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Full text of "Compute! Magazine Issue 154"


JULY 1993 



PENTIUM 

SPECIAL REPOItr! 

(SEE PAGE 56) 



T*y. 



WINDOWS APPS! 

EXPERTS 

PICK THEIR 10 i 

FAVORITE 

PROGRAMS 




PLUS! 



<a'. O Q 



VISUAL C++ 
GREAT GOLF GAMES 
BIOS BASICS 



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We've been groping for an appropriate description of our 
4DX2-66V. Screaming. Yeah, this machine definitely screams, but 
the acljcciivc is worn. Drai;xiei: Good, but that's what PC World 
called it when the_\ s;iid it was "by far the fastest machine we've 
evertesicd." We didn't want a used word, Greyhound. Fast, but 
this system mosi certainly cannot be compared to a dog. 

Then one of our Walter Mitty surfers said it: The Big Kahuna. 
in surfing vernacular, the Biii Kahuna is ihe ultimate surfer -a 
surfer whose performance is most awesome and whose reputation 



L/ 4DX2-66V 

■ 66MHz 4S6DX2 InteP Processor 

■ 16MB RAM. I56K Cache 

■ .3,5" Diskelte Drive AND CD-ROM Drive 

■ 340MB 13ms IDE Hard Drive 

■ Local Bu.s IDE Inierface 
B Inlel Pentium™ Technology Ready 

■ ATI Ultra Pro with 1 MB VRAM on VL-BU! 

■ 15" Color CtysialScdiV 15721-S 

■ Desktop Case ITower Upgrade) 

■ 7 16-Bii ISA Slots. 2 on VL-Bus 
M 124-Kcy.AiiyKey' Keyboard 

■ MS-DOS ^6. Diagnostics. Windows'" & Mouse 

■ Choice of Application Software 




$2995 




is truly magnificent. To PC dudes and dudettes, Gateway's 4DX2- 
66V is the Big Kahuna of personal computers - the most awesome 
PC on the planet. 

But you won't find this Big Kahuna flashing on just any beach. 
This totally tubular machine can only be found at Gateway 2000. 
Check out the price. It's radical, man. 

If you're looking for the Big Kahuna, get a Gateway 2000 
4DX2-66VI 





GArEmiy2ooo 




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8 0-846-2071 

61(1 Gateway Dnvc • P.O. Box 2000 • Norlli SioM Ciiv. SD 57049-2000 • 60.^-232-2000 • Fa.\ 605-? 
Sales Hours: 7ani-10p!ii Weekdays. 9am4pm (CTi 

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December 1992 
BEST VALUE. March 1993 




March 199: 



cannpuTE 



VOLUME 15, NO. 7, ISSUE 154 



JULY 1993 



FEATURES 
6 

TOP 10 WINDOWS TOOLS 

By Kimberly Havlena 

Power users name their top 

Windows applications and 

tell how they use them. 

16 

TEST LAB 

Edited by Mike Hudnall 
We corral ten 66-MHz local- 
bus thoroughbreds and put 
them through their paces. 

60 

WHERE HARDWARE MEETS 
SOFTWARE 

By Richard C. Leinecl^er 

How does your hardware 

communicate with your 

software? 

66 

PRODUCTIVITY CHOICE 

By George Campbell 

Visual Basic 2.0 from 

Microsoft. 

COLUMNS 
4 

EDITORIAL LICENSE 

By Clifton Karnes 
Windows 4 and DOS 7. 

40 

NEWS & NOTES 

By Jill Champion 
Top computer news. 

46 

FEEDBACK 

Answers to tough questions. 

49 

READERSHIP SURVEY 

Tell us what you think! 

50 

WINDOWS WORKSHOP 

By Clifton Karnes 

Microsoft's Visual C++ sets 

a new standard. 

52 

TIPS & TOOLS 

Edited by 
Richard C. Leinecker 
Tips from our readers. 




Cover photo by Mark Wagoner. Computer from Gateway 2000. 



54 

INTRODOS 

By Tony Roberts 
DOS is alive and well. 

56 

HARDWARE CLINIC 

By Mark Minasi 

Special report on Intel's new 

Pentium. 

58 

PROGRAMMING POWER 

By Tom Campbeli 
PowerBASIC is back! 

68 

PERSONAL PRODUCTIVITY 

By Rosalind Resnick 

Leasing versus buying a 

personal computer. 



70 

MULTIMEDIA PC 

By David English 
Encarta is tops. 

72 

ART WORKS 

By Robert Bixby 
Finding that special paper. 

120 

NEWS BITS 

By Jill Champion 
Top stories at press time. 

ENTERTAINMENT 
74 

DISCOVERY CHOICE 

By David Sears 
The Animals! 



76 

GAME INSIDER 

By Shay Addams 

The hottest new 

entertainment software. 

78 

ENTERTAINMENT CHOICE 

By Peter Olafson 

Alone in the Dark from 

I • Motion/Interplay. 

80 

GAMEPLAY 

By Paul C. Schuytema 

A look at some game 

programs that are off the 

beaten path. 

83 

HITTING THE LINKS 

By Paul C. Schuytema 

When the masters tee up, 

which ones can dhve a hole 

in one? 

REVIEWS 
89 

Sony Desktop Library, 

Dashboard for Windows 1.0, 

Smith Corona Coronajet 200j, 

DEC 433DX LR 

AutoCAD Release 12, 

Gobliiins, 

Quantum Hardcard EZ 240, 

Wyse Decision 486si, 

Pacific Islands, 

Suncom FX 2000, 

Insight, 

Grandmaster Chess, 

Air Force Commander, 

Best Data Smart One 9624 

FP Traveler Fax/Modem, 

Mutanoid Math Challenge, 

Space Ace l\: Borf's 

Revenge, 

Coffee Break Gambling, 

The Operation: Fighting 

Tiger, 

Practical FaxMe, 

and Mixed-Up Fairy Tales. 

ADVERTISERS INDEX 

See page 97. 



COMPUTE (iSSfJ 0194-357X) Is published monthly in the United Slases and Canada by COMPUTE Publications internalional Ltd , 'S65 Braadivay New York NV 10023-5965 VoluiT.e 15 
Number 7, Issue 154. Copyright E 1993 by COMPUTE Publications International Ud All rignls reserved COMPUTE is a rDQislcred trademark of COMPUTE Publications iniernaiionai Ltd 
Disiribuled waridwide (except Auslraiia and the UK) by Curtis Circulalion Company, PO Box 9102. Pennsaukcn, NJ 08109. Dislribuled in Australia by The Horv/ite Group RO Box 306 
Cammeray NSW 2062 Australia and m the UK by Northern and Sholi Pic. RO Box 381 , Miliharbour. London E14 9TW. Second-class postage paid al New York NY and at addilional maiiing 
oirices POSTMASTER: Send address changes to COMPLTTE Magazine, PO Bon 3245. Harlan. lA 51537-30'! 1, Tol, (BOO) 727-6937 Entire conlenls copyrighted. Ail rights rcscn/od 
Nolhing may be reproduced in whole or m pan without wrinen permission from the publisher Subscriptions; US. AFO - SI 9 94 one year; Canada and elsowhoro -$25.94 one year Single 
copies $2 96 in US. The publisher disclaims all responsibility to return unsolicited matter, and all rights in portions published Ihereol remain the sole property of COMPUTE Pubiicalions 
Iniernaiionai Ud Letters sent to COMPUTE or its editors become Ihe property of the nuagazine. Editorial offi[:es are located at 324 W. Wendover Ave Ste 200 Greensboro NC 2740B 
Tel. (919) 275-9809, ' ' 



Printed in the USA by R. R. Donnelley & Sons Inc. 
2 COMPUTE JULY 1993 



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A new 16-bit audio standard. 



Introducing the Sound Blaster" 16 
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THE ONLY SOUND CARD THAT GROWS WfTH YOU. 

Urdike other 16-bit cards, Sound Blaster 16 comes with built- 
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And the unique modular, scalable 
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ad\'anced features 
and technologies 
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Like our Advanced Hands-free 
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Or professional-qualit}' sampled 
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EDITORIAL LICENSE 



Clifton Karnes 



W I hat's ahead tor Win- 
fdows and DOS? That's 
a question we all ask 
ourselves, and those of 
us in the business of following 
the PC industry ask it more of- 
ten than anyone else. This 
past April, at the Windows De- 
velopers Conference in Bos- 
ton, we received an answer. 

At the conference, Micro- 
soft made a presentation that 
focused on two things: OLE 
2.0 and 32-bit Windows, How- 
ever, the talk ranged over top- 
ics that included NT, Win- 
dows for TVs, and Chicago 
(Microsoft's newest hush- 
hush project). 




It's clear that 

OLE is an 

extremely important 

technology to 

Windows' future. 



First off, Microsoft sees 
three Windows families. The 
first family is Modular Win- 
dows, which includes Tandy's 
VIS (the only shipping prod- 
uct built on Modular Windows 
to date), the as-yet-to-be-devel- 
oped WinPad operating sys- 
tem for PDAs (Personal Digi- 
tal Assistants), Windows for 
TVs (a joint venture with Intel 
and General Instruments), 
and Windows Telephony (an- 
other joint venture with Intel). 
You could call this family con- 
sumer Windows, because 
that's clearly the market Micro- 
soft is going after. 

The next family is called per- 
sonal Windows, and this 
group includes Windows 3.1, 
Windows for Workgroups, 
and the yet-to-be-announced 



Chicago project. 

The last Windows family is 
Windows NT which most of 
us have heard a lot about in 
the last year. NT, which 
stands for New Technology, 
is the corporate branch of the 
Windows family tree. 

One thing that's worried 
some of us is the future of Win- 
dows 3.1. Will it be replaced 
by NT? From the evidence at 
the conference, it doesn't 
look as if it will be. Microsoft 
said that 89 percent of its fu- 
ture business is planned to 
come from its personal Win- 
dows products— Windows 3.1 
and its successors — with the 
rest divided between Modular 
Windows and Windows NT 

So if personal Windows is 
so important, why the empha- 
sis on 32-blt Windows? Most 
of us think of NT as the 32-bit 
version of Windows. Although 
that's true now, NT won't be 
the only 32-bit Windows 
around by 1994. Windows 4, 
planned for release next 
year, will be a full 32-bit oper- 
ating system. Interestingly, 
DOS 7 will be part of Win- 
dows 4. And the Chicago pro- 
ject, mentioned above, con- 
sists of both Windows 4 and 
DOS 7. And what about Win- 
dows for Workgroups? Micro- 
soft plans to include all the net- 
working capability of WFWG 
in Windows 4, so WFWG will 
disappear as a separate prod- 
uct, just as Multimedia Win- 
dows did when 3.1 included 
multimedia support. 

As you might expect, DOS 
7 will be a full 32-bit operating 
system. It may even come 
close to the "DOS NT" colum- 
nist Mark Minasi talked about 
in his May "Hardware Clinic" 
column. 

One thing's for sure: The dif- 
ference between personal Win- 
dows and Windows NT won't 
be the difference between 16- 
and 32-bit operating systems. 
It will be the difference be- 
tween an end-user version of 



Windows and a high-perform- 
ance, security-intensive work- 
station version. 

This is good news for all of 
us. it means that in order to 
move up to high-performance 
32-bit computing, we can sim- 
ply upgrade to Windows 4. 

And what will Windows 4 
be like? It's certain to be 
more object-oriented than Its 
predecessors. And here, ob- 
ject-oriented means "easier to 
use." Drag and drop will be 
the primary vocabulary, and 
perhaps most important, the 
emphasis will switch from ap- 
plications to documents. 

As documents become 
more integrated (containing 
text, graphics, sound, and vid- 
eo), each document will be 
created by a suite of applica- 
tions. The document, then, 
will become the focus of our at- 
tention, and the applications 
that create it will become 
more transparent. 

This application transparen- 
cy is one of the goals of OLE 
2.0, v/hich I discussed six 
months ago. With the new 
OLE, as you work In a com- 
pound document and as you 
move from application to ap- 
plication, your document 
stays the same, but the frame 
window changes (usually as lit- 
tle as possible) to reflect the 
proper editing environment 
for the current part of your doc- 
ument. This is a powerful 
tool, and something we can 
look forward to in the very 
near future. 

Interestingly, this emphasis 
on OLE 2.0 doesn't come 
from some ivory tower philos- 
ophy cooked up at Micro- 
soft's Redmond headquar- 
ters, but from user surveys, 
According to figures present- 
ed by Microsoft, end users 
have told the company that 
what they really want from Win- 
dows applications is better in- 
tegration. And with Windows 
4, DOS 7, and OLE 2.0, we'll 
all have it. □ 



COMPUTE JULY 1993 





Mission 

IBM Programming Systems introduces 
C Set++,™ the most complete application 
development package you can buy for 
'OS/2® Its 32-bii C/C++ 
compiler lets you unleash 
all the pow-er of OS/2 — so you can 
create the most advanced, high- 
performance applications. 

It has an extraordinary code optimizer with a 
full set of options. Even a switch to optimize for the new 
Pentium™ processor. Plus a full set of class libraries, 
including application frameworks for PM, container 
classes and classes for multitasking, streams and more. 

There's also a full complement of other helpful 
features. Such as an mteractive source level debugger. 

And the unique Execution Trace 
Analyzer traces the 

execution of a program, 
then graphically displays 
^^^^ diagrams of the 

C^^^^^^^^ i^Li^a analysis. Plus a class 
^^^^ ^^ T ^ library browser that 
shows class library relationships. 

What's more, you get Workframe/2,™ a language- 
independent tool that lets you customize your own envi- 
ronment. It's adaptable and flexible — you can use any 16 
and 32-bit DOS, Windows™ and OS/2 tools. 





^ C Set -I-+ Technical Features 




ANSICX3.159-19B9 


Standards 


NIST validated 


ANSI C-H- X3J16 (Full ARM) 


150 9899:1990 


1 




Global 


Inler-module 


Optimization 


Function inllning 


...^^^^^^^ 




1^^ 


Instruction sctieduling 



Upgrade until August 31, 1993, from C Set/2 or Work Sel/2 
for only 3149. CD ROM prices slightly lower. 

To order C Set++, contact your nearest dealer or call 
1-800-342-6672 (USA) or 
1-800-465-7999 ext. 460 (Canada). 

Qearly, there's only one place to start. C Set++ . 



starts 
here 



ManLfactLrer's suggested relail price is S595. IBM and OSS are regislBred Irademarks and C Set++ and Worlrframe/2 are tradamarta of IntemBtional Business Machines 
Corporation. Pentium is a trademark of Intel Corporation. Windows Is a trademark of Microsoft Corp. t 1993 IBM Corp. 



ower users name 
the top 
Windows 
applications and 
^ tell how 
they put them 
I to use. 
yivimberly Havlena 




Looking for the Windows applications 
tliat offer the most in terms of tools, 
speed, and intuitiveness? Here are the 
experts' opinions to help you in your 
search for the programs that will best 
meet your needs. 
The experts whose opinions we 
solicited have reviewed hundreds of 
programs and identified the ones that 
they i!l<e best. Whatever sparks your 
interest — word processing, spread- 
Sheets, databases, or graphics— here 
are the Windows application programs 
that will provide the greatest ease, 
efficiency, and enjoyment. 

Getting the Words on Paper 

Word processing took a long time to 
come to Windows. Once it arrived, the 
word-processing arena suddenly filled 

with contenders. There is hardly a 

major word processor that doesn't have 

a Windows version available. With all 

that software to choose from, which 

programs are the most popular among 

users who spend hours a day making 

their living by writing? 

Leslie Eiser has been writing in 



■fi^:'': 



'.■-■.'••H» 



■t^-M^^MiM^&■a'mf^^^i^:^.AM^: 




COMPUTE and elsewhere about edu- 
cational computing for ten years. Eiser 
says Microsoft Word for Windows is 
her pick as thie best word processor. 
She likes it not only because it's pow- 
erful and easy to use, but also 
because it's helpful in a school envi- 
ronment. It has well-integrated tools, 
such as a style checker and the- 
saurus, that make it a great help to 
teachers. Another advantage is that 
it's a word processor equally power- 
ful—and popular— in its PC and 
Macintosh versions. And in compari- 
son to WordPerfect, Word for Windows 
is much easier to use, Eiser finds. 

Tom Campbell owns and operates 
the South Bay Company, which devel- 
ops software; he writes the "Program- 
ming Power" column for COMPUTE. 
Campbell uses Word for Windows 
because it's the best word processor 
he can find for large documents. He 
uses It for creating everything from 
brochures to 800-page manuals. 

Desktop publishing expert William 
Harrel has written five books about 
publishing and hundreds of articles 
for COMPUTE and other magazines. 
When it comes to word processing, 
Harrel prefers Ami Pro. "As a review- 
er, with my extensive knowledge of 
the three top Windows word proc- 
essors. Ami Pro is the most so- 
phisticated and the most useful," says 
Harrel. Ami Pro, a full-featured word 
processor, excels in its page layout 
features. While it can be used as a 
simple word processor for typing and 
creating documents, it can also han- 
dle "relatively sophisticated page lay- 
outs, such as newsletters," says 
Harrel. The advantage of using your 
word processor for layouts is that you 
don't have to do any extra work to 
transfer text between your word 
processor and your layout program. 

George Campbell is a conthbuting 
editor for another computer magazine 
and a shareware author. Campbell is 
also a fan of Ami Pro; he thinks that it 
makes the best use of the Windows 
environment and offers outstanding 
tools for page design. Campbell feels 
that Ami Pro is easier to use than its 
competitors (specifically Word for 
Windows and WordPerfect for 
Windows). He uses Ami Pro for every- 
thing from basic correspondence to 
high-end desktop publishing. 

Word processing is more than get- 
ting words down on paper, though. 
What kinds of word-processing add- 
ons do our experts rely on? 

Regular COMPUTE contributor 
Richard Mann is a certified public 
accountant as well as a writer. Mann 
recommends Microsoft Bookshelf as 

8 COMPUTE JULY 1993 



an add-on for word processing. This 
electronic library comes with handy 
reference tools, including a dictionary 
and an encyclopedia, Bookshelf is a 
CD-ROM product. In fact, Microsoft 
Bookshelf now comes as a premium 
with Multimedia Word for Windows 
and Bookshelf. If you find a quotation 
in the dictionary or encyclopedia that 
you want to use in your text, you 
merely highlight it and, with the click 
of a button, it's inserted into your 
Word for Windows document. In ad- 
dition to this, an automatic footnote is 
inserted to tell which reference book 
the material came from. 

Steven Anzovin spends most of his 
time writing books, but he's also a free- 
lance writer, an editor, a computer con- 
sultant, and a database programmer. 
Anzovin uses MacLinkPlus as his prin- 
cipal word-processing add-on. Mac- 
LinkPlus transfers files between the 
Macintosh and PC over a modem con- 
nection, automatically translating be- 
tween various PC and Mac file formats. 

Tony Roberts operates a desktop 
publishing business and is a COM- 
PUTE contributing editor, To Roberts, 
helpfulness means OmniPage Direct. 
OmniPage Direct allows him to place 
a typewritten page on the scanner 
and read it into a word-processing 
file. With OmniPage Direct, you can 
do the scanning from within your own 
applications without having to exit to 
another program. 

it's so easy to lose the cursor on 
your computer screen. ArrowSmith is a 
cursor enlargement program that will 
be sure to catch your eye and add 
some fun to computer input. Not only 
does it enlarge the cursor, but it allows 
you to choose what form you want the 
cursor to take. You could choose an 
ordinary arrow or opt for something 
with a little pizazz such as a syringe, a 
heart, a flag, or a magnifying glass. 
ArrowSmith also allows you to modify 
the wait symbol to a picture of a stop 
sign, a stoplight, a don't-walk sign, a 
snovi^lake, a smiley face, even a com- 
puter in jail. "I like ArrowSmith because 
it's the best cursor enlargement pro- 
gram I could find. Plus, it's lots of fun to 
use," says Tom Campbell. 

trun<hing Numbers 

Spreadsheets were an early port to 
Windows. First and foremost was 
Microsoft Excel. Recently, publishers 
have been creating and porting spread- 
sheets to Windows in increasing num- 
bers. Which are the cream of the crop? 

Richard Mann says that Excel and 
Quattro Pro are both excellent spread- 
sheets for Windows. Because Quattro 
Pro has the newest version, it currently 



does a few more things than Excel. But 
the features race wiil continue. 

Quattro Pro gives you a three- 
dimensional spreadsheet which 
allows you to work not only in rows 
and columns but also in stacks of 
pages, The 3-D metaphor resembles 
a three-ring binder with tabs at the 
bottom of each page that you can 
click on to move back and forth 
between all the pages in your spread- 
sheet. Quattro Pro also has graphic 
tools for drawing and making slides 
that give a professional touch. "It's not 
only a spreadsheet, but it's a little pre- 
sentation-building package as well," 
says Mann. 

George Campbell thinks that Excel 
is the best Windows application. With 
its intuitiveness. it simpiifies complica- 
tions, and the final output is easily 
made to look presentable. 

The World of Publishing 

Is ease of use your prime considera- 
tion when you're looking for a desktop 
publishing and layout program? 
William Harrel says that in his opinion, 
Aldus PageMaker is the easiest desk- 
top publishing software to use. It has 
a pasteboard metaphor that Harrel 
likens to working on a layout table. 
Anybody familiar with laying out 
pages on a drafting table or a paste- 
up table would be more comfortable 
with PageMaker than with some of the 
frame-based programs. If price Is 
more important than ease of use, 
Harrel recommends Microsoft 
Publisher or Express Publisher. 

Tony Roberts uses PageMaker in 
his desktop publishing business to 
create newsletters, brochures, and 
books. He prefers it to other desktop 
publishing software because of its 
many options, Roberts says that he 
has never liked Aldus PageMaker's 
keenest competitor, Ventura Publish- 
er, in any other incarnation {Macin- 
tosh and DOS) and that he is going to 
stay away from it in Windows, 

Ever the contrarian, Robert Bixby, 
features editor of COMPUTE and 
author of "Art Works," COMPUTE's 
desktop publishing column, prefers 
Ventura Publisher because it keeps the 
text closer to its original condition, eas- 
ily editable by a DOS or Windows word 
processor. He finds PageMaker unintu- 
itive and difficult to use. 

Using Data 

When it comes to managing data, the 
options for Windows users have multiplied 
over the past few months with the intro- 
duction of Microsoft Access and Microsoft 
FoxPro for Windows. How does our panel 
of experts rate these packages? 




^ESSSSiSfusa**'* 



Quiet.' 



Quiet Tecliiwhgij lor 
near kier-quiel opcratim. 



When you already have a 
best seller like the KX-P 1 1 23 Dot Matrix 
Printer that delivers outstanding print quality, speed and 
reliability for the money, what do you do for an encore? We asked people just 
like you and they told us to make it quieter. 

WE ASKED PEOPlf HOW 

TO IMPROVE OUR BEST SELUNG PRINTER. 

THEYTDLDUSTO BE QUIET. 

So, we added Panasonic's Quiet Technology and created the new KX-P2023 24-pin Dot 
Matrix printer. But, we didn't stop there. At the same time we made it easier on your ears, we 
made the KX-P2023 much easier to use with an all-new, user-friendlier control 

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simplified paper path. Plus, like all Panasonic Dot Matrix Printers, the KX-P2023 is backed by a 
two-year limited warranty.' No wonder the 1 992 PC Magazine Service and Reliability Survey 
rated Panasonic "Excellent" on reliability, service and support. 

Why would Panasonic take a proyen winner and improve it? Because the surest way to 





create another best seller is by making things better. 

For more information visit your Panasonic dealer or call 1-800-742-8086. 
POI0.COM Circle Header Service Number 134 



Office Automation,f='^\ 



George Campbell uses Access to 
manage his data. In addition to being 
easy to use and having powerful out- 
put, "it uses a subset of the Visual 
Basic language for development, 
which . . , makes it easy to work with," 
Campbell says. 

Tom Campbell uses Access for the 
databases to run his business. One 
reason he likes it is that it has a pro- 
gramming language similar to ones 
that he already knew. He warns, how- 
ever, that Microsoft tries to market Ac- 
cess as a product that is supposedly 
so easy that even a beginner could 
start working with it right away, "I think 
Access is a tremendous program — 
I'm even writing a book on it— but it is 
not for beginners," says Campbell. 
"FiieMal<er Pro 2.0 from Claris is much 
better for beginners than Access or 
FoxPro for Windows. Instant Database 
from Asymmetrix is another easy and 
inexpensive alternative. FoxPro is 
great if you're already familiar with 
FoxPro for DOS or dBASE, but it 
doesn't do things in an intuitive v/ay 
for a seasoned Windows user." 

Why isn't Access Campbell's first 



choice for beginners? "When dBASE It 
came out, it was a lot easier than any- 
thing else available, but it took a lot of 
work to learn to use it. It's the same in 
the case of Access. I simply don't think 
it's as easy to use as FileMaker Pro 
when you first start using it. If you're 
willing to work to learn Access, though, 
your efforts will be richly repaid. If your 
time is limited, stick to FileMaker Pro or 
Instant Database." 

Making Contact 

Windows has always been an excel- 
lent environment for telecommunica- 
tions. In these days of instant faxes 
and high-speed interchange of data, 
it makes even more sense to do your 
communicating in Windows, William 
Harrel stands by Procomm Plus for 
Windows because he's found it to be 
powerful and easy to use. He says 
that Procomm is the telecommunica- 
tions product that has something for 
everybody. 

George Campbell joins in the 
praise for Procomm. He says that it's 
easy to script for logging on and other 
functions. It also has a good dialing 



directory that's easy to set up and 
works well at high communication 
speeds. 

Robert Bixby recommends WinFax 
Pro as the foremost product in the 
field of direct faxing. Sending a fax 
with Winfax is exactly iike printing to a 
local printer. When you select Winfax 
as your printing device under 
Windows, it pauses to get the sending 
information (recipient, fax number, 
and cover page), then formats the 
page as a fax. It dials the remote fax 
machine and sends the file automati- 
cally. Many similar programs are 
appearing, including programs that 
receive faxes and convert their graph- 
ic information into ASCII text for easy 
editing and compact storage. Among 
these is Caere's FaxlVlaster. 

Keith Ferrell, editor of Omni maga- 
zine, says, "RapidFAX for Windows 
[from The Complete PC] handles my 
fax material more efficiently than any- 
thing else I've tried. It certainly beats 
printing it out, walking to the fax 
machine, and transmitting it manuaily. 
Seriously, the program is almost 
effortless to use, resides nicely in the 



Fun and Windows don't seem to go 
together for most people. But the 
fact is that some of ihe most innova- 
tive educational and entertainment 
software is beginning to appear 
ready to run in the formerly all-busi- 
ness Windows environment, 

Parents quickly learn the names 
of good children's stories and their 
authors. Brederbund's Just Grand- 
ma and Me and Arthur's Teacher 
Trouble are two computer programs 
based on the popular children's sto- 
ries of the same names. "These are 
well-known, well-respected chil- 
dren's stories, which makes them 
very appealing to the parents," says 
Lesiie Eiser. 

Just Grandma and Me, by 
Mercer Mayer, is designed for chil- 
dren who are learning to read. A 
page of the storybook comes up on 
the screen, and the computer reads 
the story in beautiful, accented voic- 
es. Behind the pictures on the 
screen, animated sequences are 
hiding. Once you think you know 
what to expect, the animated 
sequences change. 

The animation of Just Grandma 
and Me resembles the author's iilus- 
trations and style. "For children, one 
doesn't use the same graphics [as 



Just for Fun 

in adult productivity software]. 
Children are not little adults . , . they 
need to be . . . talked to differently," 
says Eiser. These programs ap- 
proach children in a completely dif- 
ferent way from a lot of other chil- 
dren's software. 

Arthur's Teacher Trouble, written 
by Marc Brown, is for older children. 
It focuses on human relationships 
rather than reading skills. The plot 
that moves the program is that 
Arthur is having problems with his 
teacher at school and is contemplat- 
ing how to solve his dilemma without 
upsetting everyone. 

THE ANIMALS!, developed by 
the San Diego Zoo, is another espe- 
cially appealing children's program. 
It's an encyclopedic view of animals. 
Its interface uses the multimedia 
extensions that come with Windows 
to provide a colorful picture of the 
zoo. When you click your mouse on 
a certain section of the zoo, you are 
given information on the animals liv- 
ing in that habitat. THE ANIMALS! is 
meant to be used in a classroom sit- 
uation with children who are either 
planning to visit the zoo or are 
putting together projects on animals, 
(THE ANIMALS! is reviewed else- 
where in this issue.) 



Windows has always been aimed 
at productivity, but important 
Windows entertainment software for 
grownups has begun to appear, "A 
lot of [Windows] games are just 
rehashes of DOS games," says Paul 
Schuytema. But Microsoft Golf, a 
version of the Links golf games, uti- 
lizes the Windows format and comes 
complete with digitized sound and 
excellent graphics. Instead of cram- 
ming everything into one window, as 
a lot of the DOS games do, 
Microsoft Golf uses full windowing to 
show you such things as your power 
bar and information on how far your 
clubs can hit, (See "Hitting the 
Links" elsewhere in this issue.) 

Maxis has recently released a 
Windows version of SimCity — The 
City Simulator, It's another game 
that follows the Windows format of 
opening and closing windows and 
being able to pile them on top of 
each other. By doing so, it gives a 
new perspective to SimCity. It's easy 
to switch back and forth between a 
world view and a city view, and 
graphs can also be brought up. 
"Once you've played SimCity on 
Windows, you can't go back to the 
DOS version because it's just so 
good," says Schuytema. 



10 COMPUTE JULY 1993 



FOR THE DISCRIMINATING MOVIE FAN. 



<s:> 



■'--■'i'^^ii^^h 



Doiith Becomes Her 


*\o-- - 


A League Of Their Own 


1070UUb 


Passengers? 


* 1037709 


Sneakers 


* 1071604 


Top Gun 


0426908 


Allen 


0000206 


Aliens 


0360909 


Allen 3 


* 1042506 


Boomerang 


* 1064005 


Dune 


0211102 


The Blues Brottiers 


0211706 


Goodlellas 


*0969808 


Hook 


•0854307 


Back To The Future 


» 02 11409 


Back To The 
Future Part 11 


*0921304 


Back To The 
Future Part III 


*0497008 


Field 01 Dreams 


0920306 


Fried Green TomatoeB 


1OO5404 


The Prince Of Tides 


*0847103 


Patlon 


0788703 


The Empire Of The Sun 


*0633206 


The Addams Family 


* 1000900 


National Lampoons 
Animal House 


0211508 


Bugs Bunny Clasaics 


0297705 


Fatal Attraction 


0439307 




*nq5iqn5 




Bugsy 


•0853408 


The Bible 


* 0074708 


Casablanca 


0050708 


It's A Wonderful Life 
(4&th Anniversary Ed.) 


0392306 


New Jack City 


0971507 


ThQ Man Who Would 
Be King 


*OOB5803 


Far& Away 


* 1046507 


Patriot Games 


* 1051 309 


The Sound Ot Music 


♦00039O5 


Backdralt 


•0559005 


The Hunt 

For Red October 


♦0625000 


The Silence Of 
The Lambs 


0805309 


Robin Hood: 
Prince Ot Thieves 


*0976e03 


Die Hard 


♦0367607 


Die Hard 2 


•0041806 




LASER* 
DEO- 



SEE DETAILS BELOW. 



The Abyss 



• 0881102 




2001 : A Space Odyssey 
Edward Sclssorhands 



C3r> 



SlarTrok: 

The r.lotion Picture 


♦0203505 


Star Trek II: 
TheWralhOIKhan 


•0201301 


Star Trek 111: 

The Search For Spock 


♦0201608 


Star Trek IV: 
Tho Voyage Home 


♦0430603 


Star Trek V: 

The Final Frontier 


♦0446605 


Star Trek Vi: The 
Undiscoyered Country 


♦1001007 


Ghost 


♦0826008 


E.T: The Extra-Terrestrial 


0681106 


Scarlace(1983) 


0216804 


Chinatown 


♦0202507 


North By Northwest 


♦0844209 


Beverly Hills Cop 


0205302 


BsvcriyHliisCopii 


0431 90S 


Wayne's World 
Conan Tho Barbarian 
Forbidden Planet 


♦0853705 
♦0220509 
•0844407 


Jaws 


0100008 


Kindergarten Cop 


0523407 


Henry V (1990) 


0040303 


The Commitments 


0691303 


Caddyshack 


0602300 


Black Bain 


♦0911701 


The African Queen 


0061102 


Hard To Kill 


0953505 


Hamiel (19901 


0970603 


Msmphis Belle 


•0983502 


Superman: The Movie 


• 0001305 


Bectlejuice 


0633003 


Dangerous Liaisons 


•0638700 


Blue Velvet 


•051 6007 


Road Warrior 


0602805 


Ail Dogs Go To Heaven 


0289702 


American Graffiti 


0211300 


TheGodtather 


□000802 


TheQodiather Part ill 


0842302 


The Wizard 0( 02 


0001404 


Batman (1989) 


♦0642504 


Batman Returns 


♦1029909 


Home Alone 


♦0104208 


The Last Boy Scout 


• 0779108 



Lethal Weapon 
Lethal Weapon 2 



♦0642702 



Here's a greal way to build a 
colleclion of your favorite movies-on 
laserdiscs! Just write in the numbers 
of Ihe 3 laserdiscs you want for 
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Buy only what you wanll if you 
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F.ritertaining 
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One Person 
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IA5EREHSC CU» 




Columbia House Laserdisc Club 

Depi. .17J P.O. Box 111 2, Terre Haute, Indiana 4781 1 -1 1 1 2 
Yes, pleose enroll me under itie lerins outlined in this odvertisemenl. As a member, 
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n 



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n Chorge my introductory loserdiscs ond future Club purchases to: 

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1- 



No*e CoJumbpQ House laieidnc Club reserves fhe righl \o rejecl oi corce' any irwmberiJiip. Offer tlmiled' ta 
Avijnuc, TerreHoutft. INi/SlM 1 12 099/F93 

♦Letterbox © 1993, The Columbia House Company 



background, and is something upon 
which I have grown quite dependent." 

Out in Public 

presentation software is one of the 
fastest-growing areas in Windows. 
What do our Windows pros like when 
it comes to taking information to the 
people? 

For presentations, William Harrel 
prefers Microsoft PowerPoint because 
it's both feature rich and easy to use. 
Harrel says that the approximately 20 
Windows presentation programs 
available right now all work with basi- 
cally the same idea. You create an 
outline, and from the outline the pro- 
gram automatically generates slides. 
PowerPoint, however, imports Word 
for Windows outlines. Linked to Excel 
and Lotus 1-2-3 spreadsheets, Pow- 
erPoint creates graphs and charts. 
"It's just all-around versatile," says 
Harrel. 

Aldus Persuasion is Tony Roberts's 
choice among presentation pro- 
grams. His desktop publishing busi- 
ness uses Persuasion extensively to 
create slides, overheads, and presen- 
tation material for speeches. 

Every Picture Tells a Story 

Creating graphics of all kinds was the 
earliest use of graphical environ- 
ments. Windows and the Macintosh 
operating system made it easy to cre- 
ate a standard interface and a stan- 
dard set of graphics tools, and the 
mouse— though not perfect— was still 
a very good drawing tool. While over 
the past couple of years Windows 
software has taken great strides 
beyond drawing and painting, and 
now includes virtually every kind of 
software, graphics remain the heart of 
the Windows experience and the prin- 
cipal attraction of the graphical user 
interface for many users. But which 
graphics programs are the best? 

Steven Anzovin considers Adobe 
Illustrator the standard in the field of 
graphics: "It may not have every tool 
that you want, but it has the great ad- 
vantage of being a standard that 
many other artists are familiar with 
and use." Adobe Illustrator is geared 
to the professional artist, and so is 
Fractal Design Painter, which Anzovin 
says is an excellent paint program. It 
gives you tools that don't exist in other 
programs, such as watercolor, oil 
paint, and charcoal. For the best 
effects in painting, Anzovin says 
Painter is the only choice. Anzovin 
also admires the program Arts & 
Letters Graphic Editor for its extensive 
typeface and clip art libraries. 

When asked for his choice of the 

12 COMPUTE JULY 1993 



best graphics program, William Harrel 
comes out strongly in favor of 
CorelDRAW!. "The reason I use it is 
[that] I'm not a graphics artist, and it 
has a lot of features that make me look 
like one," says Harrel. CorelDRAW! is a 
vector drawing program that excels for 
nonillustrators because it has a lot of 
automatic features for creating 3-D 
objects, for mirroring objects, and for 
wrapping text along a path; it can also 
give an object perspective to make it 
look more three-dimensional. Co- 
relDRAW! comes with about 250 type- 
faces and 14,000 pieces of clip art, 
along with a charting application, a 
bitmap application, a slide-show appli- 
cation, and other utilities. "So it's not 
only powerful — It's a great value," says 
Harrel. 

Tom Campbell joins in the praise 
for CorelDRAW!, mostly for technical 
illustration. "I have to admit [that] it's 
kind of fun to play with, too," says 
Campbell. His reason for choosing 
CorelDRAW! is that it has the best 
combination of features and price. 

Tony Roberts uses Aldus Free- 
hand and PhotoStyler In conjunction 
with PageMaker when he draws maps 
or diagrams or scans in photographs. 
The programs work hand in hand in 
production of Roberts's books and 
brochures, 

You may have noticed that the pro- 
grams Roberts uses are generally 
Aldus products. He says that that has 
something to do with why he has cho- 
sen to use these applications. Page- 
Maker was the first Aldus application 
he owned, and he felt so comfortable 
with it that when he began to add 
drawing tools and tools for scanning 
and photo manipulation, he decided 
to go with the Aldus products as they 
came out. The programs are 
designed to work together. Roberts 
says, "I felt confident that If I was 
working in one program, I would be 
able to use the output of it in the other 
without too much trouble. And that's 
been fairly true." 

"CorelDRAW! and Arts & Letters 
Graphic Editor are fine products," 
Robert Bixby says, "but if you're look- 
ing for a complete professional vector 
graphics package with a robust trac- 
ing program, Micrografx Designer is 
second to none. It has most of the 
tools of the other programs, plus that 
incredibly powerful trace that no one 
else can match. It suffers slightly from 
having an outdated interface, but 
those who use it swear by it." 

Programming 

COMPUTE was built on programming. 
When there were few commercial pro- 



grams available, COMPUTE printed 
listings that would enable readers to 
create their own word processors, 
spreadsheets, databases, and graph- 
ics programs. Now that programming 
is largely the province of profession- 
als, what tools do the pros like to use? 

George Campbell chooses Visual 
Basic 2.0 for programming. Accord- 
ing to Campbell, it's easy to use, pow- 
erful, and by far the best way to cre- 
ate Windows applications. 

Tom Campbell uses Borland C++ 
to write programs. The reasoning 
behind his programming choice is 
that Borland C++ happens to be the 
only C compiler that currently has a 
Windows-integrated environment, 
which makes It easier and more 
pleasant to use. And when it comes 
time to test one of his Windows pro- 
grams, he's already in Windows, so 
he doesn't have to take the time to 
start up the environment, 

Windows Productivity Suite 

Windows has come a long way. The 
environment that once utilized only 
applications designed for graphics 
and spreadsheets now supports soft- 
ware of virtually every variety. In fact, 
there are so many applications avail- 
able today that it's sometimes difficult 
to decide which one to buy. That's 
why experts were called in to help 
narrow the selection. 

The programs most recommended 
include Microsoft Word for Windows, 
Ami Pro, Microsoft Excel, Quattro Pro, 
Aldus PageMaker, Microsoft Access, 
Procomm Plus for Windows, Microsoft 
PowerPoint, Aldus Persuasion, and 
CorelDRAW!, with minority support for 
Microsoft Bookshelf, MacLinkPlus, 
OmniPage Direct, ArrowSmith, Ven- 
tura Publisher, Instant Database, File- 
Maker Pro, Microsoft FoxPro for 
Windows, Aldus FreeHand, Aldus 
PhotoStyler, FaxMaster, WinFax Pro, 
RapidFAX, Adobe Illustrator, Fractal 
Design Painter, Arts & Letters Graphic 
Editor, and Micrografx Designer. 
When it comes to programming lan- 
guages, our experts like Visual Basic 
and Borland C++. 

How can you choose between 
such powerful programs as Word for 
Windows and Ami Pro or between 
Excel and Quattro Pro? If you have 
some specific application in mind, 
look for the program with the feature 
set that most closely matches your 
needs. Word for Windows is better for 
writing, while Ami Pro is better suited 
to publishing (though it's also very 
good for general writing). If you 
choose any one of the best products 
in a category, you can't go wrong. □ 



^n.^^ 




: Swwta 










[ Hyto 



Create Songs on 
Your Sound Card with 
MusicTime. 

Whatever your musical 

ability, MusicTime will 

inspire you to create your 

own breathy love songs, 

foot-tapping jazz or 

head-slammin' rock 'n' 

roll. With MusicTime 

and either a sound card 

or a MIDI instrument, 

you can compose, edit, 

play back and print, sheet 

music on your ?.C. 

Bring Your Music to Life. 

Use your mouse to click 
musical notes and 
symbols onto a staff 
sheet. If you've got a 
Miracle'" or MIDI key- 
board, MusicTime will 
record and transcribe 
your live performance into music notation in real 
time — right before your eyes! 

Easy to Play Back, Edit and Print. 

Play back instandy through your sound card or MIDI 
gear. Editing is easy with MusicTime's cut, copy and 
paste commands. Automatically transpose notes into 
any key. Add guitar chords. Write beautiful lyrics. 
Print out publishing-quality sheet music. 



MusicTime couldn't be 
easier to use. 

Windows, Mac and 
MIDI Compatible. 

MusicTime is available 
for PC's with Windows'" 
or the Macintosh? and is 
compatible with The 





Miracle Keyboard, Sound 
Blaster Pro? Media Vision 
Pro Audio Spectrum' and 
Thunder Board'," AdLib 
Gold ' and most popular PC sound cards. 

For your copy of MusicTime, call Passport or visit 

your nearest computer or 

music store. If you're tired of 

just playing games with your 

sound card, get MusicTime and 

turn your beeps and blasts into 

be-bop and hip-hop. 

m 




PASSPORT. 



MKROSin- 
■WIN00i\S-« 



i 



a 






m 









Marks 



> * 



Passpoit Designs, Inc. ■ 100 Stone Pine Rd. f Half Moon Bay, CA 9-1019 USA • Phone: (413) 726-0280 • Fax: (41 3) 726-2254 



Pas5pon Music'imE is i liademarti of ^sspori Designs. Ire A!i olhef piofluds and brands ate Irademarks or tegisteiedlradcmartis ol tiieir respective tioldsrs. 
Circle Reader Service Number 273 



Adobe Illustrator for Windows 4.0 — 

$695.00 
ADOBE SYSTEMS 
1585 Charleston Rd., Box 7900 
Mountain View, CA 94039 
(800) 833-6687 
(408) 986-6555 (overseas) 
(415)961-4400 

Aldus FreeHand 3.1^$595.00 
Aldus PageMaker for Windows 5.0— 

$895.00 
Aldus Persuasion— $495.00 
Aldus PhotoSty I er— $795.00 
ALDUS 

411 First Ave. S 
Seattle, WA 98104-2871 
(206) 628-5739 

Instant Database — $95.00 

ASYMMETRIX 

110 110th Ave. NE, Ste. 700 

Bellevue, WA 98004 

(800) 448-6543 

(206)637-1500 

Borland C++ 3.1— $495.00 
Borland C++ 3.1 with Application 

Frameworks— $749.00 
Quattro Pro for Windows 1.0 — 

$495.00 
BORLAND INTERNATIONAL 
1800 Green Hills Rd. 
Scotts Valley. CA 95067 
(800)331-0877 
(800) 461-3327 (Canada) 
(408) 438-8400 

Arthur's Teacher Trouble— $59.95 
Just Grandma and Me — $49.95 
BR0DERBUND SOFTWARE 
500 Redwood Blvd. 
Novate, CA 94948-6121 
(800)521-6263 
(415)382-4400 

FaxMaster— $109.00 

OmniPage Direct 1,0— $595.00 

CAERE 

100 Cooper Ct. 

Los Gatos, CA 95030 

(800)643-3915 

(408) 395-7000 

FileMaker Pro 2.0— $399.00 

CLARIS 

5201 Patrick Henry Dr., Box 58168 

Santa Clara. CA 95052 

(800) 544-8554 

(408) 727-8227 



Product List 

RapldFAX for Windows— $49.00 

THE COMPLETE PC 

1983 Concourse Dr. 

San Jose, CA 95131 

(800)229-1753 

(408)434-0145 

Arts & Letters Graphic Editor 3.12- 

$695.00 
COMPUTER SUPPORT 
15926 Midway Rd. 
Dallas, TX 75244 
(214)661-8960 

CorelDRAW! 3.0—5595.00 

COREL 

1600 Carling Ave. 

Ottawa, ON 

Canada K1Z 8R7 

(800) 836-7274 

(613)728-8200 

Procomm Plus for Windows 1 .01 — 

$179.00 
DATASTORM TECHNOLOGIES 
P.O. Box 1471 
Columbia, MO 65205 
(314) 443-3282 

MacLinkPlus/PC 7.0— $199.00 

DATAVI2 

55 Corporate Dr. 

Trumbull, CT 0661 1 

(800) 733-0030 

(203) 268-0030 

WinFax Pro— $129.00 
DELRINA TECHNOLOGY 
6830 Via Del Oro, Ste. 240 
San Jose, CA95119 
(800) 268-6082 
(408) 363-2345 



Fractal Design Painter 2.0- 
FRACTAL DESIGN 
335Spreckels Dr., Ste. F 
Aptos, CA 95003 
(408) 688>8800 

ArrowSmith— $17.00 
CLIRON KARNES 
2519 0verbrookDr. 
Greensboro, NC 27408 
CompuSen/e 75300.2103 

Ami Pro 3.0— $495.00 
LOTUS DEVELOPMENT 
55 Cambridge Pkwy. 
Cambridge, MA 02142 
(800)343-5414 
(617)577-8500 



-$399.00 



SimCity for Windows— $59.95 
MAXIS SOFTWARE 
2 Theatre Sq., Ste. 230 
Orinda, CA 94563-3346 
(800) 336-2447 
(510)254-9700 

Micrografx Designer— $695.00 
MICROGRAFX 
1303E. ArapahoRd. 
Richardson, TX 75081 
(800) 733-3729 
(214)234-1769 

Microsoft Access 1.1— $495.00 
Microsoft Bookshelf for Windows 

1993 Edition— $195.00 
Microsoft Excel for Windows 4.0— 

$495.00 
Microsoft Golf 1 .0— $64.95 
Microsoft PowerPoint for Windows 

3.0— $495.00 
Microsoft Publisher for Windows 

1.0— $199.00 
Microsoft Word for Windows 2.0— 

$495.00 
Multimedia Word for Windows and 

Bookshelf 2.0 Video and Sound 

Edition— $595.00 
Visual Basic for Windows 2.0 — 

$199.00 
Visual Basic for Windows 

Professional Edition 2.0 — $495.00 
MICROSOFT 
1 Microsoft Way 
Redmond, WA 98052-6399 
(800) 426-9400 
(206) 882-8080 

Express Publisher for Windows — 

$79.95 
POWER UP SOFTWARE 
2929 Campus Dr. 
San Mateo, CA 94403 
(800)851-2917 
(415)345-5900 

THE ANIMALS!— $119.95 
THE SOFTWARE TOOLWORKS 
60 Leveroni Ct. 
Novato, CA 94949 
(800) 234-3088 
(415) 883-3000 

WordPerfect for Windows 5.1 — 

$495.00 
WORDPERFECT 
1555 N. Technology Way 
Orem, UT 84057 
(800)321-4566 
(801)225-5000 



14 COMPUTE JULY 1993 




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TEST LAB 



Edited by Mike Hudnall 
Reviews by Tom Benford 

Combine the blazing speed 
and colossal computing pow- 
er of Intel's 486DX2/66 with 
the latest local-bus technolo- 
gy, and you've got a computer 
ready for the most demanding 
applications. Windows programs 
that seem sluggish on older com- 
puters are downright snappy on 
these systems, so you can 
spend less of your time waiting 
for the Windows hourglass and 
more of it taking care of business. 
Not inexpensive by any means, 
these systems nevertheless deliv- 
er lots of value, especially when 
you consider what you could get 
for the same price a year ago, how 
much time you can save, and how 
expandable they are. 

You may be asking yourself 
whether you really need this 
much power and speed right 
now— a fair question. Here at 
COMPUTE, we see today's cut- 
ting-edge technologies as tomor- 




«■ 




row's consumer technologies, 
and with the current dizzying 
pace of change in the computer 
industry, tomorrow will probably 
be here sooner than you think. 
Already Intel has announced its 
new Pentium chip, which by all ac- 
counts significantly outperforms 
the 486DX2/66 but is likely to 
cost significantly more, and I sus- 
pect that by the time this issue 
hits the stands, most computer 
companies will offer VESA local 
bus as a standard feature rather 
than as an option. 

In setting up this month's 
lineup of systems, we asked for 
Industry Standard Architecture 
(ISA) because it's less expensive 
than Extended Industry Standard 
Architecture (EISA) and because 
most of our readers won't need EI- 
SA's performance benefits. We 
asked for 8IVIB of RAM because 
many of the systems include 8MB 
as the standard complement and 
because some of the more 
demanding applications that 
would benefit from the extra horse- 
power of 4B6DX2/66 chips also 
require more than 4MB. We also 
asked the manufacturers to install 
whatever cache was part of the 
standard configuration, since 
many COMPUTE readers will opt 
for standard packages. Because 
these high-powered computers 
are likely to handle high-powered 
applications and mountains of 
data, we requested hard drives of 
at least 200MB, not at all an unusu- 



COMPUADD EXPRESS 
12301 Tectinology Blvd. 
Austin, TX 78727 
(800) 925-3000 

Oirect price: $2,595 for review 
eonfiguration; $2,195 for standard 
configuration 

Warranty: one year, parts and latior; 
30-day monev-tjact< guarantee; 30- 
day exchange (new system 
components); one year free on-site 
service 



al size for these machines. 

All ten of the systems in this 
month's Test Lab come with Win- 
dows 3.1 and DOS, and they're 
all, of course, 486DX2/66 sys- 
tems with local-bus video. 
Beyond those common elements, 
you'll find a variety of prices and 
features. While most of these com- 
puters, for example, use stan- 
dard VESA local bus, some com- 
panies use proprietary local-bus 
video. At least a few include a 
local-bus drive controller along 
with the local-bus video adapter. 
And in some cases the video 
card is accelerated for optimized 
Windows performance. 

For the specifics of configura- 
tion, expandability, and other fea- 
tures, you should find the fea- 
tures grid helpful. Whether or not 
you understand the differences 
among local-bus video stan- 
dards, you'll appreciate the bench- 
mark graphs, which provide not 
only Norton index data but also 
real-world performance data — 
how long a particular computer re- 
quired to find and replace text in 
a word processor, index and sort 
a database, play back video, and 
so forth. These systems were so 
fast that our lab had to redesign 
the benchmark test suite to pro- 
duce more statistically significant 
data. In fact, we had to drop a 
planned spreadsheet benchmark 
because even a Windows spread- 
sheet proved too small a chal- 
lenge for these machines, Tom 
Benford's reviews home in on sig- 
nificant features of these comput- 
ers, whether it's their strategies 
for handling the heat given off by 
their microprocessors, their mem- 
ory expansion capabilities, their 
case designs, their use of cach- 
ing, or their ability to accept 
upgrade chips, 

Whether you're ready to buy 
one of these systems now or just 
want to see the kind of system you 
couid be buying before long. Test 
Lab has information to help you 
understand the technology and 
make a more informed purchase. 

MIKE HUDNALL 



COMPUADD EXPRESS 
466/DX2 

The CompuAdd Express 466/DX2 
is the current top-of-the-line mod- 
el in the company's series of "scal- 
able" computer systems designed 
with upgradability in mind. 

Scalable is, for all intents and 
purposes, another word for mod- 
ular in that the Express lets you 
change the configuration by sim- 
ply replacing the CPU and chang- 
ing the jumper switch settings. 
The company offers six varieties 
of the machine, ranging from a 40- 
fvlHz 386DXL-based system to 
486SX models and the 466/DX2 
model reviewed here. 

You'll find many of the essen- 
tial system functions integrated 
right into the motherboard itself: 
the IDE controller, the floppy 
drive controller, the parallel and 
serial ports, the keyboard connec- 
tion, and local-bus video for fast- 
er video performance. 

The full-profile case occupies 
a baby-AT footprint and provides 
three bays accessible from the 
front: two half-height 5y4-inch 
bays and a vertical 3y2-inch bay. 
A hidden SVs-inch bay is also avail- 
able. To power any additional 
drives you might install, just use 
the three available connectors 
from the 200-watt power supply 
A Western Digital Caviar 2340 
(333MB formatted) hard drive pro- 
vides the mass storage for the sys- 
tem, while a combination SVs- 
inch/5'/4-inch half-height unit 
occupies the uppermost bay and 
provides floppy disk I/O. 

Because the Express inte- 
grates so much into the mother- 
board, all of its full-length 16-bit 
slots are available. A proprietary 
slot holds a proprietary video adapt- 
er card and is, apparently, the 
local-bus connection: Tseng Labs 
manufactures the video BIOS. I 
found no other local-bus slots. 

The high-speed, high-pow- 
ered 66-MHz i486DX2 CPU gen- 
erates an enormous amount of 
heat, the archnemesis of electron- 



DEU COMPUTER 

9505 Arboretum Blvd. 

AusUn, TX 78759-7299 

(800) 289-3355 

(51 2» 338-4400 

Direct price: $3,409 tor standaril 

configuration 



ic components. The CompuAdd 
folks, however, have taken some 
serious measures to ensure that 
heat won't be a problem with this 
system. A high-volume fan mount- 
ed at the front of the case less 
than six inches from the CPU 
pulls in outside air through the 
case vents. A deeply finned heat 
sink and a miniature fan mounted 
atop the CPU itself also help: 
under this arrangement, the heat 
sink dissipates the chip's heat and 
the fan keeps cool air circulating 
over the heat sink to further aid in 
keeping the interior case temper- 
ature "comfortable" for the compo- 
nents. The design apparently 
works well, as I didn't experience 
any problems or anomalies during 
the time I spent using this system 
for the review. 

A three-button mouse supplied 
with the system has a switch that 
lets you select either a Microsoft 
(two-button) mode or a Mouse Sys- 
tems (three-button) mode. While 
the mouse itself resembles a Mi- 
crosoft mouse in style, feel, and 
shape, the clicking action could 
best be described as erratic: fre- 
quently, several rapid clicks 
were required to enter a Windows 
command or function. 

I wasn't entirely satisfied with 
the keyboard (made by Lexmark 
here in the USA), either. I found the 
action quite stiff, there was no au- 
dible click, and it had a straight 
cable (which looked very similar to 
RJ-14 telephone cable) rather 
than the heavier, coiled cords usu- 
ally found on keyboards. 

Aside from the mouse and key- 
board difficulties, the CompuAdd 
Express 466/DX2 local-bus sys- 
tem provides good performance, 
features, and expandability. 

Circle Header Service Number 371 




DELL SYSTEM 
466/M 

Dell has built its reputation on 
high-quality, dependable PC sys- 
tems that are popularly priced. 
Maintaining that reputation, the 
Dell System 466/M proves itself to 
be a sterling performer. 

The baby-AT-sized desktop 
case provides a surprising 
amount of expansion room, 
thanks to large-scale integration 
of components on the system's 
motherboard. Components critical 
to the system, including the video 
adapter, input and output ports, 
and disk controllers, are all integrat- 
ed rather than requiring separate 
expansion cards. As a result, you 
have five full-length 16-bit expan- 
sion slots available for user- 
installed peripherals, in addition to 
a single three-quarter-length 16- 
bit slot for shorter boards. 

Looking for room to add 
drives? The system has two avail- 
able exposed half-height bays 
and an internal 3'/s-inch bay. 
Dual floppy drives are provided 
as standard equipment on the sys- 
tem, but rather than being individ- 
ual units that require separate 
bays, the two floppy drives are 
integrated into one half-height 
combination drive — a nice touch 
that conserves space and 
improves expansion capabilities. 

A 240-watt power supply pro- 
vides more than enough power 
for the system and sports three "pig- 
tail" connectors available for pow- 
ering any additional drive devices 
you might install in the system. 

JULY 1993 COMPUTE 17 



TEST LAB 



An extra-large finned heat sink 
on the 66-MHz Intel 486DX2 CPU 
helps dissipate the heat this fast 
chip generates. To aid the heat 
sink in its cooling functions, a high- 
volume fan mounted almost direct- 
ly in front of the CPU provides 
excellent air flow inside the case. 

Dell uses a proprietary local- 
bus standard w^htch is not VESA 
compliant, and there is no local- 
bus slot available for user-instal- 
lable cards, since the local-bus 
features are integrated into the 
motherboard's circuitry. Dell han- 
dles video through this local bus, 
using the popular S3 accelerated 
video chip set, which can gener- 
ate 1024 X 768 noninteriaced res- 
olution with a maximum color pal- 
ette of over 32,000 colors. 

The integrated IDE interface fea- 
tures a 32K cache buffer, which 
helps to keep things moving at a 
brisk pace in the system, You can 
also get an optional 128K internal 
system cache. 

Knowing that users naturally 
upgrade their systems as their 
needs for power and speed 
grow, Dell offers a motherboard 
with a 238-pin (low insertion 
force press-pin) socket that can 
accommodate future upgrades, 
such as higher-speed 486 chips 
or the P24T (Pentium Overdrive) 
when they become available. The 
flash memory Phoenix/Dell BIOS 
is disk upgradable, another fea- 
ture which ensures the system's 
longevity. 

The review system contained 
8MB of RAM, but you can up- 
grade the memory to a maximum 
of 64MB using 16MB SIMMs in 
the four sockets provided on the 
motherboard. Dell also included 
a Maxtor LXT-340A 320MB IDE 
hard drive and a Dell UltraScan 
14C SVGA monitor as part of the 
standard equipment. 

A Microsoft tvro-button mouse 
supplied with the system plugs 
into the built-in PS/2-style mouse 
port. MS-DOS 5.0, Windows 3,1, 
and an enhanced keyboard 
round out the system and ensure 
that it's ready to go to work as 

18 COMPUTE JULY 1993 



DIAMOND TECHNOLOGIES 

171S5 Gillette Ave. 

Irvine, CA 92714 

(800) 989-7253 

(714) 252-1008 

Direct price: $2,695 (review 

configuration) 

Warranty: one year on monitor, 

floppy drives, and hard drives; 15 

months on ail other parts 



soon as you plug it in. 

Deli has an excellent system 
here in the 466/M, and it 
deserves your serious consider- 
ation if you're in the market for a 
486DX2/66 local-bus system. 

Circle Reader Service Number 372 

DIAMOND 
486DX2/66 

Smart styling, good expansion 
potential, and snappy local-bus 
performance make the DT 486DX2/ 
66 system from Diamond Technol- 
ogies a pleasing package. 

A fud-height baby-AT case pro- 
vides expandability while maintain- 
ing a reasonably small footprint 
for the desktop. For adding 
drives, this system includes two 
half-height bays accessible from 
the front of the machine. No 
additional unexposed bays are 
available, but since the Diamond 
comes equipped with dual flop- 
pies, two bays should suffice for 
the vast majority of users. The 
200-watt power supply is also 
adequate for such expansion, 
although it comes with only one 
extra "pigtail" connector for power- 
ing another drive. 

The 14860X2/66 CPU, mount- 
ed in a standard press-pin sock- 
et, has a deeply finned heat sink 
to minimize heat buildup and the 
problems associated with it. 
Since the AT-sized case affords 
plenty of internal "breathing" 
room for air to circulate, this 
arrangement works well, keeping 
the CPU and other components 
cool and thus contributing to 
system reliability. 




The motherboard, a fairly com- 
pact unit manufactured by S&A 
Labs, uses an American 
Megatrends, Inc. (AMI) BIOS. 
Eight SIMM sockets on the mother- 
board accept either 1MB or 4MB 
SIMMs, yielding a maximum 
configuration of 32MB on the moth- 
erboard itself. 

The system came with two 
local-bus siots on the mother- 
board, both occupied; a Dia- 
mond Viper SVGA card is 
installed in one, while the (DE 
caching disk controller resides in 
the other. Five of the six full- 
length 16-bit slots are available 
for adding expansion boards (the 
sixth slot contains the multi I/O 
card, which provides the parallel 
and serial ports). 

At the front of the case, above 
two flush-mounted push-button 
switches for changing to and 
from turbo mode and resetting the 
system, you'll find three LEDs for 
signaling power on, hard drive 
activity, and turbo status. The SVa- 
inch high-density drive is vertical- 
ly mounted next to the 1 .2MB 5 '/i- 
Inch drive which occupies the 
topmost bay in the case. Look for 
the power switch on the rear pan- 
el of the case at the right side. 

A comfortable enhanced key- 
board (no audible click) comes 
as part of the standard package, 
along with a three-button Micro- 
soft-compatible serial mouse. 
While considerably larger and 
bulkier than a Microsoft unit, the 
mouse is still quite serviceable. 

The system delivers excellent 
video performance, thanks to the 
combination of the Diamond Viper 
board equipped with 2MB of vid- 



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The real beauty of the GSX-230 is what we left out - the 
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^CITIZEN" 

CIrcte Reader Service Number 166 




TEST LAB 




eo RAM and the local-bus slot. If 
your eyes tire easily from staring 
at a screen, you'll appreciate ttie 
CTX CMS-1561 SVGA monitor 
tfiat came with this review system; 
the monitor can display 1024 x 
768 noninterlaced resolution with 
256 colors. This combination of a 
high-powered SVGA card, a local 
bus, and an excellent monitor is 



DIGITAL EQUIPMENT CORPORATION 
Desktop Direct Irom Digital 
P.O. Box 4076 
Wobum, MA 01888 
(800) 722-0332 
Suggested retail price: $2,949 
(incluiling SVGA monitor, 245MB 
hard drive, and 8MB RAM) for 
review configuration; $2,549 (with 
VGA monitor, 122MB hard drive, and 
4MB RAM) tor standard 
configuration 



hard to beat if you do lots of graph- 
ics-intensive work. 

Word processing, desktop pub- 
lishing, database operations, and 
spreadsheet work all benefit 
from the overall power of the DX2/ 
66 CPU and the local-bus archi- 
tecture, resulting in overall per- 
formance that is above average 
in all respects. 

MS-DOS 5,0 and Windows 3, 1 



are supplied already loaded on 
the system, which enables you to 
get off to a productive start imme- 
diately, I found the system and 
software manuals thorough and 
well organized. 

The Diamond DT 486DX2/66 
puts lots of muscle into a baby- 
AT-sized case and certainly 
mehts your serious consideration 
when shopping for a 486DX2 
local-bus system. 

circle Reader Service Number 373 

DECPC 466D2 LP 

The design of Digital Equipment 
Corporation's DECpc 466d2 LP 
exemplifies how good expansion 
possibilities can be incorporated 
in a diminutive case. 

The footprint of the PC approx- 
imates that of a baby AT, but the 
case has a much lower profile 
than that of a standard desktop. 



THE NORTON OVERALL INDEX 

The Norton Overall Index factors in microprocessor and disk performance, among other 
things, to indicate how well a computer performs when compared to a 4.77-MHz IBM XT. 
The greater the index value, the faster the computer. 



150 



120 




Overall 
Index 

Disk Speed 
CPU Speed 



20 COMPUTE JULY 1993 



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TEST LAB 



measuring less than four inches 
from the top of the desl< to the top 
of the case. On the front of the ma- 
chine, you'll find recessed LEDs 
for power, hard drive activity, and 
turbo status. The reset button and 
power switches, similarly unobtru- 
sive, contribute to the streamlined 
appearance of the machine, 

A single SV^-inch high-density 
drive comes installed as standard 
equipment on the DECpc 466d2 
LP, but there's a front-accessible 
Sy^-inch half-height bay available 
underneath the drive for accepting 
another device of your choice. By 
virtue of its dual-sized plastic bay 
cover plate, this bay can also 
accommodate a 3y2-inch drive. 
DEC has provided a hidden 3'/?- 
Inch bay inside the machine, and 
two power connectors are availa- 
ble for powering any user- 
installed drives, 

DEC has integrated the paral- 
lel, serial, mouse, and keyboard 
ports; the video adapter; and the 
floppy and hard drive controllers 
into the motherboard itself to 
keep the design compact and 
leave as many expansion slots 
free as possible. An extension 
card inserted vertically into the sys- 
tem board provides three full- 
length 16-bit expansion slots for 
any peripherals you choose to in- 



stall. There are no 8-bit or local- 
bus slots provided in the system. 

The 66-fv1Hz 486DX2 CPU and 
related performance components 
reside on a separate board 
(referred to as a CPU module in 
DEC'S manual) attached via an 
nterlocking connector to the 
main system board. This module 
permits quickly changing the sys- 
tem's configuration, presumably 
allowing upgrades. The module's 
vacant 238-pin socket certainly 
seems to support such a conclu- 
sion. The CPU itself resides in a 
press-pin socket on the module 
board. 

I was somewhat surprised to 
find that the only means of dissi- 
pating heat generated by the 
CPU was a deeply finned heat 
sink attached to the top of the 
chip. There was no cooling fan to 
circulate air within the case inte- 
rior which, compared with the oth- 
er systems reviewed, was much 
less spacious. However, heat 
buildup didn't seem to be a prob- 
lem; the system performed as ex- 
pected during the review period. 

The system's integrated local- 
bus video adapter, based on the 
popular S3 accelerated chip set, 
comes with 512K of video RAM in- 
stalled. Even though the review 
unit came with an additional 



WINWORD 2.0 TEXT SEARCH & REPUCE 

WORSE 6 



BEHER 



■ 






III 1 


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\ % \ % * 



% 






22 COMPUTE JULY 1993 



A NOTE ON PRICES 

With computer products changing 
more rapidly than ever and with 
options more plentiful than ever, 
computer prices can be a tricl<y busi- 
ness, indeed. 

It pays to keep the following 
points in mind: 

Street and direct prices can be 
considerably lower than list prices. 
Shopping around helps you find the 
best price. 

Because computer technology 
evolves rapidly, a product may 
have changed by the time our re- 
view sees print. A manufacturer may 
decide to change the video card or 
the hard drive, for example. 

Because consumers are more 
sophisticated than ever about what 
they want in computer products and 
because manufacturers have 
responded with more options and 
configurations than ever, one com- 
puter model may be subject to doz- 
ens of variations, each with a slightly 
different price. 

At COMPUTE, we make every ef- 
fort to verify prices and differentiate 
between the price tor a review con- 
figuration and the price for a stan- 
dard configuration. It's still a good 
Idea, however, to call the manufac- 
turer or vendor to make sure that the 
configuration you want matches the 
price you have in mind. 

—MIKE HUONALL 



51 2K of video RAM installed (yield- 
ing 1 MB total), i was unable to in- 
itiate or use Windows in 1024 x 
768 256-color mode. Since run- 
ning in 800 X 640 256-color 
mode wasn't a problem, that's the 
mode I used. DEC provided a Dig- 
ital PC7XV-DE monitor with the re- 
view unit, and I suspect that the 
monitor, and not the video card, 
prevented accessing the 1024 x 
768 mode successfully. 

DOS 5.0 and Windows 3.1 
come supplied with the system, 
as does a copy of Diagsoft's 
QAPlus software. 

If your expansion requirements 
aren't too demanding and you 
like the idea of a slimline case, 
this DEC machine may be worth 
a closer look. 

Circle Reader Service Number 374 



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circle Reader Service Number 288 



TEST LAB 



EPSON 

PROGRESSION 
486DX2/66 PC 

Epson has taken a modular ap- 
proach wilh its Progression series 
of computers, and the Progression 
486DX2/66 PC model is represen- 
tative of this design trend. 

The Progression's full-height 
baby-AT case provides room for 
expansion without requiring lots of 
desktop real estate. The review 
unit came with a single one-third- 
height high-density S'^-inch 
drive, leaving three front-accessi- 
ble bays (one one-third-height and 
two half-height bays) available for 
additional devices. Two half- 
height internal bays are also avail- 
able for upgrading the system. 

There's lots of room for expand- 
ing RAM beyond the system's 
standard complement of 4MB. 
With four SIMIvl sockets, you can 
expand up to a maximum of 
128fvlB using 16MB SIMfVls. The 
review unit came equipped with 
12MB of RAM: the lab removed 
one 4MB SIMM so that this sys- 
tem could meet the 8MB config- 
uration requirement for the bench- 
mark testing. During the review, 
however, I used the full 12MB con- 
figuration and found performance 
to be respectable for ail types of 
general computing work. 

The 14860X2/66 CPU resides 
on a separate card which plugs 
into a special slot on the mother- 
board. Under this modular 
arrangement, someone with a Pro- 
gression 486SX/25 or 486DX/33 
machine could upgrade to a 
486DX2/66 simply by replacing 
the CPU card rather than chang- 
ing the chip itself. Future 
upgrades to more powerfui 
CPUs as they become available 
will also be easy to perform under 
this design scheme. 

The review system's CPU, 
installed in a low-force press-pin 
socket, has a deeply finned heat 
sink. A vacant ZIF (Zero insertion 
Force) socket is located adjacent 

24 COMPUTE JULY 1993 



EPSON AMERICA 

P.O. Box 2842 

Torrance, CA 90509-2842 

(800) 922-8911 

(310! 782-0770 

Suggested retail orice: $3,976 lor 

review configuration with monitor 

and 12MB RAM ($3,353 esllinateil 

street price); $3,398 tar standard 

configuration with monitor and 4IVIB 

RAM ($2,862 estimated street 

price) 

Warranty: one year, including on- . 

site service witiiin 75 miles ol 

auUiorized service center 



to the i486 chip on the CPU card 
itself, presumably for future 
upgrade options. The proprietary 
slot that accepts the CPU card 
looks like a local-bus slot, but it 
is not one; it is a slot designed to 
accept the modular Epson CPU 
cards only. 

You1l find all of the I/O ports 
(parallel, single serial, mouse, vid- 
eo, keyboard) integrated into the 
motherboard. This leaves six fuli- 
length 16-bit slots open and avail- 
able for use. A 200-watt power sup- 
ply provides the essential 
operating voltages for the system. 

Instead of the local-bus archi- 
tecture found in other systems cov- 
ered in this issue, the Progression 
uses its own Wingine Graphics 
Acceleration Technology for 
improved video performance. 
The heart of the Wingine is a 
CHIPS and Technologies display 
controller equipped with 1MB of 
video RAM (upgradable to 2MB) 
and a BrookTree RAMDAC. Rath- 
er than using an expansion card, 
Epson's Wingine integrates the vid- 
eo controller into the mother- 
board itself. 

Another unusual aspect of 
Epson's Wingine technology is 
that the total amount of system 
RAM can also affect the video 
performance. For example, with 
only 8MB of RAM instaiied, the sys- 
tem could not support 1024 x 
768 256-color noninterlaced resolu- 
tion in Windows; 800 x 640 was 
the highest video mode that 





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would operate with the monitor sup- 
plied for review, a 14-inch Epson 
T1183A extended VGA model. 
Curiously, Epson lists the 17-inch 
Professional Series monitor as the 
standard unit for this system. 

A two-button mouse and a com- 
fortable enhanced keyboard pro- 
vide the means for inputting data 
and controlling system and appli- 
cation functions. 

The Progression provides a 
workable alternative to the local- 
bus technology of this month's oth- 
er systems, and it provides some 
appealing features that make it 
worthy of consideration. 

circle Reader Service Number 37S 



GATEWAY 
4DX2-66V 



Gateway 2000's 4DX2-66V is a 
local-bus PC in an attractive, stan- 
dard-sized AT desktop case with 
reasonable expansion options. A 
vacant front-accessible half- 
height bay beneath the dual flop- 
py drives is ready to accept a CD- 
ROM drive or tape backup unit, 
and two additional half-height 
bays are available at the front of 
the case adjacent to the drives, if 
you want to mount additional in- 
ternal devices. (Editor's note: A CD- 
ROM drive now comes standard.) 
In this system. Gateway uses 
a standard-sized, highly integrat- 
ed motherboard that incorpo- 
rates the floppy dhve controller 
and a local-bus IDE hard disk 
interface. The motherboard can 
support up to 64MB of RAM direct- 



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The DOS and Windows 3.1 voice recognition pro- 
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Easy to install and use, you will be up and rurming 
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Circle Reader Service Number 205 



TEST LAB 




ly using 16MB modules in its four 
SIMM sockets. 

The 66-MHz Intel 486DX2 CPU 
resides in a standard press-pin 
socket and is lilted with a heat 
sink with crosshatched fins to dis- 
sipate its heat. An upgrade sock- 
et next to the CPU lets you add 
an upgrade chip, such as the 
Intel Overdrive accelerator. How- 
ever, since the 486DX2/66 is the 
fastest CPU currently available, 



GATEWAY 2000 

610 Gateway Dr. 

N. Sioux City, SO 57049 

(8001 846-2000 

Direct price: $2,985 

Warranty: one year, parts and iabor 



there is no advantage or benefit 
to be derived by adding an Over- 
drive chip at this point in time, 

The system includes two local- 
bus expansion slots, one holding 
the ATI Graphics Ultra Pro video 
card. Of the five 16-bit expansion 
slots available, four can accom- 
modate full-length cards; the oth- 
er 1 6-btt slot can only accept a half- 
length card. Of course, you can 
use the remaining local-bus slot as 
a 16-bit slot for non-local-bus 
expansion cards if you need to. 



The reset and turbo selector 
switcHes, flush mounted on the 
front of the case, reside next to 
the key lock, just above the illu- 
minated power, hard drive activi- 
ty, and turbo LEDs. The power 
switch is located at the right rear 
corner of the machine. 

The machine comes with a spe- 
cial 124-key keyboard, but you 
can order a traditional AT-stan- 
dard 101 -key keyboard if you pre- 
fer. The 124-key keyboard has an 
enhanced cursor-control station 
with extra keys, which I found con- 
fusing, I found that both key- 
boards, made for Gateway by 
MaxiSwitch, feel great. 

Gateway's 1572 FS 15-inch 
CrystalScan SVGA monitor accom- 
panied the system unit and pro- 
vided an excellent display for the 
high-speed graphics processed 
through the ATI video card and 
the local bus. 

Overall, the performance of this 
machine was excellent, especially 



DATABASE TESTS 



WORSi 150 



120 



I 



90 



60 



30 



BETTER 





1 


1 






1 










































































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1 




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Index 






\ %. 



26 COMPUTE JULY 1993 




We created our new line of laser printers 
under very strict guidelines. 




Introducing Star's LS-5 series of laser printers. 



when we set out to create our new laser printers, we were 
bound by the same standards that enabled our dot-matrix 
and ink-jet printers to garner so many industry awards. 

Our mission was to produce a line of lasers that pos- 
sessed the very same attributes: superb print quality unsur- 
passed compatibility and excellent paper handling. 

The result is a family of laser printers of uncompromis- 
ing quality, yet outstanding value. 

Introducing the Star LS-5, LS-5EX and LS-5TT. The LS-5 
series has all the features youd expect from a high-end 
printer: dual-bin printing, which allows you to use two types 
of paper; a maintenance-free, high-definition one-piece 

IhieTypt is a trademark of Apple Compuler, Inc. Windows is a Iradtmark of Microsofi Corporaliun. 



toner/drum cartridge for blacker blacks and more striking 
detail; and 15 scalable TrueType™ fonts for Windows™ 3.1. 
Plus, the added assurance of Star's ^^A'o Year Warranty With 
so many features at such an affordable price, you're sure 
to be hearing a lot about the LS-5. And judging by our past 
successes, reading about it, too. 
For a brochure or your nearest 
Star dealer, call 1-800-447-4700. 
To have additional product 
information sent to you by fax, 
call 908- 
572-4004. 

Clrcls Reader Service Number 203 




THE LASER PRINTERS 



TEST LAB 



when running Windows. Even with 
a screen resolution of 1024 x 768 
with 256 colors, Windows was fast 
and snappy. And the Mach32 con- 
troi panel, which is a dedicated 
front end that manages the ATI 
local-bus controller, makes it very 
easy to change resolutions, colors, 
and system fonts. 

All in all, the Gateway 4DX2- 
66V is a first-rate local-bus system 
in a well-designed package. It's def- 
initely worth considering. 

circle Reader Service Number 376 

INSIGHT 
4a6DX2-66 VL 

Need a 486DX2/66 local-bus 
system with plenty of expansion 
possibilities as your needs grow? 
Well, then, you'll want to take a 
closer look at this tower configu- 
ration from Insight, 

The full-size tower case has a 
base that pulls out lateratly, from 
both sides, to provide stability. 
The full vertical configuration 
affords lots of room for adding 
drives or tape backup units, with 
three half-height front-accessible 
bays still available even with the 
system's dual floppies and 
210MB Western Digital hard 



INSIGHT OlSmiBUTION NETWORK 

1912 W. Fourth St. 

Tempe, AZ 85281 

(800) 927-7848 

(602) 902-1176 

Direct price: S2,779 for review 

configuration; S2,199 lor standard 

configuration 



drive installed. If you need addi- 
tional mounting room, there's 
also a concealed full-height bay. 

A beefy 250-watt power supply 
should adequately power any 
drives or expansion boards you 
add to the'system. 

The motherboard, manufac- 
tured by ASUS, IS one of the small- 
est 486 motherboards I've seen 
to date, and it looks out of place 
in the gargantuan cavity of this 
tower configuration. Small size not- 
withstanding, the motherboard 
still provides five available full- 
length 16-bit expansion slots, 
which should prove to be more 
than adequate for most users. 
The motherboard also contains 
two full-length local-bus slots, 
which are already occupied; the 
video controller occupies one 
local-bus slot, and the combina- 
tion multi l/0-drive controller 
card resides in the other. 



VIDEO FOR WINDOWS 
VIDEO PLAYBACK 



WORSE 



BETTER f> 



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2B COMPUTE JULY 1993 




The Intel 80486DX2 CPU is 
mounted in a ZIP socket for easy 
removal or upgrading. I found no 
heat sink on the chip (to help dis- 
sipate heat); however, owing to 
the spacious area of the tower 
case, heat buildup doesn't seem 
to be a problem. The large front- 
mounted cooling fan does a 
good job of circulating the air with- 
in the case to keep things cool, 
and I didn't experience any prob- 
lems usually associated with over- 
heating during my review. 

The manufacturer integrates 
the drive controller and I/O ports 
all on a single board, which 
occupies one of the VESA local- 
bus siots. In addition to the par- 
allel, game, and dual serial ports, 
this card aiso provides an IDE 
interface for the hard drive as well 
as control for the dual floppies. 

A comfortable enhanced key- 
board (no audible click) comes 
with the system, along with a 
Microsoft-compatible Insight three- 
button serial mouse. Software sup- 
plied with and installed on the sys- 
tem consists of fvlS-DOS 5.0, Win- 
dows 3.1, Dr. Solomon's Anti- 
Virus, and Stacker 2.0. 

The Insight machine had a qual- 
ity assurance slicker plainly 
affixed to the rear of the case, yet 
I was greeted with a HDD control- 
ler failure message when I first 
turned the machine on, I decid- 
ed to remove the system cover to 
look for any obvious problems be- 
fore calling Insight's tech support 
number, and as soon as the cov- 



Who cares how 



they can sell it 
for $18,995. 
Just get one before 
they change 



W 



their minds. 



M- 



■■ — '■■. ■'^S^jf j^-^^!^ 



.J 



('it 



i-r 




Eight}/ Eight Siuviat Eililioii 



*■*' All for just $18J995. How do we do it? We'll be happif to tell you. Call 1-800-24 



IOLDSMOBILE 



'$afchf belh, rjTrr with an air tii^f. 



TEST LAB 



er was removed I found the cul- 
prit: Thie ribbon cable coming 
from the hard drive had become 
disconnected from the pin connec- 
tor on the I/O card. I reattached 
it and reinstalled the cover, and 
the system booted and per- 
formed perfectly, without inci- 
dent, from that point on. 

The machine proved to be 
quite a snappy performer for all 
types of applications — from 
word processing to spreadsheets 
and charting to 3-D modeling 
and other graphics-intensive 
tasks. The system came supplied 
with a 15-inch Viewsonic 6FS mon- 
itor which provided excellent view- 
ing and enabled the STB Power- 
graph video card (S3-based) with 
1 MB of RAM to show its stuff (aid- 
ed in the express department by 
the system's 32-bit local bus). 

Performance for today with 
room for expansion is what the In- 
sight 486DX2-66 VL delivers. 

Circle Reader Service Number 377 



KEYDATA INTERNATIONAL 

111 Corporate Blvd. 

S. Plalnfleld, NJ 07080 

[800] 486-7010 

[908] 755-0350 

Direct price: $2,675 (standard 

conliguratlon) 

Warranty: one year, parts and labor; 

on-site service; 30-day money-back 

guarantee 



KEYDATA 
486DX2-66 VL 

If you're looking for 66 MHz of local- 
bus speed and power but prefer 
full-size tower computers, you'll be 
interested in Keydata's 486DX2- 
66 VL Bus WindowStation. 

t^ike the Insight tower also 
covered here, the Keydata uses 
the Taiwan-manufactured ASUS 
local-bus motherboard. This com- 
pact motherboard provides two 
VESA-compliant local-bus slots. 




■-'>--^-i;^SPTB^ 



In the first of the local-bus 
slots I found a Genoa Systems 
Windows VGA 24 video card 
{model 8500VL) with 1MB of RAM 
and a Cirrus Logic chip set. 
Keep in mind, however, that Key- 
data may furnish a different vid- 
eo adapter. 

The second local-bus slot pro- 
vides a home for the IDE disk 
controller card, which also 
includes the parallel port, two seri- 
al ports, and a game port. By 



CAD TESTS 



50 

WORSE 

40 



30 



20 



10 



SETTiR 



■ 


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I Drafix Windows 
CAD 130 
Rotation 

AutoCad 3-D 

I Concepts Files 



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30 COMPUTE JULY 1993 




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SCIENCES 

The leading edge ofletinimg 



TEST LAB 



using these two local-bus slots for 
the video, disk functions, and I/O, 
the manufacturer leaves five full- 
lengtti 16-bit expansion slots free 
for adding expansion cards of 
your choice. 

Four front-accessible half- 
height drive bays are available, 
as well as an additional hidden 
half-height bay. All of these avail- 
able bays are located above the 
SYs-inch and 5y4-inch floppy 
drives and the 250MB Conner 
30254 IDE hard drive, A particu- 
larly nice feature of the Keydata 
case is its use of a hinged door 
that conceals all of the drives and 
drive bays, giving the case an 
extra-clean, streamlined look. 

The flush-mounted power, tur- 
bo, and reset switches, as well as 
their related LEDs and the three- 
place speed LED, are all mounted 
at the top of the case at an angle, 
which makes them easily accessi- 
ble. I consider the Keydata case 
one of the best-looking tower units 
I've seen, with lots of eye appeal 
in addition to its functionality, 

The i486DX2/66 CPU mounted 
in a ZIP socket is directly in the 
line of air flow coming from the 
front-mounted cooling fan. The 
manufacturer doesn't use a heat 
sink on the massive chip, and the 
chip apparently doesn't need 
one, thanks to the excellent circu- 
lation provided by the fan and the 
large open area of the case. I 
didn't experience any heat-relat- 
ed problems while using the ma- 
chine for extended periods. 

The CTX Model 1560 ProScan 
SVGA monitor I used with this 
system provided excellent color 
and definition. Other standard 
equipment includes an 
enhanced Chicony 5181KT key- 
board with audible click and a 
three-button serial mouse. Keyda- 
ta preinstalls MS-DOS 5,0 and Win- 
dows 3.1 on the system and sup- 
plies floppy backup copies. 

If you expect to expand your 
system's capabilities as your 
requirements grow — perhaps add- 
ing a CD-ROM drive, a tape back- 
up unit, a sound card, a digitizer, 

32 COMPUTE JULY 1993 



MICRO EXPRESS 

1801 Carnegie Ave. 

Santa Ana, CA 92705 

(800) 989-0900 

(714) 852-1400 

Suggested retail price: $2,375 

(standard contlguration) 

Warranty: two years, parts and 

labon 30-dav money-bach 

guarantee; optional on-site ^rvice 



and so forth — it's comforting to 
know that the Keydata's 250-watt 
power supply has plenty of mus- 
cle and three available power con- 
nectors to service these addition- 
al devices. Clearly, this system 
delivers plenty of performance for 
today while affording great poten- 
tial for tomorrow's expansion. 

Circle Reader Service Mumber 37B 

MICRO EXPRESS 
486-VL/DX2/66 

Building upon the success of its 
486-Local Bus, which used a pro- 
prietary local-bus implementation 
for high-speed graphics process- 
ing, Micro Express now offers the 
486-VL/DX2/66 for your purchas- 
ing consideration. This model fea- 
tures two VESA-compliant local- 
bus slots for accommodating a 
graphics processor and another 
local-bus expansion card, such 
as a disk controller. 

The minitower configuration of 
the Micro Express case provides 
a nice compromise between stan- 
dard desktop cases, which eat 
up lots of desktop space, and a 
full tower case, which sits on the 
floor. The minitower should work 
equally well either on a desktop 
or next to it. 

You'll find flush-mounted pow- 
er, turbo, and reset switches 
aligned vertically on the front of 
the case, just above the key lock. 
LEDs indicate power on, hard 
drive activity, and turbo status, 
and another LED display indi- 
cates the current CPU speed. 

An ATI Graphics Ultra local- 
bus SVGA video card equipped 




with 2MB of video RAM ensures 
speedy graphics processing. 
The card resides in one of the 
486-VL's two local-bus slots, leav- 
ing one vacant and available for 
a user-installable local-bus expan- 
sion card. This slot can also be 
pressed into service as a stan- 
dard 16-bit slot if needed. 

Of the six 16-bit expansion 
slots built into the motherboard, on- 
ly four are available for accepting 
expansion cards. Of the available 
slots, two are full-length and the oth- 
er two are three-quarter-length. 
One 16-bit slot has the IDE cach- 
ing hard and floppy controller 
board inserted in it, and another 16- 
bit slot holds the I/O board with par- 
allel, game, and serial ports. 

The system includes dual flop- 
py drives (a 3y2-inch and a 5Va- 
inch), leaving two 5'/4-inch bays 
and one 3'/?-inch bay available 
for adding drives. For mass stor- 
age, the system uses a Western 
Digital Caviar 2200 (210MB) 
hard drive. Micro Express installs 
Windows 3.1 and MS-DOS 5.0 on 
the drive for you, and you get flop- 
py copies along with manuals. 

The system comes with 8MB of 
RAM as the standard comple- 
ment, but you can expand the 
memory up to a maximum of 
32MB by replacing the 1MB 



Benchmark/performance testing 
was conducted by Computer Prod- 
uct Testing Services Inc. CPTS is an 
indepencfent testing and evaluation 
laboratory based in Manasquan, NJ 
Every effort has been made to en- 
sure the accuracy and complete- 
ness of this data as of the date of test- 
ing. Performance may vary among 
samples. 




CompuServe does Windows. 



SL "m 



irrrnaL"/r.~TtrT 



Introducing a whole new way to look 
at CompuServe: CompuServe Information 
Manager for Windows {WinCIM"). It's a fully- 
integrated Windows application, and lets you 
take advantage of Windows 
when you're on CompuSen'e. 
It'll make your session 
faster, more efficient, 
easier, and a lot more fun. 

With the help of icons 
and pull-do\'sTi menus, you'll 
find ^•our CompuSer\'e time is almost effortless. 
Cruise the forums, browse through your 
messages, download files — it's all about as 
simple as clicking a mouse button. 

Visit us ai PC Expo, Javiis Center, New York. 

\S'iitdowi ii i iiadtmark of Microsoft CorporiUon. 



r- 



i»H i. 



Urn 
9 



And with WinCIM you can do more 
offline, too. That means everything from 
writing letters to reading the answers to your 
hardware and software questions can be done 
much more economically. 

So take a look for yourself. 
If you're already a CompuServe 
member, just type GO WINCIM. 
If you aren't, call us for more 
information at 1 800 848-8199. 
Either way, you'll soon see why 
the best view is the one from CompuServe 
Information Manager for Windows. 






Ct] 



CompuServe* 



The information service you won't outgrow.' 

June 28 through July 1, Booth 430.1 

circle Reader Service Number 108 



TEST LAB 



SIMMs with 4MB units in the 
eight SIMM slots. The review unit 
came with 512K of cache memo- 
ry, and this, too, can be upgrad- 
ed to a full megabyte. 

The manufacturer uses two 
methods of dissipating heat from 
the i486DX2/66 CPU: a deeply 
finned heat sink mounted atop 
the CPU chip and a miniature fan 
attached to the top of the heat 
sink. The fan serves two func- 
tions: It dissipates the heat which 
is transmitted through the heat 
sink's fins, and it also pulls cool- 
er air through the fins to keep the 
chip's operating temperature with- 
in reasonable limits. Since heat 
buildup is the major cause of 
CPU and component failure, it's 
reassuring to see that the Micro 
Express folks have taken the bull 
by the horns, so to speak, with 
these preemptive measures. 

I liked everything about this sys- 
tem except for the mouse. A three- 
button serial mouse from XOA, ! 
found it to be a bit too bulky and 
stiff for my liking, but this is a 
minor point and purely one of 
taste. The enhanced keyboard sup- 
plied with the system is available 
in either audibfe-click or silent ver- 
sions (a silent model came with the 
review machine), and it has a nice 
slope and comfortable action. 

The minitower configuration pro- 
vides lots of installation flexibility, 
and the 486-VL should prove to be 
adequate for the needs of most 
users. It certainly merits a closer 
look if you're interested in moving 
your data on the local bus, 

circle Reader Service Number 379 

ZEOS 4860X2-66 

When you unpack and set up as 
many computer systems as I do, 
you really appreciate it when the 
manufacturer has done a good 
job of preparing and testing the 
machine before it leaves the fac- 
tory. The folks at ZEOS deserve 
some kind words in recognition of 
the exemplary job they do in mak- 
ing sure everything's right with a 
system before they ship it. 



34 



COMPUTE JULY 1993 



ZEOS INTERNATIONAL 

1301 Industrial Blvd. 

Minneapolis, MN 55413 

{800] 423-5891 

Direct price: $2,893 (review 

conllguration) 

Warranty: one year, parts and labor; 

ao-day money-ttach guarantee 



In addition to a detailed pack- 
ing slip with a complete invento- 
ry of the system components 
(both internal and external} and 
their associated part numbers, 
ZEOS also included a quality 
assurance checklist with the sys- 
tem. This checklist confirms that 
all aspects of system preparation 
and component quality assur- 
ance checking have been per- 
formed — not just once but twice — 
and that everything passed. 

There's even a parts check sec- 
lion that ensures all required 
cables, manuals, power cords, 
and other required elements are 
also present and accounted for pri- 
or to sealing the box and ship- 
ping the system. Kudos to ZEOS 
for going the extra mile here. 

Every computer system is the 
sum total of all its component 
parts, and ZEOS has supplied a 
shining example of what a good 
system is made of. The 200-watt 
power supply with built-in surge pro- 
tection provides the operating volt- 
age to power the system's dual flop- 
py drives, its 245MB Seagate ST- 
3283AT hard drive, and the sys- 
tem board. 

The spacious case provides 
lots of expansion room. Flush- 
mounted push-button reset, pow- 
er, and turbo switches have LED 
status indicators, and a system 
key lock is also mounted at the 
front of the case. A snap-off plas- 
tic cover conceals the screws 
securingthecase cover to the chas- 
sis and gives the rear of the ma- 
chine a smooth and uncluttered 
appearance. As far as vacant 
bays go, you'll find a 5'/:-inch bay 
and a vertical 3'/?-inch bay, both 
accessible from the front of the ma- 
chine; inside the case there's 




t~J ucu Usi£j^ 



room to add two additional 5Va- 
inch half-height drives. 

ZEOS uses its own mother- 
board , which provides a total of sev- 
en full-length 16-bit expansion 
slots and a single three-quarter- 
length 8-bit slot. Two of the 16-bit 
slots have local-bus extensions on 
them as well. In the review unit, 
one of the local-bus slots was oc- 
cupied by the Diamond Viper 
SVGA card, while all of the other 
slots were vacant and available. 
To dissipate the excess heat gen- 
erated by the CPU, ZEOS 
installed a large heat sink about an 
inch longer than the 80486 chip it- 
self. A ZIF socket makes removing 
the CPU for future upgrades an ef- 
fortless procedure that consists of 
lifting the socket's locking lever. 
replacing the chip, and pushing 
the locking lever back down again. 

I found the system's perform- 
ance beyond reproach, handling 
both text- and graphics-based 
applications quickly and without 
a whimper. A comfortable 
enhanced keyboard with audible 
click and a Microsoft serial 
mouse make using the system a 
pleasure, and Lotus Organizer 
software, DOS 5.0, and Windows 
3.1 all come standard. And if 
that's not enough, you can 
choose either Lotus 1-2-3 for Win- 
dows, Ami Pro, or Lotus 
Freelance as an additional includ- 
ed software package. 

ZEOS builds a solid machine 
that should deliver excellent, trou- 
ble-free performance for many 
years to come. If you're thinking 
of purchasing a 486DX2/;66 local- 
bus system, this one should be 
high on your list of potential 
candidates. 

circle Reader Service Number 3B0 




x^^ 




Fly higher. 



Higher. Faster. Farther. 
CH Products is defining new 
standards of design and 
performance for computer pilots. 
We'll empower you to effortlessly 
relay commands with a feel of 
absolute control.. .to swoop, loop 
and soar like never before. 

Get your hands on the 

red-hot precision 

FLIGHTSTICK™ series joysticks. Or 

our lightning-fast GAMECARD 3 

AUTOMATIC". And VIRTUAL 

PILOT"-', a yoke that will defy your 

concept of reality. And there's 

more on the horizon. d__-.|- farther 
From drawing board "ts***-" icirwi«sr- 

to your fingertips, ours is a relent- 
less pursuit of new and better 
products. CH Products began with 
a dream 25 years ago, and we've 
never looked back. 
Today, we give you the wings to fly. 
Higher. 
Faster. 
Farther. 




970 Park Center Drive Vista, CA 92083 
Phone:619.S9a.2518 Fax; 619,598.2524 



TM 1993 CH Producta, H Joystick Toclinologjea inc. Co. 

Circle Reader Service Numtsr t56 



SYSTEM FEATURES 




Hard drive 
Make 



Western Digital 



Maxtor 



Maxtor 



Diaital 



Quanium 



Model 



Caviar 2340 



LXT 340A 



Da213A 



Digital 



ProDrive LPS 



Formatted capacity 



333MB 



320MB 



213MB 



239MB 



24QM8 



Conlfolter 



IDE 



inlegrated IDE 



IDE 



integrated IDE 



IDE 



Conlroller caclte 



32K 



32K 



4K 



NA 



Ottier drives 
1.2MB 



NA 



1.44MB 



MOTHERBOARD 


^^^^Mi 








; , '^^^M 


Manufacturer 


BCM AOvancefl Research 


Deli 


S&A Labs 


Digital 


Epson Portiand 


Standard RAM 


4MB 


BMB 


8MB 


4MB 


4MB 


Max RAM 


32MB 


64MB 


32MB 


64MB 


12BMB 


No. of 8-bit slots 

















No. of 16-bit slots 


6 


6 


6 


3 


6 


No. of VESA focal-bus slots 








2 








BIOS 


AM! 


Ptioenix/Deli 


AMI 


Phoenix 


Epson 


External cache 


128K 


128K (optionai) 


256K 


128K 


yes' 


Max cache 


256K 


128K 


256K 


256K 


variable- 


CPU socket 


press-pin 


pfess-pin 


press-pin 


press-pin 


press- pir, 


Upgrade socket 


yes 


yes 


no 


yes 


yes 


Power supply 


200 W 


240 W 


200 W 


NA 


200 W 


INPUT OUTPUT 













Parallel ports 



Serial ports 



PS,^ mouse port 



Game port 



Mouse supplied 



SUPPLIED SOFTV/ARE 



DOS 



yes 



yes 



yes 



yes 



yes 



yes 



yes 



Windows 3.1 



yes 



yes 



yes 



yes 



Floppy backups 



yes 



yes 



yes 



OJher software 



Close-up 4.0 and choice of 

one: Lotus Organizer. Lotus 1- 

2-3 lor Home, Lotus Write, 

Lolus Works 



NA 



NA 



QAPius 



NA=not applicable or information about ttiis feature not available 

'noninterlaced 

^Epson uses wfiat it calis VirtualCache. a proprietary cache that can let you use all of your system memory as a virtual cache pool. 




yes 



t^A 



36 COMPUTE JULY 1993 




Meet One Of Our Wildest Titles 



"Eye-popping, ear-tingling, mind- 
blowing" - Software Toolworks' 
products like The San Diego Zoo"* 
Presents The Animals!'" read more 
like hit movie reviews. Even 
Microsoft Chairman Bill Gates called 
The Animals! "...a must get!" at the 
1993 CD Expo. 




.-jC 





The Animals! is the latest in our 
multi-media edutainment series 
and just one of the dozens of titles 
from the world's largest supplier of 
CD-ROM Software. In fact, every 
four seconds of every business day, 
someone buys a Software Toolworks 
CD-ROM. 



i<9h 




Look for The Animals!, Mario Is 
Missing!'", Mavis Beacon Teaches 
Typing! *, The Chessmaster-, World 
Atlas, and many mind-expanding 
titles from the world's leader in 
CD-ROM - The Software Toolworks. 

^_-^^^^H^H Fcr [he dealer nearest you 

^F- ' '^^^B or to order, call loll-free 

Biiykial 1-800-234-3088 



■ 







"he San Diego Zoo™ Presents The Animals!'" was designed by Arnowitz. Inc. Programmed and produced by Amowitz, Inc., and The Software Toolworks. Inc. 



-cTofliworis I 
Wfved 



TEST LAB 



^^^H 


SYSTEM FEATURES 


^H 




Gsleway 


Insight 




Keydata 


Micro 
Express 


ZEOS 


1 DIMENSIONS (in Inches) 


^^ 


bsngth 


16.00 


17 50 




^ { Q-j 


16.50 


18,25 


Width 


16.25 


7.75 




7 20 


8,00 


18,75 


Height 


4,25 


25.25 




24,&0 


24.80 


6.25 


1 VIDEO "^^^^^BT 1 


Monitor 


CrysialScan 1572 PS 


ViewSonic 6PS 




CTX 1560 


ME PM 360 


ZEOS 14-inch SVGA 


Video adapter 


ATI Graphics Ultra Pro 
Local Bus 


STB Power Graph 


Geno 


a Windows VGA 24 


ATI Graphics Ultra 
Local Bus 


Diamond Viper VLB 


Adapter max Nf resfcoiors 1024 x 768/256 


1024 X 768/16,7 million 


1024 


X 768/16.7 million 


600 X 600/32.768 


1024 X 768/16.7 
million 


DRIVES 


Hard drive 
Make 


Western Digital 


Western Digital 




Conr.e.' 


Western Digital 


Seagate 


Mode! 


Caviar 


Caviar 2200 




30254 


Caviar 2200 


ST 3283AT 


Formalted capacity 


333MB 


2tOMB 




250MB 


210MB 


245MB 


Controller 


integrated IDE 


VL-bus IDE 




VL-bus IDE 


IDE 


VL-bus iDE 


Cantfoller cache 


128K 


no 




no 


2S6K 


no 


Other drives 
1.2MB 11111 


1.«MB 


1 


1 




1 


1 


1 


MOTHERBOARD 


Manuladurer 


Galeway 


ASUS 




ASUS 


Micro ExQfess 


ZEOS Imemational 


Standard RAM 


8HB 


8MB 




8MB 


8MB 


4MB 


Max RAM 


64M3 


32MB 




32MB 


32MB 


64MB 


No. of 8-bit slots 
















1 


to. of 16-bii slots 


6 


5 




5 


6 


5 


No. of VESA local-bus slots 2 


2 




2 


2 


2 


BIOS 


Phoenix 


AMI 




AMI 


AMI 


Phoenix 


External cacite 


2S6K 


256K 




256K 


512K 


128K 


Max cache 


256K 


256K 




256K 


1MB 


256K 


CPU socket 


press-pin 


ZIP 




ZIP 


press-pin 


21F 


Upgrade socl^el 


yes 


yes 




yes 


no 


yes 


Power supply 


200 W 


250 W 




250 W/ 


200 VV 


200W 


iNRjTiOUTPirr ' 


^^m: ^■■B^^ 1 


Parailel ports 


1 


1 




1 


1 


2 


Serial ports 


2 


2 




2 


2 


1 


PS,'2 mouse port 



















Game port 





1 




1 


1 


G 


Mouse supplied 


yes 


yes 




yes 




yes 


SUPPLIED SOFTWARE J 




• 1 


DOS 


yes 


yes 




yes 


yes 


yes 


Windows 3.1 


yes 


yes 




yss 


yes 


yes 


Floppy backups 


yes 


yes 




yes 


yes 


yes 


Other software 


Cooi Tools. PC Tools, 
QAPIus 


Dr Solomon's 
Anti-Virus. Slacker 


Choice of one, Morton Desktop 

for WinOows. OOjecl Vision, 

Sidekick, Turbo 0++. Paradox 

dBASE IV 


m 


Lotus Organizer and 

one: Ami Pro or 

Freelance 


l>iA=not applicable or intonr 
■noninterlaced 


ation about this featLire not available 











38 COMPUTE JULY 1993 








RETURN 


m 


PHANTOM 






TheFIjiure 

OfAdveniure 

Ganung Begins 

m When The m 

Phantom Returns! 

PticroProse pushes adventure gaming to its 
limits with the most significant innovations in 
graphics and animation to date! 






•KaatyassHcmeDWiUfliiTiRi 




i 




Tragedy awaits you 
and the audience 
inside the famed 
Paris Opera Housel 

Explore the 
opera's labyrinth 
of catacombsl 



Confront the 
^SP Phantom face- 
to-face! 



'is--' 






tal 


^^Sf^^ml 


E 


BQII 


mi'"--'^ 


'i^WW 


i^HIE 


1 


l^^fo^ 


I^PJ^Sl " ii'..0---^^^^-<"" " ""fefe 


t:^ 


^^^^-^ 



Search for clues 
along the catwalks, 
through the wings, 
and into the many 
backstage rooms 
of the opera house! 

Try Rex IHebular And 
The Cosmic Gender 
Bender^*^' for more 
mind-blowing 
adventures! 






^<W 



II 

li Piante 

|l Address . 
City 



To get our free catalog, call 1 -800-87 9-PLAY. 
(Mon.- Fri., &30 am-5:00 pm EST.) 
Or nil out this coupon and mail it to: MicroProse Software, Inc. _ . . , 
180 Lahefront Drive • Dept. D-10 ■ Hunt Valley, HD 21030-2245 GAM 



_ State . 



-HP- 



J i u 









Seriously Fun Software 

© 1993 MicroFrose Software, Inc. ALL KIGHTS RESERVED 

Circle Reader Senlce Numbef 174 



NEWS & NOTES 



Jill Champion 



PLANMaker 

helps you 

put together 

a winning 

business plan. 



For Capital Seekers 

There's nothing like gridlock. 
While small businesses hold 
the greatest potential for cre- 
ating new jobs, they also 
have the hardest time obtain- 
ing venture capital. Add to 
that bleak picture, according 
to one study (by Coopers and 
Lybrand), the fact that only 1 
in 100 business plans ever 
shows promise of being seri- 
ously considered because it 
is concise and well written, 
and you can see that hope- 




fuls with poorly constructed 
plans are working against a 
huge disadvantage. 

A new software package 
called PLANMaker, not your or- 
dinary fill-in-the-blanks busi- 
ness program, is designed to 
help overcome such odds. It 
#»mbines all the ingredients 
necessary to formulate and 
publish a sophisticated busi- 
ness plan — one that conforms 
to the standards now demand- 
ed by bankers and investors. 
Its suggested retail price is 
$129. For more information, 
contact PowerSolutions for 
Business, 1920 South Broad- 
way, St. Louis. Missouri 
63104: (314) 421^0670. (314) 
421-0668 (fax). 

Future Teleconferencing 

We all remember the classic 
line from "Star Trek": "Lieuten- 
ant, can you put that on- 



screen for me?" Even three 
decades ago, remote commu- 
nications in sci-fi programs 
and flicks involved visual as 
well as audio contact. 

Now, NCR is bringing to 
market NCR Telefvledia Con- 
nection. It's a combination of 
hardware and software that 
lets PC users communicate 
with each other through tele- 
conferencing while they collab- 
orate on files and documents 
in realtime. 

"NCR TeleMedia Connec- 
tion will change the way we 
work," says Neil Whittington, 
assistant vice president of 
NCR's Multimedia Products 
business unit. 

The product consists of 
two 16-bit ISA bus plug-in 
cards to support video and 
graphics on 386- and 486- 
based PCs, as well as soft- 
ware that allows users lo col- 
laborate on Windows-based 
files. It also supports an option- 
al video camera and audio 
unit. As a result of all this tech- 
nology, a widely dispersed 
group of people can work to- 
gether as if they were in the 
same room. 

NCR plans to introduce 
products utilizing TeleMedia 
Connection technology later 
this year. For more informa- 
tion, contact NCR, 1700 
South Patterson Boulevard, 
Dayton. Ohio 45479: (800) 
225-5627 or (513) 445-5000. 

Beatles Tour — 30 Years Later 

The Beatles have begun an 
ambitious worldwide tour on 
CD-ROM. Voyager is launch- 
ing a new CD-ROM edition of 
A Hard Day's Night, an inter- 
active program that includes 
the complete uncut movie, 
the entire script, a book's 
worth of text about the 
Beatles and the rise of rock 
'n' roll, a Beatles photo gal- 
lery, and profiles of the songs 
and the film cast. 

The suggested retail price 
is $39.95 for the Mac version. 



40 COMPUTE JULY 1993 



A PC version of the program 
is scheduled for release later 
this year. For more informa- 
tion, contact Voyager. 1351 
Pacific Coast Highway, Santa 
Monica. California 94041: 
(310) 451-1383, (310) 394- 
2156 (fax). 

Decrypting the Code 

The Computer Museum in Bos- 
ton opened From Words to 
Code: How People Make Com- 
puters Work this April, the 
first exhibit to reveal in a light- 
hearted, interactive way the 
mysterious world of program- 
ming and how it affects daily 
lives. 

Using video, computer sta- 
tions, and 3-D objects, the ex- 
hibit takes visitors on a jour- 
ney into a "land of languag- 
es" to discover how pro- 
grams, or sets of instructions, 
are all around — from recipes 
to lock combinations — and 
how these sets of instructions 
are turned into code using pro- 
gramming languages. Visitors 
are even able to build their 
own programs. The grand fina- 
le, a nine-foot-high 3-D tower, 
graphically illustrates the vari- 
ety of programming languag- 
es that have evolved since 
the early 1950s. The exhibit is 
on display through Septem- 
ber 6. 1993. For more informa- 
tion, contact The Computer 
Museum, 300 Congress 
Street, Boston. Massachu- 
setts 02210: (617) 426-2800, 
(617) 426-2943 (fax). 

Don't Dump That Old Laptop! 

Why spend more money on a 
new laptop when you can 
have your current one upgrad- 
ed? Laptop Solutions of Hous- 
ton replaces the current hard 
drive with a brand-new, high- 
er-speed, higher-capacity 
drive. "We have a rigorous 
quality-control program," 
says Ken Duckman, presi- 
dent of Laptop Solutions. "We 
pride ourselves on our 0-per- 
cent defect policy — every ma- 



The best sound is not in the cards. 




Perk up your 
presentations. Make 
training more eflective. 
And, put some guts 
into your gaming 
pastimes, Anytime. 
Anywtiere, Intact, if you 
are not a card carrying 

member ot the computer set, you liave to hear 

PORT-ABLE Sound Plus from Digispeech. You 

know, those real smart people who make simple 

sound solutions. 

PORT-ABLE Sound Plus is She first portable 

external sound peripheral to deliver 16 Bit CD 

quality music with stereo audio capabilities. 

And. since you just plug into your IBM PC or 

compatible, desktop or laptop parallel port, you 

do not need an engineering degree or even a 

screwdriver. 

When you compare 

PORT-ABLE Sound PUs to 

any other external sound 

peripherals, you will see 

why anything else is just 

noise. PORT-ABLE Sound 

Plus is based on advanced 

Digital Signal Processing 

technology, so you 

will enjoy the greatest 




compression capability with the highest quality 
sounds. Here is something else that will be music 
to your ears. PORT-ABLE Sound Plus comes 
complete with everything you need including a 
high fidelity speaker and builtnn microphone. 
There is an "Audio-in" for a CD or tape player 
and a "Line-out" for external powered stereo 
speakers. Even a built-in smart parallel port pass 
through so you can keep printing. 

Whether you take your work across the hall 
or across the country, with PORT-ABLE Sound 
Plus, you have all the cards you need to play 
right in your hip pocket. The hinged design lets 
you flip up the unit if you are short on desk space 
Of lap space. And, the power will always be with 
your whether you use rechargeable or non- 
rechargeable AA batteries. PORT-ABLE Sound 
Plus also comes equipped with an AC/DC power 
converter. 

As a bonus, you will get 
allthesottwareyou need to 
communicate. Like Lotus 
Sound'" an OLE server for 
Windows 3.1. WinReader for 
Windows 3.1, a handy text- 
to-speech utility, Digispeech's 
DOSTalkandDOSReader 
text-to-speech applications. 
Show & Tell For Kids' for 




POBT- ABLE Souno Plus is a trademark al Digtspeecti. Inc. All olher produU 
names are irademarks or registered trademarks of llieir lesoecliw owners 

Circle Reader Service Number 168 



Windows - an easy to use MultlMedia Authoring 
program. It is also Sound Blaster and AdLib 
compatible. 

Why compromise on quality, portability, 
compatibility or affordability? When all the cards 
are on the table, PORT-ABLE Sound Pius from 
Digispeech, Inc. is your ace in the hole. 
Suggested retail is only $198.95. 




To order or obtain more information about 
PORT-ABLE Sound Plus, write or call Digispeech, 
or, contact your local dealer. 

Sales Office: 550 IVlain Street, Suite J, Placerville, 
Califomia95667. Telephone: (916) 621-1787. 
Fax (916) 621-2093. 



^^ 



.rtNIXJAS.. 




m 

I 



NEWS & NOTES 



chine must go back to the cli- 
ent in better condition than 
when we received it." 

The entire process takes 
48 hours. During the sec- 
ond 24 hours, after compo- 
nents have been upgraded, 
the machine is put through 
an intense "burn-in and 
test" period in which the 
hard disl< is exercised 
through a variety of software 
applications and environ- 
ments. The new drive must 
perform perfectly before the 
company will release the ma- 
chine. Such meticulousness 
has helped Laptop Solu- 
tions win licensing agree- 
ments with Toshiba and Com- 
paq, but the company is al- 
so skilled in upgrades of 
many other manufacturers' 
designs, including Sanyo 



ZEOS, Tl, Tandy, Compu- 
Add, and AT&T 

For more information, con- 
tact Laptop Solutions, 
10700 Richmond Avenue, 
Suite 114. Houston. Texas 
77042; (800) 683-6839. 

Finding Silicon 

Do-it-yourselfers take note: 
JDR Microdevices has a 
new catalog designed specif- 
ically for engineers, techni- 
cians, hobbyists, and hack- 
ers that offers the compa- 
ny's largest selection ever of 
electronic components, pro- 
totyping products, and devel- 
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components for today's ad- 
vanced designs. Readers 
will also find Hitachi oscillo- 
scopes, solder accessories, 
and even hard-to-find refer- 



ence books from National 
Semiconductor, Intel, Motor- 
ola, and other chip makers. 
The catalog also features 
insightful information to 
make the buyer more produc- 
tive. Derrick Moore, director 
of engineering at JDR, 
shares his development strat- 
egies in "Derrick's High- 
Tech Corner" columns, and 
numerous "Tech Tip" col- 
umns offer insightful tips. To 
order a free catalog, contact 
JDR Microdevices, 2233 Sa- 
maritan Drive, San Jose, Cal- 
ifornia 95124; (408) 559- 
1200, (408)559-0250 (fax). 

Floppy Jukebox 

Once you've tried the Disk 
Dispatcher, a "point-and- 
click floppy jukebox. ' you 
might never go back to con- 



ventional disk storage meth- 
ods again. The Disk Dis- 
patcher, from Select Prod- 
ucts, organizes, indexes, 
and dispenses SV's-inch flop- 
py disks or Flopticals. 

Simply list up to 20 of your 
most-used disks or Fiopticals 
on the reversible index and 
punch in your selection, and 
the patented selector-action 
mechanism on the box instant- 
ly hands you your disk. 

The Disk Dispatcher also 
has the smallest operating 
footprint of any 20-disk hold- 
er currently on the market, 
so it will save desk space. 
Its suggested retail price is 
$21.95. For more informa- 
tion, contact Select Products, 
520 First Street, Fillmore. Cal- 
ifornia 93015; (805) 524- 
1747, (805) 524-1767 (fax). 



UNKS 386 PRO 

"PC Game of the year" 



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IF YOU DOrn- HAVE UNKS 386 PRO YET, YOU OWE IT TO YOURSEUF TO PUT THIS MAGAZINE DOWN 
RIGHT NOW AND GO OUT AND BUY IT AT YOUR IjOCAL SOFTWARE RETAILER! 



Can't Buy It? Charge It! 

Businesses strapped for cap- 
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migfit want to try shopping 
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Leasing International, 3000 
Dundee Road, Northbrook, Il- 
linois 60062; (708) 272- 
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Companies or public rela- 
tions firms with Items suitable 
for "News & Notes" sliould 
send information along witti a 
color slide or transparency to 
News & Notes. Attn: Jill Cfiam- 
plon. COMPUTE, 324 West 
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The Disk Dispatctier makes selecting a 3'/2-inch floppy disk or 
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FEEDBACK 



Key depression, 
specialty viruses, 
virtual air 
traffic, liigh-llying 
memoiv, colorful 
forms, easy virus de- 
tection, and more. 



Keyed Up 

Some time ago, you showed 
how to set or reset the Caps 
Lock key and other control 
keys. But what about ordinary 
keys? Is there a way to tell 
which key has been 
pressed? 

JOHN JACKSON 
DETROIT, Ml 

This program might work for 
you. It's written in OBASIC. 

CLS 

DEF SEG = 

top: 

LOCATE 1, 1 

FOR i = 1G49T0 1088 

PRINT (PEEK(i)); 

aS = INKEY$ 

NEXT 

GOTO top 

This program displays the key- 
board buffer (bytes 1053 
through 1085), a pointer that 
keeps track of the current char- 
acter in the buffer (byte 
1052). and a pointer that 
keeps track of the most re- 
cent character read (1050). 
When increasing the value of 
1050 will make it equal to the 
value in 1052. your computer 
beeps to alert you that your 
keyboard buffer Is full. To 
print onscreen the ASCII val- 
ue of the most recent 
keypress, use this program. 
(The line that reads aS=IN- 
KEYS keeps the beginning 
and end pointers in the same 
position.) 

CLS 

DEF SEG = 

top: 

q = tPEEK(1052)-3ZJ 

IF q = -2 THEN q = 30 

LOCATE 1,1: PRINT PEEK{1054 + 

q) 

a$ = INKEYS 
NEXT 
GOTO top 

Viral Spiral 

The article on viruses in your 
February 1993 issue an- 



swered quite a few questions 
for me, but can you answer 
these? 

Is it theoretically possible 
for a compiler, if infected with 
any of the viruses the article 
described, to generate an in- 
fected EXE file? 

Is it theoretically possible 
to vy/hte a virus that would in- 
fect a compiler and cause it 
to generate an infected EXE 
file? 

If the answer is no to both 
questions, can a newly com- 
piled and not yet executed 
EXE file be considered virus 
free, assuming the source 
code contains no viruses? 

RICHARD M. SANDERS 
BURNSVILLE, MN 

Anything is possible. Some of 
the viruses described in the ar- 
ticle Install themselves as TSR 
files which constantly scan 
the hard disk for uninfected 
files. A new EXE file (one that 
was just created) would be vul- 
nerable to the Dark Avenger, 
for example. As far as we 
have been able to determine, 
no virus currently in circula- 
tion specializes in infecting 
compilers In such a way that 
they would generate dis- 
eased EXE files (although 
novj that you've raised the 
question, someone some- 
where will probably try circu- 
lating one). Such a virus 
would be too specialized to 
spread and would quickly be 
isolated and destroyed. The 
answer to your final question 
is that no file can be assumed 
to be virus free. 

Rights and Wrongs 

In response to the "News 
Bits" item called Controlling 
the Infectious (December 
1992), I believe that there 
should be controls both on 
weapons and virus construc- 
tion kits. Nobody sets a load- 
ed and cocked gun in a room 
and then says, "Be careful." Vi- 
rus construction kits are load- 



ed guns. They're all too easi- 
ly put to use. Viruses, like 
guns, will not disappear un- 
der stricter controls, but by re- 
stricting their availability, few- 
er people will suffer. 

JOSEPH LEWIS LOUTZENHISER 
ASHLAND. OR 

Taking Control 

I wish to point out a miscon- 
ception regarding virtual real- 
ity and aviation. In "Virtual Re- 
ality" (February 1993), Jeffrey 
Hsu suggests that "air-traffic 
controllers may one day take 
direct control of the planes on 
their radar scope through 
VR." In fact, it's more likely 
that pilots will one day re- 
place the ground controllers. 
Technology currently exists 
(GPS navigation and data 
link transponders) which 
would allow pilots to provide 
their own separation and se- 
quencing. It should be noted 
that these are the sen/ices cur- 
rently offered by ground con- 
trollers. 

C. SEBERG 
MOUNTAIN VIEW, CA 

Infection Control 

I would like to take issue with 
one of Philip Chien's com- 
ments in "The Great Virus 
Scare" (February 1993). He 
states, "In all cases, viruses 
are programs that were writ- 
ten by an outlaw — a hacker 
who specifically sets out to 
damage other people's com- 
puters." In all deference to 
fvlr. Chien, this is simply not 
true. Paul Mungo and Brian 
Clough, discussing Teodor 
Prevalsky, a Bulgarian engi- 
neer who was an early virus 
writer, state, ". . . for Teodor, 
destruction of data or pro- 
grams was never the point. 
He wrote viruses as an intellec- 
tual challenge. None of his 
viruses had ever been inten- 
tionally damaging . . ." (from 
Approaching Zero, 1992). 
scorr MOSER 

DANVILLE, IN 



45 COMPUTE JULY 1993 



TICHNOLOGY UPDATE 



New device lets you get 
twice as much done, 
inlialfthetime! 

Breaktluvugli affordable touch screen computer saves you 
money by organizing and accelerating everyday tasks 

hy Charles Antoii 



On'air awicch 








o you ever get fnis- 
1 trated tryiiig taloCiTte 

the phone number or 
name of a client? Forget \vh ich 
piece of papt-r you wrote it 
down on? Well if you are like 
most people, your business 
depends on quick access to 
important phone numbers, 
appointment schedules or 
other messages that could 
make a difference in getting 
that "big job." With Axxess, 
the contact ninnagement so- 
lution from Oregon Scientific, 
you can immediately put an 
end to all these problems. 

Touch screen. Just by 
touching a word or letter on 
the screen, Axxess displays 
or speed scrolls to find the 
right company or message. 
Help yourself remember the 
nameof a person or company 
that plays a key role in your 

business. Si nee a 11 

theinformationis 

^loss-refercnced, 

)'ou can type in 

one or two key 

facts to retrieve 

the desired infor- 
mation. Print out any mes- 
sage you want by connecting 
Axxess to vour I'C printer 
(withadditionalcable). Down- 
load data from }'our Mac or 
IBM compatible computer to 
give your Axxess an instant 
database .This working data- 
base can later be up-loaded to 
vourcomputerto updateyour 
files (with optional soft^va re /cable package). 

Unmatched capabilities. No other legal 
pad or black book can match Axxess' capabili- 
ties. With just one touch, you can search through 
hundreds of notes and reminders. Brief yourself 
onclients,thdrcompaniesandvvhatyou thought 
about them. Axxess will even speed dial up to 
four different phone numbers from every record. 

No thick manuals. With Axxess, there are no 
thick manuals to read. It's completely menu- 
driven. Operation is easy and self-explanator)'. 
Just touch the screen to indicate what type of 
information you're looking for, and that data is 
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connections. Just plug Axxess into an outlet or 
use the built-in rechargeable Mead battery pack. 





Na^rD»/pro^^ta° easy portabUcly 



Co^niKiion PrtrMerycompulfit 



Features: 

• Toiidi fcrtvii keypad 

• FJcctnmk directonf 

• /\i(fo,sc(Trc/! 

• lUgh-spced fetnch 

• Onc-hmch diulinii si/sfcuj 

• Time log &■ lOO-i/enr cnkndtir 

• Continuojis time/date displuy 

• Appointment reminder 

• Prtss code sccurihj 

• Links to desktop coitipiitcr 

• Links to printer 



The affordable 
alternative. Per- 
sonal computers are 
ttxiexpensivetousejust 
for storing business records. 
But that's what most compa- 
nies are using them for. The 
Axxess system fromOregon 
Scientific can store o\'er 1,000 
business records, including 
names, companies, phone 
and fax numbers, addresses 
and two-line memos. Just 
touch a number and it's di- 
aled for vou. It's great for 
small business oivners who 
can't afford a secretar\' but 
still need an extra hand. I^lus, 
with an optional cable, two 
or more Axxess units can 
share information! 

Just a touch away. Sim- 
plv touch the screen to access 
information... Keep accurate 
records of time spent on spe- 
cific tasks... Speed search 
through the listings you 
want... Print this information 
directly to vour printer... 
Schedule appointments- 
days, weeks or months in ad- 
vance and let your alarm re- 
mind you... Mender forget n 
phone mnnber or be late for 
an appointment again. 

Speed dialing. Axxess can 
be used ivith most phones 
for speed dialing. Just select 
your contact and touch the 
number on screen— it's nuto- 
maticallv dialed for you ... in 
seconds. Axxess can also be 
used as a tone d ialer for pliones that you cannot 
directly link to, like pay phones. Simply touch 
the number on the screen and then hoki the 
phone's handset over Axxess' speaker, Axxess 
emits a series of electronic tones which dial the 
number for you. 

Appointment scheduling. The Axxess per- 
sonal organi/eralsohasa llXl-year calendar, its 
built-iii alarm remindsyou of every 
appoiiitment. There is a continuous 
time/date display to help you 
keep on schedule as you work, 
increasing your productivity. 

Time log. The time log feature helps keep an 
accurate record of time spent on each project. 
Axxess tracks your hours as you go, so you 








Four ways you can start 
saving time and money 
every day with Axxess.-- 




&rva20iTwnu te a 



don't waste time calcu- 
lating them later. It helps you bill 
clients more accurately and get full compen- 
sation for vour time. 

Electronic protection. Another great fea- 
ture- Axxess allows you to set a security code. 
This keeps everything confidential, limiting 
Axxess to only the pc^^ple you choose. 

k On the go? Axxess goes where 

^^_^- vou go. With the rechargeable 

^0^^ internal battery Ojic/i(iii'if)you can 

^ j^ have up to 3.5 hours of continuous 

^^ portable use. A detachable cover 

I protects the touch screen when in transit. 

Try it risk free. 

Axxess is backed up 
by our "Ho Qiies- 
lioiis Asked" money- 
back guarantee. If 
you're not com- 
pleteK' satisfied for 
any reason, just re- 
turn the product 
within 30 days for a 
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Factory direct 

offer. With this 

breakthrough 

portable touch 

screen technology, 

you can be twice as 

productive in half 

the time. Now you can get the best features of a 

database for a fraction of the cost of a personal 

computer. Axxess is now available from 

Com trad Industries for only S399. 

Axxess touch-screen database from 

Oregon Scientific S399 S24S8iH 

Optional Accessories 

Software for Mac or PC S39 S4 s&H 

Axxess to Axxess Cable S19 S3 S&H 

Macintosh Keyboard Cable S19 S3 SW 

Your order will be processed in 72 hours and shipped 
UI'S. I'lenso nienlion prtmiotional code CU1 101 
For fastest service toll-free 24 hours a dav. 

800-992-2966 




To ordtT hy maii send check or money order for the 
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expiration date WA raith'Uls add 4.5% fiik< tax). 



INDUSTRIES 

2820 Waterford Lake Drive. Suite 106 

Midloltiian. Virginia 23113 
Circle Reader Service Numt>er 206 



FEEDBACK 



Good point. There 's a bit of inteliectual 
chailenge in writing a virus virulent 
enougii to plant itself unl<nown in tieav- 
ily defended computers. If that were all 
that viruses did. no one would care 
about them. Unfortunately, most virus 
writers go that extra mile to mal<e their 
creations destructive, or at least trouble- 
some. Recall that some say Nero 's pur- 
pose in torching Rome was to receive 
the inspiration for a poem. Should we 
forget the damage that resulted from 
his flight of fancy simply because he 
was seeking an intellectual challenge? 
In retrospect, we probably should 
have changed the word all to most in 
Mr. Chien's article. !\Aany people be- 
lieve in She doctrine 'All absolute state- 
ments are false. " 

Flying High 

I have DOS 5,0. How can I load my 
TSRs into high memory? 

JOSHUA NEWMAN 
COOPER, TX 

We get a lot of letters about this. DOS 
programs (particularly games) have be- 
come so memory hungry that you 
need every byte of conventional mem- 
ory you can get your hands on. 

You can save significant amounts of 
conventional memory by loading your 
TSRs high. You do this with Loadhigh. 
If you have a TSR called Nicholas, in- 
stead of simply putting its name on a 
line by Itself in your AUTOEXEC.BAT 
put Loadhigh Nicholas. 

A couple of other ways to save mem- 
ory are to use DOS=HIGH and to use 
Devicehigh for ttie drivers in your CON- 
FIG.SYS file (as in DEVICEHIGH=SET- 
VER.EXE). Make sure DE- 
VICE=Hlf^Elvl.SYS comes first in your 
CONFIG.SYS file. You can't load 
HllvlEM.SYS high. 

Color Forms 

Are there any form programs that can 
use PCX graphics and make color 
forms? 

STEVEN KILIAN 
APO. AP 

FormWorx (Power Up Software, 2929 
Campus Drive, San Ivlateo, California 
94403) can import uncompressed black- 
and-white PCX files up to 64K and print 
text and fills in color PerFORM Pro Plus 
48 COMPUTE JULY 1993 



(Delrlna Technology 6830 V/a Del Oro, 
Suite 240, San Jose, California 95119) 
will import and print grayscale PCX 
files and print text and fills in color 

Drafted into Service 

I'm a deputy sheriff and editor of a 
small journal for an organization of traf- 
fic crash reconstructionists. We've 
found that MacDraft is a great program, 
But because most sheriffs' departments 
have PCs rather than Ivlacintoshes, I'm 
looking for a PC product that's as good 
as MacDraft on the Mac for drawing 
crash sites for courtroom presentations. 

WILT rslELSON 
HOWELL. Ml 

MacDraft is now available in a Win- 
dows version called f^acDraft for Win- 
dows. Contact Innovative Data Design, 
2280-A Bates Avenue, Concord, Cali- 
fornia 94520: (510) 680-6818. 

Looking for Trouble 

I wanted to alert your readers to the 
fact that you can often detect viruses 
that infect EXE and COM files because 
they change the size of the infected 
files. Also, there's a simpfe test for cer- 
tain viruses, particularly Stoned and 
fvlichelangelo, These viruses decrease 
the amount of base memory DOS 
thinks it has. If you run Chkdsk, you 
should see 655360 total bytes of mem- 
ory, If you see a value less than that, 
your computer may have an infection. Al- 
so, if you think you have an infection, 
you should turn your computer off imme- 
diately and seek professional help. 
There's a chance that the virus can be 
stopped before it does serious harm to 
your computer. 

MARK ANDERSON 
DEL NORTE, CA 



Readers whose letters appear in "Feed- 
baci<" will receive a free COMPUTE's 
PC clock radio while supplies last. Do 
you have a question about hardware or 
software? Or have you discovered 
something that could help other PC us- 
ers? If so, we want to hear from you. 
Write to COMPUTE'S Feedback. 324 
West Wendover Avenue, Suite 200, 
Greensboro, North Carolina 27408. We 
regret that we cannot provide person- 
al replies to technical questions. 3 



Editor 

Art Director 

Managing Editor 

Features Editor 

Reviews Editor 

Editor, Gazette 

Editor, Amiga nesource 

Senior Copy Editor 

Copy Editor 

Edttarial Assistant 

Contributing Editors 

Intern 



Giilton l^rnes 

l^bin C Case 

David Englisn 

Robert Bixbv 

Mike Hudnali 

To-Ti Meisei 

Denny Atkin 

K^ren Huffman 

Margarel I^msey 

Poliy Cilfparr 

Sylvia G?aiiam. Edde Hultman. 

Tony Roberts, Karen Si&oak 

Kfm Havlena 



ART 
Assistanl Art Director Kenneth A Hardy 
Designer Katie Murdock 
Copy Produelion Manager leny Cash 
PRODUCTION 
Produelion Manager De Potter 

Traflic Manager Barbara A Williams 

PROGRAMMING & ONLINE SERVICES 

Manager Troy Tuci-eT 
Programmers Bri^ce M Bowden 
Sieve Dfaper 
Bradley M Small 

ADMINISTRATION 
President, COO Kainy Kaeton 



Executive Vice President, 

Operations 

Ediloriai Director 

Operations Manager 

Otrice Monagar 

5r. Administrative Assistant 

Administrative Assistant 

Receptionist 



\V,:liam lynan 

Keilli Ferreil 
David HensJey Jr 
Sybil Agee 
Julia Fleming 
Lisa G Casrnger 
LeWanOa Fox 



ADVERDSiNG 

Vice President, Peter t Jctinsmeye' 
Associale Pul)1islier (212)196.6100 

ADVERTISING SALES OFFICES 
EasiCoas! P. i , ;■ ■ i ■■■iif- li; : .■■.■ :,iiTjonris- 
meyef. Chris Cul': 1 fu.. CiM'-uri^i ..L ,i;,;:..i:i !:,-,u-::.jlianal Lid , 
1965 Broadway. Neiv York, NY t0023; (212) -196-6100 Soulh- 
east— Harriet Rogers, 603 A St.. SE, Washington, DC 20003; 
(202) Siie-SgaS. Florida — I, M, fiemer Assnciales, 3300 NE 
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(}6'3 (FAX) Nor|h^\esi— Jerry Thompson, Jules E Tivompson 
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Patrick J Gavin (senior vice president and CFO) 

Ricnaro (^ien (executive vice president and treasurer) 

Jeri Winston (executive vice president, corporate services) 

Haf Haipnet (vice president, director o( rnanutactuFing) 

William Tynan (vice president, technology and inlorTnaiion 

services) 

ADVERTISING AND MARKETING 

Sr, VP/Cprp D,r tie^t Bi.sin(>ss Devsiopmen!, Beverly 
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Off ces: New York 1965 Broadway. New Ywk. NY 10023-5965, 
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Dr„ Suite 508, Cfiicago IL 606D1; (312) 819-0900, (3)2) 819- 
0813 (FAX) South; 1725 K St Mi Suite 903. Washington. DC 
20006. Tel (202) 728-0320, West Coast; 6723 Eton Ave,. Can- 
oga Park. CA 91303, Tel, (BIS) 992-4777, UK and Europe Flat 
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Sr VP. CFO- PalricK J Gavin, EVPiCorporale Sarv.ces Jeri Win- 
ston; EVPy'Grapnics Director Frank Devi no; EVP/Clrcuiation: 
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per; Dir. Nev/ssland Circulation; Paul Roinick, Dir,. Newsstand 
Operations- Joe Gallo: Dir Subscription Circulation; Diane Mor* 
genthalef: VP Director ol Research Robert Ratlner: Advertising 
Production Director: Charlene Smilli; Advertising F^oduclion Trat- 
fic fvtgr; Pam Rizk; Traffic Dir William Harbutt: Dir. Budget and 
Finance; Tom Maley. Production Mgr Tom Slinson; Asst F^oduc- 
lion Mgr.: Nancy Rice. Mgr,. International Div,: George Rotas: 
Exec. Asst, to Bob Quccione: Diane O'Connall: Exec. Asst to 
David J, Myerson: Ten Pisani: Special Asst, 'D (job Guccione 
Jane Homlisti 



READERSHIP SURVEY 



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What computer(s) do you own or plan 
to buy? 

Plan 
Own to Buy 

n n 8088/8086, brand 

D 80286, brand 

n 80386, brand 

D 80486, brand 



n Pentium, brand 

n Notebool</laptop, brand. 

D Macintosh, model 

D Game system, brand 

a Other 



Which video display system(s) do you use? 

D Monochrome 

D Hercules 

n CGA 

n EGA 

D VGA 

D Super VGA 

Which peripheral(s) do you own or plan to 
buy? 

Plan 
Own to Buy 

D n Sy^-inch disk drive 

n n SVs-inch disl< drive 

a n CD-ROM drive 

D D Dot-matrix printer 

D n Fax modem 

n D Hard disk 

D D Laser printer 

D n MIDI device 

n D Modem 

n n Mouse 

D n PostScript printer 

□ □ Sound card 

D n Speakers 

D D Tape bacl<;up system 



How much memory does your computer 
have? 

D 640K or less 
n 1MB 
a 2MB 
D 4MB 
n 8MB 
D 16MB 

Which operating system(s)/environment(s) do 
you use? 

D DR DOS version 

D Microsoft Windows version 

O MS-DOS version 

n OS/2 version 

a Other 

Which parts of the magazine do you iike the 

most? 

D Art Worlds 

D COMPUTE'S Getting Started With 

D Editorial License 

n Features 

D Feedback 

n Game Insider 

n GamePlay 

n Hardware Clinic 

D IntroDOS 

D Multimedia PC 

D News & Notes 

n News Bits 

D Pathways 

n Personal Productivity 

D Programming Power 

n Reviews 

D Test Lab 

D Tips & Tools 

n Windows Workshop 

Which of the following computer-related top- 
ics do you like to read about? 
n Databases 
D Desktop publishing 
n Disk management and MS-DOS 

□ Education 

n Games and entertainment 
D Graphics (paint, draw, or CAD) 
D How to upgrade your PC 

□ Integrated software 

n Local area networks (LANs) 
a Money management 



□ Multimedia 

a New computer technologies 

n New hardware 

D Pen computing 

D Programming 

n Spreadsheets 

D Telecommunications 

D Windows 

n Word processing 

n Other 



Where do you use your PC? 

O Home 

n Work 

a School 

n Other 



Where did you get this copy of 

COMPUTE? 

D Subscription 

n Newsstand 

D Other 



How long have you been reading 
COMPUTE? 

D Less than tvro years 
n Two years or more 

If you have a modem, which online service(s) 

do you use? 

D America Online 

D BIX 

D CompuServe 

n DELPHI 

D GEnie 

D Internet 

D Prodigy 

n Other 



Comments - 



JULY 1993 COMPUTE 49 



WINDOWS WORKSHOP 



Clifton Karnes 



Visual C++ is a 

superb development 

environment 

that has just about 

everything. 



COMPILER WARS 

Back in January, I talked 
about Borland's C++ 3.1 and 
what a great Windows devel- 
opment environment it was. 
The quality of Borland's new en- 
try in the compiler market 
wasn't loston anyone, especial- 
ly Microsoft. Now Microsoft 
has countered Borland's C++ 
3.1 with Visual C++, a superb 
development environment 
that has just about everything. 

There are lots of modules to 
Visual C++, and they all work 
together. The heart of the sys- 
tem is Visual Workbench, 
which is the Windows-based 
integrated environment. It 
boasts an interface much like 
QuickC for Windows but with 
many added features. There's 
a toolbar for quick access to 
common commands; a syntax 
highlighting editor; and a Tool 
menu, to which you can add 
your own commands. 

The editor is not configura- 
ble (you can't remap the key- 
board), but it's fairly powerful 
and has lots of useful com- 
mands such as one that lets 
you change the case of text 
and another that indents and 
unindents blocks. 

Next on the list is App Stu- 
dio, which you can use to edit 
all your resources, including di- 
alog boxes, icons, cursors, 
menus, and bitmaps. You can 
also edit resources in EXEs, 
DRVs, and DLLs. App Studio 
is like Borland's pioneering Re- 
source Workshop, but it's eas- 
ier to use and more powerful. 
App Studio is written entirely 
in Visual C++, too, which 
brings us to this product's cen- 
tral theme: C++. 

One of the reasons that M\- 
crosoft created Visual C+ + 
was to make it easier for C pro- 
grammers to move to C++, 
and two of Visual C++'s mod- 
ules— AppWizard and Class- 
Wizard— focus on that task. 

If you've misspent your 
youth starting each new Win- 



so COMPUTE JULY 1993 



dows' project by copying the 
canonical Generic, you'll real- 
ly appreciate AppWizard. It's 
an application generator that 
lets you create a program's 
source files based on a series 
of options. You can create pro- 
grams with an fvlDI interface, 
a toolbar, printing and print pre- 
view functions, custom VBX 
controls, context-sensitive 
help, and OLE client support. 
AppWizard can also create 
external makefiles, and it will 
generate source comments. 

What language does 
AppWizard use? C++ and Vis- 
ual C++'s new rvlicrosoft Foun- 
dation Class 2.0 library. It's 
worth noting that you use 
AppWizard only once — when 
you create your program. It's 
not a CASE tool, like Windows- 
MAKER or Caseworks, that 
you can return to in the devel- 
opment process. 

After creating your program 
skeleton, ClassWizard lets you 
make connections between us- 
er-interface elements, messag- 
es, and code by pointing and 
clicking. 

When it comes to debug- 
ging. Visual C++ really packs 
the Raid. It boasts a Windows- 
hosted debugger that's inte- 
grated with the Visual Work- 
bench editor. Just press F8 or 
click on the step button on the 
toolbar, and you're debug- 
ging. Find an error? Just start 
typing to correct it. This is the 
way Windows debugging 
ought to work! 

The integrated debugger 
features normal and condition- 
al breakpoints, watches, and 
register display. If you need 
more powerful debugging, 
there's CodeView for Win- 
dows, which, using technolo- 
gy from Nu-Mega, runs as a 
nonmovable Windows app in 
one corner of your screen. It's 
not as convenient as the inte- 
grated debugger, but it's a 
heck of a lot easier to use 
than Borland's full-screen de- 
bugger that makes you flip 



back and forth between the de- 
bugger and Windows. 

Other debugging aids in- 
clude HeapWalker, DDESpy, 
Spy, Stress, Zoomin, and 
Hotspot Editor. 

In addition to all this, N/licro- 
soft's online help, which has al- 
ways been good, is even bet- 
ter now. The entire API refer- 
ence is online, and you'll find 
tons of TechNotes — articles 
on programming problems. 

The documentation is excel- 
lent, but all the 3.1 SDK docs 
aren't included. You can get 
the missing ones for an extra 
$99. 1 consider them a neces- 
sity, and they're a steal at $99. 

Other useful features in- 
clude a first-rate Browser and 
precompiled headers that are 
finally easy to use. 

Visual C++ comes in two ver- 
sions: a Standard Edition for 
$199 and a Professional Edi- 
tion for $495. The Standard Edi- 
tion has everything in the Pro- 
fessional Edition except for 
the Windows debugging appli- 
cations, DOS program gener- 
ation, and the optimizing com- 
piler. 

The Standard Edition replac- 
es QuickC for Windows, and 
the Professional Edition replac- 
es C 7.0 and the SDK. 

The bottom line with a devel- 
opment environment is how 
fast it compiles and how small 
the executables are. With a 
few informal tests on medium- 
sized programs with 1000- 
4000 lines, t found Visual C++ 
to be slower at compiling than 
Borland C++, but the EXEs 
were considerably smaller 
(the in-memory images were 
the same as those generated 
by Borland's compiler). 

One thing that has won me 
over to Visual C++ is the small- 
er executables. Another thing 
is the integrated debugger. 
This feature alone saves 
hours and hours with every pro- 
ject. Visual C++ is hard to 
beat, but I'm sure Borland's go- 
ing to try. □ 





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TIPS & TOOLS 



Edited by Richard C. Leinecker 



Checking COM files 

with a new 

Checksum, finding 

files from any 

directory, and using 

ttie extended 

power of Xcopy 

and M.BAT 



Checksum Redux 

Here is a new Checksum De- 
bug script. The original Check- 
sum was published in the Ju- 
ly 1992 "Tips & Tools" column 
in COMPUTE. In this column 
and in future columns, this is 
the Checksum program that 
will be used to verify the accu- 
racy of COM files. 

Make sure the DOS pro- 
gram called Debug is in your 
path or the current directory. 
In these examples, the italic 
text represents what the com- 
puter prints; the reman text 
represents what you should 
type. One way to be sure you 
get these programs exactly 
right is to have someone 
read the numbers to you as 
you type them in. Another 
way suggested by one of our 
readers is to read the num- 
bers into a tape recorder and 
then play them back as you 
enter the program code. 



debug checksum.com 


File not lound 


-e100 M 70 01 be SO 00 ac Oa 


-elOB c(] 74 61 ac 3c M 74 5c 


-BlIO 3c 20 74 (7 8b (16 4a ac 


-ellB 3c Dd 74 04 3c 20 75 f7 


-e120 c6 44 ft 00 2b If 8b 15 


•e128 b8 00 3d cd 21 72 3d 8b 


-e130 d8 b4 31 b1 01 8b d5 cd 


-e 138 21 Oa cO 74 06 8a 04 03 


-e 140 f8 eb ee b4 3e cd 21 8b 


-e148 c7 bb 10 27 8b fd 2b d2 


-e150 f7 13 04 30 aa 52 2h d2 


-e158 8b c3 bb Oa 00 f7 fS 8b 


-e160 d8 53 Ob db 75 eS 8b dS 


-e1B8 b4 09 cd 21 b4 4c cd 21 


-e 170 00 00 00 00 00 Od Oa 24 


■RCX 


CX 0000 


:78 


•W 


Writing 0078 bytes 
-Q 



To use Checksum, type check- 
sum filename.com. If you run 
Checksum on Checksum, you 
will see the number 13907 on 
your screen. 

RICHARD C. LEINECKER 
MIAMI, FL 



No Scroll 

In your December 1992 is- 
sue, you had a batch file 
called M.BAT that lists sever- 
al different file specs in a di- 
rectory, It also lists the vol- 
ume name and free disk 
space after each file spec, 
and this can make the listings 
scroll off the top of the 
screen. I added the /b switch 
to Dir to eliminate these super- 
fluous items. Here's my ver- 
sion, called DIRR.BAT 

ECHO OFF 
IF"%1"==""GOTON0PARAIVI 

:L0OP 

01 R %1 /b 

SHIR 

IF"%1"="" GOTO END 

GOTO LOOP 

:NOPARAM 

ECHO Parameter missing 
ECHO Usage: DIRR filejpecj 
llle_spec_2. . . file_spec_9 
:END 

I also wrote a batch file that 
will find a file anywhere on a 
disk from any directory. You 
can add the /b switch to the di- 
rectory to get rid of everything 
except the found files and 
their paths. I call it FF.BAT 

ECHO OFF 

IF '■%1"=="" GOTO NOPARAM 

DIR \%1 /s 

GOTO END 

:NOPARAM 

ECHO Parameter missing 

ECHO Usage: FF filename 

:END 

JIM KROON 
WALLINGFORD. CT 

Even Easier Backups 

In your December issue, you 
showed how to do easy back- 
ups. There's an easier way 
with Xcopy and the right 
switches. The following batch 
file backs up the current 



directory, but only files from 
the given date forward. The 
batch file is called X.BAT. 
For it to work, you must 
give it the date from which 
to start backups in the form 
mm/dd/yy. 

ECHO OFF 

IF"%1"=="" GOTO NOPARAIVI 
XCOPY *.' A:/M/V/D:%1 
GOTO END 

:NOPARAIVI 

ECHO Usage: X mm/dd/yy 

ECHO Files from the given date 

ECHO lorward will be tiacked up to 

ECHO the destination drive. 

:END 

You can modify this batch file 
to include subdirectories by 
adding a Is switch to the 
Xcopy line. Here's X.BAT re- 
worked slightly to include 
subdirectories. 

ECHO OFF 

IF"%1"="" GOTO NOPARAIVI 
XCOPY *.* A:/IV1/V/S/D:%1 
GOTO END 

: NOPARAIVI 

ECHO Usage: X mm/dd/yy 

ECHO Files Irom the given date 

ECHO forward will be backed up to 

ECHO the destination drive. 

:END 

You can also do a selective 
backup and get prompted for 
each file by adding the /p 
switch. Here's X.BAT with the 
/p switch so that you're prompt- 
ed for each file. 

ECHO OFF 

IF "%1 "=='"' GOTO NOPARAM 
XCOPY •.' A:/[VI/V/P/D;%1 
GOTO END 

:NOPARAIVI 

ECHO Usage: X mm/dd/yy 

ECHO Files from the given date 

ECHO forward will be backed up to 

ECHO the destination drive. 

:END 

BARRY L. REHEARD SR. 
LANCASTER, PA 



52 COMPUTE JULY 1993 



Clearing Keys 

I've used GETKEY.COM from 
the October 1991 issue many 
times in my batch files. Once 
in a while, users press keys be- 
fore my screens are dis- 
played. This can lead to the 
wrong input. The way I 
solved this problem was to 
write a short file called 
CLKEY.COM that clears the 
keyboard. Then, GETKEY- 
.COfvl can wait for a key 
when the display appears. 

You can type in Clkey us- 
ing the DOS Debug com- 
mand. You will type in the 
text in roman. The italic text is 
provided by Debug. 

debug clkey.com 

File not found 

-e100 b4 01 cd 16 74 06 2a e4 

-e 103 cd ie eb f4 b4 4c cd 21 

■RCX 

CX 0000 

:10 

-W 

Writing 0010 bytes 

-Q 

If you run the new Checksum 
on this file, you will see the 
number 02000 appear on 
your screen. 

In case you missed the Oc- 
tober 1991 issue, here's 
GETKEY.COM. It returns the 
keypress as an errorlevel 
code; this code is the ASCII 
value of the l<ey. If A was 
pressed, it would return 65. If 
you want it to capitalize all re- 
turn values, pass it any com- 
mand line parameter, 

debug getkey.com 

File not found 

-e100 be 80 DO 2a e4 cd 16 80 

-e 108 3c 00 74 Oa 3c 61 7c 06 

-ellO 3c 7a 7f 02 24 df b4 4c 

■e118 cd 21 

-RCX 

CX 0000 

:1a 

-W 

Writing 001a bytes 

-Q 



If you run Checksum on this 
file, you will see the number 
02480 on your screen. 

You might want to clear the 
keyboard buffer and then 
wait for a key, all in one step. 
Here's a program that does 
just that. It returns the same 
values as GETKEYCOM, 

debug clgetkey.com 

File not found 

-e100 b4 01 cd 16 74 06 2a e4 

-e1D8 cd 16 eb 14 be 80 00 2a 

-ellO e4 cd 16 8D 3c 00 74 Oa 

-e 118 3c 61 7c 06 3c 7a 7f 02 

-e 120 24 df b4 4c cd 21 

-RCX 

CX 0000 

:26 

-W 

Writing 0026 bytes 

■Q 

If you run Checksum on this 

file, you will see the number 

03986 on your screen. 

Vir^CENT D O'CONNOR 
BABBITT, MN 

Safer File Moves 

I've read a number of batch 
files that move files from one 
directory to another. Ultimate- 
ly, the file is copied to the des- 
tination and then removed 
from the source. 

Unfortunately, a few mis- 
takes can cause a user to 
lose the file. That's why I 
wrote a batch file called COP- 
YMOVE.BAT that makes sev- 
eral checks and tries to pre- 
vent accidents. 

ECHO OFF 

IF "%1"="" GOTO NOPARAM 
IF "%2"=""G0T0 NOPARAM 
IF EXIST CHECK.DIR DEL 

CHECK.DIR 

IF NOT EXIST %1 GOTO NOFILES 
IF NOT EXIST %2\NUL GOTO 

NODIR 

IF EXIST %2\CHECK.DIR DEL 

%2\CHECK.DIR 
ECHO TESTING > CHECK.DIR 
IF EXIST %2\CHECK.01R GOTO 

SAMEDIR 
GOTO COPYMOVE 



:NOFILES 

ECHO %1 file(s) not found 
IF EXIST CHECK.DIR DEL 
CHECK.DIR 
GOTO END 

:NODIR 

ECHO Directory of %2 not found 
IF EXIST CHECK.DIR DEL 
CHECK.DIR 
GOTO END 

:SAMED1R 

ECHO Files cannot be 
ECHO COPYMOVED into the 
ECHO current directory. 
ECHO Change to 
ECHO any other directory 
ECHO and try again. 
IF EXIST CHECK.DIR DEL 
CHECK.DIR 
GOTO END 

:NOPARAM 

ECHO Missing parameter 

ECHO Usage: 

ECHO COPYIVIOVE 

ECHO filespec 

ECHO destinationjath 

GOTO END 

iCOPYMOVE 

IF EXIST CHECK.DIR DEL 
CHECK.DIR 
COPY %1 %2 

FOR %%F IN (%1) DO DEL %%F 
ECHO 7o1 file(s) COPYMOVED 
ECHO to the %2 
ECHO directory 

:END 



DENNIS T MILLER 
DALLAS, TX 



// you have an interesting tip 
that you itiinl< would help oth- 
er PC users, send it along 
with your name, address, and 
Social Security number to 
COMPUTE'S Tips & Tools. 
324 West Wendover Avenue, 
Suite 200, Greensboro. North 
Carolina 27408. For each tip 
we publish, we 11 pay you $25- 
$50. All tips submitted be- 
come the property of General 
Media international. n 



Three batch-file- 
enhancing COM files 
and a saier 
tile moving pragram 



JULY 1993 COMPUTE 53 



INTRODOS 



Tony Roberts 



Overcoming fear of 

the DOS prompt 

just takes a little 

understanding. 



GRASPING P(MER 

Windows may get all the atten- 
tion these days, but DOS- 
based computing is still alive 
and well. Just because a com- 
puter doesn't have the horse- 
power to run Windows applica- 
tions doesn't mean it's a can- 
didate for the landfill. Jay At- 
las, a reader who is a profes- 
sor of philosophy at Pomona 
College in Claremont, Califor- 
nia, made this point to me re- 
cently during an exchange we 
had over Internet. 

Atlas contends that most 
homeowners, small business- 
es, and students in particular 
can get by just fine without get- 
ting all wrapped up in Win- 
dows. I have to agree. Al- 
though the potnt-and-click en- 
vironment makes a computer 
a little easier to use, there's a 
great deal of overhead (fast 
processor, fast hard disk, lots 
of RAM) involved in attaining 
that ease of use. 

If you're into desktop pub- 
lishing, multimedia, CAD, or 
graphics design, then you 
probably need Windows and 
Windows software. But if your 
computing needs are less 
lofty and you're willing to es- 
chew the glitz and glamour 
that the latest machines offer, 
you'll discover that even an 
80286 with 1MB of memory 
can be a powerful workhorse. 

Let's look at what a DOS ma- 
chine can do. 

Word processing. Most peo- 
ple I know use their computers 
for writing, and as far as I'm 
concerned, no graphical appli- 
cation compares with DOS 
when it comes to word process- 
ing. I'm not talking about type 
styles and headlines; I'm talk- 
ing about content. A student 
writing a term paper should be 
more concerned with what 
words say than how they look, 
The same can be said for a 
businessperson preparing a 
business plan. Parents will ap- 
preciate a plain and simple let- 



ter just as much as one 
gussied up with fancy fonts 
and dingbats. 

Telecommunications. Even 
if you have the fastest comput- 
er on earth, your telecommu- 
nications progress is meas- 
ured by the speed of your mo- 
dem— 1200, 2400, or 9600 
ops. A modem and telecommu- 
nications software provide a 
gateway to vast quantities of 
information. Sign up for GEnie 
or CompuServe and tap into 
whatever field of data interests 
you there. For exampie, own- 
ers of small businesses can 
learn to avoid numerous stum- 
bling bloci<:s and pitfalls with in- 
formation found on GEnie's 
Home Office/Small Business 
RoundTable. DOS computers 
telecommunicate so well that 
several Windows users I know 
have set up their older, slower 
computers as telecommunica- 
tions stations. 

Database applications. To- 
day's newest database soft- 
ware has gone graphical, allow- 
ing you to include a digitized 
photo with each employee re- 
cord, but most of us have da- 
tabase needs that are far less 
demanding. Mainly we want to 
manage an address and 
phone list for a few friends, as- 
sociates, and customers. 
There are numerous DOS ap- 
plications that do this well — 
and fast. 

So there's still plenty that 
can be done at the DOS 
prompt, but therein lies the 
problem; the DOS prompt, the 
C;\ with the bad reputation. 

I won't deny that DOS can 
be cumbersome and difficult 
to use, but the same can be 
said for a sewing machine or 
a power saw. Using any tool 
properly requires an under- 
standing of the process and 
the expected outcome. For ex- 
ample, a seamstress under- 
stands how to use a sewing ma- 
chine to assemble a garment. 
The sewing machine is a 
great tool, but it can't be put 



on autopilot. The operator is re- 
quired to use judgment, make 
decisions, and decide what 
steps will be completed in 
what order. 

Computer users get in troub- 
le with the DOS prompt when 
they try to engage the autopi- 
lot — they try to memorize com- 
mands rather than to under- 
stand processes. For exam- 
ple, I'm continually amazed at 
how troublesome the DOS sub- 
directory structure is for most 
computer users. Let's look at 
a simple example. On our 
disk, we have the root directo- 
ry, C:\, and two subdirecto- 
ries, DIR-1 and DIR-2. 

Assume you're working in 
DIR-1 and you want to get to 
DiR-2. If you enter cd dir-2. all 
you'll get is the message Inva- 
lid Directory because there's 
no subdirectory named DIR-2 
that branches off the current 
subdirectory {DIR-1 ). To avoid 
this frustration, you've learned 
that when changing directo- 
ries, you must first go back to 
the root directory and then 
change to the target directory. 
So you type cd \ to get to the 
root directory and then cd dlr- 
2 to change to DIR-2. 

Mission accomplished, but 
without full understanding of 
what's happening, What you re- 
ally need to know is that the 
full name for DIR-2 is C:\DIR- 
2. The backslash is important; 
it represents your disk's root di- 
rectory. When you know that 
DIR-2 is a branch of the root 
directory, you can easily 
switch to it from any subdirec- 
tory by typing cd \dir-2. In this 
case, the CD command uses 
the root directory (\) instead of 
the current directory as the 
starting point in looking for the 
DIR-2 subdirectory. 

If you're computing at the 
DOS prompt and feeling blue, 
it's time to snap out of It. Com- 
mit yourself to understanding 
the processes, and you'll dis- 
cover you have a most helpful 
tool at hand. □ 



54 COMPUTE JULY 1993 



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Why is a Pentium 

faster ttian 

a 486, and how 

fast is It? 



PENTIUM POWER 

By now, you've heard a lot 
about Intel's new microproces- 
sor, the Pentium, Wondering 
how much of the stuff that 
you're hearing is actually true? 
Well, the Pentium is a good 
chip in many ways, although 
not the amazing world-beater 
that some of the {ahem} compet- 
ing computer magazines claim 
it to be. This month, let's take 
a very quick look at what's fact 
and what's not concerning In- 
tel's newest engine. 

I said you'd probably heard 
a lot about the Pentium; actu- 
ally, hearing is about all you'll 
be doing about the Pentium 
for a while, as Intel will be 
lucky to be able to produce 
200,000 of them by the end of 
the year. While 200,000 may 
sound like a lot of chips, it's on- 
ly about 1 percent of Intel's pro- 
duction run for this year's 386 
and 486 chips, and an even 
smaller percentage when you 
add in the folks like Cyrix, 
AMD, and IBIVI who make 
clones of those CPtJs. 

There are lots of things to 
like about the Pentium, and 
not a lot of space to describe 
them. Here's a whirlwind tour. 

Greater raw speed. The Pen- 
tium comes in 60-MHz and 66- 
MHz flavors. If offering two 
speeds that are so close togeth- 
er seems odd, it is — usually. 
The Pentium is such a difficult 
chip to make, however that the 
percentage of manufactured 
chips that can operate at the 
goal rate of 66 percent — the 
yield, in chip talk — is much low- 
er than it is for, say, 386 or 486 
chips. Lowering the bar of ac- 
ceptability to 60 MHz allows In- 
tel to sell the chips that almost 
made it. That means that the 60- 
MHz Pentiums failed the 66- 
MHz test but passed the 60- 
MHz test, whereas the 66-MHz 
Pentiums passed both tests. Per- 
sonally, I'd look closely at a re- 
turn and service policy before 
buying a PC based on a 60- 



MHz Pentium, 

Why is the Pentium so diffi- 
cult to make? For one thing, it's 
much bigger than the 486, The 
486 contains 1 ,2 million transis- 
tors; the Pentium contains 3.1 
million — over two-and-a-half 
times as many (That's not the 
biggest jump we've seen, how- 
ever. The 386 is only a quarter 
million transistors,) The Pentium 
is also a hot chip in the literal 
sense. The Pentium overview 
document from Intel says that 
the chip should be expected to 
run at up to 85 degrees Centi- 
grade — that's 185 degrees Fahr- 
enheit — prompting the inevita- 
ble observation that it'll not only 
crunch your numbers, but it'll al- 
so cook your dinner. Look for 
makers of Pentium-based com- 
puters to tout their unique cool- 
ing facilities. 

The greater raw speed re- 
fers to the fact that the 66-MHz 
clock rate is a pure clock rate, 
unlike the 486DX2/66 chip, 
which runs at 66 MHz internal- 
ly but interacts with the out- 
side world at only 33 MHz. A 
486DX2/66 is a relatively sim- 
ple chip to design a PC 
around; that it communicates 
at 33 MHz externally means 
that all a designer needs to do 
is to mate a DX2/66 GPU chip 
with a run-of-the-mill 33-MHz 
motherboard, and it's an in- 
stant 66-MHz computer. 

With a Pentium-66, on the oth- 
er hand, both internal and ex- 
ternal communication is at 66 
MHz, requiring a motherboard 
that runs at 66 MHz. While it 
may seem that building a 66- 
MHz motherboard would be a 
small incremental change from 
the currently available 33-MHz 
and 50-MHz motherboards, it's 
not — the task gets harder as 
the speed gets greater. It turns 
out that 66 MHz is around the 
frequency of TV channel 4, so 
a Pentium-equipped PC has a 
serious potential noise prob- 
lem. Run one without the prop- 
er shielding (with the cover off 
or with an inadequate cover). 



and you're, well, on the air. Cur- 
rently, anyone can design a 
motherboard with a few chips 
and a processor. That won't be 
true with Pentium-based sys- 
tems. Don't be surprised if the 
early 66-MHz Pentium-based 
PCs vary in usable speed by 
as much as 50 percent. 

Smarter cache. Since the 20- 
MHz 80386DX's introduction, 
PC designers have been 
faced with a difficult choice — 
what kind of memory to use in 
their machines. The majority of 
PC RAM is called dynamic 
RAM (DRAM): It's relatively 
cheap, but it's not available in 
the kind of speeds needed to 
keep up with systems of 20-i- 
MHz. You can't get DRAMs in 
40, 25, 20, or 15 nanosecond 
access times, the times re- 
quired by those systems. 
There's a different kind of RAM 
called static RAM (SRAM) 
that's available in those higher 
speeds, but SRAM is much 
more expensive than DRAM. 

How do manufacturers build 
high-speed machines and still 
find RAM that won't drive the 
price of the PCs out of sight? 
By using a lot of DRAM and a 
little SRAM. The DRAM serves 
as main memory, and most sys- 
tems have megabytes of it. But 
many motherboards have be- 
tween 64K and 512K of SRAM 
called cache RAM. When the 
CPU needs the next item of da- 
ta from the system RAM, it 
looks first in the fast SRAM 
cache to see if it's there. If the 
data is in the SRAM cache, 
then the CPU gets it from the 
SRAM without delay. 

If, on the other hand, the re- 
quired data isn't in the SRAM, 
the CPU must go to DRAM for 
the data, which slows the sys- 
tem down considerably. The 
whole idea of a cache is that 
some smart hardware called a 
cache controller {it's built into 
the 486, and it's an optional 
chip with the 386) must essen- 
tially look into the future, 
guess which data the CPU will 



56 COMPUTE JULY 1993 



soon need, and go get that da- 
ta before the CPU asks for it. 

While many 386 mother- 
boards incorporate some kind 
of cache memory and cache 
controller, the 486 actually 
builds a cache and cache con- 
trolling into the CPU. The 486 
chip contains 8K of cache, and 
most 486 systems have addition- 
al cache on the motherboard. 

The Pentium's cache system 
is better than the 486's in four 
ways. First, the Pentium has 
twice as much cache, with two 
8K caches — one for data, one 
for program code, Second, the 
cache's method of organizing 
its cached data is more effi- 
cient, employing a write-back ai- 
gorithm. The opposite of a write- 
back algorithnn, a write-through 
algorithm, forces data written to 
the SRAM cache memory to be 
immediately written to the slow- 
er DRAM memory. That means 
that memory reads can come 
out of the cache quickly, but 
memory writes must always oc- 
cur at the slower DRAM time. Be- 
cause not every piece of infor- 
mation written to memory stays 
in memory very long, the Penti- 
um's cache algorithm puts off 
writing data from SRAM to 
DRAM for as long as possible, 
unlike the 486, which uses a 
write-through cache. 

Third, there's the time wast- 
ed by the cache controller in 
searching to see if an item is 
in the cache. The Pentium re- 
duces that time by dividing 
the cache into smaller caches, 
each of which can be 
searched more quickly; that 
technique is called a two-way 
set associative cache. 

To explain the fourth v/ay in 
which the Pentium's cache is 
better than the 486's, I have to 
first make an important point 
about what a cache must do. 
Recall that a cache has to 
guess which data and pro- 
gram code the CPU will need 
soon, and then go get that da- 
ta before the CPU asks for it. 

Guessing what the CPU will 



need isn't a straightforward 
task, particularly when there 
are decisions to be made. Sup- 
pose the cache sees that the 
GPU is currently executing 
some instructions that mean: 
"Compare value A with value B. 
If A is greater than B. then set 
the value MAXIMUM to A; oth- 
erwise, set the value MAXI- 
MUM to B." That simple state- 
ment boils down to a bunch of 
instructions that had better be 
in the cache if the Pentium is go- 
ing to continue to run without de- 
lays. But since the cache con- 
troller can't know whether the 
CPU will take the "A is greater 
than B" or "B is greater than A" 
fork in the road, it doesn't know 
which result's code to go grab 
and put in the cache. For 
years, mainframe cache control- 
lers have used a technique 
called branch prediction to 
guess which way the CPU will 
go, and now a PC chip — the 
Pentium — has a cache control- 
ler builtinto it with branch predic- 
tion capabilities. 

Two processors in one. 
There are essentially two CPUs 
in this chip. The first one is a sim- 
ple 386-like CPU; It does inte- 
ger operations, not floating- 
point operations. The second is 
like the 486— a 386 with floating- 
point capabilities built right into 
it. That means that the Pentium 
is essentially a parallel-process- 
ing CPU, with the ability to do 
two things at once. Those two 
CPUs-within-a-GPU are called 
the U and V pipelines, and the 
fact that the Pentium has more 
than one pipeline makes it a su- 
perscalar CPU. Without special 
programming, only the 486 
pipe (the U pipe) is active. New 
programs and operating sys- 
tems, such as Windows NT 
and OS/2 3.0, will be required 
to make use of these multiple 
processors. 

Fault tolerance. The Penti- 
um is designed to be linked 
with another Pentium on the 
motherboard that's dedicated 
to fault tolerance. The second 



Pentium constantly monitors 
the first. If the main Pentium 
malfunctions, the other one 
jumps right in and takes up 
without skipping a beat. 

Benchmarking the Pentium 

How much faster is a Penti- 
um, really? As I said, the ac- 
tual speed of a Pentium- 
based PC will depend heavily 
on motherboard design, as 
the Pentium relies upon the 
motherboard to access both 
its DRAM and its external 
SRAM cache, if those re- 
spond slowly, the Pentium 
can only run slowly. 

Simple small benchmarks, 
on the other hand, will run like 
greased lightning because 
they'll fit entirely into the Penti- 
um's 16K cache. They'll return 
some great numbers, but 
those numbers will be of very 
little real-world value in judging 
system effectiveness. After all, 
how many applications do you 
run that will fit in 16K? 

I should also mention that 
modern benchmarks don't ex- 
ploit multiprocessor capabili- 
ties, so any benchmark values 
on the Pentium are values de- 
termined while it works with 
one hand tied behind its 
back — that is, while the V pipe- 
line isn't doing anything. Using 
a common set of benchmarks, 
the Pentium-based PC built by 
Intel (who should, after all, 
know how to make a Pentium- 
based PC) turns in a perform- 
ance 76 percent faster than a 
DX2/66 on basic processor op- 
erations, with memory through- 
put almost exactly the same 
as the fastest current DX2/66s. 

This underscores my previ- 
ous point: The CPU performs 
amazingly well in a vacuum, 
but hook it up to peripherals 
on a motherboard — such as 
RAM chips — and you'll see 
that while the Pentium is a very 
special chip, it will need some 
very special hardware surround- 
ing it before it can soar to com- 
puting heaven. n 



JULY 1993 COMPUTE 57 



PROGRAMMING POWER 



Tom Campbell 



There's a sparkling 

"new" BASIC 

on the scene, one 

that might be 

familiar to old hands. 



POWERBASIC 3.0 

There's a sparkling "new" BA- 
SIC on the scene, one that 
might be familiar to old 
hands. PowerBASlC 3.0 from 
Spectra Publishing {1030-D 
East Duane Avenue. Sun- 
nyvale, California 94086, 408- 
730-9616) has just been re- 
leased, and it's very hot. If the 
name doesn't ring a bell, it 
used to be Borland's Turbo Ba- 
sic two versions ago. PowerBA- 
SlC 2.0 was the first release 
from Spectra, and I loved it. 

Uppermost in many peo- 
ple's minds is: How compati- 
ble is PowerBASlC with Micro- 
soft's QuIcl^BASIC? The an- 
swer is that they're fairly close. 
But any large program will prob- 
ably require major rewriting. 

PowerBASlC is a lightning- 
fast native code compiler, just 
like QuickBASIC's Make EXE 
file option. But this one always 
compiles, and it compiles in- 
sanely fast. For large projects, 
you can break programs up in- 
to precompiled versions 
called units, just like Turbo Pas- 
cal's. You can also use OBJ 
files, but they aren't as good 
as units. 

PowerBASlC has a ton of 
new features. My favorite by a 
landslide is its ability to create 
any kind of TSR imaginable. 
TSRs can be triggered by hot 
keys, by interrupts, by timer 
ticks, and by a few less obvi- 
ous methods. You can swap 
them out to EMS memory or a 
disk file, so that the executa- 
ble can be 200K yet still con- 
sume only 4,5K of convention- 
al memory. The TSRs are quite 
stable, working well under my 
rather strenuous test condi- 
tions. In all. this feature alone 
is worth buying the product if 
you need to develop TSRs. It's 
cheaper than many C libraries 
that offer the same feature, yet 
it offers the convenience of BA- 
SIC. Related to that is the new 
ASM statement (with the alias 
.' for brevity), which allows you 



to embed assembly language 
statements right into the BA- 
SIC code. 

A less sexy feature (but per- 
haps a more important one) is 
the ability to create huge ar- 
rays, which may contain more 
than 64K of data. Unlike "the 
other BASIC," PowerBASlC 
lets you create these huge ar- 
rays in any size, not just a 
space-wasting power-of-two di- 
mension. Hand in hand with 
huge arrays is the ability to cre- 
ate compound data types — 
not only the TYPE variety, but 
the UNION variety as well, 
which lets you overlap similar 
data structures, like the variant 
records of Pascal or the union 
of C. And anyone who writes 
directly to the screen or reads 
from the BIOS frequently will ap- 
preciate the ability to deciare 
arrays at an absolute memory 
location. Ever since Turbo Pas- 
cal added this one, I've been 
champing at the bit for a bet- 
ter DEE SEG. 

Last on the list of my favor- 
ite new features is the addition 
of a deceptively simple option 
that requires you to declare 
variables before using them. 
Although this seems like a 
cruel trick on BASIC program- 
mers, I have found it absolute- 
ly essential on large projects. 
Until now I haven't been able 
to use BASIC for programs 
over a thousand lines or so be- 
cause BASIC will simply initial- 
ize to zero any new variable it 
finds. Too many times, my de- 
velopment has ground to a 
halt at 2:00 in the morning 
while I read and reread my 
code, missing every time that 
an array called SymTable has 
quietly transmogrified into 
SymbolTable. That C and Pas- 
cal require variable declara- 
tions went from an onerous bur- 
den to a basic requirement. 
Now I can look forward to us- 
ing PowerBASlC even in seri- 
ous development. 

Besides these major new ad- 
ditions that hit home with me. 



there are scores of other fea- 
tures you'll find it hard to resist, 
such as byte, word, and dou- 
ble-word types (all unsigned, 
at last!): ON ERROR LOCAL 
for intraroutine error trapping; 
an editor that can handle 
huge files and. finally, mice; 
reasonably good hypertext 
help; and a stand-alone debug- 
ger. But call for a brochure — 
there are even more. 

This month's program is writ- 
ten in PowerBASlC and is avail- 
able on CompuServe in the 
IBMPRO forum under the file- 
name DBFDIR.BAS. If you 
have any trouble finding it, 
you can send me E-mail at 
75530,3607. It both highlights 
and improves one of Power- 
BASIC's most useful features, 
the DIRS function. DIR$ is 
meant to be called once with 
a file specification, such as 
"C:\DBFV.DBF", and after 
that in a loop without the file 
specification. The first time it's 
called, it returns the first file 
matching the specification; 
the second time, and on sub- 
sequent invocations without 
a parameter, it returns the re- 
maining matches. The prob- 
lem is that it only returns a 
filename and extension, not 
the drive and path. So, in the 
example of ■*C:\DBR*.DBF", it 
might return "TODO.DBF", 
"ACCTS.DBF", and so on, but 
not '■C:\DBRTODO.DBF", and 
so forth. DBFDIR.BAS, the 
PowerBASlC program I wrote, 
acts like dBASE's Dir com- 
mand and lists database char- 
acteristics (last update and re- 
cord size) of all the dBASE 
data files in the specified direc- 
tory. I ported SplitPilenameS 
from an earlier column with no 
effort at ail; it's used to recon- 
struct the matching filenames 
so they can be opened and 
the DBF header data read in. 
As usual, this is modular 
code, so you can easily hollow 
out the dBASE-specific por- 
tion and just use the frame- 
work for your own files. □ 



58 COf^PUTE JULY 1993 



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HOW DOES YOUR HARDWARE 

COMMUNICATE WITH 

YOUR SOFTWARE? THE SOFTWARE 

HARD-WIRED INTO 

YOUR COMPUTER'S BIOS IS LIKE A 

BRAIN WITHIN A BRAIN. 




i 



By Richard C. Leinecker 



Illustration by Bill Bruning 



Today's computers think faster than 
mere mortals can comprehend. 
But without software — the instruc- 
tions the processor performs — a com- 
puter is just a pile of scrap iron, wire, 
and silicon. 

Application software has to run on 
virtually an infinite variety of hardware 
configurations. That's why each IBM- 
compatible computer has a liaison 
layer that acts as a compatibility- 
assurance arbitrator between the 
application software and the hard- 
ware. This layer is called the BIOS 
(Basic Input/Output System}. It usually 
resides in two ROM chips on a com- 
puter's motherboard. 

Imagine the difficulty software 
developers would face if they had to 
worry about whether their products 
were saving data to a 20MB or a 
200MB hard drive. They'd need to 
treat each variation as a different 
case. Or worse yet, what if they had 
the additional difficulty of providing 
separate routines to deal with each 
drive type, whether it was an IDE, 
MFM, SCSI, or RLL drive? If not for the 
BIOS, applications would be many 
times larger than they are. The BIOS 
shields developers from these 
headaches by providing a standard 
way of talking to hard drives and other 
hardware. 

There's a standard way of dealing 
with all peripherals, including floppy 
and hard drives, modems and serial 
ports, printers, video systems, and 
keyboards. DOS (the Disl^ Operating 
System) builds its own routines 
around the BIOS routines. That's why 
different versions of DOS run on all 
IBM-compatible systems. 

Some peripherals, like video cards, 
have their own embedded BIOS. In 
most cases the specialty BIOSs add 
functions that extend the original 
BIOS. A good example is a VESA- 
compatible (Video Electronics 
Standards Association) Super VGA 
card. At runtime the video card patch- 
es the base BIOS so that new routines 
are available to application software. 
This is necessary because video stan- 
dards change rapidly and many peo- 
ple upgrade their video systems many 
times before replacing their comput- 
ers. The motherboard manufacturer 
couldn't possibly anticipate which of 
the hundreds of types of video boards 
users will install. 

In addition to allowing the operating 
system to communicate with the hard- 
ware, the system BIOS also contains 
diagnostic programs that check out 
the computer each time it's turned on. 
This series of diagnostic tests is called 
the POST, or Power-On Self Test, and 

62 COMPUTE JULY 1993 



Power*On Self Test 

Here's the sequence of tasks your 
computer performs when it starts 
up. 

1. The microprocessor begins 
execution at address FFFF;0OOO, 
an area almost at the end of the 
ROM BIOS area. 

2. The microprocessor is tested, 
usually with a self-test mode that's 
built into the microprocessor. 
The system board, the system 
buses, and the system memory 
containing the POST code are 
tested, too. 

3. The system timers are tested. 

4. The video display system is 
tested, usually the video memory 
and the signals that drive the dis- 
play. 

5. All memory is tested. 

6. The keyboard is tested. 

7. The disk drives are tested for 
their status. 



it involves checking the microproces- 
sor, memory, video system, and other 
internals. Not ail installed options are 
tested. For example, printers and 
modems are not tested. 

The more comprehensive the 
POST, the better your computer can 
diagnose itself and alert you to prob- 
lems. And the more memory you have 
installed, the longer the tests take to 
verify it all. 

BIOSs Aren't Created Equal 

IBM was the creator of the first BIOS 
used in a PC, but it was the develop- 
ment of third-party BIOSs that made it 



Support Reference 

AMi 

Distributed by Washburn & 

Company 

3800 Monroe Ave. 

Pittsford, NY 14534 

(716)248-3627 

(404) 246-5825 (BBS) 

Award Software 
IBOKnowles Dr. 
Los Gatos, CA 95030 
(408) 370-7979 
(408) 370-3139 (BBS) 

Phoenix Technologies 
Distributed by Micro Firmware 
1430W. LindseySt. 
Norman, OK 73069 
(405)321-8333 

(405) 321-3553 (BBS) 



possible for virtually anyone to build a 
PC. The three major companies that 
specialize in development and sales 
of compatible BIOS products are AMI 
(American Megatrends, Incorporated), 
Award Software, and Phoenix 
Technologies. Each one licenses its 
BIOS to hardware manufacturers. 
Selecting a BIOS for motherboards 
isn't easy. A list of questions has to be 
addressed in order to choose a BIOS 
that's already been designed or to 
custom-develop a BIOS. 

The AMI BIOS has a built-in setup 
program activated by pressing the 
Delete l<ey in the first few seconds 
after the boot procedure begins. In 
addition to the setup program, the 
AMI BIOS features a built-in, menu- 
driven diagnostics package. 

The Award BIOS has a built-in 
setup program activated by pressing 
Ctrl-Att-Esc. Award is unique among 
BIOS manufacturers in that it provides 
its code to hardware manufacturers 
and allows them to customize the 
BIOS themselves. Because of this 
customization, the hardware compa- 
nies can fine-tune the BIOS to work 
best with their computers. 

The Phoenix BIOS has been the 
standard by which others are judged. 
It was the first third-party BIOS on the 
market. One area of particular 
strength for the Phoenix is its POST. 
The BIOS outputs an extensive set of 
beep codes that help diagnose prob- 
lems on the motherboard. It can even 
isolate a memory failure to an individ- 
ual chip. This simplifies identifying 
system problems for the owner or the 
repairperson. 

If you have a modem, you can get 
support from these BIOS manufactur- 
ers (or their distributors) or from their 
BBSs (see the "Support Reference" 
sidebar). All of these BIOSs have 
been on the market for years. 
Although they offer different kinds of 
diagnostics, alf are extremely reliable 
and have proved themselves over 
time. But since they have to be updat- 
ed every time a new piece of hard- 
ware is introduced, a few bugs have 
cropped up from time to time. 

BIOS Bugs 

Like all software, the ROM BIOS is not 
Immune to bugs. If your BIOS is from 
one of the major manufacturers, you're 
probably safe. But even then, don't 
forget that BIOS manufacturers have 
had some minor problems. 

How can you protect yourself from 
problems when you're buying new 
and used equipment? If you're consid- 
ering the purchase of used equip- 
ment, you should install the applica- 



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tions you'll be using and make sure 
they perform the way you expect 
before laying your money down. For 
new equipment, you should Install 
your applications and put them 
through their paces as soon as you 
can. If you find a problem, contact the 
source that sold you the computer. 

BIOS Upgrading 

You'll rarely be In the position of need- 
ing a BIOS upgrade. Here's a list of 
reasons why you might want to con- 
sider it. 

• Adding support for 720K 3Va- 
Inch, 1.2MB 5V4-lnch, and 1.44MB 
3V2-lnch drives. 

• Allowing a user-definable hard 
drive type that matches an MFM. RLL, 
IDE. or ESDI drive. 

• Adding support for 101-key 
enhanced keyboards. 

• Correcting known conflicts or 
bugs. It's best if you contact the hard- 
ware or software vendor's technical 
support to verify that there is a prob- 
lem with your particular BIOS. 

• Adding features and perfor- 
mance found in newer BIOS versions. 

Before you go shopping, you'll 
need some Information. 

• Make and model of the system. 
For many popular systems this is all 
that's needed to find the right BIOS. 
For less common clones you'll need 
more information. 

• The CPU type (286, 386SX, 386, 
486SX, 486). 

• The make and version of the 
existing BIOS. This is necessary 
because some revisions will require 
that the keyboard controller be 
replaced, too. 

• The type and number of the 



Flash BIOS 

You've probably heard the term 
Flash BIOS al some point and won- 
dered what It meant. It doesn't 
mean an ultrafast BIOS. It's just an 
alternate way of placing informa- 
tion in the BIOS. A BIOS is simply 
an EPROM (Erasable Program- 
mable Read Only Memory). Flash 
BIOS is a special l<lnd of EPROM 
that can be erased and rewritten 
while it's still on the motherboard. 
That allows manufacturers to make 
minor changes in the BIOS to con- 
form to new computer designs. 
Don't think you can simpiy go into 
your Flash BIOS and start chang- 
ing things, though. Altering the 
BIOS requires specialized equip- 
nfient. The Award spokesperson 
told me that eventually the BIOS 
could be available in CMOS, which 
would allow you to upgrade your 
BIOS in place with a manufacturer- 
supplied utility. 

—ROBERT BIXBY 



existing BIOS ROMs. Locate the part 
number on one of the ROM chips. You 
may have to peel back a label. The 
part number will usually start with 27. 

• Check for an integrated chip set. 
This will consist of square, flat, large- 
scale integration chips with pins 
around all four sides. They'll usually 
have a manufacturer's name or logo. 
Some examples are CHIPS. SUNTAC, 
VLSI, and OPTI. An integrated chip 
set performs the functions of hun- 
dreds of smaller chips. Even IBM uses 
third-party Integrated chip sets on 
some models. 



To get this information, open your 
computer's case and start taking 
notes. It only takes a few minutes. 
With this information you can accu- 
rately order BIOS upgrades. 

There are some alternatives to 
upgrading your BIOS. Some compa- 
nies (Washburn & Company, for 
example) supply accessory ROMs to 
augment the existing BIOS. They can 
fit in the two empty sockets that are 
found on most AT motherboards, or 
they can go on a card that fits in any 
8- or 16-bit slot. 

If you've identified a specific prob- 
lem, some technicians are well versed 
at patching BIOSs, But it may be risky 
if the person doing it doesn't possess 
the skills. (I don't think I've ever heard 
a technician admit he or she couldn't 
do something until it was too late.) 
Unless you have complete confidence 
in a technician, leave this option out. 

Don't Be Fooled by Imitations 

Just because your computer boots 
and shows you the copyright of a 
major BIOS manufacturer doesn't 
mean you're home free. If you bought 
your system used, bought it from a 
cut-rate source, or have had it ser- 
viced by cut-rate technicians, there's a 
small chance you have an illegal BIOS 
copy. I've heard of more than one per- 
son who, having experienced system- 
level bugs and incompatibilities, 
inspected the motherboard and found 
a BIOS copy — not the real thing. 

This is illegal and dilutes the BIOS 
manufacturer's ability to provide the 
best possible product for paying cus- 
tomers. Besides that, those BIOS 
copies may not be the best fit for the 
systems. 



Compaq actually created the first 
BIOS clone, but It was only interested 
in providing BIOSs for its own 
machines. Only when Phoenix intro- 
duced its version of the PC BIOS did 
the clones and compatibles war really 
begin. Since then, many other makers 
have entered the market, notably the 
makers mentioned in the article, One 
additional BIOS maker, Quadtel, was 
recently purchased by Phoenix. 

I called various BIOS makers and 
asked them about their products. I 
was surprised by their responses. 
The question Why is your product 
better than the competition? usually 
Invites a fusillade of marketing 
squibs, but this time, most of the 
people I spoke with echoed the 
statement, "A BIOS is a BIOS." The 



Ending BIOS Fear 

principal differences among BIOS 
makers are their market niches and 
small utilities and improvements that 
are quickly incorporated by the com- 
petition. 

For example, a spokesperson for 
Award stated that the Award BIOS is 
outfitted with a boot-sector virus 
detector which is expected to appear 
soon in new BIOSs from other manu- 
facturers. 

AMI sells primarily to motherboard 
makers while Phoenix sells primahly 
to OEMs (Original Equipment Man- 
ufacturers — companies that make 
the whole computer and some 
peripherals). 

One irony of the modern BIOS has 
resulted from IBM's decision to mar- 
ket its BIOS to compatibles manufac- 



turers (in the industry, this is called 
opening the kimono), which would 
allow non-IBM computer makers to 
advertise an even higher level of IBM 
compatibility, Since a system's 
design is such an integral factor in 
BIOS design (virtually all BIOSs are 
customized at least a little to match 
the system they serve) and since no 
OEM wants to provide detailed sys- 
tem design information to IBM, an 
avid competitor, IBM has decided to 
market its BIOS through Phoenix, the 
first company to release an IBM- 
compatible BIOS. This will allow 
Phoenix, a disinterested third party, 
to make the tweaks necessary to 
allow the IBM BIOS to work with an 
individual system. 

—ROBERT BIXBY 



64 COMPUTE JULY 1993 





Beep Beep 




1 Here's the scenario. Your computer won't boot, but you 


Phoenix 




hear beeps, Interpreting those beeps nnight mean the 


The Phoenix 


BIOS beep codes are three groups of beep 


difference between rectifying the situation yourself and 


counts. 




calling a technician. Here's a list of the error beep codes 


1-1-3 


CMOS write/read failure 


for AMI, Award, 


IBM, and Phoenix BIOSs. 


1-1-4 


ROM BIOS checksum failure 






1-2-1 


Programmable interval timer failure 


AMI 




1-2-2 


DMA initialization failure 


1 short 


DRAM refresh failure 


1-2-3 


DMA page register write/read failure 


2 short 


Parity circuit failure 


1-3-1 


RAM refresh verification failure 


3 short 


Base 64K RAM failure 


1-3-3 


First 64K RAM chip or data line failure. 


4 short 


System timer failure 




multibi! 


5 short 


Processor failure 


1-4-2 


Parity failure first 64K RAM 


6 short 


Keyboard controller gate A20 error 


1-4-3 


Fail-safe timer feature (only EISA 


7 short 


Virtual mode exception error 




BIOS) 


8 short 


Display memory read/write test failure 


1.4.4 


Software NMI port failure {only EISA 


9 short 


ROM BIOS checksum failure 




BIOS) 


1 long, 3 short 


Conventional/extended memory failure 


2-1-1, 2-1-2, 


First 64K RAM chip or data line failure 


1 long, 8 short 


Display/retrace test failed 


2-1-3,2-1-4, 
2-2-1,2-2-2, 


on bit 0-F 


Award 




2-2-3. 2-2-4, 




AH Processors 




2-3-1 , 2-3-2, 




1 long, 2 short 


Video error 


2-3-3, 2-3-4, 




2 short 


Any nonfatal error 


2-4-1,2-4-2, 




1 short 


No error during POST 


2-4-3, 2-4-4 








3-1-1 


Slave DMA register test failure 


80286/80386/80486 Processors 


3-1-2 


Master DMA register test failure 


1 long, 3 short 


Keyboard controller error 


3-1-3 


Master interrupt mask register failure 






3-1-4 


Slave interrupt mask register failure 


IBM 




3-2-4 


Keyboard controller failure 


1 short 


Normal POST system OK 


3-3-4 


Screen memory failure 


2 short 


POST error — error code displayed on 


3-4-2 


Screen retrace failure 




CRT 


4-2-1 


Timer tick failure 


No beep 


Power supply, system board 


4-2-2 


Shutdown failure 


Continuous 


Power supply, system board 


4-2-3 


Gate A20 failure 


Repeating short 


Power supply, system board 


4-2-4 


Unexpected interrupt in protected 


1 long, 1 short 


System board 




mode 


1 long, 2 short 


Display adapter (mono/CGA) 


4-3-1 


RAM test of memory above 64K failed 


1 long, 3 short 


Enhanced graphics adapter (EGA) 


4-3-2 


Programmable interval timer channel 2 


3 long 


3270 keyboard card 




test failed 






4-3-4 


Realtime clock test failed 






4-4-1 


Serial port test failed 






4-4-2 


Parallel port test failed 






4-4-3 


Math coprocessor test failed 



It's pretty easy to distinguish the 
real McCoy from a fake. Take a look 
at the ROM BIOS chips on the moth- 
erboard, '/ou should clearly see the 
name of the manufacturer, along with 
a serial number, usually on a label. If 
you buy a new system with a fake, 
report the supplier to the manufactur- 
er of the BIOS cloned on the fake 
chips, and return the system for a full 
refund, If you're looking at a used sys- 
tem with a copied BIOS, tell the seller 
you're not interested. Even if you buy 
it at a bargain price, you're in for trou- 
ble in the future. 

Into the Sunset 

Most people never consider the BIOS 
version and manufacturer when pur- 
chasing a computer. We take it for 
granted that such an integral compo- 



nent is carefully checked by the sys- 
tem manufacturer for correct opera- 
tion, and it almost always is. But as a 
system ages and newer peripherals 
become available, you need to be 
thinking about a BIOS upgrade to 
support newer hardware. Generally, a 
BIOS upgrade is a step involved in 
some other kind of major equipment 
upgrade. If you install the hardware 
correctly and it still won't work, your 
BIOS automaticaily becomes the 
prime suspect. 

The guidelines I've presented 
should help you make your purchase 
and upgrade decisions now and in the 
future. If you have any questions, 
though, a reputable technician will 
help you out. And if you're adventurous 
and want to upgrade, order the chips 
yourself and have at it, J 



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JULY 1993 COMPUTE 65 



PRODUCTIVITY CHOICE 




The improvements to this development system 

keep it the preferred choice for Windows programmers 

who vaiue ease of use and extendible power 

George Campbell 



VISUAL BASIC 2.0 

Microsoft brought about a rev- 
olution wlien it introduced Vis- 
ual Basic 1.0, malting Win- 
dows programming accessi- 
ble to just about anyone with 
some BASIC programming ex- 
perience. With the introduc- 
tion of version 2.0, program- 
mers get even more of a 
good thing. 

Like version 1.0, VB 2.0 
gives you a quick way to de- 
sign the interface for your Win- 
dows programming project. 
Since interface design has al- 
ways been the most difficult 
part of programming for Win- 
dows, using VB lets you get 
down to the business of the 
working part of your program 
with very little delay You sim- 
ply draw your interface on the 
screen, much [ike using an ob- 
ject-oriented paint program, 
and then whte code to tell the 
program what to do when 
something happens. For exam- 
ple, if a user clicks on a com- 
mand button in your program, 
you need only write the code 
for that button click. List box- 
es, text-editing windows, and 
all other interface objects 
work in the same way. 

This event- oriented program- 
ming style is the key to VB's 
ease of use, Since you write 
less code to make your pro- 
gram work, you can concen- 
trate on the important code, 
rather than on code that sim- 
ply displays your program. Us- 
ing language syntax familiar 
to all BASIC programmers, 
VB makes writing simple pro- 
grams fast and easy. While 
Windows programming was 
once the province of dedicat- 
ed C or C++ experts, anyone 
willing to learn some new 
rules can use VB 2,0 to cre- 
ate professional-quality Win- 
dows applications and utili- 



ties. Since you can also ac- 
cess most of the commands 
embedded in the Windows 
API, you can even extend VB 
far beyond its own internal 
statements. 

There are two VB packag- 
es: Standard and Profession- 
al. The Standard Edition, de- 
signed for casual or personal 
use, lists for $199. The Profes- 
sional Edition, listed at $495, 
includes enhancements more 
advanced programs need. 
You can begin with the Stan- 
dard Edition and upgrade if 
you want. Both packages 
have good documentation 
and extensive online help. An 
online tutorial and plenty of 
sample code and applica- 
tions also ease the transition 
from DOS programming. 

Both editions offer im- 
proved performance over the 
original VB. Programs general- 
ly run about 20 percent fast- 
er. A program's EXE file is 
now smaller, although the 
VBRUN200.DLL runtime li- 
brary needed for all programs 
has grown. The program de- 
sign environment is also im- 
proved; you now get a sepa- 
rate window for setting the 
properties, like color, fonts. 



and size of objects (such as 
command buttons, list box- 
es). Since this window can al- 
ways be onscreen, setting an 
object's properties is fast. An 
icon-based toolbar also 
makes programming easier^ 
you click on an icon to carry 
out most functions in the devel- 
opment environment. 

New graphics controls let 
you insert bitmapped images 
in your program or draw 
lines, boxes, and circles with- 
out using as much precious 
Windows memory as needed 
with version 1,0. The program 
also offers support for Win- 
dows OLE (Object Linking 
and Embedding) plus a 
spreadsheetlike grid control 
from the earlier Professional 
Toolkit, You also get support 
for the fvlultiple Document in- 
terface (MDI), a huge array li- 
brary for arrays larger than 
64K, and tools to create auto- 
mated installation systems for 
your applications. 

Other programming tasks, 
too, get a boost, with im- 
proved debugging features 
like watch and break expres- 
sions. You can also select mul- 
tiple controls and set com- 
mon properties for all of them 



66 COMPUTE JULY 1993 



in a single step. A new varia- 
ble type, called Variant, can 
substitute for any variable 
type, such as Integer or 
String; and you can shift be- 
tween variable types automat- 
ically when needed. Using Var- 
iant, you don't have to con- 
vert a numerical variable to a 
string variable to display it in 
a text area onscreen. 

With the Professional Edi- 
tion, you get additional tools, 
such as a communications 
module, a help compiler for 
creating full-scale hypertext 
help systems, support for the 
MAPI E-mail system, ODBC 
database libraries, and more. 
Custom controls available on- 
ly in the Professional Edition in- 
clude a group of 3-D controls 
like command buttons and 
check boxes, an animated 
command button, access to 
the Windows Common Dialog 
w/indows, multimedia controls, 
controls specific to pen- 
based computers, plus a hand- 
ful of other useful additions. 
For programming profession- 
als, the additional features 
are well worth the cost. 

Overall, the additional fea- 
tures and improvements in 
both VB 2.0 editions are very 
welcome and help keep VB 
well ahead of competitors 
like GEA Basic and Turbo Pas- 
cal for Windows. It's still by 
far the easiest development 
system you can find for Win- 
dows, and it's a pleasure to 
work with 

That said, however, VB is 
not the be-all and end-all for 
Windows programming. A 
number of limitations keep it 
from becoming the only lan- 
guage Windows program- 
mers need. Eirst, its inability 
to use Windows API functions 
that require callbacks keeps 
VB programmers from access- 
ing some important Windows 



tools, such as setting printer 
options without user input. Elir- 
ther technical limitations in- 
clude an inability to use point- 
ers to memory locations and 
a requirement that a runtime li- 
brary be included with each 
program. While VB can use Dy- 
namic Link Libraries (DLL) to 
extend the language, it can- 
not create them— a particular- 
ly annoying limitation for ad- 
vanced programmers, who 
must turn to other languages 
to create modular extensions 
to VB. 

Then, too, while fvlicrosoft 
fixed some bugs that 
plagued VB 1.0, it introduced 
some new problems in 2.0. Es- 
pecially irritating is a bug 
which sometimes causes pro- 
grams that run perfectly in the 
development environment to 
crash after being compiled. 
There's an easy way to work 
around this bug, but it's a both- 
er. A bug in the Professional 
Edition's Common Dialog 
tools makes the Printer dialog 
difficult to use, requiring addi- 
tional code to change the de- 
fault printer from within a VB 
program. Microsoft acknowl- 
edges these problems and of- 
fers work-around solutions, 
but the company apparently 
has no plans to issue an Inter- 
im version of the language. 

A final limitation can cause 
problems for some users. 
While you can effortlessly dis- 
play bitmapped graphics on- 
screen, it's very difficult to 
send them to the printer. In- 
deed, there's no direct meth- 
od in VB itself to print graph- 
ics and text on the same 
page. Printing bitmaps 
means using a complicated 
set of Windows API com- 
mands and, even then, it's al- 
most impossible to print graph- 
ics on a PostScript printer with- 
out purchasing an add-on li- 



brary from another source. 

Fortunately, an entire indus- 
try has already grown up 
around VB. Vendors like Cres- 
cent Software and MicroHelp 
offer extensive add-on librar- 
ies. These libraries, which be- 
come part of the VB develop- 
ment environment, extend the 
language and fill in the gaps 
fylicrosoft left. VB's popularity 
also means that support on fo- 
rums such as fvSSBASIC on 
CompuServe is excellent, with 
many advanced users offering 



IBM PC or 
coniDalibie (SOZSS 
comiiatjtile); IMB 
RAM; Hercuies, 
EGA, VGA, or better 
graphics; one liigti- 
density floppy 
drive and one hard 
drive with 18MB 
free; Winitows 3.0 
or higher; mouse 




solutions for VB problems and 
even free add-on libraries, f^i- 
crosoft, too, is active on the 
CompuServe support forum, of- 
fering solutions for many prob- 
lems and answers to tough 
technical questions. 

All in all. Visual Basic 2.0 is 
the ideal way to get started in 
Windows programming. Its 
ease of use and extendible 
power may make it the per- 
fect platform for most program- 
mers, especially for creating 
uncomplicated appiications 
and utilities. If you have any 
desire to create personal or 
professional applications for 
Windows, definitely look into 
this development system. 

Circle Reader Service Number 391 



recommended— 
$199 (Standard 
Edition), S495 
(Professional 
Edition) 

MICROSOFT 
One Microsoft Way 
Redmond, WA 
98052-6399 
(800) 426-9400 



JULY f993 COMPUTE 67 



PERSONAL PRODUCTIVITY 



Rosalind Resnick 



When it comes to 

financing your lieast 

take tfie time to 

crunch the numbers. 

Vbu miglit be 

surprised at the 

hidden costs. 



LEASING VERSUS 
BUYING 

Flip through just about any 
newspaper or magazine 
these days, and you're sure to 
find ads for cut-rate comput- 
ers. With computer prices in a 
virtual free fall, millions of com- 
puter users are finding it diffi- 
cult to justify not upgrading to 
an 80386 or 80486 with the lat- 
est features. And no matter 
what computer you buy or 
where you make your pur- 
chase, it's hard to overpay. 

Even so. there's more to 
shopping for computers than 
simply deciding how much 
RAM you want and how big a 
hard drive to get. To entice 
shoppers to part with their mon- 
ey, computer dealers nation- 
wide are offering not only low 
prices but seductive lease 
deals, too. Let's face it: If 
you're just starting a business, 
you may not have enough mon- 
ey to buy a new computer 
with cash, but you might easi- 
ly be able to afford a monthly 
payment that costs little more 
than a business lunch with a 
new ciient. 

The troubfe is that some 
computer leases are far more 
costly than they first appear. 
Recently, one national comput- 
er chain ran a newspaper ad 
offering a brand-new 25-MHz 
386SX IBM-compatible com- 
puter for $1,150. It also of- 
fered buyers the option of fi- 
nancing their purchase with a 
three-year, $42.55-a-month 
lease — and buying the comput- 
er for $1.00 when the lease 
term was up. 

The beauty of the lease, of 
course, is that you don't have 
to tie up that SI, 150 right now 
(assuming that you have the 
money in the first place). And 
you don't have to tie up your 
credit cards, either, leaving 
you free to spend on other 
things. 

So is leasing the better 



deal'' Not really. 

In preparing this story, I 
asked my accountant. Art 
Berkowitz of Mission Viejo. Cal- 
ifornia, to crunch the numbers 
and compare the two options. 
What he found out amazed 
me. Leasing the computer for 
three years would cost 
$1 ,532.80 (including the SI .00 
you'd pay at the end of the 
lease to buy it) — only $0.08 
less than you'd pay to finance 
it with a credit card at the stan- 
dard 21-percent interest rate! 
(In fact, Berkowitz says, what 
the chain bills as a lease is ac- 
tually more like a financing ar- 
rangement than a true lease, 
in which you pay only for the 
use of the computer and not 
the retail cost.) 

That's why, Berkowitz says, 
the most economical way to 
buy a new computer is with 
cash, unless your business is 
so hot that you can invest the 
money in your company and 
reap double-digit returns. 

"For the person who has 
the funds available, cash is 
the best way to buy almost all 
of the time," Berkowitz says, 
"Only if you're making more 
from your business than you'd 
payout in interest, [or] if you're 
squeezed for cash, does it 
make sense to finance your 
computer purchase." 

Even if you don't have the 
money, Berkowitz says, there 
are some other options to con- 
sider. Your credit card, for 
one. Though many credit 
cards charge interest as high 
as 21 percent, some cards of- 
fer lower rates, occasionally 
as low as 10 to 15 percent, to 
customers who have good 
credit ratings. Many newspa- 
pers publish a list of low-rate 
credit cards in their business 
sections. 

By charging the computer 
on your credit card, you can 
pay off your purchase as fast 
or as slowly as you like. If your 
business kicks into high gear 
sooner than you expected, for 



example, you can pay off the 
computer more quickly. If 
sales are sluggish for a while, 
you have the option of making 
only the minimum monthly pay- 
mients until things get rolling. 
Under the terms of most leas- 
es, Berkowitz says, you're 
stuck making the same month- 
ly payments until the lease 
term is up, forcing you to con- 
tinue financing your purchase 
at high interest rates even 
when you can afford to pay it 
off completely 

Another option is a home eq- 
uity line of credit. Because a 
home equity credit line is se- 
cured {that is, the equity in 
your house acts as collateral 
for the loan), banks are willing 
to lend you money at lower 
rates than you'd get with a cred- 
it card. In fact, many banks 
are so eager to lend you mon- 
ey that they'll waive all the 
fees and costs involved in do- 
ing the papenA/ork and assess- 
ing your home's value. While 
it doesn't make sense to mort- 
gage your house just to buy a 
computer, a home equity cred- 
it line might make sense if 
you're starting a business and 
need, say, $10,000 in working 
capital. 

"A home equity loan makes 
sense as long as you remem- 
ber the biggest caveat of all, 
which is that you could lose 
your home," Berkowitz says. 
"And frankly, that scares me to 
death." 

The bottom line: When shop- 
ping for a computer, it's just as 
important to check out the 
fine print on the financing con- 
tract as it is to read the reviews 
in the computer magazines. 
And if you're not so handy 
with a calculator, there are plen- 
ty of software programs (and 
accountants) that can crunch 
the numbers for you. 

Remember: The old adage 
"Let the buyer beware" ap- 
plies not just to shopping for 
computers but also to paying 
for them. □ 



68 COMPUTE JULY 1993 



^ 


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— • RSZffiStt 





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IB" -- 



ETA, Autumn 1993. 






1^800- WEB-FEET 



Circle Reader Service Number 280 



MULTIMEDIA PC 



David English 



Encarta is so good 
you no longer 

have an excuse for 
not owning a 

CD-ROIVI drive and 
sound card. 



THE WORLD 
ON A PLATTER 

Until recently, you could sum 
up the major CD-ROM encyclo- 
pedias like this: One has bet- 
ter multimedia, while the other 
has better text. The better mul- 
timedia encyclopedia has 
been Compton's Interactive 
Encyclopedia (Compton's New- 
Media, 2320 Camino Vida 
Roble, Carlsbad, California 
92009; 619-929-2500; $395). 
Formerly called Compton's 
Multifvledia Encyclopedia, it 
has introduced several innova- 




tive techniques for gathehng 
up electronic inforrTiation. 

The better text encyclope- 
dia has been The New Grolier 
Multimedia Encyclopedia (Gro- 
lier Electronic Publishing, Sher- 
man Turnpike, Danbury, Con- 
necticut 06816; 800-356- 
5590; $395). Its text is written 
on a higher grade level than 
Compton's, with many of its ar- 
ticles penned by experts in 
their respective fields. 

Duhng the last nine months, 
Grolier has worked hard to 
close the interface gap by final- 
ly introducing a Windows ver- 
sion of its encyclopedia. It's 
much easier to use than the ear- 
lier DOS version. Compton's 
has responded with its new Vir- 
tual Workspace technology 
that more closely approximates 
how we collect information in 
the real world (sort of a books- 
open-and-scattered-in-a-logi- 



cal-order approach). 

Just when things had settled 
into a predictable two-way com- 
petition, along comes Microsoft 
to shake everything up. Micro- 
soft's entry in the world-on-a- 
platter sweepstakes is called 
Microsoft Encarta Multimedia 
Encyclopedia (Microsoft, One 
Microsoft Way Redmond, Wash- 
ington 98052; 800-426-9400; 
$395). Ouite simply it's one of 
the best nnultimedia applica- 
tions I've seen. While the 
25,000 articles that Microsoft 
has taken from the Funk & Wag- 
nails' Encyclopedia may not be 
as strong as the 33,000 articles 
contained in Gro- 
lier, Microsoft 
has added so 
much additional 
information and 
organized the 
material so well 
that Encarta is 
easily the most 
browsable and 
usable of the 
three products. 
Like Comp- 
ton's and Groli- 
er, Encarta of- 
fers a time line for a chronologi- 
cal view of events, an atlas for 
a geographical view of events, 
and a knowledge tree for a con- 
ceptual view of events. All 
three CD-ROM encyclopedias 
let you get at their vast bodies 
of knowledge by letting you 
choose the most appropriate 
path. This multiple-path ap- 
proach lets you follow from one 
fact to another until you've ex- 
plored a series of connections 
guided by your own interests. 
Encarta improves on the mul- 
tiple-path approach by offering 
a more logical structure and 
building up the components 
that are best suited to multime- 
dia. The overriding structure for 
Encarta is its 93 categories, 
which include 9 primary catego- 
ries (Physical Science and Tech- 
nology; Life Science; Geogra- 
phy; History; Social Science; 
Religion and Philosophy; Art, 



70 COMPUTE JULY 1993 



Language, and Literature; Per- 
forming Arts; and Sports, 
Games, Hobbies, and Pets) 
and 84 subcategories. For in- 
stance, the primary category of 
Performing Arts includes the 
subcategories of Music; Musi- 
cal Instruments; Musicians and 
Composers; Dance; Theater; 
and Cinema, Television, and 
Broadcasting. Once in a subcat- 
egory it's easy to view a list of 
each entry in that subcategory, 
browse each entry in alphabet- 
ical order, or switch to a new cat- 
egory or subcategory By stress- 
ing a categorical organization, 
Microsoft has recognized how 
we learn best: by exploring a 
group of associated ideas and 
then jumping to a related 
group of associated ideas. 

Wherever possible, Micro- 
soft has added material to 
Funk & Wagnalls' Encyclope- 
dia to exploit the new medium 
of multimedia. Fully half the CD- 
ROM is made up of images 
and audio, with another 10 per- 
cent devoted to animations and 
videos. 

For example, the Gallery sec- 
tion, where you can quickly 
browse Encarta's 7000 photo- 
graphs and seven hours of au- 
dio, includes a Special Lists but- 
ton. Included among the spe- 
cial lists is a Foreign Language 
Samples list, which, when com- 
bined with the automatic slide 
show, lets you sample common 
words and phrases (spoken by 
native speakers) from 46 na- 
tions and cultures, A slide 
show of World and Folk Music 
offers a similar tour with a gen- 
erous helping of musical exam- 
ples and stunning pictures. 

I could go on and on about 
the gems of wisdom you'll dis- 
cover as you explore Encarta. 
Suffice it to say. if you're the 
tyfDe who can spend hours in 
a library moving from one refer- 
ence book to another, this is 
the one product that will make 
it worth your while to buy a CD- 
ROM dhve and sound card. 
It's that good. a 




Role Playing Then 



You push a button. You open a door. Leave the life of paperwork and laundry, of squalling kids and car trouble. 

Enter new worlds. Of adventure. Horror. Magic. Love. Death. Solve a mystery. Save a kingdom. Live by your wits, tap 

the reserves. Find out who you are, the sruff you're made of With the power of 1300 floppies on a single disc, 

CD-ROM LETS YOU ESCAPE INTO THE DEPTHS OF YOUR OWN IMAGINATION. 




Role Playing Now 



Video clips from David Lynch's cult 
film of Frank Herbert's famed sci-fi epic 
heighten ilve reality of DUNE"; as you 
battle to control production of the 
consciousness-expanding spice Melange, 



THE 7TH GUEST"; assembles a cast of 23 
actors I 24, including you| in the world's 
first true Interactive Drama'", set inside 
the haunted hilltop mansion of twisted 
loymaker Henry Stauf. 



In FABLES AND FIENDS'": THE 
LEGEND OF KYRANDIA", you are 

the rightful prince of Kyrandia who 
must tecover the precious Kyragem, the 
source of all the magic in the land. 



Circle Reader Service Number 122 

IHE 7IH tXtST <«J Inwcta Dk™ .™ i™d.r«Ai d Vi^ Go~M. I« ond t.k*^. In,, e i Mi . .g- G=™. i^ ^ Tr.ob,*, kK. Al .^» .«,^ FAfllES 4 FINDS »d ™ lEOEW Of KySAMM 




ART WORKS 



Robert Bixby 



A specialty paper 

supplier will make 

any desktop 

publishing project 

easier and 

more attractive. 



WHO ARE YOU? 

As the hit song by The Who 
says, "I really want to know." 
I'd be interested to know what 
software you're using and 
what you're using it for. If you 
have a moment to spare, drop 
me a letter or postcard to tip 
me off. Desktop publishing 
has become so widespread, 
and desktop publishers are en- 
gaged in such a broad array 
of activities, I feel the need to 
focus on the things that are of 
most benefit to you. I want to 
provide information that will 
directly assist you in the kinds 
of projects you are pursuing. 
If you have tips or ideas that 
make publishing easier or 
more rewarding, I'm interested 
in hearing those, too. If I use 
your tip in the column, I'll give 
you full credit (and maybe 
something extra besides). 

Here's what I've been up to. 
Recently I've been involved in 
making my bocks more visual- 
ly interesting by using different 
kinds of paper. In the begin- 
ning, I simply used a card- 
stock cover, usually in buff or 




gray because those were the 
most attractive cardslocks 
available from my printer. 

What finally drove me to 
search for alternative sources 
of paper was a book I was put- 
ting together for a poet who 
used very long lines. I decid- 
ed the easiest way to present 
her material Vtias by using sad- 
dle-stitched legal-size paper 
to yield a 7- X 8'/?-inch page 
(as opposed to my standard 
5V?- X 8'/2-inch page, I could 
find iegahsize paper in many 
different colors and textures, 
but I also needed cardstock in 
a precut 8M'- x 14-inch size to 
make the cover I couldn't find 
anyone who stocked it, and no 
one would provide it in the 
quantity needed (75 sheets). 

Finally, serendipity took a 
hand in my quest when I re- 
ceived, unsolicited, the Paper 
Direct catalog (Paper Direct, 
205 Chubb Avenue, Lynd- 
hurst, New Jersey 0707 1 ; 800- 
272-7377). If you haven't 
seen this little collection of spe- 
cialty papers, you're in for a 
treat. All you need to do is call 
to get a free catalog. 

About half of the catalog is 
filled with specially printed pa- 
per for letterhead, invitations, 
presentations, and pam- 
phlets. If you think you can't af- 
ford to print up a four-color 
pamphlet, buy a box of beau- 
tifully colored pamphlets from 
Paper Direct and fill them in 
with your information. 

The other half of the catalog 
is a desktop publisher's 
dream. I won't say that every 
weight and color of paper is 
available (only three colors of 
cardstock were available in 
the size I wanted, for exam- 
ple — white, pale gray, and 
pale blue), but a wide enough 
variety is available to meet 
virtually any need. Paper Di- 
rect has many different kinds 
of recycled paper, textured pa- 
per, and even translucent vel- 
lum in many different styles. 

Because its primary custom- 



ers are desktop publishers, Pa- 
per Direct also provides tips 
on using its papers, mainte- 
nance supplies for Hewlett- 
Packard laser printers, and in- 
teresting, hard-to-find items 
like foil, a pamphlet folder, and 
a paper recycler you can use 
to make your own paper out of 
scrap, A minimum order is $30 
(plus $6 for UPS shipping; the 
charge is slightly more for over- 
night delivery). With your first 
order, you can request a 
sampler containing a sheet of 
each type of paper offered by 
the company and a fan of pa- 
per strips to simplify ordering, 

A couple of months ago, I 
mentioned the nVIEW line of 
video projectors. Since then a 
couple of other very interest- 
ing product announcements 
have crossed my desk. The 
Eiki (pronounced "achy" as in 
"achy, breaky wallet") LC-300 
provides up to a 300-inch pro- 
jection picture (diagonal meas- 
ure) of any composite video im- 
age for $4,395, To use this 
with a computer, you would al- 
so need a VGA-to-composite 
converter, The LC-200 pro- 
vides a 200-inch picture for 
$3,995. Expensive, yes. But a 
video display 15 x 20 feet in 
size (10 X 13-3 feet for the LC- 
200) is bound to impress. To 
find out more, write or call Eiki 
International at 26794 Vista Ter- 
race Drive, Lake Forest, Cali- 
fornia 92630: (714) 457-0200, 

Another product that will in- 
terest people making traveling 
presentations is the Cruiser 
notebook computer. This com- 
puter features a detachable 
translucent LCD screen that 
can be used with an overhead 
projector. It has a 25-MHz 
386SL chip, built-in trackball, 
fax/data modem, removable 
hard disk, and an optional ex- 
ternal 16-bit expansion bus. 
To learn more, contact Rever 
Computer at 8F, Number 2, Al- 
ley 6, Lane 235, Pao Chiao 
Road, Hsin Tien, Taipei, Tai- 
wan, Republic of China, n 



72 



COMPUTE JULY 1993 



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Earn good money fiill-time, 

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There's no doubl atiout it: Businesses spend billions of dollars 
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sendee and support That's why Department of Labor 
Statistics show skyrocketing employment opportunities 
for PC troiibleshooters — people with the hands-on skUl 
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Now with NRI, you can be the one "in-the-know" when 
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Your trainmg includes a powerful 
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NRI training gives you a practical understantUng 
of today's PCs...how Oiey work, what can go wrong, 
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As you work with your computer 

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NRl's step-by-step lessons and unique hands-on Discovery Learning 
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((I've located the 
pwblem. Your 
data lias been 
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==^ 




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If the coupon is missing, write to NRI Schools, McGraw-Hill 
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SEND TODAY FOR YOUR FREE NRI CATALOG! 



SCHOOLS .McGraw-Hill Coniinuing Ediiration Center 

4401 Connerticut Avenue, MV, Washington, DC 20008 




WCheck one FREE catalog only 



3 PC Troubleshooter 

n PrograJiiniing in C++ with 

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4537-0793^ 



DISCOVERY CHOICE 



See strange and exotic creatures 

from around the world when you visit the San 

Diego Zoo — in your own living room. 

David Sears 



THE ANIMALS! 

See lions and tigers and 
bears and more wlien you vis- 
it the world-famous San Die- 
go Zoo. Don't think you can af- 
ford the plane fare and hotel 
accomodations (not to men- 
tion the time off from work)? If 
you own a CD-ROfvl drive, 
you can send your favorite 
youngsters all the way to San 
Diego without their having to 
leave your home — for a very 
reasonable fee. The Animals!, 
a true multimedia tour de 
force featuring the San Diego 
Zoo, makes this thp possible, 
and it's more than worth its 
price of admission. 

The Software Toolworks 
took advantage of the vast 
world available on a CD-ROM 
drive and made The Animals! 
almost as much fun and as 
easy to explore as the real 
zoo. After loading the pro- 
gram but before you even 
reach the fvlain menu, you 
have the option to browse 
through exfiibits by looking 
up animals by name. You sim- 
ply click on the appropriate 
icon on the title screen, and a 
windowful of animal names, 
all alphabetically listed, ap- 
pears. Click on the name of 
any animal, and you'll see the 
animal beautifully and very 
sharply digitized before you. 
The Animals! creators did a 
fantastic job both collecting 
and transferring the visual da- 
ta to disk. From the title 
screen, you can also click on 
the Sky Tram icon for an over- 
view of the zoo's exhibits, or 
you can click on the tvlain 
fvlenu icon, which opens the 
fvlain fvlenu map, On to the 
zoo! 

The Main IvSenu is essential- 
ly a large map divided into 
sections. These sections in- 
clude Tropical Rain Forest, 




Montane, Tundra, Desert, Is- 
land, Grassland, Savanna, 
Temperate Forest, Taiga — all 
the earth's biomes. The Ani- 
mals', like the San Diego Zoo, 
displays its animals in sur- 
roundings that approximate 
their natural habitats. The 
map also includes the Center 
for the Reproduction of Endan- 
gered Species (CRES). a 
Kids section, a Storybook The- 
ater, a Nursery, and a Tours 
booth, among other things. At 
the CRES, you can learn 
what the zoo does to repopu- 
late dwindling species. At the 
Storybook Theater, you can 
watch films about the zoo and 
its inhabitants. The Kids sec- 
tion even contains a few quiz- 
zes. There are hours of fun 
and learning to be spent 
here. 

Navigating The Animals! 
does not consume much of 
your time — it's faster than walk- 
ing to exhibits at the actual 
San Diego Zoo. At the top of 
the Main Menu, you'll find the 
Navigation Palette, which 
holds a band of command but- 
tons that allow you to travel 
quickly to any point in the 
zoo. These are simple 
enough to operate, and you 
can move forward or back- 
v/ard one exhibit, jump to any 
exhibit within the biome that 



you selected, and summon ex- 
tensive online help related to 
your situation. A Copy to Disk 
option allows you to fill the Win- 
dows Clipboard with text or 
graphics data from The Ani- 
mals!. If you ever seem lost, 
it's very easy to retrace your 
footsteps: You simply click on 
the Go Back icon (which dis- 
plays a list of all the places 
you've visited so far). 

You may also locate ani- 
mals by searching for key- 
words such as bird or tiger. 
Clicking on the Media Library 
icon presents you with a list 
of all the pictures, video 
clips, and sounds found on 
the disc, 

When you discover an inter- 
esting animal, you may read 
about it in the text window or 
view the snapshots and vide- 
os of it in the picture window. 
Just click on the necessary 
icons, and in a second or 
(wo, the show begins. Other 
icons include the Information 
Profile, which offers a summa- 
ry of the exhibit; a Kid's Plan- 
et, which features a simplified 
overview for younger zoogo- 
ers; an Endangered Species 
section; and more. 

Before any of this matters, 
though, you have to choose a 
section of the zoo to visit. To 



74 



COMPUTE JULY 1993 



do this, examine the Main 
IVIenu map, clioose a biome, 
and clicl< on it. Tine Animals! 
transports you to the first ex- 
hibit in that particular section. 
Now, the fun really begins. 
The San Diego Zoo is home 
to more than just lions and el- 
ephants, and finding these 
more unusual creatures can 
prove enlightening as well as 
entertaining as you use the 
Text and Audio/Visual options 
to explore links between one 
animal and another. 

For instance, while I was vis- 
iting the grasslands, I came 
across the greater prairie 
chicken exhibit. This less pop- 
ular animal had only a single 
color snapshot and a single 
sound on disc. The text win- 
dow did little to liven up the 
display with its brief summary, 
but it did mention that the prai- 
rie chicken and the blue pea- 
cock are related. So, I ex- 
plored the text-media link by 
first clicking on the A/V Links 
icon; this led me to the Califor- 
nia quail. I went to the top of 
the screen to click on the 
Next Exhibit icon, passed by 
a number of exhibits that wer- 
en't particularly interesting to 
me — all still in the grasslands, 
of course — and stopped to 
stare at a peculiar bunch of an- 
imals, the meerkats. 

Cute and ferretlike, they war- 
ranted a few minutes study 
and observation time. I click- 
ed on the Facts and Figures 
icon to quickly read up on the 
little creatures. It turns out 
that they're related to the slen- 
der-tailed mongoose: are na- 
tive to Angola, Namibia, 
Botswana, and South Africa; 
and love to eat eggs. 

The Animals! let me down 
a bit at this point, however. 
The meerkats' "chitchat," 
which is mentioned in the 
text, wasn't used as a sam- 



pled sound in the A/V Links 
menu. The meerkats did get 
to star in their own short vid- 
eo, however, and their exhibit 
sported four additional snap- 
shots besides. 

The playback panel for the 
video clips appears after you 
click on a video clip's icon. It 
offers Play, Pause, Frame Ad- 
vance, Frame Rewind, Re- 
wind, and Fast Forward but- 
tons — and all work exactly as 
you'd expect, though the 
Frame Forward and Frame Re- 
wind do cause the otherwise 
smooth playback to jar and 
display some disorganized pix- 
els for a moment. 

Also, the playback can be 
viewed in any of three 
modes: 160 x 120, 320 x 
240, or full screen. The larger 
the display area, the blockier 
the images become. If you 
want the finest resolution, you 
should select the smallest dis- 
play area option on the Cus- 
tomization menu. But if you 
want to view a reasonably 
sized movie, you should go 
with the 320 x 240 display 
mode. The fantastic, high-qual- 
ity sounds remain synchro- 
nized with the images, no mat- 
ter what image size you've 
selected. 

The meerkat exhibit also 
contains a Kid's World icon la- 
beled Crazy Ways. I clicked 
on this and read some of the 
more amusing and peculiar de- 
tails of meerkat life. The text 
seems considerate of young 
readers and contains as 
much information as kids prob- 
ably could retain from a visit 
to the zoo. This is, alas, also 
the major weakness of The An- 
imals!: It provides as much in- 
formation as a trip to the zoo 
and can show you pictures of 
the animals there, but it often 
doesn't include an overwhelm- 
ing amount of factual detail. 



Certainly the extensive on- 
line bibliography will aid any- 
one who is interested in re- 
searching meerkats or other 
of the less-famous zoo ani- 
mals, but much more informa- 
tion could've gone onto this 
CD-ROfvl program than the 
amount that goes onto the ex- 
hibit placards at the actual 
zoo in San Diego. 

Don't think The Animals! is 
run-of-the-mill, would-be mul- 
timedia PC (MFC) fare, 
though: The Software 
Toolworks did an outstanding 



Windows version; IBM 
PC or compatible 
(803B6 compatible), 
2MB RAM. SVGA, 
Windows 3.1, CD-ROM 
drive. MFC- 
compatible sound 
card, mouse~$1 19.95 
DOS version: IBM PC 
or compatible (16- 
MHz 802S6 or taster), 
1MB RAM or higher 
wttti extended 




job of packaging more than 
82 short films on a single CD- 
ROfVI, along with 1300 256- 
color pictures, 2500 pages of 
text, and 2'/? hours of sound 
data. The DOS (non-CD) ver- 
sion offers fewer options but re- 
tains all the educational val- 
ue. But the real deal is the CD- 
ROfvl version. Its incredible im- 
ages, animation, and sound 
will motivate you to learn 
about all the animals in the 
San Diego Zoo. 

If The Animals! is any indi- 
cation of the next wave of 
fvlPC products, an upgrade to 
CD-ROfvl would make a most 
worthy investment. □ 

Circle Reader Service Number 392 



-.am 
a drive 
wiii) 2iVlB iree, CD- 
ROM drive wilb 135- 
Kl)5 transfer rate, 
Microsoft Extensions 
tor CD-ROM 2.1 or 
tiigher— 8119.95 

THE SOFTWARE 
TOOLWORKS 
60 Leveroni CL 
NovatD. CA 94949 
(3Q0) 234-3088 



JULY 1993 COMPUTE 75 



GAME INSIDER 



Shay Addams 




•«• ■fT>, * : 



EVERYTHING'S 
COMING UP ACES 

Following up on last year's hit, 
Aces of the Pacific, ace design- 
er Damon Slye has turned in 
his latest tour de force with 
Aces over Europe. The P-51 
Mustang, the Me 109 and Me 
262 fighters, and many other 
g war birds seen in World War II 
i| games are incfuded. One nov- 
el addition is the German Ara- 
do, a light jet bomber. Surpris- 
ingly missing, though, is the Ju- 
87 Stuka, Nazi Germany's 
main dive bomber 




Aces incorporates 

more ground action 

as it moves 

from t)ie Pacific to 

the European 

llieater, but you'll 

still see plenty 

of stomach-ctiurning 

dogflgtits. 



The action, spanning 
events from D-day to the end 
of the war in Europe, unfolds 
across your screen in much 
the same manner as in Aces 
of the Pacific. You choose a 
side and the branch of service- 
and then begin a series of mis- 
sions based on the historical 
research of Dynamix's in- 
house war historian, John Brun- 
ing. Another part of the pro- 
gram allows you to practice 
specific mission types or dog- 
fights on either side. 

Aces over Europe employs 
new flight models and an en- 
hanced version of Slye's 3- 
Space graphics system, Major 
differences in the new game 
are that it incorporates a great- 
er and more detailed empha- 
sis on ground attacks, reflect- 



ing the nature of the war in 
Europe, and that the dogfights 
are even more stomach churn- 
ing than in the ohginal Aces. 
Improved polygon graphics 
now show legible insignia on 
the planes, so you'll know 
which enemy squadron you're 
fighting. And each enemy 
plane in an engagement is 
now numbered, enabling you 
to know which pilot you're chas- 
ing — or which is about to 
shoot you out of the sky 

While most games released 
for CD-ROM have been mini- 
mally enhanced versions of 
the programs available first on 
floppy disks. Spectrum Holo- 
Byte's new Iron Helix was de- 
signed specifically for CD- 
ROM by CJrew Pictures. It's an 
action adventure with a sci- 
ence-fiction scenario reminis- 
cent of Suspended, Infocom's 
classic all-text adventure. 

The goal in Iron Helix is to 
track down certain DNA sam- 
ples on an abandoned space- 
ship. To explore the six-level 
ship, you must direct the ac- 
tions of a remote-control 
probe as it travels throughout 
the corridors and rooms. The 
obstacle is the ship's security 
probe, The security probe de- 
tects your probe's every move 
and tries to blow it away. 
Graphics and animation look 
sharp on a screen divided in- 
to four quadrants. One quad- 
rant depicts a television view 
of the probe's vicinity the oth- 
er quadrants show icon- 
based commands and other el- 
ements of the interface. Iron 
Helix is available for Macin- 
tosh as well as the PC. 

With the recent release of a 
MiG-29 mission disk. Spec- 
trum HoioByte has added yet 
more life to what remains the 
v/orid's top jet flight sim. The 
new missions are set in the 
same theaters that appear in 
the original game. This time, 
however, you can fly one of 
the other side's craft — the MiG- 
29 Fulcrum, one of the few 



light fighters to employ Be- 
yond Visual Range capability, 
a capability which the F-16 
doesn't possess. What may 
prove even more fun than the 
new missions is the opportuni- 
ty to choose either the F-16 or 
MiG-29 in a head-to-head 
game played via modem. 

A pair of new mission disks 
for X-Wing offers more chal- 
lenges for veterans who have 
already completed the first 
two Tours of Duty. LucasArts 
is calling the new mission 
disks Space Combat Tours. 
The first of these, which pro- 
vides another series of mis- 
sions set in the Star Wars uni- 
verse, should be out by the 
time you read this. By early 
fall, look for another mission 
disk that will include a new 
craft^the B-Wing— in addi- 
tion to a new Tour of Duty, And 
if they prove popular with the 
public. LucasArts will turn out 
at least one more X-Wing mis- 
sion disk. (There is, however, 
no truth to the rumor that X- 
Wing designer Lawrence Hol- 
land and Wing Commander de- 
signer Chris Roberts are team- 
ing up for a joint production 
called X-Wing Commander.) 

For X-Wing and the super- 
realistic air combat sims of the 
1990s, a new breed of joystick 
has emerged with lots more 
buttons for all the sophisticat- 
ed flight commands. The lat- 
est entry is the Gravis Pro. dis- 
tinguished by adjustable ten- 
sion and a pair of extra but- 
tons. The buttons correspond 
to the buttons on a second joys- 
tick (which many major flight 
Sims support for various fea- 
tures). The tightest of the ad- 
justable-tension settings 
makes it far easier to fly jets 
that require a light touch (like 
the Harrier in Domark's AV-8B 
Harrier Assault), especially if 
you tend to overcontrol and 
wind up like me: out of control. 
When set at one of the four loos- 
er positions, the Gravis Pro is 
at home in action games. O 



76 



COtVlPUTE JULY 1993 



^ INTRODUCING 

THE EXPERIENCE OF REAL PINBALL 



Distributed Bf 

Broderbund 




f mmsBB\ 






AMTEX. the maker of 
the award-winning and 
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gome. It's the first of 
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to be released in the 
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After chalking up, you'll bank shots, rack up bonus points, 
then shoot for the exciting and elusive Deluxe, All with 
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a must for pinball 
aficionadosl 

y.M... • Imagine all this explo- 

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need for a 

pocket full of 

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you can play 

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Watch for more of the classic games you grew up with... 
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For product information, send your name and address to: AMTEX 
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Circle ReKtor Service Number 157 



ENTERTAINMENT CHOICE 



You'll want to sleep with a 
night-light on after playing this scary 
action-adventure game. 

Peter Olafson 



ALONE IN THE 
DARK 

I sense that some line has 
been crossed; I can't leave 
now — even if I wish to. Even 
the most innocent volume on 
the bookshelf fills me with dis- 
quiet, A rocking horse seems 
to move on its own, and I 
don't like the look of that 
trapdoor. 

I finally spot the piano in a 
distant, shadowed corner of 
the attic and am on my way to- 
ward it when I notice a sugges- 
tion of movement outside the 
window; something tattered 
and ungainly fluttering in the 
air. A wrecked flag, perhaps, 
I imagine, though I recall no 
flagpole. I look more closely, 
it's not a flag. The fluttering 
form looks back at me. It has 
teeth— many teeth. It's almost 
at the window. Help! The 
stairs! The stairs! 

I wish a thousand bless- 
ings upon anyone trapped in 
the wonderful, terrifying 
place that is Alone in the 
Dark. This three-dimensional 
adventure game from the 
French company I ' fvlotion is 
the first computer game I've 
seen that has fear running 
through it like an electric cur- 
rent. Raw emotion is a rare 
enough quality in real life, and 
its appearance in this virtual 
world definitely defines Alone 
as a breakthrough product. 

A line has indeed been 
crossed: Alone is the first of a 
raft of fright bytes that were to 
hit the market in the first half 
of 1993. But it isn't the first of 
the breed, of course. We 
have Accolade's now-niter-en- 
crusted role-playing game 
Don't Go Alone, and Horror- 
soft's two Elviras and the qua- 
si Elvira, Waxworks. But 
there's a delicate line be- 




tween horror and terror: One 
is as easy as turning your eye- 
lids inside out: the other is the 
art of setting you on pins and 
needles. The Elvira games 
may make you recoil at their 
carnage, but they aren't gen- 
uinely scary. 

Alone is genuinely frighten- 
ing without ever being grisly, 
When you run from its horrible 
creatures, you'il do so in shud- 
dering terror. The first time 
you open a door and find 
something unspeakable wait- 
ing for you on the other side, 
something which proceeds to 
advance on you with arms out- 
stretched, you'll feel a genu- 
ine shock. 

The game blurs the line be- 
tween actuaily being there 
and being at home, safely in 
front of a computer. Play it in 
the dark for maximum effect. 
Even writing about it two 
weeks after playing gives me 
the creeps. It's that good. 

The adventure is based on 
the works of the author H, P, 
Lovecraft, who penned won- 
derful horror and fantasy sto- 
ries back in the early part of 
the century. They aren't the 
best stories ever written, but 
they are responsible for cre- 
ating the foundation for a won- 
derful cosmology called 



Cthulhu f\/lythos, which postu- 
lates an ancient monstrous 
race of creatures lying in 
wait, creatures who can be 
gated into this world, invaria- 
bly with disastrous conse- 
quences for the gate opener. 

As Alone opens, the gate 
is wide open and swinging. 
You're cast as either Edward 
Carnby, who is a private detec- 
tive, or Emily Hartwood, who 
is the niece of the last ten- 
ant — who killed himself. You'll 
quickly find that the vague 
agendas found in the docu- 
mentation have little bearing 
on the task at hand. In no 
time you'll be exploring, fight- 
ing for your life, solving puz- 
zles, reading books, and enjoy- 
ing a good deal of stimulating 
action-adventuring 

You get to explore the 
three-story house and its un- 
derpinnings, and they are a 
delightful hybrid of filled poly- 
gons and bitmaps. They're as 
solid and real a place as 
we've visited this side of Ulti- 
ma Underworld. Actually, it is 
not all that dark in this world, 
and you're hardly alone. The 
house comes fully equipped 
with a staff of splendid terrors 
ranging from the mundane 
(like spiders and rats) to the 
completely outrageous (such 



78 COMPUTE JULY 1993 



as a rabbit with a ferocious 
Tyrannosaurus rex head). 

When you begin your adven- 
ture, you're armed with noth- 
ing more than your wits and a 
passing knowledge of karate. 
But if you're nosy enough, 
you'll eventually come across 
more conventional weapons. 
Combat is fun even when 
your weapon of choice 
doesn't quite do what you 
had hoped. The aiming is fun, 
and the enemy's recoil and 
the fine mist of blood are 
nice rewards when you do 
make contact. And your op- 
ponent's collapse and disinte- 
gration into a hail of polygon 
circles — to the distant crackle 
of thunder — are truly satisfy- 
ing. (I prefer to play the 
game with the theme nnusic 
turned off, but the sound ef- 
fects and spot musical effects 
are quite superb.) 

Quite different from that of 
any other game, the perspec- 
tive in Alone is as if you're 
watching your character from 
a trapdoor just above and to 
the side. What's especially 
nice is that the view shifts, 
sometimes a number of 
times, depending on where 
you're standing. Finding the 
different views is fun and 
lends a sense of the house as 
an environment rather than as 
a series of snapshots. This 
haunted house really seems 
to occupy space, inside and 
out: Fights started in one 
room can spill through a door- 
way into another, and the pro- 
gram takes up over 5.5MB of 
hard disk space. 

Alone is very easy to con- 
trol. The keyboard interface is 
almost as transparent as the 
game's ethereal critters. Char- 
acters move around smoothly 
and realistically on a 33-MHz 
80486. You simply hold the 
space bar to invoke your cur- 



rent mode (Fight, Open/ 
Search, Close, or Push), and 
hit Enter to change it or in- 
spect your inventory The com- 
mands available are keyed to 
the designated object, and 
it's easy to change gears on 
the fly. 

You'll quickly acquire a thor- 
ough sense of being a real 
character inhabiting a real 
place. It's a quality that 
seeps into the opening copy 
protection (picking the 
game's 3-D objects from a 
book) and is sustained into 
the save-game mechanism 
(each save is accompanied 
by miniature screen cap- 
tures). 

Alone is very much of a 
piece; it even possesses a 
properly apocalyptic, roof-com- 
ing-down Lovecraftian end- 
ing. And when the game's 
over, delightfully, it's not 
quite over You'll still need to 
make your way back up to 
more civilized surroundings 
and out the front door. Since 
all the unearthly critters have 
been pacified, this is a per- 
fect opportunity for unbridled 
exploration. As you play, 
you'll discover lots of books 
and documents that are use- 
ful but not exactly essential in 
the solution. It's easy to over- 
look them when you're run- 
ning for your life. (Save your 
game anyway: a couple of 
books have decidedly nasty 
properties.) Now's your time 
to enjoy them. 

At the same time, Alone's 
very consistency of tone 
makes doubly disconcerting 
the occasional hiccup in the 
program engine. For in- 
stance, while your character 
may be standing immediately 
in front of a cabinet, both of 
his arms extend to the left of 
it when you move to open it. 
Likewise, toward the end of 



the adventure, when you 
have to explore a decent- 
sized maze, the game sudden- 
ly abandons its multiple cam- 
era angles and adopts an over- 
head perspective similar to 
that used in games like Lu- 
casArts' Indiana Jones and 
the Last Crusade. It's a bit jar- 
ring, and it's unnecessary; the 
designers at I ' Motion might 
have had a bit more respect 
for the purity of their other- 
wise impeccable creation. 
But these complaints are a 



IBM PC or 
compatible (80Z86 
compatible, 80386 
recommended), 
640K RAM, MCGA 
or 25G-color VGA, 
hard disk with 
SifiB free; supports 
Sound Blaster, 
Covox Sound 




small exception rather than 
the rule. 

! truly had a fantastic time 
playing this game — so fantas- 
tic, in fact, that 1 not only fin- 
ished the adventure but also 
went back a second time to 
see if I had missed anything. 
And the morning after I fin- 
ished playing it, after a rest- 
less night of dark and unre- 
membered dreams, I thought 
twice every time I had to 
open a door. 

Alone in the Dark has been 
described as "a poor man's 
7th Guest." We should all be 
so poor! This game is a tri- 
umph of the spirit — in more 
ways than one. □ 

Circle Reader Service Number 393 



Master 2+, Ad Lib, 
and Disney Sound 
Source— $59.95 

I * MOTION 
Distributed by 
interplay 
Productions 
17922 Fitch Ave. 
Irvine, CA 92710 
(8001 9G9-GAME 



JULY 1993 COMPUTE 79 



GAMEPLAY 



Paul C. Schuytema 



PANT YOUR WAY 
TO VICTORY 

When I think of the Olympics, 
the sports that excite me are 
the individual ones like pole 
vaulting and the javelin throw. 
On my PC, I have the oppor- 
tunity to play superathlete, 
trained in a variety of Olympic 
sports and honed to take on 
the best. Summer Challenge 
(Accolade; 800-245-7744; 
$54.95) gives me the chance 
to be the track-and-field ath- 
lete I've always wanted to be. 
It encompasses a wide array 



Experience the 

rush of victory as 

you s!real< 

past the finish line 

or oulshoot, 

outski, and autjunip 

ttie best 

Olympic atliietes. 




of sports, including pole vault- 
ing, throwing the javelin, kay- 
aking, cycling, and hurdling, 
You can even try your abilities 
in archery, the high jump, and 
an equestrian jumping event. 
Control is simple — you use the 
joystick, mouse, or keyboard 
or a combination of the three. 
!n cycling, for example, you 
can use your fingers to tap the 
Enter key for pedaling while 



steering with the joystick. For 
a high-speed sprint, you'll 
want to switch hands midped- 
al, since bashing the Enter key 
is remarkably exhausting. 

In the kayaking event, you 
paddle by pushing the joy- 
stick fonward and turn by mov- 
ing the stick left and right. The 
graphics are smoothly scroll- 
ing 3-D polygons. 

The Carl Lewis Challenge 
(Psygnosis; 617-731-3553; 
$49.99) is another take on the 
Summer Olympic events. In it, 
you control not only the ac- 
tions of the athlete but also the 
rigorous prematch training. 
You play coach to a team of 
athletes, and training can vary 
from isomethcs and circuit train- 
ing to several methods of 
stretching. The individual train- 
ing activities aren't controlled; 
instead, you assign workouts 
with varying levels of intensity 
and time spent on each meth- 
od of training. The goal is to 
produce a team of perfectly 
trained athletes, either ail gen- 
eral ists or specialists trained in 
specific events. 

Once trained, the athletes 
compete in sprints, hurdles, 
javelin, high jump, and long 
jump. Performance depends 
not only on how well you con- 
trol the athletes but also on 
how well you've trained them. 

The graphics consist of a 
scrolling side view and feature 
fluidly animated competitors. 
As a departure from the typi- 
cal stab-the-keys-as-fast-as- 
you-can approach, Psygnosis 
offers three control options. 
One is the typical key-bashing 
(which is nice since it simu- 
lates exhaustion so well); the 
others are rhythm control and 
gearing control. Rhythm con- 
trol challenges you to tap the 
Ctrl key as a pendulum pass- 
es the center of its path. The 
more accurate your control, 
the faster the athiete. In gear- 
ing control, you tap the Ctrl 
key as the athlete reaches cer- 
tain strides; hitting the strides 



right increases the speed. 

When I long for the snows 
of winter, I dive into Winter Chal- 
lenge (Accolade; $54.95), 
which is easily the most addic- 
tive of all the Olympic games 
I've played. Players compete 
in the luge, the downhill, cross- 
country giant slalom, two-man 
bobsled, and the biathlon. 
You can also compete at 
speed skating and ski jump- 
ing. The wide array of wildly 
different sports makes play 
exciting, and there are so 
many different types of con- 
trols that my hands don't 
cramp up on me. 

The downhill, with its breath- 
taking background and fast 
polygon graphics, conveys 
the illusion of superspeed. As 
I whip down the course, I 
have visions of Franz K!am- 
mer's brilliant, out-of-control 
gold-medal run in the 1976 
Innsbruck games. Fortunately, 
Accolade's games feature a 
VCR which allows you to relive 
your brilliant runs. 

Probably my favorite Winter 
Challenge event is the expert- 
ly modeled biathlon, that curi- 
ous marriage of cross-country 
skiing and marksmanship. 
Smooth graphics give the illu- 
sion of skiing through the Eu- 
ropean countryside, and as 
you control every stroke, you 
must watch the stamina meter, 
which shows a combination of 
breath and heart rate. When 
your skier reaches the shoot- 
ing range, the steadiness of 
the aim is determined by how 
exhausted your skier is; if your 
skier is frazzled, the aiming reti- 
cle bounces up and down 
with every labored breath. 

These games are great for 
parties. Four players can com- 
pete in The Carl Lewis Chal- 
lenge, while ten can go head- 
to-head in Accolade's games. 

Sports games aren't limited 
to baseball, football, and golf. 
Go beyond the standard fare 
and see if you have what it 
takes to be an Olympian. □ 



BD 



COMPUTE JULY 1993 



CHIPS & BITS inc. 

IBM MAC & AMIGA GAMES FOR LESS 

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umbef 261 




If golfers and caddies be not better neighbours 
Than abbots and soldiers, with crosses and sabres, 
Let such fancies remain with the fool who so thinks, 
While we toast old St. Andrews, its Golfers, and Links. 

—Andrew Carnegie, from a toast delivered in Chicago in 1874 



BY PAUL C. SCHUYTEMA 



Golf is a game with a long, rich heritage. 
Golf enjoys such popularity as to have 
become a staple of our popular cuLture 
and iconography. It's no wonder, then, 
that golf simulators have been chipping 
around computer screens as long as 
there have been CRTs. 

!n the early days, aspiring comiput- 
er golfers had to work with blocky, 
unrealistic graphics and limited play 
options. As computer technology 
evolved, so did golf simulations. Now, 
players enjoy stunningly realistic 
scenes, compensate for wind and the 
slope of the green, and choose from a 
variety of options. They can play 
against PGA pros in a tournament, 
play against other computer golfers 
over the phone, piay a skins game for 
a million-dollar purse, shoot for par in 
Hawaii, or even design a golf course. 
Indeed, the modern computer golfer 
can play under the blustery, overcast 
skies of Scotland without even leaving 
home. 

In addition, golf simulators have 
reached the level where they can 
actually assist players in their real- 
world golf games. Players who had 
never before picked up a real club 
are now hitting the links after discov- 
ering the fun of golf via a computer 
simulator, and computer users who 
don't play ordinary computer games 
discover that computer golf offers 
something different from the run of the 
mill and become hooked on the virtual 
country club on their hard disk. 

Different Strokes 

There are a wide variety of golf simu- 
lations, each with a different spin on 
the game. Links 386 Pro strives for the 
ultimate in visual realism, while PGA 
Tour Golf lets players play in a PGA 
tournament and go head to head 
against the tour's best players. The 
Jack Nicklaus Signature Edition 
allows players to design a fantasy 
course and share it with people 
around the world. David Leadbetter's 
Greens IS an expert-level tutorial that 
features dynamic camera tracking, 
which makes the experience seem 
more like televised coverage than a 
computer game. 

Most of the games employ some 
type of power meter to judge the shot 
and generally require three actions 
from the player. In a drive, you might 
tap the space bar once to begin the 
swing. Tfie power meter then moves 
to reflect your backswing. Then, you 
tap again at the power point — the top 
of the stroke — and the power meter 
begins to recede. You must time your 
third tap to fall at a precise moment to 
strike the ball straight on; any vari- 

84 COMPUTE JULY 1993 




\llmm lat^itl Sj'T ..L .■::■ -J^ | Om 1 




PGA Tour Golf: fast and fun 


• \ ■ ta. 


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JP'S 



Links 386 Pro: many views 




David Leadbetter's Greens: dynamic 

ance can lead to a hook or a slice. 

You may enjoy having such control 
over your strokes. Or you may prefer 
spending your time designing the per- 
fect course or playing against the 
masters. Whatever simulation you 
choose, the addiction level is bound 
to be high. Each of the games dis- 
cussed here will lead you to many 
late-night piaying sessions and to true 
bragging rights for that one-in-a-miU 
lion shot. 

PGA Tour Golf 

Electronic Arts' entry in the golfing 
competition, PGA Tour Golf for 
Windows, satisfies that deep need to 
go up against really expert competi- 
tors — the best the sport has to offer — 
and to beat them at their own game. 
In this simulation, the only PGA- 
licensed product, the pros are the real 
fvlcCoy; Their abilities are modeled on 
PGA players' actual performances. 

PGA Tour Golf uses stylized ren- 
derings of the players, courses, and 



objects, but the level of realism is 
quite acceptable. The natural scenery 
surrounding the course is a little on 
the sparse side, but there are enough 
trees to get in the way of nearly every 
golfer. The game features four cours- 
es: PGA West, Sterling Shores, the 
Tournament Player's Club at Avenel, 
and the Tournament Player's Club at 
Sawgrass. 

This game's hallmarks are its 
speed, its challenge, and its playabili- 
ty. The courses may look easier than 
those in games with more visually 
complicated graphics, but the play is 
extremely demanding. One thing lack- 
ing, though, is the sense of rolling ter- 
rain: The fairways are flat and expan- 
sive, without either visual or play- 
affecting slope. 

This changes when you reach the 
green, however. A window appears 
that models the green in 3-D with an 
imposed grid. You can rotate the pic- 
ture to judge the break and adjust 
your aim accordingly. The view then 
shifts back to the playing screen to 
allow you to attempt the putt. 

Far and away the most notable fea- 
ture of PGA Tour Golf is the PGA tour- 
nament. The game proceeds in tele- 
vised fashion, with an announcer com- 
menting on each shot and giving 
reports from other holes. It's very tough 
to beat the pros, but it's extremely sat- 
isfying when you start to win. 

Electronic Arts also sells a DOS 
version of PGA Tour Golf, which dif- 
fers from the Windows version only in 
that it doesn't require Windows. PGA 
Tour Golf Limited Edition is a special 
packaging of the DOS version of PGA 
Tour Golf that includes the tournament 
course disk (normally sold separate- 
ly), plus a VHS tape containing a doc- 
umentary history of PGA tour golf, 
including interviews with players. 

Links 386 Pro 

The Links simulation has been with us 
for a while, but only recently has 386 
Pro, the flagship of the Access 
Software line, made an appearance. 
A visually stunning achievement, 386 
Pro requires Super VGA, at least an 
80386 processor, and a whole lot of 
RAfvl (Access suggests 8MB, but 
4MB seems to work just fine). With all 
of that computing power behind the 
game, the results are incredible. 

The play window, a view from 
behind the goifer, approaches photo- 
realism, with varying textures in the 
grass, subtly rolling hills, and gently 
shaded sand bunkers. Access allows 
you to set up many viewing options, 
from a full-screen window of the 
course to a split screen featuring a 



front view and a view from the pin. 
Otfier windows include a top view, a 
slope window, a stance window, and 
a scorecard. 

To aim your shot, you use a unique 
"barber pole" ttiat you move around 
thie course with the mouse. When the 
shot is set, you use the mouse to con- 
trol your swing. As in the other two 
Links products, the power bar is 
curved to simulate the arc of the golf 
swing, and there's a realistic time-lag 
from the moment you attempt to stop 
the swing until the club reacts. This 
takes getting used to, but it accurately 
reflects an actual swing. 

There are no tournaments in 386 
Pro, but you can play against several 
friends or a recorded player shot for 
shot for some heated competition. 

If there are any weaknesses in 386 
Pro, the foremost would be its speed. 
The game really needs an 80486 to 
play as fast as the other games. With 
an 80386SX, the redraw tirhe can take 
quite a while. The other weaknesses 
are poor-quality sounds and no golfer 
animation when the shot is viewed 
from the green in reverse angle. It's a 
little odd to just see the ball leap from 
the fairway with no golfer in sight. 

There's no course-design feature 
in 386 Pro. but Access is providing an 
ever-increasing array of co'urses, and 
original Links courses can be convert- 
ed for play with 386 Pro (the resolu- 
tion isn't as good as that of the 386 
Pro courses, but the quality is still 
high). I had the opportunity to play 
golf in Hawaii (via the computer, of 
course) using the Mauna Kea course 
disk. The Championship disk contains 
files to play this course with Links 386 
Pro, Links, or Microsoft Golf for 
Windows 1 .0 — and it's a gorgeous 
course. Playing the third hole in 386 
Pro, a par-three iron shot over a vol- 
canic Pacific inlet, is arguably reason 
enough to go out and buy a PC. 

David Leadbetter's Greens 

Greens takes two different approach- 
es to simulating golf: it strives for real- 
world instruction, and it uses dynamic 
views of play. 

The game is endorsed and heavily 
influenced by David Leadbetter, 
arguably the preeminent professional 
golfing instructor. The manual includ- 
ed with Greens consists of a richly 
detailed instructional course, featunng 
everything from club selection to 
stance and play strategies. Micro- 
Prose sets up the game as a vehicle 
for players to learn more and improve 
their regular game of golf, as well as 
for entertainment. 

The second unique aspect of 



Greens is the view. There are a number 
of different camera angles, and if you 
select the intelligent camera, a shot is 
visualized more like television footage 
than a static view: The camera cuts, 
pans, and follows the ball in 12-frame- 
per-second animation. As a result, the 
quality of the graphics is a far cry from 
that of those in Links 386 Pro, but the 
way IvlicroProse executes the cuts 
makes up for the lack of resolution. 

Greens also features an amazing 
amount of player control over the 
shots. Golfers can experiment with 




Jack Nicklaus Signature Edition: solid 

stance and tee placement beyond the 
usual club selection. The power meter 
in Greens is also different: As you 
twist into a backswing, the "sweet 
spot" where you must hit the ball 
shrinks, which corresponds with the 
increasing difficulty of hitting a power 
shot accurately. 

On the green. Greens allows a 
golfer-to-hole view, a hole-to-ball 
view, and a perpendicular view. Using 
these different angles gives you a 
wealth of information about the lay of 
the green. 

Greens features tournament and 
skins game options as well as modem 
or direct-connect play, allowing two 
players to battle against each other in 
realtime via phone. 

Microsoft Golf for Windows 1.0 

Microsoft, in an arrangement with 
Access, ported the original Links 
game to the Windows environment. 
More than just a quick fit, Microsoft 



Golf for Windows 1.0 is a true 
Windows program and takes full 
advantage of the operating system. 
Windows can be dragged and 
resized, and the game can wait in the 
background while you switch to a 
spreadsheet when your supervisor 
walks in. 

Microsoft Golf also borrowed the 
golfer animation from Links 386 Pro, 
giving the swing animation greater 
depth than that of Links. All original 
Links courses are fully compatible 
with Microsoft Golf. The game can 
handle eight players simultaneously, 
but there are no options for tourna- 
ment play or any of the other varia- 
tions (such as a skins game, a record- 
ed player, or an Al opponent), 

As in the original Links and Links 
386 Pro, you have complete control 
over your golfer's stance, swing 
plane, and ball position. As in Links 
386 Pro, you have the option to step 
back from the ball and swing the club 
a few times before addressing the ball 
for a solid hit. 

The game plays very smoothly, but 
aiming the ball is a little awkward, 
since your golfer disappears when the 
barber pole appears. Occasionally, 
the windows seem to get in the way of 
each other, and you have to make 
sure that the swing window is active 
before attempting a swing: otherwise, 
the delay as the window pops to the 
forefront will play havoc with any 
attempts at timing. 

Microsoft Golf, like Links and Links 
386 Pro, enables you to print out a 
scorecard (which must be signed and 
attested to be valid, of course). 

Linlcs 

The most venerable of all the versions 
mentioned, the original Links is still a 
solid game that can be played ade- 
quately on an 80286, and up until the 
recent explosion of quality golf 
games, it was the king of the heap. 

Links and Microsoft Golf have a 
library of over eight courses to choose 
from, including Troon North, set in the 
deserts of Arizona, and the Dorado 
Beach East Course in the heart of the 
Cahbbean. 

Jack Nicklaus Signature 
Edition 

The Signature Edition is a significant 
rewrite of Accolade's Jack Nicklaus 
Ultimate Goif and is a youthful 
descendent of the old Mean 18 golf 
simulation. 

Signature Edition is an extremely 
solid program and features 256-color 
graphics: while the resolution doesn't 
approach that of 386 Pro. the sense of 

JULY 1993 COMPUTE 85 




he Dark Army encroaches. 



King Richard falls. And Scotia 



beckons you, laughing. 



In her mad quest for power, Scotia has ravaged the 

kingdom. She seeks the throne, yet it eludes her. 

She's getting desperate. She's getting mean. 




M Can YOU STOP HER? DO YOU DARE? 





^ Make Friends and Influence 

People - Cooperate with the helpful, 
sidestep the treacherous and destrov 



the dangerous. 



^ Quick and Easy Combat and 
Spell Casting. 



FEATURING 



^ Compass and Aufom^^ier 

Included - Ad ven tu re through 

ancient keeps and living forests. 
Unearth hidden ruins and 
haunted caves. 

^ Indulge in a Land of Sensory 
Delights- Over 20 megabytes of 
compressed art and special 
effects. Actually hear the clash of 
steel! Feel the blows of terrors 
who slip beneath your guard! 



AN INSPIRED FANTASY 

RPG EXPERIENCE FROM 

THE DEVELOPMENT 

TEAM TFiAT CREATED ^ 

EYE OF THE BEHOLDER™ I AND 11. 

WestwQOd 



.-^^ 




Distributed Exclu'^lvelv bv 



Available for your IBM PC. 




Eye of the Beholder I and 11 are trademarks of TSR, Inc. 

The F.ve of ihe fteholder uame^XSR, Inc. and .SSI arc not connected or related 



in an) way to tlie Lajjds of Lore game. Virgin Gaines, Inc-»or Westwood Studios,Ino, - 
Lancis of Lore is a trademark ofWest-AOod .Studio^. Inc. © 1993 Westwood Studios, Inc 
All rights reserved -Virgin is a n^gistered tradeinark of Virgin Enterpribe*-, Ltd. 



Circle Reader Service Numbef 132 



^-l^. 




rolling terrain is amazing. Also, 
Accolade chose to use a deep, rich 
palette of colors that seem to drip 
right off the screen. 

The gameplay is solid, with most of 
the features you'd expect from a top- 
of-the-line golf simulator. One item it 
lacks, however, is player control of the 
golfer's stance or ball position. 

You can choose stroke play, tour- 
nament mode, or a skins game, with a 
number of players competing at once. 
Signature Edition possesses a solid 
arsenal of AI golfers to battle against, 
and you can create computer players 
of matching ability (or inferior ability 
when you need a victory for psycho- 
logical reasons). You can even com- 
pete against the Golden Bear himself. 
But if you do, it's a serious challenge: 
Nicklaus just doesn't seem to miss 
any shots. 

The most striking feature of the 
Signature Edition simulation is its 
course-design program. 'With it, you 
can get your hands dirty and tackle 
the tedious, frustrating, and amazing 
task of terraforming a course. After 
you've designed a hole, you can piay 
it through to examine its subtleties. 
The design program and the golf sim- 
ulation do a credible job simulating 
the rolls and dips of terrain. 

Course designers have control of 
the scrolling background, the pixel- 
by-pixel construction of the various 
objects that populate the course 
(such as trees, flowers, and the occa- 
sional caddie shack), and the type of 
terrain, from green to cart path. 
Utilizing a paint program type of inter- 
face, you draw terrain, select areas, 
and impose hills, dips, cliffs, and even 
railroad-tie shoring for a raised green. 

Hundreds of user-designed cours- 
es, from Mark Willett's beautiful and 
fictional Alhambra course to Links set 
entirely on the surface of the moon, 
can be found on CompuServe and 
many other online services and BBSs. 
You can also join a tournament on 
Prodigy, download a course, and bat- 
tle for position on the leader board, 
posting scores each week. 

Wilson ProStaff Golf 

Konami enters the world of computer 
golf with Wilson ProStaff Golf, a game 
that prides itseif on the speed of its 
play. In a field of games battling for 
visual supremacy, Konami's entry 
takes a different approach. Instead of 
offering photorealistic graphics, 
Konami chose instead to make the 
screen redraws lightning fast. 

In that area ProStaff Golf succeeds 
completely. The panoramic screens 
pop up almost instantly, and each 

88 COMPUTE JULY 1993 



shot is followed by a televisionlike 
gallery replay, focusing on where the 
ball lands. The graphics are well ren- 
dered and have something of the 
same flavor as the graphics in PGA 
Tour Golf and Greens. 

ProStaff Golf features a very nice 
overhead view of each hole, showing 
where the ball will probably land if hit 
correctly. The overhead view breaks 



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PGA Tour Golf 

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PGA Tour Golf for Windows 

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Wilson ProStaff Golf 

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Microsoft Golf 
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MICROSOFT 
One Microsoft Way 
Redmond, WA 98052 
(BOO) 426-9400 



the shot distances into 25-percent 
intervals, making it easy to gauge how 
much force to put on a pitch or a 
choke shot. Konami has also 
rethought the basic power-bar 
approach to hitting the ball. The game 
features a circular bar for the power 
stroke, similar to the power bar in the 
Links games. But when a player 
selects the power for the stroke, the 
action then moves to the face of a 
stylized golf ball, where a red dot cir- 
cles around the dimpled surface. To 
actually make the shot, the player 
must tap the selector key when the 
dot IS exactly in the center of the ball. 
This approach accomplishes the 
same thing as the traditional power 
bar, with the added ability to purpose- 
ly hit the ball either low or high, there- 
by controlling the spin. 

ProStaff Golf features an impres- 
sive array of games, from stroke play 
to several skins games to a game 
called bingo-bango-bongo, in which 
points are awarded for being first on 
the green, closest to the hole, and first 
in the hole. The game also features an 
entire array of team games. 

ProStaff Golf, for all of its features 
and fast gameplay, is somewhat limit- 
ed. It only provides one course, which 
can get old fairly quickly. There are no 
facilities for playing against recorded 
players or connputer players, so the 
game can get lonely during the early 
hours of the morning. Finally, putting 
is more difficult here than in any of the 
other games I've played. Some 
greens are so sloped that they appear 
to be located on the side of a moun- 
tain, and the aiming reticle is located 
at the top of the screen, a long way 
from the hole and the player's best 
line of sight. 

Still, the play is fast and engaging, 
and the ease of the game, the short 
learning curve, and the ability to play 
teams makes it a great choice for a 
computer golf party after the links 
have been rained out. 

Grab Your Clubs 

Golf is a rich and compelling game, 
and computer golf simulation has 
finally become nearly as challenging 
and enjoyable as the real thing. 
Whether you prefer head-to-head 
competition with a friend on a BBS, 
tournament play with the pros, creat- 
ing a challenging course, or working 
on your golf game on a rainy day, 
you're sure to find a golf simulation 
that matches your style. And when 
you do, prepare to lose track of time. 
You won't want to quit until you've 
mastered your game — and then you'll 
want to challenge the world. □ 



64/128 VIEW 



Gazette celebrates Its tenth 

birthday with this issue — and launches a 

new column to help celebrate. 

Tom Netsel 




Fhat were you doing 
'ten years ago this 
month? If you hap- 
pened to visit a news- 
stand, you may have picked 
up a new magazine called 
COIVIPUTE!'s Gazette. 

I was working at the Uni- 
versity of Central Fiorida in 
Orlando, and I had just 
bought a 64. I was wonder- 
ing what to do with it when I 
spotted a Gazette at my lo- 
cal grocery store. I'll have to 
confess that I missed the 
first issue. I didn't see Ga- 
zette until the second issue 
hit the newsstand, but I've 
been hooked ever since. 

Gazette was billed original- 
ly as being "for owners and 
users of Commodore VIC-20 
and 64 personal comput- 
ers." As time passed and 
Commodore introduced the 
Plus/4, the 16, and the 128, 
Gazette's coverage expand- 
ed to those machines. But 
when the smoke finally set- 
tled over the personal com- 
puter battlefield, the 64 and 
128 emerged as the survi- 
vors, and Gazette narrowed 
its editorial focus to those 
Commodore veterans. 

Speaking of veterans, as 
I browse through the mast- 
head of that first issue, i see 
the names of four people 
who are still associated with 
the magazine. Regular read- 
ers will recognize colum- 
nists Jim Butterfield and 
Fred D'Ignazio, but two oth- 
er veterans may not be as 
familiar. Terry Cash is now 
copy production manager, 
and De Potter is production 
manager. Without their val- 
ued assistance, there 
wouldn't be any magazine, 

Editorial's staff has 
changed frequently, but Ga- 
zette's goal of providing its 
readers with the best of Com- 



modore-related information 
and entertainment has not 
changed. In large measure, 
each Gazette editor has re- 
lied on 64 and 128 owners 
who are willing to share 
their knowledge with our 
readers. From that first issue 
through the one you read to- 
day, we've encouraged you 
to submit articles and pro- 
grams for publication, that 
need is just as strong today 
as it was a decade ago. 
Some things don't change. 

Change is inevitable, how- 
ever, and you'll see it in this 
issue with the addition of a 
new column. Over the years 
we've published original pro- 
grams and reviewed com- 
mercial software, but we've 
seidom covered public do- 
main programs and share- 
ware — until now. GEOS coi- 
umnist Steve Vander Ark ex- 
amines this vast source of 
programs in his new col- 
umn, "PD Picks." 

The programs Steve will re- 
view and recommend can 
be found on bulletin 
boards, commerciai online 
services, user group librar- 
ies, and elsewhere. If you 
can't locate a convenient 
source for these programs, 
look for them on our month- 
ly Gazette Disks. These pro- 
grams — unlil<e the Gazette 
type-ins— are not copyright- 
ed, and you may distribute 
them freely. All we ask is 
that you honor the fee re- 
quests of shareware authors 
if you use their programs. 

In closing, I'd like to 
thank all of you devoted 
Commodore users for your 
support over the past ten 
years. Without your help, Ga- 
zette would have folded 
years ago. But with it, look 
for Gazette each month for 
years to come. □ 



GAZETTE 

64/128 VIEW G-1 

Gazette marks a milestone with this issue — ten years 
of serving the 8-bit Commodore market. 
By Tom Netsel. 


11 YEARS IN 8-BiT HEAVEN G-3 

In 1982, dozens of home computers were struggling 
to pull ahead of the pack — then, along came the 
Commodore 64. 
By Larry Cotton, 


REVIEWS 

Jara-Tava, Mathbooster, and Flyer. 


G-8 


FEEDBACK 

Questions, answers, and comments. 


G-14 


PD PICKS G-1 6 

This new column focuses on the best of public 
domain and shareware programs. 
By Steve Vander Ark. 


MACHINE UNGUAGE G-1 8 

To read a file successfully, you must know how it ends. 
By Jim Butterfield. 


PROGRAWMER'S PAGE 

More great programming tips from readers. 
By Randy Thompson. 


G-20 


BEGINNER BASIC 

Here's how to activate your user port. 
By Larry Cotton. 


G-22 


DIVERSIONS 

The 64 can be a toddler's ideal first computer 
By Fred D'Ignazio. 


G-24 


PROGRAMS 

Ultimate ML Monitor (64) 
Rascals (64) 
Scud (64) 

Cryptarithm Solver (64) 
Flasher 64 
Type-Sim (64/128) 


G-25 
G-31 
G-33 
G-36 
G-37 
G-39 



JULY 1993 COMPUTE G-1 



YOUR PRODUaiVITY! 



Harness the potential of /< 
64 and T28 with these 
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Get more work out of your 64 and 1 28 

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Here's what's on it-MetaBASIC 64, 
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The 1992 Best of Gazette Utilities 

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Subtotal 

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YEARS IN 8^BIT HEAVEN 



BY LARRY COTTON 



THE YEAR WAS 1982. 



The Vietnam War Memorial was dedicated in Washington, D.C. 

England and Argentina fought over the Falkland Islands. 

The Equal Rights Amendment lapsed without ratification. 

The St. Louis Cardinals won the World Series. 

Barney Clark became the first person to receive an artificial heart, 

the Jarvik-7. 

And in the autumn of that year, the Commodore 64 personal 
~~t computer was born. 



Commodore International, a dar- 
ling of Wall Street investors at 
that time, was known primarily 
for its calculators; the PET series of 
computers; and a successful, albeit 
memory-deficient older sibling of the 
64, the VIC-20. The company was run 
by the inimitable Jack Tramiel and 
sons, a team famous for squeezing 
the most bang from a buck, 

The personal computer market was 
in a frenzy at the time, and Tramiel 
brazenly introduced a new computer 
called the Commodore 64. This new 
machine was priced at $595, a ridicu- 
lously low price for that time. A disk 
drive or a monitor were extra. 

The Field 

The 64's major competitors were the 
Apple \\+ ($1,530), Atari 800 ($899), 
IBM PC ($1,565), and TRS-80 Model 
III ($999). The 64 was exactly the 
machine the world had been holding 
its breath for, with a third more built-in 
memory than the Apple ll-f- — four 
times more than the Atari 800 — yet 
priced at two to three times less than 
the Apple and a third less than the 
Atari. 

The 64 featured (as it does today) 
a breathtaking 16 colors: 40 charac- 
ters per screen row; eight Movable 
Object Blocks (sprites); and, best of 
all, an unbelievable 64K of random 
access memory, 39K of which was 
available for BASiC programs. Even 
without a drive and color monitor, the 
64 was still far and away the feature 
leader with outstanding color, graph- 
ics, and an integral three-voice music 
synthesizer. Its musical talents alone 
rivaled those of many dedicated key- 
board synthesizers at the time. 

I must confess that I was not one of 
the original personal computer enthu- 
siasts. I hadn't assembled an Altair in 
my basement back in the 1970s. My 
computer-related background consist- 
ed of occasionally perusing Byte mag- 
azine and assembling a few Circuit 
Cellar projects. Later, my interest 
expanded into creating some original, 
but primitive, rats-nest circuits around 
various Radio Shack chips. One such 
device featured four toggle switches 
to input data to a tone-generating 
chip. It could play tunes stored in its 
minuscule 1K of memory! I began to 
see the need for a real computer. 

Full List Price 

After extensive comparative research, 
I decided to invest in a 64. I bought 
the shiny little machine (serial number 
10917, with no colored bars in the 
logo) from a nearby dealer for full list 
price. I sold my prized 1959 Mer- 

G-4 COMPUTE JULY 1993 



TUNNELS 

Larry Cotton is the author of 
Gazette's popular and long-running 
"Beginner BASIC" column. The fol- 
lowing program is the first one that 
he wrote for the 64 and was among 
the first that he sold to Gazette. 

10 PRINT POKE 53280,0: POKE 

53281,0; PRINTCHR$(147) 
20 A=1 : B=-1 : C=40: D=-40: N^l : 

P=54272: V=1984 
30 F0RZ=1T012: GOSUB 110 
40 V=V-39: N=N+1 
50 NEXT 

60 V=V+42: N=N-1 
70 FOR2=1T012: GOSUB 110 
80 V=V+42: N=N-1 
90 NEXT 
100 END 

110 Q=INT(15*RND(1))+1 
120 FORX=1TON:POKEV+A,67: 

POKE V+A+P,Q: V=V+A; NEXT 
130 POKEV,75: POKEV+P,Q 
140 FORX=1TON: POKEV+D,66: 

POKEV+D+P,Q: V=V+D; NEXT 
150 POKEV,73: POKEV+P,Q 
160 FORX=1T0N: POKEV+B,67: 

POKEV+B+P,Q: V=V+B: NEXT 
170 POKEV.aS: POKEV+P.Q 
180 FORX=1TON: POKEV+C,66: 

POKEV+C+P,Q: V=V+C: NEXT 
190 POKEV,74: POKEV+P.Q 
200 RETURN 



cedes to raise the cash to finance it. 
In addition to the computer, I proudly 
took home a disk drive (instead of the 
more common Datassette tape drive), 
a printer, and a 13-inch color televi- 
sion to use as a monitor. My sons, 
David and Michael (then 13 and 10), 
and I cleared some working space 
and unpacked each component with 
loving care. With great anticipation 
and excitement, we connected the 
parts with cables, plugged them into 
the wall, and gingerly threw the power 
switches. Everything worked beautiful- 
ly! We were thrilled! 

As we tentatively put our new toy 
through its paces, we marveled at its 
wondrous capabilities. The only 
demonstration program our Com- 
modore dealer supplied with the 64 (in 
anticipation of a wildly successful 
Christmas selling season) showed 
Santa Claus sailing around a chimney 
and surrounded by flurrying snow, all 
the while accompanied by back- 
ground music playing "Jingle Bells." 

Software Shortage 

Our giddiness soon diminished with 
the slow dawning that, however won- 
derful the computer itself was. 



Commodore had introduced the 64 
with virtually no available software. 
The company's first ads had vaguely 
promised a word processor; a data- 
base; a spreadsheet; and several 
games, including Gorf, Visible Solar 
Systenn, Radar Rat Race, Mole Attack, 
Avenger, Ace of Aces, and Jupiter 
Lander. 

With a dearth of software, we duti- 
fully turned to the user's guide and 
began teaching ourselves to program 
in BASIC. My first program (beyond 
the sophisticated 10 PRINT "HELLO") 
was one I called Tunnels. This gem 
printed multicolored rectangles to the 
screen that overlapped in increasing 
and decreasing sizes. It was eventual- 
ly published in a series of demos 
called "Baker's Dozen" that were pub- 
lished in the January and February 
1985 issues of COMPUTE! 's Gazette. 
(That was back when COMPUTE had 
an exclamation point.) 

Magazine Scene 

After tiring of driving 45 miles every 
month to my dealer, I started a sub- 
scription to COMPUTE! in February 
1983 and voraciously read every word 
written about the 64, That was when 
COMPUTE carried articles and type-in 
programs for all of the popular PCs of 
the day. Charles Brannon, Jim 
Butterfield, and Richard Mansfield 
became my gurus of the 64, educat- 
ing me on every aspect and minutiae 
of video, inputs, outputs, machine lan- 
guage, and math. I snipped hundreds 
of articles from that magazine and 
from Gazette after it premiered in July 
1983. 

Articles in that first Gazette includ- 
ed a review of the strange Exatron 
Stringy Floppy, a mass storage device 
that's sort of halfway between a cas- 
sette recorder and a disk drive. There 
was a column by Fred D'lgnazio 
called "Computing for Kids," and tuto- 
rials on sound, reading paddles in 
BASIC, accelerated IF statements, 
and joysticks, I still have my volume 1, 
number 1 safely stashed away with 
other prized memorabilia. 

Many other Commodore-specific 
magazines have appeared — and dis- 
appeared — during the past 11 years, 
among them Ahoy!, Commander, 
Transactor, Midnight Gazette, 
Commodore Magazine, Power Play, 
and RUN. Today, only the Gazette 
section of COMPtJTE remains. 

Software at Last 

Commercial software soon started to 
catch up with 64 sales, and I could 
finally put my 64 to work. Among the 
first programs I bought for the 64 were 




Since the Commodore 64's debut in 1982. worldwide saies of it and tli9 64C, siiown liere, 
liave topped 10 million. 



the Commodore Macro Assembler 
Development System, Editor Pak, 
Word Machine, f^ame Machine and, 
TotI Time Manager 2.6. Although it has 
long been excelled by other assem- 
blers, I still use MADS for my feeble 
attempts at machine language pro- 
gramming. The first BASIC program I 
ever typed in was a sprite editor by 
Donald A. Pitts. It appeared in an arti- 
cle called "A Shape Generator for the 
Commodore 64" that was published in 
COMPUTE (November 1982} . 

SpeedScript 

Perhaps the most famous type-in pro- 
gram ever published in any computer 
magazine is SpeedScript, the pro- 
gram that I'm using to write this article. 
It was written by Charles Brannon and 
first appeared for the VIC-20 and 64 in 
the January 1984 Gazette. Updated 
several times over the years, its latest 
version, SpeedScript 3,2, was pub- 
lished in May 1987. The program has 
been enhanced many times, allowing 
users to customize the program to 
their liking. Among these programs 
are SpeedScript-80. an 80-column 
version: SpeedCheck, a spelling 
checker; SpeedSearch, a fast utility 
for finding any phrase within a 
SpeedScript file on disk; SpeedCount, 
a word-counting enhancement; 
ScriptRead, a fast SpeedScript file 
reader; and Instant 80, a true WYSI- 
WYG preview for SpeedScnpt. Some 
of these enhancements were pub- 
lished in Gazette and others appeared 
in COMPUTE when it still published 
type-in programs. (All of these pro- 
grams are still available on the 
SpeedScript disk.)When I considered 
myself proficient in BASIC (I wasn't), i 
wrote a 92-block program called 
Muzic! which I attempted to package 
and sell, I think I sold a grand total of 



four disks— and these probably went 
to my 64-owning friends. 

Meanwhile, back on the hardware 
front, finding the television hookup 
inadequate, I bought my one and only 
upgrade for the 64 — a 1702 monitor. 
I'm staring at it still. What a wonderful 
improvement! No more zigzag lines 
and blurry characters. 

Rabbits and Snails 

Although it represented a quantum 
leap in data transfer speeds over the 
interminably slow tape cassette, the 
1541 disk drive soon earned a reputa- 
tion of its own for snail-like loading 
and saving (90 blocks — 23K — in 
about a minute) and an easy-to-mis- 
align read-write head. 

To alleviate the first problem, I 
bought an Epyx Fastload cartridge. If 
there ever was a 64 accessory that's 
deserved to become a classic, it's this 
cartridge. Soon thereafter. I read an 
article on how to add an on-off switch 
to avoid plugging and unplugging the 
cartridge to accommodate programs 
which did or didn't use it. My 
Fastload's been sticking out of its port 
ever since. 

The head alignment problem was 
much more frustrating. I read many 
articles, sent the 1541 to several 
repair shops, and drilled holes in the 
bottom housing to access the stepper 
motor's adjustment screws. Finally, 
someone managed to fix it, and it's 
been fine ever since. 

Prke Wars 

As the years flew by, the 64's price 
plummeted. By June 1983, the 64's 
mail-order price was $395; a year 
later, it had slipped to $199; in May 
1987, $169.95. Today you can buy 
one for about $150. 

Part of the reason for its decreas- 



ing price was the onslaught of other 
low-priced competitive machines 
which vied for the computerphile's 
attention: APF Imagination Machine, 
the Apple-compatible Franklin Ace 
1000 and 1200. Timex/Sinclair 1000 
and 2000, Apple lie, more Tandy 
machines, Texas Instruments 99/4A, 
Coleco Adam, Atari 520ST, and IBM 
PCjr (born November 1983 and died 
March 1985). When used 64s began 
to hit the want ads at rock-bottom 
phces, I bought a spare. 

Meanwhile, Commodore wasn't 
resting on its laurels. While simultane- 
ously boosting production and cutting 
the price of the 64, Commodore was 
trotting out the portable SX-64; the 
anomalous Plus/4 and 16; the 128 and 
128D: the breakthrough Amiga family; 
and the IBM compatibles, variants of 
which became especially popular in 
Europe. None of those computers 
approached the sales of the 64, which 
is still being built and sold internation- 
ally today as the cosmetically 
enhanced 64C. 

Software Bonanza 

Within 18 months after its splashy 
introduction, more and more software 
companies had climbed aboard the 
lucrative 64 bandwagon. Ads for pro- 
grams like EasyCalc, Sprite-Magic, 
Mail Mate, Choplifter, Sargon II, 
General Ledger, Busiwriter 64, 
Monopoly, Centropod, Software 
Automatic Mouth (an amazing voice- 
synthesis program known as SAM), 
Script 64, Typing Tutor, SuperTerm, 
and WordPro Pius/64 proliferated in 
Commodore-specific magazines. 

Programmers who knew the 64 
were in demand. Even Braderbund 
Software was advertising for software 
authors in December 1983. 

A New Operating System 

In March 1986, Berkeley Softworks — 
now GeoWorks — introduced GEOS, 
the Graphic Environment Operating 
System, Although I'm not a GEOS fan 
(without an REU and extra drives, 
molasses is fast in comparison), I 
seem to be in the minority. Com- 
modore quickly adopted GEOS as its 
"official operating system" for the 64, 
and many apparently excellent soft- 
ware products have greatly helped 
the 64 stay alive and kicking. 
Gazette's GEOS column first ap- 
peared in September 1987. 

Applications 

By November 1988, 64's were being 
pressed into service for almost every- 
thing but cleaning the kitchen sink. A 
radio station in Phoenix used one to 

JULY 1993 COMPUTE G-5 



report activities on a call-in talk slnow. 
Many people, such as one avid user 
in Niceville, Florida, used their 64's to 
tracl< stock market investnnents. One 
commercial application used 128s to 
monitor and control furnace settings in 
a large apartment complex. 

Teachers calculated students' 
grades with them in Richmond, 
Virginia. A fireman in Tulare Country, 
California, used his for eliminating 
some of the paperwork involved in 
running a fire department. A preacher 
in Asheville, North Carolina, tracked 
the recreational activities of his church 
with his 64. A Union, Iowa, farmer 
used a spreadsheet running on a 64 
to keep an eye on his farm's financial 
condition. At Bosch Power Toois, 
where f work, we used a 64 for years 
to calculate and generate graphs of 
motor-performance curves. 

Hardware 

While millions of owners were putting 
their 64s to creative uses, hardware 
manufacturers were busy as well. Here's 
a short list of peripherals that have made 
life easier and more interesting. 

• Card? printer interface (Cardco) 

• VIC-1520 plotter/printer 
(Commodore) 

• Fastload cartridge (Epyx) 

• Command Control Trackball (Wico) 

• The Voice Box voice synthesizer 
{The Alien Group) 

• Hearsay 1000 voice 
synthesizer/recognizer (Hearsay) 

• fvlinimodem-C (Aprotek) 

• Super Graphix printer interface 
(Xetec) 

• SWL shortwave listener cartridge 
(fvlicrolog) 

• Flexidraw 170-C light pen (Inkwell 
Systems) 

• Stringy Floppy storage device 
(Exatron) 

• Ultimate Interface (Schnedler 
System) 

• Lt. Kernel hard drive (Xetec) 

• ComputerEyes video digitizer 
(Digital Vision) 

• MW-302 printer interface (Micro 
World Electronix) 

• Home Control Interface (X-10) 

• interpod interface between comput- 
er and various peripherals 
(Limbic Systems) 

• VIC 1650 modem (300 bps, original 
ly $150) (Commodore) 

• 1750 RAM expander (Commodore) 

• Sonus MIDI interface (SOFTpacific) 

• Video Byte II video digitizer (The 
Soft Group) 

• 1351 mouse (Commodore) 

• Ten Key Pad (Quality Computer) 

• Super Expander 64 cartridge 

G-6 COMPUTE JULY 1993 



(Commodore) 

• 1581 3v2-inch drive (Commodore) 

• Bodylink fitness system (Bodylog) 

Perhaps the most bizarre peripher- 
al of all was the heavily advertised 
Spartan adapter for interfacing the 64 
to Apple 11/11+ peripherals (Mimic 
Systems). I'm not sure it ever attained 
volume production. 

Soltware 

Here are some of my favorite pro- 
grams and applications for the 64. 
Chances are you probably have some 
of these, too. 



SpeedScript 3.2 word processor 

(COMPUTE Publications) 

Instant 80 80-column preview 

(COMPUTE Publications) 

Print Shop card/sign maker 

(Braderbund) 

Doodle drawing program (City 

Software) 

Flexidraw (Inkwell Systems) 

Generic Librarian MIDI software 

(The Music Software Exchange) 

Simon's BASIC cartridge 

(Commodore) 

PractiCalc spreadsheet (Computer 

Software Associates) 

CADPAK-64 drawing program 

(Abacus) 

Screen Graphics-64 graphics 

enhancement to BASIC (Abacus) 

Tax Master (Master Software) 

Datafile (RUN magazine) 

How about a few games? 

Space Taxi (Muse) 

Summer Games II (Epyx) 

Impossible Mission ("Stay awhile; 

stay forever!") (Epyx) 

Raid on BungeiingBay 

(Braderbund) 

Tetris (Spectrum HoloByte) 

Advanced Dungeons & Dragons 

(Strategic Simulations) 

Bard's Tale (Electronic Arts) 

Pinball Construction Set 

(Eiectronic Arts) 

Zork series (Infocom) 

Dragonworld (Trillium) 

Flight Simulator II (subLOGIC) 

Choplifter (Brederbund)^ Where in 

the World Is Carmen Sandiego? 

(Broderbund) 



In a Babbage's one day, I ran 
across Light and Temperature Labs, 
scientific experiments from Hayden 
Softv^are. They were on sale for $10 
each. In case you missed these sadly 
underpromoted products, each one is 
a series of scientific experiments on 
disk, supported by great documenta- 



tion, along with an interface box which 
connects to a joystick port. The box 
accepts either a photocell or an accu- 
rate temperature probe — also fur- 
nished! What a find! 

Gadgets 

Over the last decade-plus, I've whiled 
away quite a few hours building and 
writing supporting software for my 
own collection of miscellaneous gad- 
gets that connect to the user, car- 
tridge, or joystick ports. Some of these 
include the following. 

• A numeric keypad 

• A plotter (although plodder would 
be a better name), which could 
draw with four felt pens whatever 
appeared on the monitor screen 

• A fvllDI interface (I still use it almost 
daily with my spare 64) 

• A relay interface which controls 
small electrical devices 

• A room measurer which uses an old 
Wico trackball mechanism to roll 
around the periphery of a room, tak- 
ing the room's measurements 

• A model "drummer boy" which uses 
relay-switched solenoids to control 
drumsticks 

• A device to synchronize taped 
music and kaleidoscopic images 
(works with a four-track tape deck) 

• A talker, based on a Radio Shack 
voice synthesis chip 

In Retrospect 

I've spent literally thousands of pleas- 
ant hours with my 64 over the past 1 1 
years. The computer is still perfect for 
the vast majority of my purposes. 
Back in May 1988, Rich Mclntyre, then 
Commodore's senior vice president of 
sales and marketing said, "Eight-bit? 
Who cares? You're buying a machine 
for a specific reason. If it satisfies that 
need, it's never obsolete. Only your 
requirements become obsolete. ... If 
the need continues to exist until the 
year 2000, that machine is still satis- 
factory." 

Maybe Jim Hilty said it best in last 
December's issue of Gazette. "The 64 
has always been kind of a barnstorm- 
ing computer . , , just plug it in and fly 
by the seat of your pants. It's a fun 
computer, a truly personal computer, a 
computer that an individual can enjoy 
programming, a welcome friend." 

Thank you, Commodore. Thanks 
also to everyone who builds the hard- 
ware, writes the software, and publish- 
es information about this marvelous 
machine that is the Commodore 64. 
Here's to 11 more happy, productive, 
profitable, educational, and entertain- 
ing years in 8-bit heaven. □ 



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Batman /Robocop Bundle $9,97 
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REVIEWS 



MATHBOOSTER 

I don't think there's a kid left 
in the universe who doesn't 
respond to failing images on 
a computer screen with a de- 
sire to stop them, to be the 
good guy, the hero. Witness 
the fact that even kids who 
own videogames and 
whose parents won't give 
them quarters can't resist 
checking out the games in 
malls and stores. 

What does this have to 
do with an arithmetic drill- 
and-practice program for 
the 64? Boosting falling sat- 
ellites back into space is the 
premise behind fvlathboos- 
ter, a program imported 
from Australia. 

To prevent these satel- 
lites from tumbling down 
and crashing into the earth, 
students must quickly and 
correctly solve math equa- 
tions. This program provides 
a drill with positive reinforce- 
ment that's fun. 

Mathbooster is not a teach- 
ing program. It's designed 
to reinforce through practice 
the math skills that the stu- 
dents have learned in class. 

When the game starts, sat- 
ellites are strung across the 
sky, and a booster rocket 
waits atop its launch pad. Be- 
low each satellite is an equa- 
tion. This first wave of satel- 
lites begins to fall. Using the 
appropriate keys, you place 
the launch pad beneath a 
satellite and type in an an- 
swer to the equation. Press- 
ing Return or the space bar 
launches the booster rock- 
et — only if the answer is cor- 
rect. If so, the booster rock- 
et then pushes the satellite 
back into space. If the an- 
swer is incorrect, the satel- 
lite continues its fall toward 
earth. Once you've success- 
fully propelled the first wave 
back into orbit, a second 
wave begins to fall — at a fast- 
er rate than the first! 
G-B COMPUTE JULY 1993 



The third wave consists 
not of satellites but the 
space shuttle! It's a very 
large space shuttle that 
needs a very large booster 
rocket to restore it to orbit. 
Points are accumulated for 
boosting satellites and the 
shuttle back into space. If a 
satellite or the shuttle reach- 



current problem type, 
change it, change the 
speed settings, load and 
save the problem type and 
settings, or return to the 
game. When you view a 
problem, the screen lists the 
type of operation that's be- 
ing displayed; addition, sub- 
traction, addition and sub- 




Boost falling satellites back into space with Mathbooster. a 
program that combines arcade action with math drill. 



es the ground, the game 
ends. As in arcade games, 
the program keeps track of 
current high scores. 

fvlathbOQSter comes with 
ten sample games already 
prepared. However, its pow- 
er comes in the variations 
you can create by altering 
the type of problems. The 
main menu lists three op- 
tions: Start the game. Load 
different problems, and 
Change problems. The first 
one is self-explanatory. The 
second option lets you load 
other files of problems al- 
ready created and saved on 
disk. The third option lets 
your create these other 
math files. 

The first menu under op- 
tion 3 allows you to view the 



traction, multiplication, divi- 
sion, or multiplication and 
division, 

Next, it tells you what 
form the equation will take, 
such as A -I- B = C, Then, 
for each A, B, C, or other var- 
iable, the program sets the 
parameters. For example, if 
you're practicing addition 
where the sum, C, never ex- 
ceeds 12, then A's parame- 
ters would be 1-6, and B's 
would be 1-6 also. 

The next option is to 
change the problem type. 
The Operations List lets you 
do this. For each operation 
there's a screen that guides 
you through the steps of 
choosing the parameters for 
the variables. This requires 
care and thought, but it isn't 



difficult. The screen instruc- 
tions and the manual enable 
you to create the exact drill 
you want for your student. 

Speed Settings govern 
the actual game, controlling 
how fast the satellites and 
shuttle fall, how quickly that 
speed increases, when the 
first shuttle appears, how 
many times per wave it ap- 
pears, and whether or not 
the sound effects are 
turned on. With these you 
can customize a game to 
best challenge students with- 
out overwhelming them. 

The manual is thorough. 
Aside from a couple of ty- 
pos, it provides helpful in- 
sight and guidance in devis- 
ing games that will provide 
the kind of drill that will 
most benefit your children 
or students. Included are 
some appendices describ- 
ing the ten sample games al- 
ready on the disk and provid- 
ing some examples of how 
to set up game formats, 
Mathbooster also carhes its 
own copying program to al- 
low you to make backups. 

fvlathbooster is the sec- 
ond Free Spirit import from 
Australia that we've re- 
viewed. These two pro- 
grams by Satchel Software 
are copynghted by the Min- 
ister of Education and are 
used by the school systems 
in South Australia, (fvlathboos- 
ter's manual even makes ref- 
erence to the South Austra- 
lian curriculum modules.) As 
with the first program. Dr. 
Spellingstein, we are im- 
pressed by the solid pro- 
gramming that provides the 
actual computer game yet al- 
lows you to create and mod- 
ify within the program to 
make it fit your needs. It's 
powerful, flexible, and easy 
to operate. 

Kids love computers and 
computer games. f\/lost kids 
also love learning, although 
they'd deny it if you'd ask 



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Circle Reader Service Numh«r 197 



ATTENTION 

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REVIEWS 



them. Computers and learning games 
can be an irresistible combination 
wtien blended properly. Mattibooster 
provides the perfect recipe for turning 
math practice into a real treat. 

DAVID and ROBIN HIMNICK 



Satchel Software 

Distributed by Free Spirit Software 

720 Sycamore St. 

Columbus. IN 47201 

(812) 376-9964 

$39-95 

Circle Reader Service Number 414 



JARA-TAYA 



G-tO COfilPUTE JULY 1993 



Want to take a trip to an exotic loca- 
tion; hunt for buried treasure; and fight 
crocodiles, sharks, and hungry 
snakes? Then Satchel Software's latest 
text adventure, Jara-Tava, is your tick- 
et to adventure. 

Jara-Tava begins, like many good ad- 
ventures, with the inheritance of an an- 
cient treasure map. A letter from your 
dear, departed Uncle Bartholomew sug- 
gests that Captain Kidd's treasure 
might be found on the island of Jara- 
Mau. It also warns of danger should 
you go to neighboring Jara-Tava, the 
Isle of Fire. 

With no further urging, you're on 
your way Of course, you learn early in 
the game that the treasure isn't on 
peaceful Jara-fvlau but across the 
shark-invested strait on Jara-Tava. 

Satchel Software designed this inter- 
active text adventure with junior high stu- 
dents in mind. It has colorful graphics, 
easy-to-use text commands, and a 
challenging plot. Familiar elements 
from classic literature, si<illfully woven 
into the game, are sure to please teach- 
er, student, and parents alike. In addi- 
tion to Kidd's treasure, you'll find Robin- 
son Crusoe's tree house and Captain 
Nemo's submarine. Nautilus. Also, 
straight from an Indiana Jones adven- 
ture, there's a golden idol that's pro- 
tected by a large boulder. 

Teachers in Southern Australia 
have been using this text game in 
their classrooms since 1988. However, 
the game has only recently been li- 
censed for distribution in the U.S. by 
Free Spirit Software. The package 
comes complete with three disks and 
a 134-page combination instruction 
and resource manual. 

Teachers who decide to use this 
game as part of their classroom curric- 
ulum will be delighted with the hidden 
teacher's controls built into the pro- 
gram. Accessed by pressing Shift-T at 
the beginning of the game, teachers or 
parents can set options like help com- 



mands, maps, and multiple moves. 
They can also encode messages on 
statues to increase the difficulty of the 
game and teach students about deci- 
phering codes. But don't get the idea 
that the game is only useful in scholas- 
tic situations. It's a package that will pro- 
vide hours of computer fun at home as 
well. 

In fact, the game's design is perfect 
for the solitary player or for young play- 
ers who want to do it themselves. 
Most popular text games require verb- 
and-noun commands such as Climb 
Tree in order to move through the 
game paths. This can be confusing to 
a young player. Jara-Tava's designers 
simplified the process by creating a pro- 
gram that analyzes individual words, 
not two-v/ord sequences. Game play- 
ers can type in whole sentences be- 
cause the program searches for key- 
words and strips out unknown ones. 
This lets players use more natural lan- 
guage in the game. 

Since the game was designed with 
the junior high player in mind, older, 
more experienced players may not 
find it challenging enough. However, it 
succeeds quite well v/ith the targeted 
age group. 

Maps are important in solving this 
and any text game. The Jara-Tava man- 
ual gives students and first-time text 
game players a brief lesson on how to 
keep a map. Teachers can build on 
this for other map-making exercises for 
their students. The section gives lei- 
sure-time players new ideas for ways 
to use their maps, too. All can benefit 
from it. 

The game itself offers several choic- 
es at every point of play. Since most 
people learn more by their mistakes 
than their successes, expehment with 
the game. Try all the options — build a 
glider, ride the sub, feed the croco- 
diles. You can save your game on 
disk and go back to correct any mis- 
takes you make. You'll learn something 
new with everything you do. At the con- 
clusion of the game, the screen will dis- 
play how many steps it took for you to 
solve the game. You can play it over 
and over again, trying to beat your pre- 
vious best score. 

But there's more to it than just the 
game. Like other software packages 
from Satchel, there's a resource disl< in- 
cluded with this one. This disk has a 
simple database, an easy-to-use word 
processor, a disk copying program, 
and the Tree of Knowledge guessing 
game. 

The word processing program is de- 
signed for the junior high student who 
is beginning to do research papers 
and reports that need to be typed. It's 
a program that students can continue 



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GALACTIC CONQUEST 



GALACTIC CONQUESTh the t>est conquest game for tlie C64! 
Command hundreds of siar ships as you conquer other worlds and extend 
your empire. Watch out for blact holes, pholon storms, stars that go nova 
and General Badguy. 1-6 players. Comes with Mario's Sister Giana, 
Saiudon, Kiary-Kar and 5 other arcade quality games. Send your return 
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McClelian Ave. Pennsauken, NJ 08109. (Residents of NC, NJ. and NY 
please add appropriate tax: Canadian orders add 79c Goods and Servic- 
es Tax.) All orders must be ptiid in U.S. litiids drawn on a U.S. bank. 
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supplies last. 



JULY 1993 COMPUTE G-11 



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Circle Reader Service Number 159 



No Wild, No Wildlife. 



Polar bears, musk-ox, grizzlies, 
caribou — more animals than you'd 
find in Yellowstone — can be found 
on the magnificent 
coastal plain of the Arc- 
tic Refuge in Alaska. 
Unfortunately, this por- 
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wilderness has caught 
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gress is considering proposals that 
would allow the oil companies to 
drill there, even though reports 
indicate there's less than a 
one-in-five chance oil would 
be found. 

If we allowed drilling in the 

G-12 COMPUTE JULY 1993 




region, we would jeopardize the 
culture of the native Alaskans and 
untold wildlite, Including a herd of 
180,000 caribou. Our 
last arctic wilderness 
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The Sierra Club works 
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(415) 776-2211 




eiEWS 



to use for simple reports as they enter 
high scliool. It's also useful for people 
who have never used w/ord processing 
progranns or have been intimidated by 
them in the past. Called Tell-a-Tale, the 
Jara-Tava word processor is a very sim- 
ple-to-learn program that lets you 
write and then save your work to a 
disk. You can also center titles, 
change cases of words and letters, 
work with existing files, and print out re- 
ports. The program will not do more 
elaborate functions like footnotes and 
headers, but it's sufficient for most 
word processing needs. 

The database is useful for storing 
word lists and simple groups of informa- 
tion. The word lists can then be import- 
ed into the word processor to make 
spelling lists or to use in essays. Satch- 
el has already begun five databases 
for the user. The names are Pirates, Is- 
lands, Volcanoes, Whales, and 
Sharks. You can build on this basic 
base by adding additional files. Each 
file may be up to 29 characters. Files 
may be deleted; however, the erase 
function has been restricted so no 
more than one file can be erased at a 
time. This safeguard keeps you from ac- 
cidentally wiping out your entire data- 
base. 

The Tree of Knowledge game pits 
the player against the computer's abil- 
ity to guess. There are five trees on the 
disi< that you can select: Animals, Pi- 
rates, Whales, Sharks, and Snakes. 
New information can be added to the 
existing trees to make a more complex 
guessing game. These can be saved 
and replayed again and again. 

The resource disk takes the Jara- 
Tava package far beyond mere game 
software. In my opinion, this one disk is 
worth the modest price of the package 
all by itself. 

And there's still more. Take a look at 
the extensive, spiral-bound instruction 
manual. Tucked in the center of the 
manual is a 68-page section that is 
filled with activities related to the 
themes found in the Jara-Tava game. 
There are word games, crossword puz- 
zles, word searches, drawing activities, 
and group games. There are ideas for 
crafts, too. You can build your own mod- 
el volcano, make beanbags shaped 
like whales, or do any of a variety of 
activities. All the instructions are includ- 
ed. As an added bonus. Satchel has 
given permission for teachers to copy 
any or all of the manual for use in their 
own classrooms. 

All in all, Jara-Tava is an outstanding 
package that does more than merely 
entertain players. It stimulates and ed- 




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circle Reader Service Number 260 



ucates them. That's not a bad return 
for such a modest investmerit. 

MARTI PAULIN 

Satchel Software 

Distributed by Free Spirit Software 

720 Sycamore St- 

Columbus, IN 47201 

(812) 376-9964 

S39.95 

Circle Reader Service Number 415 



FLYER 



Flyer is a deceptively simple but mad- 
dening little arcade game for the 64. 
The idea is to guide a paper airplane 
through the rooms of a house, avoiding 
furniture and other obstacles. 

Helping you in your fight against grav- 
ity and wind resistance are a number 
of air vents that provide lift and a series 
of rollers that give your glider extra 
speed and maneuverability. As your 
glider passes over a vent, push up on 
a joystick to gain altitude. Maintain a 
light touch, though. If you climb too 
high, you'll smack into the ceiling and 
crash. 

As your plane glides from left to 
right across the screen, aim for the dia- 
mond-shaped rollers in the middle of 
the room. When you fly through one, 
push your stick hard to the right to 



pick up speed. Control is rather limited 
with this flyer, but you can lose altitude 
quickly by pulling back on the stick. 

As in any house, furniture is a major 
obstacle for paper airplanes. Beds, 
lamps, stereos, and bookcases seem 
to suck the planes into thenn. When 
you crash, you start again in the first 
room which is filled with nothing but air 
vents and rollers. Since I crash so fre- 
quently I'm glad that author Cameron 
Kaiser lets me keep the action moving. 
To restart, simply press the fire button. 

The music playing in the back- 
ground is a great rendition of "The 
Blue Danube." It puts the 64's SID 
chip to good use, but that tune just 
about drives me crazy! The volume con- 
trol takes care of that, however. 

That melodic but cursed back- 
ground music is Flyer's only sound ef- 
fect, but it's really not that bad. I just 
get annoyed when I can't nnaster a 
game. 

It took me quite some time to devel- 
op just the right touch with Flyer, guid- 
ing the plane through the house. Get- 
ting through the first room filled with 
rollers and vents was a breeze— par- 
don the pun — but I thought I'd never 
make it past that bed in the next room. 
I'd gain a little altitude, pick up some 
speed, fly over a vent, pull back to 



clear the bed, and then swish! Back to 
the beginning. 

Flyer's graphics are pretty simple: 
Everything's in black, wtiite, and gray. 
The rooms fill only a narrow portion of 
the 64's monitor, (Each one is only 
about two inches high. That's why you 
have to be careful about not flying into 
the ceiling. I think a little more creativi- 
ty could have been shown here to ex- 
pand the playing screen, and the gray 
rooms could use a bit of color to give 
the game more visual appeal. 

The documentation is clear and con- 
cise. It consists of a two-sided sheet of 
instructions and hints that's well written 
and easy to understand. 

All in all. Flyer is a simple game, and 
that could be its biggest drawback. If 
you're the type who gets discouraged 
easily, you'll probably get bored with 
Flyer rather quickly. On the other 
hand, if you're the type who refuses to 
let a computer beat you, you'll proba- 
bly get addicted to fiying this little elec- 
tronic paper airplane. 

CHRISTIAN FLEMING 

Computer Workshops 
3612 Birdie Dr. 
La Mesa. CA 91941 
S9.95 

Circle Reader Service Number 416 □ 

JULY 1993 COMPUTE 6-13 



FEEDBACK 



Where to find chips 

and whether 

excessive poldng can 

he hazardous 

to their health. 



Character ROM Chip 

Can you possibly tell me 
where I can get the 9011225- 
01 chip for my 64? I have 
been looking since 1991 but 
haven't been able to locate 
one in my country. 

DAVID SANIEL SUAREZ LOPEZ 

VERACRUZ, VER. 

MEXICO 

The chip you want Is the Char- 
acter ROM chip, and you can 
order it from The Grapevine 
Group. 3 Chestnut Street, 
Suffern, New York 10901. The 
latest price Is $9.50 plus 
$8.50 shipping costs to Mexi- 
co. Ask for part number 
CI 225. You can order the 
chip by mall or by calling 
(914) 357-2424. Readers In 
the U.S. can order by calling 
(800) 292-7445. Ask for the 
free catalogue of Commodore 
and Amiga chips, too. 

Poked to Death? 

Question: After about a year 
of sustained use, the SID 
(Sound Interface Device) 
chip in my Commodore 64 
has stopped functioning. Can 
this be caused by misusing 
the chip? For instance, is 
there such a thing as exces- 
sive poking? 

DONALD DRAPER 
RICHMOND. VA 

The SID chip Is designed to 
be poked. Such activity is con- 
sidered normal use and will 
not damage it. In general, noth- 
ing any program does will 
ever damage any of a com- 
puter's internal hardware. 
Like all other electronic com- 
ponents, SID chips occasion- 
ally fail. The only cure is to 
replace the chip. Replacing 
the chip can be either simple 
or difficult, depending on 
whether the one In your com- 
puter Is socketed or soldered. 
The SID chip, which has the 
numerical designation 6581, 
is located near the center 
of the circuit board In 



both the 64 and 128. 
Math Errors 

When using my 64 for math 
homevifork, I keep running in- 
to some problems. If I raise a 
variable containing a negative 
number to a fractional expo- 
nent, the computer returns an 
ILLEGAL QUANTITY ERROR. 
It doesn't happen with con- 
stants. For example, if I have 
the computer print -8 to the 
power of .5, it viforks fine. But 
if [ make X equa! -8 and then 
try to print X to the power of 
.5, it doesn't. Why is this? 

TARQ WILLIAMS 
LAKE GENEVA, Wl 

Computers follow a rule 
called order of operations or 
operator precedence, which 
tells them which functions or 
operations to perform before 
others. For example, PRINT 3 
+ 2 ' 7 will give you a result of 
17, not 35. because multiplica- 
tion has a higher precedence 
than addition. The result of 2 
' 7 Is calculated before the 3 
is added in. 

The up-arrow (power) func- 
tion has a higher precedence 
than the negation (-) function, 
as you'll see if you PRINT -4 1 
2. The 64 prints - 16 as the an- 
swer But squaring -4 should 
result in a positive 16, not a neg- 
ative one. V/hat happens Is 
that the result of 4 to the pow- 
er of 2 Is calculated; then the 
minus sign is appended. 

Although PRINT ~8 t ,5 
seems to work, you'll get an er- 
ror message if you try PRINT 
(-8) T .5. So it's not a matter 
of variables versus constants; 
it's strictly a problem with rais- 
ing a negative number to a 
fractional power 

Raising to the .5 power Is 
the same as finding the 
square root of a number The 
square root of -8 would have 
to be a number that multiplied 
by itself yielded -8. But when- 
ever you square a real num- 
ber, the result is positive, so 



there's no such thing as a 
square root of a negative num- 
ber, at least among the real 
numbers. Mathematicians use 
Imaginary numbers to handle 
square roots of negative num- 
bers, but your 64 isn't built to 
handle imaginary numbers. 

A Teacher's Thanks 

I would like to thank Gazette 
for providing me with a 
source of programs that I 
have incorporated into an in- 
tegrated computer-use pack- 
age for the teachers of my 
school board. Our education- 
al system, like many, is facing 
financial cutbacks, with little 
or no money available for com- 
puters or software. Your pro- 
grams filled that need. We 
have numerous 64s in our sys- 
tem, and now we are able to 
make much greater use of 
them. 

I selected programs from 
Gazette that provided word 
processing, spreadsheet, da- 
tabase, graphics, and key- 
boarding skills. Other pro- 
grams supplied language 
arts, programming sugges- 
tions, science, social studies, 
and telecommunications re- 
sources. 

With the current wave of up- 
grading, many educators felt 
that the 64 had nothing to of- 
fer. In fact, it has much to of- 
fer if it is utilized to the fullest 
possible extent. The comput- 
ers are already in the system, 
and the Gazette and well-writ- 
ten public domain programs of- 
fer a viable way to provide for 
integrated programming for 
our students. Thank you. 

CAROL A NAUSS 
CHESTER, NS 
CANADA 



Send your questions and com- 
ments to Gazette Feedback, 
COMPUTE Publications, 324 
West Wendover Avenue, 
Suite 200, Greensboro. North 
Carolina 27408. D 



G-14 COMPUTE JULY 1993 




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PD PICKS 



Steve Vander Ark 



Explore the exciting 

world of public 

domain and shareware 

programming 

in this new Gazette 

column. 



A NEW COLUMN, 
VERSION 2 

Yep, version 2. This is the sec- 
ond time I've written this col- 
umn. If you feel as though 
you've just walked into the mid- 
die of a movie, let me explain. 
This is a new column that 
deals with public domain pro- 
grams and shareware. I wrote 
the first version a few weeks 
ago, but when I reread the intro- 
duction, I just shook my head. 
It was boring. 

Oh, it was OK. I might use 
it as part of an article some- 
where along the line. It defines 
shareware and a few other re- 
lated terms, chatters about 
how nice it is to be writing this 
new column, and warns 
everyone — in no uncertain 
terms — to pay their shareware 
fees. It ends with a flourish 
about how shareware is on the 
cutting edge of Commodore 
programming today. 

I'm talking bold, new, and ex- 
citing programs that push the 
limits of Commodore's 8-bit 
wonder! I've got to be spitting 
a little flame. I don't want you 
to read this column once and 
then next time decide to save 
it until you've read the part 
again about how to type in the 
programs. I want you to turn to 
this column first! 

I'll be covering programs 
that 1 hope will provide some 
of the old spark that made the 
64 so exciting — and made its 
owners so gung-ho, so (let's 
face it) nuts about their ma- 
chines. That spark is what 
keeps me coming back to this 
great little machine. 

I've been rummaging in 
some of the stranger corners 
of QuantumUnk's libraries, 
tracking down programs to 
throw at you, Feel free to down- 
load them, I've provided file- 
names and uploader names 
for easy downloading. If 
you're not on 0-Link and you 
can't find these files on local 



bulletin boards or at your user 
group, you'll find the programs 
mentioned here on the Gazette 
Disi<. Now, let's take a look at 
this month's programs — a cou- 
ple of fast and furious, arcade- 
style shoot-'em-ups. 

Astra 

By Chris Batchelor 
QuantumLink filename: AS- 
TRA3.SDA, uploaded by Chris- 
EMM. 

OK, for you 128 users out 
there, here's an 80-column pro- 
gram that will cost you hours 
of sleep. The way I see it, 
Chris Batchelor, the sadist 
who created this arcade tor- 
ture, must lie awake nights him- 
self, chortling like the Wicked 
Witch of the Vi/est as he imag- 
ines poor joystick jockeys like 
me with chppled thumbs and 
glazed eyes, trying desperate- 
ly to fight off these endless 
waves of death. After playing 
this fast-paced shoot-'em-up, 
I know I need a continuous 
fire button on my joystick, an- 
ything to save my left hand 
from being twisted into a per- 
manent claw. 

Astra starts innocently 
enough. It seems so easy to 
pour merciless fire into those 
little bugs that swoop into 
those little chutes. But then 
there are more and more of 
them. Before long, bugs are 
hurtling down in droves, piling 
up like spilled gummy bears. 
There just aren't enough 
blasts per second to clear 
them all out. Before long, 
they get you. And then you 
play it again, and again, and 
again. 

You'll love this game, espe- 
cially if you get a rush out of 
annihilating all those little 
bugs like I do. It works its hor- 
rors in 80 columns, which 
means that you won't be able 
to complain at all about the 
graphics. As far as speed 
goes, well, just try to keep up 
with it. I can't honestly say 
how great it is a higher levels 



(I never survive that long). 

This is the third incarnation 
of this game. The fine-tuning 
has made it a real corker. So 
flex that thumb a bit, slam 
back Mountain Dews until 
your eyes bug out. and face 
the endless hordes in Astra. 

Odiir 

By Frank Lindsey 
QuantumLink filename: ODIN, 
uploaded by Mondain. 

OK, all of you 64 users 
who've been reading this and 
growling nasty things about 
those 128 users and their fan- 
cy graphics, here's a game 
that will make a red-eyed, 
thumb-happy zombie out of 
you, too. 

Odin is one of those 
games that put you in a space- 
ship at the bottom of the 
screen, armed with an end- 
less supply of energy bolts or 
whatever. As usual, the de- 
tails are unimportant. What is 
important is that all those 
crazed blobs plummeting to- 
ward you will turn your space- 
ship into pixel dust if you 
don't keep pounding that fire 
button. There's no continual 
fire here (the one major flaw 
in an otherwise outstanding 
game), so plan on some actu- 
al finger or thumb pain as you 
try to clear a path in the weav- 
ing mess. 

Odin does Astra one better 
by hurling a nifty variety of 
nasties down the screen. 
They're all animated with blink- 
ing lights and flapping wings, 
making them nice to look at 
for that split second before 
you obliterate them or vice ver- 
sa. Once you get past the 
first level, they fire back, lob- 
bing little bombs your way. 

Once again, I have to ad- 
mit that I can't vouch for the 
higher levels. I count myself 
lucky to live past level 2. 

Launch yourself into either 
of these games. Have fun 
and let me know how you 
make out! □ 



G-16 COMPUTE JULY 1993 



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MACHINE LANGUAGE 



Jim Butterfield 



In order to read a tile 

successrully, you 

have to l(now what's 

at its end. 



FILE END CHECK 

BASfC's INPUT.# statement 
has limitations that can cause 
a program crasli during a file 
read. The problem surfaces 
when two conditions are met. 
First, the program wants to 
read the whole file, using tN- 
PUT# to get the data and test 
the system variable ST (status) 
to detect the end of the file. 
The second condition occurs 
when the file ends with more 
than one Return character. 

A quick pair of programs 
will show this effect. First, 
write a file as follows. 

1D0 OPEN 1,8,2,"0:BADFILE,S,W" 
11D PRINT#1, "JINGLE" 
120 PR!NT#1, "JANGLE" 
130 PRINT#1 
140 CLOSE 1 

Line 130 creates the prob- 
lenn by writing a blank line at 
the end of the file. In other 
words, there will be more 
than one Return character at 
the end. Now for the doomed 
reading program. 

100 OPEN 1,8,2,"0:BADFILE" 

110 INPUT#1,A$ 

120 PRINT A$ 

13D IF ST=0 GOTO 110 

140 CLOSE 1 

The program will read "reg- 
ular" files without trouble. But 
on our bad file, the program 
will read JINGLE and JAN- 
GLE anti then lock up. 

Why does this happen? It's 
a conflict of two system rules. 
Rule 1: The INPUT# com- 
mand always reads to the 
next Return character. If it 
finds a blank line, it immediate- 
y goes back for another 
read. Rule 2: If the file han- 
dler is asked to deliver data 
beyond the end of the file, it 
will supply a Return charac- 
ter. Combine these rules, and 
you'll see that if the last line of 
a file is blank, the INPUT* 
statement will continue to 



read blank lines — and it'll do 
so forever! 

Our first project is to write a 
program that will scan a file 
quickly and find out what's at 
the end — a single Return, the 
normal condition; no Return, 
unusual but not fatal; or more 
than one Return, possibly a 
crash. So our program de- 
tects the danger. Another 
time, we'll add to the program 
so that it will fix the problem. 

The BASIC part of our pro- 
gram will ask for the name of 
the data file and open it as log- 
ical file number 1. Then it 
calls the following machine lan- 
guage program at address 
8704. hexadecimal 2200. 

First, connect the input 
stream to logical file 1. 

22Q0 LDX #$01 
JSR $FFCB 

Our plan is to store the last 
character of the file at ad- 
dress S2101 and the previous 
character in $2100. As a pre- 
caution, we'll prepare to store 
in this last address. 

LDA #$00 

As we go around our loop, 
the A register will contain the 
last character received from 
the file. Store this, and read an- 
other character. 

2207 STA $2100 

To read a character from a 
file, we may use a subroutine 
call to either SFFCF (INPUT) 
or $FFE4 (GET). The result Is 
the same either way. 

JSR $FFE4 

The received character is in 
A. We may test for end-of-file 
by looking at our system stat- 
us variable ST That variable 
is located at hex address 90. 
In Commodore machines pri- 
or to the VlC-20. it's located 
at address $96. 



LDY $90 

If ST has a value of 0, the file 
read is proceeding normally, 
and we have not reached the 
file's end. In this instance, 
BEQ takes us back around 
the loop. 

BEQ S2Z07 

If we didn't take the BEQ 
branch, we may assume that 
we're at the end of the file. 
The final character, still in the 
A register, is stored at $2101 . 

STA $2101 

The last instruction in our pro- 
gram jumps to $FFCC, 
CLRCHN, which restores the 
input stream to its default 
path (screen/keyboard). 

JMP SFFCC 

It's a small program, a fast pro- 
gram — and it will leave the 
last two bytes of the file in 
addresses $2100 and $2101 
and 8448 and 8449 respective- 
ly. BASIC should now close 
the file and test these bytes. 
Here's the program in the for- 
mat of a BASIC loader. 

CJ IBB PRINT"F!LE END CHECKER 

(SPACE)- JIM aUTTBRFIEL 

D" 
XR HB DATA 162,1,32,198,255,1 

69, B,H1, 8, 33, 32, 228, 25 

5 
GS 120 DATA 164,144,240,246,14 

1,1,33,76,204,255 
PC 160 DATA 72,32,204,255,162, 

2, 32,201,255,174,3,33 
JF 20O FOR J«8704 TO 8726 
EJ 210 READ X:T"T+X 
BP 220 POKE J,X 
AE 230 NEXT J 

XS 240 IF T<>30ia THEN STOP 
XF 300 INPUT "NAME OF FILE";FS 
JQ 310 OPEtl 15,3,15 
FJ 120 OPEN l,a,2,F'S 
GB 330 INPUTJ15,B,ES:IF EOfl T 

HEN PRINT ES:STOP 
Q!l 340 SYS 9704 
SB 350 CLOSE 1 
SD 360 CLOSE 15 
GC 370 IF PEEK(8449)<>13 THEN 

(SPACE)PHtNT"FILE DOES 

{SPACeJnQT end WITH <RE 

TyRN>,": END 
SE 380 IF PEE!i;(8448)<>13 THEN 

(5PACE)PRINT"FILB ENDS 

{SPACE )WITH A SINGLE <R 

ETURN>.": END 
XS 390 PBtNT'FILE ENDS WITH HU 

LTIPLE <RETURN> CHARS." 



G-18 COMPUTE JULY 1993 



The Gazette 

Productivity 

Manager 

Harness the productivity 
power of your 64 or 128! 

Turn your Commodore into 
a powerful workhorse, keep track 
of finances, generate reports 
in a snap, manage your 
money in minutes- 
all with the 
Gazette ProductioUy 
Manager! Look at all 
your 64/128 Productivity 
Manager disk contains. 

GemCalc 64 & 128— 

A complete, powerful, user- 
friendly spreadsheet with all 
the features you'd expect 
in an expensive commercial package 

(separate 64 and 128 versions are included). 

Most commands can be performed with a single keypress! 

Memo Card — Unleashes the power of a full-blown 
database without the fuss! Nothing's easier — it's a 
truly simple computerized address file. Just type in 
your data on any one of the index cards. Need to edit? 
Just use the standard Commodore editing keys. 
Finished? Just save the data to floppy. What could be 
easier? 

Financial Planner — Answers all of those questions 
concerning interest, investments, and money manage- 
ment that financial analysts charge big bucks for! You 
can plan for your children's education and know 
exactly how much it will cost and how much you need 
to save every month to reach your goal. Or, decide 
whether to buy or lease a new car. Use the compound 
interest and savings function to arrive at accurate 
estimates of how your money will work for you. 
Compute the answer at the click of a key! 

DON'T MISS OUT ON THIS 
POWERFUL WORKHORSE! 




(MasterCard and Visa accepted on orders with subtotal over S20). 



U YES! Please send me — , Froductiuity Manager ih]i{s) 

(S14.95 each). 

Subtotal 

Sales Tax (Residents of NO and NY please add appro- 
priate sales tax for your area. Canadian orders, add 
7% goods and services tax.) 

Shipping and Handling (S2.00 U.S. and Canada, S3.00 

surface mail, S5.00 airmail per disk.) 

Total Enclosed 

— Check or Money Order MasterCard _ VISA 

Lrtdil t;ard No. 



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Send your order to Gazette Productivity Manager, 

324 W. Wendover Ave., Ste. 200, Greensboro, NC 27408. 



PROGRAMMER'S PAGE 



Randy Thompson 



Use these 

readers' tips to 

read your 

64's memory, 

remove REM 

statements, and 

more. 



SNOOPERS AND 
REMOVERS 

Readers have come through 
again with some great tips. 
Let's get right to them. 

Memory Snooper 

Here's a simple BASIC pro- 
gram that searches an area 
of memory for text messages. 

SD 18 S=4111S:E-41365 

PF 20 FOR I-=S TO B 

HS 39 C=PEEK(Il ; If 031 AND C< 

123 THEN PRINT CH8S(C); 
EX 48 GET K5:IF KS=CHR$(13} TH 

EN PRINT 
MP 59 IF KS<>"-<" THEN NEXT I 

As listed, this program scans 
the area of ROM that contains 
BASIC keywords and error 
messages. You might try 
searching the area of memo- 
ry that contains BASIC pro- 
grams: 2049-40959. To do 
this, in line 10 make S equal 
to 2049 and E equal to 
40959. I find this program use- 
ful in searching for and read- 
ing E-mail that I have neglect- 
ed to read completely before 
logging off QuantumLink. 

You can make the text eas- 
ier to read as it prints to the 
screen by pressing Return. 
This forces the program to 
print a carriage return. To 
stop the program before it fin- 
ishes searching memory, 
press the back arrow key. 

BRIAr^ KISSINGER 
EVANSVILLE, IN 

Function Keys 128 

When programming in BASIC 
on the 128, the GET state- 
ment doesn't return the Com- 
modore 64 character codes 
for function keys (133-140) un- 
less you execute a POKE 
828,183 first, thus disabling 
the keys' preprogrammed def- 
initions, (POKE 828,173 re- 
turns the 12B's function keys 
to normal.) 

Rather than disabling the 
128's function key definitions, 
you can use them to simulate 
a string of keypresses that 



your program recognizes. For 
example, I recently wrote a 
game that lets me press G at 
any time to access a game- 
oontroi menu. From that 
menu, I can press L to load a 
game or S to save a game, af- 
ter which the program dis- 
plays the prompt Are you 
sure (V/A/;? before continuing. 
To simplify the selection of 
the game-save option, I pro- 
grammed the f1 key to simu- 
late pressing the G. S, and Y 
keys with this command: 

KEY1,"GSY" 

Now when I press the fl 
key while the game is run- 
ning, the character codes for 
the G, S, and Y keys are put 
into the keyboard buffer and 
read by the game's GET state- 
ment. This calls up the game- 
control menu, selects the 
save-game option, and an- 
swers Y in response to the 
Are you sure (Y/N)? prompt. 
This gives me three keypress- 
es in one! 

RICHARD R. HARVEL 
FORT WORTH. TX 

REMover 

The following program re- 
moves all REM statements 
from 64 BASIC programs. To 
use this handy utility, load 
and run the program shown 
below. Then load the BASIC 
program containing the un- 
wanted REf^ statements, and 
type SYS 49152. 



5H laa 

AJ IIB 



JF 120 

C\ 1311 
JP HO 
MK 150 

XK 16a 

FX 178 
GS 189 

GD 198 



REMOVER 

FOR 1=49152 TO 49 

AO D:POKE I,n;C=C 

T 1 

IF C033534 THEW 

(SPACEf'EHROR IN 

TATEMENTS" 

DATA 24,165,43,10 

3,253, 155,44,105, 

DATA 254,32,294,1 

,60, 24, 165, 253, in 

DATS 133,253,165, 

5,0,133,254,168,8 

40,192,177,253 

DATA 240,a,2tll,14 

37,200,76,33,192 

DATA 152,24,1(15,3 

9,192,32,204,192, 

DATA 24,165,253,1 

33,253,165,254,10 

3 

DATA 254,160,3,76 



392:RE 
+D:MEX 

PRINT 
DATA S 

5,2,13 

0,133 

92,176 

S,2 

254,10 

,140,2 

3,240, 

, 32,21 
176,1!) 
05,2,1 
5,0,13 

33,19 



PP 200 

KK 210 

BK 220 

GB 230 

PX 240 

GH 250 

PA 260 

AH 270 

GR 280 

BB 290 

MQ 30S 

DC 319 

GF 329 



2,76,51, 

DATA 1,1 

92,160,0 

DATA 2BB 

141,239, 

,201 

DATA 0,2 

9,192,10 

DATA 56, 

33,253,1 

DATA 13 3 

,72,109 

,165,254 

DATA 73, 

60,0,177 

DATA 191 

,176,3,7 

DATA 133 

3, 56,165 

,133,45 

DATA 233 

,76,48, L 

DATA 251 

230,253 

6 

DATA 24 

206,7,16 

DATA 208 

9, 192,24 

9,192 

DATA 133 

5,0,133, 



165,192,0,240 
36,152,32,219,1 
,177,253,249,4 
,76,92, 192,152, 
192,173,240,192 

08,22,24 ,173,23 
5,5,141,239,192 
163,253,233,5,1 
65,254,233,0 

254,24,165,353 
239,192,133,251 

105,0,133,252,1 

,251,145,253,32 

,192,32,204,192 

6,151,192,104 

,254,104, 133,25 

,45,237,239, 193 

165,46 

0,133,46,160,0 
93,239 

208,2,230,252, 
209,2,230,254,9 

165,254,197,46, 

5,253,197,45 

,1,56,96,141,23 

,165,253,109,23 

,253,165,254,10 
254,096,0,9,0,0 



Besides making a program 
smaller, removing REM state- 
ments can make a program 
run faster because the comput- 
er no longer has to skip over 
those descriptive but nonfunc- 
tional lines of code. 

At first glance, line 100 
may appear to be missing a 
REM statement before the pro- 
gram's name. Of course, 
when the program runs, BA- 
SIC will interpret the first 
three letters of the word as 
REM and pass on to the next 
line. This means you can test 
the program on itself. 

Be careful not to run this util- 
ity on programs that have 
GOTO or GOSUB commands 
that jump to lines that begin 
with a remark. Those tines 
wiil also be deleted. 

VINCE TAGLE 
GRANADA HILLS. CA 



"Programmer's Page" is inter- 
ested in your programming 
tips and triciis. Send all sub- 
missions to Programmer's 
Page. COMPUTE's Gazette. 
324 West Wendover Avenue, 
Suite 200. Greensboro. North 
Carolina 27408. We pay $25- 
$50 for each tip we use. D 



G-20 COMPUTE JULY 1993 




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G-21 



BEGINNER BASIC 



Larry Cotton 



Here's how to 

activate your 64's 

user port at 

any time of day. 



USER PORT CLOCK 
(PART 2) 

The 64 is blessed with four 
ports to connect with the out- 
side world. Two of them are 
quite well known: joystick 
ports 1 and 2, which are locat- 
ed on the right Side of the com- 
puter next to the power 
switch. As we learned some 
time back, those ports can be 
used for output as well as for 
normal joystick input. 

The other two ports may not 
be quite as familiar to you. Fac- 
ing the computer as you nor- 



so have a basic knowledge of 
digital electronics or know 
someone who does. 

Please remember two 
things: that all ports are con- 
nected to the innards of your 
computer and that their out- 
puts are rather feeble and sen- 
sitive to abuse. Avoid static 
electric charges like the 
plague, and always connect 
ports to low-voltage circuits by 
means of properly matched op- 
to-isolators, transistors, and/ 
or relays. 

The figure below shows the 
user port as you face the rear 
of the computer. The pins 



USER PORTS LOOKING AT REAR OF COMPUTER 
(GROUNDS AT PINS 1, 12, A, N) 



2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 



ABCDEFHJ KLMN 



POKE: 



2 4 8 16 32 64 128 



mally do, the port at the ex- 
treme right rear is the car- 
tridge port. It normally accepts 
game and other types of car- 
tridges, such as the common 
fastload cartridge. The port on 
the extreme left rear is the us- 
er port, to which I referred last 
month. When you want to 
make a connection to the out- 
side world, that's the one to 
think of first. This port is easy 
to program in BASIC. I'll show 
you how to turn on and off 
each of its pins. 

In fact, the programming is 
easier than wiring the hard- 
ware. As I warned you last 
month, 1 won't go into a lot of 
detail about user-port connec- 
tions. If you decide on a pro- 
ject, you'll need a card-edge 
connector with .156-inch termi- 
nal-to-terminal spacings, avail- 
able at Radio Shack or Mous- 
er Electronics. You should al- 



which we can control easily 
are those on the bottom row let- 
tered C through L (skipping G 
and I). 

Here's a very simple pro- 
gram that looks at the key- 
board to see if C, D, E, or F is 
pressed. 

10 P=5B577; REM USER PORT 
20 POKEP+2,255: REM ALL PINS 

OUTPUT 
30 POKEP.O: REM ALL PINS OFF 
40GETAS: iFA$='" "THEN40 
50 tFAS="C"THEN POKEP.I 
60 IFAS="D"THEN P0KEP,2 
70 IFAS="E"THEN P0KEP,4 
80 IFA$="F"THEN POKEP,a 
90 GOT040 

Line 20 sets up the user 
port so that all subsequent 
POKEs are interpreted as out- 
puts, line 30 turns all pins off, 
and line 40 waits for a key to 
be pressed. 



When you run this, press- 
ing C, for instance, turns pin 
C on. (In the jargon of electron- 
ics, the voltage on pin C 
goes high or jumps from to 
+5 volts DC.) This voltage is 
enough to power a Light Emit- 
ting Diode (LED) or trigger a 
sensitive transistor or relay, 
which must be connected be- 
tween the controlled pin and 
a ground (pin 1, 12. A, or N). 

Now let's finish last 
month's program. Add lines 
10-30 from the above pro- 
gram, change line 420, and 
add lines 430-470. 

420 PRINT"lCLR][DOWN]USER 

PORT PIN C ON. 
430 PRINT"[DOWN]PRESS ANY 

KEY TO TURN OFF. 
440 P0KEP,1 

450 GETA$:IFAS=""THEN450 
460 POKEP.D 
470 PRINT'1D0WN]USER PORT 

PIN C OFF. 

Now when you run the pro- 
gram, enter the times as you 
did last month. When the 
"alarm" goes off, pin C in the 
user port is turned on. Poking 
other values to P in line 440 ac- 
tivates other pins as follows. 



Poking 


Turns On 


1 


C 


2 


D 


4 


E 


8 


F 


16 


H 


32 


J 


64 


K i 


128 


L 



Combinations of pins can 
be activated by adding the val- 
ues in the left column corre- 
sponding to the pins you 
want to turn on. For instance, 
to turn on pins C and H, poke 
17 (1 -1- 16) to P (56577). To 
turn on pins J, K, and L, poke 
224. 

I've just about run out of 
space for this month, but I'll 
mention some of the pro- 
gram's highlights. 



G-22 COMPUTE JULY 1993 



The subroutine in lines 290- 
410 gathers user input in 
hours, minutes, and seconds 
to set the clock and the 
alarm. Line 90 pokes values 
based on this user-supplied 
information to three clock regis- 
ters 56329-56331. Line 130 
forms a variable B which is 
calculated from these values. 
B is the number of seconds 
from midnight to when the 
clock's alarm is set— when 
the user port is to be activat- 
ed. For example, B would 
have a value of 25,200 for 
7;00 a.m. Line 160 starts the 
clock by poking a to the 
tenths-of-seconds register 
56328. 

The clock is updated and 
printed to the screen in a 
loop in lines 170-280. The 
same registers we poked are 
continually peeked in line 
170, from which printable val- 
ues are derived in lines 180- 
220. A in line 230 is the actu- 
al time of day in seconds 
from midnight. Line 240 con- 
tinually compares A to B. 
When they're equal, the alarm 
goes off; control zips to line 
420 which turns on pin C in 
the user port. Here's the en- 
tire listing in case you missed 
last month's column. Remem- 
ber, always set the user port 
to activate within 24 hours of 
starting the clock, 

BM 10 P=56577:REM USER P 

OHT 
BF 20 POKEP+2,255:REM AL 

L PINS OUTPUT 
CC 30 POKEP,a:REH ALL PI 

NS LOW 
DS 40 PRINTCHRS (147) :POK 

E53281,14:POKE646, 

6 
KR 50 PRINT"SET CLOCK AT 

-.{DOWN)" 
PK 60 R=3:GOSUB290:K=432 

00:REH 43200 SECON 

DS IN 12 HOURS 
GX 70 IFIS="PM"THENX=K 
EB 80 F0RI = 1T03:H = INT (T ( 
I)/10) :L=T(I)-10*H 
:T (I>=16*H+L:NEXT 
MC 90 C=56331:POKEC,T(l) 
:P0KEC-1,T (2) :POKE 

C-2,T(3) 
Fft 100 PRINT" (DOWN] ACTIV 



FD 


IIH 


HS 


120 


JB 


130 


SK 


140 


RE 


153 


SB 


163 


PH 


170 



XG 180 



XH 190 
GJ 200 

HD 210 



FD 22( 



HA 230 



SG 240 
BJ 250 

XX 260 
MD 270 



HG 280 
DE 290 



KE 300 

KA 310 
HP 320 

PG 330 
CE 340 

GG 350 

DC 360 



ATE USER PORT AT: 

(DOWN)" 

R=18:GOSUB290 

IFI$="PM"THENV=K 

B=Y+T(1)*3600+T (2 

)*60+T(3) 

PRINT" (DOWN)PRESS 

ANY KEY TO START 

CLOCK, {DOWN} 
GETA5:IFAS=""THEN 

150 

POKEC-3,0 

H=PEEK(C) :M=PEEK( 

C-1) :S=PEEK(C-2) : 

T=PEEK(C-3) 

C1S=CHR5( (16ANDH) 

/16 + 48)+CHRS C (ISA 

NDH)+48) 

H«VAL(C1S)*36O0 

IFC1S="09"THENC1S 

= "12" 

C2$=CHRS( (240ANDM 

)/16+48)+CHR$ { (15 

ANDM)+48) :M=VAL(C 

2S)*60 

C35=CHR$( (240ANDS 

)/16+48)+CHRS( (15 

ANDS)+48) :S=VAL(C 

33) 

A=X+H+M+S:IFA=2*K 

THENPOKEC,0:POKEC 

-3,0:X=0 

IFA=BTHEN420 

IFA<KTHENJ$="AM": 

GOTO270 

J$="PM" 

PRINT"(WHT}TIME I 

S "ClS+":"+C2S+": 

"+C3S+":"T;J$+" 

{UP}" 

GOTO170 

HS="";INPUT"HOURS 

";HS:IFHS<"0"ORHS 

>"9"THENPRINT" 

{2 UP)":GOTO290 

T(1)=VAL{H5) tIFT ( 

1><0ORT(1)>12THEN 

PRINT"(2 UP}":GOT 

0290 

IFT(1)=12THENT (1) 

= 

MS=""; INPUT" 

(down}mikutes";mS 
:ifhs<"0"orms>"9" 
thenprint"(3 up}" 

:GOTO320 

T (2)=VAL(MS) :IFT ( 

2)<0ORT (2)>59THEN 

PRINT"{3 UP}":GDT 

0320 

S$="" :INPUT" 

{DOWN}SECONDS";S$ 

:IFS5<"0"ORS9>"9" 

THENPRINT"(3 UP)" 
:GOTO340 

T (3)=VAL(S$) :IFT( 
3X0ORT (3)>59THEN 
PRINT"!3 UP}":GOT 

0340 

PRINT"{DOWM)AM OR 
PH (PRESS A OR P 



[ID 370 



EE 330 

FH 390 
JD 400 

EX 410 
AQ 420 



XK 430 



GS 


440 


HO 


450 


HF 


460 


HB 


470 



)" 

GETIS:IFI$<> 

ENIFI$<>"P"T 



IFIS="A"THEN 

M": GOTO 4 00 

I5="PM" 

POKE214,R:PR 

0KE211,24:PR 

RETURN 

PRINT" {CLR}{ 

USER PORT PI 

N." 

PRINT" {DOWN} 
ANY KEY TO 

{SPACE}OFF. 

P0KEP,1:REH 
ON PIN C 

GETAS:IFA$»" 

450 

POKEP,0 

PRINT" (DOWN) 

{SPACE)PORT 
OFF." 



"A"TH 
HEK37 

IS»"A 



INT:P 
INTIS 

DOWN) 
N C 

PRESS 
TURN 

TURNS 

"THEN 

USER 
PIN C 

□ 



ATTENTION 

WRITERS, 

PROGRAMMERS 

Gazette is looking for utili- 
ties, applications, games, 
educational programs, and 
tutorial articles. If you've cre- 
ated a program that you 
think other readers might en- 
joy or find useful, send it 
and the documentation on 
disk to 

Gazette Submissions 

Reviewer 

COMPUTE Publications 

324 W. Wendover, 

Ste. 200 

Greensboro, NC 27408 

Please enclose an SASE if 
you want your materials re- 
turned. 



Send New Product 

Announcements 

and/or Press ReSeases 

on your 

Commodore 64/128 

products to: 

Tom Netsel c/o 

COMPUTE 



JULY 1993 COMPUTE G-23 



DIVERSIONS 



Fred D'Ignazio 



A 64 can be an ideal 
first commiter 

for toddlers— as well 

as a great 

teaching tool. 



TODDLER'S CHOICE 

For a recent Public Broadcast- 
ing Service show, "Learning 
Matters," we videotaped my 
segment, Technoiogy Corner, 
in my family's study. We re- 
viewed ttie newest multimedia 
CD-ROM titles for toddlers, in- 
cluding Just Grandma and Me 
{Br0derbund); Mottier Goose 
(Sierra On-Line); Silly Noisy 
House (Voyager); and Millie's 
Math House (Edmark). Our re- 
viewers were my three-year- 
old daugtiter Laura and her 
one-year-old buddy Alex. 

At the end of the segment, 
the show's producer, John Mer- 
row, noted that the equipment 
and software we used was 
"expensive and possibly out 
of reach" for many families. He 
wanted to know if there was an- 
other toddler we could inter- 
view who had a more down-to- 
earth computer setup. 

I thought of Tommy Kurek, 
Laura's next-door neighbor, 
and we called Tommy's par- 
ents and scheduled a visit. 

Tommy's computer, it 
turned out, was a perfect tod- 
dler configuration: a second- 
hand Commodore 64. Most of 
the software titles and extra 
equipment were purchased at 
yard sales or flea markets. The 
price of Tommy's entire setup 
was well under $400— the 
price of a single CD-ROM 
drive. 

The computer station was 
on a small table in the corner 
of the family living room sur- 
rounded by books, Tommy's 
toys, and two or three loung- 
ing cats. When the family did 
their computing, Tommy sat in 
his chair, and his mom and 
dad sat on each side of him 
on the floor. This made them 
all about the same size. 

To begin the interview, we 
asked Tommy's daddy, Keith, 
if Tommy had suffered from 
not having the latest multime- 
dia computer equipment. 
"I don't think so," said 



Keith. "Tommy just turned 
three. While he was still two, us- 
ing the Commodore 64, he 
learned how to write his own 
name, his friend Laura's 
name, my name, his mommy's 
name (Leanne), and the 
names of all four family cats. 
"Also, while he was two. 
Tommy used the computer to 
learn how to count to 39, 
count objects on the comput- 
er screen and press the cor- 
rect number on the keyboard, 
and recognize and find every 
number from to 9 and every 
letter in the alphabet." 

"Do you have any advice 
for fellow parents who have tod- 
dlers?" we asked Keith. 

"Tell them to find or buy a 
Commodore 64," said Keith. 
"If the parents buy an expen- 
sive computer, they'd be so wor- 
ried about its safety they'll nev- 
er be relaxed around it with 
their two-year-old, and they'll 
be afraid to turn their child 
loose on the computer. The 
great thing about this comput- 
er is it's 100 percent Tommy's 
computer He can do anything 
he wants, and the Commo- 
dore can take it. 

"The other good thing 
about the 64," Keith contin- 
ued, "is that lots of Tommy's ed- 
ucational programs come on 
cartridges. When we go visit 
Grandma on weekends, we 
just throw the computer into 
the car along with a couple of 
Tommy's favorite cartridges. 
At Grandma's we plug into her 
television set, and Tommy is 
busy for hours working on his 
number, shape, and letter 
games. When it comes time to 
go home, it takes about ten sec- 
onds to unplug the computer 
and toss it back into the car" 
We asked Tommy to pick 
out his favorite 64 programs to 
recommend to other toddlers 
who are just starting to com- 
putey. Here's his list: 

• KinderComp (Spinnaker 
Software). A set of shape-, num- 



24 COMPUTE JULY 1993 



ber-, and letter-recognition pro- 
grams perfectly suited for 
your toddler computer whiz. 

• Astro G rover (CTW-Sesa- 
me Street). Same as above, 
featuring the lovable Sesame 
Street muppet Grover. 

• Ernie's Magic Shapes 
{CTW-Sesame Street). Shape- 
recognition program featuring 
Ernie. 

• Big Bird's Special Deliv- 
ery (CTW-Sesame Street). 
More early learning programs 
featuring Big Bird. AH three pro- 
grams (Grover, Ernie, and Big 
Bird) can be found in a single 
package entitled The Sesame 
Street Learning Library. 

• Kids on Keys (Spinnaker 
Software). Helps with key- 
board recognition. 

• Alphabet Zoo (Spinnaker 
Software). Letter recognition. 

• Learning with Leeper (Si- 
erra On-Line}. Fun, education- 
al games hosted by cute little 
onscreen characters such as 
Leeper. 

• Design-a-Saurus (Britan- 
nica Software). Dinosaur rec- 
ognition and naming program. 
(Tommy is a dinosaur nut. He 
carries a Tyrannosaurus Rex 
doll to bed with him instead of 
a blanket.) 

• Dinosaurs Are Forever 
(Polarware). More reptiles for 
young dinosaur enthusiasts. 

• Kermit's Electronic Story 
Maker (Simon & Schuster). 
You and your children can 
cook up your own online pic- 
ture books. 

The cost of these programs? 
"At worst, under a hundred dol- 
lars," Keith says. "The impor- 
tant thing is to watch for yard 
sales where you can pick up 
children's software for just a cou- 
ple of dollars. Also, sign onto lo- 
cal bulletin boards where you 
can pick up lots of freeware edu- 
cational programs. Join a 64 us- 
er group, and you're sure to run 
into other young parents who 
are eager to share with you and 
your kids." n 



PROGRAMS 



ULTIMATE ML MONITOR 

By Ted Green and Ed Balchick 
Examining and debugging troublesome 
machine language (ML) routines or trying 
to see how well machine code actually 
works is usually a struggle, ML programs 
run so quickly that it's difficult to 
determine exactly what happens and 
when it happens without altering the pro- 
gram. A standard monitor's breakpoint re- 
turns are not much help because the dis- 
play is corrupted and the program halts. 
Now, with the Ultimate ML Monitor, you 
can execute any piece of ML code in 
slow motion or single step through it one 
command at a time! A special user inter- 
face lets you interact directly with the ML 
program. You can view and control the ac- 
tual operation of the program in text or hi- 
res mode as it runs; examine and modify 
the program, data, or register values; and 
allow the Kernal serial bus to access rou- 
tines while in the single-step mode. 
These and many other features, such as 
full implementation of 6502 quasi-op- 
codes, make the Ultimate ML Monitor a 
powerful programming utility that you'll 
wonder how you did without. 

Getting Started 

Ultimate ML Monitor consists of three 
programs: two small programs that 
make up the loader system and the 
main program. These three files must 
all be saved to the same disk, but the 
program that you wish to monitor can 
be on any disk, even another drive. 

The setup portion of the loader sys- 
tem is written in BASIC. To avoid typ- 
ing errors, use The Automatic Proofread- 
er to enter the program, See "Typing 
Aids" elsewhere in this section. When 
you finish typing this portion in. save it 
to disk with the filename ULTIMON.B. 

Next, the smart portion of the loader 
system is written in machine language, 
and you will need MLX, our machine lan- 
guage entry program. Again, see "Typ- 
ing Aids." When MLX prompts, re- 
spond with the following values. 

Starting address: CC13 
Ending address: CFFE 

After you type in the loader program, 
be sure to save a copy to disk with the 
filename ULTIMON.L 
The monitor portion of the program 



is written entirely in machine language 
for speed and compactness. You 
must enter this program with MLX. 
When MLX prompts you, respond with 
the following values. 

Starting address: SOOO 
Ending address: 8EBF 

Be sure to save a copy to disk with the 
filename ULTIMON.O, 

Looding the Program 

Ultimate is very easy to use. Load and 
run Ultimon.B as you would any BASIC 
program. Before you run it, however, 
you should have the program available 
that contains the ML code that you 
wish to examine. This program should 
be copied onto the same disk as the Ul- 
timate system if you are using a single 
drive. If you are using Ultimate with a 
two-drive system, have each disk in a 
drive before running Ultimate. 

As for what kind of program to look 
at, the possibilities are almost limitless. 
You aren't limited to looking at a pure 
ML program, the kind you load with the 
,8,1 extension and start with a SYS com- 
mand that you often forget. Ultimate 
will examine an ML program that 
loads like BASIC or even a BASIC pro- 
gram that reads the ML from data state- 
ments and pokes them to memory and 
then calls them with a SYS command. 

In the latter two cases. Ultimate can 
catch the ML portion just as BASIC 
tries to execute it (if you start in single 
step}. This means that for BASIC pro- 
grams in general, all of the BASIC is ac- 
tually run by the interpreter. However, 
once you are in the ML routine, you can- 
not go back to the BASIC program. 

When you have selected the pro- 
gram that you wish to examine, load 
the drive(s) and run Ultimon.B. The 
screen will clear and display the follow- 
ing prompt. 

ADDRESS TO LOAD MONITOR: 

The address must be entered as a dec- 
imal value. The Ultimate program can 
be put at any unused area from 2048 
($0800) up to and including 36864 
($9000), It can also be put at 49152 
($C000), If you try to place it above 
49152, you will get an error message. 
Placing the monitor in the RAM under 



ROM (BASIC or Kernal) is possible, but 
not recommended, except for ad- 
vanced users. The most important fac- 
tor in choosing the load address is de- 
termining where there will be 4K of 
memory that won't be used by the pro- 
gram to be monitored. 

Don't forget about BASIC variables. 
If they are a problem, protect 4K for Ulti- 
mate first. Ultimate will protect itself 
from any memory access commands 
while in any mode except full speed. 
This protective feature will cause the 
monitored program not to execute 
those commands, possibly causing an 
infinite loop in the monitored program. 
If this happens, it's best to start over 
and choose a new load address. 

You'll then be prompted for a pro- 
gram to monitor and a drive number 
from which to load. If you enter the 
same drive as the current drive, you 
must copy your program to the disk 
with the Ultimate system on it because 
there is no time to switch disks. 

You'll then be asked whether you 
want to run the program in single-step 
mode or at full speed. Enter Sfor sin- 
gle step or Ffor full speed. You'll usu- 
ally want to start in single-step mode 
for most small programs or anytime 
you want complete control over the 
whole monitored program. Full-speed 
mode is a good choice when you 
want to monitor a large program, and 
the piece of code that you're interest- 
ed in is executed sometime after the 
program begins. 

If you select full speed, hitting the Re- 
store key at anytime will break into the 
program in the single-step mode (un- 
less the program changes the NMI vec- 
tor at $0318 while in full speed). When 
the single-step mode is activated, the 
status line will be displayed at the bot- 
tom of the screen. 

Using the Program 

Once you enter the single-step mode 
of Ultimate, the main program interface 
is the interactive status line. Note that 
all numbers on the status line are 
shown in hex. The main features of the 
status line are the foliowing: PC 
(which shows the contents of the emu- 
lated program counter of the program 
you are examining) and A, X, Y, and 
SR (which are the current contents of 
the emulated accumulator and the X, 

JULY 1993 COMPUTE G-25 



PROGRAMS 



Y, and status [flag] registers). 

To the left of PC is the space for the 
full-speed Kernal routine indicator, an 
asterisk (*). More about that later. 

The most important feature of the stat- 
us line is the command display field. 
This contains the opcode mnemonic of 
the current instruction and the operand 
field. The operand field can be toggled 
between two different types of displays 
for some commands. The secondary 
mode is like a standard disassembler 
listing of the command. 

The main display mode is what 
gives Ultimate its powerful debugging 
features. It has the ability to convert the 
addressing mode into the actual mem- 
ory location used by the CPU and to dis- 
play it on the status line. For example, 
if locations OE = 75, OF = 10, and 
Y = AF, then the command above 
would display as LDA $1124. You can 
toggle between these two modes at an- 
ytime with the asterisk key, even view 
the two modes of the same command 
without stepping. There are some com- 
mands that will show an address 
(branches, RTS, JSR, and so on) that 
look identical. The command field also 
indicates the address of the destina- 
tion if a branch is taken. An RTS will dis- 
play the actual address of the com- 
mand after the JSR, not the address 1 
that it pulls off the stack. There are 
some other features used in the status 
display, but these will be discussed in 
the appropriate key description below. 

Key Functions 

A single keystroke activates many of Ul- 
timate's key features. 

F7 

Pressing f7 executes the next program 
instruction and displays the results on 
the status line. 



Press S to enter slow motion program 
emulation from single-step mode. The 
approximate execution speed of this 
mode varies greatly, but generally 
takes about 150 times longer than real 
execution speed. If there are a lot of 
Kernal routines, the Kernal mode can 
speed up the program considerably. 



The back arrow exits the monitor and 

G-26 COMPUTE JULY 1993 



runs the monitored program in full 
speed {real execution). Ultimate may 
be corrupted if set at a bad address. 
This key is good for running through a 
large piece of code to get to a particu- 
lar point. It also sets up the Restore 
key to go to single-step nnode. 

Restore 

Restore triggers Ultimate from ful!- 
speed mode, breaks into the program, 
and enters single-step mode at the cur- 
rent command. 



The asterisk toggles the operand field 
display between disassembly mode 
and address-calculation mode. 

f1 

This function key toggles the status 
line on and off without running the pro- 
gram. It's used to view the current vid- 
eo display area under the status line. 
Single step (f7) and slow motion (S) 
are the only valid keys while the status 
line is off. 

H 

Hunt allows you to enter an address 
that is the actual computed address op- 
erand of a command. The program 
runs in slow motion until it finds a com- 
mand that uses that address. This is 
useful for seeing when a particular mem- 
ory location is accessed in a program. 
If the hunt is successful and the status 
line displays the command iine and 
PC, you can toggle the display mode 
(*) or look at the source code iisting. 
Hunt can also be exited at anytime 
with the @ (At) key. 

R 

The R key will let the program run until 
an address is reached. Enter the PC of 
any command in the code and then 
the program will run in slow motion un- 
til the command is ready to be execut- 
ed. This means that when the single- 
step mode display comes on, the com- 
mand before the one you selected will 
be on the display line. That is because 
when a command is shown, it has al- 
ready been executed and the new PC 
has been calculated. This is useful to 
get the program to the beginning of a 
specific subroutine or section of code 
that you are interested in without hav- 



ing to try to stop it by hand at the right 
spot. This mode can be canceled at an- 
ytime by pressing the @ (At) key. 



Use the J key to run through a subrou- 
tine in slow motion until the correspond- 
ing RTS is encountered. This means 
that all nested subroutines will be exe- 
cuted and normally the program wiil dis- 
play the RTS command when it returns 
to single-step mode. Since this com- 
mand triggers off the emulated stack 
level, the program could also drop 
back into single-step mode if two val- 
ues are pulled from the stack or the 
stack pointer is incremented by 2 be- 
fore an RTS is encountered. This is use- 
ful in allowing you to see if the routine 
pulls its return address off the stack so 
it can jump somewhere else. It's safe 
to enter J-mode anytime after a JSR. If 
it's used outside of a subroutine, it may 
never drop back into single-step 
mode on its own, but you can exit at an- 
ytime with the @ (At) key. 



P sets the emulated PC to a new ad- 
dress; the beginning of a program; or 
the end of a loop, subroutine, or wher- 
ever. The new address is entered in 
the PC space on the status line. After 
the address has been entered, the val- 
ue will reverse to show that you have to 
make a decision. You must either 
press Return or f3. Return resets the em- 
ulated stack pointer to the top of the 
stack, $FF. This is useful when restart- 
ing the monitored program so that 
stack doesn't wrap around. Pressing f3 
will not change the current stack point- 
er. This is useful for going to the begin- 
ning of a loop or jumping over some 
code where you may need the values 
that are on the program's stack. Noth- 
ing changes but the location of where 
the monitor reads the next command. 



Dump has the same usage as Hunt ex- 
cept that all occurrences of the desired 
address usage (PC) are sent to the 
printer. This will not stop until the @ (At) 
key is pressed to cancel the mode. 

K 

This key toggles Kernal mode, the de- 
sired execution mode of calls to Kernai 



subroutines listed in the Kernal jump ta- 
ble (SFF81-$FFF3}. The default mode 
is step-by-step emulation (in single- 
step or slow mode). The special mode 
is full-speed execution, which is desig- 
nated by an asterisk to the left of PC 
on the status line. 

This mode is useful for speeding up 
programs with heavy Kernal usage 
where you are only concerned with the 
routine's net effect on the program. It al- 
so allows serial bus I/O routines such 
as disk access even in single-step 
mode. Most Kernal routines that use 
the serial bus cannot be successfully 
single stepped. Note that if the Kernal 
LOAD is used, the monitor program 
could be corrupted because the self- 
protection feature is temporarily disa- 
bled. 

If the Kernal mode is off, single- 
step mode will still let you choose how 
to execute each Kernal call. When you 
get to a Kernal call, the address of the 
routine will reverse. Return will execute 
the routine in full speed, and f3 will 
take it out of reverse mode and allow 
you to continue to single step through 
the routine. 

If you press Return, the routine will ex- 
ecute, and the next command shown 
will be the RTS of the routine. Also, the 
PC will show the address of the routine 
itself and will be reversed to show that 
you just executed that Kernal routine. 
The RTS shows where the program is 
returning to. If Kernal mode is on, then 
all Kernal routines will be executed in 
full speed with results as mentioned 
above. 



Fill lets you change the contents of any 
memory location. Note that the monitor 
will not protect itself, so use caution 
when altering any monitor parameters 
given in the article. 

M 

Memory will let you examine the con- 
tents of a memory location. For areas 
that have layers of memory such as 
$D000 (character ROM and I/O device 
RAM), the memory configuration used 
by the monitored program determines 
where the value comes from. To view a 
different area, alter the offset value, 
START + $0055, with the Fill com- 
mand. START is equal to the address 



you loaded the monitor to at the begin- 
ning of the session. If you do this, you 
must change it back before you contin- 
ue, or the monitored program may 
crash. 

A, X, or Y 

Enter a new value into a CPU register. 
After a value is entered, it will reverse 
to show that you have to make a deci- 
sion. Return will modify the emulated 
status register like an LDA command, 
while f3 will leave the flags unchanged. 
These features may be useful for alter- 
ing loop indexes or putting a keycode 
into A to be checked when letting the 
program go to the routine that handles 
the key. 

W 

W redisplays the status line in the cur- 
rent screen configuration. This is use- 
ful in single-step mode when stepping 
through code that alters VIC parame- 
ters and the screen changes so you 
can't see the status line anymore. Press- 
ing W will recover it without stepping. 



C cycles the color of the status line 
text for text mode and hi-res mode stat- 
us line displays independently. All 16 
colors are available. A separate color 
can be locked in for each mode and 
will stay the same even if you toggle be- 
tween monitor and full-speed modes. 
You won't have to change it after switch- 
ing modes. 

In hi-res mode, the foreground and 
background colors are changed. 
Since the background color changes 
only after all 16 foreground colors 
have changed, it may take a while to 
get the desired color combination. !f 
you know the color codes that you 
want for the foreground and back- 
ground, you can put the proper value 
into START + $052D. (See F key 
above.) The value should be in the fol- 
lowing format: High nybble equals back- 
ground; low nybble equals foreground. 
See any 64 reference book for more de- 
tails. To actually implement the color af- 
ter changing the memory value, hit f1 
twice. 



V toggles multicolor mode. This key 
will have effects in both text and hi-res 



modes. You may find it useful to turn 
off multicolor mode to read the status 
line clearly and then turn it back on. 



G toggles hi-res display between text 
mode and hi-res mode. This is for see- 
ing the status line should the display 
mode change while single stepping 
(like W key). Note that the proper 
mode will be selected automatically 
when changing between single-step, 
slow, and full-speed modes. 

Del 

The Delete key has two functions. It re- 
prints the current status line with the 
command after using M or F keys, and 
cancels data-entry modes of any keys 
requiring hex input, such as H or P. 

@ 

The @ (At) key cancels any slow-mo- 
tion mode {from S, J, R, H, or D) back 
to single-step mode. 

Operotionat Notes 

Not only are the regular 56 commands 
of the 6502 interpreted, but also the 14 
quasi-opcodes as defined by Raeto Col- 
lin West in "Programming the 64" by 
COMPUTE books. Most of these op- 
codes have reproducible results, al- 
though many don't seem to lend thenn- 
selves to most programming tasks. 

The new mnemonics that you may en- 
counter while experimenting are ASO, 
RLA, LSE, RRA, AXS, LAX, DCM, INS, 
ALR. ARR, OAL, SAX, SKB, and SKW. 
While there isn't enough space to dis- 
cuss quast-ops at length, most of 
them essentially decode in a way that 
is similar to the LDA-type commands. 
SKB branches over (skips) one byte, 
and SKW skips two. 

These codes are included here 
when most other monitors ignore them 
because some software may use them 
to hide codes. 

Another debugging feature is that Ul- 
timate stops automatically at a BRK or 
any invalid commands. BRK com- 
mands can be continued normally, but 
invalid opcodes will display three 
back arrows (♦-<-<-) and the hex value 
of the invalid opcode that has been en- 
countered. At this point, reset the PC 
to a new piece of code to continue. 

Ultimate executes quasi-ops like it ex- 

JULY1993 COMPUTE G-27 



PROGRAMS 



Bcutes all other commands. They are ex- 
ecuted by the 6502 after any address- 
es are decoded. 

The program works by emulating ma- 
jor features of the 6502 and 64. The re- 
al stack and CPU registers are copied 
to a protected area of memory within 
tine monitor, and all memory activity is 
monitored in protected mode so that 
the monitored program behaves as if it 
were running in real mode. Also, win- 
dow space is maintained and protect- 
ed for the text screen line, color mem- 
ory line, and one hi-res line so that the 
status line may be displayed while any 
program access to the real memory ar- 
ea is sent to the window. All of this win- 
dowing Is generally transparent to the 
user and the monitored program. 

For example, an access to the first lo- 
cation of the status line LDA $07C0, in 
default area, is shown as such, al- 
though the real load comes from the 
screen window maintained by the mon- 
itor. If a command tries to access the 
monitor's protected memory, the com- 
mand will not be executed. In single- 
step mode the operand field will be re- 
versed to alert you of this condition. 

Advanced Uses 

The Uitimon.O program is a stand- 
alone program, it contains the routine 
that actually performs the absolute ad- 
dress conversions necessary to relo- 
cate the program to the new address. 
This makes it very useful to load and 
run after another program has already 
been loaded. 

During the first call, Uitimon.O mod- 
ifies itself so that later calls to the start 
address enter the monitor mode. This 
feature may be useful when a program 
that you wish to monitor is so large 
that it would overwrite Ultimate. Usual- 
ly programs using some hi-res graph- 
ics are like this. The solution would be 
to load the monitor over a 4K section of 
a bitmap that may not be needed 
while you are trying to figure out some 
portion of the program. The loading 
could be performed by replacing a 
small piece of code with a JSR to the 
following routine (WEDGE). Then, the 
wedge routine would have to be piggy- 
backed onto another piece of the mon- 
itored program. 

SETLFS = SFFBA 

G-2e COMPUTE JULY 1993 



SETNAM =$FFBD 
LOAD = SFFDS 
DEVICE = $BA 

WEDGE LDA #1 

LDX #<NAME+1 ;lo byte 
LDY #>NAME+1 ;hi bytsi JSR SET- 
NAM 

NAME LDA #69 jElecimai 
LDX DEVICE 
LDY #0 ;relocate 
JSR SETLFS 

LDA #0 ;loail 

TAX 

LDY #>BEGINI JSR LOAD 

JMP BEGIN 

This loader wiil load, relocate, and kick 
start into single-step mode any ML pro- 
gram as long as Uitimon.O is saved as 
filename E, BEGIN = safe area 
(bitmap). Just find free memory for 
WEDGE and insert JSR WEDGE into 
code. Another technique is to load Ul- 
timate ML Monitor with a standard mon- 
itor that can perform a relocatable 
load to any address. Then run Ultimate 
so that it initializes itself to the new ad- 
dress. The initialization routine ends 
with an RTS. Now Ultimate is ready to 
use or can be resaved from the new ad- 
dress with a length of 4K. To call it, 
just use JSR or SYS to go to the new ad- 
dress. 

ULTIMON.B 

HG 5 REM COPYRIGHT 1993 - COMP 
QTE PUBLICATIONS - ALL RI 
GHT.S RESERVED 

MP 10 IFATHENSyS52243 

KD 20 D = PEEKa86) ;A = -1:L0AD"UL 
TIM0N,L",D,1 



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20 


4C 


4J. 


4E 


3E 


47 


55 


41 


47 


45 


20 


4D 


4F 


D8 


4E 


49 


54 


4F 


52 


59 


42 


45 


71 


2E 


20 


4A 


2E 


20 


42 


41 


4C 


E2 


43 


48 


49 


43 


4B 


20 


20 


54 


47 


2E 


20 


4A 


2E 


20 


47 


52 


45 


22 


45 


4E 


20 


00 


20 


60 


A5 


A9 


88 


00 


85 


7A 


A9 


02 


B5 


7B 


20 


67 


79 


00 


20 


F3 


BC 


4C 


9B 


BC 


Fl 


A9 


0D 


4C 


D2 


FF 


55 


4C 


54 


FF 


49 


4D 


4F 


4E 


2E 


4F 


9F 


41 


EC 


44 


44 


52 


45 


53 


53 


20 


46 


3F 


4F 


52 


20 


4D 


4F 


4E 


49 


54 


B6 


4F 


52 


20 


00 


9F 


4E 


41 


4D 


55 


45 


20 


4F 


46 


20 


50 


52 


4F 


46 


47 


52 


41 


4D 


20 


54 


4F 


20 


65 


42 


45 


20 


4D 


4F 


4E 


49 


54 


0D 


4F 


52 


45 


44 


0D 


00 


9F 


4E 


4E 


55 


4D 


42 


45 


52 


20 


4F 


46 


C9 


20 


44 


52 


49 


56 


45 


20 


00 


47 


9F 


53 


49 


4E 


47 


4G 


45 


20 


10 


53 


54 


45 


50 


20 


4F 


52 


20 


BE 


46 


55 


4C 


4C 


20 


53 


50 


45 


52 


45 


44 


20 


00 


05 


45 


52 


52 


4B 


4F 


52 


20 


21 


21 


20 


45 


4D 


IB 


55 


4C 


41 


54 


4F 


52 


20 


57 


F5 


49 


4C 


40 


20 


4F 


56 


45 


52 


6B 


57 


52 


49 


54 


45 


20 


4C 


4F 


C3 


41 


44 


45 


52 


00 


A9 


C0 


20 


4F 


90 


FF 


A5 


BA 


8D 


33 


CF 


23 


31 


CC 


FF 


20 


53 


CD 


20 


53 


CD 


9A 


A9 


61 


A0 


CD 


20 


IE 


AB 


20 


AF 


3F 


CD 


A4 


64 


C0 


C0 


90 


0E 


CE 


A6 


65 


FO 


OA 


A9 


C7 


A0 


CD 


97 


20 


IE 


AB 


4C 


F0 


CD 


A2 


00 


8E 


8E 


18 


03 


8C 


19 


03 


20 


53 


9F 


CD 


A9 


77 


A0 


CD 


20 


IE 


AB 


E9 


A9 


00 


85 


C6 


20 


60 


AS 


A0 


31 


00 


B9 


00 


02 


F0 


06 


99 


0B 


45 


01 


C8 


D0 


P5 


8C 


34 


CF 


20 


02 


53 


CD 


A9 


99 


A0 


CD 


20 


IE 


6F 


AS 


2<i 


3F 


CD 


A5 


65 


8D 


32 


A3 


CF 


20 


53 


CD 


A9 


0F 


AE 


32 


49 


CF 


A0 


0F 


20 


BA 


FF 


A9 


00 


IE 


23 


BD 


FF 


20 


C0 


FF 


20 


IE 


EE 


CF 


20 


C0 


FF 


A9 


00 


85 


02 


73 


A2 


0F 


20 


C6 


FF 


29 


CF 


FF 


BE 


C9 


2C 


F0 


07 


05 


02 


85 


02 


DC 


4C 


30 


CE 


A0 


FP 


C8 


20 


CF 


86 


FF 


99 


00 


02 


C9 


2C 


D0 


F5 


4E 


A9 


00 


99 


00 


02 


A9 


01 


8D 


87 


86 


02 


A9 


00 


A0 


02 


20 


IE 


AS 


AB 


A5 


02 


C9 


30 


D0 


0F 


A2 


EA 


45 


20 


C6 


FF 


20 


CF 


FF 


85 


9A 


FB 


20 


CF 


FF 


85 


FC 


A9 


45 


12 



CEC3 
CECB 
CED3 
CEDB 
CEE3 
CEEB 
CEF3 
CEFB 
CF03 
CF0B 
CF13 
CFIB 
CF23 
CF2B 
CF33 
CF3B 
CF43 
CF4B 
CF53 
CF5B 
CF63 
CF6B 
CF73 
CF7B 
CF83 
CF8B 
GF93 
CF9B 
CFhi 
CFftB 
CPB3 
CFBB 
CFC3 
CFCB 
CFD3 
CFDB 
CFE3 
CFEB 
CFF3 
CFFB 



20 C3 
20 CC 
03 4C 
AB he 

FF AA 
C9 46 
B9 34 
F7 A9 
BD FF 
00 20 
03 8A 
4C 34 
A0 45 
A2 0B 
00 00 
FC E9 
08 03 
57 CF 

03 3D 
00 20 
AS FB 
A5 FC 
2C A0 
Bl FB 
A3 AS 
C9 9E 
A5 7B 
00 02 
A5 14 
90 IS 
15 E9 
08 03 
C5 CF 
20 79 
3D 08 
20 73 
BC A5 
FB 4 6 
A5 FC 

4 8 6C 



FF A9 
FF A5 
29 CE 
CD 20 
F0 FA 
D0 F2 
CF 99 
09 A2 
A9 45 
BA FF 
20 D5 
03 A9 
20 BA 
A0 01 
38 A5 
03 B0 
A9 CF 
A9 87 
09 03 
D5 FF 
F0 04 
C9 08 

02 Bl 
35 15 
4C AE 
F3 42 
48 A5 
E6 7B 
E9 87 
38 AS 

03 B0 
A9 CF 
68 85 
00 4C 
03 A9 
00 20 
64 85 
02 B0 
48 A5 
18 03 



0F 20 

02 C9 
20 53 
IE AB 
C9 53 

35 02 
33 03 
58 A0 
AE 3 3 
A2 00 
FF 20 
45 AE 
FF AD 
4C BD 
FB E9 
0D A9 
3D 09 
8D 08, 
20 IE 

36 2D 
C9 01 
D0 7B 
FB 85 
20 60 
A7 20 
C9 97 
7A 4 8 
23 EB 
A5 15 
14 E9 
0D A9 
8D 09 
7A 6 8 
E7 A7 
A7 8D 
8A AD 
FC A5 

03 6C 
FB 48 



C3 FF 
30 F0 
CD A9 
20 E4 
FO 04 
R0 CA 
88 D0 
CD 20 
CF A0 
AC 19 
44 FE 
32 CF 
34 CF 
FF 00 
FE A5 
88 8D 
03 4C 
03 A9 
CF A9 

84 2E 
F0 09 
A0 03 
14 C8 
R6 20 
73 00 
D0 38 
E6 7A 
B7 38 
E9 03 
FE A5 
83 8D 
03 4C 

85 7B 
A9 E4 
09 03 
20 9B 
65 85 
FB 00 
A9 20 



00 00 00 



ULTIM0N.0 



8000 
8008 
8010 
8018 
8020 
8028 
8030 
8038 
8040 
8048 
8050 
8058 
3060 
8068 
8070 
8078 
8B88 
8038 
8090 
8098 
80A0 
80Aa 
80B0 
30B8 
80C0 
80C8 
80D0 
80D8 



EA EA 
E3 BA 
69 0D 
2F 83 
8E B2 
8D 18 
A9 81 

00 01 
8E 73 
E0 83 
20 CI 
A0 00 
8C 96 
82 8C 
BE ED 
3B B9 
C9 8C 
20 3E 
10 08 
B0 25 

01 DC 
F0 25 
55 83 
0D 20 
CI 82 
20 36 
3D C9 
49 01 



EA A5 
CR 9R 

48 A9 
29 EF 
82 20 
3 A9 
8D 71 
9D 4A 

86 CA 
20 34 

82 78 
8C 61 

83 8C 

49 84 
8A 8E 
C8 8C 
8D 87 
83 A9 
AD B2 
A9 DF 
C9 BF 
CE A7 
FB 0B 
A8 FF 
20 CE 

87 F0 
04 D0 
80 86 



03 43 
63 85 
43 43 
8D 49 
3E 83 

82 8D 
86 A2 
8D E8 
9A A9 
8A 20 
A9 00 3 

84 8C 
BE 83 
20 D0 
E0 83 
8D 86 
80 20 
00 FB 
8 2 CD 
80 00 
F0 11 
80 F0 
4C 53 
23 AE 

83 20 
F5 C9 
13 AD 

85 F0 



20 89 
03 18 
63 20 
8D BA 
A9 C0 
19 93 
00 BD 
D0 F7 
7B 8D 
13 83 
5 01 
03 86 
aC D9 

32 A8 
BC EF 
80 B9 
FF FF 

33 58 
DC 3 2 
DC AD 
A9 00 
05 20 
30 A9 
FF 20 

85 85 
03 F0 

86 85 
E0 20 



7D 
8F 
AB 
F7 
7B 
89 
96 
4C 
8D 
91 
40 
02 
03 
5C 
5F 
EC 
BC 
74 
EB 
DD 
70 
8F 
93 
E4 
38 
80 
35 
11 
29 
E6 
71 
35 
9B 
B4 
BF 
51 
FE 
28 
7D 
0E 



IC 
24 
C8 
ID 
7B 
70 
AB 
7B 
E2 
60 
03 
34 
65 
31 
05 
DO 
38 
B6 
04 
42 
AD 
A9 
66 
39 
61 
35 
52 
AA 



80E0 
80E8 
80F0 
80F8 
8100 
8108 
8110 
8118 
8120 
8128 
8133 
8138 
8140 
8148 
8150 
8158 
8160 
8168 
8170 
8178 
8180 
8188 
8190 
8198 
8iA0 
81A8 
81B0 
81B8 
81C0 
81C8 
81D0 
81D3 
81E0 
81E3 
81F0 
81F8 
8200 
8203 
8210 
8218 
8220 
8228 
8230 
8238 
8240 
8248 
8250 
8258 
8260 
8268 
8270 
8278 
8280 
8288 
8290 
8298 
32A0 
32A8 
82B0 
82B8 
8 2C0 
82C8 
8200 
8208 
32E0 
82E8 
82F0 
32F8 
8300 
8308 



:92 86 30 

:C9 00 00 

:AS 86 85 

:18 AC B2 

:82 A9 80 

:85 00 3 

:80 C9 11 

:D9 86 68 

:C9 29 D0 

:84 A2 04 

:82 8D Dl 

:D2 82 A2 

:48 83 D0 

:82 20 06 

:1F D0 0B 

:8D 16 D0 

:D0 0B AD 

:ai 84 4C 

:09 20 92 

:C5 80 C9 

:86 A9 40 

:80 C9 15 

:A9 80 80 

:21 87 20 

:4C C8 80 

:D9 86 A9 

:3D 20 21 

:01 20 OB 

:43 83 D0 

:A2 16 20 

:48 CA CA 

:33 D0 00 

:68 08 68 

:68 4C C2 

:A2 IB 20 

:4C 00 81 

:20 20 EB 

:D0 81 C9 

:O0 49 20 

:81 C9 14 

:D0 09 EE 

:4C 31 82 

:84 80 62 

:C8 80 C9 

:89 49 01 

:03 A9 2A 

iSR 4C C2 

:20 09 86 

;A9 04 20 

:A0 00 20 

:20 BE 84 

:84 C8 28 

:20 A8 FF 

:F7 60 C9 

135 AD 55 

:BD 4A 8D 

;F7 A9 17 

:03 A9 80 

:03 A2 00 

:AD Dl 82 

:43 20 E9 

:80 80 86 

:BD FF FF 

;EA EA 60 

:40 8D 61 

:08 A9 03 

:01 80 F9 

(69 00 80 

:69 00 80 

:82 80 09 



E4 54 47 
04 A9 40 
D0 D3 C9 

82 C8 C8 
80 8C 80 
20 92 86 

00 0B 8A 
AA A9 01 
23 A2 04 
20 OE 86 
8 2 AD DD 

04 20 A3 

05 A9 FF 

83 4C 53 
AD 16 00 
4C C8 30 

01 84 49 
C2 30 C9 
36 20 E9 
ID 00 OB 
80 67 83 
D0 16 20 
DB 82 A9 
EB 86 20 
C9 24 D0 
AD 8D DB 
87 AD 



55 

20 BE 

0A 



DO 
43 



82 

B3 C9 
EB 86 80 
20 A6 83 
AD 49 80 
80 49 8D 
80 C9 17 
EB 86 8D 
C9 19 
86 80 
lA D0 0B 
8D 11 00 
D0 10 AD 
2D 85 AD 
EF 84 
63 
16 

8D EE 89 
2C A9 20 
80 C9 12 
A9 30 80 
Bl FF 20 
84 32 AD 
AD DC 8 2 
84 82 4C 
C8 B9 C7 
00 A9 
85 01 



EE 
85 20 
25 00 



39 



9D 
8D 
80 



00 01 

18 03 

19 03 
9A AD 02 
48 20 20 

84 A9 00 

85 80 67 
99 07 82 
EA EA EA 



84 



20 CI 
02 



2C A9 
82 18 20 

01 82 AD 

02 82 60 
82 AD Dl 



45 


42 


AO 


D0 


13 


6F 


22 


D0 


83 


8C 


DC 


0F 


AD 


36 


DF 


4C 


53 


FE 


48 


20 


28 


00 


E3 


38 


20 


90 


15 


AD 


DC 


El 


82 


8D 


Bl 


83 


20 


90 


80 


B2 


CD 


30 


C9 


08 


49 


10 


E9 


C9 


31 


93 


01 


8D 


20 


09 


00 


D0 


84 


4C 


B3 


20 


09 


56 


4C 


EC 


E0 


D9 


86 


59 


30 


20 


90 


DB 


32 


BF 


10 


20 


67 


82 


A9 


04 


80 


85 


40 


84 


20 


00 


DO 


24 


D7 


46 


80 


E9 


20 


48 


01 


48 


28 


87 


00 


01 


23 


00 


OB 


EA 


47 


8D 


55 


OB 


A2 


E7 


80 


4C 


F7 


AD 


11 


CF 


4C 


71 


82 


E8 


8C 


DD 


20 


85 


43 


AD 


EF 


BB 


85 


4C 


65 


AD 


EE 


76 


4A 


90 


18 


80 


9F 


C9 


00 


32 


78 


67 


83 


DB 


BE 


ED 


46 


DD 


82 


13 


20 


BE 


93 


EC 


80 


DD 


8A 


10 


5E 


20 


92 


6E 


A2 


00 


6C 


E8 


D0 


41 


80 


16 


C5 


8D 


17 


89 


82 


48 


8F 


83 


08 


6B 


8D 


8C 


58 


83 


60 


0C 


60 


EA 


C0 


60 


A9 


35 


82 


FO 


OB 


2C 


A9 


06 


13 


83 


2C 


02 


82 


74 


AD 


02 


5E 


82 


80 


5E 



8310 
8318 
8320 
8328 
8330 
8338 
8340 
8348 
Q353 
8358 
8363 
8368 
8370 
8378 
8380 
8388 
8390 
8398 
83A0 
83A8 
83B0 
83B8 
83C0 
33C8 
83D0 
8 3D8 
83E1? 
83E8 
83F0 
83F8 
8400 
8408 
8410 
8418 
8420 
8428 
8430 
8438 
3440 
8448 
8450 
8458 
8460 
3468 
8470 
8478 
3480 
3483 
3490 
3493 
84A0 
84A3 
84B0 
84B3 
34C0 
34C8 
8400 
84D8 
34E0 
84ES 
84F0 
84F3 
8500 
8508 
8510 
8518 
8520 
8528 
8530 
8538 



D8 82 
8D AD 
AD 49 
:47 80 
:8D 46 
:30 68 
:8D 55 
120 36 
:05 00 
;8C 80 
;61 84 
;F0 26 
;D1 32 
:D2 82 
:44 80 
; 20 BE 
:E8 60 
;04 20 
;4C BC 
;83 BD 
;87 20 
;BA 83 
;21 87 
;C8 EO 
;B9 44 
:84 88 
;00 BD 
;EE 8B 
;03 0E 
;90 F7 
1A9 00 
lOE 4C 
;EF 8B 
;87 DO 
:02 FO 
;B9 36 
;A9 10 
;05 A9 
;20 BE 
;A9 00 
;20 99 
;A2 0E 
;A9 00 
;0B 4A 
:07 82 
;AD 3F 
;34 A9 
;A2 09 
;20 99 
;84 A9 
;84 AO 
;01 82 
;81 84 
;AD 08 
;4A 4A 
;0F 7 8 
;83 30 
:69 40 
103 4C 
;6a A9 
:8D 62 
; 80 E9 
;F0 3C 
;29 C0 
;29 08 
:1E 80 
;E8 8E 
:8C 80 
:eS fl9 
:8D D4 



60 AD 02 
Dl 82 3D 
80 4 8 AC 
AO 46 8D 
80 8E 47 
80 49 8D 
80 A9 36 
87 C9 01 
F5 4A 60 
4A B0 0E 
C9 30 00 
24 A8 AO 
00 ID AD 
00 IS E8 
20 BE 84 
84 A9 20 
A9 00 60 
9C 83 20 

83 20 A6 
9F Bh 49 
B7 83 20 
A9 00 ID 
B9 08 8A 
13 00 F5 
8D BE 3E 
10 F4 20 
ED SB SO 
SO 00 82 
DD 82 2E 
9D AB 8 9 
00 08 23 
B4 83 AC 
E0 03 B0 

04 E0 02 
El A2 0C 
8D AS 20 
ED F9 82 
00 20 BE 

84 A2 00 
C9 6C 00 
84 A0 00 
00 DD A2 
30 4B F0 
B0 32 20 
00 07 88 
8 4 2 BE 
20 20 21 
20 90 84 

84 20 99 
20 4C 21 
D2 82 20 
20 BE 84 
AD D9 82 
8 2 4C AA 
4A 20 C9 
F3 18 69 

05 90 03 
08 58 2C 
A8 FF 9D 
DB 80 67 

85 A9 FF 
BC AD 11 
20 6C 85 
BD S9 3C 
0A 0A 0D 
E9 8C 8D 
EB aC A9 
00 86 A9 
9A 80 D3 

86 20 C2 



32 80 
45 3D 
48 80 
28 63 
8D 8C 
60 A5 
85 01 
F0 04 
A2 00 
A0 07 
2A A2 
DC 82 
DD 82 
10 13 
AD 45 
20 A8 
AO 00 
9F 83 

83 20 
80 4C 
B7 83 
9F BA 
20 21 
60 AO 

80 20 
95 B3 
DC 82 
A2 FD 
DC 82 
E8 00 
5C 34 
E0 83 
3 2 AC 
F0 E5 
20 99 
C2 83 
AA 4A 

84 A9 
4C Bl 
B6 A2 
20 C2 

0C A0 
27 4A 

81 84 
23 81 
84 4C 
87 00 
20 93 
84 20 
87 20 
BE 84 
00 EA 
20 BE 
84 48 

84 68 
90 2C 
69 00 
67 83 
9F 8A 

85 A9 
80 EB 

00 29 
80 67 
AD IS 
E9 8C 

01 86 
00 SO 
10 80 
36 A9 

86 20 



4 4 0B 
60 BO 
AE 06 

08 26 

4 8 FB 
01 A0 
60 38 
C9 18 
AD AC 
AD C8 
00 EE 

09 40 

09 B0 
AO 50 

80 EF 
FF 40 
A2 81 

98 94 
A9 9C 
21 83 
20 B9 
4C FB 
87 90 

05 53 
BE 8A 
A2 96 
BO 70 
A9 IE 
2A 77 
EF 36 
A2 96 
BE AS 
95 7D 
C0 08 
84 65 
38 23 
90 53 

00 8B 
83 44 
ac DS 

83 F3 
24 08 
B0 62 
AD 80 

84 DC 
93 EE 
13 18 
84 82 

99 5B 

81 FF 
AD BC 
20 88 

84 85 
4A 26 
29 27 
67 65 
2C 3B 

10 50 
E8 FC 

01 86 
8C 39 
20 EO 

85 14 
00 44 
09 C5 
AA 07 
EB OA 
62 eA 
8E 2F 
6C SE 



JULY 1993 COMPUTE G-29 



PROGRAMS 



8540:85 
8548:95 

8550:A0 
8558:B9 
8560:F1 
8563:8^ 
8570:F0 
8578:AD 
B5S0:49 
8588:10 
8590:B9 
8598;F7 
85A0:D9 
3SAa:78 
85B0:1A 
85B8:85 
85CB:85 
85C8:aA 
85D0:2E 
85D8:9D 
85E0:85 
85E8:EE 
85F0:A5 
85F8:Afl 
3600:03 
8608:84 
8610:06 
8618:20 
8620:C9 
8e28:0A 
8630:E0 
8638:48 
8640:AD 
8648:82 
865ffl:D9 
8658:82 
8660:8D 
8668:86 
8670:A9 
8678:1A 
8680:AD 
8688:F9 
8690:8C 
8e98:9A 
86A0:86 
86A8:E9 
3eB0:A0 
86B3:B9 
86C0:F1 
86C8:D1 
36n0:FF 
8608:60 
36e:0:86 
86E8:DC 
86F3:F6 



8D El 
85 8D 
27 B9 
C0 DB 
A9 00 
10 FA 
4A 4A 

00 DD 
C0 09 
AD EB 
9F SA 
60 8A 

85 AD 
AD 18 
8D BD 

01 A0 
B9 9F 
2E D7 
D7 8 5 
FF FF 
69 08 
DA 85 
01 09 
60 A0 

86 A9 
86 B0 
90 EC 
84 86 
04 F0 
AA 38 
8C 8D 
FD El 
D8 82 
AD D9 
82 20 
68 8D 
SB 83 
AD 49 
00 A0 
D0 AD 
0D DC 
E0 BC 
60 AD 
8D D0 
AD E8 
8C 8D 
27 B9 
72 8E 
60 A0 
86 EE 
FF 99 
20 88 
80 00 
82 60 
86 20 



86F8 

8700 

870B:2A 

R7ia:F0 

8718:05 

8720:80 

8728:85 

8730:68 

8738:48 

8740:CA 

8748:80 

8750:20 

3758:05 

3760:87 

8768:C6 



07 87 0A 
87 20 07 



23 21 
IB A0 
88 10 
9D 9F 
68 AS 
68 68 
A5 C6 
D0 FD 
02 DC 
9F FF 
8D 6C 
F0 D9 
68 AA 



ac 8D 
54 85 
C0 07 
99 72 
A0 27 
60 AD 
09 03 
SA eA 
00 60 
80 F0 
99 C0 
43 AD 
E9 8C 
D0 4A 
85 A5 
00 A9 
8A 0A 

85 0A 
A2 07 
CA 10 
8D 09 
C8 C0 
04 85 
FF 8C 
00 0A 
0A AD 
4C EF 
B0 EF 
3A B0 
AD D8 
D8 82 
8C 8D 
79 00 
82 79 
SF 37 
D8 82 
4C F4 
8D 29 
00 80 

19 D0 
60 38 
AD D9 
E8 8C 

86 A9 
8C 8D 
D4 86 
4A 8E 
99 C0 
00 20 
D4 86 
FF FF 
84 A2 
82 20 

20 EF 
96 84 
0A 0A 

87 09 

87 CA 
0F D9 
F8 30 
8A 98 
E8 60 
4C C2 
48 A0 

88 00 
A9 00 
A5 C5 
87 F0 
8D 6C 
A9 40 



E3 ac 

8D B7 
99 4A 
BE 88 
99 C0 
18 Da 
8D 83 
6A 29 
A9 00 
0C A0 
07 88 
E8 8C 
SD DA 
29 01 
01 29 

00 BD 
2E D7 
80 06 
BD FF 
F7 AD 

85 90 
28 D0 

01 58 
03 86 
0A AS 

03 86 

87 C8 
AD 03 
40 0A 
82 48 
AD D9 
D9 82 
8D 8D 
01 8D 
63 8D 
60 A9 
82 20 

04 D0 
0D DC 
8D 19 
AD D8 

82 P-9 
D0 19 
8E 8D 
D3 86 
20 C2 
99 C0 
DB 88 
CF 86 
A0 3F 

88 D0 
09 20 
P7 86 

86 60 
A2 00 
0A 8D 
00 60 
20 36 
0E 8D 
EF B9 
48 20 
68 68 

83 78 
flA A2 
F8 A9 
BD 03 
C9 40 
DE CD 
37 68 
58 60 



8D 


19 


86 


CE 


SE 


7A 


10 


74 


DB 


D5 


29 


B9 


35 


3B 


C0 


CC 


D0 


FB 


27 


0D 


10 


SE 


8D 


45 


85 


24 


09 


6D 


FB 


BB 


07 


IB 


85 


D7 


85 


71 


FF 


F2 


09 


F4 


33 


EB 


CC 


74 


63 


B9 


EE 


Fl 


20 


4F 


C9 


FF 


C3 


9E 


86 


F4 


A3 


IB 


FD 


26 


82 


11 


13 


DE 


08 


GC 


8D 


DD 


D9 


C0 


80 


69 


26 


70 


13 


34 


8C 


4D 


D0 


CD 


82 


F5 


El 


E5 


A9 


C3 


Dl 


4D 


AD 


B8 


86 


80 


07 


17 


10 


41 


EE 


2F 


B9 


7A 


F7 


CC 


F7 


EB 


8D 


F3 


8E 


FB 


23 


57 


05 


ES 


A9 


E6 


87 


9B 


F0 


76 


IE 


30 


85 


A5 


68 


95 


SA 


F2 


FF 


A4 


FF 


EE 


DC 


ED 


D0 


58 


6C 


5E 


35 


5B 


AD 


B6 



8770; 
8773; 
8780; 
8788; 
8790; 
8793; 
87A0; 
87Aa; 
87B0; 
87B8: 
87C0; 
87C8: 
37D0: 
3708: 
87E0: 
87EB: 
87F0: 
87F8; 
8800; 
8808; 
3310: 
8818: 
8820: 
8828: 
8830: 
8838: 
8840: 
8848: 
8850: 
8858: 
3860: 
3868: 
8870: 
3878: 
3880: 
8888: 
8890: 
8898: 
88A0: 
8SA8: 
88B0: 
BBB8: 
8aC0: 
38CB: 
8800: 
3803: 
88E0: 
BBEB: 
83F0: 
88F8: 
3900: 
3903: 
8910: 
8918: 
8920: 
8928: 
8930: 
8938: 
8940: 
8948: 
8950: 
B958i 
8960: 
8968: 
8970: 
8978: 
8983: 
3988: 
8990: 
8998: 



D7 
29 



82 

07 



;8D 8D 
;0C 8D 
:32 BD 
;95 37 
;06 20 
;BA 87 
:D9 82 
:D0 05 
:6D DB 
:3D 60 
B5 00 
.F7 60 
, IC A0 
:O0 82 
:20 20 
:83 28 
:1D A0 
:84 20 

34 AD 

35 A0 
0A 4A 
4C 0C 
90 0B 
Al 87 
20 CA 
F0 97 
82 08 
87 4A 
AD 07 
AF D0 
D0 8F 
29 DE 
37 4C 



55 
A0 

03 



88 
00 
23 



82 D0 
88 A0 



IB 
DB 



20 
32 



D9 82 
69 01 
83 ED 
D2 82 
AD 08 
90 03 



61 
03 



84 
4C 



Dl 82 
60 20 
4 9 3D 
0E E0 
99 4A 
0E C8 
30 46 
B9 4A 
32 60 
09 AD 
EF 82 
B2 32 
49 80 
C9 54 
18 AD 
BD C8 
4A 8D 
13 83 
CB 20 
3F 84 



48 8D 
3D 95 
F9 82 

D7 82 
3F 84 

C9 03 
B3 87 
AD 09 

60 AD 
AD 4 7 

B2 8D 

CB BC 

99 DB 

20 6F 

01 BC 
A9 EA 
83 20 
4C F4 

02 20 
97 87 
8C 83 
02 4C 
4a 43 
8 8 AC 
A2 00 
4C 0C 
87 30 
C9 02 
20 20 
4A 90 
82 C9 
96 A9 
4A 90 
C9 BE 
0C 88 
C9 78 
23 74 
70 86 
AE AD 
01 20 
13 83 
AD 02 
4C DF 
8D DB 
D8 82 
E9 00 
82 69 
EE D9 
AD 49 
EC 82 
AD 09 
EF 32 
AE E0 
6C F0 
8D CE 
48 28 
8D 68 
8D 8D 
AD ES 
47 8D 
AD 49 
08 8E 
4C EF 
D0 IB 
Dl 82 
AD D2 
SB 33 
A0 01 
D0 82 
80 D2 



55 88 
87 A8 

68 29 
A0 01 
A9 00 
F0 14 
4C AA 
82 69 

48 SD 
8D A0 
DB 82 
Dl 87 
82 CA 

87 C9 
61 84 
8D 09 
D7 82 

82 eA 

D0 82 
A9 80 
DO 03 
FC 85 
E7 20' 
DS 82 
20 CA 

88 AE 
C7 20 
00 0B 

83 EA 
15 4A 
AE F0 

06 8D 
97 AD 
D0 A7 
AD 07 
00 07 
86 C9 
A9 01 

07 82 
00 82 
6D DB 
B2 69 
as 49 
82 38 
SD DS 
80 09 

32 SD 
82 A9 
SD 48 
AO 08 

82 30 
AC B2 

33 E0 
03 AO 
B2 32 
B9 4A 
4C 3B 

49 8D 

83 C9 
8D B2 
8D 43 
47 8D 
82 AD 
AC B2 

69 02 
82 69 
8C B2 
20 D0 
BE Dl 
82 BD 



4A 4A 99 

B9 2E 69 
E3 09 D9 
20 D0 3E 
63 AD 30 
4 A B0 DA 

87 20 E5 
00 8D 91 
AO 07 F4 
OF 18 C0 
8C 3B 0B 
AO 01 87 

88 10 DB 
02 D0 2F 
83 20 SD 
82 08 CS 
20 2F C2 
6A 90 CF 
8D 3A EF 
BD 61 9A 
4C FA 8E 
2A 90 FB 
BA 37 D7 
4A 4A ED 
87 20 FB 
47 8D 61 
6F 37 2D 
CE F9 5B 
4C F6 02 
90 Al A6 

04 C9 36 
95 87 0C 
D7 82 C5 
20 B3 11 
32 8D Dl 
A9 7F 9C 
58 D0 lA 
BD F9 10 
BD F7 B3 
30 15 4E 
82 BD Dl 
00 BD 01 
FF 18 68 
23 13 56 
82 AD E4 
82 18 22 

05 82 60 

81 8D C9 
2 3 F0 EC 

82 8D C7 
D2 82 62 
82 AD 5C 
6F B0 3E 
46 80 EF 
60 DO 62 
BD 08 lA 
39 C8 FE 
8C B2 91 
9C Fa DD 
82 4C 95 
23 AE D2 
68 8D IE 
E0 33 14 
82 88 FE 
99 4A 2E 
00 99 BA 
82 20 0A 
82 AA IE 
82 8E Al 
3A 84 8E 



B9A0 
B9A8 
89B0 
8 9B3 
89C0 
89C8 
89D0 
8908 
B9E0 
89E8 
89F0 
89F8 
8A00 
3A03 
aA10: 
eA13 
BA20 
SA28 
BA30 
8A3S 
BA40 
eA48 
BA50 
8A58 
SASS 
8A63 
8A70 
8A7S 
eAB0 
SABS 
8A90 
8A98 
3AA0 
BAA8 
8AB0 
BAB8 
8AC0 
BAC8 
8AD0 
3A03: 
8AE0; 
8AE8 
3AF0 
3AF8 
BB00 
8B38 
8B13 
SB18 
SB23 
3B23 
BB30 
8B38 
8B40 
8B4B 
3B50 
8B58 
8B60 
8Be3 
BB7a 
8B73 
8330 
SBB8 
8B90 
3B98 
3BA0 
3BA8 
3BB0 
3BB8 
8BCa 
3BCe 



AC D7 
49 84 
3E B9 
AD FF 
89 88 
30 80 
86 90 
B0 0A 



CI 
10 



lA AD 
EB A9 
83 A9 
33 D0 
35 D0 
83 20 
8C 80 
E9 84 
80 BD 
B2 32 
07 C3 
Ca D9 
B9 4A 
32 E0 
00 03 
A9 02 
82 20 
4A 80 
80 B8 
4A BD 
FF 80 
D2 82 
10 03 
20 20 
20 20 



18 
20 



:55 4E 
: 4F 52 
:23 20 
:20 29 
:20 20 
:B1 AE 
:B1 A8 
:Bl AE 
:Bl AS 
:B4 12 
:B4 12 
:B4 RE 
:B4 AB 
:B7 AE 
:C9 51 
:B7 AE 
:B7 A8 
:BA AE 
;CC 51 
:BA AE 
:BA A8 
:BD 93 
:AB 93 
:AB 93 
:AB AB 
:C0 5D 
:CF 50 
:C3 5D 
:AB 5D 
:C3 39 
:D2 39 
:C3 AE 
:C3 A8 



32 C0 6C 
R0 4C 3C 
89 3D BA 
FF 99 Dl 

10 F4 20 
61 84 A0 

11 C8 C8 
20 55 83 
F0 09 60 
EE A7 80 
BC 30 0D 
B0 8D BB 
00 80 BB 
09 AD 8C 
03 20 92 
D7 82 20 
00 B6 85 
A9 7E 8D 
96 83 20 
AE E0 83 
B9 4A 3D 
4A 3D 80 
80 8D 02 
7E D0 08 
EE 02 82 
80 61 84 
13 83 20 

33 AD 01 
AO 49 8D 
88 8C B2 
Dl 82 AD 
20 CI 82 
3D 20 20 
20 20 20 
20 01 30 
20 20 20 
13 12 3D 
54 49 4E 
20 24 FF 
20 2C 18 
2C 19 20 
2C 18 20 
66 06 Bl 
66 06 Bl 
66 06 Bl 
66 06 Bl 
03 75 B4 
03 75 B4 
03 75 B4 
03 75 B4 
45 60 B7 
45 60 B7 
45 60 B7 
45 60 B7 
00 78 BA 
00 78 BA 
00 78 BA 
00 78 BA 
3D 90 BD 
8D 90 BD 
3D 90 DB 
80 AB AB 
57 5A C0 
57 5A C0 
57 5A C0 
57 5A 05 
33 3C C3 
33 3C C3 
33 3C C3 
33 3C C3 



D0 ID 
D7 82 
89 A0 

82 CE 
06 83 
IC 20 
20 84 
00 06 
2C 67 
A9 00 
86 85 

83 20 

83 20 
80 00 
36 20 
2F 83 

00 03 
E0 83 
13 83 
EO 7E 
8D 49 

01 82 
82 8C 
EE Dl 
20 06 
60 AC 
EC 32 
32 99 
09 J.4 
82 AD 
FF FF 
F0 C6 
20 20 
20 20 
20 20 

19 3D 

20 20 
47 20 
3A 0D 
29 28 

20 20 
IE 66 
6C 66 
IB 66 
27 66 
54 33 
72 03 
15 33 

84 03 
7B 4 5 
69 4 5 

21 4 5 
2D 4 5 
7E 00 
6F 00 
24 00 
8A 00 
AE BD 
4 2 AB 
09 BD 
A5 30 
50 57 
99 57 
0C 57 
30 57 
39 33 
4E 33 
18 33 
2A 33 
36 81 



3C C9 
E3 0C 
01 CI 
B9 2C 
A9 05 
34 2E 
86 50 
20 AB 
33 2A 
00 93 
D0 74 
CE 50 
48 SE 
86 30 
20 80 
AD 8C 
20 3B 
A9 11 
AC F4 
F0 B8 
3D A9 
C8 D3 
B2 CB 

82 E5 

83 CD 
B2 4C 
99 BC 
4A 13 
99 IB 
FE F9 
8D 66 
20 5D 
20 0A 
20 BD 
20 BC 
20 2F 
43 64 
46 51 
FF 6B 
20 Ae 
20 49 
AB 0F 

06 C9 
AB B0 
63 23 
AB DF 

7 5 A8 
AB 71 
63 16 
AB 4 5 
60 CB 
AB AF 
63 ED 
AB 77 
78 04 
AB C3 
63 6B 
AE ES 
9F F3 
AB DD 
A2 28 
5A A8 
96 Al 
AB 10 
9C 12 
AE 26 
3F IF 
AB 42 
63 20 
AE BE 



G-30 COMPUTE JULY 1993 



:68 
;14 

:ae 

108 
:1B 
;02 
:72 
:4B 

:3I3 



:29 
:95 
100 
:52 
;9D 



8BD0:C6 

8BD8:AB 

eBE0:C6 

aBE3:C6 

8BF0:0B 

8BF8:06 

8C0fl 

8C08 

8C10 

acia 

8C20 

8C28 

8C301 

ec38; 

8C4a; 

8C4S: 

8C50:73 

8C58:0A 

8C60 

8C68 

8C70 

8C78 

8C80 

3C88:aa 

8C90: 26 

8C98:FF 

8CR0:00 

8CA8:83 

8CB0:20 

BCBa:00 

8CC0:71 

aCC3:DR 

8CD0:a4 

aCDa:6E 

8CE0:C0 

acea: 00 
8CF0:00 

acFa:iA 

8D00:4A 
8D08:00 
8D10:3B 
8D18:0A 
8D20:32 
8D28:01 
8D30:02 
BD38:0C 
8D40:16 
8D4a:FD 
8D50:A5 
8D58:48 
8D60:26 
8D68:A5 
8D70:03 
8D78:17 
3D80:3A 
8De8:0A 
8D90:8A 
8D98:24 
8DA0: 2E 
8DA8:27 
8DB0:E5 
3DB8: 85 
8DC0:C9 
8DC8;A9 
BDO0:A9 
8DD8:AA 
8DE0:28 
8DE8:E0 
8DFO:D0 
8DF8:90 



36 81 
36 31 
AE 81 
AS 31 
88 00 
10 E6 
00 13 
18 06 
15 A6 
08 IB 
60 00 
21 46 
08 2B 
B0 08 
54 E4 

02 61 
E0 08 
32 20 
0A 93 
12 0E 
99 46 
08 9D 

32 02 
A4 F0 
0C A6 
FE 14 
93 33 
00 0E 
DB 00 
0C A5 
00 60 
87 45 
38 09 
8A E9 

07 E3 
00 40 

8 DA 
D0 IB 
8E 72 

00 71 

03 0B 
IC 14 

33 34 

02 03 

03 02 
0C 06 
IB 29 
48 AS 
23 48 
A5 24 
48 AS 
28 48 
86 FE 
8D 18 
8D 19 
85 FC 
69 0A 
18 8A 
85 26 
38 A5 
FE 90 
28 AS 

04 90 
03 D0 

01 2C 
A5 28 
A8 Bl 

02 F0 
14 A0 
0C C9 



48 C6 
48 C6 
48 C6 

43 ce 

0C D8 

06 11 

52 06 

14 96 

06 IB 
12 08 
IC 30 
02 21 
E4 00 
4B B2 
04 61 
32 02 
7C 32 
0A 3 3 
D3 02 
95 26 
08 99 
02 03 
A0 70 
0C A6 
42 08 
9A C5 
00 64 
27 00 
4B A7 
00 73 
71 02 
83 65 

89 42 
82 DF 

07 C0 
00 00 
8F 0D 
D0 81 
8E 9A 
86 73 
10 13 

12 0E 
35 36 
04 05 
02 03 
0F 06 
26 A5 
FC 48 
A5 22 
48 A5 

02 43 
A9 03 
A9 9E 

03 80 
03 8D 
A9 ED 
85 23 
69 0B 

13 8A 
FB E5 
5F A3 
Bl 22 

14 C9 
20 C9 
A9 02 
29 IC 
26 C0 
E4 85 
02 Bl 

90 B0 



4B 81 
0F 31 
87 81 
09 06 



02 
62 
13 
10 



06 08 
IB 2C 
02 IC 
70 08 
4B 86 
08 53 
02 00 
64 E4 
00 82 
02 0A 
93 E4 
0E 93 
48 08 
9D 30 
08 A0 

02 03 
9A EF 
16 0C 
CB 00 
60 71 

00 0B 
59 00 
0E 27 
89 A3 
39 34 
82 EC 
DB E8 

01 00 
DC 0E 
FF FA 
8E 4A 
86 23 
18 IB 

15 30 
37 38 

06 02 

03 00 
0E 04 
FE 48 
A5 FB 
48 A5 
27 43 
A5 04 
85 FD 
85 FB 

16 03 
16 03 
85 22 
A9 EF 
85 25 
69 0D 
FD A5 
00 Bl 
A8 Bl 
05 B0 

07 90 
AA D0 
4A 4A 

02 D0 

04 C9 
FD C9 

03 38 



63 57 
AB 2 9 
63 76 
00 A8 
C6 26 
12 84 
06 6C 
86 D8 
IB C2 
08 C8 
32 94 
21 6F 
02 74 

60 95 

61 CI 
02 B6 
02 3F 
83 77 
02 36 
86 0D 
99 D0 
02 69 
72 96 
A6 Al 

12 55 
DF 10 
94 E5 
00 IC 
25 FD 
98 4B 
02 4E 
88 83 
8A 33 
82 96 
DB CC 
02 10 
DC 5 3 
FF CS 
80 40 

38 ED 
20 7C 
31 39 

39 33 

02 2B 
0C 9D 
06 84 
AS F2 
48 12 
25 0D 
A5 0A 
43 9E 
A6 BC 
A9 D5 

13 98 
69 CB 
18 26 
85 0A 
A9 16 
85 14 
FC 4 9 
FD EC 
24 0C 
04 DC 

03 24 

14 91 
85 6E 

04 86 
03 34 
80 47 
E9 Al 



8E00: 
8E08; 
8E10: 
8E18; 
3E20! 
3E28: 
8E3a; 
8E38: 
8E4a; 
3E48I 
3E50: 
8ES8i 
8E60; 
3E6a: 
aE70: 
8E78; 
aE80: 
8E88: 
8E90; 
8E98; 
aEA0i 
8EA81 
8EB0i 
8EB81 



30 18 
FD 65 
FE B0 
A5 03 
8A 0A 
Bl FD 
00 Bl 
03 91 
B9 74 
F7 63 
85 02 
68 85 
22 68 
85 FC 
68 85 
48 8A 
03 FE 
EA EA 
05 9D 
0D 03 
00 0D 
0C CF 
0C D7 
00 DF 



65 03 

04 85 
96 A9 
69 0E 
A8 Bl 
18 65 
FB 38 
FB CA 
8E 99 
85 28 
68 85 
24 68 
85 23 
68 85 
03 60 
48 BA 

05 01 
EA 2C 

06 Fl 
0D 05 
0D C9 
0C Dl 
0C D9 
0C 42 



91 FD 
FD 90 
8B 85 
8 5 FE 
FD 8 5 
03 85 
E9 30 
10 E2 
00 30 
68 85 
26 68 
85 25 
68 85 
FD 68 
EA EA 
FE 04 
68 AA 
00 AA 
0C F3 
0D 07 
00 CB 
0C D3 
00 DB 
0E 45 



18 A5 9A 
9A E6 A4 
FD 18 CC 
A2 19 50 
FB 08 FB 
FC A0 BF 
65 A3 
16 CA 
10 F.5 
68 78 
27 IB 
85 



18 

A0 

38 

04 

35 

68 

FB 6 8 

85 

EA 

01 D0 EB 



2D 
45 
FE 8 8 

08 eA 



68 

02 

0C 01 C0 
00 0B 9 8 
00 CD 3B 
00 D5 FB 
0C DO AE 
0E 00 IB 



EA 39 
37 DB 



Ed Balchick is an electrical engineer 
from Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, wtio en- 
joys programming in maciiine lan- 
guage and in C. Ted Green is an un- 
employed painter from Cleveland, 
Ohio, who also enjoys programming. 
They both enjoy modifying other peo- 
ple's games so they (Ed and Ted) can 
win them. 



RASCALS 



By Bob Broderick 

Just before dozing off during another bor- 
ing tiaul of galactic space animals in 
your freighter, you notice a red light on 
the control panel. Uh-oh! That warning 
light means there's been a power failure 
in the cargo hold, and all of the animals 
have escaped from their electric holding 
cells. They are a wild and dangerous 
bunch, but you've got to get them cor- 
ralled. Without a moment's hesitation, you 
suit up and set out to recapture those in- 
tergalactic rascals! 

Rascals combines arcade action with 
strategy in a fast-paced game for the 64 
that is written entirely in machine lan- 
guage. To enter it, you'll have to use 
MLX, our machine language entry pro- 
gram. See "Typing Aids" elsewhere in 
this section. When MLX prompts for start- 
ing and ending addresses, respond 
with the following. 

Starting address: 0801 
Ending address: 10B8 



Be sure to save a copy of the program 
before you exit MLX. Although Rascals 
is written in machine language, it 
loads and runs tike a BASIC program. 

Playing the Game 

As the brave freighter captain, you con- 
trol the figure in the lower right-hand cor- 
ner of the screen. Use keys I, J, L, and 
K to move it up, left, right, and down, 
respectively. The object is to trap afl 
the moving creatures on the screen. To 
do this, you must push crates that are 
scattered around the screen to form a 
corral, surrounding a rascal. The rascal 
mustn't be able to move in any direc- 
tion, including diagonally, or it will es- 
cape. You can move as many crates at 
one time as you like. 

Warning! This is a serious game. 
You have one life and can lose it by 
coming in contact with a rascal. If all 
the rascals have been boxed in, you've 
won the game. After each game, type 
Vto play again or Wto end. 

A Few Questions 

However, before you can begin play, 
you must answer the questions on the 
opening screen. The first question will 
ask you how many rascals you want 
loose in the hold. Enter a number from 
1 to 7. Remember, the fewer rascals 
there are, the faster they'll go! 

The next question regards the num- 
ber of crates available to you. A high- 
er number will give you more boxes, 
making the game easier. A setting of 1 
will give you the least amount of 
crates. 

The third question regulates the 
speed at which the rascals move. A set- 
ting of 1 is the lastest, while 9 is the 
slowest. Finally, you will need to con- 
firm your answers to begin play. 

A timer at the top of the screen 
counts the number of moves the ras- 
cals have made, so you can compete 
against your best efforts. Enjoy — and 
get those rascals! 

RASCALS 

0301:3C 03 0A 00 9E 20 32 30 64 

0809:36 34 00 00 00 00 FF A2 E3 

0811:00 BD 49 03 9D EB IF E3 FD 

0319:D0 F7 EE 14 03 EE 17 08 E0 

0821:AD 17 08 C9 29 D0 E3 A9 73 

0829:38 A2 31 A0 39 8D 07 03 44 

0831:8E 08 08 8C 09 03 E3 SE ID 

0839:0A 08 4C 00 20 00 00 00 DA 

JULY 1993 COMPUTE G-31 



PROGRAMS 



0841! 
0849: 
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00 00 

A9 07 

A9 93 

21 D0 

21 D0 

AS 01 

BD 00 

D9 9D 

00 3A 

BD El 

DD 9D 

03 3E 

04 85 
21 9D 
72 24 
4C 52 
D0 8D 
DC A9 
A2 20 
AD D9 
EE 19 
AD D9 

20 AD 
9E 21 

as FC 

FD A0 

A0 28 

6F 21 

21 4C 
IB D4 
BD A0 
4 8 A9 
FC SD 
AE 9E 
18 6D 
FD 69 
18'69 
AD eB 

BA 21 
EE 6E 
25 F0 
D7 25 
00 8D 
6A 21 
97 04 
ID 8E 
96 04 
04 EE 
3A D0 
00 00 

03 20 
B0 03 
21 B0 
9D A0 
87 F0 
60 38 
00 00 

04 0D 

05 11 
A9 00 
A9 00 
AD BA 
D0 EE 
49 D0 
D0 03 
03 4C 
4C 34 
28 85 
85 FF 
00 Bl 



00 00 00 
8D 86 02 
20 D2 FF 
60 00 FF 
A9 0E 3D 
29 FB 85 
D8 9D 00 
00 39 BD 
BD 00 DB 
27 9D 00 

00 3D BD 
CA D0 D3 

01 58 A2 
54 28 E8 
20 5E 20 
20 78 A9 
12 D0 A9 
IB BD 11 
8D 14 03 
25 8D A9 
D0 CE A9 
25 8D A9 
0D DC 4C 
BD AA 21 
BD AB 21 
00 A2 00 

20 6F 21 
E0 00 D0 
15 21 8E 
CO 6C 21 

21 AA A0 

20 91 FC 
es 21 6S 

21 8C 6C 
6C 21 90 

00 9D AB 
D4 85 FD 
21 C9 87 
EE 9E 21 
21 AD 6E 

01 63 AD 
DO 03 EE 
9E 21 BD 
8D 9F 21 
AD 97 04 
97 04 EE 
C9 3A D0 
95 04 AD 
03 8E 95 
00 00 20 
8A 21 C8 

20 8A 21 

03 20 8A 

21 E8 60 

04 C9 20 
60 00 00 
00 00 00 
5 2A 5 
06 Al 06 
80 BA 21 
8D 6D 21 
21 D0 EB 
20 E4 FF 
03 4C F6 
4C FA 23 
BE 23 C9 
24 AD B8 
FE AD B9 
A9 A8 8D 
FE 30 22 



00 00 
8D 21 
A9 00 
A9 00 
20 00 

01 A2 
38 BD 
00 DA 
9D 00 
3C BD 
00 DE 
A5 01 
00 BD 

00 F7 

20 CB 

01 8D 
7F 80 
D0 A9 
8E 15 

21 53 
21 D0 
21 M 
31 EA 
38 E9 
E9 00 

20 6F 
A0 50 
06 EE 
6C 21 
B0 FR 
29 Bl 
SA A8 
91 FC 

21 A5 
AA 21 
21 A5 
68 91 
D0 03 
EE 9E 
21 CD 
6A 21 
6D 21 
6E 21 
A2 30 
C9 3A 
96 04 
10 8E 
95 04 
04 60 
90 21 

20 90 
C8 20 

21 60 
Bl FC 
00 02 
00 00 
00 00 
6B 05 
BE 07 
4C 72 
4C 48 
AD 6D 
F0 Fl 
21 C9 
C9 4B 
4C D0 
21 38 
21 E9 
BA 23 
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68 


00 


10 


90 


15 


09 


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59 


21 


28 


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96 


0D 


60 


83 


91 


03 


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60 


97 


09 


33 


9A 


71 


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93 


29 


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85 


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21 


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20 


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62 


21 


14 


07 


09 


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AF 


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34 


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67 


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12 


00 


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12 


21 


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90 


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98 


45 


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33 


18 


81 


00 


56 


ED 


03 


03 


59 


00 


FF 


23 


Al 


23 


80 


21 


06 


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2D 


4A 


65 


D0 


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9C 


00 


C3 


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36 


91 


25 



0A71 

0A79 

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0A99 

0AA1 

0AA9 

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:FE A9 

:FE 80 
:21 18 
:A9 04 
:a9 D0 
:F0 06 
:AD BA 
;A2 01 
8 5 FE 
A0 00 
:C9 89 
:E8 4C 
:A5 FF 
:0F A0 
:ED BA 
:00 85 
:BA 23 
:20 A0 
:18 6D 
:B9 21 
:FF 18 
:AC BA 
:4C 32 
:80 8D 
:38 ED 
:E9 00 
:C9 20 
:C9 88 
:A5 FE 
:04 35 
:BA 23 
:CA F0 
:23 85 
:FF 4C 
:23 91 
;BA 23 
:E9 00 
:69 D4 
:91 FE 
:A2 08 
;A9 01 
;4C 75 

;F0 ac 

;D0 D8 

:5E 23 

14 03 

19 D0 
FF SD 
28 9D 
A2 00 

20 E4 
0B C9 
8D 21 
4C 32 
AD B9 
BA 23 
91 FE 
A5 FE 
AS FF 
FF 18 
A9 04 
B8 21 
B9 21 
A9 81 
5B R9 
91 FE 
FF 8D 
FF 88 

21 AD 
21 85 



20 A0 28 
B8 21 A5 
69 D4 85 
91 FE 4C 
03 4C CB 
4C 72 23 
23 10 03 
A5 FE 13 
A5 FF 69 
Bl FE C9 
F0 CB C9 
4D 22 A5 
18 69 D4 
00 91 39 
23 85 FE 
FF A0 00 
91 FE CA 
00 91 FE 
BA 23 3D 
69 00 8D 
69 D4 35 
23 91 FE 

22 4C CB 
BA 23 A2 
BA 23 85 
85 FF A0 
F0 0C C9 
03 07 E3 
85 39 AS 
3A A9 OF 
Bl FE A0 
11 A5 FE 
FE A5 FF 
02 23 A9 

FE AD aa 

3D B8 21 

80 B9 21 

85 FF A9 

4C CB 21 

BD 4B 28 

9D DA D8 

23 A2 00 
9D DB 04 
E8 4C 60 
78 A9 31 
8E 15 03 
A9 F0 8D 
0D OC A2 
AA 21 CA 

20 E4 FF 
FF F0 FB 
59 D0 F3 
D0 60 4C 
2 2 AD B8 

21 85 FF 
Bl FE 30 
A9 20 A0 
18 69 28 
69 00 80 
69 D4 85 
91 FE 4C 
38 E9 01 
E9 00 85 
8D BA 23 
87 91 FE 
A5 FE 8D 
B9 21 18 
A9 04 91 
B8 21 85 
FF A0 01 



91 FR 
FF 80 
FF A0 
CB 21 
21 C9 
4C CB 
4C C9 
60 BA 
00 8 5 

20 F0 

88 D0 
FE 3 5 
85 3A 
A5 FE 
A5 FF 
Bl FE 
00 E6 
AD B8 
B8 21 
B9 21 
FF A9 
4C CB 

21 38 
02 A5 
FE AS 
00 Bl 

89 F0 
4C Dl 
FF 18 



91 
00 
18 



69 00 
2 AC 
21 38 
AD B9 
AS FF 
04 A0 

20 5E 
9D 00 
CA 00 
BD 31 
A9 01 
23 60 
A2 EA 
A9 73 
lA D0 
00 BD 
D0 F7 
CA D0 
C9 4E 
EA A9 
E2 FC 

21 85 
A0 23 
EA A9 
00 91 
3D B8 
B9 21 
FF A0 
CB 21 
85 FE 
FF A0 
Bl FE 
A9 20 
B8 21 
69 D4 
FE 4C 
FE AD 
8C BA 



A5 A8 
B9 9B 
00 14 
C9 33 
88 C2 

21 5B 

22 9F 

23 3 
FF 53 
0C 01 
D5 DF 
39 9E 
A9 2D 
38 4D 
E9 D0 
AC DA 
A9 5F 
21 A0 
AD 4 7 
A5 AC 
04 2B 

21 93 
E9 30 
FE D3 
FF DB 
FE 5C 
D8 52 

22 3C 
69 05 
AC FA 
FE EA 
BA 3B 
8 5 DF 
BA F6 
ED F0 
21 57 
18 Al 
00 E8 

23 EF 

04 DC 
F2 C4 
28 63 
9D 7A 

20 D0 
SD 01 
8D IB 
A9 ID 
54 B7 

5 3 CC 
FA 7B 
F0 86 
00 EF 
00 40 
FE 57 
8C SA 
37 95 
FE 30 

21 87 
A5 94 
28 77 
AD E2 
AD 85 
00 49 
30 22 
C8 53 
AS F5 
85 DB 
CB 26 
B9 0C 
23 80 



0CA1; 

0CA9; 
0CB1; 
0CB9i 
0CC1; 
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0CD1; 
0CD9; 
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0D09: 
0011; 
0D19: 
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0039: 
0D91: 
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0DA9t 
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aODl: 
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0DE1; 
0DE9: 
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0E01: 
0E09: 
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0E19: 
0E21: 
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0E59; 
0E61: 
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0E89: 
0E91: 
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0EA1: 
0EA9: 
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Bl FE 
A9 20 
B8 21 
B8 21 
69 D4 
FE 4C 
61 25 
20 80 
F0 07 

24 60 
ED 04 
EB 8E 
F0 2F 
D9 83 
BE 6B 
D3 05 
E3 8E 
F0 07 
DA A2 
80 BE 
04 A9 
D0 A9 
8D 21 
A9 00 
A2 09 

90 13 
AS FC 
C9 07 
00 91 
28 A9 
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86 FC 
3D BF 

91 FC 
69 28 
3 5 FD 
20 EB 
A2 00 
BD 41 
Fl A9 

25 80 
07 25 
3A 8D 
DF 04 
A9 BS 
80 07 
25 A9 
FF F0 
20 E4 
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38 B0 
88 88 
38 88 
83 88 
88 88 
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20 80 
20 20 
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20 20 
20 20 
20 20 
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02 20 
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83 88 
38 83 
88 83 
38 38 



D2 
81 
35 



30 28 A9 

38 91 FE 
A5 FF 8D 
D0 03 EE 
8S FF C8 
CB 21 4C 
20 DF 24 
24 A2 00 
9D 00 04 
AC D7 25 
8E ED D8 
0D 05 aB 
E8 8E 2A 
F0 25 EB 
D9 88 F0 
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37 aE BE 
DB 60 A9 
0F 80 86 
93 20 
00 A9 
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AD IB D4 
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C9 E7 00 
00 E4 60 
FC 4C 00 

39 90 9F 
00 F7 A2 

84 FD A2 
07 A0 00 
CA F0 10 

85 FC A5 
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IF A9 IE 
BD DA 2 5 
26 9D 67 

38 80 D3 
B7 04 38 
A9 B6 8D 
03 25 20 
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BD 07 05 
05 13 E9 
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FB C9 4E 
FF CA 00 
FB C9 31 
F3 60 00 
33 88 33 
33 83 83 
83 88 83 
88 83 38 
33 38 83 
20 20 20 
20 41 20 
20 43 20 
20 4C 20 
20 20 30 
20 20 20 
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88 38 83 
S3 83 33 
83 33 88 
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87 91 
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B9 21 
B9 21 
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32 22 
20 2A 
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ES 4C 
A2 80 

88 F0 
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5 BE 
8E 6B 
IB E8 
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06 3E 

07 A9 
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02 BD 
FF A9 
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FC 86 
CD D3 
02 E6 
EA A5 
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25 00 
04 9D 
27 A3 
17 A9 
91 FC 
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FD 69 
63 A9 
8D 18 
9D 00 

04 E3 
25 20 
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DF 04 
C3 25 
8D 08 
20 C3 
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05 20 
F0 9F 
FA 20 
90 F7 
02 00 
38 83 
83 38 
88 88 
88 88 
83 33 
20 20 
20 20 
20 20 
20 20 
20 83 
20 20 
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04 05 
20 20 
20 88 
88 88 
83 88 
88 88 
88 83 



FE 68 
3D E2 
EE A7 
IS 79 
91 FA 

20 3F 
25 01 
27 B4 
B0 C4 
8E 82 
39 B6 
88 01 
2A 12 
05 FF 
8E 65 

11 51 

88 CC 
Al 67 
14 B4 
0F C2 

21 63 
0C R0 
04 6A 
FD 08 
25 2B 
FO 97 
FD 00 
A0 FO 
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89 F4 
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18 SD 
00 03 
93 45 
00 80 
04 3E 
D0 A7 
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80 80 
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25 10 
25 06 
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E4 C9 
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83 AA 
88 55 
83 5D 
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52 C7 

53 CA 
41 E0 
S3 8B 
88 09 
20 A5 
0F CA 

12 CC 
20 48 
88 FE 
88 CD 
88 D5 
88 DD 
88 ES 



G-32 COMPUTE JULY 1993 



/^N r- 



0BD1 


:88 


88 


88 


88 


88 


88 


88 


20 


85 


aED9 


:20 


20 


20 


20 


20 


20 


20 


20 


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0EE1 


:23 


20 


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06 


20 


52 


01 


13 


39 


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01 


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13 


3F 


20 


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20 


84 


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20 


31 


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37 


29 


20 


20 


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20 


20 


20 


20 


20 


20 


20 


16 


0F01 


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20 


20 


20 


20 


20 


20 


43 


42 


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01 


14 


05 


20 


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05 


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:13 


09 


14 


19 


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28 


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13 


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05 


05 


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28 


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0FF9. 


eE 


5D 


20 


20 


6B 


40 


73 


5D 


4D 


1001 


20 


6D 


40 


6E 


20 


02 


19 


20 


D6 


1009: 


42 


0F 


02 


20 


42 


12 


0F 


04 


CC 


1011: 


05 


12 


09 


03 


08 


89 


89 


20 


3B 


1019: 


7D 


6D 


40 


7D 


20 


6D 


40 


40 


AA 


1021: 


7D 


SD 


40 


71 


7D 


20 


6D 


71 


33 


1029: 


40 


40 


40 


7D 


20 


54 


09 


0D 


CA 


1031: 


05 


3A 


20 


30 


30 


3 3 


20 


20 


0C 


1039: 


20 


20 


20 


20 


20 


00 


18 


3C 


E4 


1041: 


5A 


66 


3C 


66 


3C 


18 


18 


3C 


C4 


1949: 


7E 


5A 


7E 


56 


6A 


7E 


66 


7E 


0D 


1051: 


5h 


7E 


66 


7E 


3C 


18 


18 


3C 


Al 


1059: 


76 


D5 


F7 


66 


3C 


18 


18 


3C 


3E 


1061: 


24 


3C 


18 


OC 


18 


OC 


0E 


4A 


BD 


1069: 


4E 


7E 


7C 


7C 


24 


24 


3E 


3A 


10 


1071; 


3E 


18 


18 


3C 


64 


46 


3C 


24 


56 


1079: 


3C 


3C 


5A 


3C 


66 


66 


IF 


23 


04 


1081: 


7D 


7D 


7D 


7E 


7C 


00 


IF 


23 


9C 


1089: 


7D 


7D 


70 


7E 


7C 


00 


D9 


CF 


C6 


1091: 


D5 


A0 


C4 


C9 


C5 


C4 


AE 


AO 


39 


1099: 


D0 


CC 


CI 


D9 


A0 


CI 


C7 


CI 


88 


10A1: 


C9 


CE 


BF 


A0 


D9 


AF 


CE 


00 


87 


10A9: 


D9 


CF 


D5 


A0 


D7 


CF 


CE 


Al 


AC 


10B1: 


Al 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


A2 



Sob Broderick is a student at California 
High School and has been program- 
ming for about five years. He wrote Ras- 
cals because he wanted a small ar- 
cade-style game that he could play 
with relative ease and few rules. He 
lives in San Ramon, California. 



SCUD 



By William F. Snow 
There has been a lot of discussion over 
the past few years about how little peo- 
ple know about world geography. For ex- 
ample, do you know the names of all of 
the countries in the Americas? Can you 
at least venture a guess as to how many 
there are in North, Central, and South 
America? Give up? There are 35! Despite 
its military-sounding name. Scud will 
help you learn the names and capitals of 
these 35 countries. 

Enterlig the Program 

Scud is an entertaining and fun way to 
learn something about the countries of 
the Americas. It's written entirely in BA- 
SIC. To help avoid typing errors, enter 
it with The Automatic Proofreader. See 
"Typing Aids" elsewhere in this sec- 
tion, Be sure to save a copy of the pro- 
gram before you try to run it. 

Playing Scud isn't difficult. Plug a 
joystick into port 2 and then load and 
run Scud. The opening screen will 
give brief instructions for playing the 
game. After a short pause, you will be 
presented with the name of a country 
and asked to choose the capital from 
a list of three. If you choose incorrect- 
ly, you are given the correct answer in 
a special bulletin. 

Defend the Gty 

If you choose correctly, the city will be 
displayed, sirens will wail, and missiles 
will be launched at the city. It will then 
be your responsibility to use your 
Scud missiles to try to shoot down any 
enemy rockets before they reach the 
city. Use the joystick to aim your 
Scud. A total of three missiles will be 
launched from different positions dur- 
ing each attack. If you shoot down all 
three, you will have saved the city. 

Modifications 

Scud was written to help teach the 
names and capitals of the countries of 
the Americas. Since Scud is written en- 
tirely in BASIC, it should be very easy 
to modify the game so that the capitals 
of any other group of countries or 
states could be taught. The names of 
the countries, followed by their capi- 
tals, are in data statements in lines 
1200-1300. 



In order to modify the game, 
change this data to whatever group 
you wish to work with. Then, the foltow- 
ing code should be changed to reflect 
the number of countries or states you 
have entered into the data statements: 
the dimension statements in line 40; 
the FOR in line 80; the number of coun- 
tries in tines 150, 160, 170 (the scram- 
ble routine); and the end-of-game rou- 
tine in line 200. 

Scud is fun to play and wilt quickly 
teach the names and capitals of the 
countries of the Americas to anyone 
who wants to learn them. 

SCUD 

BH 10 REM COPYRIGHT 1993 - COM 
PUTE PUBLICATIONS - ALL 
{SPACElRIGHTS RESERVED 
OD 20 REM BY WM. F. SNOW 
GG 30 GOSUB1020 

XJ 40 CLR:DIM QS(35) ,AS(35) ,C0 

$(35) ,CA$(35) ,Y(35) :V=53 

24 8:StJ = 5 4272:POKESN+24,l 

5 

GS 50 POKE53280,7;POKE53281,7: 

POKEV+31,0 
QD 60 POKESN+4,0:PRINT"{CLR} 

{8 D0WbJ}"SPC(14)"{BLU}PL 
EASE WAIT":PRINT" 
{3 DOWN) (3 SPACESlOUR SP 
lES ARE"; 
CD 70 PRINT" CHECKING ON THE E 

NEMY" 
DE 80 FOR QA=1T035:READQS(QA) , 

A$ (QA) ;NEXT 
BE 90 FOR S=12288 TO 12351;REA 

DSP:P0KES,SP:NEXT 
AB 100 FORS=12352TO 12415:READ 

SP;POKES,SP:NEXT 
QD 110 FORS=12416 TO 12479:REA 

D SP:POKES,SP:NEXT 
BM 120 FORS=12480TO12543:READS 

P:POKES,SP:NEXT 
AK 130 FORS=12544 TO 12607:REA 

D SP:P0KES,SP:NEXT 
JE 140 FORS=12e08 TO 12671:REA 

DSP:POKES,SP:HEXT 
FH 150 FOR 1=1 TO 35 
KG 160 X=INT (RND (. ) *35)+l 
FC 170 FOR CK=1 T035:IF X=Y (CK 

)THEN160 
SM 180 NEXTCK:Y{I)=X 
BD 190 CO$(X)=Q$ (I) :CA${X)=AS( 

I) :NEXTI 
GS 200 SC=0:FORI=1TO4:POKEV+I, 
: NEXT : POKEV+ 21 , : P=P+1 
:IF p>35THENP»35:GOT011 
40 
AS 210 POKE53280,13:POKE53281, 

1 
MD 220 JR=INT (RND(.)*10)+2 
RC 230 PRINT" {CLR}{ 10 DOWN} 

{4 SPACES} SCUDS HAVE BE 

JULY 1993 COMPUTE G-33 



PROGRAMS 



PB 


240 


SF 


250 


BK 


26a 


GJ 


27a 


RF 


280 


MP 


290 


JD 


300 



OF 



TO" 
: IF Q 

:IF R 



HD 310 



MX 320 



SB 
GC 



330 
340 



HG 353 



XP 360 



SG 
FG 



370 
330 



KG 390 



QE 490 



PE 
AK 



410 
420 



JG 430 



n (^Me)440 



CR 450 



HX 460 



AB 
HC 



470 
480 



EN LAUNCHED AT THE 
PRINTSPCO) "CAPITAL 
[SPACE} CBLK)"C0$ (P) 
PRINT:PRINTSPC(12) " 
(BLU) SHOULD YOU GO 
Q=INT (RND(.) *10)+1 
=P THEN260 
R=INT (RND(.) *10)+1 
=P OR R=Q THEN270 
POKE2040,192:POKEV+2 9,1 
:POKEV+4 0,1 

S = IOT (RND(. )*3}+l:0N S 
{SPACE}GOTO300,34 0,383 
PRINT:PRINTSPC (9) "{BLK} 
A) {BLU}"CAS(P) :PRINT:PR 
INTSPC(9) "lBLK)B) (BLU]" 
CA$(Q) 

PRINT:PRINTSPC(9) "{BLK} 
C) {BLU}"CAS (R) :PRINTSPC 
(9) "{3 DOWN) {CYN}HIT Q 
CSPACE)TO END GAME" 
G0SUB6aQ:IF BS="A"THEN4 
20 

GOSUB820:GOTO200 
PRINT:PRINTSPC(9) "{BLK} 
A) {BLU)"CA$ (Q) :PRINT:PR 
INTSPC(9)"{BLK}B) {BLU}" 
CAS{P) 

PRINT: PRINTS PC (9) "{BLK} 
C) {BLU)"CA$(R) SPRINTS PC 
(9)"{3 DOWN} {CYH}HIT Q 
[ SPACE }T0 END GAME" 
GOSUB6a0:IF B$="B"THEN4 
20 

GOSUB820:GOTO200 
PRINT:PRINTSPC(9) "{BLK} 
A) {BLU}"CA$(R) :PRINT:PR 
INTSPCO) "fBLK}B) {BLU}" 
CA$(Q) 

PRINT: PRINTSPC{9) "{BLK} 
C) {BLU}"CA$ (P) :PRINTSPC 
(9) "{3 DOWN}{CYN}HIT Q 
{SPACE}TO END GAME" 
GOSUB6a0:IF BS="C"THEN4 
20 

GOSUB820:GOTO200 
PRINT" {CLR}": POKES 3 280, 
13:P0KE532S1,13 
PRINT" {HOME} (18 DOWB}"S 
PC (8) "{BLK}B": PRINTS PC ( 
7)"{PUR}NPE2 SPACES} 
{RVS} {OFF}" 
PRINT"{3 SPACES}{BLK} 
{H}{A} rOP* OP": PRINT" 
{4 SPACES) {PUR}OP^T} 
{RVS} {OFF)<{N>BP{@}NP" 
PRINT" {3 SPACEST{BLKTo 
{SPACE){N> {RVS} (off! 
{N>B{PUR}M M{N>";GOS0Bl 
120 

POKEV+21,3:XA=7 5:YA=200 
: POKE 204 1 , 1 94 ; POKEV+39 , 
11:POKEV+40,6 
SC=SC+1:IFSC>3 THEN GOS 
UB970:GOTO200 
PS=INT(RND(.)*3)+1:0N P 
S GOTO490,720,77a 



SQ 490 POKE2040,192:POKEV+39,1 

1;X=60:XX=255:FORA=1TO2 

5 : XX=XX-3 : POKEV, XX 
XX 500 POKEV+1,X:GOSUB570 
QA 510 POKEV+2,XA:POKEV+3,YA:N 

EXT 
EH 520 POKEV+3a,0 
SX 530 POKE204a,l93:FORA=lTO50 

:XX=XX-3:X=X+3: POKEV, XX 

:POKEV+1,X:GOSUB570 
KE 540 IFFB=0ANDPEEK(V+30) AND2 

=2THEN GOSUB630:GOTO470 
BF 550 POKEV+2,XA;POKEV+3,YA:I 

F(P'JEK(V+31) AND1)=1THEN 

910 
RR 560 NEXT;GOTO200 
MP 570 JY=PEEK(56320) AND15:FB= 

PEEK(56320)AND16:REM RE 

AD STICK AND BUTTON 
FA 580 IFJY=7THENXA=XA+JR: IF X 

A>255THEN XA=255 
Bfl 590 IFJY=11THENXA=XA-JR: IFX 

A<1 THEN XA=1 
JD 600 IFJY=13THENYA=YA+JR: IF 

{SPACE}YA>250 THEN YA=2 

50 
SS 610 IFJY=14THENYA=YA-JR: IF 

{SPACE}yA<l THEN YA=1 
XR 620 RETURN 
HQ 630 POKE2040,195:POKEV+39,2 

:GOSUB1100:POKEV,+ 23,1:P 

OKEV+29,1 
DM 640 F0REC=1T03:P0KEV+39,EC: 

FORDE=1TO70 : NEXT : NEXT : P 

OKEV,0:POKEV+1,0 
MS 650 POKEV+3l,0:POKEV+23,0:R 

ETURN 
GS 660 GET B$:IF BS="" THEN66a 
QB 670 RETURN 

MM 680 GET B$: IFBS=""THEN6a3 
KB 693 IF BS="A"0RB5="C"0RB$=" 

B"THENRETURN 
SA 700 IF BS="Q"THEN1140 
XC 710 GOTO 6 80 
XF 720 POKE2a40,196:POKEV+39,l 

1 : POKEV, 60 :FORVS=3T0 203 

STEP5:GOSUB570 
EG 730 POKEV+1,VS:POKEV+30,0:P 

0KEV+2,XA 
EG 740 P0KEV+3,YA:IFFB=3ANDPEE 

K (V+30) AND2=2THENGOSUB6 

30:GOTO473 
JR 753 IF (PEEK{V+31)AND1) =1 T 

HEN910 
GS 760 NEXT:GOTO200 
DG 770 POKE2040,197:POKEV+39,1 

1:POKEV,255:POKEV+1,220 
DC 780 FORX=25STO0STEP-3:GOSUB 

570 : POKEV,X: POKE V+30, 
HJ 790 POKEV+2,XA:POKEV+3, YA:I 
FFB=0ANDPEEK (V+30) AND2= 
2THENGOSUB630:GOTO470 
BM 800 IF (PEEK(V+31)AND1)=1 T 

HEN910 
BR 810 NEXT:GOTO200 
AP 820 PRINT"{CLR}{4 DOWN} 

{6 RIGHT}{RED}OM <H> 



{N}{2 SPACES}<H} 
{2 SPACES}{HH2 SPACES} 
0{Y> {Y}H2 Y} B -(N}M 
T2 SPACES}{HJ-" 

DB 830 PRINT"{6 RIGHT5LN <H} 
{NJ{2 SPACES }{H} 
{2 SPACES}{HH2 SPACES} 
L-fP}{2 SPACES}<N> 
13 SPACES}B {NJ M {H}" 

KR 840 PRINT"{6 RIGHT}<H}M <H} 
■tN>{2 SPACES}<H} 

{2 spaces}{h}{2 spaces} 
<hH3 spacesHn} 

{3 SPACES}B <N> 
{2 SPACES}H{H>" 

FB S5^ PRINT"{6 RIGHT}LN M{P>N 
{2 SPACES}L{P> L-fP} L 
<P}{2 SPACES}{N> 
{3 SPACES}B {N} 
(3 SPACES HH}" 

MA 360 PRINT "(3 DOWN} {BLK} "SP 
C{4)CA5 (P) : PRINT "{BLU} 
{SPACE}THE CAPITAL OF 
{BLK}":PRINTSPC(4)C0$ (P 
) 

CQ B70 PRINT"{BLU}{2 SPACES }HA 
S BEEN DESTROYED " ; 

RP 880 PRINT"BY SCUD MISSLES. 
{3 SPACES}THE PERSON WH 
COULD HAVE SAVED THE 
{SPACE}CITYDID"; 

BA 890 PRINT" NOT HAVE ENOUGH 
{SPACE}lNF0RMATI0N TO G 
ET{2 SPACES}TO THE RICH 
T CITY IN TIME." 

XS 900 PRINT"{3 DOWN) {a RIGHT) 
■C6JHIT ANY KEY TO CONTI 
NUECBLU}":GOSUB660:RETU 
RN 

MP 910 POKEV+21,0:PRINT"{HOME} 
(20 DOWN)"SPC (4) "{RED}M 
•tF>{5 SPACES)N N":GOSU 
B1100 

AR 920 PRINTSPC(4)"N M 

{4 SPACES }N NNM N" 

QP 930 PRINTSPC(3) "TM MfQ^IBBN 
{ + JP{2 £j-Q":POKESN + 4,0 

MC 940 FORDE'l TO500: NEXT : FORC 
L=1704TO190 3:POKECL,32: 
NEXT 

FJ 950 PRINTSPC(3) "{UP}{BLK) 
{D}{0} <K}{£}{2 IJR{R} 
L{£>@-C + ><7}":F0RDE = 1T 
Oia00;NEXT 

QF 960 POKEV, 0:POKEV+1,0:POKEV 
+31,a:GOTO230 

PC 970 POKEV+21,0 

RH 980 PRINT"{CLR} {5 DOWN) 

(4 RIGHT} {BLK}THANK YOU 
! !":PRINT:PRINT"{BLU}YO 
UR KNOWLEDGE AND MARKSM 
ANSHIP"; 

AM 990 PRINT" HAVE {4 SPACES )SA 
VED{BLK)": PRINT :PRINTCA 
S (P) :PRINT;PRINT"{BLU}T 
HE CAPITAL OF{BLK}" 

HR 1000 PRINTlPRINT COS(P):PRI 



G-34 COMPUTE JULY 1993 



NT"iBLU)" 
DB 1010 PRItJT"(5 DOWN} (WHT)HIT 
ANY KEY TO CONTINUE 

[BLU)":GOSUB660:SS=SS+ 

1:RETURN 
JA 1020 POKE532a0,10:POKE53281 

,10 

PG 1030 PRINT"[CLR) {3 DOWN} 
[BLK)"SPC{12) "N{2 T} 
[2 SPACES)H<(2 T> 
{2 SPACES XGJ {M} 
{2 SPACES )OM":PRINTSPC 
(12)"Ht@>{3 SPACES}-tGJ 
{4 SPACEsitG} (M} 
{2 SPACES}{G}{H}" 

qa 1040 printspc{14) "h 
{2 spaces j-cg j 
{4 spacesHg> <M> 
{2 spacesHghm}":prin 

TSPC{12) "{2 @>N 
{2 SPACES }M{2 @> 
{2 SPACES}Mi@>N 
{2 SPACES }LN" 
JD 1050 PRINT" {3 DOWN}{BLU} 

{3 SPACES }THE enemy IS 

LAUNCHING SCUD HISSIL 

ES at national CAPITAL 

S"; 

KM 1060 PRINT" in the AMERICAS 
. {3 SPACES}YOUR JOB IS 
TO GET TO THE CAPITAL 
UNDER ATTACK"; 

KG 1070 PRINT" AND DESTROY THE 
MISSILES. USE A 
(2 SPACES}JOYSTICK IN 
{SPACE) PORT TWO,"; 

RP 1080 PRIST" BUT BE CAREFUL, 
[2 SPACES}EOUIPMENT IN 
DIFFERENT CITIES DOES 
NOT "; 

DF 1090 PRINT" ALWAYS RESPOND 
{SPACElWITH THE SAME S 
PEED. ":GOSUB900: RETURN 

KG 1100 POKESN+4,129:POKESN+5, 
92:POKESN+l, 1:P0KESN,1 
00:FORF=1TO9 99:NEXT:PO 
KESN+4,0 

CE 1110 RETURN 

PD 1120 p6kRSN+14,5:P0KESN+13, 
16:POKESN+3,l:POKESN+6 
,240:POKESN+4,65 

CJ 1130 POKESN,240:POKESN+1,20 
:POKEV+30,0:RETURN 

QD 1140 PRINT"{CLR} { 5 DOWN} 

{7 RIGHT} YOU SAVED "SS 
" OUT OF THE "P 

SG 1150 PRINT:PRINT"{8 RIGHT}C 
ITIES THAT WERE ATTACK 
ED" 

AA 1160 PRINT"{5 DOWN} 

{5 RIGHT }W01ILD YOU LIK 
E TO TRY AGAIN (Y/N) ": 
GOSUB660 

FA 1170 IF B$="N"THEN END 

AX 1180 IFB$="Y"THEN RUN 40 

CR 1190 GOTO1140 

SJ 1200 DATAANTIGUA & BARBUDA, 



ST. JOHNS, BAHAMAS, NASS 

AU, BELIZE, BELMOPAN 
EK 1210 DAT ACANADA, OTTAWA, COST 

A RICA, SAN JOSE, CUBA, H 

AVANA, DOMINICA, ROSEAU 
PB 1220 DATADOMINICAN REPUBLIC 

, SANTO DOMINGO, EL SALV 

ADOR,SAN SALVADOR, GREN 

ADA 
FS 1230 DATAST. GEORGE ' S,GUATE 

MALA, GUATEMALA, HAITI, P 

ORT-AU-PRINCE, HONDURAS 

XC 1240 DATATEGUCIGALPA.JAMAIC 

. A, KINGSTON, MEXICO, MEXI 

CO CITY, NICARAGUA, MANA 

GUA 
KG 1250 DATA PANAMA, PANAMA CITY 

, SAINT LUCIA, CASTRIES, 

SAINT VINCENT & THE GR 

ENADINES 
HJ 1260 DATAKINGSTOWN, TRINIDAD 
& TOBAGO, PORT OF SPAI 

N, UNITED STATES, WASHIN 

GTON D.C. 
BP 1270 DAT AARGENT I NA, BUENOS A 

IRES, BOLIVIA, LA PAZ, BR 

AZrL,BRASILIA,CHILE,SA 

NT I AGO 
MX 1280 DATACOLOMBIA, BOGOTA, EC 

UAD0R,QUITO,GUYANA,GEO 

RGETOWN , PARAGUAY , ASUNC 

ION 
KE 1290 DATAPERU,LIMA,SURINAME 

, PARAMARI BO , URUGU AY ,M0 

NT I VI DEO, VENEZUELA, CAR 

ACAS 
FS 1300 DATABARBADOS,BRIDGETOW 

N,ST. KITTS 4 NEVIS, BA 

SSETERRS 
FE 1310 DATA00a,000,000,000,00 

0,000,00 0,000,000,000, 

00 0,000,000,000,000,00 

0,000 
GG 1320 DATA001,00a,000,003,00 

0,000,007,000,024,015, 

000,104,127,000,143,25 

5,000 
EB 1330 DATA143,255,000,104,12 

7,000,024,015,000,000, 

007,000,000,003,000,00 

0,001 
SG 1340 DATA000,000,000,000,00 

0,000, 000, 000, 000, 000, 

000,000,000,000,000,00 

0,000 
CJ 1350 DATA000,000,000,000,00 

0,000,000,000,000,000, 

000,000,000,000,004,00 

0,000 
FR 13-60 DATA006,000,000,007,00 

0,000,007,12 8,00 0,00 7, 

192,000,007,224,000,00 

7,240 
PX 1370 DATA003,007,248,000,00 

7,252,000,015,254,000, 

028,000,000,120,000,00 

0,144 



RF 1380 DATA0g0,000,144,000,00 
0, 224, 000, 000, 000, 000, 
000,000,000,000,000,00 
0,000 

KK 1390 DATA000,000,000,000,00 
0,000,000,000,000,000, 
000, 008, 000, 000, 008, 00 
0,000 

GK 1400 DATA008,000,000,008,00 
0,000,255,128,000,008, 
00 0,000,00 8,0 00,0 00,00 
8,000 

AC 1410 DATA000,008,000,000,00 
0,000,000,000,000,000, 
00 0,000,00 0,000,000,00 
0,000 

MA 1420 DATA00a,000,000,0OO,00 
0,000,032,000,008,03 2, 
032,004,032,000,000,03 
2,000 

KF 1430 DATA001,002,000,000,13 
2,000,000,072,000,128, 
048,000,064,120,002,09 
2,252 

FH 1440 DATA248,128,120,002,00 
,048,000,003,072,000, 
00 0,13 2,0 00,001,002,00 
0,000 

CS 1450 DATA016,000,000,016,O0 
0,008,016,032,016,016, 
032,000,000,000,000,00 
0,000 

BK 1460 DATA000,003,255,128,00 
1,215,000,000,214,000, 
00 0,12 4,000,000,056,00 
0,000 

RR 1470 DATA040,000,000,040,00 
0,000,040,000,003,040, 
000,000,040,000,000,04 
0,000 

EC 1480 DATA000,340,000,000,04 
0,000,000,040,000,000, 
056,000,000,016,000,00 
0,016 

QP 1490 DATA000, 000, 016,000,00 
0,000,000,000,000,000, 
000,000,000,000,000,00 
0,000 

BA 1500 DATA000,000,000,000,00 
0,000,000,000,000,000, 
000,000,000,000,000,00 
0,000 

FK 1510 DATA003,000,000,007,00 
0,000,025,015,255,241, 
000,00 0,0 2 5,000,000,00 
7,000 

JE 1520 DATA000,003,000,000,00 
0,000,000,000,000,000, 
000,000,000,000,000,00 
0,000 

PD 1530 DATA800,000,000,00O,00 
0,000,000,000,000,000 

William Snow, a teacher for more than 
27 years, is vice president of the 
McHenry County Commodore Comput- 
er Club in fvicHenry, tllinois. 

JULY 1993 COMPUTE G-35 



PROGRAMS 



CRYPTARITHM SOLVER 

By David Pankhurst 
When I first bought my Commodore, i 
used it often to solve math problems. I 
liked the brute-force approach the com- 
puter allowed. I'd just have a series of 
FOR-NEXT loops go through the possible 
answers until a solution would appear, 

That was fine most of the time, but even- 
tually I came across a type of math prob- 
lem the computer couldn't help me with, 
the cryptarithm. You've no doubt seen 
this type of problem before. 

HELP 

+ THE 



YOUNG 



Each letter represents a different digit, 
0-9. In this example, there are ten dif- 
ferent letters, so all ten digits are 
used. The words HELP and THE each 
make numbers that, when added to- 
gether, match the result in YOUNG. 
There are no restrictions, except that 
can't be the first digit in any number. 

Clearly, this isn't a simple loop prob- 
lem. Let's say the H above was as- 
signed 1; the E, 2; the L, 3; and so on 
throughout the puzzle. A sample addi- 
tion could then be tried, and the result 
checked. 

So how many times does this need 
to be done? To completely check the 
puzzle, H has to be tried out for each 
of the 9 digits (leaving out 0), Eby 
each of the remaining 9, the L by the 
remaining 8, and so on. This gives ap- 
proximately 9x9x8x7x6x5x 
4x3x2x1 choices, or 3,265,920 dif- 
ferent combinations. That's a lot of 
loops in BASIC! If the 64 managed one 
calculation per second, it would take 
more than 35 days to complete. 

To the Rescue 

Enter machine language. Cryptarithm 
Solver brings ML brute force to these 
puzzles. In a matter of hours, it can 
solve most cryptarithms. A puzzle is 
first broken up into combinations, and 
the computer tries different substitu- 
tions for each letter. 

If the result is correct (totals on both 
sides of the equal sign match) the puz- 
zle is solved. The program then goes 
on to see if there are other solutions. 

G-36 COMPUTE JULY 1993 



Typing It In 

Cryptarithm Solver is written in BASIC, 
but it pokes machine language rou- 
tines into memory to speed calcula- 
tions. To help avoid typing errors, en- 
ter the program with The Automatic 
Proofreader; see "Typing Aids" else- 
where in this section. Be sure to save 
a copy of the program before you try to 
run it. 

Solving Equations 

When you run Cryptarithm Solver, the 
program will prompt you for a puzzle. 
To solve the above problem, enter it in 
the following format, ('y'ou may use low- 
ercase letters.) 

HELP+TH£=YOUNG 

After you press Return, the program 
displays a constantly changing sum in 
the bottom of the screen. This is a win- 
dow into the processing of the pro- 
gram. The display is the test result pro- 
duced by each combination. Usually, 
the result is wrong, and the next com- 
bination is then tried. However, when 
the result is true, the solution is dis- 
played, along with the time it took to 
find. Processing then continues with 
the next combination. 

No Key Words 

You need to watch out for one thing 
when you're preparing input for Cryp- 
tarithm Solver. If you typed SEND + 
MORE = MONEY, the program would 
display an error message informing 
you that the words contained an em- 
bedded BASIC function or command, 
This is because the BASIC commands 
END, OR, and ON are embedded in 
the formula, and the computer tries to 
encode these as commands. To avoid 
this problem, insert spaces between 
the letters. SEND + MORE=MO 
N E y would work fine, 

Cryptarithm Solver works well with all 
sorts of mathematical operations, not 
just addition. One example is the follow- 
ing multiplication. 

ABCDE*9=FGHIJ 

Entering it this way fixes the 9; only let- 
ters are changed in the puzzle. By the 
way there are two solutions to this puz- 
zle. As with other computer math opera- 



tions, be sure to enter an asterisk for 
multiplication. 

Cryptarithm Solver works at ML 
speeds, but even that isn't fast enough 
for instantaneous results. Depending 
on the formula, the program can per- 
form as many as 60 tests a second, so 
it would still take half a day to solve 
some puzzles. 

Even Faster 

One way to shorten the time is to put 
the result first on the line. As an exam- 
ple, look at MONEY=SEND+MORE. 
Cryptarithm Solver starts by assigning 
1 to M: usually, that is the correct digit 
for the first place in the sum. So, you 
can save testing for the other eight dig- 
its, and this can mean solving most puz- 
zles in less than an hour. The exam- 
ples here ranged from 40 seconds to 
three hours, using these tips. 

Other Longuages 

Cryptarithm Solver is not restricted to 
English. It also works in French. 

ELEVE+LECON=DEVOIR 

This translates loosely to become STU- 
DENT+LESSONS=HOMEWORK. If we 
entered the words into Cryptarithm 
Solver as ELEVE+LECON=DEVOIR. 
the D (which logically is 1), would be as- 
signed 7, and it would have to go 
through the whole cycle to solve. By re- 
versing the order, D is assigned 1 im- 
mediately, and the solution is that 
much quicker. It took me 64 minutes. 
(Ill give you this one. The answer is 
69656 + 96078 = 165734.) 

When the program finds a solution, 
leave it running to search for other an- 
swers. When all reasonable solutions 
have been tried, however, you'll want 
to stop it. To quit, hold down the Q 
key. You'll be asked if you wish to con- 
tinue. Press Y to continue or N to stop. 
To slow the action, hold down the Ctrl 
key. But be warned; the solutions take 
much longer. 

I hope you enjoy Cryptarithm 
Solver, yet one more way the brute- 
force methods of computing can yield 
practical results and eliminate all that 
difficult thinking for us humans. To end, 
here are two more puzzles: 

PETER+PETER+PETER+PETER=REP£AT 



IVIARS+VENUS+SATURN-i-URANUS=NEPTUNE 

CRYPTARITHM SOLVER 

PH 100 REM COPYRIGHT 1993 - CO 
MPUTE PUBLICATIONS INTL 
LTD - ALL BIGHTS RESER 
VED 

RH 105 POKE 53280, 0:POKE 53281 
,0:PRINT"{CLR} CYELKH} 

W" 

XK 110 PRINT" {8 SPACES }CRYPTAR 

ITHHS[2 SPACES}^OLVBR 
AQ 120 PRINT" {11 SPACES }BY D.P 

ANKHURST 
BX 130 PRINT 

RE 140 INPUT "CODE STRING";XS 
XB 150 DIM L(2fi) :L=0:GOSUB350: 

PP=P:YS="10234567a9" 
EM 160 FOR 1=1 TO LEN(YS);POKE 
C-l+I ,ASC(MIDS (YS,I ,1) 

):NEXT:POKE CH,LEN(Y5)- 

1 
AR 170 FOR 1=1 TO LEH(X$):P0KE 
511 + 1 ,ASC(MID5 (XS,I,1) 

) :NEXT:POKE I,0;SYS 491 

55 
SD 174 FOR J=l TO I-1:IF PEEK( 

SH+J)THEN 178 
AM 176 PRINT"{RVS} EMBEDDED BA 

SIC FUNCTION OR COMMAND 
{OFF}":END 
GE 178 NEXT;Y=1 
JX 180 IF PEEK(511+Y) <>0 THEN 

{SPACE)Y=Y+1:G0T0 180 
QQ 190 FOR K=l TO Y-1:C=PEEK(5 

11 + K) :CS=CHR$ (C) :IF CS< 

"A" OR C$>"Z" THEN250 
PX 200 IF L=0 THEM230 
CR 210 Y=-1:F0R 1=0 TO L-1:IF 

{SPACE)L(I)=C THEN Y=I 
CG 220 NEXT: IF YO-l THEN240 
PA 230 L(L)=C: Y=L:L=L+1 
SA 240 POKE PP,K:POKE PP+1,Y:P 

P=PP+2 
HC 250 NEXT: POKE PC,PP-P:FOR I 

=0 TO L-1:P0KE X+I,I:NE 

XT: POKE MX,L-1 
DC 260 PRINT"{CLR)" ; :F=0 
CS 270 PRINT"{HOMEl {24 DOWN] " 

XS;:SYS 49152 
MS 280 POKE 198,0:Y=PEEK(78i) 
EB 290 IF y=255 AND F=0 THEN P 

RINT:PRINT"{UP} {RVS| SO 

RRY-KO MATCH {OFr)":GOT 

0340 
SO 300 IF Y=255 THEN PRINT: PRI 

NT"{UP}{RVS} END OF LIS 

TS {OFF)":GOTO340 
PP 310 IF YOl THEN330 
DK 320 F=F+1:PRINT"{2 SPACES}" 

INT (T 1/6 )/10 "SECONDS"; : 

PRINT: PRINT" "X$;:SYS 4 

9158:GOTO280 
QH 330 IF Y=0 THEN PRINT" 

{2 SPACES3C0NTINUB?"; :W 

AIT 198,255:GET Y$:IF Y 



S="Y"THEN270 
EF 343 PRINT:PRINT" FINISHED A 

T"INT (TI/6)/10 "SECONDS 

":END 
DD 350 TIS="000a00":DS=1984 :IF 
PEEK(44)<>18 THEN GOSU 

B 400 
RC 360 DX=50432:NX=DX+1:MX=NX+ 

l:X=MX+l:T=X+30:CM=T+8fl 

:C=CM+1:PC=C+30:P=PC+1: 

R=P+a0 
DR 370 RETURN 
RS 400 RESTORE:FOR 1=0 TO-1 ST 

EP-l:REAn y$:I=VAL (YS) = 

-1:NEXT:X= 49152; data - 

1 
HQ 410 READ Y:IF YO-2 THEN PO 

KE X,Y:X=X+1:G0T0 410 
KA 420 RETURN 
HP 430 DATA{2 SPACBS)24,144, 3 

0, 76, {2 SPACES)9,192, 

{SPACE}56 
AQ 440 DATA 176, 24,165,122, 7 

2,165,123 
FC 450 D&T&{2 SPACES)72,169, 

{2 SPACES}2,133,123,169 

,{2 SPACES }0 
SH 460 DATA 133,122, 32,124,16 

5,104,133 
SE 470 DATA 123,104,133,122, 9 

6,173, {2 SPACES} 2 
FK 480 DATA 197,141, {2 SPACES} 

0,197,165,122, 72 
XH 490 DATA 165,123, 72,176, 

C2 SPACES}6, 32, 63 
KR 500 DATA 192, 76, 56,192, 3 

2,137,192 
ER 510 DATA 104,133,123,104,13 

3,122, 96 
FB 520 DATA 174,244,197,142, 6 

9,198,206 
JD 530 DATA{2 SPACES)69,198,17 

4, 69,198,188,245 
KM 540 DATA 197,190,(2 SPACES} 

3,197,189,164,197 
JE 550 DATA 206, 69,198,174, 6 

9,198, 48 
PA 560 DATA{2 SPACES)15,188,24 

5,197,153,192, 

(2 SPACES}7 
HF 570 DATA 153,255, {2 SPACES} 

1,174, 69,198, 76 
SC 580 DATA{2 SPACES } 69 , 192 , 16 

9,255,162,(2 SPACES}1,1 

33 
HB 590 DATA 122,134,123, 32,11 

5,(2 SPACES}0, 32 
RS 600 DATA 158,173,165, 97,24 

0,{2 SPACES}3,162 
HQ 610 DATA{3 SPACES}!, 96,165 

,197,201, 62,208 
JJ 620 DATA{3 SPACES}3,162, 

(2 SPACES}0, 96,173,141 

,(2 SPACES}2 
HD 630 DATA 201,(2 SPACES}4,20 

8, 17,169, [2 SPACES}5,1 

60 



DS 640 DATA 255,162,255,202,20 

8,253,136 
KC 650 DATA 208,248,170,202,13 

8,208,241 
XH 660 DATA 174, {2 SPACES}0,19 

7,188,(2 SPACES}3,197,2 

00 
HQ 670 DATA 140,(2 SPACES} 1,19 

7,174,163,197,169 
AD 680 DATA(3 SPACES } 0, 157 , 83 

,197,202, 16,250 
JS 690 DATA 174,(2 SPACES}0,19 

7,169,255,202, 48 
AX 700 DATA(3 SPACES } 9, 188 , 

(2 SPACES}3,197,153, 83 

,197 
JM 710 DATA 202, 16,247,173, 

(2 SPACES}1,197,205 
HB 720 DATA 163,197,240, 

(2 SPACES}2,176, 48,172 
KQ 730 0ATA(3 SPACES } 1, 197 , 185 

, 83,197,208, 12 
RP 740 DATA 174,(2 SPACES}0,19 

7,173, (2 SPACES}1, 197,1 

57 
QQ 750 DATA(3 SPACES } 3 , 197 , 76 

,235,192,238,(2 SPACES} 

1 
RX 760 DATA 197, 76,199,192,17 

3, (2 SPACES}0,197 
QF 770 DATA 205,(2 SPACES} 2, 19 

7,208,(2 SPACES}3, 76, 

(SPACE} 63 
RF 780 DATA 192,238,(2 SPACES) 

0,197,169,(2 SPACES}0,1 

41 
HM 790 DATA(3 SPACES } 1 , 197 , 76 

,171,192,206,(2 SPACES} 


EM 800 DATA 197, 16,155,162,25 

5, 96 
XK 810 DATA -2 

David Pankhurst, the author of the 
Calc II spreadsheet, lives in Montreal, 
Quebec, Canada. 



FLASHER 64 



By Henry Sopko 

Focus attention to where you want it on- 
screen with Flasher 64. You can make 
words or graphic characters flash, scroll 
the screen while they flash, and have as 
many characters flashing as you want. 
Flasher 64 is a short machine lan- 
guage program. To enter it, use MLX, our 
machine language entry program. See 
"Typing Aids" elsewhere in this section. 
When MIX prompts, respond with the fol- 
lowing addresses. 



Starting address: CCOQ 
Ending address: CDF7 

JULY 1993 



COMPUTE G-37 



PROGRAMS 



Be sure to save a copy of the program 
before you exit MLX. 

With just two commands, you can 
mal<e a word or a graphic character 
flash anywhere on the screen. As with 
the 128 in 80 columns, you can use 
the command CHR$(15) to turn on the 
flashing and use CHR$(143) to turn it 
off. All characters can be made to 
flash with the exception of characters 
254 and 255. These two characters are 
used in a special way in the program. 
However, they can be used in the non- 
flashing mode. 

You can also use your own custom 
characters as long as the screen mem- 
ory stays at $0400 (default). Flasher 64 
commands can be entered in both di- 
rect and program modes. Since Flash- 
er runs in the background using the 
IRQ routine, your BASIC or machine lan- 
guage programs will continue to exe- 
cute as normal without slowing down. 

How It Works 

A second screen was necessary to ac- 
complish this flashing technique. The 
second screen, located at $C800, is 
filled with the byte value of $FR Then, 
when the command CHR$(15) is 
used, the character{s) are redirected to 
the second screen. The command 
CHR$(143) or a carriage return will can- 
cel the printing of the character(s) to 
the second screen and resume print- 
ing them to the main screen. While 
this is happening, the IRQ routine is 
scanning for characters on the second 
screen. Any character other than 255 
will be printed to the main screen locat- 
ed at $0400 (1024). 

Two phases are required to make 
characters flash. The first phase puts 
the characters on the screen, while the 
second fills them with blank spaces giv- 
ing the effect of flashing characters. 

Also, it was necessary to copy the 
BASIC ROM and the Kernal ROM to 
the underlying RAM to support the 
scrolling of the flashing characters. A 
few changes were made to the Kernal 
so that the two screens would be in 
sync with each other when the screen 
is scrolled. 

To use Flasher 64 in your program, 
you must first execute the program 
with SYS 52224. Do this only at the be- 
ginning of your program. After you 
have issued this SYS command, use 

G-38 COMPUTE JULY 1993 



the commands CHR$(15) and 
CHR$(143) to turn on and off the flash- 
ing sequence. 

For example, after you've entered 
the SYS command, enter the following 
line in immediate mode. 

PRINTCHR$(15)"FLASH 0N"CHRS(143) 
" FLASH OFF" 

It's also possible to turn off all or 
just part of a flashing word. Simply 
send the character 255 to the second 
screen in the area that you wish to 
have the flashing stopped. In order to 
send the character 255, you must first 
use the PRiNTCHR$(15) and then in 
quotes press the Ctrl-Rvs keys simulta- 
neously. While you're still in quote 
mode, hold down the Commodore logo 
key along with the B key. This produc- 
es a character value of 255. 

A Demonstration 

For a demonstration of how these com- 
mands are used, enter the demo pro- 
gram and study its commands. The 
demo is written in BASIC. To help you 
avoid typing errors, enter it with The Au- 
tomatic Proofreader. Again, see "Typ- 
ing Aids." Since the demo loads and 
runs Flasher 64, make sure both pro- 
grams are on the same disk. After 
you've studied the demo, you should 
easily be able to use Flasher 64 in 
your own programs. 

Some cartridges may interfere with 
Flasher 64. To use the program with Su- 
per Snapshot v5, use the cartridge's 
>Q command to quit the wedge since 
Flasher 64 changes the IBSOUT vec- 
tors to point to its own routine. This prob- 
lem occurs only in the direct mode, 



FUSHER 64 
















CCO0:20 


B6 


CD 


A2 


75 


86 


SI 


20 


23 


CC08:96 


CC 


A9 


20 


78 


A2 


C6 


A0 


D3 


CC10:CC 


8E 


14 


03 


8C 


15 


03 


58 


7D 


CCie:A2 


00 


86 


92 


A2 


26 


A0 


CC 


B8 


CC23:8E 


26 


03 


8C 


27 


03 


8E 


94 


AA 


CC2 8:CC 


AE 


95 


CC 


F0 


06 


20 


7B 


AE 


CC30:CC 


20 


60 


CC 


C9 


93 


F0 


22 


Bl 


CC38;C9 


0F 


D0 


03 


20 


60 


CC 


C9 


AA 


CC40:aF 


D0 


03 


20 


7B 


CC 


C9 


0D 


E7 


CC48:Da 


0A 


AE 


88 


02 


E0 


0B 


90 


5F 


CC50:03 


20 


7B 


CC 


AE 


94 


CC 


4C 


5D 


CC58:C\ 


Fl 


23 


96 


CC 


4C 


38 


CC 


16 


CC60:8D 


91 


CC 


A5 


02 


8D 


92 


CC 


D7 


CC68:18 


69 


C4 


85 


D2 


A9 


CB 


8D 


B5 


CC70:88 


S2 


A9 


01 


8D 


95 


CC 


AD 


IE 


CC78:91 


CC 


60 


8D 


91 


CC 


AD 


92 


A0 



CC80 


CC 


85 


D2 


A9 


04 


8D 


88 


02 


40 


CC88 


A9 


00 


80 


95 


CC 


AD 


91 


CC 


0F 


CC90 


60 


80 


00 


00 


00 


00 


BE 


91 


09 


CC98 


CC 


8C 


92 


CC 


A2 


00 


A9 


FF 


43 


CCA0 


A2 


00 


A0 


C8 


86 


FS 


84 


FC 


56 


CCA8 


A0 


00 


91 


FB 


C8 


C0 


00 


D0 


9E 


CCB0 


F9 


E8 


E0 


04 


F0 


05 


E6 


FC 


44 


CCB8 


4C 


AA 


CC 


A9 


FE 


80 


E8 


CB 


23 


CCCO 


A 9 


93 


AE 


91 


CC 


60 


08 


48 


43 


CCC8 


8A 


48 


98 


48 


E6 


02 


A6 


02 


DF 


CCD0 


E0 


14 


F0 


03 


4C 


21 


CD 


A2 


53 


CCD8 


00 


86 


02 


A2 


00 


A0 


C8 


86 


19 


CCE0 


FB 


84 


FC 


A2 


00 


A0 


04 


86 


74 


CCE8 


FD 


84 


FE 


AB 


00 


Bl 


FB 


C9 


15 


CCF9 


FE 


F0 


28 


C9 


FF 


D0 


08 


ca 


04 


CCF8 


C0 


00 


F0 


18 


4C 


ED 


CC 


A6 


EC 


coaB 


92 


E0 


01 


F0 


aA 


91 


FD 


C8 


A7 


CD0B 


C0 


00 


F0 


08 


4C 


ED 


CC 


A9 


FF 


CD10 


20 


4C 


35 


CD 


E6 


FC 


E6 


FE 


44 


CD18 


4C 


ED 


CC 


A5 


92 


49 


01 


85 


8A 


CD20 


92 


68 


A8 


68 


AA 


68 


28 


4C 


4E 


CD28 


31 


EA 


A9 


C8 


A0 


28 


8D 


46 


DF 


CD30 


CD 


OC 


45 


CD 


A9 


CB 


A0 


00 


0D 


CD38 


8D 


4D 


CD 


BC 


4C 


CD 


A2 


00 


4F 


CD40 


A0 


00 


84 


FE 


B9 


00 


00 


C9 


44 


CD4 8 


FE 


F0 


28 


99 


00 


00 


C8 


C0 


90 


CD50 


28 


D0 


Fl 


18 


AD 


45 


CD 


69 


7B 


CD58 


28 


B0 


25 


SD 


45 


CD 


18 


AD 


F0 


CD60 


4C 


CD 


69 


28 


B0 


27 


80 


4C 


CE 


CD68 


CD 


A0 


03 


A6 


FE 


E6 


FE 


E0 


EF 


CD70 


lA 


D0 


Dl 


A0 


00 


A9 


FF 


99 


Dl 


CD78 


C0 


CB 


C8 


C0 


28 


D0 


F8 


60 


63 


CD80 


8D 


45 


CD 


EE 


46 


CD 


E6 


FE 


13 


CD88 


A0 


00 


4C 


5E 


CD 


8D 


4C 


CD 


EE 


CD90 


EE 


4D 


CD 


E6 


FE 


A0 


00 


4C 


E5 


CD98 


44 


CD 


78 


BE 


91 


CC 


A2 


04 


CA 


CDAO 


8E 


88 


02 


AE 


91 


CC 


4C 


C8 


Fl 


CDA8 


E9 


8E 


91 


CC 


20 


2A 


CD 


AE 


CF 


CDB0 


91 


CC 


58 


4C 


FF 


E9 


A0 


30 


01 


CDB8 


34 


02 


A2 


AS 


84 


FB 


86 


FC 


93 


CDC0 


A2 


00 


Bl 


FB 


91 


FB 


C8 


D0 


82 


CDC8 


F9 


EB 


E0 


20 


F0 


35 


Ee 


FC 


20 


CDD0 


4C 


C2 


CD 


E6 


02 


A5 


02 


C9 


DF 


CDD8 


02 


F0 


07 


A2 


E0 


86 


FC 


4C 


24 


CDE0 


CB 


CD 


A2 


9A 


A0 


CD 


8E 


0F 


B6 


CDE8 


E9 


ec 


10 


E9 


A2 


A9 


A0 


CD 


08 


CDF0 


8E 


14 


E9 


8C 


IS 


E9 


60 


00 


EF 



FLASHER DEMO 

HG 5 REM COPYRIGHT 1993 - COHP 
UTE PUBLICATIONS - ALL RI 
GHTS RESERVED 
DR 10 REM FLASHER 64 DE^10 
KG 20 POKE53280,0:POKE53281,0 
KQ 30 IFL=aTHENL=l:LOAD"FLASHE 

R 64. ML", 8,1 
DE 40 SYS52224:REM TURN ON FLA 

SHER 64 
EH 50 : 
CD 60 PRINTCHR$(147) ; :REM CLBA 

RS SCREENS 
AH 73 PRINT"{11 SPACES} (RVS) 

{YELjDEMO OF FLASHER 64" 
FM 80 PRINT 
KC 90 PRINT" {WHT}USE THE COMMA 

ND: {RED)PRINTCHR5(15) 

(2 SPACES }T0 TURN ON FLA 

SHING" 
KR 100 PRINT"{RVS}{CYN)EG: 



PR IK 



KE 120 
QA 130 



DH 143 



BS 


150 


EF 


160 


KS 


170 


KB 


180 


AP 


190 


CP 


200 



RB 


210 


CS 


220 


CM 


230 


KJ 


240 


CE 


250 


EK 


260 


EK 


270 


BD 


280 


CG 


290 


BE 


300 


MH 


310 


MK 


320 


QX 


330 


CG 


340 


HK 


350 


GF 


360 



(OFF) {2 SPACBS}PRINTCHR 
$(15) "CHRS(34) "FLASHER 
{SPACE}NOW ON"CHRS(34) 
PRINTCHR$ (IS) "FLASHER N 
OW ON": REM COMMAHO TO T 
URN ON FLASHING 
FORD=lTO6000:NEXT 
PRINT: PRINT"{WHT)USE TH 
E COMMAND: (RED}PRINTCH 
RS(143){2 SPACEG3T0 TUR 
N OFF FLASHING." 
PRiNT"{RVS}{CYNlEG: 
{OFF} [2 SPACES }PRINTCHR 
S{15)"CHR$(34) "FLASH ON 
"CHR$ (34) "CHRS (143) "CHR 
S(34); 

PRINT" FLASH OFF"CHR5(3 
4} " 

PRINTCHR? (15) "FLASH ON" 
CHR$ (143) " FLASH OFF" 
FORD=1TO6000:NEXT:REH D 
ELAY LOOP 

PRINT;PRINT"(WHT}USE TH 
E COMMAND: {RED}PRINTCH 
RS(15) "CHR$(34) "{RVS} 
{7 B}"CHR5(34) ; 
PRINT"TO TURN OFF A FLA 
SHING WORD." 
PRINT:PRINT"{RV33 {CYN}E 
G:{0FF}{2 SPACES}PRINTC 
HRS(15) "CHR$ (34) "FLASH 
{ SPACE }OH"CHR$ (34) :PRIN 
T 

PRINTCHR$ (15) "FLASH ON" 
FORD=1TO3000;NEXT:REM D 
ELAY LOOP 

PRI NT : PRINT "{CYN}{ RVS }E 
G:{0FF}{2 SPACES}PRINTC 
HR$(15)"CHR$(34)"CRVS} 
■f7 B}"CHRS(34) ; 
PRINT "TO TORN OFF A FLA 
SHING WORD." 
REM IFPEEK(146) OlTHENX 
40: PEEK THIS LOCATION F 
OR ON OR OFF CYCLE 
REM IF PEEK(146)=1 THEN 
CHARACTERS ARE ON SCRE 
EK 

REM IF PEEK(146)=0 THEN 
CHARACTERS ARE OFF SCR 
EEN 

IFPEEK(146)<>1THEN250:R 

EM ] 

PRINT" {4 UP}"; :REH MOVE 

UP TO WORD 
PRINTCHRS (15) "{RVS} 
{8 B}" 

FORD=1TO6000:NEXT:REM D 
ELAY LOOP 
PRINT:PRINT:PRINT 
PRINT"SCROLL FLASHING C 
HARACTER5 OFF SCREEN" 
FORX=1T024:FORD=1T025;N 
EXTD;PRINT:NEXTX 
PRINT" {WHT }***********" 
CHRS (15)" {PUR}tRVS}THA 



TS ALL FOLKS! {OFF} "CHR 
$ (14 3) " [WHT }****** *,^*** 
{CYN}" 



Henry Sopko lives in Hamilton, Ontar- 
io. Canada. 



TYPE-SIM 



By Donald G. Klich 

This program was designed to let you 
use your 64 or 128 as a typewriter for fill- 
ing in the blanks on preprinted forms, ad- 
dressing envelopes, typing labels, and 
other such tasks. Preprinted forms are 
usually designed with vertical spacing of 
six lines to the inch, the same as most 
printers. Therefore Type-Sim allows you 
to set your printer on the first entry line 
and move down the form as necessary. 
With Type-Sim you can set a left or right 
margin to orient your entries. 

Typing It In 

The program is written in BASIC 2.0 
and will run on either the 64 or 128. 
Use The Automatic Proofreader to 
avoid typing errors. See "Typing Aids" 
elsewhere in this section. Be sure to 
save your program before using it. To 
take advantage of Type-Sim's upper- 
and lowercase printing, be sure your 
printer is in the ASCII conversion 
mode or an equivalent mode. 

Operation Menu 

When you run Type-Sim, you'll see a 
menu that offers four data-entry oper- 
ations (options) and an exit option. Op- 
tion 1 allows you to set up a form in the 
printer so that your text will print in the 
desired location. You must first supply 
a column position, perhaps along the 
edge of the form, where you can test- 
print an X. When the Xprints, the com- 
puter sends a backspace and a re- 
verse linefeed. You should adjust the 
form to make sure the printing is in the 
desired location. You can repeat the op- 
tion by pressing the space bar. When 
the form is correctly positioned, press 
Return to go back to the menu. 

Option 2 allows you to select wheth- 
er the following entries will be left (L) or 
right (R) justified. For instance, a busi- 
ness address would be left oriented 
while entries on an income tax form 
would be right oriented. See the next 
option for setting margin settings. 



Option 3 is where you enter your 
text. Before you start, however, you 
must indicate the left or right margin set- 
ting from which your entries will print. 
The program will pack data to the 
right of a left margin or immediately to 
the left of a right margin. 

After you've entered the margin set- 
ting for this particular entry and 
pressed Return, you'll be prompted to 
enter the phrase or line of text to be 
printed. Press Return to print. If you 
need linefeeds to move the print 
head, you'll have that option after you 
print each entry. To return to the menu, 
press the up-arrow (t) key. 

Option 4 permits you to select any 
additional linefeeds you may require to 
move down the form. 

Option 5 exits the program. 

nPE-SIM 

HH 10 REM COPYRIGHT 1993 COMPU 
TE PUBLICATIONS IHTL LTD 
- ALL RIGHTS RESERVED 
GS 20 REM TYPEWRITER SIMULATOR 
GB 30 POKE53281,0:POKE53283,0: 
0PEN1,4:PRINT"{CLR}"SPC( 
8) "(2 DOWN) (BLU}UCCCCCCC 
CCCCCCCCCCCCCI " 
XH 40 PRINT"{BLU} {8 SPACES}B 
{IJTYPEWRITER SIMULATOR 
{BLU)B";PRINTSPC(8)" JCCC 
CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCK " 
AK 50 PRINT" {DOWN} {CYN} 

{10 SPACES}MENU OF OPERA 
TIONS:" 
AF 60 PRINT"{D0WN} {7 SPACES} 

(RVS) {YEL}1{0FF) {WHT} SE 
T UP FORM IN PRINTER" 
RB 70 PRINT"{7 SPACES) {RVS} 

{YEL}2{0FF}{WHT} SET OP 
{SPACE}L-R POINTER" 
DA 80 PRINT"{7 SPACES) {RVS) 

{YEL}3{0FF} {WHT} INPUT T 
YPING ROUTINE" 
RR 90 PRINT"{7 SPACES) {RVS} 

{YEL}4{0FF}{WHT) EXTRA L 
INE FEEDS" 
JH 100 PRINT"{7 SPACES}{RVS} 

{ YEL35{0FF} {WHT} QUIT P 
ROGRAM" 
FP 110 GOSOB440:ONVAL (AS)GOTOl 
2 0,190, 2 5 0,4 10, 430: GOTO 
110 
SA 120 PRINT"{3 DOWN}{GRN}TO A 
LIGN THE FORM, ENTER TH 
E HORIZONTAL" 
BX 130 PRINT"COLUMN WHERE A RE 
PEATED <1}X{GRN) CAN BE 
PRINTED" 
SC 140 PRINT" {DOWN}USE SPACE T 
REPEAT THE <1JX{GRN} 
{SPACE]AND RETURN TO EX 

JULY 1993 COMPUTE G-39 



PROGRAMS 



FD 


150 


PR 


160 


EH 


170 


CX 


180 


FG 


190 


QK 


200 


HK 


210 


FG 


220 



CQ 230 

GD 240 
PA 250 
GP 260 



FR 270 

GK 280 
SA 290 

DS 300 
QG 310 
PH 320 

HQ 330 
XK 340 



DM 350 



PR 3S0 



IT"; 

PRINT". {2 SPACES}ENTER 

(SPACE) COLUMN NUMBER:"; 

IINPUTN 

PRINT#1,SPC(N) "X":PRINT 

#1,CHR$(27) ;CHR5(106) ;C 

HRS(0) : PRINT #1,CHR5 (27) 

;"«"; 
GOSUB440;IFAS=CHRS C32)T 

HEH1S0 

IFAS=CHRS (13)THEN50 
PRINT"{2 DOWN} {GRN)ENTE 
R AN {YEL)L{GRN} IF YOU 

ARE PLANNING TO" 
PRINT"ORIENT YOUR ENTRI 
ES TO THE LEFT":PRINT 
PRINT"ENTER AN {VEL)R 
{GRN) IF YOU ARE PLANill 
NG TO" 

PniNT"ORIENT YPUR ENTRI 
ES TO THE RIGHT":PRINT" 
L/R?{2 SPACES}"; :G0SUB4 
40:M$=AS 

PRINTMS:IFM$<>"L"ANDH$< 
>"R"THEN190 
GOTO50 

PRINTCHR$ (14) 
IFMS<>"L"ANDM$<>"B"THEN 
PRINT" (2 DOWN)n} 
{4 S PACES }L OR R LOCATO 
R ?":PRINTCHR${142) :GOT 
0190 

PRINT"{CLR} (GRN) 
(2 DOWN) (5 SPACES}ENTER 

AN UP ARROW ( [YELlf 
{GRN}) TO QUIT" 
L0$="LEFT":IFf1$ = "R"THEN 
L0$=" RIGHT " 
A$="":PRINT"{GRN) ENTER 

THE PRINT POSITION FOR 

YOUR ";L0$; : INPUT" MAR 
GIN";A$ 

IFAS=CHR$(94)THENPRINT" 
{CLR)"CHRS(142) :GOTO50 
IFVAL (A$) >80ORA$=""THEN 
250 

P=VAL(A$) :AS="": PRINT" 
{5 SPACFS}ENTER PHRASE 
{SPACE}TO BE PRINTED 
{WHT}":INPUTA$ 
IFRS=CHR$(94)THENPRINT" 
{CLR5"CHR$(142) :GOTO50 
IFM$="L"THENN=P: IFN+LEN 
(A$)>80THENPRINT"NO 
(SHIFT-SPACE} ROOM 
(SHIFT-SPACF,]T0 
(SHIFT-SPACE) PRINT ": GOT I 
0290 

IFHS="R"THENN=P-LEN (A$) 
+1:IFN<0THENPRINT"NO 
{5HIFT-SPftCE} R00M 
(SHIFT-SPACE)TO 
{ SH I FT -S PACE ] PRI NT " : GOT 
0290 

PRINT#1,SPC(N) ;A$:PRINT 
#1,CHRS(27) ;CHR$(106) ;C 
HRS (0) :PRIOT#1,CHR$(27) 



HX 373 

DJ 380 

DF 390 

HQ 400 

PD 410 



PRINT"{GRN}{5 SPACES}LI 

NE FEED? y/N{3 SPACEST" 

; ;GOSUB440;PRINTA$ 

IFA$=CHR$(94)THENPRINT" 

{CLR}"CHRS (142) :GOTO50 

IFA$="Y"THENPRINT#1,"": 

GOTO250 

GOTO 250 

PRINT"{GRN}(2 DOWN) 

(5 SPACES3ENTER NUMBER 

{SPACE}OF LINE FEEDS";: 

INPUTA$: IFVAL (A$) =0THEN 

50 

F0RI=1T0VAL{A$) tPRINTll 

:NEXT:GOTO50 

CL0SE1:END 

A$="";GETA$:IFA$=""THEN 

440 

RETURN 



Donald Klich is a frequent contributor. 
His most recent program, CrossRef 
128, appeared in tlie May 1993 issue. 
He lives in Mount Prospect, Illinois. O 



FC 


420 


SM 


430 


RJ 


440 


FC 


450 



TYPING AIDS 

MLX, our machine language entry 
program for the 64 and 128, and 
The Automatic Proofreader are util- 
ities that help you type in Gazette 
programs without making mis- 
takes. To make room for more pro- 
grams, we no longer include 
these iabor-saving utilities in eve- 
ry issue, but they can be found on 
each Gazette Disk and are printed 
in all issues of Gazette through 
June 1990. 

If you don't have access to a 
back issue or to one of our disks, 
write to us, and we'll send you 
free printed copies of both of 
these handy programs for you to 
type in. We'll also include instruc- 
tions on how to type in Gazette pro- 
grams. Please enclose a self-ad- 
dressed, stamped envelope. Send 
a self-addressed disk mailer with 
appropriate postage to receive 
these programs on disk. 

Write to Typing Aids, COM- 
PUTE'S Gazette, 324 West Wen- 
dover Avenue, Suite 200, Greens- 
boro, North Carolina 27408. 



ONLY 

ON 

DISK 



In addition to the type-in programs 
found in each issue of the magazine, 
Gazette Disk offers bonus programs. 
Here's a special program that you'll 
find only on this month's disk. 

Mergee 

By Robert Quinn 
Kooringall, Waga Waga 
NSW, Australia 

This month's bonus program is a 
tough, thinking-person's game for 
the 64 that can be played from the 
keyboard or joystick. The game be- 
gins with a playing field that's filled 
with single-digit numbers, random 
boxes, squares, and open spaces. 
The object of Mergee is to move 
the numbers around so that they 
merge with other numbers and disap- 
pear from play Only like digits can 
merge, however, and when all of the 
numbers are gone, the game is 
over. The rules are simple, but there 
are a few surprises waiting for you 
that'll make Mergee almost as frus- 
trating to play as it is entertaining. 

Public Domain Programs 

Don't forget that Gazette Disk now 
contains the best of public domain 
programs and shareware. For a com- 
plete rundown of the programs on 
this disk, see Steve Vender Ark's 
"Share This" column, which makes 
its debut in this issue of Gazette. 

You can have these programs and 
all of the type-in programs found in 
this issue — ready to load and run — 
by ordering the July Gazette Disk. 
The price is $9.95 plus $2.00 ship- 
ping and handling. Send your order 
to Gazette Disk, COMPUTE Publica- 
tions, 324 West Wendover Avenue, 
Suite 200, Greensboro, North Caro- 
lina 27408. You can order by credit 
card by calling (919) 275-9809, ex- 
tension 283. 



G-40 COMPUTE JULY 1993 



REVIEWS 



SONY DESKTOP 
LIBRARY 

Here's your chance to enter 
the world of multimedia. 
With the Sony Desktop Li- 
brary, you get everything 
you need: a CD-ROM drive, 
a sound card, and a collec- 
tion of real multimedia soft- 
ware. This next-generation 
product goes beyond early 
CD-ROM products, giving 
consumers more of what 
they want and need: plenty 
of software and an easy-to- 
use front end to the CD- 
ROM titles and hardware. 

My evaluation package 
had an external drive. Two 
other packages are availa- 
ble (at a reduced price, too) 
with internal drives. The da- 
ta-retrieval speed of 150K 
per second was right in line 
with multimedia standards. 

Right now these multime- 
dia products ship with a 
Spectrum 16 sound card, 
It's Ad Lib, Sound Blaster, 
and Real Sound compati- 
ble. Software that supports 
the card in native mode 
sounds superb, even better 
than Sound Blaster emula- 
tion. A nice set of desktop 
speakers provides an alterna- 
tive to running wires to your 
stereo. 

Six full-blown multimedia 
software titles will get you 
started. There's so much ma- 
terial, it'll take several 
weeks before you'll have 
enough time for more than a 
brief sampling. 

In addition to solid, relia- 
ble hardware, the Sony Desk- 
top Library includes the 
GeoWorks CD-ROM Manag- 
er as part of the package. 
It's a front end to all of the 
CD-ROM software that's in- 
cluded. All you do to run a 
program is click on its icon. 
The package includes even 
more than front-end soft- 
ware, though — it's a graph!- 



SONY 



Desktop Library. 

nw CiMpMfv «dMm«U Cfi-HM &r^tm\ C£;^ \ 
wait Bxttml Oiivt 




With the Sony Desktop Library you get all sorts of stuff, including a 
CD-ROM drive. CD-ROM titles, and speakers. 






^E*!*!* l>jrk»f, ^Ej-»*lfl ^r<B 



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1 



With Dashboard lor Windows 1.0. a new Windows utility from Hewlett- 
Packard, you can drive your computer more effectively. 



cal environmenL Many of 
the GeoWorks niceties that 
make DOS easier are there 
as a bonus. 

You can create icons for 
other CD-ROM titles as your 
library grows. That way, 
you'll always have the same 
easy interface when you ac- 
cess your CD-ROM titles. 

I wasn't sure I could run 
CD-ROM programs from 
DOS until I called Sony, i 
didn't find any mention of run- 
ning from DOS in the Sony lit- 
erature, but I'm not a good 
manual reader, so I could 
have missed it. After talking 
to the company, I was able 
to install an icon and a 
group in Windows. I ended 
up spending more time run- 
ning GeoWorks from Win- 
dows than DOS and had no 
problems. 

The bundled software var- 
ied in quality, but my two fa- 
vorites were Where in the 
World Is Carmen Sandiego? 
and The New G roller Multime- 
dia Encyclopedia. My kids 
loved them, too. If you have 



children, the accompanying 
software will provide enter- 
tainment and edification for 
them as well. 

Some of the programs 
did the unthinkable and cop- 
ied a large portion of them- 
selves to my hard drive. 
Thinking I had plenty of avail- 
able space, I tried installing 
an application and was tak- 
en aback when I discovered 
the intrusion. 

The GeoWorks installation 
was a two-stage process re- 
quiring a Ctrl-Alt-Delete 
boot between stages. I wish 
it had done what many oth- 
er installations do and reboot- 
ed itself, followed by auto- 
matic spawning of thie sec- 
ond half of the procedure. 

In spite of several small 
complaints, I think highly of 
the package. If you're seri- 
ously thinking about getting 
a CD-ROM drive, take a 
good look at this package. 
It may be just what you 
need. And Sony, one of the 
leaders in CD-ROM technol- 
ogy, will probably be in the 



busiriess for a long time. 

RICHARD C LEINECKER 

Sony 

(800) 352-7669 

$1,069.95 (external package) 

Cfrcte Reader Service Number 434 



DASHBOARD FOR 
WINDOWS 1.0 

It's compact, neat, conven- 
ient, and fast. In fact, I like 
Dashboard so well that I reg- 
ularly use it in place of Win- 
dows' own standard Pro- 
gram Manager. 

Like the dashboard in to- 
day's high-tech cars, this 
Windows utility presents an 
impressive collection of high- 
ly visible gauges and easily 
accessible controls. The re- 
source gauge, for example, 
resembles an analog fuel 
gauge and allows you to 
monitor your Windows sys- 
tem resources. The memory 
meter below it looks like an 
odometer and lets you mon- 
itor available system memo- 
ry. If you run too low on re- 
sources or memory, a gas- 
pump icon blinks to alert 
you. 

In Dashboard's printer 
manager, you choose from 
available printers by clicking 
on a printer's icon button; a 
light at the bottom of the but- 
ton shows the default printer 
or, if you have a fax board, 
the fax software to which 
you "print." To print or fax a 
file with ease, just drag and 
drop it from Windows' File 
Manager to the appropriate 
icon. 

Forget double-clicking 
when you use the Quick 
Launch buttons. A single 
click launches your most- 
used apps, identified by 
icons and, with enough 
room, the names of the pro- 
grams, To launch less-used 
apps, click on one of the 
group buttons in the Pro- 

JULY 1993 COMPUTE 89 




The screen saver for 
high-powered PCs. 




F: 



"inally, there's a 
screen saver 
that shows off ihe 
blazing speed, 
stunning graphics 
-^ and spectacular 

sound* in your PC. 
ORIGIN FX delivers 256-color, high- 
res images** running under Windows 
- with 27 entertaining modules cre- 
ated by ORIGIN'S award-winning 
computer artists. 

Special Bonus: 

If you own Strike Commander, Wing 
Commander II or Serpent Isle, 
ORIGIN FX wtil play their cinematic 
sequences as separate modules when 
the games are installed on your 
hard drive. And 
that's just the 
beginning- 
many future 
ORIGIN games 
will support 
this feature as 
well! 






Available ot a software retailer near 

you or calf 1-800-245-4525 for 

MC/Visa/Discover orders. 




ei9n CflCM Sr^n. K. FX. Svpv^ Ut tnj Sri« Ommt^ {I* Irdmaii d 
SydBi^ bi^ Bm^v^ Arti 4 o ngmnA t tifa nart c/ Qkxvk An. W«da»t a a 
mTf4lA nqtfTBcf b* iniK. "Aeivb lii Vhhgbns be mr^^nd in 2S^<eiw ii«dvwiii 

Cbcle Reader Service Number 163 



90 COMPUTE JULY 1993 



REVIEWS 



gram menu bar; when the group win- 
dow pops up, click on the app you 
want. 

You also have buttons for the Sys- 
tem menu (like the one in Windows), 
the Task menu (to switch, run, and 
close programs), and the Layout menu 
(to create, edit, or load Dashboard lay- 
outs). The Dashboard panel also has a 
help button, a customize button, a min- 
imize button, a maximize button, and a 
button that lets you hide or show the 
Program menu. 

The Dashboard clock (digital or an- 
alog and available in several versions) 
lets you set the date, the time, and 
alarms. And Dashboard's mini program 
windows visually represent what you 
have on a particular screen. If you dis- 
like the clutter on a screen with a pro- 
gram running, an uncluttered screen to 
the left or the right can be just a click 
away 

Don't let its compactness fool you: 
Dashboard is highly customizable and 
offers much more depth of utility than 
meets the eye. If you enjoy using wall- 
paper to add variety to Windows 
computing, you'll love the way Dash- 
board takes no more room than nec- 
essary Most important, however. Dash- 
board steers you through Windows 
with minimal clutter and maximum 
speed and efficiency. 

MIKE HUDNALL 

HewlBtt-Packard 

(800) 554-1305 

$99 

Circle Reader Service Number 435 



SMITH CORONA 
CORONAJET 200J 

With laser-quality output, 20 resident 
fonts, and a compact form factor only 
slightly larger than a loaf of bread, the 
Smith Corona Coronajet 200j ink-jet 
printer is going to be as popular 
as . . . well, sliced bread. 

If you add its optional automatic 
sheet feeder, the 200j takes up only 
about as much desktop space as a 
loaf of bread spread cros sways on an 
average-sized manila folder. This 
should be welcome news to people 
who would want to use it at home or in 
a small business {the target market for 
this printer), who often need all the ex- 
tra space they can get. 

You can make each of the 20 resi- 
dent fonts bold, italic, or underlined, 
including Courier, Times Nordic, and 
Letter Gothic. For even more variety, 
you can use the 14 optional font 



cards. The 200j prints in portrait and 
landscape modes, and its easily in- 
stalled ink-jet cartridge is replaceable. 
Smith Corona claims laser-resolution- 
quality printing — 300 x 300 dpi for 
text and graphics — and my experi- 
ence confirms the claim. Everything I 
printed was crisp and dark — I just had 
to be careful not to smear freshly print- 
ed pages by touching them before 




The Coronajet 200j packs laser-quality 
printing power into a little package. 

they were dry The printer proved equal- 
ly adept at printing spreadsheets, docu- 
ments in XyWrite and fvlicrosoft Word, 
OnTime calendar sheets, and BMP 
files in black-and-white from Windows' 
Paintbrush program. It handled multi- 
ple fonts and a variety of files with no 
hesitation. 

The 200j owner's manual proved es- 
sentially adequate, with clear setup in- 
structions and a helpful troubleshoot- 
ing section but, unfortunately, no in- 
dex. The automatic sheet feeder 
comes with its own skimpy booklet, 
which is helpful but confusingly organ- 
ized, with entries in multiple languages 
for each section. 

To be honest, after I inserted the 
200j's print cartridge, 1 barely glanced 
at the manuals unless it was to consult 
the troubleshooting section. It's easy 
enough simply to open the box, con- 
nect the printer to your computer, set 
your software to the common HP 
DeskJet Plus emulation, and go to 
work. To install the 70-sheet-capacity 
feeder, you simply push the 200j on 
top of it until it locks into place. 

The 200j doesn't present you with a 
host of LEDs and switches to set, 
though its front panel does conceal 
more than 50 easily accessible switch- 
es to make adjustments for different 
fonts, manual or automatic paper load- 
ing, and other commands. The graphs 
that show how to set the switches 
proved somewhat confusing, so I was 
relieved that the only change I needed 
to make came when I added the au- 
tomatic sheet feeder, The 200j's pow- 



er switch is on the back of the printer, 
a location I found mildly inconvenient. 

Besides its size, printing quality, and 
ease of use, the 200j also impressed 
me with its quiet operation. If my dot- 
matrix printer provides no smearing 
problems, it does provide plenty of 
noise pollution. Compared to it, the 
200]— rated at less than 45 dB — was vir- 
tually inaudible, even in my cramped 
10- X 10-foot home office. 1 can't imag- 
ine anyone being bothered by its 
noise level. 

The only real problems 1 encoun- 
tered using the 200j involved loading 
paper. It wouldn't accept envelopes 
loaded longways, a necessity for the 
HP DeskJet Plus emulation in Nvelope 
Plus. It also gave trouble when 1 tried 
loading it with recycled office paper — 
the backs of old press releases, errant 
printouts, and the like — sometimes feed- 
ing two sheets at once at odd intervals. 
Using fresh paper, though, I had no 
trouble using the 200j. 

At worst, the problems I had using 
the Smith Corona Coronajet 200j were 
minor quirks. Anything this small that 
prints this well without making any ap- 
preciable noise deserves an unre- 
served recommendation. 

EDDE HUFFK/AN 

Smith Corona 
(800) 448-1018 
(203) 972-1471 
Coronajet 200j— S499 
Optional sheet feeder— $89 
Circle Reader Service Number 43G 



DEC 43aDX LP 



Deciding which computer system to 
buy can be difficult. In most cases, 
once a business commits itself to a spe- 
cific product, it must stick with it. 
That's one reason DEC (Digital Equip- 
ment Corporation) has targeted business- 
es for its new family of PCs. The upgrada- 
ble DEC 433DX LP based on Intel's 33- 
MHz 486DX processor, can be used for 
demanding desktop business as well as 
for technical applications. 

How difficult is it to set up the DEC 
433DX? The system comes with DOS 
5.0 and Windows installed. First, 1 
checked the user's guide for anything 
unusual. Then, I plugged in the appro- 
priate cables and power cord and 
turned on the system. 

The easy-to-understand Getting Start- 
ed handbook provides all the neces- 
sary information, as well as helpful illus- 
trations for inexperienced users. You 
also get the DEC 300/400 LP Series Us- 
er's Guide, the MS-DOS 5.0 User's 
Guide and Reference, and an opera- 
tions manual for QAPIus, an advanced 
system diagnostics software package. 



1 ran a variety of applications to 
check the system's compatibility, includ- 
ing Microsoft Word, Excel, PowerPoint 
for Windows, Picture Wizard, the Win- 
dows and DOS versions of Express Pub- 
lisher, a couple of DOS shareware pro- 
grams, and several other commercial 
programs. 1 found no incompatibilities. 

To remove the system cover, 1 had 
to unlock the safety lock on the back of 
the unit with the key provided. The cov- 
er is easy to remove. I found it hard to 
reach the system battery, but it seldom 
needs replacement, fortunately 

This 33-MHz system includes a DEC 
two-button mouse, one parallel and 
two serial ports, two floppy and two 
hard drive controllers, a Super VGA vid- 
eo adapter integrated with the system 
board, and three open expansion 
slots. 

Vents along one side of the unit 
should be adequate to keep the sys- 
tem's power supply from overheating. 
You'll probably find the fan noise bare- 
ly noticeable. 

Easy access to reset and on/off but- 
tons is essential. You can find both of 
these buttons on the front of the DEC 
433DX. 

You can get a 66-MHz upgrade for 
the DEC 433DX, and it's easily in- 
stalled thanks to DEC'S ZIP (Zero In- 
sertion Force) slot, The 486DX includes 
a coprocessor in the CPU chip, but 
DEC accommodates a separate 
coprocessor to aid the computer in 
CAD-CAM operations. 

It's easy to access the unit's 4MB of 
SIMM RAM chips. The standard 
amount of DRAM can be increased to 
64MB using the four SIMM sockets. 
The DEC 433DX requires SIMMs with 
an access time of 70 ns or faster. 

The price of the DEC 433DX 
doesn't include a monitor. Several are 
available, including monochrome or col- 
or VGA ranging from the basic 640 x 
480 to a multisync 1024 x 768 nonin- 
terlaced model. 

No surprises come with the DEC 
433DX keyboard. It features a stan- 
dard layout with soft-click keys and func- 
tion keys along the top. 

The one-year on-site warranty is com- 
parable to those found with a lot of oth- 
er systems and is better than some, 
The company offers a toll-free custom- 
er and technical support hot line and a 
consulting center. 

1 found the DEC 433DX to be a sol- 
id, dependable, easy-to-use system, 
Businesses looking for an upgradable, 
modular (80 percent of the compo- 
nents are common to the other DEC 
PC family members), and net- 
work-ready system would be advised 
to check this one out. 

JOYCE SIDES 



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See page 251 

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Need help organizing 

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See page 104 

COMPUTE 
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tax; Canadian orders add 7% GST.) All 
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REVIEWS 



DEC 

(800) DIG-ITAL 

S2,t99 

circle Reader Service Number 437 



AUTOCAD RELEASE 12 

AutoCAD Release 12 is an upgrade 
wish list for casual users, as well as for 
hardcore progran"iming hackers and 
third-party developers. While more pow- 
erful and advanced than any other 
CAD program, previous versions of 
this premier drawing program foun- 
dered in the aspects of speed and 
ease of use. They required regenera- 
tions for all but the slightest size chang- 
es, and operators had to memorize 
and enter archaic commands for even 
the simplest tasks. As a teacher with 
more than 20 students, I had to pro- 
gram a command sequence in the ear- 
ly evening and let it run overnight be- 
cause the equipment and software 
were so antiquated. 

With Release 12, the program's new 
speed and flexibility take full advan- 
tage of 32-bit computing capability, 
evolving networks, and advanced plot- 
ting technology. The difference from 
previous versions is immediately appar- 
ent. AutoCAD has emerged from 
dweebware into the trendy — and time- 
saving — arena of graphical user inter- 
faces, with pull-down cascading men- 
us, cursor menus, programmable dia- 
log boxes, TIFF and EPSI raster image 
inputs and outputs, and internal render- 
ing capability. 

Eminently user-friendly, Release 12's 
pull-down menus also remember your 
last input choice. Expert users who 
type commands at the prompt line will 
find all suboptions of the commands 
on the side menu, which can be 
turned off to provide a wider screen. 
The 3-D capabilities of cameras and 
lighting angles that distinguish CAD 
from paper-and-pencil drawings now 
appear within AutoCAD inside the pull- 
down Render menu, so you no longer 
need to enter AutoShade. 

The 25 new dialog boxes replace 
cumbersome line commands in start- 
ing and opening drawings (no more 
hunting around the hard drive), plotting 
{with a brand-new paper-saving pre- 
view option), and customizing.- 

You can enter the command and 
quickly change any of the settings with- 
out having to scroll through needless 
text questions. And you can correct mis- 
takes if you catch them before press- 
ing the OK button, or you can simply 
cancel and start again. 



Programmable dialog boxes consti- 
tute a veritable revolution for AutoCAD 
users, allowing a new dialog box to be 
defined by the programmer rather 
than by the limitations of the program. 
The Dialog Control Language (DCL) is 
incorporated with LISP. 

Release 12 brings plotting into the 
nineties. The plot dialog box allows 
multiple plotter configurations for both 





':■:^^^r 1 


■^-'//j'Jrr 1 










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' " 



AutoCAD Release 12 boasts 174 
enhancements over the previous version. 

plotters and printers. The plot preview 
function displays the plot image in par- 
tial or full format, superimposing the pa- 
per extent over the image. Zoom and 
Pan ensure that your plot is correct pri- 
or to sending it to your output device, 
I found one error in which a plot set to 
Vs inch = 1 foot inches did not plot 
to the correct scale and had to be re- 
set to 1 = 96, but Autodesk has appar- 
ently compiled a new plotter driver to 
counteract this oversight. 

With the program's ability to output 
raster files from EPS, FITS, TIFF, GIF, 
and TGA formats; image resolution as 
high as 1024 x 768; up to 256 colors; 
and programmable layers, linetypes, 
and line widths, perhaps Autodesk 
should be targeting the desktop publish- 
ing crowd. RASTERIN.EXP a Release 
12 AutoLISP Xload function, pulls in 
the faster image similar to a block. 

Even network users have a produc- 
tivity feature, with the ACAD-P option al- 
lowing them to plot from outside Au- 
toCAD without requiring an additional 
license. 

Taking a cue from the fvlacintosh, Re- 
lease 12 now lets you alter the verb/ 
noun technique in up to 14 commands 
using the Pickfirst variable. No more 
choosing commands and selecting ob- 
jects — you simply click and drag! And 
a new Grips feature, the Dgrips dialog 
box, lets you stretch, move, copy ro- 
tate, and mirror entities as edit func- 
tions without going into a command. 
Entities can be arcs, lines, circles, 
blocks, plines, or text. The grip, basi- 
cally an attachment, is a small colored 
square that appears at definition 
points of an entity changing color as 
it becomes hot (activated). The grips 
also let the operator grab the end- 



92 COMPUTE JULY 1993 



point, center, midpoint, and quadrant 
of an entity without using OSNAP (Ob- 
ject Snap.) 

Long, slow regen or hide com- 
mands are a thing of the past with the 
introduction of algorithims that accel- 
erate graphics from 50 percent to 500 
percent. In fact, a performance en- 
hancement practically eliminates re- 
generations -for zooms and pans! 

Graphics acceleration for Zoom 
with the old 16-bit display space is fi- 
nally gone, and in its place a 32-bit vec- 
tor space now provides an extremely ef- 
ficient Zoom. I did a Zoom Extent fol- 
lowed by a Zoom Vmax to force a draw- 
ing out as far as possible without a 
drawing regen, and even a Zoom 
5000000X (yes, six Os) did not entail 
a regen — undreamt of in previous re- 
leases. The dynamic range of the 
Zoom command is increased from 
50 : 1 up to 5,000,000 : 1 before a re- 
gen is issued. 

Advanced users and third-party de- 
velopers will appreciate Release 12's 
new organizing tools. A means of cre- 
ating a "tree structure," oct-tree spatial 
index divides drawing entities into log- 
ical groups or sort order. 

Release 12 achieves graphic accel- 
eration for faster entity selection and re- 
draws (spatial index) through the new 
variables of Treedepth and Treestat. 
Treedepth fine-tunes the oct-tree in- 
dex. Treestat files report values in 
both the model and paper space 
branches of the spatial index. 

The AutoCAD Sequel Extension 
(ASE) enables operators to pass infor- 
mation directly from AutoCAD to a da- 
tabase system without requiring 
shells. Since nongraphical information 
can be stored outside the drawing and 
linked with entities inside a drawing, 
you can reduce a drawing's size with- 
out losing useful data. 

New conversion functions convert 
text strings into decimal values, and a 
geometry calculator allows you to cal- 
culate geometry using command line ex- 
pression and interaction with existing 
AutoCAD entities, (For instant insider ac- 
cess to undocumented advantages, 
you may want to check out the new Re- 
lease 12 edition of 1.000 AutoCAD 
Tips and Tricks, a book I edited pub- 
lished by Ventana Press,) 

I don't have enough space to in- 
clude all 174 enhancements in the new 
AutoCAD Release 12, but you obvious- 
ly get your money's worth when you 
upgrade to this version. 

BRIAN MATTHEWS 



Autodesk 
(800) 964-6432 
$37.50 

Circle Reader Service Number 438 



GOBLIIINS 



Imagine the Three Stooges cast in a 
graphic adventure, and you've got 
Gobliiins, a puzzle quest with a delight- 
fully twisted sense of humor. 

Developed by European publisher 
Coktel Vision, the game is typical of 
those by the new wave of innovative 
French designers, including Delphine 




Pair your brain with tiie tiiree Gobliiins' halt 
a brain for a successful quest. 

(Out of This World) and Sensible Soft- 
ware (Mega Lo Mania). Graphic artist 
Pierre Gilhodes created the game's dis- 
tinctive look, from the lush 256-color 
backdrops to the title characters' often 
hilanous animation. 

The game consists of 22 full- 
screen, interactive puzzles strung to- 
gether in storybook fashion. The tale in- 
volves a king who's suddenly gone 
stark, raving mad — the victim of an evil 
wizard's voodoo doll. To the rescue 
come Hooter, Dwayne, and BoBo, 
three well-meaning goblins with only 
half a brain among them. You provide 
the missing link, directing the goblins 
on their pehlous lourney to find a cure 
for the ailing king. 

Because each goblin performs only 
one special task, they must work togeth- 
er to solve puzzles. Hooter, the magi- 
cian, casts spells on objects, often 
with unpredictable results. Dwayne is 
the technician, able to pick up and use 
one object at a time. BoBo is the war- 
rior, whose only talents are the abilities 
to climb and punch things. Use the key- 
board or mouse to select the goblin 
you wish to control. 

Game mechanics are kept simple, fo- 
cusing attention on your powers of 
observation and deductive reasoning. 
To advance through a screen, you 
must find and manipulate a series of 
items, often in a specific sequence, util- 
izing each of the goblins. The ultimate 
goal of one puzzle might be to secure 
an object to be used in the next, more 
difficult screen. Experimenting is an es- 
sentia! and entertaining aspect of the 
game, yet you should be careful not to 
dally with the wrong items. Negative ac- 
tions such as falls, frights, or losing im- 
portant items result in the loss of en- 
ergy Although no time limits are im- 



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eiEws 



circle Reader Servtee Numbsr 103 

94 COMPUTE JULY 1993 



posed, when all energy has been de- 
pleted, the game ends. Energy power- 
ups are available midvi^ay through your 
quest: passwords are also awarded up- 
on completion of each screen 

The game's few faults are only minor 
quibbles. Although many puzzle solu- 
tions require multiple-character input, 
only one goblin can be active at once. 
A multitasking feature for assignments 
would speed up many tedious chores 
and lend the game a welcome sense 
of urgency. Another possibility might 
be puzzles solved only through simulta- 
neous character actions. [Harsh, sporad- 
ic sound effects belie the game's 
warm and fuzzy demeanor. f\/lore ex- 
pressive voice samples and back- 
ground effects are needed to fully con- 
vey goblin gibberish, Finally, unlike the 
clever introductory screen, the game's 
victory screen is quite anticlimactic. 

Ivlost puzzles are surprisingly intri- 
cate and might prove too difficult for 
younger players. Unlike the ones in Si- 
erra's similar Castle of Dr. Brain, the 
puzzles here rely less on logic than on 
arbitrary cause and effect. A multitude 
of red herrings ensures plenty of 
wrong guesses, often with hilarious, 
game-ending outcomes. The trick is to 
think with slightly bent logic, placing 
yourself in the goofy shoes of these 
three little knuckleheads. 

Brainteasing fun with a sly comic 
flare, Gobliiins could be one of the 
year's sleeper hits. 

SCOTT A, MAY 

Sierra On-Line 

(8Q0) 326-6654 

S39.95 

circle Reader Service Number 439 



QUANTUM HARDCARD 
EZ240 

Need more hard drive space? Got an 
extra slot in your PC? Don't want to get 
involved in major PC surgery? If you an- 
swered yes to all these questions, 
you're in luck. 

Quantum offers a quick and easy 
way to add 42MB, 85MB, 127MB, or 
even 240MB to your PC, All you nQ%<i 
is a Hardcard EZ 42, Hardcard EZ 85, 
Hardcard EZ 127, or Hardcard EZ 240. 
Each Is essentially a hard drive on a 
PC card, so installation should take ten 
minutes or less. And Quantum guaran- 
tees that any Hardcard E2 will work 
with your 286, 386, or 486 system, or 
you'll receive a full refund. 

These days, you don't have to pay a 
performance penalty for the conven- 



ience of a hard drive on a card. Av- 
erage seek time is rated at 19 ms for 
the EZ 42, 17 ms for the EZ 85 and 
EZ 127, and 16 ms for the EZ 240, 
That's in line with the faster internal 
hard drives. The Hardcard prices are 
also in line with those of standard 
hard drives: S269 for the EZ 42, $319 
for the EZ 85, $419 for the EZ 127, 
and $689 for the EZ 240, 




\{'s easier to install the Quantum Hardcard 
EZ 240 than a conventional hard drive. 

Unfortunately I wasn't able to use 
the EZ 240 with an older ZEOS 386 
computer. The manual explains that 
the Hardcard E2 drives may not work 
in systems with older SCSI adapter 
boards (in many cases, you can re- 
solve the problem by changing the 
SCSI adapter's memory address), 
some 16-bit VGA adapters (you may 
have to switch from 16-bit to 8-bit trans- 
fers), and NEC's version of DOS 3.3 
(Quantum includes a work-around). 
The ZEOS's early SCSI adapter, it 
turns out, is incompatible with the EZ 
240 (that's where Quantum's money- 
back guarantee would have come in 
handy), but the Hardcard worked fine 
in the two other systems I tried. 

The Hardcard EZs from Quantum 
are fast, inexpensive, easy to install, 
and guaranteed to work. With their 
field-tested life of 250,000 hours be- 
fore failure, you'd be hard-pressed to 
find a better hard drive. 

DAViD E^^JGLISH 

Quanlum 
(800) 624-5545 
S689 

circle Reader Service Number 440 

WYSE DECISION 486SI 

Wyse Technology knows hov/ to make 
a quality product. The company's de- 
signers take the lime, and spare little ex- 
pense, to add conveniences and fea- 
tures not often found on other systems. 
But these extras and conveniences 
come with a price— namely, a higher 
price tag for Wyse computers. 

I tried a Wyse Decision 486si, 
which includes an Intel 486DX/33 CPU 
with 4MB of RAM, a 200MB IDE hard 
drive, and a VGA color monitor. The sys- 



tem I tried, which costs about S2,159, 
also came withi two floppy drives and 
256K of external cache and a local- 
bus video w\[h 1MB RAM. Wyse de- 
scribes this unit as a high-performance 
graphics workstation, since its video Is 
much faster than standard VGA and 
It's easily upgradable. 

Using its own local-bus video, Hyper 
16 VGA, Wyse can boast the fastest 
high-resolution graphics performance 
available, with more than 300-percent 
Improvement over conventional VGA sys- 
tems. And Indeed, I did find the graph- 
ics to be fast and of high quality. 

The CPU In this system Is Intel's lat- 
est 80486, the easily upgradable 
486si. In addition, the memory Is ex- 
pandable to 64fvlB. And since many of 
the system's features are integrated on 
the motherboard, all six ISA bus slots 
are available. The system Includes up 
to five mass-storage bays that support 
both 5Va- and 3 '/2-Inch floppy drives. 

Other conveniences include the 
placement of the on-off switch on the 
front of the system, as well as a front- 
panel door that covers all the floppy 
disk drive bays. This door helps keep 
dust out of the drives, as well as giving 
a sleeker appearance to the unit. The 
keyboard is a 102-key enhanced PC- 
style keyboard, and Its quality is high- 
er than that of nnany keyboards I've 
seen. 

Setup of the system Is simple and 
fast. Everything you need Is included, 
and all the ports are clearly marked. 
The setup manual is one of the best 
I've seen. Its illustrations and explana- 
tions are easy to follow. The only DOS 
manual Included is The fvlS-DOS Ver- 
sion 5.0 User's Guide and Reference, 
Concise Edition. And, although it 
gives an excellent introduction to com- 
puters and fvlS-DOS, it's not a com- 
plete DOS manual. It would've been bet- 
ter for Wyse to have included the full 
MS-DOS manual, too. The system also 
comes with Windows 3.1 and a 
mouse. 

I put the system through its paces us- 
ing Windows 3.1 and running Word for 
Windows, Quattro Pro for Windows, 
and PageMaker 4 employing the stan- 
dard VGA display. In addition, I tried 
some graphic-adventure games and 
flight simulation programs. I was satis- 
fied with the Decision 486si's perform- 
ance and was especially impressed 
with the general quality of the system. 

But. as mentioned above, this quali- 
ty comes with a higher price tag. If 
you're willing to pay for it, you'll probably 
be quite happy with this system. If you 
need a high-performance, top-of-the- 
llne graphics workstation, I can certainly 
recommend the Wyse Decision 486si, 

STEPHEN LEVY 



Wyse Technology 

(800) 433-9973 

S2.159 

Circle Reader Service Number 441 



PACIFIC ISUNDS 

War gamers who like to get their 
hands dirty on the front line rather 
than view a battlefield as icons scat- 




In Pacific Islands, the mal<ers of Team 
Yankee offer more excitement. 

tered around a strategic map will get a 
real bang out of Pacific Islands. It's a 
tactical level tank simulation from the 
makers of the popular Team Yankee. 
In Pacific Islands, you control up to 16 
tanks as you try to retake the islands of 
the Yama Yama atoll. The action is hot, 
realistic, and as addictive as a war 
game can get. 

You start your campaign by buying 
the tanks and equipment you need for 
your mission. Four types of tanks are 
available: the Ml Abrams, the Ml 13, 
the M2 Bradley, and the ITV. To arm 
these iron-clad vehicles, you can 
choose from heat shells, SABOT 
shells, TOW missiles, and smoke 
shells. If you like to get into the action 
fast, though, you can skip over ail of 
the purchasing screens, and choose 
the default setup, which instantly sup- 
plies you with vehicles and equipment, 
subtracting the cost from your cash. 

Once equipped, it's off to the brief- 
ing room, where a map of the battle ar- 
ea and an accompanying notebook ap- 
praise you of your mission's details. 
The notebook outlines your objectives, 
while their approximate locations are 
marked on the map. Occasionally, mil- 
itary intelligence has helpful clues 
about what surprises might greet you 
in the pending confrontation. In addi- 
tion, before entering the fray, you can 
request artillery support and smoke 
bombing for specific locations at given 
times. 

When the battle commences, you 
control four platoons of four tanks 
each. ReadySoft recommends using a 
mouse to play. Although you have 16 
vehicles under your control, each pla- 
toon receives commands as a group, 
so you don't have to command each 
tank Individually. Plus, you can select 
several screen views for each platoon, 



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REVIEWS 



the most important of wtiich 
are the 3-D view, which of- 
fers a first-person perspec- 
tive from the tank, and the 
map view, which shows an 
overhead shot of ttie area. 
You can zoom in and out in 
either view, which is especial- 
ly helpful on the map 
screen. Using the zoom, 
you can look at the entire 
map, focus on individual ve- 
hicles, or view the area at 
several different intermedi- 
ate magnifications. 

You also can have all 
four platoon views onscreen 
simultaneously, each pla- 
toon showing a different 
map or area of the battle- 
field. Or if you'd like, a sin- 
gle platoon's screen quad- 
rant can be magnified to full- 
screen size, a view from 
which tank controls are 
more accessible. These con- 
trols include a weapons fir- 
ing panel, turret-rotation com- 
pass, laser range finder, in- 
frared view, zoom, and 
more. 

On the map screen, you 
can access even more tank 
and screen controls. You 
can set a platoon's forma- 
tion, speed, and direction; 
and you can zoom in or out 
on the map display. Target- 
ing enemy units on this map 
is a breeze: You just mark 
the unit with the map cross 
hairs and then return to the 3- 
D view, where the compass 
icon will swivel your turret to- 
ward the marked target. You 
also use the map cursor to 
set your platoon's next desti- 
nation by clicking on the 
map. You can set your tar- 
gets and mark your destina- 
tions at any zoom setting. 

All in all, with its well-ren- 
dered 3-D graphics, realis- 
tic battle scenarios, easy-to- 
master controls, and blister- 
ing hot action, Pacific Is- 
lands is a delight. I highly 
recommend it. 

CLAYTON WALNUM 

96 COMPUTE JULY 1993 



ReadySofl 

(416) 731-4175 

$49.95 

Circle Reader Service Number 442 

SUNCOM FX 2000 

Ergonomics and aesthetics 
can make strange bedfel- 
lows, especially when ap- 



lows identical handling and 
performance capabilities for 
both left- and right-handed 
players. Twin fire controls — 
front trigger finger and top- 
mounted thumb button — 
can be manually switched 
between A and B settings, 
as designated by the soft- 
ware. The V-shaped top but- 




You'll want the solid Suncom FX 2000 handy when you're playing 
games, though you may want it hidden otherwise. 



plied to joysticks. What's 
pleasing to the touch is of- 
ten peculiar to the eye, and 
vice versa. Suncom's FX 
2000 is one such duck, a 
flight control stick resem- 
bling an errant prop from a 
Roger Gorman sci-fi flick, 
First impressions, however, 
can be deceiving. Despite 
its odd, anamorphic shape, 
Suncom's latest offering is a 
marvel of user-friendly, func- 
tional design. 

The pistol-grip controller 
is 8 inches high and 4y2 inch- 
es wide at the base, with a 
cord that's 5 feet, 9 inches 
long. Symmetrical design ai- 



ton is particularly well suit- 
ed for ambidextrous play. 
Both buttons can be set to 
autofire by controls con- 
cealed in the base or to fire 
on demand with a top-mount- 
ed switch. Sliding x- and y- 
axis trimmers are located 
on the bottom, recessed to 
prevent accidental adjust- 
ments. Finally, a throttle 
wheel is located .at the front 
of the unit — a handy option 
utilized by a growing num- 
ber of flight simulators. 

The stick performs best 
when firmly anchored, via 
built-in suction cups, to a ta- 
ble or desktop. The stability 



of this arrangement de- 
pends on surface texture, 
cup moisture, and how vigor- 
ously the device is handled. 
If the seal is too dry, the rub- 
ber cups will not maintain 
the suction. The little-known 
fvlurphy's Law of Joystick 
Suction dictates that if a 
seal can break, it wili, and at 
the worst possible moment. 
Few things are more frustrat- 
ing than having the front 
end of the stick pop off the 
desk in the midst of an in- 
tense aerial battle. Try using 
a small, damp sponge to 
lightly moisten the cups be- 
fore securing them to the ta- 
ble, and pause the simula- 
tion and reapply pressure to 
the base before the action 
heats up. 

If you prefer to hold the 
stick, you're in for a pleas- 
ant surprise. Unlike square- 
based controllers, the FX 
2000 features smooth, round- 
ed curves, molded on the 
top and bottom to fit your 
ghp. Another unique feature 
is the ability to lift and lock 
the joystick handle at a 45- 
degree angle to the left or 
right. In theory, this dramat- 
ic shift creates a more natu- 
ral line between your wrist 
and forearm. The results 
are less fatigue and poten- 
tial pain, allowing you to 
play longer and, hopefully, 
score higher. Although awk- 
ward at first, prolonged 
tests in both positions fa- 
vored this new twist on an 
old technology 

The controller tested well 
in such diverse and demand- 
ing environments as Aces of 
the Pacific, Chuck Yeager's 
Air Combat, 'Wing Command- 
er, and Falcon 3.0. The pistol 
grip's short-throw and stiff, tac- 
tile feel account for its quick 
and steady response — a 
pleasant change from com- 
monly loose and sloppy ana- 
log sticks. Primarily intended 
for flight simulations, the 



Advertisers Index 



Reader Service Number/Adverliser 



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162 
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ISO 
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254 

206 
205 
125 
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113 
226 
161 
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188 
180 
187 
167 
253 
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182 

285 
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CtvlD/Cfeative Micro Designs . . , 

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ComPro Soltware Systems 

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, 109 137 Legendary Design Tech A-28 

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. 117 260 Mad Um Software G-13 

. G-10 280 Mallard Software 69 

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, 109 191 Needham's Electronics, Inc 110 

. 114 124 Neuralink A-19 

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. 112 NRI/McGraw Hill 73 

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, G-10 273 Passport Designs 13 

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. 113 Pendragon Software 109 

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. Ill 107 Penthouse Modem 110 

. A-19 153 Performance Peripherals G-21 

. A-19 185 Po]r Person Software A-19 

. G-12 168 Powr Shareware , A-28 

. 103 PowerDisk G-11 

. 113 119 Professor Jones Ill 

A-9 256 Profit Group. The 111 

. G-9 Pure Entertainment 101 

- A-9 198 Puzzle Factory, The - A-23 

. . 99 Z57 Ratico Computer Supplies 109 

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Reader Service Number/Adtierliser 



Page 



212 
112 
116 
171 
261 
148 
189 
196 
121 
126 
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297 
190 
210 



118 
203 
130 
179 
147 
202 
242 
301 
122 
132 
155 
172 



SaleSoft Systems Inc 116 

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Shareware Central 116 

Sierra OnLine 47 

Sierra OnLine 91,93,95,BC 

Smart Luck Software 116 

SMC Software Publishers A-19 

SMC Software Publisheis 114 

SoftShoppe 114 

Software Studio, The A-19 

Software Support International A-29 

Softrvare Support International G-7 

Software Support International 116 

Software Toolworks 37 

SOGWAP Software A-9 

SOGWAP Software G-15 

Star Graphics 101 

Star Micronlcs 27 

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SubLogIc , 44,45 

Thrustmasler 115 

TEAS A-23 

Tycom G-ID 

US Robotics IBC 

Virgin 71 

Virgin 36,87 

Virtual Realily Labs 107 

Wedgwood Computer 109 

Windows 9O0 110 



Classfieds 118,119 

Product Mart 109,110,111,112,113,114,115,116,117 

104 COMPUTE Books 92,A-15,A-23,G-11 



COMPUTE Editor 900 Line 100 

COMPUTE Free Windows Offer 51 

COMPUTE Library Cases 101 

COMPUTE Ultima Power Disk 55 

Gazette Disk Subscription G-15 

Gazette Index G-21 

Gazette Productivity Manager G-19 

Gazette Single Disk Order G-40 

Gazette Specialty Disks G-2 

Gazette SpeedScrlpt G-17 

SliarePak Disk Subscription . . . 59 







CRED TS 

Cover: photo by Mark Wagoner, computer 
from Gateway 2000; page 4: Juan Alvarez/ 
Image Bank; page 8: John Mattos; page 
18: Mark Wagoner; page 20: Mark Wagon- 
er; page 28: Mark Wagoner; page 30: 
Mark Wagoner; page 32: Mark Wagoner; 
page 34: Mark Wagoner; page 60: Bill Brun- 
ing; pages 66-67: Mark Wagoner; page 72: 
courtesy of Paper Direct; pages 74-75: 
Mark Wagoner; pages 78-79; Mark Wagon- 
er; page 83: Uniphoto/Pictor. 


IMPORTANT NOTICE 

FOR 

COMPUTE DISK 

SUBSCRIBERS 

COMPUTE offers two different disk products for 
PC readers; the SharePak disk and PC Disk. 
SharePak is monthly and has a subscription 
price of $59,95 for SV'i-inch disks and $64,96 for 
3V2Hnch disks. A subscription to SharePak 
does not include a subscription to the maga- 
zine, PC Disk appears in odd-numbered 
months and has a subscription price of $49,95, 
which includes a subscription to the PC edition 
of COMPUTE. You can subscribe to either disk 
or to both, but a subscription to one does not 
include a subscription to the other. 



JULY 1993 COMPUTE 97 



REVIEWS 



stick also performs reasona- 
bly well with driving, sports, 
and arcade games, its only 
drawback is its size, which 
may prove too bulky for small- 
er hands. 

Though not the ultimate 
flight control stick, as tout- 
ed by Suncom, the FX 2000 
succeeds on three key 
points: response, comfort, 
and price. That's enough to 
send most armchair pilots 
soaring with delight. 

SCOTT A. MAY 

Suncom Technologies 

(708) 647-4040 

S39.99 

Circle Reader Service Number 443 



INSIGHT 



A blue-tinted closeup of a hu- 
man eye shows through a 
jagged tear on the white cov- 
er of the Insight box, just 
above the full program title: 
Insight to Greater Personal 
and Professional Success — 
A Kahler Process Model. 
What have we here? New 
Age software? Palm reading 
by your PC? Something mys- 
tical ... yet practical? 

None of the above, actu- 
ally, though you'd be forgiv- 
en for making any of those 
guesses after a casuai 
glance at Insight's packag- 
ing. Unless you're already fa- 
miliar with the Kahler Proc- 
ess Model, it's hard to tell 
that Insight is actually a de- 
tailed personality inventory, 
or psychological profile, pre- 
sented in software form. 

Using Insight means an- 
swering a series of ques- 
tions that allows the pro- 
gram to issue reports with 
details on topics such as 
Your Personality Structure, 
Your Success Factors, and 
Your Distress Warning Sig- 
nals. It's based on the 
Kahler Process Mo6e\ 
(KPfvl), developed by Dr. 
98 COMPUTE JULY 1993 



Taibi Kahler in the mid 
1970s. The package and 
documentation include en- 
dorsements from busi- 
nesspeople from around the 
country as well as from Dr. 
Terence fvlcGuire, a long- 
time psychiatric consultant 
for NASA who has used the 
KPfyi in selecting astronauts. 

According to Insight's doc- 
umentation — which focuses 
on background information 
and details of the profiles, 
since Insight is about as 
easy to use as computer pro- 
grams get— Kahler's model 
classifies you as one of six 
personality types, none 
good or bad. The program 
goes out of its way to estab- 
lish itself as a tool for seif- 
discovery and self-improve- 
ment, not something that will 
"teach you to manipulate oth- 
ers or use this information in 
harmful ways." Scoundrels 
needn't apply. 

If you're looking for a psy- 
chological quick fix, In- 
sight's not for you, either. Al- 
though you can copy it onto 
your hard drive in a few min- 
utes via a standard batch 
file, once you start Insight, 
you have a lot of reading to 
do, You move through the 
program using nothing but 
your cursor keys, with a 
long, colorful series of intro- 
ductory screens offering 
background on the KPM, pro- 
files of Kahler and other 
KPM developers, and ama- 
teurish graphic portraits of 
those people. The picture of 
the KPfvl that emerges from 
Insight's long introductory 
screens is one that spices 
basic psychological models 
with a pinch of humanistic 
philosophy: "We believe 
that people are OK, al- 
though their behavior is 
sometimes negative." 

When you finally make it 
to the inventory, you're 
asked a series of 22 ques- 
tions with six possible an- 



swers each. You can 
choose up to five answers 
that fit you, ranking them in 
order of importance. A short 
example is "I prefer: people, 
ideas, values, fun things, ex- 
citement, privacy." it takes 
15-30 minutes to complete 
the inventory, after which 
the program issues a copy 
of Your Personal Insight Sum- 
mary. It's presented on- 
screen with detailed descrip- 
tions of each basic person- 
ality type — Reactor, Worka- 
holic, Persister, Dreamer, Re- 
bel, or Promoter— along with 
other information to accom- 
pany suggestions of how 
you can maximize your suc- 
cess and contentment and 
minimize your stress. You 
can also get a printout of 
your inventory results with a 
couple of simple keystrokes. 

As the bit about "profes- 
sional success" in Insight's 
full title tells you, it's de- 
signed with businesspeople 
in mind. Though some of 
the blurbs on the box come 
from people who used In- 
sight to help them communi- 
cate better with family mem- 
bers, many of the questions 
and subsequent sugges- 
tions relate to business situ- 
ations. (I work alone at 
home, so I had some difficul- 
ty answering the questions 
about my colleagues.} 

Whatever you do. don't 
rush through the Insight in- 
ventory with plans to answer 
more thoroughly another 
time: The Insight package 
comes with a Profiles disk 
that limits you to two person- 
ality profiles. Additional Pro- 
files disks have to be or- 
dered at a cost of $69,95 
apiece. (You ai^e given a 
chance to back out before' 
the program completes a 
profile.) 

I won't reveal the results 
of my profile, though I will 
say it seemed reasonably ac- 
curate, with information that 



looks helpful but not really 
surprising. If you'd like 
more, well, insight into your 
own personality, however, or 
if you're looking for sugges- 
tions on improving your life 
at home or at work. Insight 
wouldn't be a bad place to 
start. It comes with good cre- 
dentials, it thoroughly ex- 
plains every conclusion and 
recommendation, and it's an 
easy-to-use program. 

EDDIE HUFFMAN 



Three-Sixty Pacific 

(408) 879-9144 

S99-95 

Circle Reader Service Number 444 



GRANDMASTER 
CHESS 

Capstone makes big claims 
for Grandmaster Chess, call- 
ing it the most powerful 
chess program in the world. 
It backs up that claim by in- 
viting comparison to other 
programs, including a 
unique guarantee on the 
front of the box: If another 
chess program defeats 
Grandmaster Chess using 
identical computers under 
tournament conditions, you 
get your money back. 

It takes approximately ten 
minutes to install the pro- 
gram, and installation in- 
cludes options to support ad- 
vanced video and sound fea- 
tures. You can choose from 
three chess sets: standard, 
human, or monster, The 
board can be viewed in ei- 
ther a two- or a three-dimen- 
sional position. The entire dis- 
play fits on one screen and 
includes the board, move 
lists, options buttons, and 
menu buttons while in two- 
dimensional mode. You can 
choose to play with black or 
white pieces, and the board 
can be rotated accordingly. 

New chess players will 
find the program less than 



I 



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39-00 US Wars Korea 


39.00 Aesops Fables 


35,00 Technotools 


15.00 Daytime Express 


20,00 


Publishers Dream Disk 


39.00 USWafS:WWJI 


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33-00 


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29.00 Vocabuleatn French 


49,00 Complete Bookshop 


15.00 Relerence 


Ham Oill 


49-00 


Publish it 2.0 (DOS) 


29-00 vocabuiearn Spanish 


49-00 Creation Stories 


39.00 Aircratt Encydopedia 


39.00 Ham Radio 


15.00 


Publish it 3 (Win) 


59-00 gnierfarnment 


Desktop Bookshelt 


15.00 Bible Library 


29.00 Libris Sntannica 


45.00 


Seals of Government 


45.00 Aegis Guardian Fleei 


69.00 Don Quixote 


39.00 Bibles S Religion 


15 00 Lion Share 


33.00 


So Much Screeniivare 


29.00 Air Warrior 


57.00 Elec Home Lib 


29 00 Cinemania 


69.00 Monster Disc 


45-00 


Swimwear & More 


29.00 Arcade 


39.00 Ooldilocl<5 & 3 Bears 


39.00 Colossal Cookbook 


15.00 NiQhtOwtS 


29.00 


Swimwear 1 993 


25.00 Battle Chess 


25-00 Srandma 8 Me 


49 00 Book ot Lists 


49.00 Ong Shwe '92 


15.00 


Ternpra Access 


25-00 Beyond Wall Stars 


39.00 Great Lilerature 


79.00 Bus.'Econ Atlas mil 


29.00 PCS1G12 


29.00 


Too Many Typelonis 


1 5.00 CD Game Pacti II 


29.00 Heather Hits Home Run 


29,00 Compton Upgrade S Switch 


119.00 Phoenix 3.0 


19-00 


VGA Spectrum 1 


tS.OO Chessmasler 30O0 


25.00 Library of Future 


59-00 Consumer Information 


39.00 Power Pak Gold 


19.00 


VGA Spectrum 2 


25.00 Conan 


29.00 Magazine Raclt 


29-00 Crossword Cracker 


19,00 Premier Shmvre 


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19,00 ConcEuesI ot Lrjngtjow 


49-00 t/asterpiece Library 


35,00 Desert Storm Col Cmm 


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Wild Places 


35-00 Deadzone Jr 


69.00 l/liied Up M Goose 


25,00 Diet S. Lang 


15.00 Shareware 'gS 


25.00 


Women of Venus 


33.00 Deathstar Arcade 


15.00 Moving G Me Stomach Ache 


29-00 Diet Living World 


119.00 Shareware Galore , 


19-00 


World ot Flight 


39,00 Fantasy Fieldom 


69,00 Murmurs ol Eahh 


49,00 Eleo Cookbooll H3 


59.00 Shareware Online 


25.00 


World of Trains 


39-00 Future Wars 


49.00 Peters Wolt 


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49.00 Shareware Tiger 


30.00 



DeLam» GlotuI Exploref 99,00 

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Monster Disc Inc. Monster Disc [2 CO Set) 45 00 

All programs were wniien updated tjeiween January l , 1 992 • Feb 1 , 1;993 1 300M& on 2 CDs 

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Top 2000+ Shwre 30.00 

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Win Shwre Gold 33.00 

Window Masler 19.00 
Windoware • 15.00 

Windows 1993 25.00 

World Vision 45.00 

Travpt 

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California Travel 45 00 

Great Cities VI 35.00 

Great Cities V2 35.00 

National Paj-ks 33.00 

Street Atlas USA 89.00 

US Atlas wAulomap 29.00 

World Traveler 15.00 

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Adut! Ref Library 25.00 

Animation Fantasies 1 33.00 

Animation Fantasies 2 33.00 

Asian Ladies 33.00 

Busiy Babes 29 00 

CD Movies 33 C'Q 

Digttal Dreams 25.00 

Dirty Talk 40,00 

Ecstasy 29.00 
Ency ot Exotc Animations 25.C-0 

Erotic Encounters 30.00 

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Hot PiK 2 33,C0 

Hot Pix 3 33.C0 

Hot Pi« 4 33 CO 

Moving Fantasies 29.C0 

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PC PiK 2 33.C0 

PC Pi* 3 33.C0 

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Order with Check. Money Order. viSA. Mas.!erCard. American Eipress, or COD Ordei Dypnone, mal Of tax Note there is na surcharge tor credil card oroers Fof tne contiguous U S , CD-HOM software shipping 15 55 00 per order (nottitie*. 
Of S9. 50 it COD. Alaska, Hawaii, Puerto Rico, Mexico and Canada addSQOO per CD-flOM software cfde: far stiippiog Costs tor stiippirsg hardware or, orders lo foreign courii;ies not mentioned, are quoted ai time of order, ^ndla^a resiOenis 
please add 5% sales lat. Not responsiole (or typographical errors. Please researcn your product purchases as ail saies are final. All products are covered b^- manulacturet's warranty Pnces and availability are subject to ctiange witiiout notice 



Free Spirit Software, Inc. - 720 Sycamore Street - Columbus, IN 47201 - Questions? Phone (812) 376-9457 



Circle Reader Service Number 115 



SPMKtP! 

\A/E at COMPUTE 

strive to provide you with the latest 

and most useful home, business 

and entertainment computer news 

and information. Now we're 

opening the GOMPUTE EDITOR 

LINE-a direct link to our editorial 

staff that lets you truly participate 

in the shaping of COMPUTE 

Magazine. 

Using this program, you can 

comment on articles and features in 

COMPUTE. After hearing the 

introduction, you'll be asked to 

leave a message for the editor. Your 

message will be reviewed and may 

be published in a future issue. 



REVIEWS 



Here's how it works: 

1. Call the COMPUTE EDITOR 
LINE: 1-900-884-8681 The 

charge is only $0.95 per min. 

2. Select the month of the issue 
you want to talk about. 

3. Enter the extension number 
printed at the end ol the feature 
or pictorial spread you want to 
discuss. If you don't have the 
extension number, just listen to 
the menu selections, and they 
will lead you to the proper 
extension for each item. 

4. Listen to the comment or 
information corresponding to the 
feature or pictorial you selected. 

5. Then, at the tone, leave your 
desired message! 

6. If you would like to make 
another selection, press " "k' to 
return to the main menu. 

PET INC, Box 166, Hllywd., CA 
90078. Must be 18 or older. 
Touch Tone phones only. 



adequate for teaching the game. Includ- 
ed with the documentation is a brief fli- 
er, published by the United States 
Chess Federation (USCF), that ex- 
plains the rules of chess. But nothing 
within the program teaches the begin- 
ner about piece movement. 





^M 




H H[~^| 




■■ ^^H 




i^m 



Granomasitii Ciiess wilt sun experienced 
players better than novices. 

The chess player with some experi- 
ence will find the program both enter- 
taining and helpful. When you push the 
hint button, the computer displays its 
analysis, which includes point values 
for each possible move and its contin- 
ued line of play, and then animates the 
best possible move. You may also 
turn on or off the computer's opening 
library of moves, which includes ap- 
proximately 12.000 positions in 4500 
standard openings. When you press 
the book button, all legal moves are list- 
ed, and those in the opening book are 
rated and ranked. 

The intermediate club player will al- 
so find the program a solid chess part- 
ner. You can choose from a variety of 
playing strengths and styles for the com- 
puter, and you can select time con- 
trols. Irom 5-minute speed chess match- 
es (best played with the computer's 
opening library turned off) to 120-min- 
ute tournament matches. The program 
includes a rating estimate that approxi- 
mates your USCF ranking, and games 
can be saved, imported, or printed. It's 
easy to edit the board and to set the 
computer to quickly solve puzzle posi- 
tions. When set at Grandmaster tourna- 
ment level, the program is quite formi- 
dable. If you defeat the Grandmaster, 
the program prints a certificate. 

While Grandmaster Chess is power- 
ful and entertaining, it does have 
flaws. It wouldn't run as a DOS appli- 
cation under Windows, crashing every 
time I attempted it. In fact, the program 
crashed on one occasion while run- 
ning under DOS, The hand cursor also 
tended to stamp itself on various parts 
of the screen regularly. Although the 
program includes synthesized 



speech, it's limited to a few trite ex- 
pressions such as "Gotcha" and "Bad 
move." I found the speech feature lit- 
tle more than annoying. 

The program does have several 
strong, unique features. Its options but- 
tons make play fast and easy It's very 
nice to be able to turn the computer's 
opening book on or off, as well as to 
change its strength and play variability. 
The program plays chess well at a vari- 
ety of levels, and it's particularly nice for 
the player with limited experience. 

Grandmaster Chess would make a 
good addition to any software library, 
but I'd advise waiting until a Windows 
version becomes available. 

JIM SMITH 

IniraCcrp 

(SOC) 463-7226 

S59.95 

Circle Reader Service Number 445 



AIR FORCE 
COMMANDER 



As Coalition forces demonstrated dur- 
ing the Persian Gulf War, achieving air 
superiority can be an important first 
step toward reaching your military ob- 
jectives. With Air Force Commander, 
you'll get the chance to direct the op- 
erations of your own air force with the 
ultimate objective of doing just that — 
achieving air superiority in several sim- 
ulated military conflicts. 

Air Force Commander is a strategic 
game of modern air warfare set in the 
Middle East. The game features 14 sce- 
narios of varying difficulty and complex- 
ity involving the United States and sever- 
al N/liddle Eastern countries, including 
Iran, Iraq, Syria. Jordan. Israef. Saudi 
Arabia, Sudan. Kuwait, Qatar, Leba- 
non, Egypt, and the United Arab Emir- 
ates. Some of these scenarios are loose- 
ly based on histohcal conflicts such as 
the Iran-Iraq War of 1973, the Yom Kip- 
pur War, and the Persian Gulf War, 
while others are based solely on hypo- 
thetical situations. 

As the name implies, Air Force Com- 
mander puts you in control of an entire 
air force, not just a single fighter plane 
or bomber. Thus, your view of the ac- 
tion is from a radar map in a war room 
rather than from the sky. Here, all air- 
craft are represented by vertical dotted 
tines that travel across the map in ac- 
celerated realtime. The length of each 
line indicates the altitude of the plane 
it represents — the longer the line, the 
higher the plane. 

Although you can direct your fighter 
squadrons to intercept specific enemy 
aircraft, your fighters are used more ef- 
ficiently if you simply set up patrols 



100 



COMPUTE JULY 1993 




Healthscope 
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around the areas you wish to protect. 
In addition, bombers are available for 
high-altitude bombing and ground 
strike missions against specific targets 
in enemy territory. To extend your ra- 
dar coverage, it's important to provide 
air cover for your bombers as v/ell as 
for AWACs planes performing circular 
sweeps, 

Squadrons can be placed on auto- 
launch so tfiat after a mission they'll au- 
tomatically return to base, refuel, and 
head back out. It's important, however, 
to monitor the efficiency of your squad- 
rons and rest and repair them as nec- 
essary to make sure they perform at 
peak efficiency. 

While the real objective of Air Force 
Commander is to achieve air superiori- 
ty, the game can also be won by turn- 
ing public opinion in the opposing coun- 
try against the war. You do this by 
attacking its power stations and sourc- 
es of food and water. 

As for Air Force Commander's 
sound capabilities, the digitized voice 
(with a Sound Blaster) is a nice touch, 
but the loud explosions that accompa- 
ny air combat and bombing raids are 
more of a distraction than an enhance- 
ment to the action. 

The various maps are nicely drawn 
and seem to be fairly accurate, but in 
general the graphics remind you that 
you're playing a computer game rath- 
er than participating in a realistic simula- 
tion. Air Force Commander is an enjoy- 
able game, but not one that's likely to 
win any awards. 

BOB GUERRA 

Impressions Software 

(203) 676-9002 

$59.95 

Circle Reader Service Number 446 



BEST DATA SMART ONE 
9624 FP TRAVELER 
FAX/MODEM 

Even though you could phone in your 
lunch order just as easily as you could 
fax it, advancing technology creates 
heightened expectations. You want a 
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The thing is that you already have a 
printer and you're not really looking for 
a similar-sized plastic box to take up 
more space in your crowded office. Or 
maybe you and your laptop do quite 
a bit of traveling, and you're in the mar- 
ket for a fax machine that allows you 
to send and receive pages from air- 
port lobbies and hotel rooms. In either 
case, the Best Data Smart One 9624 
FP Traveler Fax/Modem could get that 
kebab cooking by noon without your 



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Circle Reader Service Number 118 



COMPUTE 
UBRARY CASES 




store your issues of COMPUTE in our 
new Custom Bound Library Cases made 
o( blue simulated leather embossed with 

a white COMPUTE logo on the spine. 
It's built to last, and it will keep 12 issues 
in mint condition indefinitely. Each case 
has a gold transfer for recording the date. 
Send your check or money order (S8.95 

each, 3 for $24.95, 6 for $45.95) 

postpaid USA orders only. Foreign orders 

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TO: COMPUTE IVIagazine 

Jesse Jones Industries 

499 E. Erie Ave., Phila., PA 19134 

CREDIT CARD HOLDERS 

(orders over SI 5) 

CALL TOLL FREE: 1-800-825-6690. 

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PA. residents add 7% sales tax. 

SATISFACTION GUARANTEED 



JULY 1993 COMPUTE 101 



REVIEWS 



ever having to pick up the 
receiver. 

Tine 9624 FP tal<es up on- 
ly about as mucin space as 
a walkabout cassette player 
trailing a cord or ttiree. You 
tiook it up to your computer 
directly througti a 25-pin 
port or via cable through a 9- 
pin port and then plug in a 
phone line and a pov^er 
cord (or, if you prefer, you 
can power up the 9624 FP 
with a nine-volt battery). Red 
indicator lights tell you wheth- 
er the battery's low, if the mo- 
dem's operating at 2400 
bps or faster, whether a con- 
nection has been estab- 
lished, and if the modem is 
ready for communications to 
begin. tJnIike some porta- 
ble fax/data modems, the 
9624 FP connects directly to 
the phone line rather than 
strapping onto the receiver, 
so don't buy it expecting to 
use it easily from public 
phones or in office buildings 
with odd-sized plugs for 
their phone systems. Also, 
the modem has a slightly 
clunky feel because of 
loose nuts and a power- 
cord receptacle that gives 
slightly when you plug the 
cord in. those are essential- 
ly cosmetic concerns, howev- 
er, and they have no bear- 
ing on the performance of 
the 9624 FP. 

Anyone who has ever re- 
moved a desktop PC's cov- 
er to install a fax/data mo- 
dem board will appreciate 
the convenience of the 9624 
FP's external connections. 
Best Data has even adapt- 
ed for use by the genera! 
public a Velcro strip used 
by the company's employ- 
ees to attach the 9624 FP di- 
rectly to a monitor, out of the 
way. I had the modem 
hooked up and its accompa- 
nying software installed with- 
in about ten minutes of open- 
ing the box. The user's man- 
ual provided relatively clear 

102 COMPUTE JULY 1993 



instructions, though without 
illustrations, an index, or the 
kind of literary spark that 
can make phrases like re- 
tractable locking screws 
come alive. 

The software accompany- 
ing the 9624 FP— WinFax Li- 
te and Quick Link II — 
makes communications an 



and when you're viewing a 
fax that you're sending or 
you've received, it offers no 
helpful onscreen guidelines 
telling you how to move 
around the page or pages. I 
used both programs for suc- 
cessful fax communications, 
however, and their inclusion 
with a portable modem that 




The Best Data Smart One 9624 FP Traveler Fax/Modem is even 
smaller than its name, making faxing easy and convenient. 



intuitive breeze. Both pro- 
grams allow you to send 
and receive faxes, as well 
as view them onscreen or 
print them on your printer. If 
you run Windows, I'd advise 
sticking with WinFax Lite, 
though. Quick Link II gets 
the job done, but it has an in- 
terface on a level with an av- 
erage shareware program, 



can transmit at 9600 bps 
makes the 9624 FP a bar- 
gain at $199 suggested re- 
tail. (WinFax Lite .isn't availa- 
ble as a stand-alone prod- 
uct, but WinFax Pro retails 
at $119.) 

The bargain looks even 
better when you consider 
the error correction and da- 
ta compression technolo- 



gies built into the 9624 FP. It 
incorporates V.42bis and 
MNP 2-5 technologies, 
which are imposing-looking 
monikers for the intelligence 
that makes the modem fast 
and its transmissions clean. 
Using data compression, 
V.42bis allows for a transmis- 
sion throughput up to four 
times the bps rate of the mo- 
dem itself, which allows the 
2400-bps 9624 FP to send 
in your lunch order at 9600 
bps. (V.42 covers the error 
correction, while bis covers 
the data compression.) 
MNP 2-5 is a subset of 
V.42, and, in a nutshell, it 
means the 9624 FP can com- 
municate with other fvlNP mo- 
dems, a standard protocol. 
If you're simply looking 
for a way to get that memo 
you needed yesterday here 
today, at least, don't let all 
those weird letter and num- 
ber combinations confuse 
you. The Best Data Smart 
One 9624 FP Traveler Fax/ 
Modem packs a lot of pow- 
er into a small package, ful- 
filling your fax needs without 
crowding you a! all. 

EDDIE HUFFMAW 



Best Dala Products 
(800) 632-2378 
(81B) 773-9600 
SI 49 

Circle Reader Service Number 447 



MUTANOID MATH 
CHALLENGE 

Legacy's Mutanoid Math 
Challenge brings the charm 
and nonsense of a Saturday 
morning cartoon to acade- 
mia's most abstract subject 
and packages it with 
enough weird and wacky 
characters to keep the kids 
calculating until dinnertime. 
Although the game is rat- 
ed for kids 7-adult, it has on- 
ly three skill levels: grades 2- 
3, 4-5, and 6-8. Its 60 
quirky animations, fast- 



DISK-COUNT 
SOFTWARE 



Lowest deliverd prices with great customer service. 

800-448-6658 



A Train 39 

Constnjction Sel 22 
Aces Over Europe 44" 
Aces of ma Paafc 39" 
Mission Disk 25 
ADiO Colled Ed 2 42" 
ADiD Starter Kit «" 
AD4D Unlimited 31" 
Adlbou&JuniorVijl)34" 
Ajr Bucks W 

Air Duel 33" 

Air Wanior SVGA 35" 
AlgeBlaster Plus 30 
Algebra Wade Easy 25 
Aliens Ale Babysitter 32 
Alone in The Dark 35" 
Alphabet Blocks 29" 
Amazon 38" 

Ambush 37" 

Amsrican Cm! Waf 25 
Ancient Art War Sky 35 
Anciem Ernpires 30 
Animation Studio 75 
Armored Rst 37" 

Asties o( Empire 45" 
A.T.A.C. 35 

Automap 44 

Autoroap Windows 57 
Automap Europe 74 
B-17 F^ing Fortres 39 
Bane Cosmic Forge 36 
Barbie Design ^E 

Baitia Fashion 25 
Barbia Adventure 25 
BaIUediess4OOOVGA30 
BatliocheM4000SVGA3e 

Baltielield 37«' 

Battle Toads 24"' 
Battles o( Destiny 35" 
Beat Die House 29'' 
Betrayal at KrondOf"35" 
Bettv Croci;. Cookbook 
Bill Elliott NASCAR 30 
Birds o( Pray 
Bluelorce 39" 

Boi^ Illustrated 47" 
Bodyworks 42 

Bridaomaster 30 

Bug Bunny WrkShp 31 
Buzi Aldnn 39«* 

Campaign 34" 

Capitalist Pig 38" 
Car and Driver 37*= 
Carrier Strike 39 

Carriers at War 37" 
Castle 2 35" 

Castle of Df. 8rain 30 
Ceasar 35" 

Ctiallnge 5 Realms 33" 
Champions 35" 

Clisriiisiry Works 38 
Chassmastef 300029" 
Chessrastr 30O0 Win 35 
Chrldren Writ i Pub) 39 
Cruilization 37 

Civiliiation UPi 45 
Classii; Adventure 36 
Coaster Zi 

Comanche 42" 

Mission Disfi 25" 
Combat Classics 31" 
IDomic Book Cf eatoc 1 7 
Cohort 2 19" 

Conquered Kingdom35" 
Conquest of Japan 35 
Contraption Zat 25" 
Creepers 29" 

Cnisader Dr* Savnt39" 
Cudioo Zoo 31" 

C^ber Space 34" 

Ijemonsgate 32" 

Daoger of Amon Ha 39 
Da3? Half 39 

Darklands 33 

Oarkseed 39 

Oarit Sun 47" 

Daughter of Seipnt3l" 
DIx Paint Animalion 85 
Oil Paint II Enhncd 85 
DeiaVuli2 31" 
Design Yr Own Hm 39 
Design Your Raiird 35 
Designasaunis It 23 
DiBt?raOOS/Win25/35 
Dinosaur Adventure 34 
Dog Fight 37" 

Dr Jam Wind. 59" 
Dr. Quandry 3) 

Dragon 
Dragon's iJif I 25 

2 or Singe CasUe 37 
Dragon Lair III 39" 
Dune 2 36 

Dungeon Master 29" 
Dynamix Bundle 42 
Eagle Eye Mystery 31" 
Eco-Ouest 1 or 2 29" 



B Fish 35 

Empire Deluxe 35 

Entr Pak Win (ea) 28 

Eric the Unready 35" 

Eye of Beholder 20" 

Eye of Beholder 2 36 

Eye of Beholder 3 42 

F 15 III 44 

F 15 III Umited 49" 

F117a Stealth Fight 41 

Facts in Action 31 

Falcon 3.0 45 

Opec Fight Tiger 25 

Family Tree Maker 42 

Fami Creativity Kit 1 8 

Fatty Bear BirthdaySI" 

Femme Falale 26 

F. F. Data Disk 21 

Relds a Glorv 33" 

Right Simul A.T.P. 37 

Right Simui (M.S.) 41 

Air The Cntrtr 34" 

Arcft/Scen Osgn 28 

Aircraft Adv Factry25 

«685 17 

« 701 17 

Airport Facty Loc 17 

Calilornia 37 

F S Pro 24 

Great Britian 37 

Hawaii 1 9 

Instant Faclt Ljdc. 19 

Instmmnt Pltot Scan 

Japan Scenery 19" 

Pilots Pwer TIs 24" 

East/West U.S.ea 59 

Rescue Air 911 17 

ScenaiV St A or B 37 

Sesnery Enhn Ed 2 5 

Sound it Graphic 25 

Tahiti 19 

Western Europe 19 

Follow the Reader 29*' 

w/ Sound Source 40 

Four Crystal Trazer 

Free DC 37 

Front Paoe Sports 39" 

G-Force 19" 

Gambit 31" 

Game Maker 69"« 

68mes:Summer Chi^5 

Games:Winler Chig 35 

Gateway 35 

Gamfira 31 

Global Conquest 35 

Gobblins 1 or 2' 22 

Gods 25 

Grand Slam Brdge 1131 

Grandmaster Chess 36 

Great Naval Battle 43" 

Super Ships 20" 

Greens 35 

Gunship 2000 36 

Scenario Disi( 24 

Guy Spy 29 

Hardball 3 35 

Date Disk ea. 17« 

Harpoon Designer 32 

Harpoon Signature 49" 

Harrier Assault 34" 

Haadline Harry 37 

Health i Diet Pro 26 

Heaven & Earth 30 

Heimdal! 19" 

Haros of 357th 

Hole In 1 Golf Dlx 25 

Hong Kong Mahiong 32 

Hoyfo Bk Game 2 22 

Hoyle Bk Game 1f3 30 

Humans 25 

Inca- 29" 

Incredible Machine 29" 

Indiana Jones 4 37 

Inspector Gadget 35" 

Island of Dr. Brain 29" 

Jack NicWaus Signt39" 

Jeopardy Silver 25 

Jeopardy Super 25 

Jetfighter 2 39 

Adv. Mission Disk 1 9 

Bundle Price 49 

John Madden 2 31" 

Jump Jet 3S" 

KGB 19 

Kid Cuts 35" 

Kid Desk 25 

Kid Pkaures 19" 

Kid Pix 35" 

Kid Pii Companion 25 

Kid Works 2 36" 

Kings Ransom 34" 

Kings Quest 1 VGA 37 

King's Quest 6 45 

Knowladga Advent 42 

L A Uw 31" 

Land Of Lore 34" 

Latter Utility 22 



25 
29" 

32 
37" 

39 
35" 

17 



Leather God Phb 2 24 
Legacy Necroraanal 9" 
Legend of Xyrandia 35 
Legends ol Vatouf 38 
Legion's ol Krelia 37 
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Color or 1-2-3's 19" 
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Uninvited Windows 31" 
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V lor Victofy 1/2 ea42" 
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Wayne Gretzky 3 35 
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Time 30 

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USA Deluxe 44" 
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Wng Comandr 2 47" 
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Word Torture 

llal. Gann. Span 25 
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Workl AUas DOS 39 
World Circuit 34" 

Write? Rabbit 30 

X Wirig 39" 

Your Prsnl Train SAT30 
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Zug's Spelling Adv 22 
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Education Master 32 
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Kings Quest 5 42 

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Circle Reader Service Number 208 



REVIEWS 



paced action, and out-of- 
this-world cast will keep new- 
comers to matin engrossed 
in the computative environ- 
mental chiallenge the game 
presents. 

After loading the pro- 
gram, kids enter the year 
2020, when Earth has ex- 
hausted its landfills and be- 
gun to send its solid waste in- 
to outer space. Smart- 
mouthed aliens who don't 
want the useless junk threat- 
en revenge by dumping 
glop on the planet. Prime 
minister Monitron, a kind of 
futuristic fvlonty Hall, per- 
suades the aliens to settle 
their dispute in a contest of 
math abilities. The games 
take place in the Cubix Can- 
tina, which Legacy calls 
"the restaurant of choice for 
solar slimeballs." 

The program features a 
single-page quick-start 
guide that lets kids or teach- 
ers get into the game imme- 
diately. The 58-page play- 
er's guide is imaginatively 
illustrated, and notes on in- 
stallation, instruction, game 
tips, and troubleshooting 
are presented in a story- 
telling fashion that sticks 
with the theme of the game 
and won't turn off those kids 
who take the tinne to read 
them. Legacy recently add- 
ed support for sound 
boards, and the new musi- 
cal accompaniment greatly 
enhances the PC speaker 
sound found in the previous 
version. 

The game is copy-protect- 
ed by documentation. To 
get past Vectra. the securi- 
ty guard, players must 
match a number Vectra 
gives them to a planet 
name printed on the corre- 
sponding page in the man- 
ual. Up to 40 players can 
play, and multiplayer com- 
petitions make it ideal for 
classroom activities as welf 
as group play at home. 

104 COMPUTE JULY 1993 



Parents, teachers, or kids 
themselves can customize 
levels of difficulty to make 
the game easier, eliminating 
multiplication tables, divi- 
sion, or cube equations. 
Kids select their Mutanoid 
challengers from a cast of 
ooky-looking characters 
with appropriately juvenile 



mouse support. 

Legacy's arcade-game ap- 
proach to instruction, com- 
plete with sound and anima- 
tion, brings routine drill-and- 
practice exercises alive. Mu- 
tanoid Math Challenge will 
entertain any kid who plays 
it individually, but its contest 
approach to teaching 



^■^^^M^h<-^1 



M 




aaflBiEa. 305 



- 2 = 25 



Sudsy has 18 Elvis records 
in his cdlecilDn. He has 3 
more than Camernn. How 
man<j Elvis records does 
Cameron have? 







8 e 

0(S{ 




Mutanoid Math Challenge makes learning math concepts fun, and 
it's ideal for use either at home or in the classroom. 



names like Barbie Q., I.M. 
Tall, and Lotta B. Hinds, The 
game board presents prob- 
lems in crossword-style 
grids, where players fill in el- 
ements of the equations, 
and as word problems. Kids 
enter the answers by select- 
ing numbers on an on- 
screen calculator pad. 
From time to time, green mu- 
tant "gelatotd" creatures zip 
across the screen, and a 
player who can direct them 
to diamond squares earns ex- 
tra points. Scores are kept 
in a Hall of Fame, so kids 
can check to see how their 
scores compare with those 
of the Mutanoid (the comput- 
er) or other players. 

The game employs some- 
what unconventional key as- 
signments: To quit, you hit 
F8 instead of Esc, for exam- 
ple. But kids don't seem to 
mind. The game does have 



maKes it perfect for groups. 
Kids love competition, and 
this game's support for mul- 
tiple players makes it one of 
tfiose educational games 
that can turn a computer in- 
to an activity center in a 
classroom or family den. 

CAROL ELLISON 

Legacy Software 

(800) LEARN-92 

S49,95 

Circle Reader Service Number 446 

SPACE ACE II: 
BORE'S REVENGE 

step into the world of Satur- 
day-morning superheroes 
with Space Ace II: Borf's Re- 
venge, a nonstop arcade bat- 
tle of good versus evil. 

In the previous episode, 
the villainous Borf un- 
leashed the terrible Infanto 
Ray— a weapon capable of 



turning anyone into a help- 
less infant with a single 
blast. The big, blue fiend 
had hoped to turn the Earth 
into one big day care cen- 
ter. But Space Ace turned 
the tables and saved the 
day, zapping Borf into a 
harmless peewee. 

As the new game begins, 
Borf's tenacious Goon 
squad has restored its pint- 
sized leader to his larger- 
than-life evilness. An en- 
raged Borf then kidnaps 
Ace's girlfriend, Kimberly, 
and attempts a getaway. 
You must race to her de- 
fense, battling a relentless se- 
ries of monsters, robots, 
and other deadly threats. 

The game's look and feel 
is Inspired by Don Bluth, a 
former Disney animator who 
pioneered the first laser 
disc coin-op game, Drag- 
on's Lair. The theater-quality 
cartoon graphics and digit- 
ized sound are nearly seam- 
less on a hard drive. This 
type of game begs for a CD- 
f^Of\/l treatment. 

Though beautifully drawn 
and smoothly animated, the 
design suffers from serious 
structural flaws. Simply put, 
the story doesn't flow, it lung- 
es forward at breakneck 
speed. Transitions between 
scenes are usually clipped, 
and often missing entirely. 
The results are disjointed 
and confusing, with no 
sense of plot progression. 

Another problem is a com- 
plete lack of strategy Player 
input is limited to simple 
knee-jerk reactions — press- 
ing one of five keys in re- 
sponse to the onscreen ac- 
tion. The game's linear story 
line allows absolutely no di- 
gression from the pre- 
scribed course of action. 
False moves are rewarded 
not with an alternate direc- 
tion, but with instant death. 
Even the fastest, cruelest ar- 
cade games offer more 



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REVIEWS 



than one path to success or failure, 
This game is a bullet train with no 
stops and only one destination. Fail to 
switch tracks at the precise moment 
and the whole thing derails. 

Average games last under a minute 
for experienced players and mere sec- 
onds for arcade rookies. Having only 
three tries to complete the adventure 
adds to your frustration; luckily, a save 
option lets you start the game at the be- 
ginning of the last unfinished scene. Un- 
fortunately, once invoked, this save fea- 
ture is automatic: If you fail once or 
twice and then succeed, the game over- 
writes your last position, leaving you 
stranded with severely limited resourc- 
es. Contrary to the old maxim, if at first 
you don't succeed, give up before try- 
ing again. As if admitting to this unfor- 
giving difficulty, the manual offers fair- 
ly explicit hints for each of the game's 
27 scenes. 

More satisfying examples of this gen- 
re include Interplay's Out of This 
World, Dynamix's Adventures of Willie 
Beamish, and even ReadySoft's own 
Guy Spy series. In addition to a solid 
mix of arcade action and logic puzzles, 
each of those games takes time to tell 
a viable story, using such "camera" 
techniques as panning, noninteractive 
segues, and long tracking shots. 

Technically brilliant, Space Ace II: 
Borf's Revenge successfully emulates a 
studio-quality animated adventure, As 
an interactive game, however, most of 
the fun seems to have been left on the 
Gutting room floor. 

SCOTT A. MAY 



$59.95 READYSOFT 

(416) 731-4175 

Circle Reader Service Number 449 



COFFEE BREAK 
GAMBLING 

As new game designs begin to stretch 
the limits of time and space — your 
time and hard drive space, that is — 
Villa Crespo heads in the opposite di- 
rection with its Coffee Break Series. 
These compact, budget-priced 
games deliver instantly accessible qual- 
ity entertainment that's playable from 
floppy or hard disk. 

Villa Crespo is best known for casino- 
style gambling simulations, so it's not 
surprising that the top picks in this bur- 
geoning series are games of strategy 
and chance. Dr. Wong's Jacks & Vid- 
eo Poker is an abridged version of one 
of the company's biggest-selling titles. 
Where the original offers five variations 

106 COMPUTE JULY 1993 



of video poker, the condensed version 
contains only Jacks or Better, by far 
the most popular style. 

Features include an adjustable bank- 
roll, online tutorial and advice, hand 
analysis, and calculated returns. The on- 
ly feature sorely missing from the orig- 
inal is simultaneous two-player tourna- 
ment mode. Bells and whistles include 
somewhat garish — albeit realistic — low- 
resolution graphics and digitized 
sound effects. 

Dr. Thorp's fvlini Blackjack is the ab- 
breviated version of another full- 
fledged simulation. Up to six players 
can compete against the dealer, utiliz- 
ing such standard casino options as 
double down, split, surrender, push, 
and insurance. Advanced features in- 
clude two levels of house rules, each ful- 
ly adjustable and surprisingly detailed. 
In addition to online strategy tables 
and a basic blackjack tutorial, the 
game also teaches three methods of 
card counting. 

Casino Craps is a delightful re-crea- 
tion of the fast-paced dice game. High- 
resolution graphics and much-im- 
proved mouse controls embellish this 
dynamic one-player simulation. Exten- 
sive onscreen help thoroughly explains 
the nuances of odds and wagers, field 
bets, hard numbers, and center-table 
bets. Highlights include three levels of 
statistical analysis and player histories. 
Animated onscreen characters and dig- 
itized sound samples give this game a 
distinctive personality. Casino Craps is 
easily one of the best in the series. 

Last, but far from least, is Amarillo 
Slim's 7 Card Stud, a condensed ver- 
sion of Villa Crespo's outstanding pok- 
er simulation. Better than a heated 
match in a smoke-filled back room, the 
game pits one player against 2-1 com- 
puter opponents. Online help screens 
and tutorial advice guide greenhorns 
through the rules and strategies of build- 
ing a winning hand. Choose from the 
15 available players, each with a digit- 
ized voice and unique style of play, 
who are divided among the game's 
three skill levels. You can also custom- 
ize the house rules — maximum bets, 
raise limits, blind bets, and so on — to 
make every session unique. More than 
any game in the series, this one beck- 
ons players to seek out the full-blown 
version. Dealer's Choice, featuring 28 
poker variations. 

Short and sweet, the Coffee Break 
Series from Villa Crespo proves that big- 
ger isn't necessarily better. 

SCOTT A. MAY 



Villa Crespo Software 

(708) (taa-osoo 

SI 2-95 each 

Circle Reader Service Number 450 



THE OPERATION: 
FIGHTING TIGER 

The apple doesn't fall far from the 
tree, as they say, and The Operation: 
Fighting Tiger expansion kit for Falcon 
3.0 from Spectrum HoloByte is an en- 
hancement of its rich, dense parent 
game. Falcon plus OFT equals fighter- 
plane heaven. This is the only way to 
fly. 

Disk 1 of OFT patches the parent pro- 
gram all the way up to the current ver- 
sion (3.01); this should make happy all 
those who expected Falcon 3.0 to fly in 
full trim right out of the box and weren't 
prepared for the open-house gamma 
test — with a consequent stream of fix- 
es and tweaks — that was the sad real- 
ity. OFT adds three huge and varied 
(and alliterative) new theaters of opera- 
tions — Korea, Kashmir, and the Kurile Is- 
lands — which should please pilots who 
found that the game's scope didn't 
match its size. 

And OFT improves the game engine 
with a wide variety of pleasant new wrin- 
kles: new commands to issue to wing 
men, the ability to set difficulty levels 
for campaigns, an overcast sky 
(which looks great), more night flying, 
and too many lesser refinements to 
mention. It's also more stable and reli- 
able, and hence more satisfying — and 
not just in the new theaters. The origi- 
nal theaters, which are not overwritten 
by OFT, enjoy ail the benefits of the 
new features. And, of course, all the 
best features of the original game — 
from the masterful terrain to the in- 
volving campaigns — are in full force 
here. (Indeed, the campaigns here 
seem tougher, if anything.) 

OFT is a bit more demanding of mem- 
ory — now requiring a touch over 
616,000 bytes (and another 3MB on 
your hard drive, for a total of 14MB) — 
and even that extra 2K RAM meant I 
had to jigger my four-meg system a bit 
in order to load a mouse driver ancf get 
the digitized voice in radio broadcasts. 

And, unfortunately, OFT also in- 
herited a touch of the original 
Sim's . . . shall we say, unfinished qual- 
ity? The installation program in the 
initial release couldn't find the cor- 
rectly named FALCONS directory on 
my C drive and, once I identified the 
directory for it, wouldn't install the 
files. (That's about the worst possible 
place for a bug to appear. Imagine 
buying a toaster oven and finding 
the power cord cut in half.) Mercifully, 
Spectrum has been quick off the line 
with a fix, and a new installation pro- 
gram — followed by a full-blown up- 
grade of the upgrade (to 3.01.1) — 
was issued in October. 



However, my criticism isn't of OFT 
so much as of Falcon 3.0. I do wish it'd 
been closer to tliis condition when it 
was originally released. In a sense, 
this set of data disks isn't so much an 
add-on as the final upgrade. I suppose 
that in a competitive market exploiting 
new technology, the phenomenon of 
games like Falcon and Darklands grow- 
ing up in public sfiouldn't be such a sur- 
prise. But we wouldn't settle for it in any 
other type of consumer product, and i 
don't see why we should here, (Other 
developers — notably Sir-Tech with Cru- 
saders of the Dark Savant — have opted 
to keep long-awaited games under 
wraps until they were ready.) 

I don't mean to minimize the achieve- 
ment here, however. This is a brilliant 
piece of work, and I can't imagine any 
devoted Falcon 3.0 fiyer not loving it, 
Some things are worth waiting for. 
This is one of them. 

PETER OLAFSON 



Spectrum HoloByle 
(800) 695-GAME 
S39-95 

Circle Reader Service Number 451 



PRACTICAL FAXME 

First, there was Long Distance Xerog- 
raphy; then came the first desktop fax, 
the Telecopier I. Soon after, improve- 
nrtents in fax technology developed to 
the point where today we have auto- 
matic, plain-paper fax machines and 
computer software and hardware that 
can turn your system into a fax ma- 
chine. Recently, Practical Peripherals in- 
troduced the new Practical FaxMe car- 
tridge. This device turns any Hewlett- 
Packard LaserJet series II or III printer 
with at least 1MB of expansion memory 
into a plain-paper fax machine for re- 
ceiving faxes. 

Unlike adding a fax board to a com- 
puter, the Faxfvle is easy to install. You 
simply insert the cartndge into the slot 
of the LaserJet and attach the phone 
connector — and you're all set. If you 
do nothing else, as long as your print- 
er is on and the phone line is connect- 
ed, the FaxMe changes your LaserJet 
printer into a plain-paper fax receiver. 

f^ost people, though, won't want to 
simply turn their printer into a fax ma- 
chine; they'll also want to use the Las- 
erJet for its original purpose. Don't wor- 
ry, you still can. The FaxMe cartridge is 
designed with a full range of settings 
and options, the most important being 
the three operations modes: fax receiv- 
ing only, printer only, and automatic 
switching. You can also set the FaxMe 
with the date, day of the week, time, 
speed, and other usual settings you'd 
expect to set on a fax machine. As 



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Means having extra tfme for fun! 



Forms, forms, and more forms, coming from insurance companies, hospitals, 

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through your fax. Are you still using typewriters to fill them out, 

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INTRODUCING FORNBUSTER. 

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Data Rancli is a division of VirtimJi Rcafiiv Ixtbiiratories, Iiic. 



Available 
at your local 
reseller or at 

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Circle Reader Service Number 155 



when you make changes to the set- 
tings on the LaserJet, setting or chang- 
ing the settings of the FaxMe involves 
pushing a series of buttons on the print- 
er's control panel in the correct order. 
I tested the FaxMe on the LaserJet 
II and IIP by sending faxes that varied 
in length and density of type and graph- 
ics. All faxes were received in accept- 
able quality on plain paper. I also sent 
the same faxes to my office's regular 
fax machine, which uses standard 
rolled fax paper. As you'd expect, plain- 
paper faxes are much easier to han- 
dle, not to mention more convenient. 



There wasn't much difference in the 
quality of the graphics on the LaserJet/ 
FaxMe combo compared to the regu- 
lar fax machine with rolled paper. The 
text, though — including the entire Tru- 
eType Wingdings font — printed more 
clearly with the FaxMe. 

Who needs the FaxMe? It doesn't re- 
place a regular fax machine or a fax 
board in a computer, since it doesn't ■ 
send faxes. The FaxMe is priced lower 
than most plain-paper fax machines, 
though. Therefore, if you have a Laser- 
Jet with enough memory and only 
need a fax-receiving device, this may 

JULY 1993 COMPUTE 107 



REVIEWS 



be just what you need. You 
also might find the built-in 
battery an important option 
to consider, Once you've 
set the cartridge, you don't 
tiave to keep resetting it. 

The FaxMe operates as 
advertised and comes with 
a lifetime limited warranty. 
But it's not for everyone. 
Those who need to both re- 
ceive and send faxes might 
want to consider another op- 
tion. But if you only intend to 
receive faxes or if you're con- 
sidering replacing your fax 
machine because you're 
tired of rolled-up faxes, you 
might consider the Practical 
FaxMe cartridge as an effec- 
tive alternative. 

STEPHEN LEVY 

Praclica! Peripherals 

(800) 442-4774 

$259 

Circle Reader Service Number 452 



MIXED-UP 
FAIRY TALES 

Have you seen this child? 
Not if the child's been play- 
ing Mixed-Up Fairy Tales, a 
new educational adventure 
game from Sierra On-Line. It 
teaches children to disap- 
pear with threatening-look- 
ing strangers. 

Of course, in fvlixed-Up 
Fairy Tales the stranger is a 
benign, bespectacled drag- 
on called Bookwyrm who ap- 
pears to the child in a li- 
brary, materializing from a 
book. Bool<wyrm encourag- 
es the child to follow him to 
a magical land where water 
tastes like grape soda and 
every action plays against a 
synthesized soundtrack pro- 
vided by Bach and Mozart. 
And while Bookwyrm may 
be a stranger in the begin- 
ning, his land has charac- 
ters as familiar as Snow 
White and the seven dwar- 
ves. Jack (of beanstalk 

108 COMPUTE JULY 1993 



fame), and Cinderella. 

All is not well in Book- 
wyrm's fairy tale sphere, 
though. An aptly named lit- 
tle hairball called Bookend 
has— you guessed it- 
mixed up all the fairy tales. 
It's the child's job to put 
them together again. 
Thanks to the well-de- 
signed, mouse-oriented inter- 
face of Mixed-Up Fairy 
Tales, doing so becomes an 
entertaining, educational 
challenge loaded with 
enough difficulties to be inter- 
esting but not enough to be- 
come frustrating. 

The package comes with 
a concise, helpful manual; a 
book with bowdlerized ver- 
sions of the real fairy tales; 
and a fvlixed-Up Fairy Tales 
coloring book complete 
with crayons. The disks 
come with a self-explanato- 
ry installation program, 
which takes even novice 
computer users by the 
hand and walks them pain- 
lessly through the process. 
My biggest problem was find- 
ing enough memory to run 
the program — you need 
about 535K RAM free to 
load fvlixed-Up Fairy Tales. 

Another problem I encoun- 
tered was a virus Norton An- 
tivirus discovered in the 
sound drivers for Mixed-Up 
Fairy Tales. Repeated at- 
tempts to call Sierra's tech- 
nical-support iine yielded on- 
ly busy signals. Later, Norton 
Antivirus reported the same vi- 
rus in a sound driver for an un- 
related program, making me 
wonder whether the virus re- 
port was accurate. I still don't 
know, since I never was able 
to get through to Sierra and 
find out. 

f\/lixed-Up Fairy Tales is in- 
tended for children ages 7 
and up. There's a fair 
amount of reading required, 
but no typing. Every action 
comes as the resutt of a sim- 
ple mouse click (or a much 



less intuitive keyboard com- 
mand: you really need a 
mouse). Whether you're look- 
ing at an object, moving to 
a new screen, or talking to a 
fairy-tale character, manipu- 
lating your character quick- 
ly becomes second nature. 

If the classical music nev- 
er sounds quite as good as 
in the concert hall — at best 
it's a synthesized approxima- 
tion, at worst a bad imitation 
of funeral-home organ mu- 
sic — Mixed-Up Fairy Tales 
comes with a better-than-av- 
erage soundtrack and a 
good mix of sound effects. 
You can hear water stream- 
ing down a waterfall and lis- 
ten to Cinderella disappear 
in her pumpkin coach in a 
dizzying flourish, afthough a 
frog's hops sound more like 
a series of barely audible vi- 
olin squawks. The better 
your sound capabilities, the 
better the sound, of course. 

After a brief introduction 
from each character you en- 
counter, you must guess 
which of five fairy tales the 
character belongs to. It 
takes two or three actions to 
help each character com- 
plete his or her story, all of 
which end with a reassuring 
"And they lived happily ever 
after." The fairy tale territory 



looks like a pleasant enough 
place to run out the clock, al- 
though visually it leaves a 
few things to be desired. I 
played the 256-color VGA 
version, which features a 
nice array of backdrops but 
rather choppy characters. 
The land bears an unsurpris- 
ing resemblance to Sierra's 
companion game, Mixed- 
Up (vlother Goose. 

As with Mixed-Up Mother 
Goose, most of the action in 
fvlixed-Up Fairy Tales takes 
place at a gentle pace, but 
there are a couple of mo- 
ments of high drama. At one 
point you get to chase Book- 
end cross-country to re- 
trieve an object, and anoth- 
er time you get to watch the 
giant crash to the ground 
from Jack's beanstalk, leav- 
ing a giant-shaped hole in 
the ground. 

Don't worry about a child 
disappearing into the 
game, though: It's actually a 
nice place to get lost in, and 
an educational way for mod- 
ern technology to bring to 
life some vintage stories. 

EDDIE HUFFMAN 



Sierra On-Ltne 
(800) 326-6654 
S49.95 

Circle Reader Service Number 453 O 



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circle Reader Service Number 191 



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650 Megs 

7,000 Virus Free Files 

65% different or newer 

files than Mega CD-ROM 1 



PC Audjo/ Visual 



Over 600 l^legabytes 

of PC Graphics & Sounds 

256 Color ,Gifs, Animated .Fli's, plus 

.fulod, .Rol, ,Wav, & ,Voc Sound Files 

Our Newest Release! 



Windows and OS/2 Sharew^are 

600 Pius Megs of Windows & OS/2 

Shareware With Over 4,860 Files! 

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Now, for a limited time only! 

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or get all 3 of these fantastic 
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PROFIT PRESS, 2956 N. Campbell Ave., Tucson, AZ 85719 

Information (602) 577-9696 FAX (602) 577-9624 
Profit Press BBS (602) 299-0693 FAO BBS (602) 577-6969 



SONY Caddies S4.75 with any Non Demo CD purchase! 

The prices listed above do riot iriolude shipping and haridling. 
Special shipping and shipping lo foreign countnes is available. 

For More Information or Questions Call (602) 577-9696 

ORDERS ONLY! Call Toll Free 

1-800-843-7990 



!UaticiCsdj 



Circle Reader Service Number 256 



BASEBALL 




fSKETBALL • LOTTERY 



TBALL 



Artificial Intelligence 
Now Available 



Grid Master 
Pro Series 
Bookie Buster 
Collegiate 
Bulletin Board 



S 99.95 
199.95 
149.95 

199.95 
150.00 




Football Special 499.95 

(Includes all items) 
Shipping 450 



This year Prof Jones has 
added a sophisticated Neu- 
ral Network to the Football 
software that produces a 
higher win percentage than 
ever before. Get it now!! 



Call to Order, or for a FREE Catalog 

1-800-553-2256 

PROF. JONES. INC. • 1940 W. State St., Boise, Idaho 83702 



THOROUGHBRED- GREYHOUND •STANDARDBRED 



circle Reader Service Numlier 119 




Brand CD-ROM's 

The best quality, best software, best price. 

Locate lost family, friends and sweethearts. Find 
new suppliers. Begin a job search. Plan a trip. Verify 
credit applications. Locate debtors. Plan sales 
routes. Check for trademarl<s. And much morel 



PhoneDIsc USA 

Search residences by name. Search businesses by 
name, SIC code, business type, address or phone 
number . Narrow business or residence searches by 
state, city, street or ZIP. 

PhoneDIsc' USA Business Only $99 

9.5 million U.S. Business listings. Just one disc 

PhoneDisc USA Residential Only $99 

75 million U.S. residential listings. Just two discs 



Buy both and save 



Only $159 



PhoneDisc Reverse 

Extend your search powerl Same powerful search 
software as above plus telephone and address 
searching of residences too. 85 million businesses 
and residences. Just 5 discs Only $499 

Buy just your geographic region Only $1 29 



Winner: IIA Best CD-ROM. OPA Achievement in 
Business. Accurate listings from Database America. 
Cali To Order; Digital Directory Assistance 

1QAA 'iQA Q1C1 51S1 River RdBldS 

-Ol/U-Zo4-OjJJ Belhesda, MD 20816 



Circle Reader Service Number 180 



Build A Lifetime Income 

From Your Home 

With A Computer! 

Quit spending money on your 
computer and let it earn money 
-, for you. This is a proven turnkey 
business an individual or couple 
can run. If you purchase our soft- 
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will give you the computer and 
printer. If you already own a com- 
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Begin part-time and still retain 

the security of your present position. We will provide free, home 

office training. Financing available. 

Learn how other couples, and individuals like yourself, 

are building a lifetime income! 

To receive free cassettes and color literature, call toll-free: 

l-800-'343-8014, ext. 303 

(in Indiana: 317-758-4415) Or Write: 

Computer Business Services, Inc., CBSI Plaza, Ste. 303, 

Sheridan, Indiana 46069 




Here's What You Receive 



MAJOR HOME BUSINESS 
OPPORTUNITY OFFERING 



' Home • OHicB • Part Time • Fu!l Time • Spare Time 

The Hope Career Centers, Helping Others Pur- 
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Interested bu/ers are offered a lurn-key inspira- 
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'A career planning business that includes so many 
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For over seven years the Hope Center has been 
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cre. 



$495.™ PERIOD!!! 

MAKING IT BIG STAYING SMALL 



FREE 

Inronnjtion 

& Details CALL: 

HOPE 

CAREER 

CENTER 

2735 Snulh Ncwtun Strcel, Denver, CO 80236 




This extraordinary program 
provides a sense of "seturrty" 

by providing a complete 

identimation of a child should on 

emergency occur. 

• A Business You Can Be Proud Of 

• full Of Port Time 

• Continued Dealer Support 

• Turnkey Package - Compuler, 
printer, software, ID system supplies 
and training just S6995.00 



CALL TODAY for 
rNFORMATION 



2T4-248-9100 

3216 Commander Dr. 
Suite 101 • DepI 21 
tarrolllon, TX 75006 



303-934-1018 



Hope 



Uale K H\m 



Kitki 



t2/15/M Sro Bro «aiil «lb 



Oe/M/92 



JiBSiltoii Mln 
laiUnltrttt 

tuiB, htss 
KiflM-iaz 



Hoc 



A 



- SIGNS RI\1D 
,- ^v^ RU666R STRMPS 

l^o'*''' for your oujti use or Q 
profitable sideline business 



Self-Inking and traditional 

knob handle stafnps can 

be made for less tnan '$1, 

Retail prices will start in 

the $10+ range, 




Informational signs, nameplates, 

control panels, name badges, 

and hundreds of olfier signage 

items can be made for pennies 

per square inch. 




JdCKSON MORKING nowm CO. INC 

Brownsville Rd., D-KOO, Mt. Vemon. IL 62864 
Phone: 800-851-4945 Fax; 61 8-841-773 B 



Circle Readsr Ssrvics Number 231 

"^^ Learn 
Computers! 

Home study. 
Learn the per- 
sonal compu- 
ter for a better 
career and an 
easier home 
life. Exciting, 
easy to follow. 
Free booklet. 

Call 800-223-4542 

The School OF 
Computer Training 

6065 Rosevvell Road 
- Depi. KHfiSta. Atlanta. GA 30328 . 

Circle Reader Service Number 112 





Have FUN vihWe 
learning with... 



ySoff 



I 



wcire. s 



MUTANOID MATH CHALLENGE 



7\fitkmi;Jic-. pi'cictice 

Ove.1' 200 woi'd pi'oblejms 

tr^fi+ical tl^l^l<il1g skills 



MUTANOID lA^ORD CHALLENGE 



Speiling/vocabHiai'y pi'QC+ice 

65^000 worcl on-i;lisl< dictionafy 

(Ct'ific.al flAinkint:) skills 

MS-DOS or Macintosh 

Ages 7 and up • 449.95 each 
Call for FREE demo disk 1-800-532-7692 



112 



Circle Reader Service Number 117 



Make Money With \biir Computer 



Imagine owning a 
lifetime license for a 
patented product that will 
please adults, delight and 
educate children, and 
return high profits on a 
minimal investment. 
That's the surefire success 
formula that Best 
Personalized Books 
offers to distributors who 
are building strong, easy 
to run, highly profitable 
businesses. 

Charmingly illustrated 
by top artists, Best 
Personalized Books 
become instant favorites because 
the child is the star of each story 
and friends and relatives join in on 
every adventure. An extensive array 
of titles appeals to a wide range of 
ages and tastes, and includes well- 
written stories on religious and 
ethnic themes that reinforce family 




With a small investment, you can build a highly profitable btisiness 
at home. Create personalized children 's books with your computer. 



values. There's never a renewal fee, 
and new titles are available for just 
S5 per software update. 

Because no computer experience 
is necessary, creating Best 
Personalized Books is a snap. A 
comprehensive training manual 
shows you how to personalize a 



book in just minutes. And 
with Best's strong marketing 
program, you'll find seUing 
options are limitless. You 
can work at home, on 
location at malls, wholesale 
clubs, craft fairs, flea 
markets, or home parties, or 
in conjunction with local 
business or fundraising 
groups. 

Strong dealer support is 
a Best priority, as is the 
commitment to helping you 
make even bigger profits with 
other popular personalized 
items including audio 
cassettes, party invitations, holiday 
letters, birth announcements, 
calendars, and stationery for teens 
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FOR A FREE KIT, CONTACT: 

/(I'.v; PersonaUzeil Books Inc. 

475 Hal Persomlizcd Plaza 

4350 Sinma Drive. Dallas. TX 75244 

(214) 385 -.miO 




'Ven^ ^0^ T^^v^it 



• With our process and a computer you can instantly produce ttie tiighest 
quality personalized ctiildren's books and stationery on the market 
today. 

• All books are liardbound witfi full color illustrations and laser quality 
printing. Ideally suited for tiome based business, malls, department 
stores, fairs or mail order. 

• Very simple to operate and tiigtily profitable. 

• Only a limited number of dealersfiips available. 



For a tomplete information packel tall today. 



D&K ENIERPRISES, INC. • 3216 COMMANDER DRIVE 
SUITE 101 * DEPT 27 • CARROILfON, TEXAS 75006 




oice 
Mail 
Cash 
Machine 






^ . S. -^.^ ■ ^ ^- S- S ■ % • % f S« SV V< S* %• V'SW* 



Press 1 for 

soles, 2 for 

service, 3 for 

live operator 



mm 



JVLake thousands of dollars effortles^iy by installing a BigmOuth voice 
package in your286/3 86. Use it to answer your home-office phone, rent 
pocket-pagers, advertise products, or operate a pay-per-call service 
using major credit cards, passwords or a nationwide 900 #. 

Xo get started, order our '25 PC Opportunily Toolkit It contains all 
the information you need & its cost is applied to all future purchases. 



A Few Home-Based ventures Featured In Our '25 Toolkit! 



BIgmOuth 

voicc/l"ax/pager 

rentals 

. »295. (Dorrx) *25) 
^ -J 

''KinderChek 

lalchlkey cblkj 

momt^ 

. *2250. (Demo *25) 



QuIckUne 

wrtic programs 
In QDaac 

n745. (DemQ^25) 



XlientCaller 

opibound 

pros pec lof 

01450. (Demo *25) 



Rise'n'Shlne 

wakc-up & 

remiDdcT jKTvice 

nWS, (Demo '25) 



< TollBridge 
dj5 lance tiiDe 
=1995. (I3emo!25> 



DemoSource"" 

"nM Voice AppUcadon Sup 
• ••••••• 



aMSf^m«i<iSi.staa]2 

Nonhridgg, CA 61324 USA 

tfL»brl.n,) to Ijictr iniblL.hW* 



TRY 



our ciemolinel 816 718-9560 



-®- 



To order, call 24 hours: 
800.283.4759 



m 



Circle Reader Service Number 131 



SeXXy Softwrare 

SeXXv DtSKS 



SeXXcapades . . . The GAME 

The First Adult Game with TRUE SOUND 

and 256 Color VGA Graphics 



^ 



tSeXXy Saftwrare 
SeXXy CD-ROMS 



The g^irrto sveryone has been wa^Iincj tor. Foi Thai svening ycu wQnl loicjet wlh Q 10\sd onB or group at verv dosQ 
Itierd^. Fulfill fDut seiual des;rB5. Find our hew your psmer wcu!d really lika 10 nnakB [ova. I Ower fiO Cofof VGA Scenes * 
Real Voicas Guide Bia Ac;iOfl • Fu*ep^y Op::on ■ Play wilh 2-3 Close Fr lerxjs 

S79- Special Dftef S69 wilh purchj^e C.I arivCG disk. /VGA and h3fd tii5l< required - shipped on high density disks. 



CONNOISSEUR COLLECTION ALL NEW! In 256 Color VGA.'! 

SelXy Disk ICCI • -t TDU BE TXE STAR *T1K H RST CUSTOMIZABLE mom allows you 10 urnle the dialog and Uie mle, ONLY AVAIL- 
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SeXXy Disk tCCZ • TtHE FIRST SOUND NOUIEI The liij; comculer movie with EOUriD Sec ttx incndibic 256 color VEA graphics while 
hoinni) Ite 3CIUJ1 ilij!™ OUS 5 EXCLUSIVELY! 

SeVXy Diik'CD3"THEBESTMQVIE!Thi;bi;^l convulcr movie salable. Only lor Itie senaiis collect or 256 stunning VGA coiois. 

SeXXy Diik *Ct4 • VOLUPEUOUS MOVIEwilh Sound! See and heat 3 syrtipliony ol e«tepTionsliy prcportjoncd women 

SeKXy Disk fCCS*QODIEIES MOVIE Willi SDund! SiH: men olmcrediblcpropcrtiDns and women with pnicue abilities -UNBELIEVABLE! 

Prices: ? Mo^is S29. 3 Movies SS5, 5 Movies S94 



NEW!! Exclusively imported from Europe!! 256 Color VGA Games 

SG4 PORNTRIS - Adult version ol the popular gome. Vou reveal a hidden ittowie whae ootit/olling blocks tailing down 
yauf stieen Multiple levels, MUST SEE! 

SG5 PORNPIPE - Ad jit version ol Pipe tor Windows (Windows not required) - Mult pie n^ovies revealed as the gaine pro- 
gresses HOURS OF FUN! 

SG6 MOZAIK • Adult jigsaw puzzles with over d5 celebrity pictures - you re.tssemble the most exciting women on eaith 
Price: $35 each or all 3 lor $89 



ORIGINAL SeXXy DISKS - 6 disk set wilh movies, pictures, games $32 



ADD S3 SH ■ 3.5" Or FOREIGN ORDERS ADD S2DISK ■ W PA ADD TAX • MUST STATE AGE OVER 21 YEARS. 

VISA/MC Orders Only: 800-243-1515 Ext. 600FG 1 24HRS I 7 DAYS 

Or CICMO to: SeXXy Software. P.O. Box 220. Dept. BOOFG. Hatfielti, PA 19ii0 



SeXXcapades . 



. The MOVIE 



First eoOMB MovlB far the FC 



Tb« nasi inci«djbl4 MEW COROTil PnxJuci' The FIRST compltTe 600 MB MOVIt wiEh SOUND lor me 
IBM PC Tlw movie fejlziies i g/wp oJ Iriefids plvfinj our ScXXcsMiJes Qumt. Tlw jc'ton is liol and 
inciediBle! Vou will m« unbf hevjtie uhs ot i msuse 4n<J joystick. This beaublul 256 mIoi VGA mi?M 
filK 2/4 ol !l}i« "^ittn Yqu wtd csMd it ku£t i 2a€SX tomiMjli:r. you tin piust & Sun u on i \ltK 
OURS EXCLUSIVELY. 
Price: t129 or jW v.U ans' ot^sr CD-RO'.^ cu'chase. SeXXmmdeg g:ame5D% DFf wttfi rmwte purctuse 



S&XXy CD-ROMS 

ScXXy CO #1 th« ^rcmsTE ac^i x:o:oi> ■x:*n- 6S0 M3 ot aa^Oi wm; 52667(3* pCJufBv 87 movies.5Ti so 

rOT.gjmBDAfi£T(}COMPAft£S 
SoXXy CO #2 jr. wclus.v« Golletl on Mfiiaintng cve( 900 Svper VGA |>iciufKO0?i)( 763 » ?S61 anj (p(er 

400 VGA p cljrK (540 x 480 1 2:!*) These vt pet j/m Itiil UIWI be found atiywtiwe bJsb! TIw womai 

andlhflcuiJ'ivaresljfT'.tng 
ScXXy CO <o af^oiNe; co'ettioi cf over6W H3 of \t\i fwirw prciures JOilable, O/er5.0O0 VGA^ciufes. 

mvK a-d L*li!« tnatwiiJ h?/5^tj'j ^pe-Cr^ dT/s j-j^t trying IQ see ilafi! 

MENU DRIVEN VIEWING - NO DUPLICATION / PRICE: SH eich {SSd ^tti ^ny CCdi^ u 
SeXKcaj^fle^S /SLi^ER CD BUHDIE -TAKE ALL 3 XXX CD-RQ^JS FOR SIM 



MtX & MATCH CD-ROMS 

First 3; $99 oach or 3 for $ 199; 

Thert: $69 &ach or 3 far $ J 49 

ADULT TITLES 

MY PRIVATE COLLECTION I & i1 

PCPIXI.IISIII 

EROKCEHCOUNTERS 

DUSTV BABES 

ANIUATIOM FANTASIES I 4 II 

STORM III • ECSTASY- ADULT PALETTE 



350ms inierna! Drive Kit - S249 
[whti 3 CO purchase). 



COMMERCIAL TITLES 

^JiJEoul Cta^ri^cUi/tiTit^tii Mirrn-.u 
AJ:niV)Ri4A1is 

Pri<i4i^Ei SJiar^ifb-t^DO- pi^g^ar^i ■ ir-inij «jfii«n 

5hv1cd[h^4iiMC^nii/i>^gCitfM3vi' 
V^^rxj^n Sg!4 «h] SournJ- Hjiriii. pdjiM. ubbtai 

So U'jcn Scrs«rwar»- S^Q Mb dI br^tonl picns. irmvt 

5i> \J'jth Sriiftmni* -O^i 1 CB ^ ri,-^n*u pafi-.^s. ^a^nn 

i««tw5 C3 - t5Cfl Pi*4. tens. iMifi •:& 



Circle Reader Service Number 1T6 



WhereAdults 
Come To Play! 



I Local NLDribas Qmrtag 700 U.& Cities! 

■ CB-ayle Group and Private Chatl 

■ 1000'3 Of Sharewarn: Programs! 
I Business and Pereona] Scrviccsl 

■ Travel & Flight Scheduling with QAGI 
I Giant Message Foroins & Ctassifledsl 
I Live Multlplayer Gaincsl 

■ Matchmaker Dating Database! 

■ Designed For Adult Uacrsl 

For Signup, Mosf. !\ro«.»ATton, Or A 
Local Nvmber Near You Call 

818-358S968 

By Modem, e/N/i-3/is/24oo Baud 



Circle Reader Service Number 14t 



For IBM/MS-DOS: 



MICHOPHOSE »18.50 EACH 

GUNSHIP PUNISHER, 
SWORD OF THE SAMURAI 

FLAMES OF FREEDOM, 

X-MEN 2, COVERT ACTION. 

AMAZING SPIDERMAN, 

TlAdLIGKT 2000. LIGHTSPEED 



SIERRA DEALS »0 EACH 

l!WC'SaUESTl,H£ARTOP 
CHIMA, RISE OF THE DRAGON. 
KINGS QUESH OR LARRY 1. 

SIERRA DEALS jHEACH 
iMNHUNTgS 1 OR 2. MIXTD UP 
MOTHER GOOSE. FIREHAWK. 

HOYLES aOOK OF GAMES 2. 



LAND, SEAtAIRBUNDLEII 

ONLY tH.50 

Includes: PiratesI, Airbonae 

Ranger 4 Gtinship. 5.2S' only. 



MARVEL TRILOGY 

ONLY> ia.50 

rcludcii: Dr. Doom's Revenge 

Amaring Spiderman 4 X-Men. 



ADULTS ONLY FUN 

Sex Vixens Irom Space Si* 50 

Sex Olymplizs 516.50 



^ESURE SUIT LARRY BUNDLE 

ONLYS25 

Includes; Larry 1 . 2 & 3!II 



CREDIT CARD ORDERS 
US MINIMUM 

1-800-676-6B16 

QnJera Only, piease' 



^ CHEAP DEALS t5 EACH 
Outrun, tipacjf Hamer. blarquatie, 

Wy Grand Piano. Sail G»ine, 
C^-ilcudarB & Slallortary, Tra::kcri 
Street Fightina Mar. Crossbow, 

hAafjic Jodirson BasJtelbaK. 
Gambler, Humrin Biology, Mind 

Dance -or U.S Geography. 

BATTLECHESS 2 S19.50 

WIZARDRY 5 S14.5G 



COMPSULT 

PO. BOX 5160 
SAN LUIS OBISPO. CA 93403 



VUE AISD CARRY APPLE, MAC, CE4/12B. AMIGA, ATARI ft MDUE 
Tooider, serd :heck QrmarEV order (a lite AbauG address. Calilorj^ia cidsrs 
must incltrdE 7.2SK^ale3it3i. Afl orders mu^i incluiJc-shiapingchBrge<idl 
iS lor U.S.A., SB lor Canada, or $15 for IrlErnalionflL for ojr compEeie 
cataioflSDitl S2 inU.S, poslag&stampsorcash, Acaiftlcgis sent FREE with 
any crdei. Be sure lo s pe^: if yyojr computer lype & disksize Alien ord^riicj. 
F{ir allinquirias & adriitional inrormjiien, call (8D5)S44-EEI5. 



25,000 SHAREWARE 
PROGRAMS $ 



ON 4 CD-ROMs 2 set. 

LATEST '93 EDfTION - for Si 50 
30 DA Y MONEY BACK GUARANfTEE 

More pirogirams Ihan ever bcloreili Windows Applitationi.. 
Games... Programminig TooIb . DataBase Attcsso- 
ries.. Educational Aid$... DeskTop Publishing . ^vcn 
OS/2... Word Processors,.. Utilities for Prinlcis. Files 
Keyboard, Screen, Cliparl, Sprrad5heetft..Conrnunic:a' 
lions... Phologfaphs... CAD,.. Music_._ in short - pro- 

a ram; lor any appliraliDn you cai imagine! 
niquc LISTER PROGRAU alloAs you to easilK access ANY 
PROGRAW, IN ANY CATEGORY, in jyst seconds -loadit 
Drvlo If our HO, and when you'rf finisTicd, eilhef keepilonthe HD, 
or do l^iG^ hou$c1ictping to keep your HO uncluttered with pro- 
grams yci may use only infiequci^tly 
OVER i GiGABYTES - 25.000 PROGRAMS-THE BEST 
SHAREWARE AND MOST VALUABLE DATA YOUU EVER 
FlUDtl NO CL UBS to'foin... nonfonthiy downiasdingftts. . H s 
all ther* faryoti to r;y._ to co/rfwrt... toaxparimtnt wUhfAL L 
avsilibh within stcondsHf YOU CANT FIND A WIDER 
SELBcriON - OB A LOWER COST PER PROGRAM 
ANYWHERE ELSEf LATEST '93 EDITION 
ORDER YOURS TODAY RUSH SS9 + S9 «/H, 
CASH, CHECK, MONEY ORDERi CODs OK! 

DEALERS WANTED 

CROSLEY SOFTWARE 
BOX 276, ALBURG, VT 05440 

Fax: (51 4) 345-8303 Tel : (51 4) 739-9328 



Circle Rearlr^r Service Number 226 




Circle R^der Service Number 150 



Choose from 



GAMES • KIDS 
FONTS •CUP ART 
HOME & BUSINESS 

Receive either 3/3.5" or 5/5.25" disks- 

Poy a service charge of only S2-95 

per collection, Credit card only. 



Software of the Month Club® 



SA nsfACT/o/vaMftAfvrfwsmcf 1985 



619-931-8111 Ext 511 



Circle Reader Service Number 121 



IBM & MAC SOFTWARE 

CATALOG 

32 Pages! ASP Member 




SOFTSHOPPE, INC 

P.O. Box 247 
ARTESIA, CA 90701 
Tel: (310)802-1333 
FAX: (310) 802-1494 



Toll-Free— 24 Hrs. 
1-800-851-8089 



Circle Reader Service Number 126 



2^^^^^ 



,'3l-;^^-a%.-^^ 



¥ 



, experiences 



THE MAGIC MIRROR - . . a toolbox 
for your mind. E. Kinnle, PhD., Clinical 
Psychologist. $39,95. 

MAGIC MIRROR II 

for your mind. S39.95. 

MERLIN ... an apprenticeship. S29.95. 

I CUING , , , ancient Chinese wisdom 
and prophecy. S29-95. 

THE MAGIC MOUNTAIN , . . a journey 
into another reality. Not for children- 
Male and female versions, S39.95. 

SCREEN SAVER . . . math art and 
fractals, lively and colorful. S19-95- 
Blue Valley, 29 ShcpaKi St, Walton. Nl' 13856 
MaslcrCardA'uw l-80O«J>6172 loftcr 5 p,m.) 
Call or write for free catalog- 



9 

9 



^T'^'^T^T'^^ ^ ' ^'^ ' ^T '^ 



circle Reader Service Number 173 



We've Outdone Our 

Only Competition.^ 
Ourselves^ 



INTRODUCING 
THE MARK II WCS™ 



* Allows You to 
Program Both the 
WCS™and Your Joystick 



TItrustMaster 

* Get Real 




TAS 



ThruslMasterlnc. 101 50 SW Nimbus Ave. Suite E-7Tiaord OR 97223 PHONEI503)639-3200 FAX(503)620-8094 



Circle Reader Service Number 147 




Vaar Nossogc ficross 

CreatiDg posters, memos and flyers with cartoon graphics has never 
been easier. Caitoon Mania is an amazing new software that lets you 
create unique cartoons using hundreds of built-in clip arts. You start 
by choosing a background and then adding characters and objects to it. 
ITie clip arts of characters can change posture and facial expressions. 
They can jump, sit, run, cry, laugh and do dozens of other things. 
Change the size of characters and objects to create the proper 
perspective. Write the captions you want and then print it Create 
posters, story books, birthday greetings, jokes and even memos. Order 
now and enjoy the benefits of Cartoon Mania immediately. 

List Price $49.95 

Introductory Price $34.95 
Buy now and save $15.00 
FL resident add 6% Sales tax 
Add $3.50 for shipping & handling 






Call (904) 483-2934 or send check/money order to: 



JemmaSoft 



12505 Pine Glen Drive, 
Leesburg, FL. 34788 

30 DAY MONEY BACK GUARANTEE 

Circle Reader Service Number 140 



Purchaser must state 



inteiw 
CD-ROMs- taut w 
lo choose from, how do^ 
which CDs are right for yoj? 

Now. Ihe Slarware Adult BundMBWake 
ordering easy. Each Bundle has been careful- 
ly selected to include only the BEST Adull 
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To got you viewing pictures in a hurry, we 
have included our "Quick Slarl Instructions** 
with e.nch Bundle. You are guaranteed the 
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V. - ^ 
Bundle *1 "For Beginners :„X^ 

h^staiilly add thousands ot GIF lilos and h' 
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Circle Reader Service Number 130 



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Circle Read&r SeivJce Number 250 



Save BIG $$ in 
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Clri:le Reader Service Number 2S4 




Magic Tricks 
on your PC.'.'.' 

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Send check or money order to 

MicroMagic Productions 

175 51h Avenue Suite 2625 

New York, NY 10010 

|212)Se9-0J20 
Requires IBM PC or compalible wilh VGA. EC3A or 
CGA, Ateo lO-tnck Professional version (S4fi * 5 SJh) 
and 1'lrick Demo disk (S3 * S3 s/h) 



Circle Reader Service Number 200 

ARE YOU PRACTICING 
''SAFE" COMPUTING? 

Protect your computer froni viruses witlt 
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55.99 for 1 or S9.99 for 2 to 
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m - 1480GuirRond 

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J^il 



Stereo / 4-Op 
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Memory- 
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Klo music experience required. 

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11590 Seminole Blvd. 

Largo, FL 34648 

VISA 813-397-3530 MC 




circle Reader Service Number MS 



116 



CALIFORNIA ADULT SOFTWARE 

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Circle Reader Service Number 304 



OMNI 
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Phoenix, AZ 85013 

Adult Oriented ''. 
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Circle Reader Service Number 142 



E E ! 



Download the HOTTEST & SEXIEST Images 
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JUlCcl Is an Adult Of»-Llna Magazine that 
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I'm Chritif, the Sytletiu Admtit- 
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Circle Reader Sen/ice Number 17B 





She ^^isR Qutfflw 

shareware Company 

37lt.S Richmond Ave. SI NT 10312 
Ttfl:(7 18)31 7-0198 Fa.\:(7 1 8)966-4766 



10 Most Wanted 



1. Solar Winds -a uaique cumtiination ot 
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animated grapliies. (JOYSTiCK.)(VGA) 
m- (.Sciund Ulasler) 

2. Major Strylcer - an e.xeellent sliool'em up 
game faim Apogte. Major Siryker's mission is 
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3. Zone ^() - an ultra high tech 32-bit arcade 
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4. Overkill - an excellent shootVm up game 
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gaining power as you progress through Ihe 
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5. Jill of the Jungle - guide jill through !6 
stunning 256 color graphic levels of ftin and 
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(). Wolfenstien 3D - Tlie slanilard by which 
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7, Ancients • graphic inlensive IJ&D style 
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'). MegatTon • enter the labyrinlh combat 
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Circlie Reader Service Number 266 



CLASSIFIEDS 



ACCESSORIES 



CABLE TV 



CABLE TV 



USED COMPUTERS 



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Box 461782 
Oept C 
^— ^Garland, TX 75046-1782 
FAX & BBS 214 -272 - 7920 



Circle Reader Service Number 370 



BOOKS/PUBLICATIONS 



ECO-friirndly Djsl-^ Maj;ji/.ine for PC. Inicresriiiu ;ini- 
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Circle Reader Service Number 367 



CABLE TV 



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Circle Reader Service Number 358 



-R^a- 



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Circle Reader Senrice Number 359 



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CABLE TV DESCRAMBLERS 



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Circle Reader Service Number 368 



CABLE TV DESCRAMBLERS 

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Circle Reatlef Service Numbef 369 



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Why Pay A High Monthly Fee^ 
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'V eajDment C^nsull lacal cable operator 



L&L ELECTRONIC ENGINEERING 
1430 Miner Street. Suile 522 
DesP!aines,iL 60016 

Free Catalog 1-3m542.9425 
Inlormation 1-708-540-U06 



Circle Reader Service Number 3&e 



POSITION WANTED 



HOME TYPISTS, 

PC users needed. 
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Cull (1)80.'; 'Jf):-Roo(i E,\t. R-Mtim 



IJ:ldJ.T.W.f.|P 

• GABLE T.V. BOXES - ALL TYPES 
' LOW PRICES • DEALER PRICES 



^ Ace Products ▲ 

' 1-800-234-0726 



Circle Fleader Service Number 360 



COMPUTER KITS 



PC-BfILD rnMPITF.R KITS. THt; RlECOCMZF.Ii l.i;AI5F;R 
in huildii-yoursclf PC's. Rec'd by PC-Upgradi; 
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COMPUTER REPAIR 



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mnipulers. Quiek scrviee.3() day warranty 
MOM & POP's Compuier Shop. 114 N. !6ih. 
Bellitmy, MO 64424 (8l(i> 425-4400 



EDUCATION 



In Computei' Sciences 



• iri.depfiiOegfEeFrti7aiTiswttitl1coutHst)c(iw&tutfy. ^^^^mm 

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Foj lies infomalron call 1 -800-767-2427 SCIENCES 

gim-CC Magnola Ave. S, ' Sine ZGO • BiinMigtein. AL 35aa "^^^^ 




Circle Reader Service Numljer 362 



How To Get 

A High-Paying 

Job In 

COMPUTER 
PROGRAMMING 



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Specialized Associate degree and diploma 
programs in computer programming, com- 
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Call or write tor college catalog and txwklel "FHow to Get 
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233 Academy Drive • P.O. Box 421788 

Kissimmee, FL 34742-1768 

Member, D.L. Peoples Group • Acctediled Mamber, NHSC 



Circle Reader Service Number 361 



118 



CLASSIFIEDS 



MISCELLANEOUS 



PUT YOUR FAVORITE PHOTOS ON YOUR COMPUTER 
Will coiivtn ru HMl" 16,256 iir 24 hii tiilur runiKii Icir 
wallpaper or your tavoriic scrt^eii saver. Send pJuiio anil 
$9.95 check/mo payable lo P.C. PICS, P.O. Hiw .ilK, 
New Lemix, IL fifW.'il NO PORNOGRAPHY! 



SOFTWARE 




SKELET4li\ KEY 

l-ITS MOST LOCKS 

{bolllocks. (ttxjrUxik'., fk \umc \\u.\\i-H.i.\\ 
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Wiih A Lock I'itkinp TX^monsKiilniii 
You get 3 sized tcn^ioji keys, \hc slide pick A preci^*- inMruciionv 
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Satisfaclipn Guaranteed or Full Rtfond: 2 Wce!t\ [Jclivc:y 
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SOFTWARE 



BUY/SELL USED SOFTWARfi! LOWEST PHICILS! 
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IBM . COMMOOORR 64 & I2K - AM1G..\. 
lOOO's of PD/Shiireware pRjjirjrns im 1{KI\ 
of disks. Free listing or SI fur lurijc 
descriptive cataloj; (specify compuier). 
DISKS O-PLENTY INC.. «3fi2 Pines Blvd.. 
Suite 270B, Pembroke Pines, FL .13024 

USED SOFTWARE— I-Ri;[-; HKOCIiURE 
Specify Amiga or Cfv4/128. We also huy used sultwiire. 
Send list. Bare Bniies Software, 941) 4t!i Ave.. 
#222, Huntington. WV 2.i7f)l or 1-MK) 63S-1 12?. 



Sports Scheduler 



THE BEST MOST COfJPLETE LEAGUE PlJ^Y 
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• Built in SCHEOUli EDITOR nllowj you lo 
ctiange the date^imcAocatiDn/opponenls 
of seiiscted games. Add TOtes, seanch 

A replflc*, in5<!ft ertra games, elc. 

• Equal distlibulion ot opponents, lime slols, 
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NEWS BITS 



Jill Champion 



Bringing ethics 

to Justice, sending 

mice into 

space, pacl<aging 

TSN for the 

masses, winning big 

money witti 

software, ami more 



Tlie Riglit Stuff 

Product design gave Micro- 
soft's Ballpoint mouse the 
edge when it was chosen for 
NASA's shuttle mission last 
April. The BallPoint mouse 
was launched with the Discov- 
ery crew, attached to the Pay- 
load and General Support 
Computer that ran the shut- 
tle's primary scientific project, 
the Atmospheric Laboratory 
for Science and Applications 
(ATLAS 2). 

Historically, NASA has en- 
countered problems working 
with computer mice in space, 
as zero gravity tends to send 
the user floating in the oppo- 
site direction of the mouse. 

Microsoft's Ballpoint 

mouse design, particularly its 
breakaway mounting, made it 
acceptable to the crew and 
safe for other equipment. 
"However," said Patrick 0. 
Wilson, project engineer at 
Johnson Space Center, "the 
main advantage was that we 
didn't need to nnodify the 
mouse to keep the trackball 
from floating in zero-g." 

Score Your Own Video 

Binary Zoo, a Broderbund af- 
filiate, is sponsoring a Rock 
and Bach Studio Best Video 
Contest, in which contestants 
create their own music videos 
using Binary Zoo's new Rock 
and Bach Studio software pro- 
gram. Entries must be submit- 
ted on PC disks, and all en- 
tries must be created using 
Rock and Bach Studio tools. 

The Best Video Production 
winner will receive $100 in 
Brederbund software, the 
Best fvlusic winner will receive 
$200 in software, and the 
Best Overall Video winner will 
receive $300 in products. 
Each winner will also receive 
his or her choice of a Binary 
Zoo product. 

The deadline for entries is 
September 30, 1993. If you 
would like to have further infor- 
mation about the contest, con- 



tact Binary Zoo, P.O. Box 
3210, Champlain, New York 
12919; (514)846-4059. 

Game Modem 

Best Data Products and The 
Sierra Networl< (TSN) recently 
announced a new bundled 
product. Game Modem, that in- 
cludes TSN's multiplayer 
game software and Best Data 
Products' internal 2400-bps 
modem. 

"Our goal is to work with 
TSN to position the modem 
as a standard game-playing 
peripheral, just like a joystick 
or sound card," says Tony 
Esfandiari, Best Data Prod- 
ucts' executive vice president 
of strategic alliance. "At less 
than $50 for the modem and 
more than seven megabytes 
of game software in the pack- 
age. Game Modem is already 
competitive with other prod- 
ucts on the computer game 
shelf priced $10 to $15 
more." Plus, the TSN Member- 
ship Kit that's included gives 
members three free hours of 
evening or weekend access 
to the entire interactive net- 
work and a $30 credit toward 
TSN membership and usage. 

The Sierra Network is al- 
ready low-priced at its flat- 
rate fee of $12.95 per month. 

Look for Game Modem in 
the games software section of 
your favorite retailer. 

Inoculate Your PC 

Avoid virai infection for less, 
Virex for the PC, the popular 
antivirus software, is now avail- 
able in a newly released ver- 
sion and at a newly suggest- 
ed retail price that's been cut 
in half. Version 2.7 will retail 
for around $49.95; previous 
versions sold for $99.95. 

"The price reduction re- 
flects Datawatch's commit- 
ment to be the industry lead- 
er in antiviral solutions," says 
Andrew W. Mathews, general 
manager of Datawatch's Trian- 
gle Software Division, (3700- 



B Lyckan Parkway, Durham, 
North Carolina 27707; 919- 
490-1277, 919-490-6672 fax). 
Along with the price slash, Da- 
tawatch also offers free up- 
grades via BBS. 

Display Your Best 

Dust off that screen saver 
you've been working on. 
Berkeley Systems announced 
its After Dark Display Contest 
for 1993. This year's contest in- 
cludes categories for both Win- 
dows and Macintosh environ- 
ments and a category for com- 
puter artists. 

A $10,000 grand prize will 
be awarded for Best Entry 
Overall. Other prizes include 
a Fujitsu 2.0 GB M2652SA 
hard drive, a Compaq Centu- 
ra 3/25C Model 84 PC, and 
an Epson ES800C color scan- 
ner with interface kit, 

Winning displays may be in- 
cluded in future releases of Af- 
ter Dark products, and all win- 
ners will receive an engraved 
Flying Toaster trophy. 

The deadline for submis- 
sions is midnight, July 15, 
1993. To obtain entry forms, 
contact Berkeley Systems at 
(510) 540-5535, (510) 540- 
5115 (fax). 

You Can't Cheat on This One 

Legend Entertainment, known 
for its sci-fi and adventure 
games, has a contract to de- 
velop an interactive ethics- 
training program for Justice 
Department employees. 

In the game. Justice Depart- 
ment employees will learn to 
do well by doing good. They 
will choose career goals and 
then make choices that will 
bring them "career, happi- 
ness, and ethics points — or 
land them in trouble," accord- 
ing to Legend's president. 
Bob Bates. 

The worst that can happen 
to employees who mess up? 
Jail time or (most reformative 
of all) having their unethical be- 
havior exposed on TV. □ 



120 



COMPUTE JULY 1993 





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I Offergood through December 3 1,1993 ©t993The5ierraNetwork Offer#310 I 



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