViE, BLESS USA, ETERNL 
FLAME, GALACTICA, LEAN ON ME, 
LIKE A PRAYR, MISSION IMP, MY/ 
DREAMS, NEVERENDiNG, OLD TME 
ROCK, STAR WARS, WILDAA/EST and 
YEARS. All are magnificently arranged. 
These are just a few of the many ex- 
cellent musical works available for 
downloading. 

PRODUCTIVITY 

Power Budget 

Similar to a spreadsheet, this SW budg- 
eting program for the 64 is quite versa- 
tile. It allows you to enter and change 
data quickly, and the computer han- 
dles the calculations. Furthermore, 
budget projections can be calculated 
for an entire year. Clear instructions are 
included with this easy-to-use financial 
program. 

The Data Base 

This SW program is a superb flat-file da- 
tabase that possesses as much power 
and flexibility as some commercial 
ones. All the expected features are 
here, including multiple records, sort- 
ing by several keys, report writing, SEQ 
translation, searching, and so on. This 
program is excellent for most database 
needs. There are separate versions for 
the 64 and 128, and the 128 version 
has both 40-column and 80-column ver- 
sions available. 

UTILITIES 

CS-DOS 

CS-DOS is more than a DOS shell; it's 
an entire operating system similar to 
MS-DOS. For instance, this SW pro- 
gram for the 128 features a command 
line, batch files, and so on. A number 
of programs are available to run under 
CS-DOS. I think you'll find this to be 
quite an interesting offering. 

Vector Drive 

Disk editing requires good tools, and 
Vector Drive is a PD program that fills 
those needs. It packs as much power 
as Its many commercial competitors. 
This menu-driven program for the 64 
features search and replace, sector 
fill, copy, memorize, and BAM display, 
plus all the other options you'd expect 



on an outstanding disk editor, It works 
with any 1541 or compatible drive. 

MISCELLANEOUS 

Star Trek 

Commodore owners who have a 1764 
or 1750 REU will get a real treat with 
this one. This PD program for the 64 
fills an entire disk and utilizes digitized 
sound. You'll hear the entire introduc- 
tion to the original "Star Trek" TV se- 
ries, beginning with "Space, the final 
frontier. . . ." Very impressive! □ 



ONLINE SERVICES 

CompuServe 
P.O. Box 20212 
Columbus. OH 43220 
(800) 848-8199 

Delphi 

3 Blackstone St. 
Cambridge, MA 02139 
(800) 544-4005 

GEnie 

401 N. Washington St. 
Rockville, fi/ID 20850 
(800) 638-9636 

QuantumLink 

8620 Westwood Center Dr 

Vienna, VA 22180 



DISK SERVICES 

Caloke Industries 
P.O. Box 18477 
Raytown, MO 64133 

C&T ComputerActive 
P.O. Box 893 
Clinton, OK 73601 
(405) 323-5890 

Diskoveries 
P.O. Box 9153 
Waukegan, IL 60079 

Disks O'Plenty 
7958 Pines Blvd., Ste. 270A 
Pembroke Pines, PL 33024 
(305) 963-7750 

JLH 

RO. Box 67021 
Topeka, KS 66667 
(913) 234-3388 

Paradise Software 
7657 Winnetka Ave., Ste. 328 
Wlnnetka, CA 91306 
(800) 233-2451 

Parsec 
RO. Box 111 
Salem, MA 01970 

64 Disk Connection 

4291 Holland Rd., Ste. 562C 

Virginia Beach. VA 23452 



YOUR PRODUCTIVITY! 



Harness the potential of y^ 
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Subtotal 

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area. Canadian orders, add 7% goods and services tax.) 

Shipping and Handling ($2.00 U.S. and Canada, $3-00 surface mail, $5.00 

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REVIEWS 



TEENAGE MUTANT 
NINJA TURTLES— 
THE ARCADE 
GAME 

Hey, man! That Shredder 
creep is back in town with 
the Foot Clan! Yeah, dudes! 
And he's got April! We've 
got to rescue her! He's hold- 
ing her somewhere in New 
York. Let's go! Ccwabunga! 

Sound familiar? What 
could be the start of an out- 
line for a Teenage Mutant 
Ninja Turtles screenplay is 
actually the premise for the 
latest in Turtle games from 
Konami — and a hot game it 
is. Based on the arcade 
game, this game follows the 
Turtles through eight levels 
of battle against Shredder 
and his henchmen, includ- 
ing key figures Bebop and 
Rock Steady as well as the 
highly trained Foot Clan. 

You can choose to be 
any one of the four Turtles: 
Leonardo, Donatello, 

Michaelangelo, or Raphael. 
Then take off after the bad 
guys. Your first stop is 
April's flaming apartment. 
You battle member after 
member of the Foot Clan. 
Some are armed, while oth- 
ers have only their ninja 
skills as weapons. If you de- 
feat all of them and outlast 
Rock Steady, then it's on to 
Times Square. 

Pick up a pizza for an ex- 
tra life; watch out for Bebop 
by the convertible! Next, it's 
the SoHo Sewers, complete 
with rats and robots! Then, 
Vinnie's Valet Parking Ga- 
rage, Madison Square Ave- 
nue, Rock-a-fella Express- 
way, the Rock Quarry Facto- 
ry (lair of the Stone Warrior), 
and finally, level 8, the Tech- 
nodrome! This is where you 
meet all your opponents for 
the ultimate showdown. 

As you take on a Turtle 

G-12 COMPUTE AUGUST 1992 



persona, you need to realize 
that each Turtle prefers a dif- 
ferent weapon. This means 
that each fights a little differ- 
ently. Experimentation will 
tell you which Turtle best 
fits your style of gameplay. 
One hint: Each Turtle has an 
awesome side drop kick. 
We found a lot to like 



Robin, age of discretion: 
"The graphics are good; the 
sound, even better. I don't 
have to go blind to find the 
password, since it's printed 
on white paper. I like the 
fact that the Turtles have dif- 
ferent abilities. It makes 
things more individual and 
less boring. Donatello is my 




Raphael, armed with a pair of Sai daggers and a bad attitude, 
takes on Shredder's goons in Aprii's burning apartment. 



about this game. There is 
something in Teenage Mu- 
tant Ninja Turtles for 
everyone. We'll let the play- 
ers speak for themselves: 

Michael, age 4: "1 like the Tur- 
tles! It's my new Turtle vide- 
ogame. I'm Michaelangelo, 
and 1 get rid of those guys! 
Even the robots. I got 67 
points— all by myself!" 

Katelyn, age 6: "I like this 
game 'cause it's fun. I think 
it's a little hard, though. I 
like using Leonardo be- 
cause he has longer 
swords." 

Meaghan (our family's top 
scorer), age 10: "I tike the 
Turtles Arcade Game. I like 
Raphael the best. The graph- 
ics are great. It's easy, too. 
Not complicated. But it's a 
challenge to really win." 



preferred hero. The game is 
challenging, but not so 
much so that you give up on 
it. But I have to admit that it 
makes my hand sore." 

David, age 40 or so: "It's 
one of the few arcade 
games I like. Maybe be- 
cause it's one of the few I 
find playable. Great graph- 
ics and sound. Now, if I 
could just outscore my 
daughter!" 

Kacey and Kelsey, age 15 
months, are twins of few 
words. We can only go by 
their reaction whenever 
they hear the music. They 
love it. They bob, dance, 
grin, and clap their hands. 

OK, so much for the fami- 
ly's individual opinions. We 
like a game that gives the lit- 
tle kids a chance. Many ar- 



cade games require too 
much coordination for small 
hands. This can be frustrat- 
ing to a little guy who's just 
trying to have some fun. 
This game has familiar char- 
acters, exciting battles, and 
an ease of play that enables 
little people to play like the 
big kids. I'm not advocating 
that such a game should 
take the place of an educa- 
tional game, but everyone 
likes something that's just 
plain fun. 

Konami is generally pretty 
thorough in what it does. 
This program is no excep- 
tion. One manual serves all 
versions, with an insert to 
amend instructions to accom- 
modate Commodore differ- 
ences, The manual is just 
what you need to get going, 
It's concise, informative, and 
entertaining. However, it is 
misleading in one item. The 
manual claims that after 
your last Turtle life ends 
{you get three), you are of- 
fered two options. Continue 
or End Game, The Continue 
option allows you to pick up 
at the scene where you left 
off, and you're allowed to do 
this up to three times. It 
doesn't happen this way, 
however, in the 64 version. 
The death of the last Turtle 
means the end of the game. 
There's no explanation of 
why the 64 doesn't have 
this option. It's a shame, be- 
cause such a feature would 
be a terrific plus. 

This misinformation in the 
manual seems to be the on- 
ly negative point in a game 
that is otherwise exciting 
and lots of fun. When an ar- 
cade game is translated in- 
to a computer videogame, it 
can bring the fun home — 
and even save a few quar- 
ters. Teenage Mutant Ninja 
Turtles — The Arcade Game 
does this in a very capable, 
enjoyable fashion that ap- 
peals to those aged 4 to 40 



Big Blue Reader 128/64 - 4.0 

Transfers word processing, text, ASCII, and binary files between 
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New Version 4.0 features: Transfers ASCII, PET ASCII and Screen 
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Supports drives # 8-30. New Backup (C128) and Format (1571/1581) 
programs. Reads MS-DOS sub-directories, uses joystick, and more. 
Includes C64 & CI 28 programs. Requires 1571 or 1581 Disk Drive. 

Big Blue Reader 128/64 - 4.0 only $44.95 

Version 4.0 upgrade, send original BBR disk plus $18. 

(Bi5[eSearcft3.2 

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includes more than 700,000+ references. 

3. Incredible five (5) second look-up time per/word, per/disk. 

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5. Boolean search options, including AND, OR & NOT logic. 

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Includes: C64 & CI 28 programs: printef and disk output; users 
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8: RECIPES SET 
9; UTILmES SET 
A CHRISTMAS 
B: ASST. (Mario +) 
C: MUSIC SET 
D; ART GALLERY 
E: GEOS FILES 





MINDSCAPE 
HANDGRIP 
JOYSTICK 

ONLY $5.00 



INCLUDES THE SEGA HITS 
OUT RUN, AFTERBURNER, 
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Add SI. OOabippingperitem ordercd'U.S. Foods Onlyl 
SORRY NO CO.D.'t OR CREDIT CARD ORDERS 
FOR A FREE COPY OF OUR CATALOG, CALL: 
(516)-957-lU0 MONDAY -FRIDAY 10 am to 5 pm EST 

circle Reader Service Number 1E2 



Upgrade your Commodore system 



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Commodore 64 Public Domain 



Highest Quality since 1987' 

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24 hour shipping. 



64 DISK CONNECTION 



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(* Formerly RVH Publications) 



Circle flaadef Service Number 254 







Realistic Nuclear Attack Sub Simulation 

CM 01 1 28 In 64 f/ooo 
Commana Missions Unda' The Aiciic Icq 
Hunt Russian Typhoons fn TJie North Sea 

Requires CS4 OEOS 1.3 or 2.0 

$19.95 Check or Money Order 
VMC Software PO Box 326 
Cambria Hts. NY 11411 



UBS 



circle Reader Service Number 171 




\\C*\ Compyter Make 

^Xii3) YOU 
3/ $1,000,000? 

!^. WITH LOHERY PC YOUR NEXT TICKET 
COULD BE WORTH MILLIONS! 

LOTTERY uses the raw power and storage of your 
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IBM PC/XTMT and compatibles 

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handline per orrier lo 

{Illinois residents add 16% sales tax) 

(Orders outside Noflh America add S3.CI0I 



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C.O.D. orders call: 
(708) 566^47 

Superior Micro Systems, tnc 

26151 N.OaHAve, 
Mundelein, IL 6O060 






Crrele Reader Service Number 221 



AUGUST 1992 COMPUTE G-13 



REVIEWS 



and then some. So, cow- 
abunga, dudes, and have 
yourselves a righteous 
good time! 

DAVID and ROBIN MINNICK 

Commodore 64 and 12S— $29.95 

KONAMI 

900 Deerfield Pkwy. 

Buffalo Grove, IL 60089 

(708) 215-5100 

Circle Reader Service Number 341 

THE SIMPSONS 
ARaDE GAME 

Hey, dudes! Grab your skate- 
boards and get ready for ac- 
tion with The Simpsons Ar- 
cade Game by Konami. Hom- 
er, Marge, Bart, and Lisa 
will lead you on a wild 
chase through the streets of 
Springfield. They're trying to 
rescue little Maggie 
Simpson from the jewel 
thieves who kidnapped her 
after she accidentally swal- 
lowed a valuable jewel. 

Simpsons fans will enjoy 
the colorful graphics and live- 
ly music in the opening ani- 
mation sequence, which 
sets the scene for the 
game. You can bypass the 
animation with a click of 
your fire button. 

The game has two dou- 
ble-sided disks that offer 
you eight increasingly diffi- 
cult levels of play. On each 
level you'll meet a variety of 
foes who attempt to prevent 
you from finding Maggie. 

You'll face off against 
ghosts, zombies, tavern 
thugs, yes-men, and other 
foes too numerous to men- 
tion. The bad guys seldom 
appear alone. Since the 
game offers you a two-play- 
er option, you can team up 
with another player and use 
tag-team tactics against the 
bad guys. 

The Simpson characters 
are easily recognizable, 
even though the game re- 

G-14 COt^PUTE AUGUST 1992 



lies more on color than on de- 
tail to portray them. Other 
characters from the popular 
television show, like Krusty 
the Clown, Mr. Burns, and 
Smithers, will join in the cam- 
paign to stop you from ad- 
vancing in your search. 

Each Simpson is 
equipped with a special 



gy remaining for your charac- 
ter {or characters), The ener- 
gy level tails you when it's 
time to look for burgers and 
other goodies to restore 
some of your strength. 

From time to time, com- 
ments from your character 
appear in a message bal- 
loon that's also in the status 



:ir=r 



ii^. 



SPraNGRBi 

FIBEDEFT 



.ww^v^ 



Each Simpson is equipped witi^ a special weapon to help him or her 
fight any villains who block the way- 



weapon to help him or her 
fight any villains who block 
the way, Lisa lashes with 
her jump rope, Bart bashes 
with his skateboard, Homer 
hammers with his fists, and 
Marge is a maniac with her 
vacuum cleaner and tower- 
ing hairdo. 

Each Simpson begins the 
game with four lives, but 
you should plan to lose a 
few until you get the hang of 
the game. You'll have fun 
testing each character's fight- 
ing skills alone and in com- 
bination until you find the sin- 
gle character or team that 
suits you best. 

A status window at the bot- 
tom of the screen will keep 
you advised of how well 
you're doing throughout the 
game, tt shows how many vil- 
lains you've defeated, the 
number of lives you have 
left, and the amount of ener- 



box. These comments are 
typical of whichever 
Simpson you're playing, but 
they won't help with the 
game. Nor do they have 
much to do with what's hap- 
pening on the screen. 

One of the drawbacks of 
the game is that the status 
window doesn't show you 
the hit power or the energy 
of your foes. This makes it dif- 
ficult to judge how well 
you're doing during an at- 
tack. Since the competition 
gets tougher on every level, 
your character will lose 
more energy when hit, but 
you won't be able to tell how 
much damage you're inflict- 
ing on your foes. 

Most levels have a partic- 
ularly strong "boss" charac- 
ter whom you must defeat in 
order to advance to the 
next level. !t would be espe- 
cially helpful to know how 



much damage your blows 
have inflicted on these su- 
per bullies. In most cases, 
you'll find it takes 1-3 hits to 
best an ordinary bad guy 
and about 20 hits to finish 
off a boss. When you've de- 
feated 50 bad guys, your 
character earns another life. 

Don't expect the instruc- 
tion manual to offer you 
much help. This is one of 
those games that you'll 
learn while you play it. In 
fact, there are times when 
the manual is a bit mislead- 
ing. For example, the pic- 
tures of level 2 and level 5 
are reversed in the manual. 
It also tells you that since 
the undead creatures on the 
cemetery level can't be 
killed, you must try to find 
an escape route. fHowever, 
it doesn't offer any clues as 
to which enemies are un- 
dead and which are living. 

Appearances are deceiv- 
ing, too. The ghost dangling 
from a rope isn't a ghost at 
all. It's a bad guy hiding in a 
tree. (Jump up and hit the 
tree to knock him down.) 

As for that escape route, 
you'll quickly discover that 
you can't run away from the 
enemies. You'll be unable to 
move beyond the end of 
any screen as long as there 
are foes alive onscreen. 
Don't toss the manual away, 
though; you'll need it for the 
passwords that are printed 
in the back to start the 
game. After that you're on 
your own. 

The more you play The 
Simpsons Arcade Game, 
the more you learn! That's 
part of the appeal of this chal- 
lenging game. 

MARTI PAULIN 

Commodore 64 and 128— $39.95 

KONAMI 

900 Deerfield Pkvir/. 
Buflalo Grove, IL 60089 
(708) 215-5100 

Circle Reader Service Number 342 



FOn Graptiics [HaEtiinE 

FUN ERfiPHICS fllflCHIHE (FGffl) IS AH "BLL - 1 N-OHE" GRAPHICS 
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FUN GflAPHICS (llflCHINE SUPPORTS IfflPORTING GRAPHICS UNO 
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GEOS SCREENS CAN BE CAPTURED SIfflPLV BV RESETTING 
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rem CLIP RRT VDL.I oder 20a excellent grrphics- le.OO 

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ADD ta.SO FOR S/H PES OKDEB 

ONLV ORDERING OUERLRVS TNEN S/N IS »2,00 PER ORDER 





gh 



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GRAPEVINE GROUP ^ , 

Inc. O 
COMMODORE UPGRADES 



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> COMPUTER SAVER: This C-64 ProlKlion 
[ Syslem sares you cosily repairs. Over 52% ot 
C'64 lailures are caused by malfiincliDring 
power supplies Itial destroy youf computer 
Installs in socontjs between powet supply & 
C-M. No soWenng. 2 year wafraniy. An 

; absoiule must and great seller 117.95 

I Dcliue ()»]> Iniedaa by Donjirni . . . 122.51 
I Saial Pnr.to Iniafact by Omnitrmi .... H2,VI 
I PfllNTEB PORT ADAPTER py Omiilraiix 
Avoid obsolescence. Aliows you to use any 
Commodore (C-64) printer on any PC compati- 
; ble pr clme. Does not wortf with 
Amiga t34,9S 



ai2KR*M EXPANDERS 



Super 1750 REU CLone (512K] Dots not 
require a larger power supply ..,..,$142,50 
On5italREU17M512XEjpariderUnit ...tlJl.W 

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Ongs/ialV de\dot>ed as a software package. 

then convened ;o a readaWe lorniar. the 

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• A super-heavy, repairable C'64 power sup- 
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Repair your own Commodore/ Amiga and save 
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Send lor full details. Five difleteni kits 
available. 



HEPLnCEMENT/UPGRADE 
CtllPS & PARIS 



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EACH 



6510 CPU 
6526 CIA. 
6581 SID. 
6567 Video . ^i*' 

PLA 906114 

AII901/225-6-7-9 
4164 1C-64/RAM) 

C-128 ROMs Upgrade (set 3) 24.95 

C1S71 ROM Upgrade [3106S4-05) .. ilD.95 

C-54 Keyboard (new) 19.95 

Commodore Cables Cill 

Service Manuals lor C64, C12e, 1S02, 
1084, 1541 t2|,)S 






Send Fur Free 36 Page Catalog 

3 CHESTNUT ST„ SUFFERN, Nri0901 

Order Line 1-800-292-7445 Fax 914-357-6243 

Customer Serelce: 914-368-4242 Intematioral Order Line: 914-357-2424 

We Ship Worldwide Hours: 9-6 E T, M-F Prices subjeci to change K\ Restocking Charge 

Tell a friend voir 're heard it through the Grapevine. 



Circle Reader Service Number 14S 



COMPUTE'S 



SpeedScrlpt Dish 



A powerful word processing 
package for Comtnodore 64 
and 1 28 owners 

A Great Deal for Commodore 
Users! 

• SpeedScript for the 64 

• SpeedScript 128 — 80-column version 

• Spelling checkers 

• Mail merge 

• Date-and-time stamp 

• 80-coIumn preview for the 6i 

• Turbo save and load 

• Plus more than a dozen other SpeedScript 
support utilities all on one disk (including 
full documentation) 




■ ES! Send me copies of COMPUTE'S 

SpeedScript Disk. 

I've enclosed *U,95 plus $2,00 postage and handling. (Outside 
U.S. and Canada add SI, 00 for surface mail or 13.00 for 
airmail.) 





Ammmr 


ORDER NOW! 


Total 


Namp 




AflHrrss 


City SiaTf 


, zrp 



Mail personal check or money order to 

Commodore SpeedScript Disk 

324 W. Wendover Ave., Ste. 200 

Greensboro, NC 27408 

Residents of North Carolina and Nt-w York, adij appropriate tax for your area t^aiaadian 
orders, add 1% gooil and services tax. 

Please allow 4-6 weeks for deliver^'. Program available only on 5ii-ttich disks. 



DISKS O'PLENTY INC 

7958 PINES BLVD. SUITE 270A 

PEMBROKE PINES FL 33024 

(305) 963-7750 

Call or write for free descriptive catalog of 
C64I128 Public Domain & Shareware 

Choose from over 900 Disks 
Adult /f'sf of over 50 Disks available 
to those 18 or over. 
021 MU SID MUSIC UTILITIES 
019GR PRINTSHOP UTILITIES 
019ED JRHIGHEDUCATION 
062ED HIGH SCHOOL EDUC. 
033ED TYPING /SPANISH 
031 ED COMPUTER SCIENCE 
010UT PIRATES TOOLBOX 
1 19GA FOREIGN ARCADE 
022GA CASINO-BOARD GAMES 
021GE GEOS FONTS 
002MS LOTTERY PROGRAMS 
003MS COLLECTORS CORNER 



o 
o 

in oL 

ifi- UJ 



circle Reader Service Number 253 



THE STRATEGY/CAMPAIGN GAMES 
ofJACKO'ROSES 19S2 



Icrplay on Commodore 64.'128 and Plus4 

{5t/4-cIisc.Specil¥iMorPlus4) 
$19.00 Each or S55.00 for all 3! 



THE RECENT UNPLEASANTNESS 



Individual control oi 43 Contederale DiviSfons'149 
Bridges. Could you have tuined oack ihe Federal on- 
slaught? Don'l re-iighl the C vll War. declare your own! 



COmSOPAC : The Guadalcanal Camoalan 



Engage the Imperial Japanese Navy In Iron&o'iom 

Sound. Lead air atlacks on Itie 'Tokyo Express' m "The 

Slot'. Be wilh the 1 si Marines and American Division 

along the Tenaru. 



MALADAN THE INVADER 



You alone. Krysiga. have the political and military 

savvy 10 form Ihe Alliance and lead into battle the legions 

of the nine fuedal Lords. Slam-bang medieval combat. 

Never play lire same game mice. Packed w:!n Hismxal fad. 

Send check or money order to: 

JACK 0' ROSES 

P.O. BOX 144, MIDDLETOWN, PA 17057 

(717)944-5843 

(ComnxKlofeisafeg TMo^CcnTioda-EE-iTessMacMmesJnc.wnoarerKM 
resporatblebrno'a!ti.a:edA'ititrp2m'owiD^this.s0ftA'arei 



Protect 

Our 

Natural 

Resources. 

Children are our greatest 
resource. The Boys & Girls Club 
provides them with a positive 
environinerit in which to learn 
and grow. Make a contribu- 
iion today, so they can make 
one tomorrow, 




DOVS & GIRLS CLUB 



eiEws 

S.E.C. CHECK 
REGISTER 12a 

My biggest complaint with Commodore 
computers is their slow loading time, 
but S,E,C. Check Register 128 over- 
comes that problem beautifully. Within 
five seconds of turning on my 128, the 
menu selection is on the screen. Less 
than a minute later, the program has 
loaded and is ready to go. 

This particular check register pro- 
gram is designed for small businesses, 
yet it will also keep your personal 
check register and files balanced and 
in order. With this program you'll be 
able to keep a current and accurate 
check register, print checks and regis- 
ter data, and maintain a recurring pay- 
ee file. Even with all these options, da- 
ta entry is fast and relatively easy. 

Check Register's main menu is exten- 
sive, but easy to use and understand. 
From there you can enter check infor- 
mation, record deposits and withdraw- 
als, check off transactions that have 
cleared the bank, print checl<s, load 
files, and perform numerous other func- 
tions. Most selections are made by 
pressing a function key. 

Each selection has its own menu, 
which allows you to carry out specific 
tasks easily. Any transaction can be ed- 
ited at any time, making the correction 
of errors hassle-free. You can edit and 
delete transactions, insert memos, and 
swap transactions. Check Register al- 
so allows you to format new data disks 
from within the program, a feature I 
appreciate in any software. 

Before setting up your business or 
personal checking files, it would be 
wise to browse through the sample 
files that come with the program. 
These are the files of a Mr. Jones, 
which include his check register, recur- 
ring payee file, and check format tile. 
Read through these and experiment 
with the program's various functions to 
become familiar with them. 

Depending on how large your files 
are, entering your records can be time- 
consuming. This doesn't need to be 
done at one sitting, however; you can 
save your files and add to them or edit 
them at a later time. 

Check Register can do more than 
simply keep track of your checking ac- 
count; it can write checks as well. If 
your bank doesn't supply form-feed 
checks, you can order checks and oth- 
er computer forms from the address giv- 
en in the manual. 

A computer printout ruler, available 
in most office supply stores, will prove 



useful when setting up your check tor- 
mat file. This ruler can help you deter- 
mine the exact spacing required for 
printing out your checks. Check Regis- 
ter is quite flexible, limited only by 
your printer and interface features. 

Check Register also offers the fea- 
ture of printing out reports, useful for 
tax or budgeting purposes. Your regis- 
ter data may be printed out by transac- 
tion and reference numbers, by refer- 
ence numbers and date, by date only, 
or by payee. 

Two other routines allow you to ad- 
dress large and small envelopes for re- 
curring payees with addresses on file. 
This saves you the trouble of switching 
to a program to print out labels or ad- 
dressing them by hand. 

The check register portion of the pro- 
gram is easy to use. The initial setup 
will be the most difficult part of using 
the program. One minor item to note: 
When first signing on, you're asked to 
enter the date in MMDDYY format. 
Don't put spaces between the num- 
bers; the program won't accept them, 

The second part of this program is 
the S.E.C. Financial Loan Consultant, 
There's no mention of this section in 
the manual. Although this part of the 
program is easy to use, a few words of 
guidance would've been appreciated. 

There are six parts to this section, 
with room for expansion. When you sup- 
ply financial information at tfie 
prompts, the program will determine 
the amount of your recurhng loan pay- 
ment and the amount of the finai pay- 
ment. It will also determine terms of a 
loan, the balance of a loan, and what 
the total cost would be to borrow an 
amount of money. It will also analyze 
the loan and provide amortization infor- 
mation. This feature can help you de- 
cide whether or not to buy a car or 
equipment for your business. 

I'd like to see two items improved in 
future releases. My first request would 
be for a bit more guidance in the man- 
ual; I like lots of detailed instruction. Al- 
though Check Register is a very easy 
program to use, there were a couple of 
times when I had to stop and decipher 
what was happening. My other sugges- 
tion would be to let the user alter the 
black and green screen colors. 

Otherwise, I consider this a well- 
thought-out program that can take 
some of the time-consuming burden 
out of running a small business or man- 
aging your personal checking account. 

CHERYL TURrjEY 

Commodore 128 with 80-column fnortitor— $16 

SPARKS ELECTRONICS 

RO- Box 475 

St. Joseph, MO 64504-0475 

Circle Reader Service Njmber 343 G 



G-16 COMPUTE AUGUST 1992 



PROGRAMMER'S PAGE 



Randy Thompson 



REAL 

PROGRAMMERS 

OWN64S 

Computing has changed in 
the last few years. It used to 
be that owning a computer 
meant learning about how it 
worked and how to program it. 
In fact, you couldn't even run 
a program without first getting 
acquainted with BASIC'S 
LOAD and RUN commands. 

This isn't true anymore. To- 
day's software boots automat- 
ically, and programming lan- 
guages such as BASIC are 
considered optional. The com- 
puter industry believes that 
the less you have to know 
about a computer the better. 
Beware this user-friendly atti- 
tude that ignorance is bliss. 

If you want to be a hot pro- 
grammer, learn how your com- 
puter works. Learn all you can. 
Learn its capabilities and its lim- 
itations, fvlost important, learn 
its hardware. Why? Because 
when you know this, you'd 
know what your computer can 
do and how to do it. 

Commodore 64 program- 
mers understand this. With a 
built-in BASIC that lacks com- 
mands even to change the 
screen's colors, 64 owners 
learn quickly what a hardware 
register is and where it's lo- 
cated in memory For exam- 
ple, how many of you don't 
know the function of location 
53280? What about 53281 or 
54296? And what true Com- 
modore hacker doesn't know 
what's stored in memory be- 
tween 1024-2023 or what im- 
portant value is kept in loca- 
tion 646? 

Those who program the 64 
don't care if ttieir computer is 
considered crude by the rest 
of the industry. That's be- 
cause they realize that hack- 
ing the bare metal is what pro- 
gramming is all about. Experi- 
menting with the computer's 



operating system, interrupts, 
and video chips is what 
makes owning a computer so 
much fun. Sure, the 64 may be 
primitive compared to the Ami- 
ga, but it's still one of the great- 
est machines around for the 
hobbyist. 

Today's more powerful com- 
puters come with high-level lan- 
guages that take the work out 
of programming. Ironically I be- 
lieve that programmers are los- 
ing their edge because of it. 
You no longer need to under- 
stand what binary is to display 
a bitmapped picture, or how 
your computer's DOS works to 
open a file, or where your vid- 
eo registers are located to dark- 
en your screen. Unfortunately, 
too many programmers aren't 
bothering to try. They're spend- 
ing more time learning about 
programming languages than 
learning about the computers 
they program on. 

I ttiink you should under- 
stand yourcomputer first. What- 
ever programming language 
you choose to learn is, for the 
most part, incidental. If you 
know how your computer oper- 
ates, you'll know the most effi- 
cient ways to control it, no mat- 
ter what language you select. 
High-level languages are 
good as long as you don't for- 
get the computers they're de- 
signed to control. 

There's also a trend toward 
writing generic, abstract 
code. This type of program- 
ming produces software that 
can be easily maintained and 
transferred to other comput- 
ers. This is fine (and crucial) 
for many business applica- 
tions. But these types of pro- 
grams are, by nature, bigger 
and slower than programs 
that have been written specifi- 
cally for one computer by a pro- 
grammer who takes advan- 
tage of what that machine has 
to offer. In my opinion, the 
best programs don't run on oth- 
er brands of computers with- 
out significant modifications to 



the programs' codes. 

Whether you own a 64, 128, 
Amiga, or MS-DOS clone, it's 
your duty to understand the 
hardware you program. Let's 
push these machines to the lim- 
it. After all, isn't that what own- 
ing a computer is all about? 

Stepping down off my soap- 
box for a second, I'd like to 
make a request. I'm looking 
for some neat raster interrupt 
routines. I'd like to publish a col- 
umn of impressive raster vid- 
eo tricks. Such routines may 
display a multitude of sprites, 
change video modes on the 
fly, animate the screen's bor- 
ders, or whatever else you can 
imagine. Your program 
should be as short as possible 
(certainly no larger than what 
can be listed on this page) 
and preferably submitted on 
disk. If possible, try to make 
your routine something that 
can be easily included in a BA- 
SIC program. This way, all 
programmers will be able to 
make use of your efforts. As 
usual, we'll pay you for any tip 
we publish. 

In the meantime, try running 
the following pseudo raster in- 
terrupt program on your 64. 
(Your 128 can run this, too, but 
the effect will be different). En- 
ter it exactly as shown here, 
with no spaces. Watch careful- 
ly. Enter a comma, a period, 
and 18 colons after the first 
POKE53280. Also, notice that 
there's no line number after 
the GOTO command. Sure, 
it's weird looking, but try it any- 
way. It might surprise you. 



n you want to be 
a hot programmer, 
learn how your 
computer wot1(s. Leani 
all you can. 



POKE53Zao, .:::::::::::;:::::: 
P0KE532B0,7:GOTO 

"Programmer's Page" is inter- 
ested in your programming 
tips and tricks. Send them to 
Programmer's Page, COM- 
PUTE'S Gazette, 324 West 
Wendover Avenue, Suite 200, 
Greensboro, North Carolina 
27408. We pay $25-$50 for 
each tip we publish. a 

AUGUST 1992 COMPUTE G-17 



BEGINNER BASIC 



Larry Cotton 



Build this simple 

Interlace, 

and you can use 

your 64's 

loystlch port to 

control small 

electrical devices. 



MORE JOYSTICK 
OUTPUT 

Last month we saw how to use 
a joystick port as a miniature 
user port. With a short BASIC 
program, we controlled an 
LED connected to a joystick ca- 
ble. Now let's expand on that 
idea so that we may control a 
small electrical device. To do 
this, we'll build an interface on 
a Radio Shack IC breadboard 
that will connect the 64 and 
the device. The interface will 
use the fire button wire to con- 
trol a small relay. 



the common contact; (he oth- 
er two are the normally open 
(NO) and normally closed 
(NC) contacts. 

2. Make three small inverted- 
U loops of bare connecting 
v^ire approximately one-half 
inch long. Use these to con- 
nect the three main relay 
switching contacts to the cir- 
cuit board. 

3. Solder the tops of the invert- 
ed-U loops to the three main 
relay leads, with the six short 
(one-fourth inch) leads point- 
ing down. 




ITOSMTCWEODEVKS 



-cificuiT GOAno 



^ TO SWITCHED DEVICE 



WARNING: You must be 
thoroughly familiar with elec- 
tronic construction techniques 
and associated safety precau- 
tions before attempting this pro- 
ject. The relay must switch on- 
ly small electrical circuits op- 
erating on voltages safe to han- 
dle. In no case should 
switched currents exceed 1 
amp (1000 milliamperes). Use 
adequate-sized wiring from 
the relay to your appliance, or 
use several wires in parallel. 
Carefully follow these step-by- 
step instructions based on the 
parts list printed at the bottom 
of the page. Also, refer to the 
accompanying diagram. 

1. Of the five relay leads, 
bend the three thick ones to a 
horizontal position. The center 
lead at one end of the relay is 

G-18 COMPUTE AUGUST 1992 



4. Plug all six leads into the cir- 
cuit board so that the common 
contact is in one group of sock- 
et holes and the normally open/ 
normally closed contacts are 
in another. (The two groups of 
holes are electrically divided 
by the channel that runs down 
the middle.) Ensure that the 
two small coil contacts under 
the relay are plugged into the 
same group of holes as the 
common switching contact, 
fvlake sure that any wire or 
wires running from the relay 
contacts to your electrical de- 
vice are of adequate size to 
handle the associated current. 

5. Solder short pieces of con- 
necting wire to the nine-volt bat- 
tery connector: plug them into 
the two outside rows of holes 
on the board carefully noting 



polarity. Don't connect the bat- 
tery yet- 

6. Plug in the transistor with 
the flat face as shown in the di- 
agram printed above. 

7. Connect the diode from the 
transistor to the positive edge 
of the board. The band on the 
diode should be toward the 
positive terminal. 

8. Connect the resistor be- 
tween the transistor and an un- 
used row of holes. 

9. Connect wires from the tran- 
sistor and the positive edge of 
the board to the two hidden re- 
lay coil leads. 

10- Connect a short jumper 
from the transistor to the neg- 
ative edge of the board. 

This completes the construc- 
tion of the interface. Now run 
ast month's program and 
make sure that the LED still 
flashes. Turn off the computer 
and unplug the joystick cable 
from the computer. Remove 
the LED; plug the orange, 
black, and brown wires into 
the circuit board as shown; 
and then enter this program. 



AS 


10 


PRINT" {CLR}" 


DM 


20 


PRINT" {2 DOWN] PLUG 
CABLE INTO PORT 1 
{DOWN} 


HH 


30 


NT=400:FT=400:B=3: 
REM ON TIME, OFF T 
I ME AND NUMBER OF 
fSPACE}BLINKS 


BS 


40 


IFPEEK(56321)=255T 
HEN40 


QP 


50 


P0KE56323,17 


CS 


60 


POKE 56321, 16;PRINT 
"ON" 


EH 


70 


FORT^lTONTrNEXT 


RK 


30 


POKE56321,0:PRINT" 
OFF" 


MD 


90 


F0RT=1T0FT:NEXT 


CM 


100 IFPEEK(56321)=238 






THEN120 


CP 


110 GOTO60 


PX 


12{ 


POKE198,0 


QB 


13C 


POKE56323,0 



Connect the nine-volt bat- 
tery and run the program. At 



the prompt, plug the joystick cable into port 1. The relay 
should now start clicking regularly. Its contacts are 
alternately opening and closing, with their status printed 
on the computer screen. Note that the keyboard won't re- 
spond as long as the joystick cable is plugged in. 

Now unplug the cable. The program ends, the relay 
stops clicking, and the keyboard again responds normal- 
ly. Disconnect the battery. If you are experiencing any prob- 
lems at this point and your circuit isn't performing as de- 
scribed, check your wiring carefully and make sure you 
have a good battery- 
Use the common contact and either the normally open 
or the normally closed contact of the relay to switch a 
small electrical device. Observe the precautions stated 
above. Always use electrical tape or shrink tubing to in- 
sulate live leads from each other, yourself, and others. 

Of course, this project only hints at your computer's 
potential for controlling electrical devices. The two basic 
categories of devices which can be controlled are those 
which need sophisticated timing and those which sense 
external events. By modifying the program and adding 
more interfaces, up to five circuits can be controlled inde- 
pendently from one joystick port. 

In the first category, your computer can control devic- 
es such as solenoids. Timing can be implemented by us- 
ing either the Tl function (the most accurate) or by using 
FOR-NEXT loops. I had fun building a model of a "drum- 
mer boy" which uses low-voltage relays and small sole- 
noids to control its drumsticks. By paying careful atten- 
tion to its construction, I was able to make the model look 
realistic. With a few changes in the program, I was able 
to make his marching drum patterns varied and sound 
even more authentic. 

In the second category, the computer can sense vari- 
ous parameters of the environment. The other joystick (or 
user) port could be connected to sensors which detect 
electrical resistance changes or on/off signals. Resistance 
can vary by light with photoresistor cells or by heat with 
a thermistor. It can also be changed manually by using 
a potentiometer, such as that found in computer paddles. 
By using your imagination and a little knowledge of elec- 
tronics, you can have your 64 controlling any number of 
sophisticated appliances and gadgets. 

The following list of parts has Radio Shack stock num- 
bers listed as a convenience, Similar items should be avail- 
able at any well-stocked electronics store for less than $20. 

PARTS IIST 

• Circuit board, RS 276-175 

• 2A SPOT nine-volt coil relay, RS 275-005 

• MPS2222A transistor, RS 276-2009 

• 1N914 diode. RS 276-1122 

• lOOO-ohm resistor. RS 271-023 

• Nine-voll battery connector, RS 270-325 

• Nine-voll battery 

• Joystick cable 

• 24-gauge solid wire 

• Electrical tape or shrink tubing for exposed wires □ 



Calc II 

The Fastest 
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Commodore 64 



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AUGUST 1992 COMPUTE G-IQ 



MACHINE LANGUAGE 



Jim Butterfield 



Modifying a 

thousand distinct 

character 

positions caiis for 

mactiine 

ianguage speed. 



G-20 COMPUTE AUGUST 



SCREEN EFFECTS 

When a program is doing a 
great deal of computation, it 
may step the border color to 
indicate that the computer is 
active. Machine language pro- 
grams can do this with a sin- 
gle instruction: INC $D020. 
Since this instruction doesn't 
affect the A, X, or Y registers, 
it's easy to slip it into a pro- 
gram Icop. It'll produce a daz- 
zling color display. 

The address shown above 
produces a whole-screen ef- 
fect by means of a single data 
store to memory. Sometimes, 
however, we have good rea- 
son to go after the individual 
characters on the screen. Mod- 
ifying a thousand distinct char- 
acter positions in a reasona- 
ble amount of time calls for 
machine language speed. 

The character cells of the 
64's screen can be refer- 
enced directly. Each charac- 
ter occupies a byte of memo- 
ry. Screen memory usually 
starts at address $0400 (deci- 
mal 1024), with the last byte at 
$07E7 (decimal 2023). There 
are also 1000 color nybble lo- 
cations starting at $D800 (dec- 
imal 55296). If we wish to per- 
form screen work without flick- 
er, it's best to wait until retrace 
time. The video screen is "paint- 
ed" 60 times a second (50 in 
Europe). After drawing the 
screen, the video beam 
moves back to the top, or re- 
traces. That's the moment 
we've been waiting for. Our pro- 
gram may then go to work with- 
out screen jitter. The action 
must be performed quickly, 
but machine language is fast 
enough for the job. 

Our program is called 
Wipe, and it'll run through the 
screen 40 times. Each time it'll 
reverse one column of screen 
data. The effect is that of a vid- 
eo wipe effect, moving from 
left to right. 

The 40 separate runs are 
counted in the Y register. The 

1992 



contents of Y also serve to 
specify the column to be mod- 
ified on each pass. 



2QQ0 AO 00 
2002 . . . 
202F C8 
2030 CO 2B 
2032 DO CE 
2034 60 



LDY #soa 

INY 

CPY #$28 
BNE $2002 
RTS 



Within each pass of the loop, 
we wait until screen retrace 
takes place. This serves two 
purposes: It keeps the 
screen free from flicker and 
slows down the wipe effect so 
that it looks better. To check 
for retrace, watch the two high- 
est bits of location $D011; 
when its value goes down, 
we know that the screen has 
just begun to retrace. 

2002 AD 11 DO LDA $D01t 

2005 29 CO AND #$C0 

2007 CD 08 21 CMP $2106 

20QA 8D 08 21 STA $2108 

200D BO F3 BCS $20Q2 

Note that there's an instruc- 
tion sandwiched between the 
test (CivlP for CoMPare) and 
the Branch (BCS for Branch 
Carry Set). This STA instruc- 
tion doesn't affect the flags 
produced by CMP. 

As our program goes 
down the screen a line at a 
time, it sets the top-of-screen 
address, $0400, into the indi- 
rect address at $FC and $FD. 
After each line has been han- 
dled, the program adds 40 to 
this address, moving to the 
next line. Before looping, the 
program testa the address to 
see if it's reached the end of 
the screen address area. 

200F A2 04 LDX #$04 

2011 A9 00 LDA #$00 

; store a screen line pointer in FC/ 

FD 

2013 86 FD STX SFD 

2015 85 FC STA SFC 

; move to next spreen line (add 40 
to FC/FD) 



201 DAB 
201 F A5 

2021 18 

2022 69 
2024 90 
2026 E8 

; compare pointer 
screen 



FD 
FC 

28 
01 



2027 EO 
2029 90 

202B eg 

202D 90 



07 
E8 
E8 

E4 



LDX SFD 

LDA SFC 
CLC 

ADC #$28 

BCC $2027 
INX 
to end-of- 

CPX #$07 
BCC $2013 
CIVIP #$ES 
BCC $2013 



The code for the innermost 
loop is quite simple. The start- 
of-line has been stored in in- 
direct address FC/FD; the col- 
umn to be modified is in Y. To 
reverse the character, use the 
EOR (Exclusive OR) instruc- 
tion to flip the high-order bit. 

2017 B1 FC LDA ($FC),Y 

2019 49 80 EOR #$80 

201 B 91 FC STA ($FC),Y 

That's the whole machine lan- 
guage program. To put the 
program into a more conven- 
ient form for BASIC entry, 
a complete demonstration 
called Screen Wipe is sup- 
plied below. 



BD 


10 


DATA 160,0,173,17 
,208,41,192,205,8 
,33,141,8,33,176, 
243 


BQ 


110 


DATA 162,4,169,0, 
134,253,133,252,1 
77,252,73,128,145 
,252 


JE 


120 


DATA 166,253,165, 
252,24,105,40,144 
,1,232 


XG 


130 


DATA 224,7,144,23 
2,201,232,144,228 
,200,192,40,208,2 
06,96 


Hft 


200 


FOR J=8192 TO 824 

4 

READ X 


DP 


210 


CG 


220 


T=T+X 


FQ 


230 


POKE J,X 


QF 


240 


NEXT J 


HP 


250 


IF TO7508 THEN S 
TOP 


BQ 


300 


PRINT "SCREEN WIP 

E!" 

SYS 8192 


FF 


310 


GH 


320 


FOR J=l TO 1000:8 
EXT J 


RH 


330 


SYS 8192 



WORLD VIEW 



Steve Jarratt 



VIEW FROM 
THE U.K. 



Few (if any) utilities are now re- 
leased for the 64 in the U.K., 
so serious users look else- 
where for their software. Here 
are some sources. 

A useful contact for hard- 
ened l<eypunchers is the Inde- 
pendent Commodore Prod- 
ucts User Group. If you want 
more from your 64 than just a 
high score, write to Jack Co- 
hen at ICPUG, P.O.Box 1309. 
London N3 2UT. For a fee of 
under $30, you get a bimonth- 
ly magazine, contact with oth- 
er like-minded 64 users, and 
access to a massive library of 
public domain software. 

Alternatively, you could try 
FSSL Computer Software, 
which stocks everything from 
video digitizers to GEOS-com- 
patible programs — all for the 
64. I don't have the address, 
but from the U.S., pick up the 
phone and dial Oil 44 386- 
553153. (Remember the time 
difference!) Ask for its cata- 
logue and then gasp in awe at 
its amazing range of periph- 
erals and utilities. 

Even though the 64 is a low- 
ly 8-bit machine, that doesn't 
mean that you can't teach the 
old dog some new tricks. The 
most recent acquisition on the 
serious side of 64 software is 
Intro, a starter pack for electron- 
ic musicians. If you possess a 
fvilDI-compatible synthesizer 
but have fingers like a gorilla, 
this sequencing software lets 
you use the 64 as an interface 
between you and the synthesiz- 
er's brain. Basically, it's like a 
word processor for music. 

The package includes a 
hardware fvllDI interface with 
a fVIIDI-In and two MIDI-Out 
ports, two five-foot IvIIDI ca- 
bles, and version 2 of Dr. T's 
Keyboard Controlled Se- 
quencer on disk. It's all good 
stuff, but then for around $250 
(U.K. prices) it ought to be. 



While the pack is ostensibly 
aimed at beginners, its user- 
friendliness is on a par with 
that of a four-year-old Dober- 
man called Adolf. If you're not 
daunted by its aiphanumerical 
tables and machine language- 
like instructions, then you're ob- 
viously from the planet Zog. 
The kit, however, is very pow- 
erful and covers an extensive 
range of editing and sequenc- 
ing functions. I won't give you 
that bull about its making you 
the next Rick Wakeman (aged 
hippy keyboarder), but at 
least it'll keep you off the 
streets or give your joystick a 
rest. Intro is already available 
in the U.S., so if you're interest- 
ed, write to Dr. T's Music Soft- 
ware, 100 Crescent Road, 
Needham, Massachusetts 
02194 or call (617)455-1454. 

That's one for the musi- 
cians, so what about one for 
the artists? Well, there are 
enough paint packages 
around for the 64, but what 
about trying to create your 
own 3-D environment? Do- 
mark's 3-D Construction Kit en- 
ables you to do just that. 

Using the Freescape 3-D 
modeling system pioneered 
by Incentive Software, this kit 
allows the user to build hous- 
es, rooms, spaceships — even 
small worlds — given enough 
time and patience. Once the 
modeling is finished, you can 
move around your construc- 
tion and examine it in 3-D 
space. (I refuse to use any- 
thing as pretentious as virtual 
reality.) 

There are special functions 
included that enable you to dic- 
tate what happens under cer- 
tain criteria. For instance, you 
can fire a laser beam at a 
block, causing it to disappear, 
move sideways, or fall on top 
of your 3-D character! These 
functions are there as the foun- 
dation stones of puzzles, and 
while the kit is primarily de- 
signed as an interactive game- 
making pacl<age, the more 



ingenious modelers can in- 
dulge in all sorts of CAD- 
based diversions. 

The 3-D Construction Kit, 
which includes a tutorial vid- 
eo, costs about $40 and can 
be obtained from Domark, Fer- 
ry House, 51-57 Lacy Road, 
London SW15 1PR. 

One of the treats of being in 
touch with so many 64 users 
is the constant influx of de- 
mos. I'm not sure if this phe- 
nomenon is as big in the 
States, but in Europe there are 
hundreds of small bands of 
coders who like nothing more 
than making the 64 do things 
it was never designed to do. 

These punk programmers 
push the beige box to its limit, 
producing visual and audial 
extravaganzas. Demo teams 
can create dozens of sprites 
on screen, rapid 3-D vector 
graphics, full-screen images 
without borders, pictures with 
more than three colors per 
character block, crisp sam- 
pled tunes, and clever raster 
line tricks. Sometimes it's diffi- 
cult to believe that the 64 is re- 
sponsible for such feats of com- 
puting prowess! 

There are thousands of 
such demos in British PD librar- 
ies, but be warned: Since Amer- 
ica's television system and 
electricity differ from Europe's, 
some demos won't work. For 
instance, it's a lot more difficult 
to put sphtes in the border on 
a U.S. 64 because of the 
screen timing. For those that 
do work, however, it's well 
worth the cost of the airmail. 
You'll make your 64 sing and 
dance like never before. 

Try dropping these guys in 
England a note: Binary Zone, 
153 Farriers Corner, Wes- 
tlands, Droitwich, Worcester- 
shire WR9 9EX; Kingsway Com- 
puter Services, 72 Glencoe 
Road, Sheffield: Phoenix, 64 
Plumberow, Basildon, Essex; 
and Silver Wing Software, 185 
Callowbrook Lane, Rubery, 
Birmingham B45 9TG. D 



Serious products 
and exciting 
new demo urograms 
are still available 
for die 64 in England. 
Here are some 
sources for both. 



AUGUST 1992 COMPUTE 0-21 



GEOS 



Steve Vander Ark 



GEOS GRAB BAG 



Here's a look at 

a variety of old 

and new products 

and services 

of interest to GEOS 

users. 



G-22 



Well, it's been a year now 
since I first wrote this column. 
Over the past 11 months — re- 
member that little "hiccup" in 
April?— I've covered a lot of 
GEOS ground, I've also heard 
from many of you, either via 
the U.S. Snail fviail or E-mail on 
QuantumLink. It's been interest- 
ing, to say the least. 

A lot of the mail lately has 
been in response to the De- 
cember column, in which I dis- 
cussed Susan Lamb's geo- 
Store. Susan has been unable 
to make a go of geoStore, un- 
fortunately, and as a result 
hasn't been answering the 
many requests she's received 
for a catalog. It's always sad 
to see this kind of thing hap- 
pen, especially since it 
means that most of you will nev- 
er get to see any of Susan's 
excellent graphics. 

If you're in the market for ex- 
ceptionally high-quality clip art 
for GEOS, however, there's 
another place to turn. The 
folks who run a company 
called DigiClips (1401-7235 
Salisbury Avenue, Burnaby, 
British Columbia, Canada V5E 
4E6) have been proving them- 
selves lately on Q-Link, where 
they go by the name Fasung 
Jai. These guys are dedicated 
to the Commodore computer; 
they pledge to support GEOS 
until their equipment melts 
down. They've been backing 
up their promise with exception- 
ally high-quality clip art upload- 
ed to Q-Link, Their work in- 
cludes line art, such as you'll 
find on a Newsroom disk, and 
highly detailed gray-scale im- 
ages. Their graphics are 
some of the best I've seen for 
the Commodore, easily on a 
par with the kind of art files 
you'd find in a Mac or IBM 
package. Q-Link's libraries 
have a nice selection of Di- 
giClips files available. 

This brings up the subject 
of uploading and download- 

COMPUTE AUGUST 1992 



ing files for GEOS, which is the 
best way to get the new utili- 
ties, graphics, fonts, and so 
on that come from other 
GEOS users. (It's also about 
the only way!) A new utility re- 
cently made available on 0- 
Link called geoPack (filename 
GEOPACK, uploaded by Pe- 
terlvlCS) lets you not only con- 
vert files back and forth be- 
tween GEOS and standard 
Commodore formats, which is 
essential for any transfer of 
GEOS files via modem, but al- 
so archive (combine into one 
large file) groups of files for eas- 
ier transfer. GeoPack does all 
this from within GEOS itself, 
which is a treat for people like 
me who hate to leave GEOS 
and stumble around, typing in 
clumsy DOS commands. 

A lot of you have written to 
ask where you can find all 
these great GEOS files I talk 
about if you don't happen to 
be a Q-Link user. Last year, I 
published a phone number of 
a BBS in Grand Rapids, Mich- 
igan (where I live), that had an 
extensive GEOS file section. 
Unfortunately, the sysop of 
that board has decided to no 
longer support GEOS, so I've 
had to switch my allegiance to 
another local BBS. This 
board, Rogue River BBS, is 
one of the longest-running 
BBSs in the area. It's running 
on an Amiga, but the sysop, 
Jim Foley, cheerfully supports 
our local Commodore users 
group and has agreed to let 
me print his number. I'll be 
uploading to his board all of 
the public domain and share- 
ware files that I've mentioned 
in my columns. Now, any 
GEOS fan can download 
them for the price of the long- 
distance call. The sysop as- 
sures me that you should 
have no trouble downloading 
on the first call since his BBS 
has no ratios or file points. 
Rogue River BBS can be 
reached 24 hours a day at 
(616) 36V8267. 



Several other new products 
have been showing up in de- 
mo form on Q-Link. (Demo 
form means that all the fea- 
tures of the programs are not 
enabled, but users have a 
chance to sample before buy- 
ing.) One eagerly awaited pro- 
gram is geoCanvas, a new 
paint program that allows you 
to open several windows on 
one or more documents. 

GeoCanvas features many 
excellent drawing tools for cre- 
ating high-resolution bitmaps, 
including some not available 
in geoPaint As of this writing, 
geoCanvas is in Beta testing 
and is available to the public 
in demo form only. 

Dave Ferguson, whose 
Dweezil Disks are a must for 
any GEOS user, has recently 
released Dweezil Label, a la- 
bel-making program for 
GEOS. A new version of his 
popular geoStamp program, 
called GeoSTAMPbig, is also 
available. This new version 
will allow stamps that are four 
times the size of the old 
stamps. The stamp file-han- 
dling routines have been im- 
proved to make it a cinch to 
move through your collections 
and choose a stamp. Each of 
these great programs is avail- 
able on Q-Link in demo form. 
You can order the Dweezil 
Disks direct from Quincy Soft- 
ware, 9479 East Whitmore Av- 
enue, Hughson, California 
95326-9745. Disk 1 ($17.95) 
features NewTools, and Disk 
2 (S15.95) includes UltiPatt, 
the ultimate pattern editor. 
While you're at it, send Dave 
$4.00 for his GeoPublish Com- 
pendium, a ten-page booklet 
with supplemental sheets tell- 
ing you everything you need 
to laser-print documents from 
GEOS, even if you don't own 
a laser printer. 

Send your GEOS^related 
questions to Steve Vander Ark 
in care of COMPUTE. He can 
aiso be reached on Quantum- 
Link as SteveVU. □ 



The Gazette 

Productivity 

Manager 

(Formerly PowerPak) ^^ 

Harness the productivity 
power of your 64 or 128! 

Turn your Commodore into 
a powerful workhorse, keep track 
of finances, generate reports 
in a snap, manage your 
money in minutes- 
all with the new 1991 
Gazette Productivity 
Manager! Look at all 
your 64/128 Productivity 
Manager disk contains. 

GemCalc 64 & 128— 
A complete, powerful, user- 
friendly spreadsheet with all 
the features you'd expect 
in an expensive commercial package 
(separate 64 and 128 versions are included). 
Most commands can be performed with a single keypress! 

Memo Card — Unleashes the power of a full-blown 
database without the fuss! Nothing's easier — it's a 
truly simple computerized address file. Just type in 
your data on any one of the index cards. Need to edit? 
Just use the standard Commodore editing keys. 
Finished? Just save the data to floppy What could be 
easier? 

Financial Planner — Answers all of those questions 
concerning interest, investments, and money manage- 
ment that financial analysts charge big bucks for! You 
can plan for your children's education and know 
exactly how much it will cost and how much you need 
to save every month to reach your goal. Or, decide 
whether to buy or lease a new car. Use the compound 
interest and savings function to arrive at accurate 
estimates of how your money will work for you. 
Compute the answer at the click of a key! 

DON'T MISS OUT ON THIS 
POWERFUL WORKHORSE! 




(MasterCard and Visa accepted on orders wilh subtotal over $20). 



Productivity Manager disk(s) 



D YES! Please send me . 

(SI 4.95 each). 

Subtotal 

Sales Tax (Residents of NC and NY please add appro- 
priate sales tax for your area. Canadian orders, add 
7% goods and services tax.) 

Shipping and Handling ($2.00 U.S. and Canada, S3.00 

surface mail, S5.00 airmail per disk.) 

Total Enclosed 

_ Check or Money Order _ MasterCard _ VISA 

Lrcdll CHjd No. 



SL^tiaturr - 



{Rn)iiifrd) 



Daytinr THtphone "^o. 



L»r 

Pnivinri 



iHP/ 



Send your order to Gazette 1991 Productivity Manager, 
324 W. Wendover Ave., Ste. 200, Greensboro, NC 27408. 



DIVERSIONS 



Fred D'lgnazio 



Body language is 

like a true 

confession of what's 

really going on 

In the learner's mind. 



A SWARM OF 
NAKED PUPPIES 

Have you ever thought of the 
contrast between the way you 
learn now and the way you 
learned as a child? 

Recently, I've been an ob- 
server of two laboratories of 
learning: one in a high school 
and one here in my study. In 
the high school, I watch teach- 
ers learning on computers. At 
home, I watch two toddlers — 
Laura, 3, and Tommy, 2'/2 — 
also learning on computers. 

The contrast in their learn- 
ing styles couldn't be more dra- 
matic. And it's all in their body 
language. Body language is 
like a true confession of 
what's really going on in the 
learner's mind, 

The teachers enter the com- 
puter lab at the high school in 
tight little clusters. They joke 
nervously and loudly, and 
they immediately ask where 
the rest rooms are and how 
soon they can have their first 
coffee break. When ihey sit at 
the computers, they push 
their chairs as far away from 
the tables as possible, some- 
times so far that it's impossible 
to reach the computer keys. 

Once the class begins, the 
teachers are supposed to be- 
gin team projects that encour- 
age them to get up and move 
about. However, most teach- 
ers stay glued to their chairs, 
as if to say, "This is where we 
are supposed to learn. We are 
the audience; you are the per- 
former. You jump up and 
down and be interesting, and 
we'll stay seated." 

Tommy and Laura enter the 
study in a slightly different man- 
ner, more like shock troops, 
gangbusters, and tornadoes! 
By the time they get to the 
study, they have managed to 
lose most or all of their cloth- 
ing and have become "naked 
puppies." And these puppies 
don't just mosey into the 



study — they swarm, they gal- 
lop, and they stampede! They 
bang open the study door; at- 
tack both of the computers by 
immediately pressing all the 
keys and jerking the poor little 
computer mice this way and 
that; and all the while giggle, 
shout, and jump around. And 
they never sit down! 

The computers are usually 
in "sleep" mode when the pup- 
pies arrive. Their screens are 
lit up with iittle fishbowls or 
scenes of sleepy cityscapes. 
"Wake up, computer!" Laura 
yells, as she clicks the mouse 
and knock-knock-knocks on 
the computer screen. 

"L-M-N-0-Z!" shouts Tom- 
my as he simultaneously press- 
es 11 keys, using both his 
hands and his forehead. 

Puppies swarm around the 
computers, and they love to 
print. They print immediately 
They print constantly. They 
both know the key combina- 
tions to crank up the printer, 
and within a moment after 
they've entered the study, the 
printer starts spitting out pic- 
tures of crabs, cats, moons, 
and unicorns on skateboards. 

As the puppies' teacher, I 
try to maintain a semblance of 
order in the classroom and 
break up fights. But, overall, 
the puppies get along pretty 
well, and I never have to re- 
mind them to stay on task. 

What is their task? As their 
teacher, I try to lead them 
through their early learning pro- 
grams, beginning at the begin- 
ning of the manuals and work- 
ing toward the end. For some 
reason, this isn't the way pup- 
pies learn. While I'm still at the 
beginning of a manual, Laura 
is somehow in the icon-edit sec- 
tion of chapter 33, zooming in 
on icons, painting red hair on 
the sun ("See, Daddy. It's a 
happy face!"), and drawing 
legs on a pine tree. Mean- 
while, Tommy is supposed to 
be using a music program, 
but he's found a key combina- 



tion that turns the musical key- 
board into a talking parrot. A 
moment later, he and Laura 
are talking into the computer 
microphone, trading insults 
with the parrot. 

The teachers in the high- 
school lab spend six hours in 
a workshop, trying to learn 
more like naked puppies 
iearn. And the miracle is that 
they succeed. Sometimes it 
takes the entire six hours, some- 
times not. By the time they 
leave the lab, they, too, are 
swarming over the machines, 
talking, laughing, pressing but- 
tons a mile a minute, making 
mistakes, and doing crazy, un- 
predictable, wonderful things. 

Their body language tells 
all. As they transform from au- 
dience to performers, the 
teachers begin standing, walk- 
ing, crouching, and crawling 
under tables, examining wires 
and cables. They carry a vid- 
eo camera up onto a table 
and shoot the classroom from 
a lofty angle, or they fall to the 
floor and adopt a toddler's eye 
view. As they begin to imitate 
my two little puppies, their ex- 
citement goes up, their enthu- 
siasm goes up, and their 
noise goes up. And their learn- 
ing. And their self-confidence. 
And their self-esteem. And 
their independence from their 
teacher. 

I like adults who act like pup- 
pies. At the end of a long, ex- 
hausting workshop day, if I 
have a room full of big pup- 
pies (all with their clothes on, 
thank goodness!), I consider 
the workshop a success. And 
the teachers do, too. In fact, at 
this point, they don't care a bit 
what 1 think. They're too busy 
running around the room witln 
video cameras, microphones, 
magic markers, and colored 
construction paper, working 
on projects galore. They're too 
busy to notice whether they 
even have an instructor. 

That's when I know I've 
been a good teacher. O 



G-24 COMPUTE AUGUST 1992 



PROGRAMS 



SUPERWINDOWS 

By Cameron Kaiser 

A problem with most computers is that 
your worl< is limited to one screen. That 
is, you have to deal either in text only or 
graphics only. Some programs offer dou- 
ble screens, but, invariably, one is too 
large and one is too small. Or they won't 
act like you want them to. In most cases, 
they're just a hassle. On the 64, the only 
way to circumvent this one-screen rule is 
through raster interrupts, but who wants 
to do all that work? With SuperWindows, 
you might not have to. 

SuperWindows is a patch that forks in- 
to your VIC chip, giving you three 
screens instead of one. Each screen car- 
ries its own attributes, its own back- 
ground color, its own screen memory (if 
you want it), and its own screen mode 
(the screens handle hi-res, too). Each 
screen can also be shrunk and enlarged 
to fit your program's needs. 

Entering the Program 

SuperWindows consists of two pro- 
grams, Windowboot and Windows. Win- 
dowboot is written entirely in BASIC. To 
help avoid typing errors, enter it with 
The Automatic Proofreader; see "Typ- 
ing Aids" elsewhere in this section. 
When you've finished entering this 
short boot program, save it to disk be- 
fore exiting Proofreader. 

The main program, Windows, is writ- 
ten in machine language. To enter it, 
use MLX, our machine language entry 
program; again, see "Typing Aids." 
When MLX prompts, respond with the 
following. 

Starting address: COOO 
Ending address: C10F 

Be sure to save a program copy with 
the filename WINDOWS, because this 
is the name the boot program expects 
to toad, 

For some ideas on how to use Super- 
Windows effectively, examine Windows 
Demo. By following this demonstration 
program closely, you can discover 
many of the more extraordinary fea- 
tures of SuperWindows. It's written en- 
tirely in BASIC. Once again, enter it 
with The Automatic Proofreader to 
help avoid typing errors. Save it and 
Windows on the same disk. 



Running the Program 

To get SuperWindows up and running, 
run Windowboot. It loads and executes 
the main program and then returns you 
to BASIC. Four SYS codes control Su- 
perWindows. SYS 49170 turns it on. 

SYS 4934G.SM.MP.MB.SP.se. EW is 
the syntax for editing Window 1. SM is 
screen mode, the value normally going 
into location 53265, For text this value 
is 27; for hi-res, the value is 59. 

MP is memory pointer, the value nor- 
mally going into location 53272. Usual- 
ly this vatue is 21 or 23. 

MB is memory block, the value nor- 
mally going into location 56576. Usual- 
ly this value is 151. 

SP is screen page, the value normal- 
ly going into location 648. Usually this 
value is 4. 

$C is screen color, the vatue normal- 
ly going into location 53281. Set this val- 
ue to whatever color you wish (0-15). 

EW is end of window. For Window 1, 
the default value is 100. Any value 
less than 49 will go offscreen. Conflicts 
will result if the value exceeds the end 
of Window 2's value. Press Run/Stop- 
Restore if you have problems. 

Window 2 

SYS 49306.SM,MPMB.SPSC.EW is 
the syntax for editing Window 2. Note 
that the SYS code is less than that for 
Window 1 . Watch out! The codes work 
the same as those in Window 1, with 
the exception that the default value for 
end of window is 192. Again, any val- 
ue less than 49 will go offscreen and 
probably conflict with Window 1. Also, 
the end of window value for Window 2 
mustn't exceed that of Window 3. 

Window 3 

SYS 49383.SM.MPMB,SP.SC,EW is 
the syntax for editing Window 3. The de- 
fault value for end of window is 255. 
Again, the end of window value 
should be greater than 49. It doesn't 
matter if the end of window value 
doesn't cover all the screen; Window 1 
will wrap around to fill in the rest. 
Should you need to turn SuperWin- 
dows off, simply press Run/Stop-Re- 
store. The values for the window para- 
meters can be 0-65535; however, the 
high byte of the values provided, if 
any, will be stripped off. 
One warning: Never use the disk 



drive while SuperWindows is active. Dis- 
able SuperWindows first, or disk dam- 
age could result. 

WINDOWBOOT 

CP 1 REM COPYRIGHT 1992 - COMP 
UTE PUBLICATIONS INTL LTD 

- ALL RIGHTS RESERVED 
FH 5 IFA=0THENfl=l:LOAD"WINDOWS 

",8,1 
FX 10 SYS49170:SYS49346,27,23, 

151,4,6,100:SYS4930a,27, 

23,151,4,6,192 
QD 20 SYS49383,27,23,151,4,6,2 

55: PRINT" {CLR}SUPERWINDO 

WS3.2 ENABLED" 
HB 30 PRINT"DO NOT USE DISK OR 

IVB WHILE ONLINE"; :NEW 



WINDOWS 



C000 
C008 
C010 
C018i 
C020! 
C028i 
C030; 
C038: 
C040: 
C048: 
C050: 
C058: 
C060; 
C068: 
C070; 
C078; 
C0B0; 
0088; 
C090; 
C098; 
C0A0! 
C0A8; 
C0B0; 
C0B8: 
C0C0: 
CacB: 
C0D0: 
C0D8: 
C0E0: 
C0E3: 
C0F0: 
C0F8: 
C100: 
CI08; 



00 00 
00 00 

8E C0 
A9 01 

02 A9 
C0 8D 

03 A9 
AD 19 
F0 19 
85 02 
11 D0 
BD 8 5 
C0 8D 
21 00 
8A F0 



40 
IB 
04 



00 00 00 

00 00 00 
78 A9 7F 
8D lA D0 
IB 8D 11 
12 D0 A9 
C0 BD 15 
D0 8D 19 
C6 02 10 
A6 02 BD 
BD 82 C0 
C0 8D 00 
88 02 BD 
BD 7C C0 
06 68 A8 
31 EA 5A 
17 17 17 



00 00 
00 00 
BD 0D. 
A9 03 
00 AD 
38 3D 

03 58 
D0 29 

04 A9 
7F C0 
8D 18 
DD BD 
36 C0 



20 PD 
B7 A5 
7F C0 
20 90 
C0 8D 
SB C0 
C0 60 
20 90 
C0 3D 

89 C0 
20 90 

90 C0 
8D 84 
C0 20 
90 C0 
8D 7E 



04 04 
AE 20 



03 
9E 
20 



8D 
68 
38 
97 
06 



14 60 
28 90 C0 
C0 8D 85 
38 C0 
EA 20 
20 90 C0 
C0 8D 83 
86 C0 20 
20 90 C0 
C0 8D 7D 
8D 81 C0 
C0 20 90 
90 C0 8D 
8D 8D C0 
C0 60 9E 



20 
90 



AD 20 
90 C0 
BD 82 
Ca 20 
90 C0 
00 8D 
SD 80 
C0 20 
90 C0 
8D 8C 
C0 60 
20 90 
C0 BD 
8A 00 
20 90 
9E BE 



00 81 

00 89 

DC DB 
85 BA 
7C EC 
14 lA 
60 54 

01 29 

02 5F 
8D FC 
D0 AB 
88 36 
BD 02 
D0 5F 
68 5F 
IB D2 
97 88 
00 FD 
F7 SD 
8D 3A 
C0 21 
90 4F 
8D 65 
7C AE 
C0 C5 
90 SF 
8D 45 
C0 72 
20 57 
C0 15 
87 9E 
20 39 
ca EE 
BE BB 



WINDOWS DEMO 

FX 1 IFPEEK (49170) O120THENLOA 
D"WIND0WS",B,1 

XE 10 print"{clr){blk}(nHh1"; 

:SYS49170:SYS49346,27,23 
,151,4,3,100:POKE808,237 

MK 20 SYS4930B,27,23,151,4,14, 
192: SYS 49383, 27, 23, 151, 4 
,1,255:POKE53280,14 

CM 30 PRINT" (HOME 1(3 DOWN} "TAB 

AUGUST 1992 COMPUTE G-25 



PROGRAMS 



(14) "SUPERWINDOWS" 
GA 40 PRINT" [7 DOWN) "TAB (6) "CO 
PYRIGHT 1992 COMPUTE I_NT 
•L" 
JH 50 PRINTTAB(10) "ALL RIGHTS 

{SPACE] RESERVED." 
JX 60 PRINT" (8 DOWN] "TAB (6) "PR 
OGRftMMED BY CAMERON K A I S 
ER" 
MA 70 FORX=8192TO10240:POKEX,0 

:NEXT 
CH 80 POKE53280,15:SYS49346,27 
, 23, 151, 4, 15, 100 :SYS 49 30 
8,27,23,151,4,15,192 
QB 90 SYS49383,27,23,151,4,15, 

255 
QE 100 POKE53280,12:SYS49346,2 

7,23,151,4,12,100:SYS49 

308,27,23,151,4,12,192 
PB 110 SYS49383,27,23,151,4,12 

,255 
ER 120 POKE53280,11:SYS49346,2 

7,23,151,4,11,100:SYS49 

308,27,23,151,4,11,192 
KB 130 SYS49383,27,23,151,4,11 

,255 
DO 140 POKE53280,0:SYS49346,27 

,23,151,4,i3,100:SYS4930 

8,27,23,151,4,0,192 
KS 150 SYS49383,27,23,151,4,0, 

255:FORX=1TO93 0:NEXT 
EX 160 PRINT"{CLR]{5>{8 D0WN}N 

ORMALLY YOU'VE GOT ONLY 
ONE SCREEN TO 

{2 SPACES ]WORK WITH." 
FM 170 FORX=10240TO12288:POKEX 

,0:NEXT 
GH 180 PRINT"THAT'S THE IDEA B 

EHIND S^UPERWINDOWS." 
GD 182 FORX=12288T014336:POKEX 

,0:NEXT 
EK 190 PRINT"I^T GIVES YOU THRE 

E SEPARATE SCREENS TO 

{2 SPACES JCONTROL." 
RD 200 FORX=14336T016383:POKEX 

, : NE XT 
FA 210 PRINT"{CLR]SEE?"; 
BR 220 SYS49308,59,29,151,4,0, 

230:SYS49346,27,23,151, 

4,0,60:GOSUB63000 
RS 230 PRINT"{CLR}SCREENP CAN 

{SPACE} BE RESIZED TOO.. 

EVEN SHRUNK!"; 
BA 240 FORX=lTO84:SyS49308,59, 

29,151,4,0,230-X:SYS493 

46,27,23,151,4,0,X+60:N 

EXT 
DF 250 SYS49308,27,23,151,4,0, 

230 
HK 252 SYS49346,27,23,151,4,a, 

60 
QB 253 PRINT"{CLR]AND THE SCRE 

ENS ACT INDEPENDENTLY 

F{4 SPACES) EACH OTHER!" 
QJ 254 FORX=1TO2500:NEXT 
AJ 260 PRINT"{CLR)THIS SCREEN 

{SPACEJWON'T CHANGE..." 

:FORX=lTO1000:NEXT 

G-26 COMPUTE AUGUST 1992 



QH 270 PRINT" (HOME) {8 DOWN}... 

BUT THIS ONE WILL!" 
FH 280 FORX=1TO100:SYS49308,27 

,21,151,4,I1,230:SYS493 

08,27,23,151,4,0,230:NE 

XT 
CQ 290 PRINT" {CLR}SO MANY EFFE 

CTS ARE POSSIBLE THAT T 

HIS{2 SPACES)DEHO CAN'T 
POSSIBLY SHOW"; 
HA 30.0 PRINT" THEM ALL!" 
CC 310 FORX=1T0128:SYS49346,27 

,23,151,4,X,100:SYS4930 

8, 27, 23, 151, 4, X+1, 192 
XD 320 SYS49383,27,23,15l,4,X+ 

2,255:NEXTX:PRINT"(CLR} 

i< . 

EB 330 SYS49308,27,23,151,4,0, 
192:SYS49383,27,23,151, 
4,0,255:FORX=1TO1000:NE 
XT 

DS 340 PRINT"PRESS D TO SEE TH 
IS DEMO AGAIN." 

KS 350 PRINT"PRESS RUN/STOP-RE 
STORE TO QUIT." 

EJ 360 WAIT198,1:GETAS:IFAS<>" 
D"THEN360 

QA 62999 RUN 

DR 63000 FOR X=0 TO 289 STEPl. 
5 

KQ 63010 Y=1NT (90+80*SIN(X/10) 

) 
XM 63020 CH%=X/a:R0%=Y/8 

RX 63030 LN=Y AND 7 

FP 63040 BY=8192+RO%*320+CH%*8 
+ LN 

FX 63050 BI=7-(X AND 7) 

SP 63060 POKE BY,PEEK{BY) OR 2 
TBI 

SR 63064 IFX=60THENPRINT"{CLR] 
{WHT}EXCITING! 
{6 SPACES}":SYS49346, 
27,23,151,4,14,60 

PX 63065 IFX=120THENPRINT" 

{CLR} {BLK]1PRETTY, RIG 
HT? ":SYS49346,27,23, 
151,4,4,60 

DB 63066 IFX=240THENPRINT" 

{CLR)<5JBUT THERE'S S 
TILL MORE!":SYS49346, 
27,23,151,4,0,60 

AC 63067 IFX=180THENPRINT" 

{CLR}{WHT}A POWERFUL 

{SPACE}UTILITY!":SYS4 

9346,27,23,151,4,3,60 

KP 63070 IFX=60THENPRINT" 

{HOME} f 23 DOWN}{BLK]^ 
T CAN'T BE!" 

JH 63071 IFX=60THENSYS493a3,27 
,23,151,4,15,255 

AA 63072 IFX=120THENPRINT" 

{HOMEl{23 DOWN}{WHT]T 
HIS IS AMAZING!" 

BQ 63073 IFX=120THENSYS49383,2 
7,23,151,4,2,255 

BH 63074 IFX=180THENPRINT" 

{HOME} {23 DOWN}{CYN}T 
HIS DEMO IS GREAT!" 



GG 63075 IFX=180THENSYS49383,2 
7,23,151,4,11,255 

XS 63076 IFX=240THENSYS49383,2 
7,23,151,4,0,255 

PX 63079 NEXT 

HF 63080 RETURN 

Cameron Kaiser lives in La Mesa, Cali- 
fornia. He's the author of Batch File 64 
(May 1992). 



REVELATION 



By Matthew Spinks 

Most people who are familiar 
with the 64's graphics capabili- 
ties have used sprites at one 
time or another. They may 
have used one to create a point- 
er in a graphic-driven menu sys- 
tem or to display alien space- 
ships in a game. In most cases 
when sprites are used, they are 
high-resolution or multicolored 
objects, which contrast well 
against the background color. 
In some situations, however, 
sprites need not be visible to 
be effective. For example, set- 
ting a sprite to the background 
color enables it to reveal on- 
screen text smoothly, a pixel at 
a time. 

To achieve this, an unexpand- 
ed sprite is created as a solid 
block measuring 8x8 pixels, 
or one character in size. The col- 
or of the sprite is set to that of 
the background color, and the 
sprite is then placed on the 
screen where the first character 
of the text is to be displayed. 
The first character is poked in- 
to the screen position where it's 
hidden by the sprite. As the 
sprite moves across the 
screen, the character is slowly 
revealed, pixel by pixel. When 
the character has been com- 
pletely displayed, the next char- 
acter is poked into position be- 
neath the sprite. As the sprite 
continues to move across the 
screen, it reveals the text as it 
goes. This process is repeated 
until all the text has been dis- 
played. The overall effect is 
that the text has been revealed 
pixel column by pixel column. 



are patterned or shaped. Thus, by hav- 
ing a sprite shaped as a right-angled tri- 
angle, characters could reveal a pixel a 
row at a lime, pixel column by pixel col- 
umn. By making use of sprite priorities, 
sprites could reveal first each other and 
then text, thereby producing a three-di- 
mensional effect. Sprites can work to- 
gether to reveal text in different places on 
the screen simultaneously or to reveal 
text vertically instead of horizontally 

Entering the Program 

Revelation is written entirely in machine 
language. To enter it, use MLX, our ma- 
chine language entry program; see 
"Typing Aids" elsewhere in this sec- 
tion. When MLX prompts, respond 
with the following values, 

Starting address: CDDC 
Ending adilress: DQ03 

Be sure to save a copy of the program 
before exiting MLX. 

A demonstration program is also pro- 
vided to show off some of Revelation's 
features. It's written in BASIC. To help 
avoid typing errors, enter it with The Au- 
tomatic Proofreader; again, see "Typ- 
ing Aids," To use the demonstration, 
first load Revelation with the ,8,1 exten- 
sion and then type NEW. Then load 
and run Demo. 

Other Techniques 

These are only some of the ways you 
can use Revelation. The technique can 
be adapted for all sorts of purposes. 
The only limitations on the process are 
those imposed by your own ingenuity 
To use Revelation in your own pro- 
grams, give the command SYS 
52700,X,Y,SP,A$. After the SYS call. X 
and Y are the x and y coordinates of 
where the text is to be placed .on the 
screen (ranges 0-39 and 0-255 respec- 
tively), SP is the speed at which the 
text is to be revealed (0 is the fastest 
speed, 99 is the slowest), and A$ is 
the text string to be revealed. Be sure 
to put A$ text in quotation marks. For ex- 
ample, SYS 52700, 0.0,0, "HELLO 
THERE" would print those words in the 
upper left corner of the screen at the 
fastest possible speed. 

Revelation has considerable scope 
and flexibility. First, Revelation occu- 
pies the upper portion of the area 



$C000-$CFFF (49152-53247) so that 
the lower part of the area is still availa- 
ble for use by other programs. 

Interrupts 

Revelation is interrupt-driven as well. Af- 
ter you've given the SYS command to 
activate Revelation, you're free to con- 
tinue with other processing. Revelation 
also has a latch mechanism so that if 
you give two Revelation SYS com- 
mands in succession, the computer 
will wait until the first command has fin- 
ished before it attempts to process the 
second. This is useful if you only want 
to reveal text and do nothing else. (See 
the demonstration program for an exam- 
ple of this.) 

Revelation will, as nearly as possi- 
ble, emulate the standard PRINT com- 
mand. All color codes, as well as 
reverse on and off, are supported. 
All parameters are fully evaluated. 
Thus the command SYS 52700,0,0,0, 
CHR$(5)+CHR$(18)+"HELLO THERE" 
will reveal the text in white reversed 
characters at the top left hand corner 
of the screen, at the fastest possible 
speed. Note that you must use plus 
signs to connect the character strings 
and text in this mode. 

If a Y value of more than 24 is spec- 
ified. Revelation will cause the screen 
to scroll, with the text being revealed 
on the bottom line of the screen. This 
is to allow scrolling of the screen, simi- 
lar to the ordinary PRINT command. 

Error checking is another supported 
feature, If any unprintable characters 
are entered — CHRS(O), for example — 
they won't be printed. This includes 
any cursor or other control characters 
not previously mentioned. Also, if the 
text to be revealed would wrap around 
onto the next screen line, either be- 
cause the text to be printed is more 
than 40 characters long or because 
the specified x coordinate is too large, 
then an ILLEGAL QUANTITY error will 
be generated, because Revelation will 
reveal only one screen line at a time. 

Revelation also includes a facility 
that allows you to define your own 
sprites. This is useful if you wish to em- 
ploy one of the more complex reveal- 
ing methods outlined above, such as us- 
ing a shaped sprite, or if you need to 
use a VIC bank other than bank 0: Sim- 
ply poke location 52916 with a 1 to use 



your own sprite. 

Revelation expects you to use 
sprite 0. It's entirely up to you to spec- 
ify sprite size, color, data location, and 
so on. Revelation will handle sprite po- 
sitioning for you, however, Use POKE 
52916,0 to return Revelation to its nor- 
mal mode of setting up the invisible 
sprite for you, 

Revelation should also peacefully co- 
exist with any other software interrupt 
programs you may wish to use, so 
long as they aren't raster based. If 
you're using other software interrupt pro- 
grams, enable them first and Revela- 
tion lasL This wilt ensure that all pro- 
grams receive their fair share of inter- 
rupts. Revelation also uses memory 
from the cassette buffer to store sprite 
and character data, so avoid this area 
while Revelation is in use. 

REVELATION 



CDDC 


:AD 


15 


03 


09 


CF 


00 


07 


AD 


0F 


CDE4 


:14 


03 


C9 


35 


F0 


F2 


20 


00 


6B 


CDEC 


:E2 


E0 


28 


90 


03 


4C 


48 


B2 


CC 


CDF4 


iSE 


F4 


CF 


20 


00 


E2 


E0 


19 


77 


CDFC 


:90 


05 


20 


EA 


E8 


A2 


18 


8E 


65 


CE04 


:F5 


CF 


20 


00 


E2 


E0 


64 


B0 


A8 


CE0C 


:E4 


8E 


F7 


CF 


8E 


F6 


CF 


20 


CB 


CE14 


:FD 


AE 


20 


9E 


AD 


20 


A6 


B6 


3C 


CEIC 


:C9 


00 


F0 


47 


8D 


F8 


CF 


A0 


CI 


CE24 


:00 


8C 


FA 


CF 


8C 


FF 


CF 


Bl 


F6 


CE2C 


:22 


A2 


11 


DD 


E0 


CF 


D0 


05 


70 


CE34 


:8A 


09 


80 


D0 


lA 


CA 


10 


F3 


86 


CE3C 


:C9 


FF 


D0 


02 


A9 


7E 


48 


4A 


IB 


CE44 


:4A 


4A 


4A 


4A 


AA 


68 


38 


FD 


EC 


CE4C 


:D8 


CF 


90 


0C 


EE 


FA 


CF 


AE 


CE 


CE54 


:FF 


CF 


9D 


80 


03 


EE 


FF 


CF 


45 


CE5C 


:C8 


CR 


F3 


CF 


D0 


C9 


AD 


PA 


32 


CE64 


:CF 


D0 


01 


60 


18 


6D 


F4 


CF 


74 


CE6C 


:C9 


29 


B0 


81 


AD 


F4 


CF 


C9 


12 


CE74 


:1D 


90 


0C 


48 


AD 


10 


00 


09 


23 


CE7C 


;01 


8D 


10 


D0 


68 


29 


DF 


0A 


BE 


CE84 


:0A 


0A 


69 


18 


80 


00 


00 


AD 


14 


CE8C 


F5 


CF 


0A 


0A 


0A 


69 


32 


8D 


E2 


CE94 


01 


D0 


AE 


F5 


CF 


AD 


F4 


CF 


0B 


CE9C 


la 


7D 


F0 


EC 


85 


F9 


85 


F7 


A9 


CEA4 


B5 


D9 


29 


03 


69 


D8 


85 


FA 


9D 


CEAC 


29 


27 


0D 


88 


02 


85 


F8 


A9 


94 


CEB4 


00 


D0 


31 


a2 


3F 


A9 


00 


9D 


15 


CEBC 


40 


03 


CA 


10 


FA 


A2 


15 


A9 


CB 


CEC4 


FF 


9D 


40 


03 


CA 


CA 


CA 


10 


29 


CECC 


F8 


AD 


17 


00 


29 


FE 


SD 


17 


B9 


CED4 


Da 


AD 


10 


D0 


29 


FE 


8D 


10 


74 


CEDC 


D0 


AD 


21 


D0 


8D 


27 


D0 


A9 


03 


CEE4 


0D 


8D 


F8 


07 


AD 


15 


D0 


09 


68 


CEEC 


01 


8D 


15 


D0 


AD 


86 


02 


8D 


37 


CEF4 


FD 


CF 


A9 


03 


8D 


FB 


CF 


8D 


44 


CEFC- 


FC 


CF 


8D 


FE 


CF 


80 


F9 


CF 


27 


CF04- 


78 


AD 


14 


03 


80 


9F 


02 


AD 


9A 


CF0C: 


15 


03 


8D 


A0 


02 


A9 


35 


8D 


61 


CF14: 


14 


03 


A9 


CF 


8D 


15 


03 


A9 


21 


CFIC: 


7F 


BD 


0D 


DC 


2D 


11 


00 


80 


2B 


CFZ4: 


11 


D0 


A9 


FF 


8D 


12 


D0 


AD 


B9 



AUGUST1992 COMPUTE G-27 



PROGRAMS 



CF2C 


:1A 


D0 


09 


81 


8D 


lA 


D0 


CF34 


:60 


AE 


F7 


CF 


F0 


08 


CE 


CF3C 


:CF 


10 


55 


BE 


F6 


CF 


CE 


CF44 


:CF 


10 


3B 


AC 


F9 


CF 


CC 


CF4C 


:CF 


F0 


57 


BE 


F9 


CF 


B9 


CF54 


03 


10 


16 


29 


7F 


C9 


10 


CF5C 


0B 


29 


EF 


AA 


BD 


F2 


CF 


CF64 


FE 


CF 


B0 


DF 


8D 


FD 


CF 


CF6C 


DA 


AC 


FB 


CF 


0D 


FE 


CF 


CF74 


F7 


AD 


FD 


CF 


91 


F9 


EE 


CF7C 


CF 


A9 


07 


8D 


FC 


CF 


AD 


CF84 


D0 


D0 


FB 


EE 


00 


D0 


D0 


CF8C 


AD 


10 


D0 


09 


01 


80 


10 


CF94 


A9 


01 


80 


19 


00 


AD 


00 


CF9C 


29 


01 


F0 


03 


6C 


9F 


02 


CPft4 


BC 


FE 


AD 


15 


D0 


29 


FE 


CFAC 


15 


D0 


A9 


00 


80 


00 


00 


CFB4 


01 


D0 


AD 


10 


00 


29 


FE 


CFBC 


IB 


D0 


20 


84 


FF 


AD 


lA 


CFC4 


29 


7E 


80 


lA 


00 


AD 


9F 


CFCC 


8D 


14 


03 


AD 


A0 


02 


8D 


CFD4 


03 


4C 


94 


CF 


FF 


00 


40 


CFDC 


FF 


40 


80 


80 


90 


05 


IC 


CFE4- 


9C 


IE 


IF 


9E 


81 


95 


96 


CFEC- 


98 


99 


9A 


9B 


12 


92 


80 


CFF4: 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


CFFC: 


0S 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 



58 15 
F6 E7 
FC EC 
FF AA 
80 EC 
90 A2 
8 5B 

90 20 

91 B6 
FB 8 6 
12 BC 
08 IC 
00 E0 
DC C0 
4C 91 
80 20 
80 OB 
8D 76 
00 A0 
02 6A 
15 B0 
20 39 
9F 15 
97 4F 
00 28 
00 94 
00 9C 



DEMO 



CO 

AL 



CE 


110 


HJ 


120 


MK 


130 


XK 


140 


XA 


150 


AX 


160 



MQ 100 REM COPYRIGHT 1992 
HPUTE PUBLICATIONS 
L RIGHTS RESERVED 
REM WRITTEN BY M. SPINK 
S 

REM MAKE SURE LOADER IS 
IN MEMORY 



V=53248:SA=52700:POKEV+ 
3 2,0:POKEV+33,0:PRINTCH 
RS (147) ; :POKE646,14 
BL=52916:SYSSA,0,1,0,"T 
HIS DEMONSTRATION SHOWS 

HOW TEXT CAN BE" 
SYSSA, 0,3,0, "REVEALED S 
MOOTHLY " : S YSSA , 27 , 3 , , " 
ON THE SCREEN" 
SYSS A , 18 , 3 , , " ANYWHE RE " 
: SYSSA, 3, 5,0, "TEXT CAN 
{SPACE }BE DISPLAYED IN 
( SPACE }ANY":A$="" 
B$="COLOR":FORT=1TOLEN ( 
B$) :READX:AS=A$+CHR$ (X) 
+HIOS (BS,T,1) :NEXT 
SYSSA,32,5,0,AS:A$=CHR$ 
(18)+CHR?(158)+"OR WITH 

REVERSE ON AND OFF" 
SYSSA,7,7,0,A$:SYSSA,a, 
0,0,"": POKE 646 , 4 : POKEBL 
, 1 : POKE V+3 9 , 5 : POKEBL , 1 
POKE V+39, 4: SYSSA, 5,9,0, 
"TEXT CAN ALSO BE CURSO 
R DRIVES":SYSSA, 0,0,0," 



SF 230 POKEBL, 0:SYSSA, 4, 11,0," 
AND CAN BE REVEALED AT 
{SPACE} ANY" :A$="SPEED" 

BG 240 F0RT=1T0LEN(A$) :SYS8A,3 

6-28 COMPUTE AUGUST 1992 



RG 170 



MD 180 



CJ 190 



BG 


200 


QB 


210 


QF 


220 



0+T,ll,T,MIDS{AS,T,l) :N 

EXT 
OG 250 SYSSA, 2, 13,0, "TEXT CAN 

{SPACE)SCROLL LIKE NORM 

AL AS WELL:":POKE646,10 
SR 260 Y=14:FORT=3.14T06.28STE 

P.2:C=C0S (2*T) +SIN(T) :X 

=6*C+12:Y=Y+1 
GE 270 SVSSA,X,Y,0, "SCROLLING" 

:NEXT:SYSSA,X,Y,0,"":FO 

RT=0TO1E3:NEXT:POKE646, 

3 
FG 280 PRINTCHR${147) ; :SYSSA,0 

,1,0, "DISPLAY OF TEXT I 

S INTERRUPT DRIVEN TOO: 

n 

HA 290 POKE646,13:A$=CHR5{18)+ 
"THAT ' S ALL FOLKS 1 ! ! " ; 
SYSSA, 10, 3, 3, A$ 

XC 300 FORT=0TO4:PRINTCHR$ (17) 
: NEXT; END 

PH 310 DATA158,30,31,153,150,5 

Matthew Spinks lives in Erica, Victoria, 
Australia. He's the author of Medium- 
Density Driver (September 1991). 

FORMATTED LIST 

By R. Markland 

Formatted List is a programmer's utility de- 
signed to create more manageable hard 
copies of BASIC program listings for the 
64. Formatted List produces uniform 
page breaks, rather than printing pro- 
gram lines over page perforations, and 
prints an identifying header and page 
number at the top of each page, 

TyfNng It In 

Formatted List is written entirely in ma- 
chine language. To enter it, use MLX, 
our machine language entry program; 
see "Typing Aids" elsewhere in this sec- 
tion. When MLX prompts, respond 
with the following values. 

Starting address: CQOG 
Ending address: C3B7 

Be sure to save a copy of the program 
before you exit MLX. 

Compatibility 

In general. Formatted List is compati- 
ble with any printer, with or without an 
interface, that will normally print a pro- 
gram listing with OPEN4,4: CMD4: 
LIST and recognizes CHR$(12) as a 
one-byte form feed. Should you need 
another form-feed command, you may 
poke appropriate decimal values to 



49424 and 49549 after Formatted List 
is loaded. Because Formatted List can- 
not recognize every conceivable print- 
er/interface combination, it processes 
50 BASIC program lines per page and 
then sends a standard ASCII form 
feed before starting the next page. You 
may also need to determine if your print- 
er/interface must be set with linefeeds 
on or off. When some interfaces encoun- 
ter cursor control or character color sym- 
bols, they automatically convert the sym- 
bols into words {up, down, blue, and 
so on). An 80-character BASIC pro- 
gram line may thus require more than 
one printer line. Usually, Formatted 
List can compensate for this. On rare 
occasions a program may contain a se- 
ries of lines packed with control char- 
acters that, when expanded, will cor- 
rupt the page formatting. If you can set 
your interface to print the actual Com- 
modore characters, it's advisable to do 
so to eliminate the potential problem. Af- 
ter Formatted List is loaded, you may 
adjust the number of BASIC lines per 
page by poking 49415 with a decimal 
value less than 50. 

Features and Conventions 

Formatted List should be loaded at the 
beginning of a programming session im- 
mediately after power-up by typing 
LOAD'TORMATTED LIST",8,1, Press 
Return and then type NEW and press 
Return again. Now load a program to 
be edited or begin work on a new pro- 
gram. To use Formatted List, in direct 
mode type SYS49152 and press Re- 
turn. Screen prompts will ask for a head- 
er line, remind you to check the print- 
er, and inform you that the listing may 
be aborted by pressing Run/Stop. 

Formatted List will print a listing of vir- 
tually any BASIC program, from a sin- 
gle line up to more than 30K in length. 
The listing requires tractor feed paper 
and should be started with the print- 
head centered on a perforation if your 
interface expands lines. Otherwise, you 
may prefer to adjust the paper to cen- 
ter the text top and bottom. It's advis- 
able to turn the printer off and on after 
the paper is aligned to establish prop- 
er page length. 

In the interests of simplicity and com- 
pactness. Formatted List assumes 
that there's a BASIC program in mem- 
ory and that a printer is connected, on- 



line, and loaded with paper. If you run 
the program without these conditions 
in place, Formatted List is likely to 
crash and/or lock up the keyboard. 
The title line may consist of 1-32 char- 
acters and may contain any combina- 
tion of characters with CHRS values in 
the range of 32-95 decimal values. 

Formatted List will list the entire pro- 
gram from beginning to end, If you 
wish to list only a portion of a program, 
formatting is unnecessary. A range of 
lines may be specified in a standard 
CMD4;L1ST range command. Should 
you decide that you need Formatted 
List after you have a BASIC program in 
memory, in direct mode, type 
PRINTPEEK(45);PEEK(46) and press 
Return. Record the values displayed. 
Then type LOAD"FORMATTED 
LIST"8,1 and press Return, Then enter 
POKE45,i/?: POKE, v2 and press Re- 
turn {v1 and v2are the values previous- 
ly recorded). 

Here's an important note: If you're 
test running a BASIC program that 
loads to or uses memory from address 
49152, you'll overwrite Formatted List. 
Should this happen, reload Formatted 
List using the alternate loading method 
described immediately above. Keep in 
mind that if Formatted List has been 
overwritten or corrupted, any SYS 
49152 call will no doubt send you on a 
one-way trip into the Silicon Cosmos, 
so be sure to save your work first as a 
precautionary measure. 



FORMATTED LIST 



C000 


■ft9 


01 


85 


CC 


A9 


20 


C00B 


FF 


A9 


0D 


20 


D2 


FF 


C010 


A9 


20 


9D 


91 


C3 


E8 


C0ia 


D0 


F8 


A2 


00 


BD 


71 


C020 


00 


F8 


06 


20 


D2 


FF 


C028 


F3 


A9 


0D 


20 


D2 


FF 


C030 


FF 


A9 


20 


20 


D2 


FF 


C038 


SE 


8E 


C3 


86 


cc 


AD 


€040 


8D 


9-1 


02 


20 


E4 


FF 


C048 


F0 


34 


C9 


14 


D0 


10 


C350 


C3 


C0 


01 


90 


E8 


CE 


C05a 


20 


D2 


FF 


4C 


3D 


00 


C060 


C3 


C0 


20 


F0 


D3 


C9 


C068 


D4 


C9 


60 


B0 


D0 


20 


C07O 


AC 


8E 


C3 


99 


91 


03 


C078 


C3 


AC 


8E 


C3 


D0 


BF 


C080 


85 


cc 


A5 


C7 


C9 


00 


C088 


a9 


20 


20 


D2 


FF 


A9 


C090 


D2 


FF 


20 


D2 


FF 


20 


C098 


A2 


00 


BD 


Fl 


02 


C9 


C0A0 


06 


20 


D2 


FF 


E8 


D0 


C0A8 


0D 


20 


D2 


FF 


20 


E4 


C0B0 


FB 


A9 


30 


8D 


Bl 


C3 



20 D2 F4 
A2 00 73 
E0 20 DE 
C2 G9 97 
E8 D0 D9 
20 D2 5B 
A2 00 FD 
86 02 Bl 
C9 0D 74 
AC 8E 78 
8E C3 70 
AC 8E 33 
20 90 C5 
D2 FF 8A 
EE 8E 06 
A9 01 EE 
D0 FA 14 
0D 20 F8 
D2 FF D2 
00 F0 70 
F3 A9 A3 
FF F0 98 
A9 31 9A 



C0Ba: 
C0C0; 
C0C8: 
C0D0; 
C0D8i 
C0E0! 
C0E8: 
C0F0; 
C0F8; 

0100; 
C108; 
C110: 
C118i 
C120I 
C128; 
C130: 
C138; 
C140; 
CI 48; 
C150; 
C158; 
C160; 
C163; 
C170; 
C178: 
C180: 
C188: 
C190; 
€198: 
C1A0; 
C1A8; 
C1B0: 
C1B8: 
C1C0: 
C1C8: 
C1D0; 
C1D8: 
C1E0; 
C1E8: 
C1F0! 
C1F8; 
C200; 
C208; 
C210; 
C218; 
C220; 
C228: 
C230; 
C238; 
C240: 
C248; 
C250; 
C258; 
C260; 
C268: 
C270; 
C278; 
C280; 
C288; 
C290; 
C298; 
C2R0; 
C2A8; 
C2B0; 
C2B8: 
C2C0: 
C2C8; 
C2D0; 
C2D8; 
C2E0; 



8D B2 C3 
2C 8 5 FC 
B3 C3 C8 
fl9 00 AA 
04 A2 04 
20 C0 FF 
20 A0 CI 
20 El FF 
20 lA CI 
EE B5 C3 
D0 E6 A9 
0C 20 D2 
F0 C0 AD 
B4 C3 85 
5F 85 FB 

00 Bl FB 
FB 8D 90 
FB AD 90 
Bl FB 80 
8D B4 C3 

43 C8 Bl 
CI A9 0D 
FF 20 02 
20 D2 FF 
A2 00 BD 
06 20 D2 
0D 20 D2 
FF A9 04 
FF 4C 74 
A2 04 20 
D2 FF 20 
B2 C2 C9 
FF E8 D0 
C3 20 D2 
F5 A2 00 
F0 06 20 
AD Bl 03 
C3 20 D2 
FF 20 D2 
B2 C3 C9 
C3 A9 30 

01 84 0F 
2C A8 C8 
5F 05 15 

02 B0 2C 
A9 20 a4 
AB C9 22 
FF 85 0F 
D0 0E fi8 
5F 86 5F 
10 DC C9 
30 D4 38 
A0 FF CA 
A0 10 FA 
A0 30 B7 
C2 20 20 
45 4E 54 
54 4C 45 
48 45 41 

44 2E 0D 
20 20 20 
54 4F 20 
41 52 41 
29 00 4C 
47 20 46 
20 20 20 
20 20 20 
20 20 20 
20 20 50 
20 00 4 5 



A5 2B 
A0 02 
Bl FB 
A8 20 
A0 00 
A2 04 
A9 00 
D0 03 
A9 0D 
AD B5 
00 8D 
FF 20 
B3 C3 
15 20 
A5 60 
8D 8F 
C3 AD 
C3 85 
B3 03 
A0 00 
FB D0 
20 D2 
FF A2 
E8 E0 
E2 C2 
FF ES 
FF A9 
20 C3 
A4 20 
C9 FF 
D2 FF 
00 F0 
F3 A2 
FF E8 
BD 00 
D2 FF 
20 02 
FF A9 
FF EE 
3A D3 
3D B2 
Bl 5F 
Bl 5F 
D0 04 



85 FB 
Bl FB 
8D B4 
BD FF 
20 BA 
20 C9 
8D B5 
4C 91 

20 D2 
C3 C9 
B5 C3 
A0 CI 
85 14 
13 A6 
85 FC 
C3 08 
8F C3 
FC A0 
08 Bl 
Bl FB 
3E 20 
FF 20 
00 A9 

21 D0 
C9 00 
D0 F3 



A5 8D 
8D BF 
C3 8C 
A9 A8 
FF 8 5 
FF 01 
C3 DA 
01 36 
FF 7 2 
32 3E 
A9 57 
4C 4F 
AD 3F 
A5 31 
A0 4A 
Bl 47 



24 
DE 



0C 
FF 



84 
49 



D0 06 
C8 F0 



Bl 
85 



FF F0 
E9 7F 
F0 08 
30 F5 
20 47 
20 20 
45 52 
20 46 
44 45 
20 20 
20 20 
33 32 



FF CI 
A9 0D 
A2 00 
06 20 
00 BD 
B0 20 
C2 C9 
Ee D0 
FF AD 
0D 20 
B2 C3 
08 EE 
C3 60 
F0 40 

AA ce 

E4 14 
20 CD 
7F 20 
A5 0F 
11 Bl 
AA C8 
D0 B8 
D8 24 
AA 84 
C8 B9 
C8 B9 
AB 4C 



43 

49 
4F 
20 



20 
20 

4F 
52 
20 
28 
20 
45 



54 49 
3A 20 



23 20 
20 20 



47 
44 



20 
20 
20 
45 



FB 31 
D0 09 
FF 65 
D2 7C 
20 D6 
F8 6D 
F0 61 
A9 85 
D2 85 
CC 2C 
60 EC 
20 F7 
BD 0F 
D2 2A 
91 Fl 
D0 64 
00 70 
F3 B8 
B2 BE 
D2 3D 
AD 46 
Bl Dl 
A0 AD 
20 83 
Bl EA 

pg 33 

BD BC 

47 7A 
49 75 
5F 14 
Bl C2 
60 73 
0F 88 
49 CI 
9E 0C 
9E 81 
65 2A 
20 47 
49 18 
20 22 
49 EC 
20 49 
20 60 

48 3C 
53 6P 
4E B5 
00 63 
20 46 
20 4E 
20 56 
23 47 



20 4F 46 8B 



C2Ea;20 

C2F0:00 

C2F8:45 

C300:54 

C308:50 

C31 

C318:20 

0320:20 

C328:43 

C330:20 

C338:4E 

C340:4F 

C348:4C 

C350:0D 

C358:20 

C360:55 

C368:49 

C370:20 

C378:4F 

C380:53 

C388:41 

C390:00 

C398:00 

C3A0:00 

C3A8:00 

C3B0:00 



50 50 
20 
20 



4C 49 53 

20 20 20 

43 4B 20 

45 52 20 

41 50 45 
4C 59 
20 20 
20 20 

4 5 4E 0D 

50 52 45 

59 20 4B 

20 50 52 

49 53 54 

20 20 20 

20 20 23 

52 49 4E 

4E 34 00 

20 48 4F 

57 4E 20 

54 4F 50 

42 4F 52 
00 00 00 
00 00 00 
00 00 00 
00 00 00 
00 00 00 



54 49 

20 20 

50 52 

41 4E 

52 20 
0D 20 
20 20 
20 20 
20 20 

53 53 
45 59 
49 4E 
49 4E 
20 20 
20 20 
47 20 
20 20 
4C 44 
52 5S 
20 54 

54 00 
00 00 
00 00 
00 00 
00 00 
00 30 



4E 47 9B 

43 48 D4 

49 4E 0A 

44 20 3B 

53 55 75 
20 20 3C 
20 20 9P 
20 54 DB 
20 20 Al 
20 41 E3 
20 54 lA 

54 20 F2 
47 0D 17 
20 20 4B 
20 44 04 

50 52 E2 
20 20 65 
20 44 06 
4E 2F FC 
4F 20 C6 
00 00 F2 
00 00 18 
00 00 20 
00 00 28 
00 00 30 
00 00 38 



R. fVlarkland, who lives in Rawlins, Wy- 
oming, has seen listing questions in Ga- 
zette many times and says it's time for 
a definitive solution. 



BLANKER 



By Charles W. Bozarth 
Even with today's newer monitors, 
there's still a concern about burning a 
screen image into the picture tube. This 
can occur if the image on the monitor 
stays the same for long periods of time, 
IBf4 computers have a variety of utilities 
for blanking the screen white the comput- 
er isn't being used. Blanker is a similar 
screen-blanking utility for GEOS on the 
64. It provides various ways to blank the 
screen from any GEOS program that us- 
es desk accessories. 

Entering the Program 

Blanker is written in machine language. 
To enter it, use fvlLX, our machine lan- 
guage entry program; see "Typing 
Aids" elsewhere In this section. When 
fvlLX prompts, respond with the follow- 
ing values. 

Starting address: 0247 
Ending address: D76E 

Be sure to save two copies of the pro- 
gram to a GEOS work disk before exit- 
ing MLX. Since you can't enter GEOS 

AUGUST 1992 COMPUTE G-29 



PROGRAMS 



programs directiy, Blanker must be con- 
verted to GEOS format before it can be 
used. One copy of Blanker will be con- 
verted by GeoConverter 2.0 into a 
desk accessory. Keep the other copy 
as a backup in case something goes 
wrong with the conversion. 

If you don't already have a copy of 
GeoConverter, we've included the list- 
ing here. The converter can be found 
on COMPUTE'S GEOS Collection disk, 
and it was printed in "The GEOS Col- 
umn," March 1990. Be sure to use 
"The Automatic Proofreader" (again, 
see "Typing Aids") to help prevent typ- 
ing errors when you enter the program. 
Save a copy of GeoConverter to the 
disk that contains Blanker. 

To prepare Blanker for use with 
GEOS, load and run GeoConverter. 
When prompted for a filename, enter 
the name you used to save Blanker. 
GeoConverter will then convert the file 
into a GEOS desk accessory format. 
Those who get Gazette Disk should 
copy Blanker to a work disk before mak- 
ing the GEOS conversion. 

Using the Program 

To start Blanker in most programs, se- 
lect it either from the deskTop, or from 
the GEOS menu in other programs. A 
dialog box appears on the screen with 
four choices to blank the screen. Select- 
ing Cancel will return to the application 
without blanking. Select one of the 
choices and then click on the OK icon 
to start the process. 

Each option has its own unique way 
of clearing the screen. For example, 
Blank is the option that goes directly to 
blanking the screen with the border col- 
or, This is most effective if the border 
is a dark color such as the GEOS de- 
fault of black. The Blank option has the 
same effect as turning off the monitor. 
Tilt, Dissolve, and Drip are additional 
choices, Drip is an especially amusing 
and realistic effect. You'll probably 
want to touch the screen to make sure 
it isn't wet. All of these options have the 
effect of turning off the monitor once 
the screen is erased. 

While the screen is being erased, 
the mouse pointer moves to the bottom 
right corner of the screen. The blank- 
ing process can be stopped at any 
time and control returned to the appli- 
cation by pressing any key or clicking 

G-30 COMPUTE AUGUST 1992 



the mouse button. 

Blanker was written for the 64 ver- 
sion of GEOS 2.0 using geoProgram- 
mer software. 

BLAHKER 



0247; 

024F; 

0257; 

025F; 

0267; 

026F; 

0277; 

027F; 

0287; 

028F; 

0297; 

029F; 

02A7; 

02AF; 

02B7; 

02BF; 

02C7; 

02CF; 

02D7; 

02DF; 

02E7; 

02EF; 

02F7; 

02FF; 

0307; 

030F; 

0317; 

031F; 

0327; 

a32F; 

0337; 

a33F; 

0347: 

034F; 

0357; 

035F; 

0367; 

036F; 

0377; 

037F; 

0387; 

038F; 

0397; 

039F; 

03A7; 

03AF; 

03B7; 

03BF; 
-fl3C7; 
^3CF; 



0F 03 15 
00 01 BF 
A0 00 05 

05 A0 00 
00 05 A0 
A0 00 05 
0D BF FF 
FF FF 4F 
3F FF FC 
BA 2C 00 
20 42 6C 

56 31 2E 
43 68 61 

57 2E 20 
74 68 20 
65 73 6B 
73 73 6F 
72 20 62 
6E 67 20 
45 4F 53 

6 5 6E 2E 
4E CI 20 
08 40 IF 
00 00 40 
20 B7 CI 
03 20 B6 
E6 06 A5 
A9 00 85 
84 A9 69 
SD A4 84 
A9 01 85 
A9 C7 85 
88 88 B9 
C8 B9 29 
AD 11 D0 
A9 30 85 
29 IF 85 
00 C8 00 
CI 99 08 
3E C2 A9 
00 8D 9B 
AD 11 D0 
60 A9 04 
3D 9B 84 
00 85 02 
06 A9 5A 
A4 06 B9 
3D 20 05 
18 A9 0A 
02 E6 03 



BF FF 

FF FD 

A0 00 

05 R0 

00 05 
A0 00 
FD 30 
FE 72 

83 05 
04 53 
61 6E 
30 00 
72 6C 
42 6F 
0F 2C 
20 61 
72 79 
6C 61 
74 68 
20 73 
0F 34 
B7 CI 
20 53 

01 A9 
IF 85 

06 20 

02 C9 
39 A9 
8D Al 
A9 69 
3B A9 
3C AS 
29 07 

07 8D 
09 10 
01 20 
9C 03 
00 40 
00 60 
00 8D 

84 A9 
29 EF 
80 9C 
A9 A0 
A9 00 

85 07 
28 05 
91 02 
65 02 
A5 03 

2.0 



FF FF 
B0 00 
05 A0 
00 05 
A0 00 
05 B0 
00 01 
20 00 
00 00 
63 72 
6B 65 
00 00 
65 73 
7A 61 
00 00 
63 63 
20 66 
6E 6B 
65 20 
63 72 
00 00 

00 60 
02 00 
80 85 
IE 29 
3i 07 
02 F0 
04 8D 
84 A9 
3D A3 
3F 85 
16 0A 
SD 9B 
9C 84 
3D 11 
B7 CI 
20 A5 

01 20 
40 IF 
9C 8 4 
35 85 
8D 11 

84 A9 

85 03 
85 05 
60 A6 
A8 Bl 
20 OA 
85 02 
C9 BF 

i t >/' 



80 B2 

0D 4B 

AS 
AO 0E 
05 70 
00 E 3 
FF D7 
04 75 
04 2F 
6E B7 
7 2 3E 
00 E3 
20 BA 
7 2 AD 
4 4 AA 
65 87 
6F FF 
69 2D 
4 7 98 
65 3A 
20 B2 
99 73 
C8 64 
2F A5 
90 C8 
20 09 
38 57 
A2 59 



94 
84 



56 
9D 



3A 46 

AB C2 

84 A7 
60 06 
DO CC 
IE 88 
Cl E9 
B7 A5 
4C 54 
A9 IC 

01 DA 
D0 06 
C7 A3 
A9 49 

85 8F 
05 D2 

02 7B 
05 CF 
90 96 
D0 DA 



GEOCONVERTER 

BA 10 HEM COPYRIGHT 1992 COMPU 

TE PUBLICATIONS INTL LTD 
- ALL RIGHTS RESERVED 
SE 20 IF(PEEK(772)+PEEK(773)*2 

56)=42364THEN40 
PD 30 LIST0,1:LIST4,1:LIST6,1: 

SA=PEEK(4625)*256+PEEK(4 

624) :GOTO50 
SX 40 POKE56,PEEK(46) +40:CLR:P 



OKE 53 28 0,0: POKE 53 281,0:5 
A=PEEK(56) *256+PEEK(55) 
QO 50 PRINT" {CLR}{8}{N) {DOWN]" 
TAB (12) "{RVS}GE0C0NVERTE 
R 2.0{OFF}{GRN} {3 DOWN}" 
:PRINTTAB(13) "COPYRIGHT 
{SPACE}1992{DOWN}" 
KR 60 PRINTTAB <7) " COMPUTE ! PtJB 
LIGATIONS UlC. {DOWN}"; PR 
INTTAB(11)"A.LL RIGHTS RE 
SERVED{2 DOWN}" 
MK 70 N=8:PRINT"DRIVE NUMBER " 
N"{4 LEFT}^; : INPUTN:IFN< 
8ORN>11THEN70 
QE 80 K$ = "N":PRINT"1^S DRIVE"N" 
A 1581? "K$"{3 LEFT}"; :I 
NPUTKS:IFK$<>"N"ANDKS<>" 
Y"THEN80 
SB 90 TS=CHR$(18) :SS=CHRS(1) :I 
FK$="Y"THENTS=CHRS (40) :S 
$=CHRS(3) 
RS 100 INPUT"FILE TO CONVERT"; 
NMS:OPEN15,N,15:OPENl,N 
,8,"0:"+NMS+",P,R" 
BX 110 GOSUB440:IFEN<>0THENPRI 
NT"(RVS}"ENS" "EM$ETSEE 
$:GOTO400 
FF 120 GET#1,K$,VS: IFKS<>CHR$ ( 
71)0RV$<>CHR$ {2)THENCL0 
SEl:CLOSE15:GOTO220 
BR 130 PRINT" {D0WN}DECOMPRESSI 
NG. . .":Z$=CHR$ (0) :GET#1 
,ESC$:ESC=ASC(ESC$+Z$) : 
AD = SA 
GOSUB170: IFVOESCTHENPO 

KEAD,V:AD=AD+1: GOTO 140 
GOSUB170:CT=V:GOSUB170: 
CT=CT+V*256:GOSUB170:GO 
SUB160:GOTO140 
F0RI=1T0CT:P0KEAD,V:AD= 

AD+1:NEXTI :CT=0:RETURN 
GET#1,V$:S=ST:V=ASC(V$+ 
Z$) : IFST = 0THENRETURN 
IFS<>64THENGOSUB440:PRI 
NT" {DOWN] LOAD ERROR - 
{RVS}"EN$" "EM5ET5EES:G 
OTO400 
AF 190 IFCT<>0THENGOSUB160:AD= 

AD~1 
DG 200 PRINT"{D0WN}WRITING. . ." 
:CLOSE1:PRINT#15,"S0:"+ 
NMS:CL0SE15 
EF 210 OPEN1,N,8,"0:"+NM$+",P, 
W": FORI =SATOAO: PRINT* 1, 
CHHS(PEEK(I) ) ; :NEXTI:CL 
OSEl 
GP 220 PRINT"{DOWN}CONVERTING. 
. .":HD$<»"":F0RI = 1T0 4:RE 
ADHE:HDS=HDS+CHRS (HE) ;N 
EXTI 
CF 230 F0RI=1T05:READIE: IDS = ID 

S+CHBS(IE) :NEXTI 

DR 240 NLS="":OPEN15,N,15,"I0: 

":OPEN2,N,2,"t" 

mm 250 gosub410:get #2,nt$,ns$ 
:fore=0TO7:dS=NL$:GET#2 
,b$:i=1:ifb5=nl5then310 

pe 260 if asc{b$)<>130 then310 



RQ 14 

FP 15 

DH 16 

PK 17 

SJ 1 



30 



AE 


270 


GET#2,HTS,HS$:I=3:IFHS$ 
=""THENHSS'CHR9{0) 


DJ 


280 


GET#2,BS:l=l+l:lFB$=""T 
HENBS=CHR$(0) 


BH 


290 


IF(ASC(B5)=160)OR(I=19) 
THEN310 


SF 


300 


D$=DS+B5:GOTO2B0 


EB 


310 


FORI=IT031:GET#2,BS:NEX 
TI:IFD$=NMSTHEN340 


JX 


320 


NEXTE: IFNT$=NL$THEN34a 


CH 


330 


T5=NTS:SS=NS$:GOTO250 


GA 


340 


IFDS=NL$THENPRINT" 
(DOWN}DISK ERROR! ":GOTO 
400 


PD 


350 


DT$=T$:SS$=SS:T$=HT$:S$ 

=HS$:GOSUB410:GET#2,MTS 
,MS$:1FMS$=""THENMS$=CH 
RS(0) 


GF 


360 


FORI=0TO65:GET#2,B5:NEX 

TI:GET#2,CT?,GTS:GOSUB4 

10;PRINT#2,HD$;:GOSUB42 



T5=DT$:S$=SS$:GOSUB410: 


RX 


370 






F0RI=1T0 32*E+2:GET#2,B$ 






:NEXTI:PRINT#2,CT$;MT$; 






MS$; 


HE 


380 


FORI =0TO15:GET#2,B5: HEX 
TI:PRINT#2,HTS;HS$;CHR$ 
(0) ;GT$;ID$;:GOSUB420 


GR 


390 


PRINTNM$" CONVERTED!" 


HB 


400 


CLOSE 1: CLOSE 2: CLOSE 15 :E 
ND 


DQ 


410 


U$="O1":GOTO430 


CS 


420 


U$="U2" 


PA 


430 


PRINT|15,U5;2;a;ASC(T$+ 
"0") ;ASC(S$+"0") :RETURN 


JJ 


440 


INPUT#15,EN,EH$,ET,EE:E 
N$=STRS (EN) :ETS=STR$ (ET 
) :EE5=STR$(EE) : return 


EH 


450 


DATA 0,255,3,21,87,10,1 
,0,0 



Charles W. Bozarth, who lives in Kala- 
mazoo, Michigan, began programming 
on a VIC-20. He recently earned a de- 
gree in mechanical engineering, but 
continues to program as a hobby. 



SUPERSAVE 



By Jason P. Lewis 

Saving your work periodically is a con- 
cept that looks great on paper, but apply- 
ing it is a whole different matter when at 
the computer. Some programmers avoid 
it, saying, 'Til never lose any files. It 
could never happen to me." Otfiers com- 
plain that saving takes too much time 
when they're busy. 

SuperSave is a short utility that will 
greatly assist you in saving your BASIC 
programs or BASSEM source code files. 
In the case of a power outage, your chanc- 
es of recovering most of your file would 



be greatly improved with SuperSave. 

Typing It In 

SuperSave is a two-part program. The 
main program is written in machine lan- 
guage. To type it in, youT need MLX, 
our machine language entry program. 
See "Typing Aids" elsewhere in this sec- 
tion. When fvlLX prompts you, enter the 
following values. 

Starting Address: $CFe4 
Ending Address: SCFFF 

When you've finished entering the pro- 
gram, save it with the filename Super- 
Save. ML before you exit MLX. 

The second part of SuperSave is a 
BASIC loader or boot program. It's 
quite short, but you may want to use 
The Automatic Proofreader to help 
avoid typing errors. Again, see "Typing 
Aids." Be sure to save a copy of Boot 
on the same disk as SuperSave. ML. 
When you run Boot, it automatically 
loads and runs SuperSave. ML. 

Using SuperSave 

When you toad and run SuperSave, 
you'll see a message that the program 
has been enabled. You'd also see the 
READY prompt. 

In order to use SuperSave, you 
must either load a program you wish to 
work on or save a file. This will make 
that filename active for a short period 
of time. That filename will remain active 
from the time the save or load was per- 
formed until any other BASIC com- 
mand is executed. During this time, 
press Ctrl-Restore. This will make the 
filename permanently active, at least un- 
til you reset or turn off the computer. 

Once you have an active filename, 
you can use SuperSave as many 
times as you wish. This is done simply 
by pressing Restore. Each time you've 
made some changes and want to up- 
date the file on your disk, simply press 
Restore. 

SuperSave actually performs two 
functions during a save. First, it scratch- 
es the old version of the file, bypassing 
the save-with-replace bug on older 
1541 and 1571 drives. Then, Super- 
Save performs a normal BASIC save. 

When you press Restore, you won't 
see the usual message indicating that 
a file is being saved. In fact, the only 



visual sign that you should notice is the 
drive light coming on to indicate thai 
something is happening. By not print- 
ing a message, nothing on the screen 
is corrupted. After the SuperSave proc- 
ess, you should notice no difference in 
your program whatsoever. 

This permits you to update your file 
whenever you like, giving you no ex- 
cuse for losing valuable data during a 
power outage or simitar occurrence. Su- 
perSave will also save you several key- 
strokes (pun intended). 

How It Works 

Each time you press Restore, tde 64 ex- 
ecutes the machine language instruc- 
tions pointed to by locations 792 and 
793. The actual address of the ML pro- 
gram is the contents of 793 multiplied 
by 256 and then added to location 792 
(LC=PEEK(792)-i-PEEK(793)"256). 

SuperSave changes these locations 
to make the computer execute Super- 
Save rather than its normal routine. If Su- 
perSave doesn't recognize a keypress 
in conjunction with Restore, it'll ignore 
it. Instead, it'll execute the 64's normal 
Restore routine. This means Run/Stop- 
Restore retains its usual function and it 
will disable SuperSave. To enable it 
again, enter SYS 53092. 

Customizing the Boot Program 

You may want to customize the boot 
program for each program you work 
on. You can replace the new statement 
in line 40 with a LOAD statement to 
load your program. For example, if 
your program's name were HELP, 
then you would change line 40 to 
LOAD "HELP",8. 

Then, whenever you execute the Su- 
perSave boot program, your working 
program will automatically load. Press 
Ctrl-Restore to make that filename ac- 
tive, and you'll be ready for another 
work session. 



SUPERSAVE.ML 














CF64:AD 


18 03 


8D 


EB 


CF 


AD 


19 


15 


CF6C:93 


8D E9 


CF 


A9 


7B 


8D 


18 


99 


CF7 4:03 


A9 CF 


8D 


19 


03 


60 


AD 


16 


CF7C:8D 


02 C9 


04 


F0 


4F 


20 


El 


C3 


CF84:FF 


F0 60 


AD 


EA 


CF 


18 


69 


77 


CF8C:03 


A2 EC 


A0 


CF 


20 


BD 


FF 


78 


CF94:A9 


01 AE 


EB 


CF 


A0 


0F 


20 


ID 


CF9C:BA 


FF 20 


C0 


FF 


20 


C3 


FF 


Bl 


CFA4:A9 


01 AE 


EB 


CF 


A0 


FF 


20 


0F 


CFAC:BA 


FF AD 


EA 


CF 


A2 


EF 


A0 


97 



AUGUST 1992 COMPUTE G-31 



PROGRAMS 



CFB4 


CF 


23 


BD 


FF 


A9 


00 


20 


90 


lA 


CFBC 


FF 


A9 


2B 


A6 


2D 


A4 


2E 


20 


0F 


CFC4 


D8 


F? 


A9 


C0 


20 


90 


FF 


20 


75 


CFCC 


E7 


FF 


4C 


E7 


CF 


A5 


B7 


8D 


7A 


CFD4 


•EA 


CF 


A5 


BA 


8D 


EB 


CF 


R0 


9A 


CFDC 


00 


Bl 


BB 


99 


EP 


CF 


C8 


C4 


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38 



BOOT 

MM 5 REM COPYRIGHT 1992 - COMP 
UTE PUBLICATIONS INTL LTD 

- ALL RIGHTS RESERVED 
FE 10 IF A=0 THEN A=1:L0AD"SUP 

ERSAVE.ML",8,1 
GP 20 SXS 53092 
DD 30 POKE 53281, 0:POKE 53280, 

15 : PRINT "{WHT}{CLR) {RVS} 

SUPERSAVE ENABLED." 
KG 40 NEW 

Jason P. Lewis is a junior in high 
school in Ascutney, Vermont. He 
wrote SuperSave to iielp him with his 
other programming efforts. 



BALLOON POP 

By Maurice Yanney 
If you're the kind of person who gets a 
kicl< out of popping balloons, you'll love 
this game for the 64. You can either 
drop pins on the balloons as they rise to- 
ward the top of the screen or go for the 
extra points by intercepting the balloons 
with your pin-dropper. It slides left and 
right across the top of the screen, and 
you can control it in an effort to pop any 
elusive balloons before they slip by you. 
Pop them all and move to a more difficult 
level. See how many levels you can com- 
plete in this fast-paced game. 

Getting Started 

Although Balloon Pop is written entire- 
ly in machine language, the program 
loads and runs like a BASIC program. 
To type it in, use MLX, our machine lan- 
guage entry program. See "Typing 
Aids" elsewhere in this section. When 
MLX prompts you, respond with the fol- 
lowing values. 

Starting address: 0801 
Ending address: 11C0 

Be sure to save a copy of the program 
before exiting MLX. The program 
works with a joystick in either port or 

8-32 COMPUTE AUGUST 1992 



from the keyboard with cursor keys 
and space bar." "'- 

Playing the Gome 

The object of the game is to pop all the 
rising balloons without letting any get 
by. You control a pin-dropper, which is 
located at the top of the screen. Use 
the pin-dropper to pop the rising bal- 
loons by dropping pins on them, or ma- 
neuver it so that it breaks balloons as 
they reach the top of the screen. 

To move the pin-dropper to the left, 
use the Crsr up/down key; to move to 
the right, use the Crsr left/right key. A 
joystick (in either port) may also be 
used to move. Press the space bar or 
the joystick button to fire a pin down- 
ward toward the rising balloons. Only 
one pin can be fired at a time. 

When a pin hits a balloon, you re- 
ceive 10 points, and the number of 
popped balloons increases by 1. If the 
balloon hits the pin-dropper, you re- 
ceive 50 points, and the number of 
hits is incremented by 1. To complete 
the first level, the number of hit and 
popped balloons must be 10; an addi- 
tional 5 baltoons are needed for each 
subsequent level (up to 50). 

The score, the level, the number of 
popped balloons on the current level, 
the number of hit balloons on the cur- 
rent level, and the extra balloons are dis- 
played at the bottom of the screen. In- 
itially, there are five extra balloons. 
When a balloon reaches the top with- 
out being hit or popped, an extra bal- 
loon is lost. When there are no more ex- 
tra balloons, the game is over. An extra 
balloon is awarded for each 500 
points reached. 

Complete a level, and you'll get 10 
bonus points for each popped balloon 
and 50 points for each hit balloon. 
Each level becomes more difficult with 
the addition of another balloon to the 
number of balloons that are approach- 
ing your pin-dropper. Level 1 begins 
with three balloons simultaneously ris- 
ing. The pin-dropper is positioned clos- 
er to the rising balloons on higher lev- 
els, and five more balloons are re- 
quired to complete each level. 

To quit playing the game, press the 
Q key. To pause the game, hold down 
the Shift key or press the Shift Lock 
key. To continue playing, release the 
Shift key or the Shift Lock key. 



BALLOON POP 














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49 


0F 


A9 


00 


AE 


AS 


0F81 


:FB 


69 


28 


85 


FB 


A5 


FC 69 2F 


F5 91 


FB 


20 


91 


0F 


A9 


20 


5C 


0D59;BF 


11 


20 


CD 


BD 


A2 


0A 


A0 


A5 


0F89 


:00 


85 


FC 


CA 


4C 


7B 


0F 60 24 


91 FB 


20 


0A 


as 


A9 


F7 


BD 


30 


0D61:0F 


18 


20 


0A 


E5 


A9 


B3 


A0 


BB 


0F91 


:A9 


B6 


80 


BA 


11 


69 


01 00 90 


BE 11 


20 


2D 


0A 


A9 


01 


20 


E2 


0069:11 


20 


IE 


AB 


A9 


00 


8D 


20 


IB 


0F99 


:FC 


AD 


BA 


11 


18 


69 


01 80 FF 


F7 0F 


20 


56 


10 


60 


20 


60 


23 


0D71:12 


8D 


21 


12 


AD 


C0 


11 


F0 


C0 


0FA1 


:BA 


11 


00 


Fl 


60 


38 


A9 0F E0 


0E A9 


05 


20 


F7 


0F 


20 


81 


31 


0D79:16 


18 


AD 


20 


12 


69 


0A 


20 


C6 


0FA9 


:ED 


BA 


11 


80 


C5 


11 


A9 27 55 


10 20 


aA 


0B 


60 


AD 


BE 


11 


Bl 


0O81:F4 


0E 


A9 


01 


20 


F7 


0F 


20 


FD 


0FB1 


:ED 


BD 


11 


0D 


C5 


11 


90 3D F9 


C9 F6 


F0 


23 


20 


90 


0E 


AE 


70 


0089:60 


10 


AD 


C0 


11 


00 


EA 


AD 


E8 


0FB9 


:C8 


38 


A9 


E7 


ED 


BA 


11 80 08 


BB 11 


AC 


BC 


11 


20 


74 


0F 


FB 


0D91:C1 


11 


F0 


16 


18 


AD 


20 


12 


lA 


0FC1 


:C5 


11 


A9 


03 


ED 


BD 


11 0D 02 


A5 FB 


8D 


18 


12 


A5 


FC 


8D 


33 


0D99:69 


32 


20 


F4 


0E 


A9 


05 


20 


89 


0FC9 


:C5 


11 


90 


29 


C8 


38 


A9 63 91 


19 12 


A9 


FS 


8D 


lA 


12 


A9 


CF 


0DAl:F7 


0F 


20 


8B 


10 


AD 


CI 


11 


04 


0FD1 


:ED 


BA 


11 


80 


C5 


11 


A9 00 56 


F6 BD 


BE 


11 


20 


2D 


0A 


60 


81 


0DR9:D0 


EA 


20 


2A 


10 


A9 


00 


8D 


42 


0FO9 


:ED 


BO 


11 


0D 


C5 


11 


93 15 F9 


AD 18 


12 


0D 


19 


12 


F0 


56 


D0 


0DB1:18 


12 


8D 


19 


12 


20 


FC 


0C 


B6 


0PE1 


:C8 


38 


A9 


09 


ED 


BA 


11 8D 42 


20 3E 


0F 


A0 


00 


AD 


lA 


12 


28 


0089:60 


AC 


17 


12 


B9 


DA 


11 


BD 


IC 


0FE9 


:C5 


11 


A9 


00 


ED 


BD 


11 00 F9 


C9 F4 


F0 


41 


Bl 


FB 


C9 


F5 


03 


0DC1:BA 


11 


B9 


DB 


11 


80 


BD 


11 


BD 


BFFl 


:C5 


11 


90 


01 


C8 


60 


18 60 BE 


F0 02 


D0 


04 


A9 


20 


91 


FB 


EF 


0DC9:A0 


00 


A2 


00 


EC 


16 


12 


F0 


5D 


0FF9 


:C3 


11 


80 


C3 


11 


AD 


C4 11 06 


18 AD 


18 


12 


69 


28 


BD 


18 


72 


0DD1:15 


38 


B9 


DA 


11 


ED 


BA 


11 


30 


1001 


:69 


00 


8D 


C4 


11 


A2 


18 A0 B7 


12 85 


FB 


AD 


19 


12 


69 


00 


68 


0DD9:8D 


C5 


11 


B9 


DB 


11 


ED 


BD 


A6 


1009 


:01 


AD 


C3 


11 


80 


BA 


11 AD CS 


8D 19 


12 


85 


FC 


C9 


07 


90 


ID 


aDEl:ll 


0D 


05 


11 


F0 


08 


C8 


C8 


93 


1011 


:C4 


11 


8D 


BD 


11 


20 


A6 0F CA 


18 AD 


18 


12 


C9 


98 


90 


11 


4E 


0DE9:E8 


E0 


14 


D0 


DF 


60 


20 


0E 


0F 


1019 


:18 


20 


0A 


ES 


AD 


C4 


11 AE 3E 


A9 00 


8D 


18 


12 


8D 


19 


12 


EA 


0DF1:0C 


4C 


BA 


0D 


38 


AD 


C3 


11 


5E 


1021 


:C3 


11 


20 


CD 


BD 


20 


FS 00 AF 


A9 F7 


80 


BE 


11 


20 


2D 


0A 


BD 


0DF9:ED 


22 


12 


SD 


BA 


11 


AD 


C4 


E8 


1029 


:e0 


A0 


00 


A9 


20 


99 


00 04 A7 


60 A9 


F4 


D0 


02 


A9 


F5 


8D 


5E 


0E01:li 


ED 


23 


12 


00 


BA 


11 


90 


AC 


1031 


:99 


00 


05 


99 


00 


06 


99 93 3C 


lA 12 


A0 


00 


91 


FB 


60 


A9 


7C 


0E09:16 


IB 


AD 


22 


12 


6D 


24 


12 


AE 


1039 


:06 


C8 


00 


Fl 


60 


AC 


BF 11 0E 


02 18 


6D 


BF 


11 


C9 


14 


90 


11 


0E11:8D 


22 


12 


AD 


23 


12 


6D 


25 


FA 


1041 


C8 


8C 


BF 


11 


A2 


18 


A0 0B B3 


02 A9 


14 


8D 


IC 


12 


A0 


00 


31 


0E19:12 


.8D 


23 


12 


20 


AC 


10 


60 


5B 


104 9 


18 


20 


0A 


E5 


A9 


00 


AE BF 87 


A2 00 


BC 


17 


12 


BE 


16 


12 


65 


0E21:AD 


26 


12 


29 


07 


D0 


19 


A9 


C9 


lasi 


11 


20 


CD 


BD 


60 


AC 


C0 11 DF 


20 0E 


0C 


20 


BA 


0D 


AC 


17 


Al 


0E29:90 


80 


01 


D4 


A9 


81 


8D 


04 


00 


1059 


C8 


8C 


C0 


11 


4C 


70 


10 AC IB 


12 AE 


16 


12 


C8 


C8 


E8 


EC 


D9 


0E31:D4 


A9 


0F 


80 


05 


04 


A9 


F0 


9C 


1061 


C0 


11 


88 


8C 


C0 


11 


C0 09 D4 


IG 12 


D0 


E6 


60 


20 


97 


E0 


CF 


0E39:8D 


06 


D4 


A9 


09 


BD 


18 


04 


56 


1069 


D0 


05 


A9 


20 


8D 


D3 


07 A2 06 


AS 8F 


29 


IF 


69 


05 


AE 


16 


C9 


0E41:20 


91 


0F 


20 


E0 


0E 


60 


A9 


5F 


1071 


18 


A0 


12 


18 


20 


0A 


E5 A9 28 


12 AC 


17 


12 


9D 


02 


12 


A9 


2C 


0E49:05 


80 


01 


04 


A9 


81 


80 


04 


2B 


1079: 


00 


AE 


C0 


11 


20 


CD 


BD 60 82 


F8 9D 


C6 


11 


A9 


07 


99 


DB 


7F 


0E51:D4 


A9 


09 


8D 


05 


D4 


A9 


F0 


FB 


1081: 


AC 


Ci 


11 


C8 


BC 


CI 


11 4C F0 


11 20 


97 


E0 


AS 


8F 


29 


IF 


AF 


0E59;BD 


06 


04 


20 


50 


0F 


60 


A9 


83 


1089: 


9B 


10 


AC 


CI 


11 


88 


8C CI B2 


BD ID 


12 


20 


97 


E0 


A5 


8F 


B6 


0E61:37 


8D 


01 


D4 


A9 


83 


80 


04 


64 


1091: 


11 


C0 


09 


00 


05 


A9 


20 SD 35 


29 07 


18 


6D 


ID 


12 


8D 


ID 


EA 


0E69:O4 


A9 


F0 


8D 


05 


D4 


A9 


0F 


2F 


1099: 


D9 


07 


A2 


18 


A0 


18 


18 20 F3 


12 20 


97 


E0 


AS 


8F 


29 


01 


2A 


0E71:8D 


06 


04 


20 


50 


0F 


60 


A9 


9B 


10A1: 


0A 


ES 


A9 


00 


AE 


CI 


11 20 34 


18 6D 


ID 


12 


69 


6F 


AC 


17 


07 


0E79:C8 


8D 


01 


D4 


A9 


13 


80 


04 


83 


10A9: 


CD 


BD 


60 


20 


78 


0E 


AC C2 46 



AUGUST 1992 COMPUTE G-33 



PROGRAMS 



10B1 


11 


C0 


0A 


F0 


09 


C8 


8C 


C2 


22 


10B9 


11 


R9 


FE 


99 


DC 


07 


60 


AD 


B7 


10C1 


IB 


12 


D0 


IB 


20 


A3 


0e 


AC 


FB 


10C9 


C2 


11 


F0 


08 


A9 


20 


AC 


C2 


18 


10D1 


11 


99 


DC 


07 


C0 


FF 


F0 


04 


D8 


10D9 


88 


8C 


C2 


11 


60 


00 


00 


00 


CD 


10E1 


00 


00 


00 


3C 


66 


C3 


C3 


66 


F5 


10E9 


3C 


0C 


36 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


EB 


10F1 


00 


00 


00 


12 


20 


53 


43 


4F 


57 


10F9 


52 


45 


3A 


20 


20 


4C 


45 


56 


F0 


1101 


45 


4C 


3A 


20 


20 


50 


4F 


50 


53 


1109 


3A 


20 


20 


48 


49 


54 


3A 


20 


09 


1111 


20 


45 


58 


54 


52 


41 


3A 


20 


11 


1119 


20 


20 


20 


20 


20 


92 


39 


30 


35 


1121 


30 


30 


30 


30 


12 


20 


20 


92 


54 


1129 


20 


20 


20 


20 


20 


20 


12 


20 


2F 


1131 


20 


92 


20 


20 


20 


20 


12 


20 


D3 


1139 


20 


92 


20 


20 


20 


20 


12 


20 


DB 


1141 


20 


92 


00 


3C 


18 


18 


18 


00 


2D 


1149 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


3C 


A7 


1151 


18 


18 


18 


00 


FF 


FF 


FF 


C3 


4C 


1159 


00 


00 


00 


00 


FF 


FF 


FF 


FF 


7B 


1161 


18 


18 


18 


8E 


IC 


93 


00 


42 


F2 


1169 


41 


AC 


4C 


4F 


4F 


4E 


20 


50 


02 


1171 


4F 


50 


00 


54 


4F 


20 


50 


4C 


7C 


1179 


41 


59 


00 


50 


52 


45 


53 


S3 


39 


1181 


20 


41 


4E 


59 


20 


.48 


45 


59 


75 


1189 


20 


4F 


52 


20 


4D 


4F 


56 


45 


75 


1191 


20 


4A 


4F 


59 


53 


54 


49 


43 


97 


1199- 


4B 


00 


ID 


47 


41 


4D 


45 


20 


63 


llAl 


4F 


56 


45 


52 


00 


45 


4E 


44 


C4 


11A9: 


20 


4F 


46 


20 


4C 


45 


56 


45 


E3 


llBl! 


4C 


00 


42 


4F 


4E 


55 


53 


3A 


DF 


11B9: 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


DB 



Maurice Yanney used Fast Assembler 
from the Gazette Power Tools disk to 
write this program. He lives in Leba- 
non,. Pennsylvania. 



SUB ATTACK II 



By Tai Bush 

!f you like underwater arcade-style, 
games, you're going to love Sub Attack 
II. This fast-paced game for the 64 can ac- 
commodate up to eight players. Enemy 
targets include submarines, airplanes, 
trawlers, and helicopters, and you can 
play on any of 40 levels. Scenarios are 
played in different combinations of clear 
or murky waters and clear or cloudy 
skies. 

Entering the Gome 

Sub Attack II is written entirely in ma- 
chine language, but it loads and runs 
like a BASIC program. To enter it, you'll 
need MLX, our machine language en- 
try program, see "Typing Aids" else- 
where in this section. When MLX 
prompts, respond with the following. 

Starting address: Q801 

G-34 COMPUTE AUGUST 1992 



Ending address: 1B18 

Be sure to save a copy of the program 
before exiting MLX. 

Prepare for Action 

From the opening menu, select the lev- 
el and number of players desired. 
Press f1 to start the game. You control 
the black ship in the center of the 
screen. Use a joystick to move the 
ship left or right. Press the fire button to 
fire straight up. Tilt the joystick left or 
right and press the fire button to fire to- 
ward the sides. Puli back on the joys- 
tick and press the fire button to drop a 
depth charge. Each level lasts approx- 
imately one minute. 

Enemy Forces 

You'll face a formidable fleet of enemy 
forces, Here are some important facts^ 
about their weapon systems. 

Blue submarines fire torpedoes ran- 
domly toward the top of the screen. 
These torpedoes are deadly if they hit 
your ship or if your ship plows into a wa- 
ter spout created by their explosions. 

Airplanes drop bombs as they pass 
directly over your ship. They also drop 
bombs whenever they're hit. If you 
shoot one down, avoid it as it crashes 
into the water. 

Trawlers travel half the distance 
across the screen, then turn and 
leave. They drop mines that explode at 
random intervals. 

Helicopters have unlimited ammuni- 
tion. They drop bombs above your 
ship. Be careful whenever they hover — 
they drop bombs continuously 

Turtles are replicas of the first oper- 
ational submarine, built in 1776 by 
David Bushnell and called the Turtle. 
These Turtles are black and white, and 
they fire yellow missiles that explode 
when they reach the surface. 

Gray submarines fire missiles that en- 
ter the atmosphere, turn, and explode 
when they fall back to the surface. 

Jet planes drop parachute bombs. 

Scoring 

Blue submarines, airplanes, and trawl- 
ers earn you 10 points each when hit; 
all other enemies are worth 20 points 
each. Levels 1-10 are played in clear 
waters and are considered easy Lev- 
els 11-20 are played in murky waters 



and are moderate. Skies are clear in 
these levels. Levels 21-30 are played 
in clear waters and cloudy skies, and 
levels 31-40 are played in murky wa- 
ters and cloudy skies. These last 20 lev- 
els are difficult. 

Press P at any time to pause the 
game. Press it again to continue. 



SUB ATTACK II 














0801:0B 


08 


70 


17 


9E 


32 


34 


30 


6E 


0809:37 


00 


00 


00 


20 


20 


20 


20 


96 


0811J20 


20 


20 


20 


20 


A0 


C4 


B9 


06 


0819: 3C 


08 


99 


F8 


00 


B9 


FD 


08 


F6 


0821:99 


33 


03 


88 


D0 


Fl 


A0 


09 


4C 


0829:B9 


0C 


08 


99 


FF 


03 


88 


00 


Al 


0831:F7 


A9 


El 


85 


2D 


A9 


IF 


85 


10 


0839:2E 


4C 


00 


01 


14 


E0 


00 


El 


89 


0841:1F 


8F 


19 


B9 


6E 


09 


99 


E8 


37 


0849:07 


ce 


D0 


F7 


EE 


02 


01 


EE 


19 


0851:05 


01 


C6 


F9 


D0 


ED 


A2 


03 


23 


0859:20 


34 


03 


F0 


33 


C9 


07 


D0 


95 


0861:16 


A2 


01 


20 


34 


03 


D0 


OA 


A0 


fla69:A2 


04 


20 


34 


03 


18 


69 


07 


65 


0871:10 


05 


A2 


0A 


20 


34 


03 


85 


ID 


0879:A8 


A5 


A7 


35 


A9 


AS 


FE 


85 


FB 


0881:F7 


A5 


FF 


85 


F8 


20 


6C 


03 


73 


0889:A5 


F8 


85 


FF 


A5 


F7 


85 


FE 


72 


0891:E3 


20 


34 


03 


D0 


IE 


A2 


08 


21 


0899:20 


34 


03 


A0 


02 


84 


A8 


85 


2A 


08A1:A6 


18 


A5 


FC 


65 


A6 


85 


F7 


58 


08A9:A5 


FD 


65 


A7 


85 


F8 


20 


6C 


EF 


08B1:03 


4C 


13 


01 


E8 


20 


34 


03 


FB 


08B9:D0 


IC 


A0 


03 


84 


A8 


E8 


20 


36 


08C1:34 


03 


F0 


08 


A2 


08 


20 


34 


F4 


08C9:03 


4C 


5C 


01 


A2 


0C 


20 


34 


C3 


0801:03 


E6 


A7 


4C 


5C 


01 


Ea 


20 


AF 


08D9:34 


03 


D0 


0A 


EB 


20 


34 


03 


B2 


08E1:13 


69 


04 


AS 


D0 


D6 


E8 


20 


37 


0BE9:34 


03 


D0 


0A 


A2 


02 


20 


34 


21 


0eFl:03 


18 


69 


06 


D0 


ED 


A2 


08 


A2 


0eF9:20 


34 


03 


D0 


E6 


A9 


00 


85 


F7 


0901:A7 


A4 


FB 


F0 


9C 


06 


FA 


2A 


37 


0909:26 


A7 


C6 


FB 


CA 


D0 


P2 


A8 


03 


0911:60 


48 


Bl 


FE 


85 


FA 


A9 


03 


FE 


0919:85 


FB 


68 


A4 


FE 


D0 


02 


C6 


4A 


0921:FF 


C6 


FE 


C0 


E7 


D0 


OE 


A4 


BS 


0929:FF 


C0 


07 


D0 


D3 


A9 


37 


85 


BA 


0931:01 


59 


4C 


BD 


08 


A4 


A8 


F0 


49 


0939:22 


A5 


F7 


38 


E5 


AS 


B0 


03 


7E 


0941:C6 


F8 


38 


85 


F7 


A5 


FC 


E5 


BA 


0949:A8 


B0 


02 


C6 


FD 


85 


FC 


Bl 


3A 


0951:F7 


83 


91 


FC 


98 


D0 


F8 


C4 


42 


0959:A9 


F3 


0A 


Dl 


F7 


C6 


FD 


C6 


76 


0961:F8 


C6 


A9 


10 


EC 


60 


78 


E6 


98 


0969:01 


40 


16 


08 


60 


00 


0C 


08 


75 


0971:01 


00 


9E 


32 


30 


36 


31 


E3 


9B 


0979:25 


A9 


IC 


47 


09 


18 


A9 


80 


EC\ 


0981:8D 


SA 


C9 


0F 


80 


18 


65 


51 


10 jrc 


0989:R0 


9E 


20 


23 


19 


20 


07 


09 


2A 


0991:6D 


04 


84 


7E 


80 


BA 


03 


20 


51 


0999:AC 


0B 


20 


7F 


0E 


20 


38 


10 


32 


09A1:20 


D5 


0C 


DI 


CI 


0D 


20 


C0 


IB 


09A9:15 


20 


9F 


FF 


81 


IB 


C4 


DB 


20 


09B1:73 


45 


50 


D0 


F9 


4C 


27 


B8 


EO 


09B9:59 


AA 


F3 


78 


6D 


04 


15 


44 


13 


09C1:HD 


DA 


15 


05 


D4 


04 


35 


CI 


3F 



09C9 


86 


02 


A9 


F8 


99 


06 


B9 


05 


AF 


0BF9 


09 


0F 


49 


0F 


F0 


00 


SF 


F0 


DD 


0E29 


CA 


00 


FA 


AD 


50 


F0 


0E 


00 


E3 


09D1 


.E9 


52 


01 


D4 


BD 


F8 


08 


99 


56 


0C01 


AB 


80 


14 


83 


FE 


2E 


lA 


20 


CE 


0E31 


lA 


06 


00 


11 


50 


49 


BD 


37 


CI 


09D9 


00 


D4 


23 


FC 


99 


42 


2E 


A6 


CD 


0C09 


6D 


08 


A6 


FB 


A4 


FC 


60 


A2 


AB 


0E39 


09 


17 


A9 


09 


20 


56 


03 


40 


10 


09E1 


FC 


A4 


FB 


60 


94 


66 


5A 


A7 


BE 


0C11 


04 


3F 


91 


00 


05 


A9 


90 


20 


A9 


0E41 


20 


0E 


A9 


0A 


20 


8F 


08 


A9 


BF 


09E9 


65 


23 


AA 


AS 


FC 


C3 


2E 


E6 


61 


0C19 


88 


A2 


2E 


50 


03 


B0 


7A 


81 


0B 


0E49 


06 


80 


20 


D0 


88 


00 


Dl 


51 


59 


09F1 


BD 


CB 


03 


32 


99 


12 


63 


A2 


78 


0C21 


90 


04 


9E 


0B 


0A 


lA 


04 


00 


98 


0E51 


77 


16 


04 


D4 


80 


0B 


04 


AE 


60 


09F9 


00 


86 


FC 


8A 


09 


BD 


EE 


67 


01 


0C29 


F5 


88 


34 


El 


A2 


50 


23 


05 


AE 


0E59 


A2 


7F 


FE 


44 


BD 


40 


10 


E0 


BA 


0ft01 


21 


E0 


8D 


04 


04 


4C 


8A 


08 


C4 


0C31 


D2 


FF 


A9 


04 


C0 


10 


0A 


20 


A2 


0E61 


58 


05 


99 


03 


54 


03 


20 


95 


OE 


0A09 


84 


F3 


A0 


07 


4C 


B4 


38 


E5 


0E 


0C39 


9A 


9F 


9fi 


IE 


90 


A3 


63 


64 


B9 


0E69 


00 


F6 


69 


40 


07 


09 


60 


90 


E3 


0A11 


01 


90 


50 


18 


11 


21 


D0 


81 


85 


0C41 


65 


66 


92 


33 


DC 


49 


FF 


A8 


E4 


0E71 


4E 


45 


58 


54 


29 


7E 


B2 


00 


FE 


0A19 


21 


21 


81 


IC 


12 


A0 


E4 


00 


E0 


0C49 


20 


B8 


0B 


40 


06 


0C 


18 


AF 


06 


aE79 


AO 


70 


11 


F0 


04 


OE 


BB 


E0 


6D 


0A21 


64 


04 


0B 


0B 


60 


A0 


03 


02 


08 


0C51 


82 


04 


20 


08 


28 


09 


08 


F0 


99 


0E81 


B2 


IB 


D4 


A8 


09 


38 


B0 


10 


83 


9A29 


02 


01 


17 


10 


57 


IC 


21 


0C 


DB 


0059 


25 


73 


49 


36 


28 


8A 


86 


18 


FD 


0SS9 


4A 


4A 


4A 


0A 


0A 


3A 


18 


6D 


5D 


0fl3X 


19 


19 


86 


0D 


12 


F4 


F6 


7D 


39 


00 61 


86 


A4 


10 


CE 


68 


43 


C9 


FE 


CB 


0E91 


11 


BO 


AA 


BD 


65 


03 


IB 


IF 


63 


flA39 


FA 


B5 


F6 


23 


31 


87 


92 


IE 


34 


0C69 


D0 


F6 


AA 


01 


77 


AA 


37 


74 


56 


aE99 


00 


20 


90 


10 


00 


28 


B0 


18 


12 


0A41 


IE 


IE 


4E 


01 


72 


CI 


4F 


BE 


CA 


0C71 


F0 


72 


8A 


El 


09 


40 


80 


30 


3E 


0EA1 


AD 


05 


3A 


7E 


30 


07 


CF 


41 


83 


0A49 


06 


09 


D9 


8D 


22 


D0 


18 


A0 


DB 


0C79 


0A 


81 


EE 


46 


00 


24 


F0 


DD 


89 


0EA9 


AD 


09 


00 


C9 


9A 


BC 


50 


86 


9E 


0A51 


10 


A2 


CI 


65 


El 


Fl 


00 


19 


94 


0C81 


AA 


9E 


02 


29 


61 


68 


10 


lA 


68 


BEBl 


FB 


41 


09 


AE 


15 


54 


4B 


29 


El 


0A59 


31 


AD 


IE 


00 


AO 


IF 


B6 


3F 


19 


0089 


58 


20 


8C 


B0 


23 


33 


0B 


EC 


6F 


0EB9 


02 


05 


09 


B0 


92 


sa 


08 


00 


71 


0A61 


4C 


CA 


2E 


A4 


6C 


2B 


09 


00 


39 


0C91 


8D 


C6 


AO 


B8 


10 


02, 


06 


72 


EB 


0EC1 


05 


A2 


01 


4C 


E4 


0E 


8A 


29 


8B 


0A69 


01 


02 


03 


04 


05 


08 


07 


IF 


94 


0C99 


03 


0A 


0D 


95 


04 


00 


3A 


30 


D8 


aE09 


07 


13 


BE 


A2 


02 


20 


26 


E4 


82 


0A71. 


70 


6C 


61 


79 


65 


72 


AB 


3F 


28 


0CA1 


08 


E0 


A0 


08 


10 


09 


90 


98 


10 


0ED1 


B4 


61 


00 


B4 


03 


9D 


B7 


03 


6E 


0A79 


11 


11 


D0 


40 


46 


9D 


90 


90 


F9 


0CA9 


0C 


0A 


0C 


F0 


10 


C9 


04 


95 


20 


0ED9 


A9 


18 


80 


BB 


03 


8A 


A6 


FB 


C9 


0A81 


67 


65 


74 


A0 


A3 


72 


65 


61 


36 


0CB1 


08 


66 


91 


10 


80 


A3 


AS 


60 


03 


0EE1 


DE 


65 


03 


AA 


AA 


57 


3D 


86 


25 


0A89 


64 


79 


00 


80 


73 


69 


21 


30 


F5 


BOB 9 


98 


29 


0C 


DA 


F0 


06 


A3 


45 


CD 


0EE9 


CE 


AD 


0E 


02 


94 


80 


10 


30 


0A 


aA91 


71 


8D 


A7 


05 


A9 


5B 


99 


A4 


99 


0001 


8D 


01 


60 


93 


07 


20 


IC 


3D 


AA 


0EF1 


0E 


0A 


AA 


B9 


B4 


58 


04 


20 


B7 


0A99 


A0 


90 


82 


13 


39 


A4 


07 


A9 


B7 


0CC9 


77 


30 


20 


3D 


08 


94 


62 


43 


9D 


0EF9 


43 


EC 


12 


05 


D0 


8A 


4A 


AA 


75 


0AA1 


AC 


8D 


00 


B3 


99 


80 


01 


00 


80 


0OD1 


AD 


74 


28 


19 


0E 


99 


03 


E7 


04 


0F01 


98 


A0 


FF 


08 


38 


E9 


04 


B0 


42 


0AA9 


A0 


01 


8C 


15 


D0 


88 


ac 


01 


F3 


0CD9 


59 


01 


81 


EE 


66 


60 


40 


04 


37 


0F09 


FA 


B9 


91 


21 


OD 


FA 


07 


B9 


F9 


0AB1 


79 


5E 


IB 


8D 


11 


00 


B9 


9D 


33 


0CE1 


CE 


lA 


01 


AD 


03 


lA 


6B 


00 


0B 


BFll 


2A 


02 


07 


20 


FS 


34 


22 


10 


94 


0AB9 


09 


F0 


35 


C8 


73 


9C 


E5 


91 


2D 


0CE9 


23 


D5 


C4 


10 


29 


70 


A2 


14 


07 


0F19 


D0 


98 


4A 


A3 


B9 


AD 


0F 


9D 


09 


0AC1 


09 


93 


90 


11 


71 


15 


36 


26 


D4 


0CF1 


89 


18 


63 


30 


28 


40 


20 


30 


F6 


0F21 


29 


3A 


8E 


00 


42 


A0 


51 


04 


6F 


0AC9 


46 


C3 


61 


43 


61 


83 


78 


34 


90 


0OF9 


64 


04 


14 


43 


32 


33 


E9 


AA 


EC 


0F29 


04 


44 


91 


03 


ID 


40 


43 


9F 


FO 


0AD1 


16 


8A 


84 


42 


FA 


El 


05 


20 


Dl 


0001 


8C 


ec 


6B 


21 


08 


49 


E4 


01 


34 


0F31 


30 


0D 


F0 


Bl 


Bl 


2A 


44 


B9 


62 


0AD9 


20 


90 


0D 


00 


36 


15 


0D 


4A 


2E 


0D09 


46 


0B 


65 


30 


EB 


5E 


31 


BA 


FD 


0F39 


A6 


0F 


F0 


IB 


AC 


06 


3F 


A9 


E3 


0AE1 


20 


E2 


0A 


ID 


01 


A8 


8C 


AA 


06 


0011 


18 


69 


02 


80 


02 


00 


90 


EE 


0E 


0F41 


09 


IE 


B0 


11 


C9 


0A 


93 


04 


8E 


0AE9 


27 


8C 


42 


18 


E3 


C8 


CA 


AC 


2B 


0D19 


4C 


B8 


0G 


90 


3F 


10 


01 


A2 


F0 


0F49 


09 


14 


IE 


FF 


87 


B6 


20 


16 


82 


0AFI 


13 


DA 


3A 


A4 


EE 


40 


04 


A0 


F8 


0021 


01 


60 


A0 


DC 


00 


18 


60 


F8 


4A 


0F51 


00 


IB 


D0 


60 


6F 


D3 


D6 


Ea 


AF 


0AF9 


30 


4C 


E9 


09 


8C 


41 


04 


0E 


86 


9D29 


IE 


56 


08 


A9 


03 


79 


05 


EE 


A2 


0F59 


El 


DB 


OB 


E4 


E5 


E7 


E9 


2 


8E 


0B01 


39 


5D 


81 


2F 


31 


3D 


4A 


04 


86 


0D31 


8C 


AO 


01 


00 


85 


29 


00 


E4 


74 


0F61 


07 


41 


B9 


41 


06 


61 


21 


50 


40 


0B09 


64 


5B 


A8 


C0 


IE 


B0 


37 


C0 


2C 


0039 


55 


05 


16 


DE 


3E 


02 


00 


96 


80 


0F69 


14 


01 


0D 


04 


07 


01 


07 


05 


03 


0B11 


14 


B0 


0E 


A9 


C7 


SB 


8A 


9D 


18 


0D41 


FF 


D0 


IE 


97 


7F 


El 


E5 


0D 


29 


0F71 


0B 


36 


FC 


23 


06 


57 


6F 


87 


6E 


0B19 


08 


05 


E8 


BC 


C0 


0A 


B0 


25 


12 


0D49 


95 


3F 


18 


4F 


48 


95 


EC 


88 


F0 


0F79 


9F 


B7 


CF 


E7 


FF 


87 


IF 


D4 


FE 


0B21 


A2 


C7 


A9 


9A 


13 


8E 


E7 


66 


62 


0D51 


37 


FB 


A2 


09 


A4 


BE 


44 


23 


B6 


0F81 


71 


50 


47 


01 


01 


00 


05 


57 


OE 


0B29 


38 


02 


45 


49 


IC 


34 


E6 


07 


9F 


3059 


09 


33 


9F 


40 


9C 


AD 


CA 


F0 


3F 


0F89 


57 


B4 


B4 


00 


00 


02 


02 


DE 


lA 


0B31 


55 


4C 


0E 


8D 


E6 


DB 


A6 


48 


DE 


0D61 


11 


A8 


B9 


AE 


49 


90 


03 


40 


2F 


0F91 


DE 


18 


3F 


A8 


83 


38 


74 


74 


5B 


0B39 


4C 


7i 


0A 


A0 


00 


A2 


28 


B9 


Bl 


0D69 


2E 


66 


95 


00 


03 


81 


03 


51 


17 


0F99 


7E 


7E 


6A 


6A 


87 


0F 


64 


04 


CF 


0B41 


A2 


C5 


0B 


B9 


A7 


B2 


6A 


00 


F3 


0D71 


BE 


24 


AD 


BO 


B0 


24 


14 


10 


BB 


0FA1 


ED 


ED 


00 


40 


46 


9A 


9A 


8F 


Bl 


0B49 


CA 


D0 


F7 


A2 


50 


C8 


C0 


05 


4E 


0D79 


4F 


A2 


89 


EC 


08 


F0 


2F 


BD 


04 


0FA9 


8F 


7B 


7B 


85 


85 


71 


71 


BB 


C6 


0B51 


D0 


EA 


8-F 


OF 


00 


E0 


29 


D6 


27 


0D81 


50 


B4 


F4 


FE 


F0 


28 


8E 


E8 


34 


0FB1 


BB 


07 


D7 


09 


09 


E5 


E5 


04 


F0 


0B59 


8C 


46 


33 


04 


C0 


88 


8D 


E7 


19 


0D89 


B9 


C4 


E5 


0A 


BD 


BE 


01 


3E 


38 


0FB9 


08 


80 


76 


OE 


40 


80 


3A 


88 


AC 


0861 


DB 


IC 


02 


60 


AS 


0B 


14 


90 


9C 


0D91 


00 


CA 


43 


B9 


OF 


0D 


07 


07 


20 


0FC1 


A3 


97 


88 


00 


10 


26 


A2 


00 


07 


0B69 


IC 


A2 


07 


A0 


02 


01 


25 


03 


85 


0D99 


20 


00 


A0 


00 


B9 


31 


04 


FA 


70 


0FC9 


20 


4D 


10 


E0 


03 


82 


3B 


IB 


0F 


0B71 


BC 


98 


0A 


3E 


E8 


BF 


0A 


AA 


36 


0DA1 


C8 


00 


08 


00 


3D 


4C 


63 


10 


50 


0FD1 


A2 


10 


20 


13 


11 


E8 


E0 


06 


6E 


0B79 


C6 


31 


A0 


82 


4C 


85 


0A 


60 


68 


0DA9 


22 


E0 


06 


0D 


91 


5E 


E0 


19 


97 


0FD9 


D0 


EE 


07 


A9 


32 


F8 


82 


80 


AA 


0B81 


01 


00 


03 


69 


2A 


E6 


60 


80 


80 


0DB1 


00 


F5 


66 


09 


87 


D0 


F9 


68 


F6 


0FE1 


02 


FB 


D0 


F0 


41 


00 


58 


90 


77 


0B89 


82 


02 


9D 


01 


02 


01 


U 


01 


5C 


0DB9 


68 


4C 


00 


08 


93 


11 


11 


05 


45 


0FE9 


41 


96 


OA 


B8 


29 


93 


01 


25 


93 


0B91 


01 


ID 


04 


02 


0D 


02 


03 


0F 


95 


0DC1 


40 


41 


4E 


20 


20 


53 


43 


4F 


C2 


0FF1 


66 


AE 


58 


00 


53 


91 


E3 


Bl 


70 


0B99 


06 


0F 


00 


05 


E8 


F8 


C7 


46 


C7 


000 9 


E2 


76 


07 


90 


05 


IC 


9F 


90 


51 


0FF9 


08 


A9 


0E 


7B 


28 


48 


85 


10 


70 


0BA1 


43 


87 


C7 


41 


ID 


03 


66 


39 


43 


0DD1 


IE 


81 


9E 


El 


18 


3C 


20 


50 


8F 


1001 


09 


6B 


C4 


05 


A9 


AA 


A2 


CI 


69 


0BR9 


01 


65 


20 


65 


S6 


FB 


84 


FC 


IE 


0DD9 


A6 


53 


20 


46 


35 


20 


54 


4F 


A6 


1009 


A0 


28 


08 


40 


8E 


05 


60 


00 


AA 


0BB1' 


FS 


C2 


IF 


BC 


IB 


05 


18 


7D 


3F 


BDEl 


20 


52 


45 


00 


71 


07 


05 


20 


0D 


1011 


00 


F0 


BF 


85 


AB 


24 


07 


06 


BF 


0BB9 


12 


00 


CF 


26 


12 


A0 


00 


12 


5A 


0DE9 


3E 


00 


0D 


60 


61 


62 


05 


90 


30 


1019 


4E 


96 


El 


28 


30 


3E 


01 


8E 


CF 


0RC1 


32 


44 


08 


64 


A2 


28 


69 


00 


Dl 


aoFi 


47 


41 


4D 


45 


20 


4F 


E8 


as 


90 


1021 


09 


68 


0B 


C9 


03 


90 


19 


D5 


46 


0BC9- 


9D 


6C 


08 


90 


SB 


33 


7A 


14 


20 


0DF9 


52 


00 


04 


94 


71 


7A 


DA 


70 


A2 


1029 


2F 


B0 


15 


40 


64 


11 


BD 


E6 


3E 


0BD1 


4C 


E4 


62 


34 


IE 


86 


8C 


8B 


86 


0E01 


9B 


E0 


38 


90 


F2 


AD 


6E 


29 


87 


1031 


■16 


0B 


F0 


06 


3D 


FF 


40 


C6 


E6 


0BD9 


35 


7A 


14 


60 


04 


2E 


E2 


36 


86 


0E09 


FC 


D0 


6A 


A2 


0D 


A0 


0F 


18 


70 


1039 


10 


40 


63 


36 


D3 


4E 


14 


09 


IE 


OBEl 


61 


C8 


98 


12 


4fl 


46 


21 


37 


F3 


0E11 


30 


Fl 


4F 


25 


7A 


BD 


73 


0E 


BD 


1041 


:1A 


85 


95 


13 


C9 


E0 


52 


Al 


CB 


0BE9 


04 


BD 


3C 


03 


29 


0F 


18 


69 


48 


0E19 


F0 


07 


20 


D2 


FF 


E8 


4C 


12 


EE 


1049 


:E3 


51 


A6 


68 


80 


OB 


44 


Al 


09 


0BF1: 


30 


8D 


38 


04 


98 


5D 


44 


03 


90 


0E21 


0E 


AB 


00 


A2 


06 


20 


70 


13 


F4 


1051 


:0F 


51 


ID 


68 


14 


E4 


44 


Al 


3E 



AUGUST 1992 COMPUTE G-35 



PROGRAMS 



1059 


:E6 


51 


B7 


68 


6E 


E7 


44 


1061 


:EB 


Dl 


3C 


18 


60 


8A 


28 


1069 


:8e 


68 


01 


D0 


01 


AD 


70 


1071 


:CC 


51 


D3 


68 


14 


71 


12 


1079 


:D9 


CA 


8F 


DB 


E6 


A3 


28 


1081 


:DF 


17 


83 


A0 


16 


C9 


E3 


1089 


:A0 


Bl 


15 


09 


Ee 


84 


0F 


1091 


:17 


09 


E6 


52 


Al 


EE 


51 


1099 


:18 


C9 


EE 


90 


68 


17 


F0 


10A1 


:68 


DC 


17 


60 


01 


E2 


88 


10A9 


0C 


lA 


0B 


12 


lA 


0B 


50 


10B1 


•F9 


21 


9A 


E0 


2F 


08 


11 


1039 


CD 


19 


B0 


IP 


13 


09 


9F 


10C1 


:38 


93 


30 


30 


79 


44 


2B 


10C9 


44 


26 


72 


E3 


SB 


4C 


04 


10D1 


C9 


32 


B0 


IC 


E0 


CI 


82 


10D9 


FO 


15 


18 


69 


FB 


5E 


0D 


10E1 


EF 


85 


08 


F3 


5E 


F0 


03 


10E9 


5C 


DE 


82 


B0 


05 


31 


03 


10F1 


B7 


03 


10 


0A 


10 


Al 


A4 


10F9 


E5 


11 


05 


00 


lA 


D3 


20 


1101 


CF 


34 


D0 


61 


D0 


ID 


44 


1109 


00 


9E 


IB 


A3 


0A 


29 


07 


1111 


00 


D3 


IB 


70 


D4 


83 


85 


1119 


4E 


06 


F0 


14 


C9 


OB 


F0 


1121 


06 


E7 


04 


C2 


C2 


09 


05 


1129 


03 


40 


8B 


01 


13 


30 


32 


1131 


03 


87 


5F 


30 


B0 


86 


FE 


1139 


CC 


10 


22 


3A 


86 


04 


0E 


1141 


C0 


C2 


51 


04 


22 


01 


5A 


1149 


4C 


6B 


12 


fl9 


11 


6A 


45 


1151 


CC 


F9 


11 


C9 


CE 


B0 


20 


1159 


35 


89 


09 


96 


F0 


11 


94 


1161 


CD 


F0 


05 


23 


28 


D6 


80 


1169 


4G 


E2 


02 


CE 


G6 


00 


30 


1171 


4A 


0E 


67 


85 


30 


42 


3F 


1179 


ca 


AA 


EC 


A9 


01 


29 


8C 


1181 


00 


D2 


F0 


0D 


FE 


94 


04 


1189 


26 


0C 


30 


0E 


96 


08 


20 


1191 


10 


05 


4C 


C4 


08 


B8 


88 


1199 


9C 


80 


03 


08 


99 


23 


0E 


llRl 


E6 


28 


80 


90 


80 


20 


08 


11A9 


50 


25 


8C 


84 


8D 


Al 


22 


llBl 


A3 


07 


2E 


E2 


18 


65 


BA 


11B9 


B0 


59 


25 


22 


7D 


E8 


60 


llCl 


B9 


91 


02 


33 


E5 


FB 


13 


11C9 


E9 


A9 


12 


38 


E9 


B2 


12 


llDl 


28 


80 


2D 


20 


98 


07 


23 


11D9 


08 


33 


21 


82 


85 


20 


ID 


llEl 


DA 


8A 


70 


85 


FB 


A5 


32 


11E9 


0E 


80 


05 


FB 


8A 


72 


38 


llFl 


39 


18 


32 


10 


82 


00 


10 


11F9 


71 


15 


70 


06 


31 


0F 


24 


1201 


83 


D0 


F9 


AD 


12 


CD 


55 


1209 


F0 


F9 


4B 


8D 


0E 


DC 


60 


1211- 


D6 


E0 


20 


21 


00 


44 


A6 


1219- 


09 


A8 


09 


E3 


26 


D4 


F0 


1221 


C9 


D7 


F0 


50 


C9 


D5 


F0 


1229: 


C9 


D8 


F0 


5F 


A3 


D7 


OF 


1231: 


93 


18 


74 


84 


88 


A9 


05 


1239: 


7D 


06 


D0 


3F 


FE 


81 


3D 


1241: 


2A 


10 


00 


80 


D3 


C3 


04 


1249: 


8C 


2F 


DA 


4C 


F6 


E0 


11 


1251- 


43 


59 


A9 


D9 


E5 


23 


16 


1259: 


BC 


41 


El 


31 


14 


18 


3B 


1261: 


06 


53 


37 


18 


40 


83 


A5 


1269: 


26 


44 


04 


10 


B0 


4C 


82 


1271: 


58 


41 


98 


00 


12 


A9 


02 


1279: 


16 


C4 


5A 


96 


E0 


A4 


42 


1281: 


35 


E0 


D4 


05 


D9 


0B 


D6 



A3 


FD 


IF 


91 


D3 


87 


09 


Al 


39 


38 


D2 


44 


40 


4D 


DB 


99 


B0 


51 


B5 


70 


9C 


13 


£8 


ID 


F0 


FE 


72 


91 


11 


9A 


E5 


34 


3A 


FE 


FE 


57 


7D 


BB 


El 


05 


4F 


62 


02 


CD 


80 


75 


47 


99 


10 


E2 


90 


04 


03 


2B 


Al 


E4 


29 


37 


CD 


76 


C0 


06 


38 


E0 


C9 


D9 


02 


19 


70 


CE 


08 


33 


40 


F4 


00 


CA 


6F 


2D 


8D 


9A 


72 


A2 


C9 


SB 


27 


75 


08 


EF 


Bl 


S3 


90 


BE 


E2 


32 


00 


F6 


38 


38 


07 


50 


84 


4A 


42 


80 


0A 


2F 


33 


DA 


09 


D4 


07 


5A 


54 


E4 


63 


2E 


12 


AA 


56 


47 


CI 


E5 


03 


00 


04 


01 


IE 


08 


81 


74 


F3 


75 


0A 


FB 


A7 


08 


5D 


0A 


E6 


F2 



1289 


91 


90 


0E 


DA 


F0 


10 


5E 


42 


D0 


14B9 


14 


87 


37 


30 


01 


52 


5C 


B8 


7A 


1291 


DA 


CE 


43 


05 


F3 


B0 


00 


60 


F3 


14C1 


80 


BD 


3D 


0E 


18 


69 


ai 


2D 


B7 


1299 


95 


90 


CA 


63 


14 


lA 


IF 


B0 


34 


1409 


98 


05 


F7 


09 


01 


44 


OD 


20 


10 


12A1 


00 


60 


00 


FD 


09 


41 


01 


74 


F9 


14D1 


DB 


0F 


B9 


04 


00 


CD 


AD 


FB 


2D 


12A9 


35 


02 


44 


F0 


12 


64 


DD 


0F 


C5 


14D9 


14 


B0 


90 


95 


02 


40 


B5 


17 


6D 


12B1 


07 


A5 


FC 


77 


85 


FC 


A5 


FB 


41 


14E1 


A9 


07 


9D 


00 


BF 


00 


33 


00 


49 


12B9 


D9 


0A 


D0 


51 


F0 


D7 


62 


01 


29 


14E9 


03 


90 


F2 


07 


0A 


A9 


00 


A0 


IE 


1201 


FC 


83 


25 


FC 


F0 


09 


49 


01 


F8 


14F1 


18 


30 


A9 


BE 


EA 


2F 


FE 


C7 


44 


12C9 


16 


13 


F0 


02 


18 


60 


38 


60 


0F 


14F9 


72 


AE 


A9 


09 


20 


05 


Dl 


3F 


C4 


12D1 


BA 


A6 


lA 


9E 


44 


90 


31 


27 


13 


1501 


09 


EF 


F0 


30 


73 


27 


23 


00 


3D 


12D9 


A4 


A9 


IB 


9A 


04 


22 


10 


E0 


11 


1509 


25 


0F 


04 


AD 


98 


20 


BA 


00 


0F 


12E1 


0B 


19 


16 


E2 


0A 


08 


82 


80 


B3 


1511 


A0 


18 


ID 


lA 


86 


BD 


11 


09 


6A 


12E9 


0B 


20 


B0 


08 


F3 


99 


88 


85 


8C 


1519 


AD 


A0 


0A 


50 


04 


80 


10 


97 


67 


12F1 


BD 


06 


29 


0F 


C9 


07 


D0 


03 


9B 


1521 


42 


20 


84 


a3 


60 


09 


9D 


B0 


55 


12F9 


FE 


29 


41 


FB 


2A 


68 


00 


4F 


63 


1529 


06 


15 


28 


04 


20 


lA 


01 


4C 


98 


1301 


E0 


F0 


00 


IE 


64 


0D 


93 


09 


BE 


1531 


2B 


F2 


DD 


90 


41 


08 


96 


46 


D0 


1309 


4C 


03 


15 


7A 


FB 


A0 


20 


78 


7B 


1539 


B6 


A9 


05 


20 


ID 


50 


30 


5E 


86 


1311 


15 


37 


56 


30 


64 


51 


C8 


08 


20 


1541 


10 


28 


04 


0A 


DF 


02 


BC 


C9 


EB 


1319 


00 


06 


D0 


02 


78 


F0 


55 


B8 


46 


1549 


E9 


9A 


SI 


83 


OB 


66 


4D 


18 


22 


1321 


02 


44 


90 


Al 


02 


0D 


D0 


98 


3B 


1551 


A9 


02 


20 


E3 


8A 


41 


41 


09 


B8 


1329 


10 


Dl 


El 


Fa 


0A 


AB 


OB 


68 


16 


1559 


E8 


86 


02 


El 


AB 


C9 


9E 


90 


32 


1331 


2A 


El 


24 


IB 


60 


18 


24 


20 


E6 


1561 


0A 


DE 


15 


BO 


B4 


20 


50 


03 


AA 


1339 


62 


42 


83 


E2 


E0 


IE 


8A 


09 


IE 


1569 


D0 


28 


20 


FB 


12 


09 


A4 


D0 


9B 


1341 


02 


D0 


E6 


02 


AS 


06 


IE 


19 


59 


1571 


E2 


88 


90 


10 


84 


B0 


03 


09 


03 


1349 


A9 


E2 


40 


39 


15 


8A 


0A 


A8 


A9 


1579 


EA 


F0 


DO 


AD 


BA 


03 


30 


24 


40 


1351 


60 


38 


13 


6A 


F0 


BA 


C9 


7E 


43 


1581 


51 


F2 


IE 


0E 


FE 


FA 


3B 


20 


30 


1359 


F0 


B6 


40 


41 


15 


E0 


Fl 


ED 


41 


1589 


20 


E5 


0A 


A9 


0E 


4C 


56 


08 


6F 


1361 


60 


79 


38 


E2 


F3 


08 


F2 


18 


F6 


1591 


22 


2E 


07 


04 


F3 


09 


DE 


F6 


09 


1369 


70 


14 


90 


5D 


32 


51 


41 


03 


11 


1599 


20 


Fl 


12 


4C 


B6 


13 


B9 


01 


El 


1371 


3B 


03 


33 


34 


18 


El 


73 


18 


E6 


15A1 


BO 


00 


8A 


07 


CD 


05 


80 


0A 


91 


1379 


84 


07 


39 


00 


A9 


E3 


2A 


B7 


B3 


15A9 


CD 


07 


D0 


F0 


05 


CD 


09 


D0 


E7 


1381 


70 


04 


02 


2F 


09 


96 


00 


34 


AA 


15B1 


D0 


05 


A9 


14 


9D 


S7 


03 


AD 


7B 


1389 


A9 


03 


E8 


8D 


00 


98 


EE 


17 


98 


15B9 


15 


00 


3D 


27 


10 


Fa 


01 


60 


63 


1391 


01 


AD 


BO 


03 


29 


07 


AB 


00 


12 


1501 


AD 


IB 


D4 


C9 


40 


B0 


C0 


07 


0S 


1399 


AA 


El 


04 


80 


20 


DA 


15 


A0 


4D 


1509 


4F 


EB 


9D 


40 


3F 


A9 


01 


90 


5F 


13A1 


40 


D9 


07 


03 


AA 


BO 


ED 


44 


20 


15D1 


2C 


D0 


20 


3F 


13 


4C 


65 


13 


E5 


13A9 


16 


24 


48 


FD 


IS 


99 


25 


38 


5E 


15D9 


73 


72 


83 


09 


Al 


OB 


00 


B9 


39 


13B1 


BD 


00 


16 


99 


26 


38 


60 


81 


AA 


15E1 


B6 


38 


E9 


0A 


99 


0B 


00 


40 


3A 


13B9 


F2 


70 


C2 


20 


C9 


40 


C8 


00 


B3 


15E9 


8D 


12 


30 


BB 


44 


21 


20 


50 


3E 


13C1 


31 


D8 


15 


05 


01 


05 


04 


36 


04 


15F1 


2A 


00 


52 


A0 


03 


46 


60 


BD 


35 


1309 


02 


20 


03 


01 


3C 


SD 


50 


21 


A3 


1SF9 


65 


09 


ED 


F0 


B6 


FE 


FD 


07 


CA 


13D1 


40 


50 


54 


B0 


C4 


22 


BC 


48 


32 


1601 


A9 


06 


9D 


60 


10 


60 


F0 


E2 


64 


13D9 


09 


DB 


F0 


13 


93 


F3 


3E 


E4 


E8 


1609 


40 


F8 


18 


OE 


01 


BB 


BD 


Bl 


A2 


13E1 


DD 


D0 


lA 


BC 


D0 


0C 


9C 


D0 


FA 


1611 


03 


29 


01 


00 


9E 


40 


35 


13 


09 


13E9 


22 


75 


3E 


78 


08 


0A 


00 


ID 


75 


1619 


A0 


00 


30 


72 


90 


A9 


33 


0A 


63 


13F1 


00 


32 


26 


30 


18 


60 


73 


98 


A2 


1621 


03 


0A 


00 


A4 


23 


40 


0A 


Dl 


00 


13F9 


:E7 


17 


AD 


7F 


03 


FC 


11 


B9 


75 


1629 


A4 


29 


B9 


00 


D3 


99 


00 


2B 


59 


1401 


:df 


Ee 


39 


07 


E7 


20 


E0 


20 


30 


1631 


00 


Fa 


EB 


A9 


37 


B5 


01 


08 


4E 


1409 


:61 


BD 


7E 


16 


D9 


06 


95 


06 


90 


1639 


80 


0E 


DC 


38 


35 


Fl 


2A 


B0 


40 


1411 


:40 


Fl 


12 


BE 


OS 


02 


20 


33 


14 


1641 


30 


68 


20 


98 


AA 


91 


FB 


OS 


0B 


1419 


37 


10 


FA 


01 


D0 


06 


01 


C5 


38 


1649 


00 


B8 


FC 


43 


74 


0D 


D0 


F4 


4E 


1421 


.95 


16 


65 


05 


07 


21 


02 


B0 


lA 


1651 


AA 


A9 


55 


DB 


A9 


IB 


85 


FC 


37 


1429 


03 


9D 


B4 


98 


26 


A0 


13 


70 


A4 


1659 


08 


0B 


FD 


E3 


BD 


E5 


lA 


85 


D9 


1431 


EC 


31 


10 


4D 


B0 


07 


lA 


64 


02 


1661 


FE 


E8 


Bl 


FB 


F2 


F8 


00 


02 


50 


1439 


80 


41 


9A 


F0 


25 


BD 


51 


12 


29 


1669 


E6 


FC 


09 


DF 


Fa 


0F 


C9 


DD 


B4 


1441 


40 


4E 


10 


19 


60 


E2 


20 


56 


05 


1671 


F0 


E4 


91 


FO 


E6 


FD 


00 


EA 


ID 


1449 


08 


60 


87 


80 


A2 


A3 


03 


98 


08 


1679 


E6 


FE 


40 


75 


19 


SF 


0B 


9E 


75 


1451 


80 


00 


83 


09 


A9 


00 


9D 


AE 


65 


1681 


aA 


9D 


30 


C9 


AC 


18 


00 


F8 


OE 


1459 


03 


4C 


PB 


04 


IF 


85 


BF 


10 


74 


1689 


BA 


B0 


80 


C5 


C2 


07 


10 


FF 


9F 


1461 


7A 


FE 


DB 


16 


B2 


FE 


E5 


72 


33 


1691 


85 


FB 


38 


33 


00 


A0 


00 


E8 


A7 


1469 


FE 


EA 


07 


F9 


8B 


C3 


21 


AC 


A6 


1699 


18 


20 


FB 


FF 


E6 


FB 


A6 


FB 


68 


1471 


00 


08 


8F 


AC 


49 


01 


0A 


2D 


50 


16A1 


E0 


66 


F0 


3B 


BO 


4E 


lA 


F0 


F2 


1479 


62 


6F 


90 


45 


09 


EC 


B0 


41 


B9 


16A9 


E8 


DA 


AE 


93 


37 


19 


20 


E4 


57 


1481 


32 


78 


59 


D0 


39 


SO 


25 


32 


D0 


16B1 


FF 


C9 


86 


F0 


34 


09 


87 


F0 


F8 


1489 


Fl 


3C 


E6 


E6 


43 


02 


36 


62 


BE 


16B9 


4D 


C9 


88 


F0 


46 


09 


85 


09 


50 


1491 


06 


66 


61 


94 


21 


07 


D2 


60 


63 


1601 


29 


00 


A9 


02 


EC 


4A 


16 


F0 


85 


1499 


09 


5B 


B0 


13 


95 


68 


0A 


B0 


07 


16C9 


04 


90 


02 


A 9 


FE 


90 


5D 


03 


23 


14A1 


59 


8B 


00 


04 


CF 


6A 


01 


60 


C5 


16D1 


EB 


E0 


08 


00 


ED 


A2 


07 


E9 


AA 


14A9 


DC 


50 


80 


IC 


0E 


70 


01 


4C 


A6 


16D9 


30 


90 


80 


CA 


00 


FA 


A9 


93 


3D 


14B1 


E5 


11 


78 


59 


71 


14 


03 


01 


lA 


16E1 


20 


D2 


FF 


40 


B4 


aA 


Fl 


50 


A7 



G-36 COMPUTE AUGUST 1992 



16E9 


:68 


C9 


38 


D0 


0A 


R9 


FF 


E0 


A8 


1919 


.00 


5A 


05 


0D 


54 


64 


70 


01 


EF 


16F1 


:D3 


E2 


A3 


10 


22 


68 


3E 


80 


E5 


1921 


:50 


05 


2A 


C8 


C0 


01 


58 


20 


69 


16F9 


:13 


5C 


4C 


E2 


FC 


EE 


4A 


01 


B7 


1929 


.01 


40 


01 


40 


Al 


F7 


01 


7C 


7B 


1701 


:AD 


41 


C9 


28 


D0 


0D 


A9 


00 


20 


1931 


.4A 


74 


01 


A0 


F5 


15 


42 


84 


DC 


1709 


:8D 


00 


9E 


09 


14 


C5 


03 


44 


64 


1939 


55 


5A 


00 


15 


6E 


56 


39 


59 


96 


1711 


:EE 


34 


02 


AD 


B2 


C9 


3A 


D0 


E0 


1941 


08 


21 


25 


68 


0C 


55 


50 


03 


44 


1719 


:87 


EE 


49 


06 


A9 


30 


8D 


4A 


C3 


1949 


95 


Bl 


C5 


30 


34 


31 


83 


40 


AD 


1721 


:06 


4C 


CA 


19 


00 


3D 


11 


11 


78 


1951 


Bl 


5C 


BC 


8C 


37 


02 


3E 


00 


12 


1729 


ill 


9A 


53 


40 


4D 


20 


41 


54 


Be 


1959 


01 


3C 


DD 


63 


2C 


F9 


20 


04 


AE 


1731 


;AC 


43 


4B 


20 


49 


49 


45 


IF 


0B 


1961 


63 


D2 


90 


64 


A3 


B0 


71 


B0 


C5 


1739 


:50 


59 


52 


49 


47 


48 


54 


32 


FA 


1969 


ei 


56 


9C 


16 


01 


60 


0C 


05 


7D 


1741 


38 


39 


39 


32 


8B 


39 


43 


4P 


3B 


1971 


19 


02 


45 


05 


24 


01 


4C 


F0 


58 


1749 


4D 


la 


54 


45 


01 


59 


55 


42 


5D 


1979 


0A 


90 


3A 


AA 


94 


F0 


02 


95 


C8 


1751 


4G 


2E 


00 


11 


BB 


31 


82 


28 


B9 


1981 


5C 


9C 


A8 


44 


32 


00 


0F 


FC 


0F 


1759 


53 


54 


41 


52 


54 


A3 


43 


33 


92 


1989 


DD 


C6 


30 


A0 


03 


16 


06 


A0 


89 


1761 


E3 


50 


4C 


41 


59 


45 


52 


53 


0B 


1991 


0F 


16 


AA 


AC 


56 


30 


0F 


2A 


ED 


1769 


20 


20 


DC 


21 


35 


C7 


4C 


45 


04 


1999 


BC 


FF 


3F 


F0 


6F 


29 


C2 


00 


AE 


1771 


56 


45 


4G 


20 


20 


30 


31 


00 


CB 


19A1 


02 


0B 


19 


16 


02 


85 


05 


80 


CC 


1779 


3C 


46 


37 


3E 


20 


51 


55 


49 


5C 


19A9 


40 


0A 


C9 


00 


C0 


00 


30 


30 


0F 


1781 


54 


A9 


09 


8D 


CI 


BB 


CE 


80 


59 


19B1 


82 


6A 


D7 


DD 


20 


25 


E0 


20 


10 


1789 


14 


20 


C5 


lA 


AD 


60 


00 


F5 


AA 


19B9 


13 


50 


03 


20 


A0 


00 


20 


A3 


D9 


1791 


60 


AC 


5C 


03 


B9 


54 


03 


AA 


A6 


19C1 


30 


20 


20 


IC 


A3 


A8 


54 


DD 


20 


1799 


ED 


C9 


81 


F2 


02 


65 


03 


BD 


El 


19C9 


A0 


32 


0B 


E6 


7B 


03 


C0 


2A 


64 


17A1 


Fl 


IE 


99 


6D 


03 


98 


E2 


04 


9E 


19D1 


2F 


0A 


08 


0C 


2A 


IB 


07 


55 


01 


17A9 


08 


A8 


8A 


18 


69 


28 


AA 


90 


AA 


19D9 


15 


55 


55 


DD 


42 


B8 


60 


7E 


AS 


17B1 


E8 


60 


27 


30 


AC 


30 


EC 


30 


84 


19E1 


27 


36 


20 


42 


10 


89 


00 


7B 


9F 


17B9 


2C 


31 


6C 


31 


77 


31 


AC 


31 


F5 


19E9 


24 


40 


44 


22 


DD 


40 


2E 


01 


36 


17C1 


B8 


31 


EA 


31 


2A 


32 


6A 


32 


2A 


19F1 


50 


A9 


54 


00 


40 


lA 


A9 


D0 


CF 


17C9 


!\A 


32 


B6 


32 


EA 


32 


F6 


32 


14 


19F9 


12 


A8 


6A 


55 


A0 


B0 


93 


02 


F2 


17D1 


3A 


33 


7R 


33 


B7 


33 


F4 


33 


14 


1A01 


10 


46 


20 


36 


lA 


15 


01 


03 


65 


17D9 


2E 


34 


74 


34 


87 


34 


E5 


34 


ac 


1A09 


A2 


8E 


54 


23 


2E 


74 


15 


00 


AC 


17E1 


0D 


35 


4F 


35 


A4 


35 


CC 


35 


E9 


lAll 


eA 


A4 


AA 


AA 


A9 


0A 


55 


A9 


6D 


17E9 


11 


36 


76 


36 


B7 


36 


EB 


36 


05 


1A19 


BC 


0B 


10 


04 


00 


04 


DD 


A8 


00 


17F1 


2E 


37 


71 


37 


DC 


37 


24 


38 


EA 


1A21 


45 


ID 


05 


71 


03 


33 


34 


4C 


CC 


17F9 


64 


38 


A4 


38 


F7 


38 


lA 


39 


BE 


1A29 


35 


C5 


10 


3C 


0B 


FE 


00 


01 


AC 


1801 


58 


39 


Bl 


39 


D2 


39 


12 


3A 


4F 


1A31 


96 


03 


01 


80 


01 


01 


a3 


02 


EE 


1809 


54 


3A 


94 


3A 


E5 


3A 


13 


3B 


Al 


1A39 


82 


22 


50 


10 


7C 


43 


43 


06 


03 


1811 


53 


3B 


9B 


3B 


DB 


3B 


DC 


73 


DE 


1A41 


44 


ic 


07 


DD 


39 


05 


07 


4D 


96 


1819 


37 


0E 


D4 


F8 


07 


18 


D0 


IB 


E7 


1A49' 


03 


08 


14 


50 


03 


DD 


55 


46 


8B 


1321 


D0 


20 


D0 


08 


3C 


10 


36 


7E 


0A 


1A51- 


86 


7F 


3F 


77 


90 


3C 


7E 


35 


AF 


1829 


61 


7F 


FF 


FE 


3F 


FF 


FC 


EF 


BD 


1A59- 


02 


39 


10 


61 


FE 


FC 


99 


07 


IB 


1831 


13 


19 


10 


C5 


44 


40 


53 


55 


AE 


1A61- 


19 


02 


50 


00 


IC 


C5 


40 


51 


76 


1839 


AA 


96 


41 


AA 


A8 


50 


4F 


DC 


39 


1A69: 


08 


00 


41 


03 


19 


01 


CC 


33 


93 


1841 


81 


06 


05 


11 


22 


12 


DD 


C4 


3F 


1A71: 


34 


90 


11 


FF 


FF 


DD 


30 


80 


FE 


1849 


06 


CE 


C0 


4E 


41 


IC 


0A 


38 


44 


1A79: 


Aa 


0C 


80 


DD 


ca 


CI 


DD 


IB 


D2 


1851 


88 


59 


0A 


19 


EF 


81 


40 


08 


PC 


lABl: 


DD 


01 


DD 


06 


06 


C8 


41 


03 


D9 


1859 


08 


DD 


C0 


DD 


80 


CI 


5F 


83 


48 


1AB9: 


72 


12 


DF 


28 


68 


A0 


08 


00 


CF 


1861 


C2 


03 


Bl 


28 


96 


AA 


55 


2A 


A0 


1A91: 


84 


14 


C6 


03 


10 


0F 


04 


21 


FB 


1869 


AA 


41 


A8 


2B 


2E 


3C 


E4 


AS 


D3 


1A99: 


23 


AB 


40 


CB 


43 


C8 


08 


14 


68 


1871 


A0 


84 


83 


44 


AS 


D8 


28 


D8 


52 


lAAl: 


13 


D6 


38 


4E 


20 


25 


19 


47 


BE 


1879 


88 


04 


A2 


20 


0E 


85 


22 


22 


32 


laA9: 


A3 


40 


D9 


40 


DA 


05 


Bl 


28 


75 


1881 


eA 


61 


03 


11 


08 


53 


20 


01 


7F 


lABl: 


10 


0A 


93 


05 


26 


B3 


88 


80 


C4 


1889 


DD 


E0 


82 


02 


24 


DD 


FF 


80 


6A 


1AB9: 


A2 


28 


7A 


28 


37 


F0 


EA 


08 


76 


1891 


44 


E2 


AS 


C3 


F0 


A0 


05 


8D 


DF 


lACl: 


DC 


40 


C8 


B8 


33 


CF 


E2 


11 


4B 


1399 


58 


C0 


38 


D3 


30 


05 


DD 


18 


24 


1AC9: 


84 


EE 


88 


88 


A3 


64 


C3 


03 


CE 


18A1 


6A 


18 


49 


26 


C0 


9A 


3F 


B0 


33 


lADl: 


61 


63 


63 


43 


2A 


E3 


A9 


98 


FC 


18A9 


07 


30 


EE 


A6 


B0 


E6 


B0 


90 


C4 


1AD9: 


98 


03 


Al 


28 


AB 


03 


Al 


98 


17 


18B1 


33 


F8 


03 


17 


AF 


BC 


8E 


0B 


63 


lAElt 


93 


43 


A0 


48 


88 


85 


05 


2B 


59 


13B9: 


8F 


88 


62 


21 


A3 


FA 


B9 


30 


2F 


1AE9: 


00 


4E 


Ee 


30 


0F 


99 


91 


0A 


79 


18C1: 


04 


A5 


44 


15 


70 


80 


C6 


A0 


EA 


lAFl: 


8F 


89 


0D 


04 


E3 


00 


90 


34 


IF 


18C9: 


60 


A5 


47 


25 


40 


28 


40 


63 


55 


1AF9: 


8C 


87 


0F 


0F 


AC 


89 


3B 


0A 


35 


18D1: 


AE 


78 


04 


3D 


06 


ID 


03 


00 


80 


1B01: 


20 


61 


14 


0A 


0A 


19 


33 


61 


3F 


18D9: 


5F 


0A 


40 


12 


81 


45 


FB 


A5 


IE 


1B09: 


SE 


83 


05 


46 


A0 


00 


00 


00 


71 


18E1: 


A0 


10 


B9 


54 


20 


65 


50 


29 


43 


IBII: 


0A 


00 


0F 


05 


E0 


00 


00 


00 


85 


18E9: 


33 


05 


55 


30 


15 


56 


C0 


15 


3B 






















18F1: 
18F9: 


53 
IC 


B5 
8A 


70 
00 


01 
14 


4C 
03 


59 
0C 


03 
D0 


04 

0E 


29 

14 


Tai Bush, 


a computer science student 


1901: 


0E 


9A 


BE 


0E 


3C 


DE 


0C 


21 


CF 


at the 


Unive 


rsity of Colorado at Col- 


1909: 


20 


C0 


CI 


73 


41 


4C 


91 


52 


EB 


orado 


springs, enjoys radio-controlled 


1911: 


74 


54 


78 


2C 


64 


14 


6E 


AF 


64 


boats, electronics, and classical 


nnusic. 



TAG IT 



By Farid Ahmad 

Wlnile working on a specific area of a pro- 
gram, you may find it necessary to list the 
same lines repeatedly. You must either 
hunt through the entire listing until you 
find the lines you need or remember and 
enter the proper numbers each time. 

There's an easier way. Tag It is a 
handy, relocatable utility that makes it pos- 
sible to list different parts of a BASIC pro- 
gram with a single keystroke. With Tag It 
you can mark different parts ol a listing 
with different tags and list them easily. 

Tag It offers other features as well. 
These include definable function keys, ed- 
iting keys, and an escape key to cancel 
quote or insert mode. 

Enteiiig the Progrom 

Tag It is written in machine language. 
To enter it, you'll need MLX, our ma- 
chine language entry program; see 
"Typing Aids" elsewhere in this sec- 
tion. When fvlLX prompts, respond 
with the foilowing. 

Starting address: 0801 
Ending address: 1330 

Be sure to save a copy of the program 
before exiting MLX. 

Using the Program 

When you load and run Tag It, it'll in- 
stall and activate a machine language 
routine. Tag It will display the memory 
area where it has put the routine and 
then ask if you want to create an object 
file. For now, answer no. Any response 
other than Y is taken as a no. 

Now hold down the Commodore key 
and press any of the following keys: Z, 
P, R, A, S, D, or F. Each combination 
lists a different portion of the program. 
You can quickly move the cursor for ed- 
iting by using other combinations with 
the Commodore key. 

Press Commodore-< to move the cur- 
sor to the beginning of a line. Press 
Commodore-> to move the cursor to 
the end of a line. Press Commodore-? 
to move to the middle of a fine. Com- 
modore-Crsr Down moves the cursor 
to the bottom lett corner of the screen. 

Enter the quote or insert mode. 
Press the Ctrl key to confirm that you're 
in this mode. To escape from the 

AUGUST 1992 COiMPUTE G-37 



PROGRAMS 



quote mode, press the Ctrl key and 
Commodore key simultaneously. 

Tags 

A tag consists of a REM statement and 
a letter of the alphabet. You saw a dem- 
onstration of a tag if you pressed the 
Commodore key and one of the letters 
listed above. For an example, list line 
10. If you have entered the line correct- 
ly, you should see REM-A. The letter is 
the tag identifier. You can use any let- 
ter of the alphabet as an identifier. 
Now hold down the Commodore key 
and press A. You'll notice that the pro- 
gram lists from line 10 onward. Sup- 
pose you want to list your program 
from line 600 onward. Add the follow- 
ing line to your program. 

599 REM-T 

By using different letters for different 
lines, you can create up to 26 tags. 
Note that there's no space between 
REM, the minus sign, and the letter. 
This is important. 

Tips and Caveats 

Most programs are written with many 
subroutines, each with a specific job. 
You can use descriptive tags to list 
them. If a subroutine starting at line 
1000 produces a display, you might 
add 999 REM-DISPLAY to your pro- 
gram. Commodore-D will list this sub- 
routine. Note, however, that Tag It us- 
es only the first letter in the word for 
identification. 

For another example, if in the same 
program you added 2000 REM-DRAW 
TITLE, Commodore-D would still list the 
program from line 999 onward, This is 
because Tag It reads only REM-D in 
both of the above lines; and since line 
999 is found first, the listing starts 
from there. In general, whenever the 
same letter is used in two or more 
lags, the listing starts from the first oc- 
currence of that lag. If you press Com- 
modore-D with Tag It on the screen, 
you'll see the program list Data state- 
ments that begin with line 480. 

Normally, when you press the Com- 
modore key along with a letter key, a 
graphic character is displayed. These 
characters are generally typed within 
print statements. Tag It checks for the 
quote and insert modes. If either of 

G-3a COMPUTE AUGUST 1992 



these is active, the normal graphic char- 
acter is displayed. If a tag isn't found 
in the listing, nothing happens. 

Tag It will be disabled when you 
press Run/Stop-Restore. Reactivate it 
with SYS and the starting address. 

Function Keys 

Now, hold down the Commodore key 
and press any of the function keys. 
The default function key definitions will 
be displayed. These can be altered. 

List the program to see the default 
function key definitions in lines 220- 
250, or press Commodore-F if Tag It is 
active. You can change these defini- 
tions at will. However, the total length 
of the text of the four function keys (in- 
cluding carriage returns, if used) must 
not exceed 250 characters. A warning 
is given if this happens. 

Reiocotion 

The BASIC loader puts Tag It at loca- 
tion 49152. This can be changed easi- 
ly by assigning a new address to vari- 
able SA in line 30. The amount of mem- 
ory used will depend upon the length 
of the function key definitions. 

If you answer yes when the program 
asks if you want to create an object 
file, you'll be asked for a filename. Af- 
ter that, a machine language file of Tag 
It is saved on disk. You can install Tag 
It from the object file by using the fol- 
lowing commands. 

LOAD'TAG IT".8,1 

NEW 

SYS starting address 

Before saving the object file, you may 
want to change the function key defini- 
tions to your liking. 

If you plan to use Tag It from the BA- 
SIC loader, add the following line to it: 
395 NEW. When you run this new ver- 
sion of Tag It, you1l not be asked if you 
want to create an object file. The pro- 
gram will then execute the NEW com- 
mand after it installs the machine lan- 
guage in memory. 

Compalibiiily 

Tag It is compatible with BASSEM and 
MetaBASIC. If you use Tag It with Meta- 
BASIC, the 8 function keys provided 
by MetaBASIC will still be active, giving 
you a total of 12 function keys. 



TAG IT 



0801' 


09 


09 


0A 


00 


8F 


2D 


5A 


00 


BE 


0809- 


3F 


08 


14 


00 


97 


35 


33 


32 


67 


0811 


38 


30 


2C 


30 


3A 


97 


35 


33 


9F 


0819- 


32 


38 


31 


2C 


30 


3A 


97 


36 


09 


0821 


34 


36 


2C 


33 


3A 


99 


22 


93 


Al 


0829 


54 


41 


47 


20 


49 


54 


20 


12 


8C 


0831 


57 


4F 


52 


4B 


49 


4E 


47 


2E 


FF 


0839 


2E 


2E 


2E 


2E 


22 


00 


4C 


08 


46 


0841 


IE 


00 


53 


41 


B2 


34 


39 


31 


E8 


0849 


35 


32 


00 


5A 


08 


28 


90 


45 


4C 


0851 


41 


B2 


53 


41 


AA 


33 


37 


35 


F2 


0859 


00 


6B 


08 


32 


00 


8F 


2D 


50 


51 


0861 


4F 


4B 


45 


20 


49 


54 


20 


49 


BB 


0869 


4E 


00 


8B 


03 


3C 


00 


31 


49 


C0 


0871 


32 


S3 


41 


A4 


45 


41 


3A 


87 


4D 


0879 


20 


44 


3A 


43 


4B 


82 


43 


4B 


ID 


0881 


RA 


44 


3A 


97 


49 


2C 


44 


3A 


76 


0889 


82 


00 


88 


03 


46 


00 


8B 


43 


FE 


0891 


4B 


B3 


81 


34 


36 


31 


33 


39 


03 


0899 


A7 


99 


22 


45 


52 


52 


4F 


52 


49 


08A1 


20 


49 


4E 


20 


44 


41 


54 


41 


F0 


08A9 


20 


53 


54 


53 


54 


45 


4D 


45 


F5 


08B1 


4E 


54 


53 


22 


3A 


80 


00 


C7 


26 


08B9 


08 


50 


00 


SF 


2D 


52 


45 


4C 


64 


08C1 


4F 


43 


41 


54 


45 


00 


D5 


08 


95 


08C9 


5A 


90 


46 


4B 


B2 


53 


41 


AA 


94 


08D1 


33 


37 


36 


00 


FD 


08 


64 


00 


E8 


08D9 


48 


31 


82 


B5 


23 


28 


53 


41 


D5 


08E1 


AA 


31 


33 


29 


AD 


32 


35 


36 


63 


08E9 


29 


3A 


4C 


31 


B2 


28 


53 


41 


D7 


08F1 


AA 


31 


33 


29 


AB 


43 


31 


AC 


2A 


08F9 


32 


35 


36 


00 


27 


09 


6E 


00 


71 


0901 


43 


32 


82 


B5 


28 


28 


53 


41 


3F 


0909 


AA 


33 


34 


31 


29 


AD 


32 


35 


70 


0911 


36 


29 


3A 


4C 


32 


B2 


28 


53 


94 


0919 


41 


AA 


33 


34 


31 


29 


AB 


48 


ED 


0921 


32 


AC 


32 


35 


36 


00 


51 


09 


6E 


0929 


78 


00 


48 


33 


B2 


B5 


28 


28 


98 


0931 


53 


41 


AA 


33 


34 


32 


29 


AD 


30 


0939 


32 


35 


36 


29 


3A 


4C 


33 


B2 


27 


0941 


28 


53 


41 


AA 


33 


34 


32 


29 


07 


0949 


AB 


48 


33 


AC 


32 


35 


36 


00 


47 


0951 


7B 


09 


82 


00 


48 


34 


B2 


B5 


El 


0959 


28 


28 


53 


41 


AA 


33 


37 


36 


CE 


0961 


29 


AD 


32 


35 


36 


29 


3A 


4C 


24 


0969 


34 


82 


28 


53 


41 


AA 


33 


37 


CE 


0971 


36 


29 


AB 


48 


34 


AC 


32 


35 


D0 


0979 


36 


00 


93 


09 


8C 


00 


97 


S3 


90 


09S1 


41 


AA 


30 


32 


2C 


4C 


31 


3A 


37 


0989 


97 


53 


41 


AA 


30 


37 


2C 


48 


0E 


0991 


31 


30 


AB 


09 


96 


00 


97 


53 


79 


9999 


41 


AA 


35 


36 


2C 


4C 


32 


3A 


32 


09A1 


97 


53 


41 


AA 


35 


37 


2C 


43 


4E 


09A9 


32 


00 


C3 


09 


A0 


00 


97 


53 


65 


09B1 


41 


AA 


36 


31 


2C 


4C 


32 


3A 


lA 


09B9 


97 


53 


41 


AA 


36 


32 


2C 


48 


5A 


09C1 


32 


00 


DB 


09 


AA 


00 


97 


53 


D0 


09C9 


41 


AA 


36 


36 


2C 


4C 


33 


3A 


84 


09D1 


97 


53 


41 


AA 


36 


37 


2C 


43 


86 


09D9 


33 


00 


F3 


09 


84 


00 


97 


53 


BC 


09E1 


41 


AA 


39 


36 


20 


4C 


34 


3A 


FE 


09E9 


97 


53 


41 


AA 


39 


37 


2C 


43 


B6 


09F1 


34 


00 


0D 


0A 


BE 


00 


97 


53 


D8 


09F9 


41 


AA 


31 


30 


37 


2C 


40 


34 


B7 


0=101 


3A 


97 


53 


41 


AA 


31 


30 


38 


49 


0A09 


2C 


48 


34 


00 


13 


0A 


C8 


00 


IE 


8flH 


3A 


90 


21 


0A 


D2 


00 


8F 


2D 


E9 


0ftl9 


46 


4E 


20 


4B 


45 


59 


53 


00 


D2 



0A21 


:56 


0A 


DC 


00 


46 


24 


28 


31 


C2 


0C51 


:01 


9E 


35 


37 


38 


31 


32 


46 


DC 


OEBl 


:1C 


02 


83 


20 


20 


32 


34 


35 


36 


0A29 


:29 


20 


B2 


22 


50 


4F 


4B 


45 


ED 


0C59 


:24 


2C 


38 


3A 


97 


31 


37 


33 


5C 


0E89 


:2C 


32 


33 


32 


2C 


31 


38 


39 


Al 


0A31 


:35 


33 


32 


38 


30 


2C 


31 


3A 


45 


0C61 


:2C 


53 


41 


AD 


32 


35 


36 


3A 


74 


0E91 


:2C 


31 


31 


38 


2C 


31 


39 


33 


85 


0ft39 


: 50 


4F 


4B 


45 


35 


33 


32 


38 


lA 


0C69 


:97 


31 


37 


32 


2C 


53 


41 


AB 


80 


0E99 


:2C 


32 


30 


31 


2C 


30 


30 


30 


24 


0A41 


:31 


2C 


32 


3A 


50 


4F 


4B 


45 


7E 


0C71 


:C2 


28 


31 


37 


33 


29 


AC 


32 


58 


0EA1 


:2C 


32 


34 


30 


2C 


30 


32 


30 


A0 


0R49 


:36 


34 


36 


2C 


33 


22 


AA 


C7 


4E 


0C79 


:35 


36 


3A 


97 


37 


38 


30 


2C 


Al 


0EA9 


:2C 


32 


30 


31 


2C 


30 


31 


33 


39 


0A51 


:28 


31 


33 


29 


00 


72 


0A 


E6 


8 3 


0C81 


:31 


37 


32 


00 


AF 


0C 


CC 


01 


8E 


0EB1 


:2C 


32 


34 


30 


2C 


3 3 


30 


37 


B3 


0A59 


:00 


46 


24 


28 


32 


29 


20 


B2 


2F 


0C89 


:97 


37 


38 


32 


2C 


45 


41 


AD 


0C 


0EB9 


:2C 


30 


33 


32 


2C 


32 


30 


32 


3E 


0A61 


:22 


46 


55 


4E 


43 


54 


49 


4F 


F4 


0C91 


:32 


35 


36 


3A 


97 


37 


38 


31 


B5 


0EC1 


:2C 


32 


34 


31 


2C 


32 


33 


32 


DC 


BAeg 


:4E 


20 


4B 


45 


59 


20 


32 


22 


3C 


0C99 


:2C 


45 


41 


AB 


C2 


28 


37 


38 


59 


0EC9 


:00 


15 


0F 


26 


2 


83 


20 


20 


ED 


0A71 


:00 


3B 


BA 


F0 


00 


46 


24 


28 


42 


0CA1 


:32 


29 


AC 


32 


35 


36 


3A 


9E 


6B 


0ED1 


:30 


35 


36 


2C 


31 


37 


36 


2C 


DB 


0A79 


:33 


29 


20 


B2 


22 


4C 


49 


53 


C8 


0CA9 


:36 


35 


34 


39 


36 


00 


BA 


0C 


77 


0ED9 


:32 


33 


38 


2C 


31 


36 


39 


2C 


A6 


0A81 


:54 


3A 


22 


AA 


C7 


28 


31 


33 


Bl 


0CB1 


:D6 


01 


8F 


2D 


44 


41 


54 


41 


4B 


0EE1 


:30 


31 


33 


2C 


31 


34 


31 


2C 


74 


0A89 


:29 


00 


A3 


0A 


FA 


00 


46 


24 


CF 


0CB9 


:00 


08 


9D 


E0 


01 


83 


31 


32 


2E 


0EE9 


.31 


31 


39 


20 


30 


30 


32 


2C 


A7 


0A91 


:28 


34 


29 


20 


B2 


22 


52 


55 


06 


0CC1 


:30 


2C 


31 


36 


39 


2C 


30 


31 


92 


0EF1 


:31 


36 


39 


20 


30 


30 


31 


2C 


EE 


0A99 


•4E 


3A 


22 


AA 


C7 


28 


31 


33 


C6 


0CC9 


:31 


2C 


31 


34 


31 


2C 


31 


34 


BF 


0EF9 


•31 


33 


33 


2C 


31 


39 


38 


2C 


AF 


0AA1 


:29 


00 


A9 


0A 


04 


01 


99 


00 


77 


0CD1 


:33 


2C 


30 


30 


32 


2C 


31 


36 


72 


0F01 


30 


37 


36 


2C 


30 


37 


32 


2C 


7D 


0AA9 


CC 


0A 


0E 


01 


81 


20 


52 


B2 


5C 


0CD9 


39 


2C 


31 


39 


32 


2C 


31 


34 


2C 


0F09 


.32 


33 


35 


2C 


31 


39 


32 


2C 


75 


0AB1 


31 


20 


A4 


20 


34 


20 


3A 


8B 


IF 


0CE1 


:31 


2C 


31 


34 


34 


2C 


32 


2C 


E9 


0F11 


:30 


30 


38 


00 


63 


0F 


30 


02 


FB 


0AB9 


46 


24 


28 


52 


29 


B2 


22 


22 


9E 


0CE9 


•38 


38 


2C 


30 


39 


36 


2C 


31 


E0 


0F19 


:83 


20 


20 


31 


37 


36 


2C 


30 


33 


0AC1 


A7 


46 


24 


28 


52 


29 


82 


22 


01 


0CF1 


•37 


33 


2C 


31 


34 


31 


2C 


30 


F9 


0F21 


:38 


39 


2C 


31 


33 


32 


2C 


30 


2D 


0AC9 


20 


22 


00 


D2 


0A 


18 


01 


82 


08 


0CF9 


30 


32 


2C 


32 


30 


31 


2C 


30 


2E 


0F29 


:30 


32 


2C 


31 


36 


35 


20 


32 


95 


0AD1 


00 


0D 


0B 


22 


01 


81 


20 


52 


4D 


0D01 


30 


32 


2C 


32 


34 


30 


00 


53 


IE 


0F31 


:30 


37 


2C 


32 


34 


30 


20 


30 


C8 


0AD9 


B2 


31 


A4 


34 


3A 


4C 


B2 


4C 


20 


0D09 


0D 


EA 


01 


83 


20 


20 


30 


31 


CF 


0F39 


•31 


32 


2C 


31 


36 


35 


20 


32 


26 


0AE1 


AA 


C3 


2B 


46 


24 


28 


52 


29 


35 


0D11 


33 


2C 


32 


30 


31 


2C 


30 


33 


E3 


0F41 


30 


36 


2C 


31 


37 


34 


2C 


31 


Bl 


0AE9 


29 


3A 


82 


3A 


20 


20 


20 


SB 


62 


0D19 


36 


2C 


32 


30 


38 


2C 


30 


33 


A5 


0F49 


33 


35 


2C 


30 


30 


32 


2C 


31 


AA 


0AF1 


4C 


Bl 


32 


35 


30 


A7 


99 


22 


A7 


0D21 


36 


2C 


31 


36 


39 


2C 


30 


30 


F5 


0F51 


36 


30 


2C 


30 


30 


30 


2C 


31 


EA 


0AF9 


46 


4E 


20 


4B 


45 


59 


53 


20 


D3 


0D29 


30 


2C 


31 


33 


33 


2C 


32 


31 


9F 


0F59 


33 


32 


2C 


32 


30 


37 


00 


AB 


50 


0B01 


54 


4F 


4F 


20 


4C 


4F 


4E 


47 


84 


0D31 


32 


2C 


31 


33 


33 


2C 


32 


31 


A8 


0F61 


0F 


3A 


02 


83 


20 


20 


30 


33 


23 


0B09 


22 


3A 


83 


00 


IF 


0B 


2C 


01 


4D 


0D39 


36 


2C 


30 


37 


36 


2C 


30 


37 


EC 


0F69 


32 


2C 


30 


31 


39 


2C 


32 


33 


06 


0B11 


54 


54 


B2 


AB 


31 


3A 


81 


20 


0D 


0D41 


32 


2C 


32 


33 


35 


2C 


31 


36 


EB 


0F71 


34 


2C 


31 


36 


35 


2C 


32 


31 


2E 


0B19 


52 


B2 


31 


A4 


34 


00 


31 


0B 


84 


0D49 


35 


2C 


32 


31 


32 


2C 


32 


30 


39 


0F79 


31 


2C 


31 


33 


33 


2C 


32 


35 


78 


0B21 


36 


01 


81 


49 


B2 


31 


A4 


C3 


BE 


'0D51 


38 


00 


9E 


0D 


F4 


01 


83 


20 


FE 


0F81 


31 


2C 


31 


36 


39 


2C 


30 


33 


D7 


0B29 


28 


46 


24 


28 


52 


29 


29 


00 


75 


0D59 


20 


32 


34 


39 


2C 


31 


36 


35 


Fl 


0F89 


30 


2C 


31 


33 


33 


2C 


32 


31 


04 


0B31 


58 


0B 


40 


01 


54 


24 


B2 


CA 


Bl 


0D61 


2C 


32 


31 


36 


2C 


32 


30 


38 


6A 


aF91 


32 


2C 


31 


33 


33 


2C 


32 


31 


0D 


0B39 


28 


46 


24 


28 


52 


29 


2C 


49 


D4 


0D69 


2C 


32 


34 


35 


2C 


31 


36 


35 


C7 


0F99 


36 


2C 


31 


33 


33 


20 


31 


39 


ID 


0B41 


29 


3A 


54 


54 


B2 


54 


54 


AA 


84 


0D71 


2C 


31 


35 


37 


2C 


32 


34 


30 


CA 


0FA1 


39 


2C 


31 


33 


33 


2C 


32 


31 


A0 


0B49 


31 


3A 


97 


46 


4B 


AA 


54 


54 


DF 


0D79: 


2C 


32 


34 


31 


2C 


31 


36 


3 5 


97 


0FA9 


31 


30 


F6 


0F 


44 


02 


83 


20 


81 


0B51 


2C 


C6 


23 


54 


24 


29 


00 


5F 


9E 


0D81 


2C 


32 


30 


33 


2C 


31 


33 


33 


37 


0FB1 


20 


31 


36 


34 


2C 


30 


30 


32 


EA 


0B59 


0B 


4A 


01 


82 


49 


00 


74 


0B 


0E 


0D89- 


2C 


30 


30 


32 


2C 


31 


36 


39 


BA 


0FB9 


2C 


31 


39 


32 


20 


30 


30 


34 


3B 


0B61 


54 


01 


54 


54 


B2 


54 


54 


AA 


EB 


0D91: 


2C 


30 


36 


34 


2C 


31 


33 


33 


97 


0FC1 


2C 


32 


30 


38 


2C 


30 


30 


33 


CI 


0B69 


31 


3A 


97 


46 


4B 


AA 


54 


54 


FF 


0D99- 


2C 


32 


30 


33 


00 


E9 


0D 


FE 


50 


0FC9 


2C 


30 


35 


36 


2C 


31 


37 


36 


OE 


0B71 


2C 


30 


00 


7B 


0B 


5E 


01 


82 


B7 


0DA1: 


01 


83 


20 


20 


31 


36 


35 


2C 


IC 


0FD1 


2C 


30 


33 


32 


2C 


31 


39 


32 


66 


0879- 


52 


00 


89 


0B 


68 


01 


45 


41 


AD 


0DA9: 


30 


30 


32 


2C 


32 


30 


35 


2C 


D9 


0FD9 


2C 


30 


30 


35 


2C 


32 


30 


38 


36 


0B81- 


B2 


45 


41 


AA 


4C 


AA 


35 


00 


8C 


0DB1: 


30 


38 


33 


2C 


31 


39 


33 


2C 


IC 


0FE1 


2C 


30 


30 


37 


2C 


31 


36 


39 


67 


0B89- 


98 


0B 


72 


01 


8F 


2D 


41 


43 


04 


0DB9: 


32 


34 


30 


2C 


32 


32 


36 


2C 


BS 


0FE9 


2C 


30 


33 


39 


2C 


31 


33 


33 


E3 


0B91i 


54 


49 


56 


41 


54 


45 


00 


A0 


SB 


0DC1: 


31 


34 


31 


2C 


30 


38 


33 


2C 


SF 


0FF1 


2C 


32 


31 


31 


00 


41 


10 


4E 


5F 


0B99; 


0B 


7C 


01 


9E 


53 


41 


00 


BE 


BC 


0DC9: 


31 


39 


33 


2C 


31 


36 


30 


2C 


E2 


3FF9^ 


02 


83 


20 


20 


30 


35 


36 


20 


EE 


0BA1: 


9B 


86 


01 


99 


22 


13 


ID 


ID 


4D 


0DD1: 


30 


30 


30 


2C 


31 


38 


35 


2C 


09 


1001. 


31 


37 


36 


2C 


30 


32 


31 


2C 


E9 


0BA9: 


ID 


ID 


ID 


ID 


ID 


12 


41 


43 


02 


0DD9: 


30 


38 


34 


2C 


31 


39 


33 


2C 


64 


1039 


31 


39 


32 


2C 


30 


30 


36 


2C 


F3 


0BB1: 


54 


49 


56 


41 


54 


45 


44 


20 


83 


0DE1: 


31 


39 


37 


2C 


30 


30 


32 


00 


33 


1011 


32 


30 


38 


2C 


33 


33 


37 


2C 


FC 


0BB9i 


20 


20 


20 


22 


00 


El 


0B 


90 


3C 


0DE9: 


34 


0E 


08 


02 


83 


20 


20 


32 


Dl 


1019: 


31 


36 


39 


2C 


30 


31 


39 


2C 


2E 


0BC1: 


31 


99 


3A 


20 


99 


22 


4C 


4F 


45 


0DF1: 


34 


30 


2C 


30 


31 


32 


2C 


32 


97 


1021: 


31 


33 


33 


2C 


32 


31 


31 


2C 


B4 


0BC9: 


43 


41 


54 


45 


44 


20 


41 


54 


2A 


0DF9: 


30 


30 


2C 


31 


39 


32 


2C 


30 


EB 


1029: 


30 


35 


36 


20 


31 


37 


36 


2C 


37 


0BD1: 


20 


3A 


22 


3B 


S3 


41 


3B 


22 


B6 


0E01: 


33 


34 


2C 


32 


30 


38 


2C 


32 


59 


1031: 


30 


31 


30 


2C 


31 


36 


39 


2C 


7F 


0BD9: 


20 


2D 


20 


22 


3B 


45 


41 


00 


E2 


0E09: 


34 


34 


2C 


31 


36 


35 


2C 


30 


F3 


1039: 


30 


32 


34 


20 


31 


33 


33 


00 


04 


0BE1: 


15 


0C 


9A 


01 


99 


3A 


99 


22 


F3 


0E11: 


30 


32 


2C 


31 


33 


33 


2C 


32 


SB 


1041: 


8C 


10 


58 


02 


83 


20 


20 


32 


E5 


0BE9: 


53 


41 


56 


45 


20 


4F 


42 


4A 


26 


0E19: 


30 


33 


2C 


30 


37 


36 


2C 


30 


BD 


1049: 


31 


34 


2C 


30 


33 


32 


20 


31 


83 


0BF1: 


45 


43 


54 


20 


46 


49 


4C 


45 


3D 


0E2I: 


37 


32 


2C 


32 


33 


35 


20 


31 


06 


1051: 


30 


38 


2C 


32 


32 


39 


2C 


30 


3F 


0BF9: 


20 


28 


59 


2F 


4E 


29 


20 


3F 


DE 


0E29: 


39 


32 


2C 


30 


30 


34 


2C 


31 


D2 


1059: 


37 


36 


2C 


30 


37 


32 


2C 


32 


38 


0C01: 


22 


3A 


97 


31 


39 


38 


2C 


30 


Fl 


0E31: 


37 


36 


00 


7F 


0E 


12 


02 


83 


AE 


1061: 


33 


35 


2C 


31 


36 


35 


20 


32 


12 


0C09: 


3A 


92 


31 


39 


38 


2C 


31 


3A 


AB 


0E39: 


20 


20 


30 


34 


33 


2C 


31 


36 


CI 


1069: 


35 


31 


2C 


32 


30 


31 


2C 


30 


E7 


0C11: 


Al 


41 


24 


00 


24 


0C 


A4 


01 


6A 


0E41: 


32 


2C 


32 


35 


35 


2C 


32 


30 


0A 


1071: 


34 


30 


2C 


31 


34 


34 


20 


30 


4B 


0C19: 


8B 


41 


24 


B3 


Bl 


22 


59 


22 


Fl 


0E49: 


30 


2C 


31 


33 


36 


2C 


32 


34 


DC 


1079: 


30 


37 


2C 


30 


32 


34 


20 


31 


F3 


0C21: 


A7 


80 


00 


3A 


0C 


AE 


01 


99 


87 


0E51: 


30 


2C 


30 


31 


31 


2C 


32 


33 


7B 


1081: 


36 


35 


2C 


32 


31 


31 


2C 


31 


8A 


0C29: 


3A 


20 


85 


22 


46 


49 


4C 


45 


6E 


0E59: 


32 


2C 


31 


38 


39 


2C 


31 


31 


51 


1089: 


30 


35 


00 


D7 


10 


62 


02 


83 


IE 


0C31: 


4E 


41 


4D 


45 


22 


3B 


46 


24 


6D 


0E61: 


38 


2C 


31 


39 


33 


2C 


32 


30 


3D 


1091: 


20 


20 


30 


34 


30 


2C 


31 


33 


DA 


0C39: 


00 


4E 


0C 


B8 


01 


8F 


2D 


53 


E5 


0E69: 


31 


2C 


30 


30 


30 


2C 


32 


30 


F8 


1099: 


33 


2C 


32 


31 


31 


2C 


30 


37 


89 


0C41: 


41 


56 


45 


20 


4F 


42 


4A 


20 


72 


0E71: 


38 


2C 


32 


34 


38 


2C 


31 


33 


46 


10A1: 


36 


20 


30 


37 


32 


2C 


32 


33 


3B 


0C49: 


46 


49 


4C 


45 


00 


85 


0C 


C2 


A5 


0E79: 


36 


2C 


32 


30 


38 


00 


CA 


0E 


6A 


10A9: 


35 


2C 


31 


35 


32 


2C 


30 


32 


BD 



AUGUST 1992 COMPUTE G-39 



PROGRAMS 



10B1:34 


2C 


31 


30 


35 


2C 


30 


35 


10 


12E1:33 33 00 2F 13 B2 02 83 4A 




10B9:37 


2C 


31 


33 


33 


2C 


32 


35 


BD 


12E9:20 20 30 33 34 2C 30 33 45 




10C1:33 


2C 


31 


36 


35 


2C 


30 


34 


FE 


12F1:37 2C 30 34 32 2C 30 33 DB 




10C9:33 


2C 


31 


33 


33 


2C 


30 


30 


C2 


12F9:36 2C 30 33 39 2C 30 33 8B 




10D1:32 


2C 


31 


36 


35 


00 


22 


11 


9E 


1301:38 2C 30 34 31 2C 30 36 68 




10D9:6C 


02 


83 


20 


20 


30 


34 


34 


81 


1309:32 2C 30 31 37 2C 30 31 63 




10E1:2C 


31 


33 


33 


2C 


30 


30 


33 


B3 


1311:33 2C 30 32 32 2C 30 33 OA 




10E9:2C 


31 


36 


30 


2C 


30 


30 


30 


E8 


1319:30 2C 30 33 31 2C 30 30 66 




10F1:2C 


31 


37 


37 


2C 


30 


30 


32 


83 


1321:39 2C 30 32 33 2C 30 32 F4 




10F9:2C 


31 


33 


33 


2C 


30 


30 


34 


CC 


1329:35 2C 30 31 32 00 00 00 9F 




1101:2C 


32 
30 
30 


30 
30 
30 


30 
32 
35 


2C 
2C 
2C 


31 
31 
32 


37 
33 

30 


37 
33 
30 


9A 
36 
69 






1109:2C 
llll:2C 


Farid Ahmad says he'd still love Gazette 




1119:2C 


31 


37 


37 


2C 


30 


30 


32 


AC 


even if we didn't publish Tag It. He 




1121:00 


60 


11 


76 


02 


83 


20 


20 


A6 


lives in Islamabad, Pakistan. □ 




1129:31 


33 


33 


2C 
2C 


32 
31 


35 
37 


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these labor-saving utilities in every issue. 




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Suite 200, Greensboro, North Carolina 




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COMPUTE Publications 




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ONLY 

ON 

DISK 

In addition to the type-in programs 
found in each issue of the magazine. 
Gazette Disk offers bonus programs. 
Here's a special program that you'll 
find only on this month's disk. 

Pyramid 

By Robert Cook 
Watertown, MA 

This month's bonus program. Pyra- 
mid, is a commercial-quality solitaire 
card game that is actually two 
games in one: Pyramidi and Pyra- 
mid9. In both games, cards are stack- 
ed to form a pyramid. The object of 
both games is to remove as many 
cards as possible. 

In Pyramidi, you must remove 
from the bottom of the pyramid- 
shaped pile a card whose number is 
one more or one less than that of the 
top card in the discard pile. Draw 
from the deck when you have no 
play. 

In Pyramid9, you are to select 
two cards whose numbers total 9. 
Both cards may be from the pyra- 
mid, or one from the pyramid may 
be combined with the top card on 
the discard pile. Once again, you 
must puil cards from the bottom of 
the pyramid. 

Both of these games are sim- 
ple, addictive, and a lot of fun. 
They're ready to play on this 
month's Gazette Disk. 

You can have this program and all 
the others that appear in this issue 
by ordering the August Gazette 
Disk. The price is $9.95 plus $2.00 
shipping and handling. Send your or- 
der to Gazette Disk, COMPUTE Pub- 
lications, 324 West Wendover Ave- 
nue, Suite 200. Greensboro, North 
Carolina 27408. 



G-40 COt^PUTE AUGUST 1992 



REVIEWS 



THE NORTON 
ANTIVIRUS 

One of the most frightening 
catastrophes that can befall 
serious computer users is 
the introduction of a virus in- 
to their systems. Since the 
very first time I heard whis- 
perings of viruses (a topic 
too terrible to utter aloud), 
I've been using one form of 
virus protection or another 

Virus programs come in 
many different forms. Some re- 
quire a tremendous amount 
of setup effort, such as enter- 
ing the names of all execut- 
able programs on your sys- 
tem and giving each of 
them "permissions." Others 
track your system and stop 
you each time any read or 
write occurs. Predictably, 
the inconvenience of either 
of these strategies would 
probably keep you from us- 
ing a virus-protection pro- 
gram: If you can't install the 
program easily or if it inter- 
rupts your work, you aren't 
going to use it. The Norton 
Antivirus sidesteps both of 
the usual problems. 

The installation is so sim- 
ple that even the most inex- 
perienced user can do it 
quickly and easily. The in- 
struction pamphlet is clear, 
concise, and to the point. I in- 
stalled the program and 
was ready to go in about 
ten minutes. If you start the 
install program and choose 
only the defaults, your sys- 
tem will be protected from 
most, if not all, infection sce- 
narios. If you have Microsoft 
Windows on your system, 
you only need to add 
NAVW.EXE to any program 
group, and The Norton 
Antivirus will be installed for 
Windows. 

Once the program was in- 
stalled, I was able to contin- 
ue with my work as if noth- 
ing in my system were differ- 



ent — until ! placed a floppy 
disk in my A: drive and tried 
to get a directory. The disk 
had the FORM virus on it 
and The Norton Antivirus In- 
tercept quickly alerted me 
to the fact that the disk in 
drive A: had a boot-sector vi- 
rus. I then launched The 
Norton Virus Clinic and 



the floppy, and copy the 
files back onto the floppy. 

There are not only many 
different viruses but also 
many different strains of cer- 
tain viruses. No product can 
possibly detect and fix eve- 
ry single one. Many new vi- 
ruses are found weekly, 
which would lead you to be- 



fjir IJk.k Virw fignHguic X""l^ 'tftntlpw Help 




Practice safe computing with The Norton Antivirus, which finds 
viruses, alerts you to their presence, and helps you remove them. 



scanned the disk. The Virus 
Clinic confirmed that the 
disk indeed had a virus, iden- 
tifying the FORM virus by 
name. 

Unfortunately, selecting 
the Repair option failed to re- 
move the virus — although 
the program did inform me 
that the virus hadn't been re- 
moved. I called customer 
support and learned there 
was a way to remove the vi- 
rus "by hand." Norton's cus- 
tomer-support staff talked 
me through the procedure. 
If the virus is on a hard 
drive or bootable disk, all 
you have to do is boot with 
a clean DOS disk and reis- 
sue the DOS command 
SYS.COM. In my case, how- 
ever, the virus was on a non- 
bootable floppy disk. I was 
told to do the following: 
Copy (using COPY or 
XCOPY not DISKCOPY) the 
files from the disk, reformat 



lieve that any product you 
buy will be useless in about 
a month. Fortunately, The 
Norton Antivirus can also 
overcome those difficulties. 
The program works by us- 
ing virus "definitions": these 
are like little pictures of the vi- 
rus's signature. For support, 
there's a free bulletin board 
service from which you can 
download new virus defini- 
tions as needed. These def- 
initions can easily be in- 
stalled into your existing pro- 
gram, making your system 
as current as the technology 
at Symantec, 

For those of you without a 
modem, there are two alter- 
nate ways to update your vi- 
rus definitions. First, for the 
cost of shipping and han- 
dling, Symantec will send 
you a disk containing up- 
date information. Second, it 
has a fax service from 
which you can get defini- 



tions that you can install by 
typing them in. The latter 
may not sound optimal, but 
if you happen to have a par- 
ticular virus on your system 
and you need a new defini- 
tion for only that one, it 
won't take more than five to 
ten minutes for even the 
worst hunt-and-peck typist 
to update that particular 
definition. 

After using The Norton 
Antivirus, I can clearly see 
that Symantec has taken 
great pains to create a pro- 
gram capable of preserving 
data. It will work well on al- 
most any system and in 
most cases will provide the 
protection you need. It's 
easy to install, convenient to 
use, and simple to update. 

In these days of both soft- 
ware and hardware being 
shipped already infected 
with viruses, the virus prob- 
lem is no longer the exclu- 
sive province of the modem 
enthusiast. Everyone needs 
virus protection, and The Nor- 
ton Antivirus is a good 
place to get it. 

BRADLEY M. SMALL 

IBM PC and compatibles: 384K 
RAM; supporls mouse and Microsoft 
Windcws; works witti tJovell NetWare 
286 and 386, SCOfi^ OPEN, and OS/ 
2 LAN Manager— S129 

SYMANTEC 
10201 Torre Ave. 
Cupertino, CA 95014-2132 
(800)441-7234 

Circle Reader Service Number 361 

AST ADVANTAGE! 

The AST Advantage! note- 
book computer actually pre- 
sents a bad omen for a 
large sector of the PC indus- 
try. No, it doesn't bode neg- 
atively for the future of lap- 
tops, but it could be a sign 
of eventual doom for the be- 
hemoth desktop PCs that cur- 
rently inhabit our work are- 
as. When manufacturers 
can create laptops with all 

AUGUST 1992 COMPUTE 97 




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Circle Reader Service Numlwr 246 



the functionality, performance, and er- 
gonomics of a full-size computer, 
there's little justification for most people 
to give up the top of their desks to a 
mammoth PC. 

No, the Advantage! doesn't have ex- 
pansion slots, a CD-ROM drive, or a 4- 
billion-color graphics card. What it 
does have, though, is a set of features 
that will probably satisfy all the comput- 
ing needs of a large percentage of the 
PC-using public, all packed into a 
case that's small enough to slide over 
to a corner of your desk. And since the 
Advantage! is sold through mass-mar- 
ket outlets such as Circuit City, its 
street price should be competitive 
w/ith prices of brand-name desktop 
PCs. 

When you go on the road, you don't 
have to settle for a stripped-down ma- 
chine to get the advantage of portabil- 
ity. With a 20-MHz 386SX processor, a 
40MB hard drive, 4MB of RAM (expand- 
able to 8MB), an internal 2400-bps mo- 
dem, and VGA graphics, the Advan- 
tage! packs a lot of utility into a six- 
pound package. 

The machine is solidly constructed, 
with a heavy-gauge plastic case. In 
three months of use, including numer- 
ous airplane trips, I never experienced 
a problem with it. Its size is just about 

98 COMPUTE AUGUST 1992 



right to fit on an airline tray table, al- 
though it's a little deep; you'll find the 
keyboard pretty close to your belly if 
you're sitting in coach. 

The Advantage! has one of the best 
laptop keyboards I've used. The keys 
have a deep throw, and their feel is 
very similar to the feel of a desktop's 
keys. A PS/2-style keyboard port on 
the back of the machine allows you to 
connect a full-size keyboard (or a sepa- 
rate numeric keypad) when using the 
machine in the office. The same port 
can also accommodate a PS/2-style 
mouse. 

The gray-scale LCD screen on this 
laptop is sharper and clearer than that 
of any other laptop I've ever used. It ex- 
hibits none of the ghosting problems of 
earlier-technology laptop screens. The 
onscreen clarity of the sharp black-on- 
white text was the primary reason I 
chose to do all my writing on the Advan- 
tage! instead of my desktop PC. If you 
do need color, the Advantage! has a 
monitor port on the back that supports 
all standard VGA modes. Also present 
are parallel, serial, and power-adapter 
ports. 

The Advantage! has a host of power- 
saving utilities built in, including the 
automatically timed shutdown of both 
backlighting and the hard disk. The mo- 



dem and speaker can be shut off if 
they're not needed, and a sleep mode 
slows the processor to a crawl if the 
computer is idle for a period of time, 
saving even more power. On average 
1 was able to get about three hours of 
usage from a single charge. If you buy 
an extra battery, you'll find swapping 
batteries a literal snap. Just open the 
battery cover, pull out the old battery, 
and slide in the new one — a welcome 
change from the days of removing ni- 
cad battery wires with a screwdriver. Us- 
ing a standard bulky power brick, charg- 
ing takes only 3 hours when the Advan- 
tage! is turned off and 10-16 hours 
when it's on. If you need more portabil- 
ity, you can purchase a trickle charg- 
er—a small, light unit that charges the 
machine overnight with the power off. 
You can't run the computer from the 
trickle charger, though. You can also 
buy an automatic adapter and an exter- 
nal battery charger for the unit. 

The only really negative aspect of 
the machine is its poor documentation. 
The 38-page user's guide is probably 
all an experienced computer user will 
need to get up and running, but its 
short, one-line definitions of DOS com- 
mands will do little to help the novice. 
Considering that this model is de- 
signed to be sold in mass-market out- 
lets, where the sales staff's computer 
knowledge is inconsistent at best, AST 
should have included more thorough 
documentation. 

That minor caveat aside, the Advan- 
tage! is a real winner. Its speedy per- 
formance, power-saving features, and 
crystal-clear LCD screen make it a 
standout among laptops. All but the 
most power-hungry PC users will find 
the Advantage! a better choice than ei- 
ther underpowered notebook comput- 
ers or desk-hogging PCs. 

DENNY ATKtN 



AST Advantage!— SI .899 

AST COMPUTER 

16215 Alton Pkwy. 

IrvrnG. CA 92713 

(714) 727-4141 

Circle Reader Service Numlwr 362 



HARE RAISING HAVOC 

Remember what it was like to go to the 
movies to see a Disney feature-length 
animated film, such as Snow White, Pi- 
nocchio, or Who Framed Roger Rab- 
bit? Disney's new computer game. 
Hare Raising Havoc, may be too short 
to merit comparison to a feature film, 
but the Disney style and quality are 
there. It may be trite to say so, but a 
great computer game requires the 
same attention to detail needed with a 
movie production. 



Enhance Your Tandy ® 



Hard Cards 


1000 EX / HX 


For 1000, A, SX, TX, 


SL, 


External Hard Drives 


TL, SL/2, TL/2, TL/3 


.IBM 


Complete With Controller 


42 Meg 28 MS 


$299 


42 Meg 28 MS $399 


68 Meg 23 MS 


$359 


68 Meg 23 MS $425 


85 Meg 16 MS 


$399 


85 Meg 16 MS $429 


105 Meg 16 MS 


$469 


105 Meg 16 MS $489 


130 Meg 15 MS 


$499 


130 Meg 15 MS $529 


210 Meg 15 MS 


$689 


210 Meg 15 MS $699 



15 Month Warranty, 30 Day Money Back Guarantee. TOLL FREE Help Line. 



1000 HX 

Internal Hard Drive 
Complete. Replaces a Floppy 

42 Meg 28 MS $299 
85 Meg 16 MS $389 
105 Meg 16 MS $449 
130 Meg 15 MS $539 

IDE "SmartDrive" 

For TL/2, RL, TL/3, RLX 

42 Meg 28 MS $289 



Memory Board to 640K, Chipsets 

1000, A to 640K W/Clock, Serial $229 

256K EX or HX to 640K $ 149 

256K 1 200 or IBM to 640K $ 1 89 

384K SX, EX, HX, SL to 640K $ 49 

TX, TL, TL/2, TL/3 to 768K $ 49 

3000 NL from 512K to 640K $ 49 

1000RLto768K $ 39 

1000 RLX to One Meg $ 39 



Over 640K Memory Boards 
Micro Mainframe 51 SOT EMS Board 

More Space for Spreadsheets, Windows,® and More 
Complete With LIMM 4.0 

1 Meg installed $229 

2 Meg installed $249 

1 Meg for 1500 or 2810 Laptops 

Also for Panasonic CF- 170,270,370 $129 



Floppy Drives ex/hx 

Capacity Internal External External 



360K 
1.2 Meg 
720K 
1.44 Meg 



$ 99 
$159 
$109 
$159 



$199 
$199 
$199 
$199 



$129 

N/A 

$129 

N/A 



CD-ROM Drives 

For lOOO's*, IBM, compatibles, Slot Box 

Internal CD ROM Drive $369 

External CD ROM Drive $449 

♦Note: EX or HX must have Slot Box 
Call for CD Titles available 



SLOT BOX Seven fuU length slots, three 5.25" 
drive bays, one3.5"drivebay. Powerand hard dri ve 
lights. 200 Watt power supply, cooling fan. At- 
taches to EX, HX, 1000. A, SX, TX, SL, TL, SL/2, 

TL/2, RL, TL/3, RLX. $279 



~^. 



iSLOT BOX 




"..Provides the ideal upgrade path.."-PCM Dec 91 



Modems and Faxes 

Hayes Compatible, 

2400 Baud Internal 
2400 Baud External 
9600 Baud Internal 
Fax/Modem Internal 

2400 Baud Modem, 9600 
Baud Send/Receive Fax 

360dpi Mouse 
Serial Card 



$ 79 
$ 99 
$349 



$159 
$ 49 
$ 29 



Serial Card EX/HX $ 49 



VGA Combinations 

For SX, TX, SL, TL, SL/2, TL/2, 
RL, TL/3, IBM, compatibles 

Combo 1 

14" CTX Monitor 

256K VGA Card 
640X480 $489 

Super Combo 
14" CTX Monitor 

1 Meg VGA Card 
1024 X 768 $589 



Tandy, Hayes, IBM, Windows, are registered Trademarks 
Prices subject to change without notice. 

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1-800^37^3539 

(614)-592-4239 Foreign (614)-592-1527 FAX 

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upgrades and installation. Covers all 
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Speed Up Chips 

1000, A, SX, EX, HX, 
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PC Sprint 100% Faster 
1000, A, IBM XT $75 



Math Coprocessors 

TX, TL, TL72. TL/3, 80286's 

Now only $139 

Math Sprint Socket $59.00 

Makes 80287 up to 200% faster 



REVIEWS 



Sam Palahnuk assem- 
bled a team who worked on 
the game for almost two 
years. Charies Fleischer and 
other voice talents from the 
cartoons re-created the voic- 
es that were digitized for the 
game from a script written 
especially for the produc- 
tion. It really sounds like Rog- 
er Rabbit when he reminds 
you, "I had better get mov- 
ing," as you race to beat the 
clock. A movie sound-ef- 
fects company digitized 
more than 240 effects, so 
when Roger gets hit on the 
head with an ironing board, 
it's a totally different sound 
from when he breaks dish- 
es. The soundtrack of open- 
ing, ending, and transition 
music was composed and ar- 
ranged by a movie compos- 
er and digitized from a 
sound-studio performance, 
so the game sounds like a 
Maroon Cartoon. Stings — 
short music pieces de- 
signed to evoke emotion — 
have been digitized to punc- 
tuate the action. The 1MB+ 
audio portion of the game is 
remarkably effective. 

Animation is what Disney 
does best. The Hare Raising 
Havoc animation started at 
the Disney storyboard with 
pencil drawings. The pencil 
drawings were expanded to 
detailed action drawings, 
which were approved by 
the animation department be- 
fore being digitized into com- 
puter graphics. Video foot- 
age from Who Framed Rog- 
er Rabbitwas captured, mod- 
ified, and digitized for the an- 
imation sequences, such as 
Roger's authentic and goofy 
16-stage walk cycle. The an- 
imated characters were 
then layered over detailed, re- 
alistic, and believable back- 
grounds as in all Disney ani- 
mated features. The draw- 
ings and backgrounds were 
painted with a computer 
paint program. The result is 

100 COMPUTE AUGUST 1992 



some of the best computer 
animation seen in a game of 
this type. Remarkably the ac- 
tion is smooth and runs sur- 
prisingly fast on a slow 386 
machine. 

Beyond the dazzle and 
glitz of Hollywood and Dis- 
ney animation technology, 
the Disney design team had 



a race against the ever-mov- 
ing hands of the clock. The 
seeming lack of time is cor- 
rected by repeating certain 
actions that earn Roger ex- 
tra time. The solution to the 
Roger game is a difficult se- 
quence of arcade events 
which, when combined with 
the lack of a save-game tea- 



HARE RAISII 
PAVOC 




:^ 



w^ 




Hare Raising Havoc offers Disney animation, but the game is 
difficult and. witfi no save-game feature, potentially frustrating. 



to tackle a new area of inter- 
active siiicon-based entertain- 
ment. Hare Raising Havoc is 
accurately described by Pa- 
lahnuk as a "puzzle and ar- 
cade game." As a game, it 
differs significantly from the 
other animation-based pro- 
ductions, such as the Dy- 
namic adventure game Willy 
Beamish, Roger's puzzles 
are obscure, at best, and 
their solution requires imagi- 
nation and the ability to 
think like a "toon," Roger 
must be squashed, pound- 
ed, tripped, and burned to 
complete the episode, all as 



ture, leave no margin for er- 
ror, fvlany will find this game 
too frustrating, but its visual 
and audio features will keep 
others coming back for 
more. 

In spite of the short 
length, lack of locations to ex- 
plore, and difficult and ob- 
scure puzzles. Hare Raising 
Havoc emerges as a land- 
mark in the production of 
computer games. The anima- 
tion, detailed backgrounds, 
wonderful music, elaborate 
sound effects, and voice 
track make me hope that pro- 
ducer Palahnuk will bring 



Roger back for a longer and 
more involved romp in a se- 
quel to this excellent game. 

ALFRED C. GIOVETTI 

IBM PC and compatibles (lO-MHz 
80286 or laster); 64aK RAM: CGA, 
EGA. or VGA; supports Sound 
Source. Sound Blaster. PS/1 Audio 
Card, and Tandy Sound— $49,95 
($69,95 with Sound Source) 

WALT DISNEY COMPUTER 

SOFTWARE 

500 S. Buena Vista St. 

Burbank. CA 91521-6740 

(BOO) 688-1520 

(818)841-3326 

Circle Reader Service Numtier 363 



CANON BJ-5 

Canon's BJ-5 printer is near- 
ly indistinguishable from the 
other entries in its portable 
BJ line. It uses the same bub- 
ble-jet technology that 
brought ink-jet printers out 
of the closet and put them 
in the briefcases of mobile 
executives and on the 
desl<s of home office work- 
ers. In fact, except for the col- 
or of the case — a traditional 
computer cream, rather 
than the dark gray of the BJ- 
10e — you won't be able to 
tell much difference be- 
tween this and the original. 
Like the other BJ printers, 
the BJ-5 draws power from 
either an AC adapter or a re- 
chargeable ni-cad battery 
pack. And, though larger 
than some other portable 
printers, the BJ-5 makes a 
good traveling companion 
for sales personnel or any- 
one else needing access to 
high-quality printing while 
on the road. But don't sell 
this unit short if you're look- 
ing for a desktop printer. The 
compactness — 12.2 x 8.5 x 
1.9 inches — that makes it 
such a good traveling com- 
panion also sen/es well in a 
home office, where space is 
at a premium. When cou- 
pled with the automatic 
sheet feeder, the BJ-5 rivals 



CHIPS&BITS GAMES FOR LESS CALL 800 753 GAME 



IBM WARGAMES 




IBM STRATEGY 




Action Stations 


529 


Conquered Kingdoms 


$36 


Adorn Slatons Seen 1 


S14 


Crisis in the Kremlin 


S37 


Allied Forces Bundle 


S29 


Dragon Lord 


S12 


AraerCWWarl-3Ea$22 


Dune 


$29 


Ancient Aflol War 


$29 


Empire 


S31 


Battle; ol Napoleon 


S32 


Empire Delune 


S« 


Biruk-ieg Antennes 


$29 


Final ConlliO 


$34 


Bravo Romeo Delta 


$37 


FireTeam2200 


$29 


Campaign 


$29 


FireTeara Const Kit 


$25 


Carriere a War 


$37 


Fort Apache 


$34 




UNKS 386 PRO' 

|ofters Super VGA 
raphics and ad- 
anced features 
lesigned lor your 
1366 or 486. New 
lleatures include 
:ompuler oppo- 
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iption that aikiws 
lyourlnendsiopiay 
against ynu in an 
exislinggame^pre- 
recorded games 
from worthy oppo- 
nents. & many 
game modes. J42 



Carrier Strike 


$42 


Glotjal Conquest $39 


CliarcB Light Brigade 


$34 


ClotMl Effect $32 


CwilWarSSI 


$42 


Koshan Conspiracy $32 


Cohort 


$34 


Lemmings $32 


Connict: Korea 


$37 


Lemmings Daia Disk $19 


Contia: Mtidle East 


$37 


L'Empereur $37 


ConPin in Vietnam 


$9 


Lberty or Death $37 


Dedson at Geltysbtjrg 


$29 


Lost Admiral $34 


Dreadnoughts 


S42 


Lost Admiral Enhanced $38 


Ore3ex3U9hts:lroncIads$29 


Lost Admiral Scenario 523 


Dreadnoughts: Bismart $29 


Medieval Lords $37 


Fire Brigade 


$34 
$26 1 


Merchant Colony $34 


GEN QTRS GAMES 


*■ 1 


GeltysburgiTuming Pni $37 


**■* *" ■■'^^tBW^^M 


Great Naval Battles 


$42 


^-^^ 


Halls of MonlEzuma 


$24 


Hai^Bon 


$25 


Harpoon Set 2 or 3 


$19 


Bi»-,'.iif», i^Hk;^ 


Harpoon Set 4 


$24 


f .«?* 






^ .«. ^^ 


Harpoon Challenger Pal($42 


. 'mf 




$37 


^■^■4 




^acArthur's War 


$29 


f ''''*'^ •' 


Panzer Baoles 


$22 


/ ■■ ^ ■■.' 


Painoi 


$38 


^ • i 


Patriot Battle Sets Ea 


$24 




Patton Stnkes Back 


$37 


^ 


Red Lghmifig 


$12 




Rommel North Africa 


$24 


f 


Rofl^e's Drift 


$34 


1 ' ' 


Secor-d Front 


$37 


,•-'/ 


SIM CAN GAMES 


$36 


Not>un^alor2 $37 


Slotnt Across Europe 


$12 


NiKl«arWar $12 


Tliird Retch 


$27 


Otjecfiw $34 


Typhoon of Steel 


$12 


Opefaljon Combat 51S 


UMS2 


$19 


Pacific Theater of Ope- $42 


UMS2 Civil War 


$24 


Perfect General $34 


UUS 2 Desert Siomn 


$20 


Perfect General Disk 2 523 


LIWS 2 Planet Editor 


$2B 


Populous 2 538 


V (or Victory 


$X 


Power Monjer 534 


Waterloo 


$12 


Power Monger WWl 521 


Western Front 


$37 


OOP Bundle $59 


White Deatti 


$29 


Railroad Tycoon $34 


'^nn-'' 


JV 


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ft^BB 


/ <i 


SHjOURhlEY' is a 


^imwfara 


m 


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coinpleie solitaire 


F/,H 


rvogram. Choose 


OtjkJW^c 


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T5"!: 


(rom 105 of the 


rmiWk 


klX 


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world's most [Bpu- 


Ry^v-~- 


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m^Wk^m^ 


mi 


^^^■mF^nl nlav wiiirh 


■tS>s-,- 


M 


^^Hlallows you to ore- 






^^H ate your own, keeps 
^^Hja compiele history 
^^HIs overall averages 
■^■lor each game. 4 
i^^Blninguing quests 
■jjHareinduded.($«v. 
m^Beial play levels. t36 



IBM STRATEGY 

SimEarlh $41 

Star Control 2 $37 

StarHeel 1 or 2 $38 

Task Force 1942 $39 

Theatre of War $32 

Traders $29 

Utopia $31 

Viking Fields of Conqsi S37 

Visions ol Aflemialti 512 

Warlords $29 

Warlords 2 $42 

Worlds at War S29 

IBM ADVENTURE 

Advnts Willie Beamish $34 
Advnts WIlie Beamish 2 $39 

Codename Iceman 2 5K 

Cokinel Bequest 2 $34 

Conc|uests ol Longbow $34 

Conspiracy Deadlock $34 

Coven Aaion $29 

Cruise lor a Co-pse $34 

DBJaVu2LoslinLV $12 

Don t Go Alone $ 9 

Eco Quest 1 $34 

Free DC $29 

Gateway $36 

Godlather $32 

Head of China $34 

Hostage $ 9 

Indy Jones LCrsdvga $27 
Indy Jones Fate Atlantis $38 

Jai^ the Ripper $38 

King's Quest 1 Enhncd $34 

Kings Quest 2 or 3 $28 

King's Quest 4 $34 
King'5Quest5or6VGA$39 

Leather Goddesses 2 $42 

Leisure Suit Ltry 2. 3. 5 $34 

Leisure Suit Lny Bundle $39 

Loom $19 



laM SPORTS 
Gretsky League 
HardDall2 
Hardbal3 
John Elivay's QB 
LH3in1 Foottsall 
LHBoihg 
LH allege Basketball $30 
LH Full Count Baseball $30 
LH Hockey 530 

LH Pro Basketball $30 



$26 
$28 
534 
$6 
530 
$30 



IBM TRADITIONAL 

Blackjack DOSWiN $19 
CeniBftoM Squares $21 
Check Mate DOS-WIN $36 
Che£5masier3t)00 $32 
Chessm aster 3000 WIN KB 
Dealers Choce Poker $32 
EdwrdOThitiBlckJck $19 
Femmes Fatale $26 

Femmes Fatale Disk $18 
GO Master 5 Olx $109 




AIR FORCE 
COMMANDER' is 
asimulatcnol mod- 
em air warfare in 
ihB Middle East, 
You combine re- 
sou rcemanagment 

Ih staiegk: com- 
|mand in a point S 

ick interface. Fea- 
ures include a va- 
riety ol modern 
pianos. sateliilB & 
Igeographical maps 
ol the area, S 26 
Imodern Middle 
Eastscenanos,$37 



fSIEGE'samedi- 
level style castle 
lassaultgame. You 
lare given four 
■castles to attack 
landdelendinaone 
Icasiie scenario or 
Ian extended cam- 
Ipaign. Includes his- 
llorical troops 
WFrench, English, 
Iceltic), mythical 
Btroops [Elves, 
HTrolls, Giantsl. 
Isiege Kwers. bat- 
Biering rams, cata- 
Ipults, andoil. $38 



IBM STRATEGY 
4 Tra n $42 

Armada 2525 $E 

Sand^ Kings Anc. Cftina$37 
Basle Isle $32 

Breach 2 Enhanced $19 
Breach 2 Scanaiio Disk $15 
Castles $36 

Castles Disk 1 $19 

Ciinliration $39 

Command HO $19 



Rampart 527 

Realms 529 
Renegade Legnn InUcpl 512 

Revolution 76 529 

Romanc 3 Kngdm 1 or2 542 

Rules of Engagemem $37 

Second Conflict WIN $34 

Siege S38 

Sim Ant 537 

SimCity 529 

SimCity Graphic 1 or 2 523 



Lost in U $37 

Lost Treasures Inlocom $42 
Martian Memorandum $37 
Out of this World $36 

Plan 9 Icom Outer Space$31 
Police Quest 1 S28 

PoliceQuestl VGA $34 
Police Quest 2 or 3 $34 
Rise ol the Dragon 534 
SecrtMonkylslTdlvga $23 
SecrtMankylsiTd2 S38 
Sei Olympics $24 

Sex Vixens from Space $12 
Siena Adventure BundleS39 
Space Quest 2 
Space Quest t , 3 or 4 $34 
Space Quest 5 VGA $39 
Space Quest Bundle $39 
Spelk^siingtOt $19 

SpellcaslingJOt $36 

SlartrekS $12 

Slartrek 25tli Aniversry $36 
Time Quest $19 

Uninvited $ 9 

Where Amrcas Pst CSD $37 
Where Europ. USA, timeS30 
Where World CSD $27 
Where Work! CSD Dli $49 

IBM SPOIiTS 
4D Boxing $17 

4th4 Inches $9 

ABC Boxing 532 

All American College Fb$36 
AP8A Baseball 528 

APBA 1908-91 Ea $21 
APBA Basketball S2S 
APBA Bowling $19 

APBA Fooftal $49 

AP8A Micro Manager S32 
Greens $34 

Gretsky Hockey 2 $34 



LH Team Disks Sl5 

LH League Leaders $15 
LH Utility Disks $15 

Unks Golf $37 

Links Golf WIN 539 

Lnks Course 1 -6 Ea 517 
Unks 386 Pro Goll $42 
Lirtks 386 Pro Courese S20 
Madden FoDtbal 2 532 
Matto Andretfi Racing $1? 
MLBasbllMngr'5Chllng$24 
ML Worn Series D*s $17 
ML TD 1982 - 1990 Ea 517 
ML Franchise Disks Ea 520 
Microleague Basketball $28 
ML Person^ Pro Golf $28 
ML Football Deluxe $39 
ML Ftball Team Disks $17 
Michael Jordan Fit Sim $44 
Mike Diixa Football $32 
NFL Challenge $60 

NFL 1984- 1987 Ea $15 
NFL 1988- 1991 Ea $22 
NFL Football $31 

NFLProleaguo Football $24 
Nkjdaus Signature Edit 539 
Nddaus SE Clip An $24 
Nk*laus Unlimited Goll $29 
NG Clip Art $17 

NG Course 1.2,3. 4. or S$t6 
Pete Rose Baseball $ 9 
PGA Tour Golf $32 

PGA Tout GoJf WIN 538 
PGA Tojr Golf Disk 1 517 
PGA To-jr Golf Ltd EdI $45 
Pro Footall Analyst 534 
Pro Tennis Tour 2 $32 
Road to (he Final Four $37 
Reel Fish n $12 

Tom Landry Football $29 
Tony LaRussa Basebll $29 
T LaR Fantasy Managr $15 



GO Master 5 DOSWIN $39 
Grand Slam Bndge $22 
Hong Kong Mali Jong $32 
Hoyle Book Games 1or252t 
Hoyle Book Games 3or4529 
Monopoly $24 

Omar Sharif on Bndge 537 
Penthousejigsaw $24 
Risk WIN 529 

Scrabble Deluie 534 

Shanghai; $24 

Solitaire's Journey $36 
Stralego $31 

Strip Poker 3 531 

Strip Poker Data 1-5 Ea $19 
Trump Castle 2 $29 

Video Poker OO&WIN $34 
Wheel ol Fortune Gokd $15 
Wordtris $29 

World Champ Backgmn $24 
World Champ Cribbage $24 

IBM ROLE PLAYING 
Bard's Tale 2 $19 

Bard's Tale 3 $31 

Bard's Tale CnstTctn St 519 
Balllelech 2 $31 

Buck Rogers 1 $12 

Buck 2: Mairii Cubed 532 
Captain Blood 5 9 

Celtic Legends 532 

Champkxis $37 

CHARACTR EDITORS $16 
Conan $29 

Cyberspace sa 

Darklands $33 

DusKottheGods $33 

Elvira 1 Misuass Dark $34 
Elvira 2 Jaws Cerbems 539 
Flames of Freedom 528 
Hero'sOt»st2or3 534 
Hyperspeed $34 

Iffimonal $17 



IBM ROLE PUYING 

Might & Magic 1 or 2 $12 

Might & Magic 3 $37 

Might S Magic 4 $39 

Pirates 5 9 

Planet's Edge 537 

Sea Rogue $39 

Sentinel Worlds 515 

Spacel88g 516 

Space Inc $34 

Spellbound S39 

Starlight lor 2 519 

Sword of the Samurai 5 9 

Swrd Samrai & Pirates $16 
Tales Magic: Prophcy S $35 

Third Courier $ 6 

Tunnels 5 Trolls $12 

Twilight 2(»0 $34 

Ultima Martian Dreams $37 

Unima Savage Empire $34 

Ultima Trilogy 535 

Ultima Trilogy 2 S45 

Ultima 1-6 Bundle CD S59 

Ultima 6 False Prophet 539 

Utiima 7 Black Gate $45 

Ullima Stygian Abyss $48 

Uncharted Waters $42 

Wizardry Trilogy $32 

Wizardry 4 $19 

Wizardry 5 $32 

Wizardry 6 Cosme Frg S37 

Wizardry 7 Crusaders $39 

IBMAD&D 

ADdD Bundle $3S 

Champkjns of Krynn $20 

Curse ol Azure Bonds 515 

Dark Qtjeen ol ifrynn $32 

Dealfi Knights of Krynn $20 

Dragons ot Flame $12 

EyaoftheSelxilder $32 

EyeofttieB«hokJer2 $38 



IBM SIMULATION 
Ft 5 SE2 Scenario Disk $17 
Ft 5 Strike Eagle 3 $44 
F19Steal;h Fighter $24 
F22 ATF $39 

Fakan 3.0 $45 

Flight Simulator 4.0 $39 
Fly Grand Canyon 3D $45 
Gunship $12 

Gunship2000 $39 

Harrief Combat Sim $ 6 



HINT BOOKS 
AOSD HINTBOOKS $10 
Bard's Tale 1. 3 Ea $10 
Buck Rogers 1 $10 

Buck 2: Matrix Cubed S10 
Civilizafon $16 

Dyni Great War Planes $16 
Elvira lor 2 $10 

Harpoon Battlebook $16 
Indy Jones Lst Crsade $10 
Irtdy Jones Fate Atlantis $10 



GLOBAL 
EFFECT 


In 'GLOBAL EF- 
FECT' you are 
called upon to pro- 
tect crdiizaiionscn 
distani planets. In 
save a wodd. you 
must solve envimrt- 






1 


rule a work!, you 
have full military 
options to use 
against your oppo- 
nents; and in cre- 
ate a world, you 


^^^^^^^1 


ground up. Has 
modem play. $32 



Heros of Ihe 357th 
Hyperspeed 
Jet Fighter 2.0 
Land, Sea AAJr 1or2 
Life* Death 1or2 
M1 Tank Platoon 
Mantis Expminll Fgh'j 
Megafortiess 
Megafrtrss Msai 1 or 2 $27 
Red Baron VGA $34 

Red Baron Mssn 1 or 2 $24 
fled Stomi Rising $12 




■HEHOS OF THE 
3S7lh' is a WWII 
air combat Simula- 
ton. You are asked 
&3becomeamem- 
berofthe357th,an 
elite lorcBofP-5tD 
mustang pikits. Fly 
actual combatm^. 
sions: fighter 
sweeps, escort US 
tiomberSi drop 
tkimbs £ rockets 
during ground ai- 
tadts, i inteicspt 
V-1 Buzz bomijs 
over England. $32 



Jettighter2 $16 

Loom $10 

Lord of the Rings 1 or 2 $10 

LucasAnsArJvenlure $15 

Magk: Candle 1 01 2 $10 

Martian Dreams $13 

MatnxCubed SIO 

Mights Magic 3 $15 

Planet's Edge $16 

Po()uk)us1S20tf«jSti $16 

Power Monger $16 

Quest lor Clues 2, 3or4 $21 

Railroad Tycoon $10 

Savage Empire $10 

S«fetMnkylstnd1or2 $10 

SIERRA HINTBOOKS $10 

SimciIy,'Simearth $20 

SiatH^ht1or2 $10 

Strategy Plus 3 -11 Ea $ 8 

Strategy Plus 12-18 $ 5 

Ullima 4 - 7 Ea $10 

Utiima Avatar Advenirs $14 

Wizardry 6 Cosmk; Ffg $12 

Wizardry 7 Cnjsade $12 

Yeager's Air Combat $16 




'THUNDER 

BOARD' isasound 
board Ihal is 100% 
compatible with 
Soundblasler and 
Adiib. itreproduces 
digitized sounrjs 
using anSbilDAC. 
Features include 
dynamic filtering, 
1 1 Voice FM music 
synthesizer, sam- 
pling rate up to 22 
KHz, microphone 
input, joystick port, 
and a 2 wah power 
amptilier, $84 



Gateway Savge Fronir $32 
Heroes ol the Lanoe 512 
Pod ol Darkness $3S 

Poo! of Radiance $15 

Secret ol Silver B^des 515 
Shadow Sorcerer $32 
Treasurs Savage Frontr C2 
War ot the Lance $ 9 

IBM HARDWARE 
AdUbSourxlCard $59 
AdLibGoldlOOO $179 
AdIib Surround Scund $64 
Adiib Telephone Module $64 



Sailing Simulator $39 

Sailing Sim Voyages Ea $34 
Secret Weapons Lfiwft $44 



S Weapons Expt^ 

Shuttle 

aient Service 2 

Strike Commander 

Team Yankee 

Team Yankee 2 

Test Dnve 2: Collection $34 

TestDrtveS $32 

TD3 Roads Car Disk $19 



CHIPS 8e bits 

PO Box 234 

Rochester VT 05767 

Fax Ba2-767-33S2 

802-767-3033 

800-753-4263 

GEnte Keyword CHIPS 

We accept Visa, MC SMoney 
Orders. COD add 55. Checks 
Hekj 4 Weeks, Most items 
shipped sameday. All shipping 
rates are per order net per item. 
UPS $4: 2 Day Air $6: Mail $5: 
Aimiail Canada S6:HI.AK. PR, 



S15 
$43 
$46 
$109 
$189 
$15 



TLaflusa Stadiums $15 
TLaRTeamsl90t-68 $15 
Weaver Baseball 2.0 $32 
Weaver Commisnr 2.0 S21 
Weaver 2.0 Comm Edl $56 
WorW Crcuit $34 

IBM TBAOmOHAL 
Ao^uire $15 

Amafilio Slim Poker 512 
Backgammon WIN $19 
Battle Chess WIN K9 
Circle Reader Servli 



Ad Lib Speakers 

Flight Stick 

Flight Stick w Falcon 

Sound Blaster 

Sound Blaster Pro 

Snd Blaster Speakers 

ThmstmaslerJoyst(3< $69 

Thmstmstr Pro JoystickSt 09 

Thhjstmstr Weapn Cntrt $79 

Thunder Board SrbBrd $84 

Thunder Board Spkrs $15 

IBM SIMULATION 
A10 Avenger $43 

Acss ol the Pacifc $42 
Aces Padlc ktssn 1 or 2$27 
Aces over Europe $46 
Aces Europe (tesn 1 or 2$27 





'MIGHT AND 
MAGIC 3' IS Itte 
latest in the Mighl 
5 Magic roiepiay- 
ng series. Fea- 
lures an elaborate 




world in which to 
adventure, thou- 
sands of illustialed 
nhabitanis, stun- 
ning music, sound 
ehecls t speech, 
automatic help 
with pop-up maps 
ndudes full cokir 
map ol the Isles of 
Terra. J37 



Legacy ol Necromancer $29 


ATP 


$37 


TFHSBH1942 


Lord ol the Rings 1 


534 


B17 Flying Fortress 


$39 


Uhrabots 


Lord of the Rings 2 


S37 


Bull AkJrin Race Spc 


$37 


Virtual Reality Studo 


Loremasler 


$a 


Car 5 Driver 


$38 


Wng Commander 1 


Lure ol the Temptress 


537 


Design yr own Ralroad $29 


WClMisson1or2 


Mag ic Candle 1 


515 


Dynamics Bundle 


$39 


WC1 Bunde 


Magic Cardie 2 


S37 


Elite Plus 


$19 


Wing Commander 2 


Mechwarhor 


534 


Eye of the Stomi 


$29 


WC2 Operations 1 or 2 


Megatraveilet 1 


516 


F1t7ANighttiawk 


$42 


WC2SpeachPack 


Megaitaveller 2 


519 


F14 Tomcat 


$26 


Wolfpa* 


Megatravellei 3 


539 


F15StnkeEagle2 


$19 


Yeagef s Air Combat 


ca Numbvr 149 











$44 2DayAirS12:AJn7iailEurop« 

$37 $l2lirstitemplus$6peradii- 

$49 tonal item. 
$39 

$19 All Sales Final. Check 

$45 compalibllilybejoreyoubuy, 

545 Shipping limes not 

$27 guaranteed. Defectives 

$15 replaced with same product. 

$15 Price \ BVBllabillty stibJKt 

$38 10 change. 



REVIEWS 



many more expensive print- 
ers, including low-cost laser 
printers. 

The BJ-5 setup proce- 
dure is simple and is aided 
by clear instructions from 
the brief but complete man- 
ual. The process of install- 
ing a ribt)on cartridge and 
printing a test pattern takes 
about eight minutes. Charac- 
ters come out clean and with- 
out smearing, though not 
quite as dark as characters 
printed from a laser printer. 
The quality of the BJ-5's print- 
ing certainly offers competi- 
tion to 24-pin printers, how- 
ever. The BJ-5 is much qui- 
eter than either a laser print- 
er or a dot-matrix printer. 

It took me about ten min- 
utes to print a five-page, 
14K text file using Ami Pro 
2.0 under Windows, with a 
standard Helvetica typeface 
and the printer set to IBf^ 
ProPrlnter emulation (other 
emulation modes include Ep- 
son 24-pin and BJ-130e). A 
file of the same size took six 
minutes using a DOS-based 
word processor in a Courier 
typeface. Both speeds are 
acceptable for home office 
and other light-duty print 
jobs, For Windows applica- 
tions, there Is a driver availa- 
ble from Canon (call 800- 
423-2366); aiternatively. you 
can download the file 
BJWIN.ZIP from the Canon 
forum on CompuServe. 
With the Windows driver, 
you can take full advantage 
of the printer's 360 x 360 
dpi resolution for graphics 
printing. 

Clearly labeled touch-pan- 
el controls are located on 
the front of the printer, From 
here you can set the top of 
form, adjust the line and 
form feeds, set pitch for con- 
densed or regular spacing, 
and switch back and forth 
between the two printing 
modes: Economy and High 
Quality. Economy saves Ink 

102 COMPUTE AUGUST 1992 



but is no faster than High 
Quality. 

Paper can feed into the 
printer from the top or bot- 
tom. Envelopes or thick pa- 
per should move through 
the bottom slot, as it has the 
straightest paper path and 
is least susceptible to jam- 
ming. An optional sheet feed- 
er holds about 30 sheets of 
paper, is very simple to op- 
erate, and installs In less 
than five minutes (including 
time spent reading the direc- 
tions). In weeks of testing, 
the BJ-5 didn't jam once, ei- 
ther from the sheet feeder or 
in the main printer mecha- 
nism. Plain bond typewriter 
paper is recommended. 

The BJ-5 makes a solid 
component for the home of- 
fice desktop. With simplicity 
of operation and very good 
print quality, low noise lev- 
els, portability, reliability, 
and low maintenance require- 
ments, this printer is very 
easy to work with, And that 
makes it easy to live with. 
PETER scisco 

Canon BJ-5— $499, $589 with sheet 
feeder 

CANON U.S.A. 

One Canon Plaza 

Lake Success, NY 11042 

(516)488-6700 

Circle Reader Service Number 364 

MICROCAMP 2.0 

Planning a famiiy camping 
trip to Yosemite this sum- 
mer? How about the Grand 
Canyon? With MicroCamp 
at your fingertips, you can 
stop worrying about whether 
you'll find a suitable camp- 
ground and start dreaming 
about those hiking trails and 
fishing holes. 

MicroCamp is a camp- 
ground directory from Corinthi- 
an Concepts which finds the 
campgrounds and RV parks 
of the West that meet your 
needs. No longer do you 



have to search through 
piles of brochures and infor- 
mation sent from your local 
travel agency. Just pop In 
the MicroCamp disk, install 
it on your hard drive, and 
decide where you want to 
go. 

Twelve states are Includ- 
ed in the database: Alaska, 
Arizona, California, Colora- 
do, Idaho, fvlontana, Ne- 
vada, New fvlexico, Oregon, 
Utah, Washington, and Wyo- 
ming. You simply select the 
state you'll be visiting and be- 
gin narrowing your search. 

MicroCamp allows you to 
decide whether you're inter- 
ested in campgrounds with- 
in a certain geographical re- 
gion or recreation area, or 
campgrounds close to a spe- 
cific town. Then, you consid- 
er whether you prefer to 
stay in federal, state, or 
private campgrounds — or 
whether you're interested in 
them ali. 

Next, you determine what 
sort of accommodations you 
require. Are RV hookups 
and disposal important to 
you? You can decide wheth- 
er you want a campground 
that has boating, fishing, or 
hiking trails, or one that lies 
at a certain elevation. If 
you'll be traveling in the fall, 
winter, or spring, you'll want 
MicroCamp to help you find 
campgrounds open then. 
There are 14 options on the 
Features screen to help you 
limit your search. 

My fiance and I are plan- 
ning a trip to New Mexico 
and Yellowstone. Micro- 
Camp found many camp- 
grounds in north-central 
New Mexico that met our ba- 
sic requirements: open by 
May 20, pets allowed, and 
15 or more tent sites, with 
flush toilets, drinking water, 
and showers available. Five 
of the campgrounds are 
right on our intended route, 
so I printed their reports. 



Now, when we get close to 
our destinations, we'll have 
directions to the camp- 
grounds, their phone num- 
bers, and other helpful 
information. 

I repeated the search in 
Colorado and Wyoming, find- 
ing several campgrounds 
along the route we'll be tak- 
ing. It was so easy that I 
had all the reports printed 
out an hour after I opened 
the MicroCamp package. 

The program is menu driv- 
en and very easy to negoti- 
ate. Context-sensitive help 
is available at every screen, 
but the program is so intui- 
tive that you probably won't 
need the help. If you dislike 
the screen colors and have 
a color monitor, it's easy to 
change them. You can ad- 
just screen contrast if you 
have a monochrome moni- 
tor or an LCD screen- 
handy if you plan to take 
MicroCamp with you on 
your laptop. 

The only fault 1 find Is that 
there aren't enough states 
in the database. Traveling 
from the East Coast, we 
have a lot of miles to cover 
before reaching the part of 
the West included in Micro- 
Camp 2.0. But begging for 
more Is a compliment rather 
than a complaint. 

We leave on our trip in a 
week, and yesterday we 
were concerned about being 
able to find appropriate camp- 
grounds. Today, our Micro- 
Camp reports are packed 
with our maps, and all we 
have left to do is load the 
car. Westward ho! 

KAREN LEE SIEPAK 



IBM PC and compatibles: 512K 
RAM; CGA. EGA, VGA. Hercules, or 
monochrome, hard dnve — $99.95 

CORINTHIAN CONCEPTS 
4805 Ipswitch 
Fair Oaks, CA 95628 
(800) 524-7171 

Circle Reader Service Number 365 



ZERO'S & ONE'S PC WAREHOUSE 

7525 Rosecrans Ave., #203, Paramount, CA 90723 

310-630-3551 (information) 8-5 M-F * 310-634-7745 (FAX) 24-hours 

800-788-2193 (orders) 8-6 M-F, 9-4 Sa P.S.T. 

ALL IBM COMPATIBLE 




SOUND BOARDS 



ATI Stereo F/X 147.95 
Pro Audio Spec +189.95 
ProAudio 16-bil 229.95 
Roland LAPCl 399.95 
Sound BIst Pro 169.95 



Sound Blaster 99,95 
Sound B MCA 219.95 
Sound BC/MS 25.95 
Sound Comndr + 69.95 
Thundefboard 99.95 



JOYSTICKS AND MICE 



Aviator nt Yoke 31.95 

TM Throttle 84.95 

Joystick 69.95 

CH Flight stick 41,95 

CH Wach II 24.95 

CH Mach III 29,95 

Winner Pistol 24.95 

Winner Yoke 46,95 

Gravis gamepad 24.95 

Gravis stick 33.95 



MICE 

3-Bijt1on 17.95 

Logitech 

Mouseman 69.95 

Rollerballs call 

Microsoft OEM 79.95 

Game Cards 

Economy 9.95 

Hi-speed 19.95 

CH gams III 28.95 



MATH CO-PROCESSORS 
3C87SX-16 3087-25 call 

3C87SX-20 3087-33 (or 

3CS7SX-25 3087-40 prices 



MULTI MEDIA 

CLabs MM CDR Drive & bndl for SB Pro 369.95 
CLabS MM CDR Drive & bndl w/SB Pro 559.95 
MediaVis kit w/ProAudioSpee Plus 769.95 
MediaVis kit w/ProAudloSpec 16 959.95 
Sony CDU 535 internal w/card 349.95 
Sony COU 535 external w/card 399.95 
Computer Eyes RT 434,95 
Computer Eyes Pro 299,95 
Xapshot Canoera, Canon RC-250 459,99 
CALL for Ql her CDR pfpducts 



EDUCATIONAL ENTERTAINMENT 



ACT Studyware 29.95 
Atge-BlasterPlus 29.95 
Algebra +,v.2 32.95 
Barbie Design 15,95 
Barbie Fashion 24.95 
Beauty&B.PrntKit 14.95 
Bodyworks 47,95 

Carmen San Diego grp 
Castle Dr.Braln 29.95 
Chal Anc Empire 29,95 
Comic Bk Creatr 19,95 
Dance Planets 149.95 
Destination Mars 34.95 
D Tracy Print Kit 14.95 
Dinosaur Designr 19.95 
Disney Snd Srce 26.95 
Dr. Quandry 35.95 
Earthquest 35.95 

EcoOuBst 33.95 

EcoSaurus 24.95 

Friendly Computr 29.95 
GMAT Studyware 29,95 
GRE Studyware 29.95 
Joshua Reading 29.95 
Kid Pix 34.95 

Kid Works 29.95 

Knowledge Adv. 47,95 
LSAT Studyware 35,95 
Marvin Moose 31.95 
Math Blasters 29.95 
Math Climber 6,95 
Math Mystery 29.95 
Math Rabbit 25.95 
Math Zone 32.95 

M. Beacon Type 31,95 
McGee 24.95 

McGee at Fair 24.95 
McG Katie Farm 24.95 
Metrognm Music 29,95 
Mickey's ABC 24.95 
Mickey's ABC w/ 
sound source 37.95 
Mickey's 123 24.95 
Mickey/M PrntKit 14.95 
Mickey Crosswrd 19.95 
Mickey Jigsaw 29,95 
Mickey's Zoo 12.95 



Midnite Rescue 29.95 
Mixed Fairy Tales29.95 

Mixed M.Goose 41.95 

Mutanold Math 26.95 

My Letters 26.95 

Newsroom 14.95 

Nigel's World 35.95 

Numbr Munchrs 29.95 
Once Upon a Time 

Stories 29,95 

Puppets 29.95 

Oper.Neptune 34,95 

Orbits 35,95 

Oregon Trail 29.95 

Out Numbered 29,95 

PC Globe 4.0 39.95 

PC USA 2.0 29.95 

Phonics Plus 26.95 

Playroom 27,95 

Pfin of Biology 24.95 

Prln of Calculus 29.95 

PfIn of Chemstry 24.95 

PfIn of Econmcs 24.95 

Prln of Physics 24.95 
Handm Hs Encyc 71 .95 

Reader Rabbit 29.95 

SAT PersnITrainr 29.95 

Second Math 32.95 

See the U.S.A. 23.95 

Speed Reader 29.95 

Spell-a-Saurus 29.95 

Spellbound 31.95 

Spell It + 29.95 

Stlckybaar Read 24.95 

Slickybear Type 29.95 

Story Teller I 31.95 

Story Teller II 31.95 

SuperMunchers 29.95 

Think Quick 31.95 

Treasure Mtn 29.95 

Treehouse 34.95 

Typing Tutor 5 29.95 
vJhat's My Angle 

(geometry) 29,95 

Word Munchrs 29.95 

World Atlas{Win.) 49.95 

Write & Publish 39.95 



GAMES 

A-IOETankKJIIir 3S.SS 
AdvBficad O&D uriflt call 

ADOiTrsai Sovg Fmli« 31. BS 
Aciion S:Sllph9«d,Th«xd*f, 

FiraHawk, ZiJiard, 

Oll'l Wtll At.as 

Acllon Stalloni £9.S5 

AS: Sconajio 16.85 

Alrbui Aa20 4e.SS 

AIIM Forces 41.65 

AmstClvWoi, I S4.95 

Am«r Civ W«l, H 24.B5 

AinirCivWu, III £4.eS 

American Gl^lators 24.95 

Armada 2525 29.95 

Armor Alley 26.95 

Astrology, visions 24.95 

Atomino 29.95 

ATP FIJgW Aisgn 3S.B5 
Bach lo Future series 

Bandil King Ar^c.China 35.95 

Bane Cosmtc Forge 33.95 

Bards Tales III 29.95 

Bards Tale Constr.Sat 33.95 

Ban SiiTtpson £9.95 

Battle Con^mand 22.95 

Battle Isle 29.95 

Battle ot Napoleon 31.95 

Berlin 1948 25.95 

Blsodwych 24.95 

SfeacliJ 19.95 

Carrier Strike 41.93 

Cailleol Dl. Brain 29.95 

Castles 35.95 

Ctiip's Ctiailnge 25.95 

Civili»tian 3S.95 

Colonels Bequest 35.95 

Command HQ 35.95 

Coran 29.95 

Cor^tlict; Kotoa 39.95 

Conquest at LongBow 39.95 

(!^rporallon 29.95 

([^untdoiAm 31.95 

Covert Action 29.95 

Danger Zone 29.95 

Dark Spyre 25.95 

Decision at Gettysbrg 23.95 

Design own Railroad 34.96 

D-Generalion 31.95 
Dragon's l-air series 

Dusk ot Itu Gods 37.95 

Elite Plus 29.95 
Elvila saries 

F-117ANIglvttnv* 44,95 

F-1 4 Tomcat 26.95 

F'lS Strike Eagle II 29,95 

Faargt^ail, Legend ot 25.95 

FaJcona.O 44.95 

Figtiting for Rome 29.95 

Final Conflict 24,95 

Fire Team 2000 29.95 

Flight ol the Intnider 32.85 

Flight Sim 4.0 37.95 

FS AircraK & Scenery 27.95 

FSSceneiyCA/NEV 35.95 

FS Instrument PS 59.95 

FS Mallard Hawaii 26.95 

FS MallBid upgrade 26.96 

FS Scenery disks 19.95 

Four Crvstafs Trazere 31 .95 

Free O.lD. 39.95 

Future Wars 29.95 

Genghis Khan 35.95 

ISIobaJ Conquest 35.95 

Godfather 29.95 

Crallriueet 24.95 

Gunship 2000 39.95 

Hard Nova 1 9.95 

Hare Raising Havoc 29.95 
Harpoon senes 

Head ol China 35.95 

Hill Slieet Blues 24.95 

Home A^one 24.95 

Hyperspead 34.95 

Imniortet, The 19.95 

Indy Jones IV 3S.95 

JBond:Staaltn Alfalr 29.95 

Jeinghterll 39.95 
Kings Quell series 

Knights ot Sky 29.95 
L«is.Sui1 l_arry series 

Lemmings 29.95 
Les Manley series 

LHX Chopper 25.95 

Life S, Death 23.95 

Ute & DealhJha Brain 25.95 

Lightspeed 29.85 
Utile htetmaidyOeauly 

and Beast print hH 19.95 

Loom 19.95 
Lord of Rings seiles 

Lost Admiral 35.96 

MacArlhgi't War 29.95 

Magic Candle II 36.95 

h^anhunterS 29.95 

Wanlac Mansion 16.95 

Maitian Dreamt 35.95 

Martian Memorandum 34.95 

Marvel Tillogy 22.95 

Maliii Cubed 31.95 



Might «, iji^lc { 
Millennium 



Mean Streeli 35.95 

Megafonrass 35.95 

Million disk 25,95 

MegaT reveler It 32.95 

MICli-29 Fulcrum 29.95 
aeries 

26.65 

Mission Impossible 29.55 

Murder 29.85 

Nobgnaga Arnbitlon II 34.95 

No Greater Glory 45.95 

Nova 9 21.95 

NudeafWar 31.95 

Obilui 29.95 

Opeiation (!^mbat 29.95 

Out ol this World 36.95 

Overlord 29.95 

Facilic Islands 31.85 

Panier Battles 21.85 

Paperboy 2 26.85 

Patlon Slrlkii Back 35.85 

Perfect General 35.85 
Pater PBrVHotjIn Hood 

print kit 19.95 

Pianel't Edge 36.95 
Police Quest leries 

Power Monger 33.95 

Predator: 14.95 

Prince of Persia 29.95 

Ouest for Glory 36.86 

Red Baron VGA 39.95 

Rise of Dragon 34.95 

Romance 3 Kjngdm II 39.95 

Railroad Tycoon 32.95 

Hocketeer 29.95 

Rules ol Engagemenl 36.95 

Sea Rogue 35.95 

SeeonrfFront 36.95 
Sacrel Monkey Island series 

Stcrtt Weapons Luft 42.95 

add'ons 19.95 

Serr Olympics 24.96 

Shuttle 35.95 

Sierra Network 19.95 

Silent Service II 34.95 

Sim Ant 35.95 

Sim Clly 29.95 

Sim City Graphic 21.95 

Sim Earth 42.95 

Sleeping Gods Lie 29.95 

Space isag 23.96 

Space Ace II 35.95 

Space Quest IV yga 37.95 
SpeilcastIng series 

Spiderman 24.95 

Spirit or Ekcatlbur 29.95 

Star Control 29.95 

Star Ttek 25ttl Anniv. 35.95 

Stellar? 24.95 

Stratago 29.95 

TeenhJinja Turtle Arcd. 24.95 

TerrTiinalor I! 39.95 

Their Finest Hour 43,95 

ThBxder:Firehawk 22.95 

Thun<lerhawtt 31.96 

Time Quest 29.95 

Twilighl 20O0 34.95 

Typhoon of Steal 36.95 

LTltima leries call 

UMS II 29.95 

Uf><S Planet Ed. 29.95 

UnctiaHed Water 41.95 

Vengence of Excaiibur 29.95 

Warlords 29.95 

Western Front 37.95 

Willie Beamish 39.95 
Wing Commander series 

Wizardry series call 

Wonderland 35.95 

Worlds at War 29.95 

Wrath ot lemons £9.95 

Xenoclde 23.95 

YeaserAlrCmbt 36.96 

BOARD, CARD AND 

SHOW GAMES 



AnteUp Poker 
Backgammon 
Battle Cheis 
Battle Chess II 
Blackjack 
Bridge 8uon 
Bridge Companion 
Bridge Grand Slam 
Bridge OinbJ S>iarit 
Bridge Tmscolt 
Bridge Win In 5 wki 
Casino toaster 
Casinos of the World 
Cliessmasler 3000 
Concentra1lon14.95 
Craps 
Cribbage 
Crossword Magic 
Dealer's Choice 
Femme Fatalo 
Four Queens Casino 
Go Junior 
Go Master 
Hoyte 111 
Ish'do 



24.95 
19.95 
29.95 
29.95 
29.95 
29.95 
34.95 
21.85 
29.95 
22.95 
24.95 
44.95 
29.95 
31.95 

19.95 
27.95 
31.95 
29.95 
24.95 
24,96 
22.95 
42.95 
29.95 
32.95 



KlotskI 

Leklcrosi 

Monopoly 

Puzzle Master 

Puzzles & Mazes 

Risti 

Scrabble Deluke 

Shogl Master 

Solitaire (Bicycle} 

Solitaire jHoyle If) 

Solitaire Hoyale 

Solitaire's Journey 

Sorry 

Strip Poker 

add.on disks 
Super Jeopardy 
Super Tetrri 
Tetris 
Troika 

Trump Castle It 
Welltrii 

Wheel of Fohuna 
WordUIS 



24.99 
28.95 
24.95 
29.95 
14.S5 
24.85 
35.95 
32.95 
29.95 
22.95 
21.99 
35.95 
14.99 
29.95 
ie.99 
24.95 
29.96 
19.95 
17.95 
29.95 
19.95 
23.89 
27.99 



HOME i OFFICE 



Animation, Paint 
Animation Studio 
AutoMap 
ChecKFree 
Cookbook 
Cookbook Plus 
DeluKe Paint II 
r>vorak Typir^ 
Everybodys FHanner 
Family t^are Fedialrici 
Far Side calendar 
Genealogy, Horizons 
Grade Quick 
Jobhunt 
Otijectionl 
Studio ol Greetings 
Tempra Pro 
Tempra GIF 
Tempra Show 
Vehicle Records 
Virtual ReaJity Studio 
Vista Pro 
Wedding Planner 

SPORTS 

AndrettI Racing Chal. 
Bo Jackson B&seball 
Boxing, 40 
College Football 
Faceoff 
Hardball II 
Hardball III 
Hockey Loag.Slm. 
JConner Tennis 
Jo* Montana Football 
JMadden Foottjall 
JNicklaus Gall 
JNicklaus Signature 
Links 

add-ons 
Microleag.FootballDIx 
Mike Oltka Football 
Molooross 
Nascar Challenge 
NFL PRO Football 
Pit Fighter 
Piayrnakor Football 
Pacemaker 
Sharkey 3D Pool 
Speedball 2 
Sports Adventure 
Stunt Driver 

Tony LaRussa Baseball 
Team Suzuki 
Test Drive It 
Test Drive 111 
W.Greliky Hockey 2 
Weaver Buebail It 
Wide World Boxing 



34.95 
77.95 
59.95 
49.95 
29.95 
41.95 
95.85 
29.95 
62.95 
14.95 
47.95 
24.95 
47.95 
29.95 
29,95 
43.95 
299.95 
114.95 
S9.9S 
35.95 
51.95 
77.95 
33.95 



19.95 
29.95 
19.95 
35.96 
14.95 
29,96 
34.95 
27.95 
31.95 
29.95 
29.95 
34.95 
41.95 
36.95 
15.95 
41.95 
32.95 
19.95 
29.96 
44.95 
25.95 
34.96 
49.95 
22.95 
24.95 
47.96 
29.95 
29.96 
24.95 
29.95 
34.95 
33.95 
31.95 
29.95 



WINDOWS 



aattle Chess 
Briefcase calendar 
Casino Pack ^1 
Chttssmaster 30O0 
Chessnet 
Diet Pro 
Distant Suns 
Far Side calendar 
Qolt Companion 
Herman calendar 
Latter UtilKles 
MBeacon Typing 
Entertain. Paks, each 
Money Manager 
MS Excel ver 4.0 
MSver3.1 
MSver 3.1 upgrade 
MS Works 
Perks, utilities 
Prxet Puizte 
Risk 
Screen Works 



29.95 
29.95 
3V.95 
37.95 
31.95 
34.95 
47.95 
49.96 
24.85 
19.96 
25.95 
3V.95 
27.95 
19.95 

299.95 
B9.95 
49.95 

129.95 
24.95 
39,95 
29.95 
19.95 



Sim EaJth 

Spanlsli vocabulary 
Speed Reader 
Super Tetris 
Typing Tutor 5 
tXSJlilas 3.0 
Waves, sounds 
Windov/s 3.1 
Windows 3.1 upgrade 
Wired lor Sound^ 
Worid Atlas 

CD ROMS 



42.95 
41.95 
29.95 
23.95 
29.95 
49.95 
19.95 

ag.95 

49.95 
32.95 
49.96 



Alt Abt Science 
Amer.Bus.Phnbk 
Annabel's Dream 
Apollo 
Batik Design 
Bible Library 
Britan.Fam.Chce 
Business Master 
Carmn S. Diego 
Case Caut.Condr 
CIA World Facts 
CIA World Tour 
CD Directory 
Classic Fairy TIs 
Coates Art Revue 
Coral Artshow 91 
Education Master 
Elec.Home Libry 
Family Doctor 
FD£3d Analyst 
Game Collection 
Game Master 
GeoVision fl^ln) 
Golden ImmoitaJ 
Grab Bag 
Grandma & Me 
Greatest Books 
Jones Fast l-ane 
Jungle Safari 
KGB World Fads 
King's Quest V 
LangGame/Fren 
LangGame/Span 
Langs of Worid 
Magazine Rack 
Mastering Math 
Mixed MilSoose 
Monarch Cliff NIs 
Movie DirDatabae 
MSDOS archives 
MS Stat Pack 
Murdr Str.Dedlelo 
Night Owl's 4.1 
Night OM'i 5.0 
PC-SIG10thEd 
Phoenix 2.0 
Pixel Garden 
Prooramer ROM 
RBBS in a Box 
Reasoning Skills 
RogEberl Movies 
Santa Fe 
Shakespear lllust. 
Shiis Comp Wks 
£harewra Gold II 
Sharewro Xpress 
Sherlock Holmes 
SM Consull Del. 
SH Hound Bskvl 
Sleeping Beauty 
SoMuchSharewre 
Spanish, Lea/n 
Stellar 7 

Street Atlas Mh) 
TlmeTbl Arts iE 
TlmeTbl Science 
Toolvrks Ret Ubr 
Ultima I ■ VI 
USA Factbook 
US Presidents 
US Wars, each 
US/World Atlas 
VGA Spactrum 
Vintage AToha 
WCIw/Msns1&2 
WCI w/unima VI 
Wild Places 
Woman Motion 
World Fac1bk'92 
World View 



249.95 
39.95 
62.95 
50.95 
29.95 
53.95 
74.95 
42.99 
69.95 
36.95 
32.96 
67.95 

109.96 
72.95 
53.95 
72.95 
42.95 
74.95 

107.95 
51.95 
49.95 
42.95 
39.95 
29.95 
24.95 

37.95 
40.99 
72.95 
39.99 
41.85 
58.99 
59.95 
51.99 
46.89 

129.95 
45.85 
74.89 
47.95 
31.95 
89.95 
38.99 
29.95 
44.95 

195.95 
33.95 
64.95 
66.95 
41.95 
58.95 
32.96 
29.95 
28.95 
22.96 
39.95 
33.95 
29.95 
43.95 
43.96 
36.95 
29.95 
72.95 
40.95 
ill 

73.95 

es.96 

BB.S5 
92.95 
51.95 
51.95 
51.95 
80.95 
29.95 
29.95 
69.99 
69.95 
38.99 
43.95 
07.85 
29.95 



CDROMMPC 



American Vista 
Autodesk Expir 
Battle Chess 
Beethoven MM 
Chessmstr 3000 
Composr Quest 
Dictnry.Children 
Elec. Library Art 
Guiness Records 
Mammal eneyc. 
MBeacon Typing 
MS Bookshelf 
MS Works ^n| 
Spirit Excalibur 
US Atlas, win 



69.99 
127.95 
47.95 
59,95 
69.95 
69,99 
43.95 
72.85 
74.95 
64.95 
69.95 
139.85 
134.99 
37.95 
93.85 



VISA 



Prices and availability subject to change. All sales final. We do not guarantee compatability. All software is 
factory fresh and unopened. We are not responsible for manufacturer's defects. Contact publisher 
regarding defects. Shipping: Isl pame $5; add'l games add $1 each in Cont. US. 2nd Day Aif $6 1st 
game, add'l games add $1 each in Cont. US. COD add $4. CA residents add 7.75% tax. All prices are US $. 



REVIEWS 



QUANTUM 
PASSPORT XL 

There's an old adage about 
not needing something until 
you don't have it — and then 
needing it real bad^ That ad- 
age might well describe the 
Quantum Passport XL disk 
drive system. Not everyone 
needs a removable hard 
drive, but those who do real- 
ly do. For about 1 V2 to 2 
times the cost of a nonremov- 
able hard drive, you can 
have a removable one. That 
expense may seem like a 
lot, but consider the justifica- 
tion for it. 

There are several scenari- 
os in which a removable 
hard drive is necessary Ab- 
solute data security, such 
as being able to lock your da- 
ta in a safe — or at least take 
it with you upon leaving 
your work area — is one. 
Then there's convenience — 
the ability to have exactly 
the same setup at home 
and at your office, or simply 
to take massive files home. 
A removable hard drive 
would work better than a re- 
mote control program which 
operates your office comput- 
er. You may also need a mir- 
rored (exact working dupli- 
cate) file system. 

The Quantum Passport 
XL drive system takes care 
of those needs, and it's 
easy to install, as well. 
When it comes to hardware 
installation, I usually experi- 
ence only one emotion: 
fear! This feeling was quick- 
ly alleviated when I began in- 
stalling the Quantum Pass- 
port XL. As a matter of fact, 
within about 12 minutes ! 
not only had the drive in- 
stalled but also had my com- 
plete 40MB hard drive cop- 
ied over to it. The instruc- 
tions were thorough, clear, 
and concise. 

The system I have came 

104 COMPUTE AUGUST 1992 



with a SCSI card, an exter- 
nal chassis, and a 240MB 
disk drive. The list price for 
the system I tried is $1,787, 
but I've been informed that 
the street price is more like 
$1,429. My system came 
with the external chassis; 
this was necessary because 
my computer lacked an 
open exposed drive bay. 
This accounts for some of 
the external system's cost. If 
you have a free exposed 
drive bay. you can install 
the internal chassis and 
save S110, 

There are a few things 
worth noting about a SCSI in- 
terface, fvlany SCSI devices 
can be daisychained (each 
connected to the previous) 
without a second card. 
Since the SCSI interface has 
its own BIOS, it can coexist 
with other interfaces and 
even other disk controllers. 
It should also be noted that 
even though a SCSI inter- 
face does carry a greater 
cost, the cost may be offset 
by its ability to run devices 
not necessarily designed for 
the microcomputer industry, 
such as many of the very 
large hard drives, as well as 
most nine-track (reel-to- 
reel) tape drives. 

Changing a drive control- 
ler address for the Quantum 
Passport XL was as simple 
as reading a diagram and 
moving one jumper. Beyond 
that minor adjustment, I was 
able to install the card with- 
out much thought or effort. 

The chassis installation 
was actually fun. The chas- 
sis has ingenious little feet 
that can be configured so 
that it will sit up either verti- 
cally or horizontally. The in- 
structions even explain that 
there is a "right side up" in 
both configurations. After put- 
ting the feet on, all I had left 
to do was connect the exter- 
nal SCSI cable from the 
bacl< of the SCSI card to the 



back of the chassis and 
turn the disk drive on. 

On the back of the disk 
drive are two switches. One 
of them is labeled BOOT, 
and the other PROTECT. 
The BOOT switch deter- 
mines whether or not to 
boot from the removable 
disk, and the PROTECT 
switch is like the write pro- 
tect tab on a floppy disk. I 
set them both to OFF and 
placed the drive in the chas- 
sis (it only fits in one way un- 
less you really force it). I 
then turned on the comput- 
er, placed the installation soft- 
ware in my A: drive, and ran 
the installation program; it 
asked all the right questions 
and did all the work itself. 

After the installation was 
through, I set the BOOT 
switch to ON and rebooted 
the computer The only differ- 
ence was a crucial one: 
This disk is extremely fast — 
perhaps crisp would be a 
better adjective, it's a 9-ms 
drive that leaves everything 
else I've tried in the dust. 

BRADLEY M SMALL 

Quantum Passporl XL— $449 
(50MB). S629 (105MB), $799 
(120MB), $949 (240MB) AT internal 
kit Willi adapter— $578 Microctiannel 
internal kit with adapter — $688 AT ex- 
terna! kit with adapter— $688 Micro- 
channel external kit with adapter— 
$798 

QUANTUM 

500 McCarlhy Blvd. 

Milpilas. CA 95035 

(800) 624-5545 

Ctr<:le Reader Service Number 366 



MYBUSINESS- 
CHECKBOOK 

Don't be fooled by the 
name: MyBusinessCheck- 
book is more than a simple 
checkbook balancer. It's a 
low-end home and smali 
business money manager 
that also prepares budgets 
and reports. You can import 



financial data from Quicken 
and Checkfree and export it 
to Lotus worksheets or as AS- 
Cll files. Continuous-feed 
check blanks are available. 

You can set up multiple ac- 
counts and track them by us- 
er-defined categories, with a 
ceiling of 50,000 entries. In- 
stallation is uncomplicated. 
The fairly intuitive user inter- 
face drops down menus over 
its main working screen, 
which features scrolling 
check blanks and a running 
account balance. 

The package offers nei- 
ther written documentation 
nor an F1 help key; instead, 
you'll find instructions in a 
separate file within the pro- 
gram. Telephone support is 
prompt and knowledgeable. 
While not recommended for 
a large business or an indi- 
vidual with a complex finan- 
cial portfolio, MyBusiness- 
Checkbook is fine for con- 
sumers and companies with 
minimal cash flow, 

KATHY YAKAL 

IBM PC and campatibles. 512K 
RAM-$39.95 

MYSOFTWARE 

1259 £1 Camino Real, Sle 167 

Memo Park, CA 94025 

(415)325-9383 

Circle Reader Service Number 367 

EPSON NB3S 

Now that Epson is shipping 
its new NB-SL line of note- 
book computers, the compa- 
ny has discontinued its pre- 
vious notebook — the NB3s. 
As a result, the NB3s can 
now be bought at a bargain 
price, making it a highly com- 
petitive machine. 

For an early-generation 
notebook, the NB3s is ex- 
tremely small and light- 
weight. It's only 1.7 inches 
high, and it weighs just 5.8 
pounds including the bat- 
tery. The hard drives come 
in 20MB, 40MB. and 60MB 



GET THE 

OmCIAL CLUES TO THE 

HOTTEST GAMES! 




THE OFHCIAL BOOK OF 

KING'S 




Donald B. Trivette 

Forpword by Koi>rTta WJUumt 

CiHiljInv viis] hints sp.d Unt^icf. for iioUing 
kin^'f Qufft l~V and the Utet on Sierra's 



THEGFnCIALBODKOF 

KINira QUEST, 

SECONUEmTIDN 

Here's the source for hints, 
tips, and background for the newest 

adventure. King's Quest V. 

This new volume includes more clues, 

maps, and inside details. 

along with more ways to add even 

■ more fun to all five of the 

best-selling King's Quest games. 

Covers King's Quest I - V. 



THE OFFICIAL GUIDE TO 
IRJIILROJIDI 





THEOFnCIALSUlDETO 

SID MEIER'S 

RAILROAD TYCOON 

This is the bool< that makes 
railroading and the game come alive. 

Inside players will find interviews 

with Sid Meier, the designer of Railroad 

Tycoon, along with facts 

on how the product was conceived 

and developed. Also 

includes formulas the program uses to 

determine income and expense. 



THE OFnCIAL GUIDE TD 

R06ER WILCffS 

SPACE ADVENTURES 

For the first time, 
Space Questers can learn what goes 

on in the mind of the most 
legendary janitor in the universe. Inside, 

you'll find complete maps for every 
Space Quest scenario, point values for 

every reaction, and Roger's 

walk-through to the finish of al! the games. 

Covers Space Quest I • I'V. 



\ \~m 



YES! 



I I I want more hints and tips! Please 

send me the books checked below. 

D The Otllcial Book ol King's Quest, Second Edition (2452) S12.95 
D The Official Guide to Roger Wiico's Space Adventures (237) SI 4.95 
D Thve Olticial Guide to Sid Meier's Raiiroad Tycoon (2443) S12.95 



Tota! Numlier ol Books 
Total Cost of Books Ordered 



Sales Tax (Residents ol NY, NC, and MJ add appropiale sales tax tor 
your area. Canadian orders add 7% goods and services tax,) 

Shipping and Handling: $2 per tuok U.S.; $4 Canada: 
S6 foreign. 

Total Enclosed 



D Check or liJoney Order 
Signature 



DMC DVISA 



n 



Acci, No. . 



Exp. Date . 



Please Print 



Nams . 



Sireet AdSress . 
City 



-Stale . 



Zip. 

All orders must be paid in U.S. funds drawn on a U.S. bank. 

Mail tills entire coupon to: 
COMPUTE Books 
c/o CCC 

2500 McClellan Ave. 
Pennsauken, NJ 06109 



Offer good wtiile supplies last. 



eH92C 




REVEWS 



sizes, and they're remova- 
ble — so you can easily carry 
an extra hard drive with you. 
The 60MB drive I tested 
worked fine with Stacker 
2.0, providing a 120MB 
hard drive in a very small 
package. 

Epson also offers an op- 
tional lightweight docking sta- 
tion that lets you add two 
standard 16-bit cards and a 
proprietary 200MB hard 
drive. The docking station 
has its own handle and can 
be carried with the NB3s at- 
tached. Epson even offers a 
special carrying case that 
accommodates both units, 
which together weigh only 
ten pounds. This combina- 
tion, unique at this price, 
would allow you to add both 
network and multimedia 
cards and easily move the 
whole thing between your of- 
fice and home. 

For a notebook computer, 
the keyboard has an excel- 
lent feel. The NB3s uses the 
much-preferred inverted-T 
cursor-key layout, though 
the Insert and Delete keys 
are awkwardly placed to the 
right of the space bar. 
There's also a standby but- 
ton that you can use to shut 
down most of the unit's pow- 
er quickly without having to 
reboot. As is true with most 
early notebooks, pressing 
the standby button will lock 
up the system when you're 
in Windows' 386-enhanced 
mode. 

As for the NB3s's disad- 
vantages, there are three 
main ones: a very short bat- 
tery life, a slower-than-usual 
processor, and the inability 
to switch automatically be- 
tween normal and inverse 
modes while in Windows. 
The rechargeable battery 
runs only 1 to ^V2 hours, 
though this is somewhat mit- 
igated by Epson's including 
two batteries with the unit. 
The processor runs at 16 

106 COMPUTE AUGUST 1992 





4i 


|,:^»:»^B".J 


HI:' 1 


B. 

W 




£ 



Hoyle's Official Bool< of Games. Volume 3. allows ctiildren and 
adults to play several fine games, including frog cfiecl<ers. 



MHz, rather than the 20- 
and 25-MHz speeds more 
common in today's note- 
book computers. 

Not being able to switch 
automatically between nor- 
mal and inverse modes re- 
quires a bit of explanation. 
Because white text against 
a black background can be 
hard to read on an LCD 
screen, most notebook com- 
puters switch from inverse 
to normal when moving 
from a text-based to a graph- 
ics-based application. The 
NB3s doesn't do this auto- 
matically, but it does in- 
clude a program that you 
can use in your batch files 
to make the switch for you. 
Unfortunately, this program 
doesn't work under Win- 
dows. If you prefer black 
text against a white back- 
ground and use Windows, 
you'll have to put up with a 
certain amount of frustration. 
If you prefer white text 
against a black background 
or don't use Windows, you'll 
feel perfectly at home. 

If the slower processor, 
shorter battery life, and in- 
verse-mode problems don't 
bother you, the NB3s is a 
nice little notebook. Its 
small size and lightweight 
docking station make it a 
good choice for shuffling be- 



tween your office and 
home. Since the NB3s was 
discontinued earlier this 
year, if you see one for a bar- 
gain price at your local dis- 
count store — as I did recent- 
ly — consider picking it up 
and giving it a try. 

DAVID ENGLISH 

Epson NB3s with 1MB RAM and 
60MB hard drive— $3,398 

EPSON AMERICA 

20770 Madfona Ave. 

Torrance, CA 90503 

(800) 922-8911 

(310) 782-0770 

Circle Reader Service Number 36S 

HOYLE'S OFFICIAL 
BOOK OF GAMES, 
VOLUME 3 

In Hoyle's Official Book of 
Games, Volume 3, Sierra re- 
turns once again to the tried- 
and-true games format used 
in its two earlier versions. 
Hoyle's 3 presents us with 
six new game challenges: 
Checkers, Backgammon, 
Dominoes, Snakes and Lad- 
ders, Yacht {a variation on 
Yahtzee), and Pachisi (a var- 
iation on Parcheesi). The 
third Hoyle's presents 
board games as opposed 
to the card games that were 
offered in Hoyle's 2, 



I was pleased to see that 
the computer opponents pre- 
sented in Hoyle's 3 are, as 
in the first Hoyle's, nine he- 
roes and nine villains of oth- 
er Sierra games. (Hoyle's 2 
is a solitaire game; there are 
no opponents other than 
you and the cards,) You can 
now pit your Pachisi prowess 
against Passionate Patty and 
her pulsations. You can over- 
haul Vohaul's Yacht. The 
nine heroes are arranged in 
order of their difficulty as 
opponents, from Mother 
Goose, whose digitized 
voice prompts you when 
you make a mistake, to Son- 
ny Bonds, whose ruthless 
play is mirrored in his 
squinty-eyed computer vis- 
age. The villains are similar- 
ly ordered according to 
their play proficiency. If you 
don't like computer oppo- 
nents, you can play against 
human ones. 

Checkers is by far the 
cutesiest game in the box, 
with little green and red 
frogs sitting and croaking 
on lily pads configured in 
the familiar 8x8 checker- 
board pattern. A frog can 
jump from anywhere to any- 
where, even to the top of 
your opponent's head. It will 
then jump back to its origi- 
nal position, while your oppo- 
nent's digitized voice in- 
forms you that you've made 
an illegal move. If a legal 
move is made, the game pro- 
ceeds as usual. If you make 
a double jump, your oppo- 
nent will acknowledge your 
obvious demonstration of 
skill with a compliment. 
Once jumped, frogs dive 
deep into a pond. Should 
you choose, traditional but- 
ton-shaped checkers can 
be used, but I strongly rec- 
ommend playing with the 
frogs at least once. 

Yacht and Pachisi are sim- 
ilar to the board versions of 
the games Yahtzee and Par- 




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Becker Tools 75 

Calendar Creator * 55 
CartxsnCopy 115 

Central R Antivirus 84 
Choas 39 

Colorix 95 

Copy II PC 35 

Coret Draw 349 

Correct Grammar Wind62 
Data Ease Personal 68 
7S 
125 
65 
31 
99 
59 
49 



Desqview 2.4 

Desqview 336 

D n CXJS 6.0 

Dvork on Typjr^ 

&(press Publisher 

Facelift 

Far Side C^alerxia/ 



CieoworksPro 119 

Qrammatik 5 57 

Hijaak 99 

ihio Select 87 

Language Assistant 
Fr..&..HsB,.ltal..Span. 42 
Laplink 4 Pro 99 

Lotus Works 89 

Microsoft Quick Basic 6 5 
Microsoft QuickC 65 
Money Counts 27 

MSDOSS.O 47 

MS DIDS 5.0 Upgrd 57 
Norton Desktop v2. 95 
Norton Utilities 1 1 1 

One Write Acct. 100 
Pacioli 2000 v2.0 31 
PC Animate Rus 1 1 5 
PC AnywtlBro 4 116 
PC Kwik Poworpak 72 
PC Paintbrush 4 59 
PC Paintbrush 4 * 114 
PC Tools 109 

Peachtree Basic 75 

PFS; Rrst Choice 75 
PFS; First Publishsr 75 
PFS: Window Works 75 
Presentath Tosh Free 119 
Print Shop 36 

Procomm Rus 2.0 69 
Pyro Scrssn Saver 35 
QGMM 61 

Q DOS 3 46 

ORAM 49 

Quicken 5.0 45 

Quicken lor Window 39 
Quicken Quick Pay 39 
OuickenOuickBook 84 
RightWrilor 57 

SitbackDOSorWih 69 
Software Carousel 55 
Stacker 79 

Slackerw/16BltCardl79 
Superstor 79 

Turbo Cadd v2.0 79 
Word Psrfet 6.1 orWin249 
Windows 3.1 92 

Winlax Pro 74 

IlilMJJi'^iHrfJtEin 

^poinlHoiSoRsnPrCTo 
OH Roller Mouse Serial 85 
Expert Mouse Serial 95 
Microsoft Mouse 85 
Mpuseman Serial 69 
Mouse Systems PC 3 69 
MouseS)«ieni Trackball 59 



MODEMS 



Frecom Fax960helirter 139 
MaxFax9624Fax/Md 115 
Maxlits 9624PC 199 
Maxlits 98/95 349 

Moxljte 14.4/14.4 419 
Practical Peripherals 
PM2400lnlBrnal 129 
PW 2400 External 175 
US Robotics 

Courisr 2400 289 
Couriar 2400 w/ MNP 299 
Sportster 2400 ExL 1 49 
Sportster 2400 im. 129 
SpE>ei9r2«Xlw/M^ 
Zoom External 67 

Zoom Internal 65 



SCAMNERS 



CompinanKoscarw ihd 
CompI Hand Scanner 155 
Microtek 600Z 1399 
Mouse Sys. Psbrsh 32 165 
Scanman 32 160 

Scanman 256 265 
Scahman256MCA 349 



SOUND CARDS 



Ad Lib Sound Card 65 
ATI Stereo F/x 139 

VGA stereo F/X 1 MB 360 
Covox Sound Master li 1 4S 
Media Viskm 
AudoPort 139 

CDPC 1079 

Pro Audio SpectPtus 1B9 
ProAudioSpoctrumie 22g 
Pro 16 Multimedia 
Upgrade Kit ggg 

Thunderboard 95 

Thundertxiord Wrxjow 1 09 
Sound Blaster 99 

Sound Blaster MCA 219 
Sound Blaster Pro 1 89 
S<MV]3iasiixl.V/iiiHdaiCt 560 
S.G.a>KWw/So»mirert. 360 
S.B. CD-flO^^^ Extern 429 
Sound Commander 99 
Roland SCC-1 GS 375 
Sound Canvas 559 



■^.IliahJddJ:^*!^ 

MidialOrSaoaltOrLaplOp 96 



PC fvlidi Card 
MQX.32 

MPLWPC 
MPU-tMC 



79 
179 
136 
245 



CakewaStApprentce 145 
The Miracle 349 



MIDI SOFTWARE 




Ballade 


U^ 




Band in a Box 


BS 




Cadenza 


12S 




Cakewalk 


35 




Cakewalk Pro 


IRfi 




Cakewalk Windows 2^0 




Cop/isi Apprentice 


95 




Copyist Pro/ DTP 


245 




Drummer 


6y 




Ericore 


379 




Piano Works 


95 




Ray it t>y Ear 


69 




Master Tracks Pro 


249 




Music Printer Plus 


419 




Music Time 


IBB 




Musicator 


375 




Quick Score Deluxe 


9B 




Recording Studio Pro 75 




Rhythm Ace 


69 




Songwright 5 


6b 




Trax for Windows 


60 




JOYSTICKS 




DH Fhghtstick 


44 




OH (jamo Card 3 Auto 


31 




:h Mach 3 


31 




Elimnator 33MHz Cart 


26 




3ravisJoystick 


35 




Sravis PC Game Pad 21 




KraftKC3Joystick 


18 




<raftThuhderstick 


28 




Vlaxx Flight Yoke 


69 




Vlaxx Pedal 


39 




Duickshoi Aviator 5 


32 




^ucksrxjt Game Card 


14 




Duickshot Intruder 5 


30 




Duickshot Warrior 


18 




Tlirustmaster Flight 


69 




Tlirustmaster Pro 


109 




Weapons Control 


79 





SKINS S> PADS 



uusi L'pvers 

Grounded Wrist Straps 9 

Koytjoard Skins 1 5 
Static Pads 

t-argo- System 1 5 

Wrist Pads 8 

Stax (Dust Repellent) 5 
Statx Complete 

Cleaning System 15 



TERMS AND CONDITIONS 



Master Carid.visa, American Express t Discover 
Accepted. No Surcharge on Credit Cards. Bv mail: 
P.O. Box 3, Carteret, N.J. 07008. All Sales Are 
Final. NO REFUNDS! Exchange on defective merchandise 
with the same item only, no exceptions. All Products 
are new. We do not guarentee compatabilicy . Shipping 
charges; 48 contiguous states, 54 per order. Alaska, 
Hawaii, and Puerto Rico $10 1st pc, , $1 ea. add. APO/ 
FPO and P.O. Boxes $6 1st pc. Si ea. add. Canada $8 
1st pc. Si ea.add. Heavier items extra. Foreign 
orders call for shipping charges. N.J. Residents add 
sales tax. Call for current price and availability, 
GOVERMENT AND SCHOOL P.O. 's WELCOMED. ••Does not 
include closeouts, licjuidations, or limited quantities 
and product must be shipping, for your protection, 
we will only ship to the address the credit card co. 
has on file. Hours; M-F 9A.M.-8P.H. Sat 10-3 



Cliisle Reader Seivlce Number 203 



REVIEWS 



cheesi, but not identical. In 
Yacht, you use five dice to 
build poker hands. The 
flashy color-cycling back- 
ground where the dice are 
rolled is animated to in- 
crease variety and interest. 
In Pachisi, you can play with 
up to four players, either com- 
puter-controlled or human. 
Cowrie shells, which were 
used in the ancient game, 
can be rolled instead of 
dice, with the clear or slitted 
side of the shells indicating 
the number of moves. An al- 
ternate board layout can be 
selected for gameplay. Nei- 
ther Yacht nor Pachisi has a 
board exactly the same as 
that of its respective board 
game. 

Dominoes, Backgammon, 
and Snakes and Ladders 
are the traditional games 
with no differences in this ver- 
sion. Dominoes can be 
played with two players and 
six different sets of rules. 
Backgammon can be played 
with two players and allows 
for use of the doubling cube 
if desired, Backgammon also 
lets you play with acey- 
deucy rules against a hu- 
man, and two board de- 
signs are available. Snakes 
and Ladders is played with 
up to four computer or hu- 
man players. The playing 
pieces are animated chil- 
dren who automatically 
climb the ladders and slide 
down the snakes. The anima- 
tion is fluid, well done, and 
fascinating to watch. The 
rules can be varied, and the 
game can be configured so 
it prompts younger players 
to make the correct moves. 

Hoyle's backgrounds, op- 
ponents, and playing pieces 
are animated, with digitized 
voices and a varied musical 
score accompanying play, 
The music is impressive 
throughout, as are the digit- 
ized voices. While playing 
the games, you can carry 

108 COMPUTE AUGUST 1992 



on conversations with the 
computer players to get infor- 
mation on the history of the 
games. Hoyle's 3 comes in 
256-color and 16-color VGA 
and EGA with two sets of 
3'/2- and 5y4-inch disks. Mo- 
dem play is not supported 
by the game. If you wish to 
play a human opponent by 
modem, you must subscribe 
to The Sierra Network (TSN). 
a new electronic database 
service recently established 
by Sierra, and play Hoyle's 
3 on the TSN board. Some 
voice bugs have been report- 
ed, such as conflicts with 
the mouse and partial rather 
than complete phrases and 
words. 

On the whole, Hoyle's 3 is 
a great game for adults and 
children alike. Small chil- 
dren will learn about the 
games by choosing oppo- 
nents like Mother Goose, 
who will not only teach them 
how to play but also tell 
them about the history of 
the games. If my experience 
is any indication, grownups 
will be equally entertained. 
Hoyle's 3 will probably be a 
permanent addition to my 
hard drive. 

ALFRED C. GIOVEHI 

IBM PC and compatibles; 640K 
RAM; hard drive; mouse recommend- 
ed; supports Thiunderboard, Pro Au- 
dio Spectrum, Sound Blaster, Ad 
Lib and Roland— S49.95 

SIERRA ON■Llr^jE 

RO. Box 485 

Coarsegold. CA 93614 

(209) 683-4468 

Circle Reader Service Number 369 

DICONEX COLOR 4 

Kodak's Diconix Color 4 is a 
lightweight and quiet desk- 
top color ink-jet printer that 
uses four drop-in cartridges 
of black, magenta, cyan, 
and yellow ink to produce 
an expansive palette of col- 
or combinations. 
The Color 4 offers 192 x 



192 dpi resolution on both 
plain paper and ink-jet trans- 
parencies. Its ability to print 
transparencies could be a 
real boon to anyone who 
needs to create display or 
presentation transparencies 
for use in overhead projec- 
tors. The Color 4 accepts 
both cut-sheet and tractor- 
feed paper. 

Setting up the Color 4 is 
simple. A system card 
which contains driver informa- 
tion slips into a slot in the 
back of the printer, and the 
four color cartridges drop 
easily into their color-coded 
receptacles in the printhead 
assembly. The cartridges 
do have to be primed for 
use first. This involves using 
a paper clip to start the flow 
of ink before the cartridges 
are inserted. A small sheet 
of blotter paper supplied 
with the printer must also be 
inserted in a special recep- 
tacle. This blotter absorbs ex- 
cess ink and helps prevent 
smearing. 

The printer's display pan- 
el contains the usual online, 
linefeed, and form-feed but- 
tons, pius a 16-character 
LCD display window. This 
display keeps you informed 
of any errors, and it also 
serves as a menu from 
which to select printing func- 
tions. From this menu, you 
can select either paper or 
transparency, print quality, 
any of three resident fonts, 
text color, and text mode. 

This display is especially 
useful whenever a malfunc- 
tion occurs. The Color 4 can 
diagnose most problems 
and flash an appropriate 
message on the screen. 
Some messages, such as 
ADD PAPER, are easy to 
understand, while others, 
such as CARTRIDGE 41, 
require help from the manu- 
al in locating a possible 
cause and remedy. 

I experienced this latter 



message a number of times 
when I first used the Color 4 
near an office window. One 
possible remedy involved re- 
moving, inspecting, and prim- 
ing the black ink cartridge. 
This error persisted intermit- 
tently and became quite an- 
noying. Later, I discovered 
that ambient light could be 
the culprit, causing such re- 
peated errors to occur. An 
optical sensor tracks car- 
riage and printhead move- 
ment, and bright light on 
this sensor can cause er- 
rors. After I made certain 
that the printer's iid was 
closed and I moved it away 
from the window, the Color 
4 worked very well. 

I tried the printer with a 
number of color printing pro- 
grams, but very few of tfiem 
had a printer driver for this 
new model. The manual rec- 
ommends selecting a Hew- 
lett-Packard PaintJet driver 
as an alternative. 

Whenever this driver was 
available, the Color 4 per- 
formed quite well and the 
quality of its color images 
was impressive. Drivers are 
supplied on a separate disk 
for using the Color 4 with Mi- 
crosoft Windows. 

On the negative side, I 
was not impressed with the 
quality of the Color 4's text 
printouts. Draft, NLQ, and 
Quality modes are availa- 
ble, but even at its highest 
resolution, I'd hesitate to 
recommend the Color 4 for 
business correspondence. 1 
wou/d recommend it, howev- 
er, for use at home, at 
school, or anywhere else 
that low-cost color printouts 
are needed. 

TOM r-JETSEL 

Diconix Color 4— S89B 

EASTMAN KODAK 
343 State St, 
Rochester. NY 14650 
(716) 724-4000 

Circle Reader Service Number 370 



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Here are hundreds of tips 

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m mMuM* hints and tips. 
Please send me the books checked below. 

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BM92C 



THE OFFICIAL 

GUIDE 
TO MEGA MAN 

This is the complete 
playing guide to all four of the 

best-selling Mega Man 
games, including Mega Man 

Game Boy, 
Features include extensive 

playing tips, 
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Schwartz is known for. 



COMPUTE'S 

GUIDE TO NINTENDO 

ADVENTURE 

GAMES 

Includes tips and 

strategies for half a 

dozen of the 

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Covers The Bsrd's Tale. 

Crystalis, Final 
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Shadowgate, 

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and Ultima. 




Dr. Schueler's 

Home Medical 
Advisor 

COMPUTER PROGRAM 




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Send your computer to medical school and 
access updated info on self care, symptom 
analysis, and preventative medicine. 



Urto.Ws 




Using color graphics Dr. Schueler's takesyou r 

medical history and analyzes your symptoms. 



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Conceived and designed over a two-year 
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The Home Medical Advisor contains vast 
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poisons, drug into, injuries, and medical tests. 

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PIXEL PERFECT, II\IC. 

10460 S. Tropical Tr., Merritt Island, FL 32952 



eiEws 

DESIGN YOUR OWN 
HOME 

For many years, I've dreamed of design- 
ing my own house, and I've covered 
an untold number of sheets of paper 
w/ith sketches and plans. But the effort 
made one thing abundantly clear. I'm, 
no architect, and it shows. 

Then I discovered the Design Your 
Own Home software from Oregon- 
based Abracadata. Its three modules 
(Architecture, Interiors, and Land- 
scape) brought my PC into the picture. 
Ah . . . Just the thing for a would-be 
Frank Lloyd Wright like me! 

The DYOH modules are, in essence, 
a set of specialized CAD programs 
with reasonable price tags and gentle 
learning curves. At the heart of each 
one is an intuitive, Windows-like user 
interface with pull-down menus. Each 
module offers a variety of appropriate 
tools for creating and labeling your de- 
signs; a mouse is highly recommended 
for DYOH. 

One key to successful PC-based de- 
sign is the ability to create and export 
layers, and this is easily done in the 
DYOH modules. For instance, you can 
create a floor plan in DYOH Architec- 
ture with separate overlays showing wir- 
ing and plumbing. You can then import 
the basic plan into DYOH Interiors to 
lay out furniture and plan the decor. Fi- 
nally, you can use DYOH Landscape 
to plan the plantings and gardens. It's 
straightforward, and it's fun! 

Although each module is a stand- 
alone package, many users will want to 
start by designing a floor plan and el- 
evations (side views) with DYOH Archi- 
tecture. Features such as automatic 
scaling and snap-to-grid speed the 
process, and a library of predrawn ar- 
chitectural symbols (stairs, doors, and 
so on) eliminates tedious detail draw- 
ing. You can modify a built-in sample 
plan, work with a plan from one of the 
optional libraries, or (like me) start 
from scratch and design your own. 
Plan size can range from one page 
wide by one page high (a single 
screen) to eight pages wide by eight 
pages high. 

With the floor plan done, DYOH Inte- 
riors helps you design the interior and 
arrange the furniture. You have control 
over color, texture, and even simufated 
wallpaper patterns. Interiors also offers 
a library of common furnishings, which 
you can move anywhere you want. Fin- 
ished with your arrangement? Check it 
out from four different sides and from: 
above. Don't like it? Just click on the of- 



fending piece of furniture and drag it 
somewhere else. At last — a way to 
move sofas without working up a 
sweat! 

Finally, DYOH Landscape helps you 
plan the plantings around the structure 
you've designed. The program auto- 
matically generates four side views 
from your top-view drawing. You can al- 
so preview the landscape at different 




Abracadata's Design Your Own Home 
gives a total picture at a good price. 

seasons and even at different ages 
(helpful for seeing how your landscap- 
ing will look once it's "grown out"). Tfie 
program includes a basic library of 
plant types, although you may want to 
add one of five optional regional plant 
libraries, too. DYOH Landscape even 
prepares a shopping list for you to 
take to the local nursery. 

As you might expect, the DYOH 
packages are not quite so gutsy as 
their full-blown CAD cousins, But nei- 
ther are they as expensive or as com- 
plex. You'll master any of them in just 
a couple of hours, and you'll be turning 
out the plans for your dream house in 
no time at all. 

STEVE HUDSON 



ISM PC and compatibles: 640K RAM: CGA, EGA, 
VGA. or Hercules: mouse recommended— $99.95 

ABRACADATA 

P.O. Box 2440 

Eugene, OR 97402 

(800)451-4871 

(503) 342-3030 

Circle Reader Service Number 371 



LEXia 



WordStar's Lexica describes itself as 
"a memory-resfdent, multilingual, trans- 
lating thesaurus that can quickly trans- 
late words and phrases from one lan- 
guage to another." While Lexica won't 
exactly undo the curse of Babel, it may 
well make dealing with foreign languag- 
es easier — if you already know them. 

Lexica's thesaurus contains a gener- 
ous selection of words from English, 
Dutch, German, French, and Spanish 
(any or all of these languages may be 
loaded on your hard drive). The pro- 
gram may be called up from within a 



circle Reader Service Number 169 




UVE! Specializing in 
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1-900 



S5 first min./$3 ea. addl. min. 



Use the wisdom of 

psychic forces to 

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1 -900-773-6636 
$5 first nnin./$3 ea. addl. min. 

TALJ(TOAUVEI>SYCHIC! 



For entertainment purposes 

only. If you are under 18 years 

of age, please get parental 

permission. Live psycfiics are 

available 24 hours a day. 

Sponsored by Pet inc., P.O. Box 

166, Hollywood, CA 90078. 



word processor or at the system 
prompt. To access Lexica from your 
word processor, you place the cursor 
on the word you want translated and 
press the hot keys. The memory-resi- 
dent Lexica will tal<e you to the Trans- 
lation Screen, which consists of three 
main windows. The top window dis- 
plays the word you want translated, as 
well as a sampling of its context. The 




Lexica can give muHilingual synonyms to 
bilingual or multilingual peopie. 

lower left window contains your word in 
the primary language you're working in 
(called the Source Language); a list of 
its synonyms; and, in some cases, idi- 
omatic phrases in which the word typi- 
cally occurs. The lower right window dis- 
plays the Target Language translation, 
with the primary translation highlighted, 
along with a collection of the word's 
synonyms. 

Even more information is available 
on the Concept Detail Screen. Here, 
you may highlight each of the Source 
Language synonyms in turn, and the 
Target Language Window will indicate 
the most appropriate primary and sec- 
ondary translations for the word cho- 
sen, Move the highlight to the transla- 
tion you prefer and press Enter. If Lex- 
ica supports your word processor, it 
will erase the original word and substi- 
tute the translation. If Lexica doesn't 
support your word processor, the trans- 
lation will be inserted, but you'll have to 
delete the original word yourself. 

Once in Lexica, you can easily 
switch from language to language to 
provide a multilingual sampling of trans- 
lations. If you want to translate another 
word, you don't have to return to your 
text; Lexica allows you to type in a new 
word in any of the supported languag- 
es at any time. If the word contains in- 
ternational characters (accents or other 
diacritical marks) not on your keyboard, 
Lexica also provides a Compose Char- 
acters screen that shows you how to pro- 
duce the character you need. 

If you think you've finally happened 
across Star Trek's fabled Universal 
Translator— sorry. Lexica will be of lim- 
ited use if you don't already know at 
least some of the basic grammar of 
your target language. Lexica doesn't. 



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AUGUST 1992 COMPUTE 111 



IMPORTANT NOTICE 

FOR 

COMPUTE DISK 

SUBSCRIBERS 

COMPUTE offers two differ- 
ent disk products for PC reod- 
ers; tine SharePok disk and 
PC Disk. SharePak is montfiiy 
and has a subscription price 
of $59.95 for 5V4-inctn disks 
and $64.95 for 3V2-inch 
disks. A subscription to Shore- 
Pak does not include a sub- 
scription to tiie magazine, 
PC Disk appears in even-num- 
bered months and lias a sub- 
scription price of $49.95, 
which inciudes a subscrip- 
tion to the PC edition of 
COMPUTE. You can sub- 
scribe to either disk or to 
both, but a subscription to 
one does not inciude o sub- 
scription to the other. 



for example, conjugate verbs. If you 
ask it for, as an example, the French 
equivalent of the verb try, you'll get the 
infinitive forms: essayer, examiner, met- 
tre a I'essai, as well as many other 
synonymous verbs. But deciding on 
the person, number, and tense of the 
verb is up to vifhatever you've retained 
of high schoo! or college language 
study. (Lexica does, how/ever, helpfully 
indicate whether the verbs are transitive 
or intransitive.) Similarly, because 
w/ords don't translate from one language 
to another vi'ith mathematical exactitude, 
you'll have to know a little about the 
connotations of the Target Language 
words and their appropriateness in the 
context of your writing — a basic require- 
ment for the use of any thesaurus. 

Lexica is quite easy to learn and 
use. Most of its functions can be per- 
formed either through function keys or 
the handy pull-down menus, and the us- 
er's guide provides clear instructions in 
all five of the supported languages. 
Those who are cursed with slower PC 
systems may experience a wait of up 
to 30 seconds for Lexica to appear, 
but once you're in the system, it per- 
forms with gratifying speed. For people 
who frequently deal with other languag- 
es, Lexica is a wonderful remedy for 
those momentary bouts of aphasia. 

ANTHONY MOSES 



IBM PC and compatibles. 640K RAM, hard drive 
{4MB for ali languages): nnouse supported — $295 

WORDSTAR INTERNATIONAL 

201 Alameda Del Prado 

Novato. CA 94949 

(800) 523-3520 

Circle Reader Service Number 372 



SPEEDBALL 2 



Speedball 2 is more than a futuristic, 
fast-action sports game; it's a full 
sports simulation that lets you compete 
in a 16-team league for the world speed- 
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the competition, you'll use the detailed 
player and team statistics to trade and 
buy new team members in order to cre- 
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ey your team earns to buy extra equip- 
ment to boost your players' stats. 

When the game begins, you can 
choose from four play modes, includ- 
ing Knockout, which is a series of ex- 
hibition games against each of the 16 
teams; League, which is a 14-game sea- 
son; Cup, which is a single-elimination 
tournament; and Practice, which gives 
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Depending on the type of game you 
choose, you can view team and play- 



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112 



COMPUTE AUGUST 1992 



Advertisers Index 



Reader Service Number/Advertiser Page 

254 64 Disk Conneclion G-13 

16Z B-Bil G-13 

217 900 Sollware 119 

140 Abracadata 123 

119 Accolade 77 

232 AccoladB 67 

165 Accurale Technologies 126 

134 Active Data 118 

^IQ3 .,.,..,. 125 

240 AmperorUSA '.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'..... m 

155 Antigrav ToDlkil G-19 

239 ATOP A-30 

191 Bare Bones Software A-30 

260 Best Pefsonalized Books 121 

173 Blue Valley Solttvare 125 

255 Caloke Industries G-19 

241 CanCor A-31 

149 Chips S. Bits 101 

166 Cilizen Ameiican Corp 11 

187 ComPio Scltware System 118 

150 Compsult 122 

181 Compsult G-9 

1D3 CompuServe 17 

Computer Business Servlcss 12D 

136 Computer Fdends, inc 124 

141 Computer Produdions 124 

137 CovoK 117 

230 Covox 123 

125 Creative Labs 3 

213 CSA/Computer System Associates A-27 

133 Custom Compytef Solutions 124 

120 DCS Industries ... - 99 

Delphi Noetic Systems. Inc A-15 

161 Delphi Online 95 

131 DemoSource 116 

105 DigiVision A-31 

190 DiskoveriBS G-19 

135 Diskoveries 118 

253 Disks OPIenty Inc G-16 

208 Disk-Count Software 107 

175 D&K Enterprises inc 121 

185 Empire Simulation 71 

198 EMS Proiessional Stiareware 122 

215 ESi A-30,A-31 

FGM Conneclion G-15 

207 Finetastic Computers A-15 

142 Free Spiiil Sottwaie, Inc 125 

245 Friendiy Software 120 

231 GEnie 5 

252 Gordon & Associates 122 

145 Grapevine Group, The G-15 

203 Huntley Enterprises 120 

216 ICD A-7 



Reader Service Number/AiJverliser Page 

127 inductive Logic , , , 124 

237 inlEfplay 72 

160 !PD 124 

107 Izak Computer 120 

Jack ORoses G-16 

JP PBM Producls l)y Mail G-13 

233 Karen Crav<ther 120 

223 KodeKiakr Ltd G-19 

157 LascrTecb 124 

156 Legacy Soltmre 120 

129 LWS Software 116 

258 Mallard 37 

211 MegagsMA- 31 

180 Microgralx IFC.I 

PicroLogic 29 

197 MicroMagic Productions 118 

139 MicfoMiga A-25 

225 MicroProse 55 

144 MicroPiose 57 

212 MicroPiose 51 

224 MicroProse 53 

17B Microsphere inc - A-3 

163 Moonlighter Software A-11 

National Discount Coinpuler 119 

National Videotex Network 27 

199 Needham's Electronics 123 

153 New Worid Computing 87 

246 Nordic Track 93 

NRI/McGraw Hill 55 

128 Omnitron 126 

192 Origin 39 

104 Panasonic 9 

152 Pankhurst Programming G-19 

164 Parsons Technology Inc 13 

106 Parth Galen A-21 

196 PC Comix 96 

177 PC CompoNet Inc 122 

169 Pixel Perfect m 

185 Poor Person Sottwaie A-29 

122 PowerDisk 122 

193 Piotessional Cassette 115 

Professor Jones Inc 121 

Psygnosis 47 

Pure Entertainment 110 

Duality Innovations, Inc 118 

238 Ouan'um Quality Productions 81 

251 ReadySoft 93 

220 HoKrool Softtvare A-25 

143 SaleSolt Systems, inc 118 

112 School ol Computer Training 124 

Sentient Software 121 

116 SeXXy Software 123 

154 Sierra Online BC 



Reader Service Number/Advertiser 

244 Siarra OnLine 

1D9 Smart Luck Sollwaie 

182 SoftLogic Solutions 

189 SoftLogic Sotulions 

12B Softshoppe. Inc 

138 Software ol the Month Club 

121 Software ol the Month Club . . . . 

SOGWAP Software 

SOGWAP Software 

209 SONO Associates Inc 

108 Spectrum Holobyte 

113 Star Micronics 

130 Starware Publishing Corp 

235 Stationery House 

201 Sterlingmre 

179 SubLogic 

221 Superior Micro Systems 

2B4 Technology Link. Inc 

170 Tenex 

118 The Amish Ouftaw Shareware Co . . 

257 The Vivid Group 

147 ThrustMaster 

200 TriTech Software Inc 

256 US Robotics 

Video Projects 

206 Vidia 

184 Virgin Games 

158 Virgin Games 

171 VMC Software 

159 VMC Software 

123 VMC Software 

214 V/alnut Creet CDROM 

172 V/edgwDod Computer 

226 Wild Duck 

114 Zeros and One's 

228 ZipperWare 



Pagt 

. . 45 
. . 118 
. . 21 
. . 41 
. . 125 
.A-29 
. . 124 
.A-15 
. G-13 
. . 119 
. .43 
.23 
. .118 
. . 126 
. A-15 
. . . 83 
, G-13 
. . 124 
. . G-3 
. . 118 
. . A-9 
. . 117 
. . 125 
. , IBC 
. . Ill 
.A-21 
.. .25 
. 88.89 
,G-13 
.A-30 
.A-30 
..126 
. . 126 
. . 117 
. . 103 
. A-21 



Amiga Resource Disk 

Amiga Resource/GEnie OnLine 

COMPUTE/ America OnLine 

COMPUTE'S Best Utililies 

COMPUTE Books 84,A-20,A-26,9 

COMPUTE/GEnie OnLine 

COMPUTE/PC Power Disk 

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A-25 

A-13 

49 

A-29 
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31 

G-5 

G-9 

G-23 

G-15 

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CREDITS 



Cover: Steven Krongard; page 4: Paul Ambrose/ 
FPG International; pages 6-7, 10: Tom Curry; 
page 60; Pierre Peyrolle/lmage Bank; pages 68- 
69: Mark Wagoner; page 70; Clayton J. Price/ 
Stock Market; page 73: Salem Krieger/lmage 
Bank; pages 78-79: Mark Wagoner; pages 84- 
85: Mark Wagoner; page 90: Uniphoto: pages 
A-4-5: Mark McCandlish; page A-32; Masahiro 
Sano/Stock Market; page G-7: computer-gener- 
ated illustration by Geoff McCormick, artist rep- 
resentative/Mendola Ltd.; page S-1: a 1991 
winner from CorelDRAWI's annual design con- 
test by Norbert Chausse, 



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Our list can help you do Ihe 
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AUGUST 1992 COMPUTE 113 




eiEws 



er statistics, fire and hire play- 
ers, and buy new equip- 
ment, A splendidly crafted 3- 
D control panel — including 
player portraits, equipment 
display, moving buttons, 
and panel ligfits — guides 
you through) this portion of 
the game. 

When your team is ready, 
it's off to the playfield where 
the fun really revs up. The ob- 
ject of the game is to get 
the speedball into your oppo- 
nent's goal, but the playfield 
contains myriad devices 
and special items that com- 
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ramp, for example, increas- 
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each time you manage to 
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Also on the field are 
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kens can reduce your oppo- 
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mum, move the speedball 
instantly to one of your play- 
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Pieces of equipment, which 
appear sporadically on the 
playfield, boost one of a play- 
er's statistics when picked 

up- 
Sensational graphics, con- 
vincing animation, snappy 
music, savory sound ef- 
fects, and smooth gameplay 
combine to make Speedball 
2 a guaranteed hit. Comput- 
er sports fans won't want to 
overlook this one. 

CLAYTON WALNUM 

114 COMPUTE AUGUST 1992 



IBM PC and compaliblea; 640K 
RAM: EGA, VGA, or Tandy graphics; 
supports Ad Lib, Sound Blaster. Ro- 
land, and Tandy sound; ioystick and 
hard drive optional— S39. 95 

KONAMil 

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Circle Reader Service Number 373 



PC PARTNER LX 

Leading Technology's PC 
Partner LX is a super ma- 
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Designed with new comput- 
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PC Partner LX— SI, 199 

LEADING TECHNOLOGY 
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Circle RsBdsr Service Number 374 □ 



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For ad specifications or more information call 

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Telephone (707) 451-8209 • Fax (707) 451-4269 






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10150 S.W. Nimbus Ave Ste E-7 
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circle Reader Service Number 19 



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UPGRADES! 

starting At only $199 

AfforcUihIc! .Slotlcss! Tlic .Siipcrflliip rati 
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Run Windows 3.1 in the enhanced mode, 
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1<.)831 Billings Court 
Gaitlicrsburg, Maryland 20879 

Telephone or Fax 
(301)977-1329 



Clrele Reader Service Number Z52 




While They Last 

Publish It! 
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Tliii is not a mlcprint. For a limits time you 
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/V «Sw*/ honored the program as a " Best Buy " 

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awarded the program their coveted "Editor's 

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"" ■ the source of plan-making sottviaie 



SeXXy CD-ROM - 680 Ml) with 5,268 VGA piclures, BF movlis 

67.t stories, games. Price: S99 (S89 *illi any CC disk) 

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• Special ptanlingtool 
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• Databases of vege- 
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• Text and drawing 
loots lor customized 
garden design, 



• Prints reports which 
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yield estimates. 

■ Rulers, ruler lines, and 
on-screen measurements 
aid in layout design 

• 4 scales available with 
printouts o( up to 

8 by 8 pages. 



PC Zone Price ^38 ^^ 

MacZone Price H8 ^^ 

800-248-0800 



^e 



800-258-2088 




For FREE Color Catalog from Abracadata: 
Call; 800-451-4871 or FAX: 503-683-1925 



Circlfl Reader Service Number 116 



Circle Reader Service Number- 140 



TALK TO YOUR COMPUTERB^PR"™ PROGRAMMERS 



WITH VOICE MASTER KEY« 

A PROFESSIONAL VOICE PROCESSING SYSTEM 

ADD UP TO 1024 VOICE COMMANDS TO EXISTING PftOORAMSI Speeds data 
entry and command input to CAD, desk-top fiublishing. word processing, spread 
sheet, data base, or game programs. Simply train trie computer to recognize a word 
or phrase and assign a series ot key strokes to thai command. Pop-up fSR program 
features pulWcwn menus and mouse support. Requires under 16K of main memory il 
EMS present. Near instant response time and high recognition accuracy. 

SOUND RECORDING STUDIO 

Digitally record your own speech, 
sound, or music. Software control- 
ied sampling rate (up to 
25Kbytes/SBC) with graphics- 
based editing and data compres- 
sion utiiitjes. Create customized 
audio software tor use within 
education, language training, 

Sresentations, enterteinmeni, etc. 
MA data transfer provides con- 
tinuous recording and playbad< of 
sound to/from tiard disk, PC inter- 
nal speaker supporred, 

INTERACTIVE SPEECH INPUT AND OUTPUT 

Tag your own digitized audio files to voice recognition macros. Provides speech 
resfionse to your spoken commands - all from within virtually ALL DOS application 
softv*are! Reduces CRT "eye fixation". Also ideal for training, security, robotics, factory- 
business-home automation, science experiments, handicapped, big. 

COMPATIBLE with talking soltware from IBM, Milliken, First Byte, Davidson, Optimum 
Resources, Briiannica Sottvtare, Electronic Arts. Hyperglot, Orange Cherry, Wesson 
Infl, Villa Crespo, McGraw-Hill, etc - both DOS ancf Windows-compatible versions. 

EVERYTHING INCLUDED Voice Master Key System consists of a halt-size card, 
durable lightweight microphone headset, software (5.25" floppies unless ottierwise 
specified), and manual. Made in U.S.A. One year warranty on hardware. 

ONLY S1 99.95 (plus snipping) 

ORDER HOTLINE call: [503) 342-1271 Monday-Friday 8 AM to S PM Pacific Time. 
VISAyMasterCard/American Express phone or FAX orders welcome. NO CODS, Add 
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30 DAY MONEY BACK GUARANTEE IF NOT COMPLETEL Y SA TISFIED. 
CALL , WRITE, or FAX US FOR FREE PRODUCT CATALOG 




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675 Conger Street 

Eugene, Oregon 97il02 U,SA 



Tel; (503) 342-1271 
FAX: (503) 342-12S3 
BBS: (503) 342-4136 



Stand-Alone Gang Programmer 



e ZIF Sockets (or Fast Gang 
Programming aisd Easy 
Splitting 




?{] Key Keypad 



re LCD Display 



• Completely stand-alone or PC-ririven 

• Programs E(ElPaDM5 

• 1 MegsMt ol DRAM 

• User upgradable lo 32 Megabit 

• ,3/,6" ZIF Sockets, RS-232, 
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• 32K inwrnal Flash EEPROM lor easy 
filmware upgrades 

• gulch Pulse AlgorlUim (27251 
In 5 sec, 1 Megabit In 17 sec) 

■ 2 year .varranty 

• Marie In the U.S.A. 
•Techrical support by phone 

■ Complate manual anrl sch^matrc 

• Single Socltet Piogrammer also 
aiallalile. SSSD.OO 

• Split ar.aShljIlle 16 4 32 t]il 

■ too User Oelinable Macros, 10 User 
Definable Configurations 

" Intelliceni Identifier 

• Binary. Intel Hex, and Motorola S 

• 271G to 4 Megabit 



Internal Programmer for PC 



Wew Intelligsnt Averaging Atgoriihrn. Programs 64A tp 10 sec, 256 In 1 p:\in., 1 Meg (27010,011) 
rn 2 min. 45 sec. 2 Meg (27C2001 ) in 5 min. Internal card with external 40 pin ZiF. 



■ Reads, Verifies, and programs 2716, 32, 32A, 
64,«A, 128, 12aA 256, 5t2, 513, 010, 011,301. 
27C2001. f.lCW 68764. 2532. 4 Megabits 

• Aulomatlcallii itts proorantmlng nollagg 

• Load and save bolter to drsk 

■ Binary. Iniel Hex, and Motorola S lorrrats 

• No personalllv modules lequlrstl 

• 1 Year warranty 

• 10 da/s money back guarantee 

• Adapters available for 3748, 49, 51 , 751 , 52, 
65, TMS 7742, 27210. 57i;i024, and memoiy 
cards 

• WademU.SA 



40 pin ZIF 




EMPDEMO.EXE available BBS (916) 972-8042 



NEEDHAM'S ELECTRONICS 

4539 Orange Grove Aye • Sscramento. CA 95841 

iMonday-Friday, Bam'5pm.PSTl COD 



Call tar mora irlormalion 

(916)924-8037 

FAX (9:6) 972-9960 



Circle Reader Service Number 230 



Circle Reader Service Number 199 



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End the DOS Nightmare! 



t wolUng wWi DOS duitrci tha d^ h kHptv yo" "P si 
nigtil Its time (o {^ JitCcmmoiuil 

PCU UsgiidM Publlilier'i Pick 10^91 
'A pinwful tupfilenieni to 0OS-„ MlonKitt should 
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optiwi, mora IsahFDS ttisn Ncxton 
'EMCUt*: run yar own pre^wns Bfid bakii lies as H tfiey 

had II lh« mCtmmait) Hi tafsdjon cepaMUBS 
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Induing •< lix!]: ««. dfOdKlsj. » urtira WW 
• Copy: mrtpto >o(fl« In one axrtreni. InowMrtH badajps 

Up « «ni ItaW b (oppiM Wn XCOPY 
-0n4ne (nCoramaiT) S DOS ralwenai CBellw tKn DOS SO'a") 
■ Phy*fcal draciwy sort, rwhrtrt ampflflbte. and much mora! 

Productivity Yeu Only |]resn«d 01, IMH Nowl 

fUl (Urt hxn t» DOS iwipl. Ho Miua to ilM joi dD»n. 

bUifle Vi ki ■> and dTEdor ntlCBrds. 

Selaij {and KduJa) ruHple nldsii! paOsmE at onoa. 

SelKl l« ee^lRE. AHK « ON vv Malnn. BKJGEfl « SUAUS1 

than my iza, <r«i cr virsl 117 iKtUea 
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P.O- Bffll 26238 

San Dlago, CA 92196 

|ei9] $7^514e 



Circle Reader Service Number 204 



IiitetUgeiU Sojiwaie for Lreiy User 



Circle Reader Service Number 127 



Learn . 
Computers! 




i 



Home study. 
Leam the per- 
sonal compu- 
ter for a better 
career and an 
easier home 
life. Exciting, 
easy to follow. 
Free booklet. 

VMLLoi,v'223'4542 

The School OF 
Computer Training 

2245 Perimeter Park 
Dent. KN680. Atlanta. Georcia 30341 . 

L I 

circle Reader Service Number 112 



WhereAdults 
St Come To Play! 



With NO HOURLY CONWECT or 
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From Over 800 U.S. Cities! 

■ CB-Styie Group and Private CHATl 

■ lOOO's Of Shareware Programsl 

■ Biistncas and I^raonal Servlccsl 

■ Travel & Flight Scheduling with OAGI 

■ Giant Message Forums & Claaslfledsl 

■ Live MulOplayer Realtime Gamcsl 

■ Matchmaker DaUiigbascI Plus Morel 

For sianup or More Info Cau. 

818-358-6968 

Br MODEM, a/N/1 3/ia/34O0 BAUD 



circle Reader Service Number 141 



Save BIG . . 
printing 




With Maclnker™ you can have better 
than new cartridges for less than 5e. 

Over 200,000 sold. Beautiful printing and 
longer printhead life. Average Cartridge 
can be re-inked 60-100 times. Call for 
complete information. 

Universal Cartridge Model 79.45 

Epson Maelnker 48.00 

Multicolor Adapter 40.00 

Or if you have an Ink-Jet, Bubble-Jet, or 
ThinkJet printer, re-charge your 
cartridges with Jet-Master from $24.95 

Computer Friends, Inc. 

14250 NW Science Park Dri\'e 

Portland, OR 97229 

To Order 1-800-547-3303 

Circle Raeder Service Number 136 




• SHAREWARE! 
^FREE CATALOGUER 

* IBM SOFTWARE t 

•k D lOO's of Quality Programs Available • 
•ir □ Vitys Free [S^H '^ 

^ D Ask for your "FRtE' sample B^H ^ 
gome disc. HUH 

* SHAREWARE CENTRAL * 

* P.O. Box 897 • Wheofley, Ont. NOP 2P0 * 
•k a -k -C! (519)825-7480 tr k ^ * 

circle Reader Service Number 157 



/^XXX 

Rated 



'VGA_ 



Not a Video I N ol a CartoonI But true lilm quality, 
computeranimated movlss by professior^ai artistsl 

Beyond Your Wildest Dreams ! 

The Ultimate Erotic Fantasy 1 

Physically & Humanly Impossible! 



ttaiDmt ■ ffiM or Ccmpallbe. 



Hudwam Rtqiimnenls 
256 Color VGA Of SVGA 

Piidiig 
Full Length Motion Picture, Vdune 1 - (29.00 (3 Dshs). 
Dcnvo Dill!- 15.01(1 l}bli). Res» Slalo 5-1 ^t Of 1-1/2 Dslo. 
Rus (2.50 SlippingiiHan ling. N.J.ne»d ml aiid 7% Sales Tut. 

Senl Check or Mzniy Older, tUittrMnd VitM Kxtfttd. 
IPD34W.Baire>a<iAw.,Suite111,T8naflv,NJ. 07570 
(201) 947-5252 

\ Must Siaie Age Over 21. y 

Circle Reader Service Number 1S0 



FREE- 15 DISKS -FREE 

Receive 15/5.25" or 6/3.5" 

Disks Full of our Best 

Selling Software 

Choose from 



lESS 

EDUCATION • UTlLmES 
RELIGION 



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Satisfaction guaranteed S'"*^^ '9^5 



^n/l/^ SOFTWARE 

OlvIO PUBLISHERS 

CREDIT CARDS ONL Y ■ ORDER TOD A Y - CALL 

619-931-8111 EX.511 



Circle Reader Service Number 121 



TAKE THE CHALLENGE!! 

test your knowledge 
of U.S. and worid geography 

FOLLOW THE CLUES II 

tlie cities, rivers, n-tountaln ranges 
solve the puzzles 

PLAY IT S MARTI I 

not just games but fun learning tools 

play tfiese new P.C. games for travel, 
adventure, excitement 

lorlBM/Compatibtea 

tree color brochure available 

(212) 744-4479 

CUSTOM COMPUTER SOLUTIONS, INC 

St9 137, 217 E. ee St, Nav* York, NY 10028 



Circle Reader Service Number 133 



i ;^'4g«*s\'4gj[:k^4?^?i^^gjE%.^ 




THE MAGIC MIRROR ... a toolbox 
for your mind. E. Ktnnie, PhD., Clinical 
Psychologist. $39.95. 

THE MAGIC MOUNTAIN ... a journey 
into anottier reality. Not for ctiildren. 
Specify male or female version. $29.95 
eacti. Both, $39.95. 

IVIERLIN ... an apprenlicestiip. $29.95. 

I CHING . . . ancient Cliinese wisdom 
and prophecy. $29.95. 

BhK Valley, 29 SJiepaid SL. Waltai. NY 13856 
MastcrCard/VIsa 
l-«00-5.)5.6172 IBMlCompntibles 



i 
i 

i 

i 



(after 5 p.m.J 



and AMIGA 



Circle Reader Service Number 173 







m 




Accurate Disk Copy,,, 

One Pass Disk Copier 
For Windows 3,x 

(sltlor3!t6eiili. modes) 

True Multitasking 

• Copy/ CompaiX' any 
standard disk ubile 
running other programs 

• Make any nuiiiber of 
copies irom a single pass 

• Uses liard disk or R.AM 






for more InfartnatJon, cali; 619-27S-07S5 

Accurate <ti q q^ 

1 ECHNOLOGIES. ^^^-^^ 





circle Reader Service Number T65 



A "C.A.D." program for $29.95? 

Creole flCKiTplanb, flQwcfian^, drawing^^ schrmaiki, orgin* 
stiarLal ch^ns. Undscapinf plans ^nd more! 
InjpiOn graphics with Screen Capture uiiliiy 
Design \our own fom for Mvlized icxi 
Graphic Editor 
Muliiplc 'Work. Scretns 
Rotate Dbjecu 
Calculate length and area 
Variable thictnc^^ ikfilU (fot Hoc^lam) 
* Help Screens 

- And the usual - circles. line draw, block erase. -[AzV ind 
put a graphic, copy, load & save picmrti, eic. 
CTaj>dy/IEM & compaiibJt PCs - min. il2l. &. CGA graphics) 
• • ' tBM Graphics ■ Epson - Okidjiia ■ Htwlni Packard * * * 



jcjMir 


zi.'\ 'j^ yf. 








'"krz 


! 




L-.^ 




J 



For more inrommiofl or otdere, nil or write lo: 

TriTtch Software, Inc. 

PO Box 1657, WilkH-Barrt, P.* 18702 

1.8(».i59-9086 

■ • ' Visj ami M*sl*rcaTd acrcplrd • " ■ 



FREE SPIRIT 
SOFTWARE 



Publisher of educational, enter- 
tainment and utility software for 
IBM, Amiga and C64/128 is now at 
a new location. 

Barney Bear Goes To Scfiooi $39.95 

Barney Bear Goes To Ttie Farm $39.95 
Barney Bear Goes To Space $39.95 

Barney Bear Goes Camping $39.95 

Adventures in fi^atti $39.95 



1541/1571 Drive Alignment 
PC-XT Drive Alignment 5.25' 
Ami.. Alignment System 
Doctor Ami.. 



$34.95 
$59.95 
$49.95 
$49,95 

Bravo Romeo Delta (War strategy) $59,95 
Sex Olympics (adult) $39.95 

Free Spirit Software, Inc. 

720 Sycamore Street 

Columbus, IN 47201 

(812)376-9964 FAX: (812)376-9970 



Circle Reader Service Number T4Z 



SOFTWARE 
PREVIEWS 

are only a phone caii away 
... the mail takes a littie longer. 

1-800-433-2938 



Wedgwood Computer 

5312 Wood way Drive 
Fort Worth, Texas 76133 



m m 



Circle Reader Service Number 172 



IBM & MAC SOFTWARE 

CATALOG 

24 Pages! ASP Member 



SOFTSHOPPE, INC 

RO. BOX 3678 

ANN ARBOR, Mi 48106 

Tel: (313) 761-763S 

RUC: (313) 761-7639 




^^ 



circle Reader Service Number 200 



Toil-Free— 24 Hrs. 
1-800-851-8089 



circle Reader Service Numtier 12G 



A HIGHER DEGREE OF 




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AUGUST 1992 COMPUTE 125 




486-50 MHz ! 



Customer Service, Price 
486-50 DX2 cache system $2^5 

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M«lb<rh)inl & CPU , 1M£C RAM, t:] M[yFI}Conlrollrf. lutiAit OvMQu'^'itt 
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I)K Al.l'iltS, DHOI'SHIl'I'KRS. I'l lll.lf \VKLC:ei.MK 



Circle Reader Service Number 128 



Cica Windows CDROM $24.95 

Hundreds of MicroSoft Windows [ffograms 
on your deski Utilities, games, fonts, 
icons, biUrmps, Bource code, prDgrammij:ig 
took, vidoo/printer driveis, etc. July 92. 

Siintel-20 MSDOS CD $24.95 

530 Megs, 830(H files at your fingerdpsl 
Thoosands of utilities, editors, shelli, 
publishing, comm, bl», source code. Games 
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AUGUST 1992 COMPUTE 127 



NEWS BITS 



Jill Champion 



A curfous seuuence 

of Wingdings 

characters in the font 

turned out to 

be an extraordinary 

CQincidence. 



Against All Odds 

In the wake of the riots follow- 
ing the Rodney King verdict 
last April, it should come as 
no surprise that heightened ra- 
cial tensions sometimes lead 
to erroneous accusations. 
Take the case of an April 29 
New York Post story in which 
an unnamed computer consult- 
ant discovered what he 
thought was an anti-Semitic 
message in Microsoft's Word 
for Windows program. When 
the letters NYC {for New York 
City) are changed to their cor- 
responding Wingdings font 
symbols, a skull and cross- 



ic keys; rather, they're 
grouped according to sym- 
bol, which you'll notice if you 
type out the entire alphabet in 
the Wingdings font. To avoid 
offending anyone, Microsoft 
says it will probably change 
the mapping of the Wing- 
dings symbols in future ver- 
sions of the font. 

The Best on the Continent 

The award season wouldn't 
be complete without the 1992 
European Computer Trade 
Show Awards, handed out in 
London this past April. The 
winners were the following: 




bones, Star of David, and 
thumbs-up sign appear. Accu- 
sations began flying when the 
consultant and others who 
saw the sequence of symbols 
were quick to interpret it as a 
code deliberately placed to 
convey an anti-Semitic mes- 
sage asserting "Death to 
Jews in New York City." 

One friend of the consult- 
ant's who also believed that 
the symbols were an intention- 
ally placed code calculated 
the odds of such symbols ap- 
pearing in sequence while cor- 
responding to the letters NYC 
at about a trillion to one. 

Microsoft absolutely denies 
that the sequence is anything 
but an unfortunate coinci- 
dence, a conclusion support- 
ed by the Anti-Defamation 
League, which investigated 
the incident. Microsoft points 
out that the dingbats aren't 
intentionally mapped to specif- 

128 COMPUTE AUGUST 1992 



Best Action Game — Turbo 
Challenger II, Best Adventure/ 
Role-Playing Game — Eye of 
the Beholder, Best Art Pack- 
age— DeluxePaint IV, Best 
CD Game^SimCity, Best 
Graphics — Wing Commander 
II, Best Home Productivity 
Package — Amos 3-D, Best 
Packaging — 3-D Construction 
Kit, Best Simulation Game — 
Railroad Tycoon, Best 
Sound — Wing Commander II, 
Best Sports Game — Jimmy 
White's Whirlwind Snooker, 
Best Videogame — Sonic the 
Hedgehog, Game of the 
Year — Lemmings, Most Origi- 
nal Game — Civilization, Soft- 
ware Publisher of the Year — 
MicroProse, Hardware Manu- 
facturer of the Year — Sega, 
Going Live! Viewers Award — 
Sonic the Hedgehog, and 
LOG-IN Award— 4-D Boxing. 
The COMPUTE Magazine 
Award was won by Stacker. 



Game Developers Conference 

Also in April, the 1992 Game 
Developers Conference was 
held in San Jose. California. 
Winners for best games over- 
all, voted by the game devel- 
opers themselves, were Mon- 
key Island 2, SimAnt, Willy 
Beamish, and Wing Command- 
er II. Conference topics includ- 
ed trends in game develop- 
ment for the coming year, 
such as games that learn as 
you play. In these games, arti- 
ficial-intelligence techniques al- 
low the game to "get to know 
you" over time and anticipate 
your actions. Also in the 
cards; more graphics and 
sound in games, which will 
most likely translate into high- 
er retail phces for the consum- 
er, and a 386-16 as the mini- 
mum gaming system. 

Gardening Mars 

At age 74, science fiction's 
venerable Arthur C. Clarke, in 
his isolated Sri Lankan home, 
still plugs away at predicting 
the future of humankind. This 
time, however, for his work in 
progress titled The Snows of 
Mt. Olympus: A Garden on 
Mars, he's crafting more pic- 
tures than words. 

Clarke's rendering of a "gar- 
dened" Mars of the future will 
include some 60 color plates 
of a grassy, forested Mars 
with rivers, oceans, and con- 
dominiums. Even Mt. Olym- 
pus, the largest volcano in 
our solar system, is covered 
In crops and pine trees. 

The renowned science fic- 
tion author is creating his "gar- 
dened Mars" pictures using 
VistaPro, an artificial-intelli- 
gence/virtual-reality software 
program developed by Virtual 
Reality Labs in San Luis Obis- 
po, California, Using NASA da- 
ta gained from the Viking mis- 
sion, VistaPro produces a map 
of Mars to which Clarke adds 
detail, turning the Red Planet 
green. The book is expected 
to be completed in 1993. □ 



USE THIS CARD TO REQUEST FREE 
INFORMATION ABOUT PRODUCTS 
ADVERTISED IN THIS ISSUE. 

Clearly print or type your full name, address, 
and phone number. Circle numbers that corre- 
spond to lt\e key numbers appearing on adver- 
tisements and In the Advertisers Index. Mall 
the postage-paid card today. Inquiries will be 
forwarded promptly to advertisers. Although 
every effort is made to ensure that only advertis- 
ers wishing to provide product Information have 
reader service numbers, COMPUTE cannot be 
responsible it advertisers do not provide liter- 
ature to readers. 

CARDS VAUD ONLY UNTIL EXPIRATION DATE. 

This card is for product information only. 
Address editorial and customer service in- 
quiries to COMPUTE, 324 W. Wendover Ave., 
Greensboro, NO 27408. 

JOIN COMPUTE'S READER PANEL TODAY. 
Simply checit "YES" to Question L (at right) and 
you'll be eligible to become one of a select 
group of readers who will participate in leading- 
edge market research. 



COMPUTE'S FREE PRODUCT INFORMTION SERVKE 



Name . 



Address . 

Cil/ 

Country _ 



, Slat e/Pf evince _ 



ZIP. 



_ Phone . 



A WhaT type cimputer(s[ do yfti own? t ; 486 PC . j 386 PC ;^ 386SX PC ::2a6PC 
1 ; 3 J 

L. Oitier IBM.PC CompaliBte " Laplop- MkJte&ook 

B. A1 home, do yOj uM your computer mosTly !pr 1 1 Personal Finance r WorkJHamB Busineas 

c ErrlertaifWTient a All o» the Above 
C Wuuiti you clBssiiy yoursetl as atn) n emratwanaor nTelecommJer nMoonliflhter 

L : Corpoiate Employee wlio brinos woek home 

D Whch online serviceisi tto you use? cCempuSefVB i;GEn« r America Onhne Prodigy 

15 16 ^^ '> 

E What oiner compute'^ maoazines lio you Su&ScraiQ to? - PC/Conipulrng n MPC Wofid 

rjComoulBfGamina World j Home Office CQmput^^g n PC Magazine i PC Vtorid 
2\ 22 23 7* 

F Wtitc^i Graphical U&ef Iniadace do you u&e^ Windows GeoWorks :-Olhei .jKcno 

25 2t 2'' J* 

G Totallirrw rou spend reading CCWPUTE' , < 30 mm , i 30. m,n , ; 60^ mm uW+fTHfi 

;9 30 31 33 

H, Do yoy reguartj purclwse harawar«'5olMa/s as a result ol aOs in COMPUTE? o Yes 

1 Doyouomna DCD-RomOrtre aSounJCaiD n FaitfMoitefn Boanl 

J What is vDur (oaf household Income? a<SM,CWO nJSO.IMOt rj $50,000. uSTS.OOO. 

37 3a 39 *D 

K What i5 *oui ago' l 18-24 n 25-34 a3b-i3 ^50* 

ii ii « " 

L Wou^ you li'^e to jom COMPUTE s ReaCer Panels i Ves 

CIRCLE 101 lor a o«-yMr subWJlpllon Is COMPUTE. »ou will He tilled «9.97. 



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eaplratlon date 9-1-92 



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