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Full text of "73 Magazine (December 1981)"

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Are You Joe Ham's 



Bob Cooper: 
Guru of Satellite T 






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73 Magazine • December, 1981 3 



INFO 



Manuscripts 

Contributions in the form of manu- 
scripts with drawings anchor photo- 
graphs are welcome ar>d will be con- 
sidered for possible publication. We 
can assume no responstbifity for loss 
or damage to any material. Please 
enclose a stamped, self-addressed 
envelope with each submission. Pay- 
ment for the use of any unsolicited 
material will be made upon accep- 
tance. AM contributions should be di- 
rected to the 73 editorial offices. 
"How to Write for 73 M guidelines are 
available upon request 

Editorial Offices: 

Pine Street 

Peterborough NK 03458 

Phone: 603-924-3873. 924-3874 

Advertising Offices: 

Elm Street 

Peterborough NH 03458 
Phone:603-924 7136 

Circulation Offices: 

Elm Street 

Peterborough NH 0G45B 

Phone; 603-924-7296 

Subscription Rates 

In the United States and Possesions; 
One Year {12 Issues) $25,00 
Two Years (24 Issues) $38,00 
Three Years (36 issues) $53.00 

Elsewhere: 

Canada— $27.00/1 year only, LLS. 
funds. Foreign surface mall— S35 .00/ 1 
year only, U.S. funds. Foreign air 
mall— $6200/ 1 year only. US, funds. 

To subscribe, 

renew or change 

an address: 

Write to 73 Magazine, Subscription 
Department. PO Box 931, Farming- 
dale NY 11737 Fof renewals and 
changes of address, include the ad- 
dress label from your most recent 
issue of 73, For gift subscriptions, in- 
clude your name and address as well 
as those of gift recrpients. Postmaster: 
Send form #3579 to 73 Magazine, Sub- 
scription Services, P.O. Box 93 1 Farm- 
Inodale, NY 11737, 

Subscription 

problem or 

question: 

Write to 73 Magazine, Subscription 
Department, PO Box 931, Farmingdaie 
NY 11737 Please Include an address 
label. 

73 Magazine (ISSN 0096-90 10) is pub- 
Sished monthly by 73, Inc. 80 PJne 
Street Peierborough NH 03458, Sec- 
ond class postage paid at Peterbor- 
ough NH 0345B and at additional mail- 
ing offices. Copyright (c) 1981 by 73 L 
Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this 
publication may be reprinted or other- 
wise reproduced without written per- 
mission from the publisher, Microfilm 
Edition — University Microfilm, Ann 
Arbor Ml 461 06, 




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PB-5 


5 


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250 ohms 


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6 


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PB-7.5 


7.5 


1 


375 ohms 


PB-9 


9 


1 


450 ohms 


PB-1 2 


12 


1 


600 ohms 


PB-1 6 


16 


1 


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To order, add $3 shipping/handling. California residents add sales tax. 




4 73 Magazine * December, 1981 



r 



v 



Cold Comfort 

— an HT to the rescue at fifteen below 



KA1D 12 



Beginner's Guide to Antennas 

—not iust tor Novices 



Mil "4 



Review: 

The Rex Bassett TLM-2 Mobile Mount 

— banish your fear of flying KAHR 18 

Update Your CW Music Keyboard 

— play it again, Sam .K5KL 20 



Review: 

The Daiwa Infrared Wireless Microphone 

— is the mike cable obsolete' K4TW[ 



What's It AM About ASCII? 

— RTTY technology update 



W4RI.WB4Af'R 



Review; 

The Kenwood TR-7730 Transceiver 

— let's get small' 



KA1LR 



26 



N38AH 




dec. 81 



MAGAZINE 



82 



90 



96 



WSJ I 100 



Review: 

The Radio Shack Pro-2002 Scanner 

— a look at the Shack s latest 

An Easy L-Meter 

— you'll ni i ed a frequency counter 
Review: 

A Quad for Two Meters 

— the Palomar portable power picker-upper. 

"Chopsticfc" Helical for 432 

— satisfies your Phase III appetite 9M2CR 116 



W8U 104 




Joe Ham: The Consumer 

— do you fit the mold' 

Bob Cooper: Profile of a Pioneer 



Satellite Channel Guide 

^-part If 



N6AVU 32 



The Code Pet 

^ — a Morse tutorial for Commodore's computer 

AA0C 126 



N6RK 



38 



WE5T5AT 44 



Satellite Television Glossary 

- part f. Satellite Television Handbook 




46 



No More Two-Tone Sidetone 

— modit\ vouf AEA kever „ 

Monodes 

— harbm^er of a new age 

Breaking the Decibel Logjam 

— how to cope with nothingness 



KA1LR 128 



orner 



TVRO Receivers: The Inside Story 

I— Satellite Central, part If... Gibson 




54 



130 



s<im 136 



Less Drain Is Your Gain! 

— power-saving mods for the Wilson II and IV , KA3W 138 

A Positive Supply with a Negative Chip 

— oneway to solve the parts problem K9MLD 1 42 



Review: 

The Ace Portable Synthesized VHF Receiver 

— for those times when listening is enough W6FX 68 

Never Say Die-6, Ham Help- 108, 137, 178, 195, 199, 1981 Index- 144, Reader Service-162, Fun! -164, 
Awards- 166, Corrections- 168, 193, Social Events- 170, DX— 174, Contests— 176, Letters- 185, New 
Products- 188, FCC -190, RTTY Loop- 191, OSCAR Orbits- 194, Kahaner Report- 196, Looking West- 197, 
Dealer Directory — 226, Propagation— 226 

Cover: Photo by Paul Grupp KA1LR. 



73 Magazine ■ December, 1981 5 



^B 



W2NSD/1 

NEVER SAY Dl E 

editorial by Wayne Green 




THE FCC ADVISORY 
COMMITTEE 

In order to keep in closer 
touch with those being regu- 
lated, the FCC has established 
advisory committees, made up 
of people in the regulated in- 
dustries, to work with them on 
needed regulations. In the am- 
ateur radio field, this group 
Is the National Industry Advi- 
sory Committee* Amateur Radio 
Service Subcommittee (Ml AC), 
The group has 17 members, of 
whom about two-thirds normal- 
ly attend the yearly or twice- 
yearly meetings. 

The most recent meeting was 
held at the FCC headquarters in 
Washington with eleven mem- 
bers present. More of the mem- 
bers are interested and influen- 
tial amateurs than industry rep- 
resentatives, with the only true 
industry representatives being 
me from 73, John Lindhofm from 
QST, Chris Imlay from QST t and 
Alan Dorhoffer from CQ. 

The recent meeting discussed 
aspects of getting local govern- 



W2NSD/1 ONTHE-Alfl 

SCHEDULE 

DECEMBER, 1981 

1 80*40 Phone 

8 20 RTTY 

15 20 Phone 

22 40-20 CW 

29 20-15 Phone 

On both phone and CW 
nights, look for us in the 
first 25 kHz of the General 
portion of each band. On 
the RTTY night, look for 
us between 14,090 MHz 
and 14.100 MHz. We'll be 
on the higher band first. 
Sessions run from 7:00 to 
10:00 pm eastern time. 



ment cooperation for emergen- 
cy communications, possible 
help from MARS stations, and 
so on. We had been asked for a 
report on high-speed transmis- 
sions for emergency communi- 
cations and on the possibilities 
of developing more amateurs 
for emergency operations. I 
made the following report, 
which you may find of interest. 



Amateur Radio Emergency 

Commu n i ca t i ons; 

The Future? 

AE the 1351 NIAC meeting I dis- 
cussed the matter of the lagging 
American technology in electronics. 
Since thai time this has been a mat- 
ter of continued interest in the gener 
al media, with articles in The Wati 
Street Journal and several other well* 
read publications. 

It was my concept that much of the 
explanation for this increasing tech- 
nology gap lies in the moribund na- 
ture of amateur radio in our coun- 
try. . .particularly as compared with 
the vital and growing interest in ama- 
teur radio in Japan. I felt that this 
stemmed from the proposed "incen- 
tive licensing" rules of 1963. at which 
time amateur radio in the US 
stopped its growth for an eleven year 
period. Indeed, had our ranks contin- 
ued to grow at the rate a! which they 
had been expanding from World War 
II until that time, we would have 



reached our present amateur popula* 
tjon in about If 



The result of this has been a seri- 
ous lack of the most precious life- 
blood of amateur radio, the 14- and 
15-year-old newcomers. Even the 
spurt of interest in the mid-1970s 
which resulted from the national 
enthusiasm for Citizens Band ra- 
dio brought In more middle-aged re- 
cruits than youngsters. Unfortunate- 
ly, these are not the type of amateurs 
who decide to dedicate their lives 
to careers in electronics or commun i 
cations. Thus we have a rapidly aging 
group of amateurs, with the large part 
of them well beyond the age when we 
would expect them to contribute to 
the advance of American technology. 
This largely comes from people in 
their 20s and 30s. not in their 40s 
and 50s. 

One possible solution to the prob- 
lem would be to encourage the intro- 
duction of amateur radio into as 
many high schools as possible. This 
Is the age recruit which we need, . . 
which our country needs. Without 
this group Joining our hobby I feel 
that America can only face further 
humiliation at the hands of the Japa- 
nese engineers and technicans. Fur- 
Iher, should any international con- 
flict develop, we will have to be very 
sure that the next time we have Ja- 
pan on our side. Indeed, if Japan had 
introduced the no-code ham license 
in the 1930s it is possible that the war 
couid have turned out differently. We 
should remember that Hitler publicly 
regretted his stopping of amateur 
radio In Germany and ascribed much 



of the failure of Germany in the war to 
the resultant loss of technicians 

Since we all agree that another in- 
ternational war is unthinkable and 
impossible, there is no real reason to 
even worry about our technical peo- 
ple who might be needed in that in- 
stance. Still, that does leave us with a 
gradual falling behind in business as 
the Japanese, with their army of engi- 
neers and technicians, surpass us in 
calculators, watches, television sets, 
video recorders, video players and 
disks, tape recorders, hi-fi systems, 
amateur radio equipment, all com- 
munications equipment, telephones, 
test equipment. . and so on. 

it seems to me that the further we 
allow ourselves to fall behind in 
technology, the more we will fall 
behind economically. I have visited 
I us I about every part of the world in 
recent months and on every front I 
find the Japanese firms getting 
ahead of us, Despite the serious 
problems our Administration is hav- 
ing In trying to cut down on ex- 
penses, it may be lime for a White 
House symposium on this critical sit- 
uation, with some dramatic mea- 
sures to tackle the problem. 

There have been two major techno- 
logical revolutions In the amateur 
radio field In the last twenty years. 
The first was the introduction of 
single sideband transmissions in the 
late 50s. which resulted in a change 
to that mode for virtually all phone 
shortwave communications on the 
amateur bands. . . and its use by the 
military. The second major lechnol* 
ogy change was the development of 
the FM transceiver and repeater 
which came along in the late 60s and 
developed through the 70s. Smce 
then, despite great leaps ahead in 
digital and integrated circuit technol- 
ogy by industry, little change can be 
seen in our ham bands. 

The groups of amateurs working 
for 73 Magazine are hard at work on a 
new technology, This will be intra* 
duced on twenty meters, probably on 
H,100 kHz, as an on-the-air bulletin 
board. It is our plan to have a radio 
transceiver system which will auto- 
mat I caMy answer queries from other 
stations on that frequency, sending 
at first a menu of the available mate- 
rial on the bulletin board. 

As an example of how this would 
work, a station would send a call for 
W2NSD/1 and sign its call. W2NSD/1 
would then respond with a list of op- 
tions of information. Let's say the in- 
quiring station opts for #1, a current 
DX advisory. W2NSDH would then 





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4th Prize 


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Realistic DX-300 



6 73 Magazine * December, 1981 



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IF shift, digital display, narrow-wide filter switch 





The TS-530S SSB/CW transceiver is 
designed with Kenwood's latest, most 
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wide dynamic range, high sensitivity, 
very sharp selectivity with selectable 
filters and IF shift, built-in digital display, 
speech processor, and other features for 
optimum, yet economical, operation on 
160 through 10 meters. 

T3-53QS FEATURES: 

■ 160-10 meter coverage, including three 
new bands 

Transmits and receives [LSB, USB, and 
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• Built-in digital display 

Large, six-digit, flu orescent- tube display 
shows actual receive and transmit fre- 
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• IF shift 

Moves IF passband around received 
signal and away from Interfering signals 
and sideband splatter. 



- Narrow/wide filter combinations 
Any one or two of three optional filters 
. . .YK -88SN [L8 kHz) SSB. YK-88C 
(500 Hz] CW. YK-88CN (270 Hz) CW , , , 
may be installed for selecting (with "N-W" 
switch] wide and narrow bandwidths on 
CW and/or SSB. 

Wide receiver dynamic range 

Greater immunity to strong-sign a J over- 
load, with MOSFET RF amplifier operating 
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with low noise figure, and dual resonator 
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Built-in speech processor 
Combines an audio compression amplifier 
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Two 6146B's In final 

Runs 220 W PEP/180 W DC input on 

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Matching accessories for fized-station operation: 

• SP-230 external speaker • AT-230 antenna tuner/ 
with selectable audio filters SWR and power meter 

* VFO-240 remote VFO • MC-50 desk microphone 
Other accessories not shown: 



Adjustable noiae-blanker level 
Pulse-type (such as ignition) noise is 
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RF attenuator 

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Front-panel RIT (receiver incremental 
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off frequency. 

More information on the TS-530S is 
available from all authorized dealers of 
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1111 West Walnut Street Compton, 
California 90220, 



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• VFO-230 remote digital 
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• TL-922A linear amplifier 

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• KB-1 deluxe VFO knob 

• PC-l phone patch 



• HO10 digital world clock 

• YK-88C (500 Hz) and 
YK-88CN (270 Hzl CW 
filters and YK-88SN (1.8 
kHz) SSB narrow filter 

• MC-30S and MC-35S 
noise-canceling hand 








• HS-5 and HS-4 headphones microphones 



Specifications and prices are subject to change without notice or obligation. 



STAFF 



PUBU&HEft/EDITOR 
Wayr>r* Qraen W2NSDM 

EXECUTIVE V*CE PRESIDENT 
Sharry Smyihe 

ASSISTANT PUH LI SHEA/EDITOR 
Jefl 0*Tmv W83STH 

ASSOCIATE PUBUSHEJVDI RECTOR 

OF PUBLICATIONS 

£d**'G> Punnan WA1UFT 

MANAGING EDITOR 
Jotin Burnett 

ASST. MANAGING &0FTOR 
SuftAn PfaiLbrick 

EDITORIAL ASSISTANTS 

Nancy Noyd 

Richard Pneni* 

REVIEW EDFTOR 

Paul GruppKAtLR 

CONTRIBUTING EDITORS 

Ctins Brown KA1D 

Tkrn Daniel NflPK 

Alya^n Grupp N1BEJ 

Larry Kfltianer WB2NEL 

ADM ! N1STRATIVE ASSISTANT 
Pat Gmftam 



Rotwrt Rakar WB2GFE 
BMP Gwney KE7C 

SanQflf Green 

Dave Ingram MTV. j 

Joe Kaa»f G3ZC2 

D* Marc Leavey WA3AJR 

Davt Mann K2AGZ 

BUI Pasiernah WA6HT 

Prjler Slark K20AW 



PRODUCTION MANAGER/ 

PUBLICATIONS 

Nancy Salmon 

ASST PRODUCTION 

MANAGEB/PUBtlCATlONS 

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ADVERTISING GRAPHICS 
MANAGERS 
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PRODUCTION 
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Pair ton Mackowshy 

Th«f««a Oatebc 

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JuOi Wimbefly 
Donna Woh-11 artti 

PHOTOGRAPHY 
WTlu#rrt Heyooipn 

^e-rtt Anderson 
Paul Bacicn 

Kulrvy fiifkebak 

Bryan Hastings 
Thomas- VMleneuve 

TYPESETTING 

Sara Bedell 
David Hayward 

• ily Smith 

Karen Slewan 

Mlchela Deeftoclrers 

Steve Jewetl 

Ann Lord 

CORPORATE CONTROUffl 

Hoy A Johrtson 

ESECUTW1 ASSISTANT 
teatrice O Nei< 

ACCOUNTING MANAGER 
Knud KftHsr KV4GC 

CIRCULATION MANAGER 
Debra Boudn&au 

CIRCULATION 
Doris Day 

Pauline John stone 

BULK SALES MANAGER 
G'nr.iu Boudrieau 

AOVERTISJNG 

603-924-7138 

JrmGrayWtXU Mgr 

Nancy C-amoa, Asst Mgf 

Rosa Kenyon KA1GAV 



come on and send all of the latest in- 
form alion on active rare DX stations, 
including their known frequencies, 
schedules, QSt information, name of 
the operator, and so on. Al the end of 
the transmission Ihe inquiring sta- 
tion would have an option of sending 
unlisted information for possible in- 
clusion on the bulletin board. This 
would be received at W2NSDH and 
stored for editing by the operator, it 
then could be added to the #1 list of 
information. 

Number I wo might be a list of con- 
tests during the next few weeks, with 
scoring information, where 10 send 
logs, where to get full details, and so 
on. Again, further information could 
be sent to W2NSD/1 at the end of the 
bulletin transmission. 

Plans are to have lists of bam- 
tests and conventions, the latest 
FCC releases, proposed rule 
changes, lists of nets and their fre- 
quencies, changes in repeater calls 
or channels, VHF information, RTTY 
Information, SSTV information r . . 
and so on . 

En addition to encouraging the use 
of advanced digital techniques over 
the air, these transmissions would be 
experimental in nature, helping ama- 
teurs develop systems capable of 
communications via ASCfl at 300- . 
1200-. and 9600-baud speeds. The re- 
sponse of W2NSD/1 would be set to 
match the calling speed of bulletin 



board users. 9600 baud can be sent 
within the confines of an amateur 
voice channel and, when you con* 
sider that this is approximately 8500 
words per minute, it is an efficient 
means of exchanging information. 

Let's carry this on to the next step. 
How does this have anything to do 
with emergency communications, 
the basic function of NlAC? Most of 
the emergency nets of today are on 
voice and are incredibly inefficient as 
far as handling volumes of traffic Is 
concerned. Let's look into the future 
and see where our high-speed auto- 
malic digital communications exper- 
iment is taking us. 

In a few years we may be using 
small keyboards on which we will be 
able to type messages. Indeed, these 
are already on the market, with the 
Radio Shack TRS-B0 pocket comput- 
er selling for $230. Let's Imagine that 
instead of just calling a net control 
station to send a message, the net 
calls each station in the net in turn 
and asks if there Is any traffic. With 
digital calling, this polling of a net 
could be done in milliseconds, not 
minutes with endless repeating of 
callsigns. At 3500 words per minute, 
the net control could call each partic- 
ipating station and ask for traffic in 
less than a second. If a message has 
been typed on the pocket computer, 
the station would automatically 
dump it over the air when polled. The 



control station computer would read 
ihe address and pass the message 
along to the addressee instantly. 
Wilh a network like this it would be 
possible to handle thousands of 
times as much traffic as at present 
with no tosses or errors. Further, 
links with low-band long-range sta- 
tions could be set up as part of the 
emergency network . ... even to link- 
ing through satellites via microwave 
transmissions. 

This is not a gee-whiz dream of Ihe 
future Everything needed has al- 
ready been invented, so ail amateurs 
have to do is apply the technology we 
already have developed in the com- 
puter field to radio communications. 
This should be good for amateur ra- 
dio in that it will generate a new inter- 
est in communicating via this new 
technology. It will be good for Indus- 
try In that ali amateurs will be want- 
ing new equipment. And It will enable 
amateurs to provide an emergency 
communications system far beyond 
anything imagined a year or so ago. 

We are taking the first step with 
W2NSD/1 in the establishment of Ihe 
radio bulletin board. We will be ask- 
ing the FCC for permission to experi- 
ment with 1200- and 9600-baud trans- 
missions. We will be publishing a 
vast amount of information on this 



Continued on page W0 



Well ... I Can Dream, Can't I? 



by Bandel Linn K4PP 






J 







"We've discovered a new high-speed way to learn the code! This shot will 
make you a 25-word-per-minute man immediately !" 



8 73 Magazine * December, 1981 



Reader Service tot facing page *»■ Tfr- 



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Chm Brown KA1D 
7i Miigrfzine Staff 



Cold Comfort 

an HT to the rescue at fifteen below 



One thing was certain 
_ this night would be 
very cold As I hunched 
over my sputtering stove in 
the fading twilight, melting 
more snow for drinking 
water, I wondered how long 
my HT would continue to 
perform. 

Before I had left on this 
winter backpacking trip to 
New Hampshire's White 
Mountains, friends had told 
me tales of liquid crystal 
displays freezing solid, then 
bursting, at zero degrees 
Fahrenheit, of fully charged 
nicads incapable of pow- 
ering even the receiver por- 
tion of an H I at minus ten 
Now, at 4:00 pm on this dull 
and snowy afternoon, the 
temperature was already 
minus eight degrees I knew 
it would go much lower dur- 
ing the night the question 
in my mind was, would the 
HTquit? 

I was hiking alone in 
these frigid mountains, my 
only link to the outside 
world a compact package 
of imported electronics 

12 73 Magazine • December, 



powered by a pitifully small 
battery pack. I intended to 
use my Kenwood 2400 HI 
to access a two-meter 
repeater located on a 
mountaintop eight mites 
jway. In case of trouble, 
the HT would be my only 
way of yelling "Mayday." 

Suddenly I was aware of 
the sounds hanging in the 
ho/en evening air: the roar 
of my small stove and the 
sweep of the wind-driven 
snow. Something was miss 
ing. The HT had been quiet 
for a long time. The reassur- 
ing CW ID of the Mount 
Washington repeater had 
not broken the squelch fur 
at least half an hour. Preo< 
cupied with stamping out a 
firm platform in the deep 
powder snow, setting up my 
mountain tent, getting the 
stove going, and making 
leady for the long night 
ahead, I had not noticed the 
HT's silence Now that si 
lence was overwhelming 

With clumsy, mittened 
hands I groped through my 
pack tor the HT I wiped the 



(frost from the LCD readout 
and was relieved to see it 
indicating 6.055 — the 
wrong frequency. I had 
inadvertently depressed the 
RLV button while setting 
the frequency to 6,655 
earlier and was listening on 
the repeater's input fre- 
quency instead of its out- 
put frequency, When I 
restored the switch to the 
normal position, I caught 
the tail end of the cheerful 
CW ID of KIOIQ/R, The 
repeater was still working 
and so was my HT I went 
back to melting snow and 
supper preparations as the 
winter darkness slowly 
tilled my campsite. 

This trip had come about 
as a combination of my in- 
terests in winter mountain- 
eering and amateur radio, 
And r by bringing tin HT 
along. I was able to justify 
doing something I normally 
could not justify — making 
the trip alone With the HT, 
I would always be able to 
reach the outside world 



and, in the event of trouble, 
would be able to let some- 
one know where I was I 
also thought it would be 
fun to yack with my fellow 
hams as I trekked through 
the Presidential Range in 
deep winter 

The Presidential Range 
lies in the White Mountains 
of northern New Hamp- 
shire. This wilderness area 
provides the most challeng- 
ing winter hiking and climb- 
ing in New England The re- 
gion is known for its foul 
weather and, before the 
anemometer blew away, 
the highest wind gust ever 
recorded on the surface of 
the planet was clocked at 
an incredible 231 mph on 
Mt Washington's summit 
At 6,288 feet, Washington is 
no giant among mountains 
Its reputation as a cruel 
place in winter, however, is 
first-hand knowledge to all 
eastern hikers and climbers 
who have spent time scut- 
tling across its windswept 
slopes or scaling the walls 
of its icy ravines. 



1981 



My plan was to hike into 
the national forest south of 
Mt Washington place a 
high camp at tree line on 
the Presidential Ridge f 
spend the night, and then 
hike down the ridge the fol- 
lowing day, I hoped to pass 
over the summit of Mt, 
Washington before heading 
for civilization at Pinkham 
Notch Camp I intended to 
cover a total of thirteen 
miles in two days, gaming 
most of my altitude the first 
day on the four-mile ap- 
proach up the ridge. 

Weather, of course, 
would play a major role in 
the success of any plan. The 
winter of 1980/81 was unus- 
ually cold in New England 
and the weekend I chose 
for my trip was no excep- 
tion I was well aware of the 
consequences that had be- 
fallen those foolhardy 
enough to be caught high 
on that exposed ridge in 
severe winter conditions. 
Wind-chill factors in excess 
of — 1 00 degrees were com- 
mon and, if the weather and 
winds did not cooperate, 
my plans would have to 
change. 

I had no success per- 
suading any of my friends 
to go with me, Perhaps the 
ominous weather forecasts 
which predicted snow on 
Friday night and Saturday 
with gradual clearing and 
plunging temperatures on 
Sunday dissuaded them. In 
any case, as I hiked along 
Saturday morning under my 
fully-loaded, forty-pound 
Kelty pack, I was glad to be 
alone, Working my way up 
through the forest, the only 
sounds intruding on my 
solitude were the rhythmic 
swish of my snowshoes 
through the powder and the 
occasional ID of the Mt 
Washington repeater. 

The Mount Washington 
repeater has the widest 
coverage of any machine in 
New England, Situated six 
thousand feet above sea 
level, it provides reliable 
communications over a 
300-mile, five-state area 
Though it shares its moun- 




A Sunday morning self-portrait at fifteen below zero. 



taintop with TV, FM broad- 
cast, and commercial mi- 
crowave installations, it has 
few intermodulation or 
desense problems. 

The machine is privately 
owned and is open to the 
public, The only contribu- 
tion requested from the 
large number of daily users 
is good operating practice. 
The machine is supported 
by equipment donations 
from hams in the north 
country, and maintenance 
and repairs are carried out 
by its licensee, A I Ox ton 
K101Q and by Bill "Mac" 
Beal W1PNR. The central 
role Ox ton and Beal play in 
the machine upkeep and 
maintenance is the key to 
its reliability in the harsh 
mountain environment. 

Luckily for the users, 
both Al and Mac spend con- 
siderable amounts of time 
on the summit of ML Wash- 
ington in the course of their 
duties as staff members of 
the Mount Washington Ob- 
servatory. The Observatory, 
a non-profit research facili- 
ty which operates year- 
round, is rich in folklore and 
ethereal nocturnal visitors. 
Rumor has it that at least 
one ghost is in residence on 
the summit, on wild nights 



when the wind is whining, 
he gives certain Obser- 
vatory staffers the pleasure 
of his company, Oxton and 
Beal are more concerned 
with repeaters than rumors, 
however. 

Their repeater is a VHF 
Engineering kit. A scratch- 
built control system pro- 
vides tone decoders and in- 
terface for the autopatch, 
audio processing, link to 
another machine seventy 
miles away in Concord NH, 
and auxiliary inputs 
Duplexers are by Sinclair 
and were provided by the 
Northeast FM Repeater As- 
sociation The special Gam 
half-wave vertical antenna, 
enclosed in a fiberglass 
radome, is fed with heliax 
cable cast off by the neigh- 
boring TV station. Transmit- 
ter output is 18 Watts, 20 
Watts ERP The repeater is 
voice-accessed and the 
trustees encourage users to 
say nice things when bring- 
ing the machine up. The 
dentist's office "Ahhhhhh" 
is frowned upon. Normal 
repeater power is drawn 
from ac mains, but the ma- 
chine is capable of running 
on solar power and has 
even been run on wind 
power. 

73 



That night there was no 
shortage of wind for power 
generation on Mt. Wash- 
ington. Though it bullied 
my tent, I was comfortable 
within the narrow confines 
of my mummy sleeping 
bag. Drawn tightly down 
across my face and around 
my shoulders, the bag pro- 
vided a life-sustaining en- 
vironment. The tempera- 
ture within the bag was a 
humid seventy degrees 
Four inches away, outside 
the bag's nylon and fiberfill 
walls, the temperature was 
flirting with the bag's 
minimum comfort rating. 
fifteen degrees below zero 
I had placed two full-length 
closed-cell foam pads be- 
neath me which provided 
1-1/4 inches of insulation 
from the chilling, hard- 
packed surface of the snow 
While I stayed on the pads, 
I stayed warm 

In addition to my b'2" 
frame, I had managed to 
stuff a quart of water, the 
inner liners of my hiking 
boots, assorted articles of 
clothing, a bag of GORP 
(good old raisins and pea- 
nuts), my HT, a spare nicad 
pack, and a headlamp into 
the bag with me. These 
carefully chosen items 

Magazine * December. 1981 13 



were the only things that 
would not be frozen solid in 
the morning and, as long as 
1 didn't roll over too often, I 
was totally content, 

I had been dozing in the 
bag for about two hours 
when the Granite State FM 
Net was called to order. 
This public service net 
handles national and 
regional traffic in two 
separate sessions and nor- 
mally convenes at 7:00 pm 
on the repeater in Concord 
NH Once the net is under- 
way, the Concord and Mt. 
Washington repeaters are 
linked, providing coverage 
of the entire state. For some 
reason, however, the link 
was not functioning and, 
while I could hear the net 
proceedings from Concord 
on my HT, I was not able to 
check in. I wanted to pass a 
piece of routine traffic to a 
friend and fellow ham in 
Bo/eman MT who had been 
a frequent companion on 
many previous winter trips 
Without the link, however, 
it was doubtful that I would 
be able to get my traffic 
through. 

Shortly after the net 
began, net control, N1 ALM, 
briefly left the Concord ma- 
chine and appeared on the 
Mt, Washington repeater 
asking if anyone had out- 
going traffic for the net As I 
gratefully passed the text of 
my message to htm, we 
both had to laugh about the 
propensity we hams have 
for establishing and main- 



taining communications 
between weird locations. 
Like coral reefs, maximum 
security prisons, desert 
ghost towns, or mountain- 
side campsites. Dana's 
check number matched 
mine on the first count and 
while I languished in my 
sleeping bag, my message 
began its relay to Montana. 

Outside, the weather was 
deteriorating. The constant 
swish of built-up snow 
sliding off my tent and the 
increasing staccato of the 
wind did not bode well for 
the next day's planned 
route. The exposed ridge, 
lashed by the northwest 
wind, would be drifted with 
new snow making travel la- 
borious and time-consum- 
ing. I lay mulling over my 
plans and reminded myself 
that tht 1 trip was supposed 
to be fun. 

I was almost asleep when 
the squelch was broken by 
my own callsign The gang 
at W2NSD/1 r 100 miles 
south in Peterborough, was 
trying to raise me. We had 
agreed to keep an 8:00 pm 
sked Saturday evening and 
at 7:45 pm they were anx- 
iously calling. Most of my 
fellow staffers were sure I 
was mad for making the trip 
in the first place and it was 
a skeptical and curious 
group that gathered at the 
73 ham shack to hear of my 
progress. 

After assuring them that I 
was not in a bar somewhere 
within range of the repeat- 










The winter landscape — more fit for a hobbit than a man. 
14 73 Magazine • December, 1981 



er, I filled them in on what I 
had been doing since leav- 
ing Peterborough As we 
spoke to one another across 
the intervening miles, I 
imagined their world as it 
was at that moment: a 
warm, well-lit, fully- 
equipped ham shack 
crowded with friends enjoy- 
ing themselves. It was very 
different from the cold, 
dark world I was in. For a 
moment, I envied their 
comfort and camaraderie. 

AC1Z was on frequency 
when I concluded my sked. 
Willy, an employee of the 
TV station on the summit of 
Mt. Washington, volun- 
teered to go next door to 
the Observatory and get the 
latest weather forecast for 
me. It was not good. The 
forecast called for bitter 
cold, widely-scattered snow 
squalls for the next twenty 
four-hours, and winds gust- 
ing to 100 mph. At that mo- 
ment, it was minus twenty 
degrees on the summit and 
winds were gusting to b0 
mph. I thanked him, ad- 
mired his mettle, and then 
shut down the rig and fell 
asleep. 

Sleep was fragmented 
and Sundays dawn came 
slowly The orange walls of 
my tent gradually picked 
up color as the sun rose 
behind an icy scrim of fog 
and blowing snow I lay 
awake for a long time in my 
sleeping bag trying to psych 
myself up for the inevi- 
table. The hardest part of 
any winter camping day is 
leaving a warm sleeping 
bag and getting into cold 
clothes, frozen boots, and 
an icy world Despite being 
in my fourteenth hour in my 
bag, it was easier to lay 
there pondering the best 
(and quickest] scenario to 
follow in getting dressed 
than to actually get out of 
the bag and dress, 

I snapped on the HT and 
passed time listening to the 
idle chatter of other early 
risers on this frigid New 
Hampshire Sunday morn- 
ing. Occasionally, a clipped 
New England accent would 



comment on everyone's 
favorite topic, the weather. 

"Ayup Marshall, a might 
cold here this mahnin. 
About twenty-five below. 
Acourse that's on the windy 
side of the bahn." 

As my fellow hams had 
their second and third cups 
of coffee, I struggled to get 
my stove going. Repeated 
priming finally heated the 
generator up enough to sus- 
tain combustion and soon I 
too was contemplating the 
morning's cold over a hot 
cup of Java, 

It has snowed heavily 
during the night and the 
stubby, frozen shapes here 
at tree-line were a more ap- 
propriate landscape for a 
hobbit than a ham. The 
wind-driven snow had 
sculpted grotesque and 
beautiful figures during the 
night as it packed into the 
scrub growth and pucker 
brush and fresh drifts 
covered even the deepest 
of yesterday's tracks. 

Once I was out of my 
bag, the morning cold kept 
me moving Standing in one 
place for any period of time 
invited the relentless ad- 
vance of the cold up 
through my boots and into 
my body. To keep warm, I 
busied myself with break 
ing camp — a reluctant 
sleeping bag was forced in 
to its small stuff sack, dirty 
pots left to freeze were 
chipped clean of breakfast 
remnants, and my tent was 
folded and forced into my 
pack. 

The weather was as fore- 
cast Clouds and blowing 
snow swirled around me as 
I wrestled my pack onto my 
back. As soon as I had it on, 
the HT I had carefully 
zipped into a side pocket 
came alive N1AHN, a 
friend I had spoken with the 
previous day, was calling to 
check on my progress. John 
was ten miles away in the 
village of North Conway 
After a short chat with him, 
I moved off into the storm 
feeling good that a local 
was around and interested. 

Conditions deteriorated 



with each foot of altitude I 
gained. By the time I was 
above the last of the scrub, 
it became obvious to me 
that I would not be able to 
continue the traverse, The 
poor visibility meant that I 
would be walking compass 
azimuths on that wild ridge 
and, should I have to back* 
track, would be walking 
directly into the full force 
of the wind. Frostbite was a 
definite possibility and as I 
stood with my back to the 
gale, peering down the 
ridge, I had to remove my 
met a I frame eyeglasses 
because they were drawing 
heat out of my skin so rap- 
idly that my cheeks and 
temples were losing sensa- 
tion. My windpants and 
anorak hood drummed 
wildly in the wind, and 
through the tunnel vision of 
my wool balaclava, I saw a 
landscape no sane person 
would inhabit 

I couldn't resist moving a 
short distance down the 
ridge and breaking out the 
HT for a quick test, how- 
ever I lifted six distant 
repeaters from my high 
point and, as each one 
came up, 1 announced that 
KA1 D/portable, Presiden- 
tial Ridge NH, was listening. 
Thankfully, no one took the 
opportunity to chat, and I 
rapidly retreated toward 
the relative security below 
tree line. 

While breaking my way 
down the trail, I managed 
to raise a friend and let him 
know of my change in 
plans. Ken W1NFE was lo- 
cated in Bretton Woods, a 
small hamlet at the foot of 
the mountains. We agreed 
that I would let him know 
when I was safely back at 
the trail head I skied, slid, 
and slipped the four miles 
off that ridge thinking of 
hot showers, hot food, and 
cold beer. In a few hours, I 
was down. 

The temperature at the 
trail head was minus four- 
teen, but it was warm when 
compared with the cold I'd 
felt up on the ridge, I 
flopped my Kelty on the 







* mi «- i 




« am 

Swirling clouds and wind-driven snow on the Presidential 
Ridge. 



snow and began fumbling 
through its labyrinthine 
pockets for my car keys. As 
I listened for what I thought 
would be the final time to 
the ID of the Mt. Washing- 
ton repeater, it occurred to 
me that my Kenwood 2400 
HT was one of the more 
reliable companions I have 
had the pleasure of hiking 
with It didn't freeze up and 
performed well under less 
than ideal conditions. 

Unfortunately, I was not 
out of the woods once my 
hike was over. I twisted the 
key in the ignition and after 
a few lethargic turnovers, 
the engine fired to life. I 
smugly congratulated my- 
self for the care I had taken 
in tune-up and battery 
maintenance while I habit* 
ually glanced at the oil 
pressure gauge. My smug- 
ness disappeared when I 
saw U resting on zero I anx- 
iously let the engine idle for 
ten seconds, twenty sec- 
onds, a long minute. The 
gauge never moved. Worse 
still, the tappets were grow- 
ing gradually noisier. Ap- 
parently, my adventure was 
just beginning. I shut the 
engine down and sat in the 
cab with a sick feeling 
growing in the pit of my 
stomach. As I went through 
the mental gymnastics of 
what could be wrong, the 
inside of the windows 
began to frost up, enclosing 
me in an icy, translucent 
cave 



I ruminated on the situa- 
tion for several minutes 
when that most noble of 
human traits, blind opti- 
mism, took hold. I simply 
said to myself, "This can't 
be happening. I'll just start 
this thing up and all will be 
well/' So, I did and it 
wasn't The oil pressure re- 
mained zero while the en- 
gine clattered away alarm- 
ingly, I admitted to myself 
that I had a problem. 

Sitting in the sub-zero in- 
terior of a disabled vehicle 
thirty miles from the near- 
est garage with night com- 
ing on gets old quickly. The 
images of hot showers and 
hot food I had conjured up 
hours earlier on the trail 
were still fresh in my mind 
and I resolved to somehow 
escape the developing de- 
bade, Then it dawned on 
me: For the first time in 
nearly twenty years of ham- 
ming, I had — if not an emer- 
gency—at least a large 
bummer on my hands which 
could be minimized by ham 
radio I reached for the 
mobile rig, but before I 
could turn it on it occurred 
to me that I should be using 
the HT instead. This was the 
kind of situation I had 
brought it along for in the 
first place and it seemed fit- 
ting to use it to extricate 
myself now. 

My first call was to 
W1NFE. Ken was the clos- 
est and he answered almost 
immediately After I gave 



him a brief description of 
my problem, he took the 
situation in hand. A tow 
truck was reluctantly dis- 
patched—no small accom- 
plishment on a country Sun- 
day afternoon. The cheap- 
est motel in town was 
alerted to expect an unex- 
pected guest and a few res- 
taurant recommendations 
soon followed, too 

To say that the village of 
Twin Mountain was desert- 
ed when the tow truck 
pulled me in is an under- 
statement of considerable 
proportion. Besides the 
garage man and me, only a 
few scroungy dogs roamed 
the windswept streets. Noth- 
ing could be done for the 
van that night r so I hoofed 
off toward the motel that 
Ken had suggested. One 
other guest was in residence, 
he too a victim of car trou- 
ble. After we commiserated 
briefly, I made a few phone 
calls to find all the area 
restaurants closed I then 
went upstairs to settle into 
the stillness of my room, lit- 
tering it with layers of damp 
clothes and thawing wool 
knee socks while I munched 
on the remnants of my trail 
lunch. Then I headed for 
the shower 

Sitting on the edge of the 
bed afterwards, flushed 
with the warmth of a very 
long shower, I resigned my- 
self to an early and un- 
eventful evening. I lavishly 
kicked the room's thermo- 
stat up another notch and 
stretched out on the bed 
waiting for something 
tolerable to appear on the 
only channel the rabbit- 
eared TV would receive. To 
my amazement, the phone 
rang. 

W1NFE had tracked me 
down and was calling to in- 
vite me to share dinner and 
spend the evening with him 
and his family At that mo- 
ment, the world suddenly 
looked brighter Ken soon 
arrived and we headed out 
to dinner in the twenty-be- 
low night listening to the 
familiar voices on the Mt. 
Washington repeater.! 






73 Magazine • December, 1981 15 



The FT-ONE is the culmination of an all-out design project by Yaesus top 
engineering team. Working without the usual cost constraints, Yaesu's 
design group is proud to unveil the instrument they "always wanted to 
design," a revolutionary blend of computer and RF technology. 



GENERAL COVERAGE, ALL SOLID STATE 

The FT-ONE is a full-coverage all-mode transceiver, equipped for 
reception on any frequency between 150 kHz and 29.99 MHz, with 
transmit coverage on all nine present and proposed amateur bands In 
countries where permitted, ttie FT-ONE may be programmed to trans- 
mit throughout the 1. 8-29. 99 MHz range. 

KEYBOARD FREQUENCY ENTRY 

Fully digitally synthesized, the FT-ONE uses a front panel keyboard for 
initial frequency entry, Frequency change is then accomplished via the 
main tuning dial or the pushbutton scanner, with tuning in either 1 Hz 
or 100 Hz steps possible. Truly the eontesters dream, the FT-ONE 
permits extremely fine tuning and instantaneous band change with 
equal facility. 

DUAL VFO SYSTEM 

Ten digital VFO's with memory are provided, in conjunction with an 
A-B selection scheme that allows instant recall ot any transmit, 
receive, or transceive frequency desired For split-frequency 
operation, such as on 7 MHz SSB, the operator may select TX on 
VFG-A and RX on VFO-B, automatically storing the calling and 
listening frequencies for each pile-up. For net operations, a non- 
volatile memory board is available as an option, to eliminate the 
possibility ot dumping memory, 

FULL CW BREAK-IN 

Recent advances in solid-state technology have finally made full CW 
break-in r^jable enough to be incorporated into a Yaesu product. Now 
you can select traditional semi-break-in (for use with amplifiers not 
equipped for full break-in) or full high-speed break-in. When using 
amplifiers so equipped, ttie keyer output lead may be interrupted vraa 
rear panel jack and routed to the break- m sequencing input on your 
amplifier. 

SWITCHING REGULATOR POWER SUPPLY 

Extremely compact and light in weight, the switching regulator power 
supply reduces substantially the space required to produce the 
operating voltages used in the FT-ONE, Highly efficient and uniquely 
Stable, the switching regulator supply provides superb reliability in a 
field of design long neglected by amateur manufacturers. 

ELITE CLASS PERFORMANCE FEATURES 

In addition to the full break-in and superb receiver filters, Yaesu's 
design team packed the FT-ONE with subtle virtues that others might 
have overlooked. Rear panel jacks allow the use of both an external 
receiver and an independent receive antenna, such as a 160 meter 
Beverage. While scanning, automatic halting on a received signal may 
be programmed, . perfect for watching a band for openings. If you're 
a DX-peditioner, an optional Curtis 8044 keyer board is available, so 
you won't need an external keyer thai only wastes suitcase space And 
if your amplifier fan is louder man it should be. there's even a micro- 
phone squelch (AMGC) to reduce background noise pickup between 
words and sentences 1 



ONE YEAR FACTORY WARRANTY 

Because of the level of attention to design detail, parts selection, and 
factory quality control, your FT-ONE is backed by a one-year factory 
warranty for the original purchaser at retail. Prompt and meticulous 
attention to your warranty needs will be provided by our Ohio And 
California Service Centers, in addition, ail units sold in the United 
Stales will be inspected and tested after clearing Customs, and will 
include a Service Manual in the puchase price. 

GAIN/INTERCEPT OPTIMIZED RECEIVER 
FRONT END 

Utilizing up-conversion with a first IF ot 73 MHz, the FT-ONE RF 
amplifier stage uses push-pull power transistors configured to pro- 
duce a typical output intercept of +40 dBm. The first mixer utilizes a 
diode ring module followed by a low noise post amp, for optimum 
noise figure consistent with modern day intercept requirements The 
result is a receiver with a typical two-tone dynamic range well in 
excess of 95 dB {14 MHz, CW bandwidth). Additional gam tailoring is 
provided via a PIN diode attenuator controlled from (he front panef. 

FILTERS READY FOR COMPETITION 

Three filler bandwidths are available for CW operation (two for FSK!}, 
using optional 600 Hz or 300 Hz crystal fitters. Filter insertion losses 
are equalized for constant If gain. Both IF Shift and Variable Band- 
width are provided, and two CW filters may be cascaded, for 
competition-grade selectivity. For SS8 work, the Variable Bandwidth 
feature eliminates the need for costly 1 .5 kHz or 1 .8 kHz filters, as any 
intermediate bandwidth may easily be programmed using the 
standard, cascaded SSB filters To top it all off. a high-performance 
audio peak and notch filter is standard equipment. 

EXPANDED OPERATING DISPLAYS 

Digital displays for the VFO Frequency, memory channel, and RIT 
offset are provided for quick frequency identification. The large front 
panel meter provides easy viewing of transceiver operating para- 
meters, including final transistor collector current, input DC voltage, 
FM discriminator center tuning, speech processor compression level, 
and forward/reflected relative power. 



NOT AVAILABLE AS OPTIONS 

Its hard to believe that other manufacturers still insist on making such 
essential items as a noise blanker or speech processor extra-cost 
options . We find that these are less expensive to incorporate and more 
reliable in operation when installed on our assembly line No AC power 
supply is available as an option for the FT-ONE . either, it's equipped 
for operatron from 100/1 10/1 17/200/220/234 volts AC. or 13.5 volts 
DC And it goes without saying that there will not be an external VFO 
offered for the FT-ONE — were confident tftat ten VFO's are quite 
enough ! 



Experience the FT-ONE in your Authorized Yaesu Dealer's showroom today. 
This may be the last Amateur transceiver you will ever own. + m 



Warranty policy available upon request. SASE t please. 



Specifications subject to change without notice or obligation. 



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YAESU ELECTRONICS CORPORATION, 6851 Walthall Way, Paramount, CA 90723 

Eastern Service Ctr., 9812 Princeton-Glendale Rd., Cincinnati, OH 45246 



(213) 633-400: 
(513) 874-3100 



Pau/5. Grupp KA1LR 
73 Magazine Staff 



The Rex Bassett 
TLM-2 Mobile Mount 

banish your fear of flying 




The Rex Bassett TLM-2 mobile mount, with a VAC-2Q 

antenna. 

19 73 Magazine • December. 1961 



HF mobile operation is 
near and dear to my 
heart, and I am always in 
search of better ways to 
cope with the necessarily 
large and bulky equipment 
One of the biggest prob- 
lems seems to be mounting 
the antenna. Whether you 
use the ubiquitous Hustler 
system, the Rex Bassett an- 
tennas, or motorized won- 
ders like Cubic's, you need 
something to mount it on 
that will support the consid- 
erable load the antenna 
presents while motoring 
down the highway. The 
mounts offered by the man- 
ufacturers are rarely confi- 
dence-inspiring. Mechani- 
cal integrity and protection 
of the coax connection are 
the primary areas that need 
attention. 

The TLM-2 mount from 
Rex Bassett solves the prob- 
lems in both areas, as long 
as your antenna fits a stan- 
dard 3/8-24 mount. Best of 
all, it doesn't require a band 
around the bumper (which 
won't fit many small cars). 
The mount resembles an in* 
verted teacup, with a thick 
gray finish applied All 
hardware exposed to the 



elements is stainless steel- 
On the bottom of the 
mount is a threaded SO-239 
connector. A single hole is 
drilled through the bumper 
or rear deck, and the mount 
is screwed down with hefty 
hardware and a thick rub- 
ber washer. Once installed, 
this mount isn't going any- 
where—it's rock solid! The 
SO-239 connector on the 
other side of the mounting 
surface is also an important 
advance. If you mount the 
antenna on the rear deck of 
your car, problems with 
water-logged coax are a 
thing of the past. Installed 
on the bumper, the coax 
will need some sort of pro- 
tection from the elements, I 
have used Coax-Seal (avail- 
able at most dealers) with 
great success. 

Rex Bassett's antenna 
products have acquired a 
reputation for intelligent 
design and rugged durabil- 
ity. The TLM-2 mount con- 
tinues that tradition. For 
more information, contact 
Rex Bassett Electronics, 
Inc., 1633 N.E. 14th Avenue, 
Fort Lauderdale FL 33305. 
Reader Service number 
47b ■ 

Reatf&r Service tor facing page *r&J— 



KDK MAKES 2 METER FM 
SIMPLE AND EASY! 

KDK INTRODUCES A NEW GENERATION OF 2 METER FM RADIOS. 

The sparkling 2025A MKII is loaded with new features! East of operation is the design concept at KDK. 



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• Features such as ten channel memory in two banks of five each, a 
solid 25 watts of power, full MARS and CAP coverage from 143,000 Mhz 
to 148.995 Mhz, plus built in memory retention for up to one year . , . 
end much, much more makes this the radio of the year, ff you have been 
watting to move up to a new model, or have wished for a radio with 
"everything". . . KDK has it! 

•The ten channel memory is easily addressable and you have two banks 
of five channels each. You can even use both banks at once for odd splits. 

•Standard 600 hi shift up or down. Band scan or memory scan. Memory 
scan is easy. There is also band scan with upper and tower limits you can 

choose yourself! 

• Built in nicads for the memory retention which has drain in nano-amps, 
not milli-amps* The internal hattery will hold the memory for up to one 
year! No other radio offers you this feature. 

• Fast and easy dialing. Full solid state dialing and you can choose from 
the front panel either a fast or slow dial rate. 

• No relays are used, only solid state switching. This eliminates a trouble 
spot many radios encounter, 

• KDK has also eliminated another trouble spot by completely hand 
wiring each radio. No internal pFugs to become intermittent and no wire 
wraps either, just good solid wiring. 

ORDER NOW DIRECT 
CALL TOLL FREE 



800- 




4141 



This number for ORDERS ONLY! 
Mail Order - COD - Bank Cards 



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HOURS - 9:00 - 5:00 CST Monday • Saturday 
Phone (615) 865-7949 
Telex 80-8327 









• KDK gives you one of the hottest receivers you can find. By using UHF 
(not VHF) dual gate MOS-FETs with electronic auto tuning for the RF 
amplifier and the first mixer, you have a combination of ultra sensitivity 
and maximum quietness. 

•The audio output stage in the 2025A Mk II uses an integrated circuit 
which has internal protection against over voltage and shorted output 
conditions. Plus it is a high audio output chip - just what you need in a 
noisy mobile situation. 

•The transmitter uses direct VCO varicap modulation for true FM. Your 
transmitted audio sounds as it should; crisp, clear and natural. 

•The power output stage of the 2025A Mk II will not break down even 
with an infinite VSWR load, and uses heavy duty solid state antenna 
switching with a four stage low pass filter. All this gives you an exception- 
ally clean, spur free output. 

• KDK has included an adjustable sub audible tone circuit which can also 
be used for CTCSS or tone burst on transmit, Again, more features) 

• Size is 2 7/10" high - 7 1/8" wide - 9 1/2" deep. 

•You can switch from 25 watts to 3 watts low power. 

•And, of course, the DC cable is included along with the microphone 
and mobile mounting bracket 

Write for brochure - Dealer inquiries invited! 

Warranty information available at your dealer 

Company reserves the right to change specifications without notice. 

Exclusive LIS Distributor - Dealers Welcome! 



ORDER DIRECT 

OR AT YOUR DEALER" 
Distributed by: 

KDK DISTRIBUTING CO., INC. 

617 SOUTH GALLATIN ROAD - MADISON. TN 37115 

Phone 4615)865-7949 




D. N. (Km Kittretl K5KL 
703 Serenada Drive 
Georgetown TX 78626 



Update Your 
CW Music Keyboard 

play it again, Sam 



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F/g. /. Wiring diagram for modified diode matrix. R A and Rg 
values are not critical; however, a large deviation wilt cause 
erratic operation. R c - prevents truncated characters should 
other keys be struck while the space bar is down. Resis- 
tors— y A W; diodes— 1N914/1N4 148; capacitors— 0. 1 disc. 

20 73 Magazine ■ December. 1981 



Considering operational 
features versus IC 
count, cost, and ease of con- 
struction, the Morse key- 
board designed by Crom 
WB9WRE is one of the best 
keyboard bargains available 
(73 Magazine, February, 
1 979, p. 84). The author sug- 
gests several options, and 
the design readily accom- 
modates others. One such 
option, to make typing easi- 
er, is described in this arti- 
cle, 

I found the basic key- 
board awkward to operate 
because of the key-interlock 
feature which disables all 
other keys while one is de- 
pressed. Although other 
keys may be struck, nothing 
will come out— and that was 
my problem: striking the 
next key too soon resulted 
in omitted characters. 

The answer is n-key roll- 
over. With n-key rollover, 
second, third, etc., keys may 



be struck while the first 
and/or succeeding keys are 
still held down, yet code will 
go out in perfect sequence 
{the capability exceeds the 
demand). 

The technique used by 
Horowitz W1HFA for his 
Compucoder {QST f June, 
1975), two resistors and one 
capacitor in each keyswitch 
lead, was adapted for this 
modification, as shown in 
Fig. 1, Essentially, the func- 
tional difference between 
the original WB9WRE diode 
matrix and the modified one 
is the duration of the key- 
switch input. The static, or 
rest, condition of data buses 
K0-K7 and the strobe input is 
high in both cases* When a 
key is struck, diodes in the 
key-switch line take selected 
data buses low to form the 
8-bit binary code represent- 
ing the character keyed. 
One or more of the low data 
buses take the strobe input 



The right design — for all the right 
reasons. In setting forth design pa- 
rameters for ARGOSY, Ten-Tec engi- 
neers pursued the goal of giving 
amateurs a rig with the right features 
at a price that stops the amateur 
radio price spiral. 

The result is a unique new trans- 
ceiver with selectable power 
levels (convertible from 10 
watts to 100 watts at the flick 
of a switch), a rig with the 
right bands (80 through 10 
meters including the new 30 
meter band), a rig with the 
right operational features 
plus the right options, and 
the right price for today's 
economy— just $549. 
Low power or high power, 
ARGOSY has it Now you 
can enjoy the sport and 
challenge of QRPp 
operating, and. 
when you need it* 
the power to stand 
up to the crowds in 
QRM and poor 
band conditions. 
Just flip a switch to 
move from true 
QRPp power with 
the correct bias 
voltages to a full 
100 watt input. 
New analog 
readout design. 
Fast, easy, reliable, 
and efficient. The 
modern new 
readout on the 
ARGOSY is a 
mechanical de- 
sign that in- 
stantly gives you all significant figures 
of any frequency. Right down to five 
figures (± 2 kHz). The band switch 
indicates the first two figures (MHz), 
the linear scale with lighted red bar- 
pointer indicates the third figure 
(hundreds) and the tuning knob skirt 
gives you the fourth and fifth figures 
(tens and units). Easy. And effi- 
cient—so battery operation is easily 
achieved. 

The right receiver features. Sen- 
sitivity of 0.3 ptV for 10 dB S + N/N, 
Selectivity: the standard 4-pole 
crystal filter has 2.5 kHz bandwidth 
and a 2.7:1 shape factor at 6/50 dB. 



Other cw and ssb filters are available 
as options, see below. l-f frequency 
is 9 MHz. if rejection 60 dB, Offset 
tuning is ± 3 kHz with a detent zero 
position in the center Built-in notch 
fitter has a better than 50 dB rejec- 
tion notch* tunable from 200 Hz to 
3.5 kHz. An optional noise blanker of 

Here's a Concept 
You Haven't Seen 
In Amateur Radio 
For A Long Time 





New TEN-TEC ftirm© 





the i-f type has 50 dB blanking 
range. Built-in speaker is powered 

by low-distortion audio (less than 2% 
THD) 

The right transmitter features. Fre- 
quency coverage from 80 through 
10 meters, including the new 30 me- 
ter band, in nine 500 kHz segments 
(four segments for 10 meters), with 
approximately 40 kHz VFO overrun 
on each band edge. Convertible 
power; 100 or 10 watts input with 
100% duty cycle for up to 20 min- 



utes on all bands- 3-f unction meter 
shows forward peak power on 
transmit. SWR, and received 
signal strength. PTT on ssb, full 
break-in on cw, PIN diode an- 
tenna switch. Built-in cw sidetone 
with variable pitch and volume. ALC 
control on "high" power only where 
needed, with LED indicator. 
Automatic normal sideband 
selection plus reverse. Nor- 
mal 12-14V dc operation 
plus ac operation with op- 
tional power supply 
The right styling, the right 
size. Easy-to-use controls, 
fast-action push buttons, all 
located on raised front 
panel sections. New meter 
with lighted, easy-to-read 
scales. Rigid steel chassis, 
molded front panel with 
matching aluminum top. 
bottom and back. 
Stainless steel tilt- 
up bail. And it's 
only 4" high by 
9W wide by 12" 
deep (bail not ex- 
tended) to go any- 
where, fit any- 
where at home, in 
the field, car, plane 
or boat. 

The right acces- 
sories—all front- 
panel switchable. 
Model 220 2.4 kHz 
8-pole ssb filter $55; 
Model 218 1.8 kHz 8 
pole ssb filter 

y$55: Model 
217 500 Hz cw 
filter $55; 
Model 219 250 
Hz cw filter $55; Model 224 Audio 
cw filter $34; Model 223 Noise 
blanker $34; Model 226 internal Ca- 
librator $39: Model 1125 Dc circuit 
breaker $15: Model 225 II 7/230 V 
ac power supply $129: Model 222 
mobile mount, $25; Model 1126 lin- 
ear switching kit, $15. 




Model 525 ARGOSY 



$549. 



Make the right choice, ARG03Y- 
for the right reasons and low price. 
See your TEN-TEC dealer or write. 



inn 



TEW -TEC. inc 

SEV^ERVILIE, TENNESSEE 371*1 



73 Magazine • December, 1981 21 



low, firing the strobe which 
loads the FIFO, 

The work of the key- 
switch is now complete. In 
the original version, the key- 
switch provides a direct 
ground which retains the 
8-bit code on the data buses 
and holds the strobe input 
low, preventing reset until 
the key is released. Con- 
versely, there is no direct 
ground path in the modified 
version. The keyswitch dis- 
charges the capacitor, send- 
ing a negative-going pulse to 
form the 8-bit code and trig- 
ger the strobe. When the 
negative-going pulse is com- 
plete, the data buses and the 
strobe input revert to the 
static (high) state and are 
ready for the next keystroke. 
The depressed key is inert 
until released; after release, 
the capacitor recharges and 
the key may be used again 
(there is no discernible de- 
lay). 

Foolproof key debounc- 
ing is a bonus feature of this 
modification. The keyswitch 
panels I used were removed 
from old computer termi- 
nals that had individual 
magnetic reed-switch mod- 
ules mounted on rails. Some 
of the switches, outwardly 
identical to all others but 
used for special or dual 
functions, caused sporadic 
character iterations. I tried 
numerous strobe pulse 
widths, and even a 555 
wired as a one-shot, without 
result. A partial cure, effec- 
tive for some but not for all 
of the aberrant keys, was fi- 
nally achieved using capaci- 
tor conditioning on the 
strobe-input line. These key- 
ing anomalies completely 
disappeared after the key- 
board was modified. 

With due respect to 
WB9WRE, it's a matter of 
opinion whether his— or any 
other— keyboard makes CW 
music; some would say that 
on ly a bug i n the hands of an 
expert can do that! Music or 
not, this keyboard will play a 
better tune after this simple 
modification. ■ 




Photo A. Aluminum angle stock hotted to the sides supports aluminum lop f bottom, and rear 
panels. The top was painted with epoxy spray enamel; dear epoxy protects the transfer letter- 
ing on the keys and controls. The digital display is for the QRQ, QRS digital speed indicator, 
(See article by W7BBX, 73 Magazine, June, 1980, p. 50). 




Photo 6. The n-key rollover components are at the top of the diode matrix. Vector T-44 Mini- 
wrap posts are used to support the data buses and to terminate keyswitch leads. The key- 
board logic, speed meter, and regulator boards are below. All interconnections are made 
with single row headers. 



22 73 Magazine * December, 1981 



Reader Service for tacmg p$ge f 54— 



\ 



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i 




I 



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7 



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M A P £ 



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This terminal has it all 
in one compact package at one low price. 

THE ROBOT 800 SPECIALTY MODE TERMINAL 



If you have been shopping around 
for RTTY equipment, you probably 
have asked yourself: "How can I get 
high performance, multiple-mode 
capabilities without spending a 
fortune?' Robot Research has 
answered this question through the 
use of microprocessor technology 
The Model 800 is the most complete 
specialty mode terminal ever offered 
for under $1000; yet it has features 
and performance capabilities which 
put it in the class of systems costing 
twice this amount or more 1 All that's 
needed to have a complete opera t- 
ing system is the addition of a stan- 
dard TV monitor 

HOW DID WE DO IT? 

The most advanced RTTY sys- 
tems on the market are designed for 
multiple applications As a result, 
these systems are burdened with ex- 
otic features which are seldom used 
on amateur radio These 'features* 
add to the cost, complicate opera- 
tion, and in some cases even com* 
promise performance! 

The 800 does not attempt to dou- 
ble as a hobby computer or a time- 



share terminal. It was designed ex- 
pressly for use as a specialty mode 
communcations terminal for ama- 
teur radio, and nothing else! By 
focusing our attention on this simple 
concept, we are able to provide a 
product which works better, costs 
less, and is easier to operate than 
those systems which try to do 
"everything" and end up doing 
nothing very welL 

ONE EXAMPLE: 

The single most important factor 
which affects RTTY receive perfor- 
mance is the quality of the demod- 
ulator In the 800, we do not allow for 
a wide variety of shift frequencies 
through the use of tuneable filters. 
There are only two shifts which are 
used in amateur RTTY, and tuneable 
discriminator filters are both expen- 
sive and are poor in performance. 
The 800 uses separate mark and 
space discriminator fitters for each 
of these two shifts which are pre* 
cisely tuned at our factory. Even 
though the center frequency for the 
mark filter is the same for both wide 
and narrow shifts, the bandwidth is 



different and therefore requires sep- 
arate filters. By giving careful atten- 
tion to these details, we can equal or 
exceed the performance found only 
in expensive stand-alone terminal 
units. 

WHAT ABOUT FEATURES? 

The Model 800 has all of the ad- 
vanced operating features such as 
split-screen, word and line editing, 
message memories, autostart, 
SELCOM, and many others. In addi- 
tion, the 800 has a complete set of 
operating aids such as an on-screen 
Status line, graphic tuning indicator, 
and a side-tone oscillator. To get a 
complete picture of all of the fea- 
tures which the 800 offers, we sug- 
gest that you contact us for a full- 
color brochure, or visit one of our 
dealers for a demonstration. 

ROBOT RESEARCH* 7591 Convoy 
Court, San Diego, CA 92111 • (114) 
279-943Q 




WORLD LEADERS IN SLOW SCAN TV, PHONE LINE TV, AND IMAGE PROCESSING SYSTEMS. 



WILSON SYSTEMS TOWERS 



- FACTORY DIRECT - 



to 9 



Z'OO 



FACTORY DIRECT 

1174 



ST-77B 
Features: 

Max. Height; 77' 
Min. Height: 24 f 
Weight; 700 lbs. 
Winch: 1500 lbs. 
Cable: 6400 lbs. 
Requires RB-77B a 
will be totally 
freestanding 

Recommended 
Rotor: High Gain 
Roto-Brake 



FACTORV DIRECT 



roD 



674 



FACTORY DIRECT 

409 



T T 



ir 



16' 



V. 



16' 



6" O.D, 



MT-61 B 
Features: 

Max. Height;, 61 r 

Min. Height; 23' 
W Weight: 450 lbs. 

Winch: 1200 |bs. 

Cable: 4200 lbs. 

No Guys required 
when mounting 
against house. 

For completely 
freestanding in- 
stallation, use 
RB-61 B or 
FB-61 B below \ 

\ 



■3.5 O.D. 



16' 






* 5" 



6" CD. 



' 



^ 



w 



fe- I I 



TM5B 
Features: 

Max Height: 45' 
Min. Height: 22' 
Weight: 250 lbs. 
Winch: 1200 lbs. 
Cable: 4200 lbs. 

No Guvs required 
when mounting 
against eve of 
house. 

For completely 
freestanding 
installation, use 
RB45B or FB-45B 
below. 



Z'Q.D 



IS' 



y&'o.D. 



4 5 O.D 



SO' 



m. 



20' 



WIND LOADING 
Tower Height Sq. Ft. 


ST77B 


l:< 


16 


Square 

Footage 

Based on 

50 MPH 

Wind 


77 


10 


MT61B 


53 


18 


61 


12 


TT^5B 

L 


37 


18 


45 


12 



&5S 



( 


BASE CHART 




TOWER 


WIDTH 


DEPTH 


TT^SB 


12**12" 


30" 


FB-45B 


30" x 30" 


4tt ' 


RB4BB 


30**30* 


4ft ' 


MT*1B 


18* a 18* 


4' 


FB-61 B 


3 f *3' 


5Vr' 


RB-61B 


3' x 3 f 


Mf» 


ST-77B 


See Below 


Bases 


B9-77B 


3tt ' x 3£ ' 


6 J 



Wilson Systems uses a high strength carbon steel tube manufactured especially for Wilson Systems. It is 
25% stronger than conventional pipe. The tubing size used is 2" & 3Vi" 095; 4 1 /?" & 6" ., 8" -J 34. 
All tubing h cold dip galvanized. Top section is 2" OD, for proper rotor and antenna mounting. 

The TT-4SB and MT GIB come complete with house bracket and hinged base plate for against-house 
mounting. For totally freestanding installation, use either of the till-over bases shown below. 

The ST-778 cannot be mounted against the house and must be used with the rotating tilt-over base 
RB-77B shown below. 



TILT -OVER BASES FOR TOWERS 



FIXED BASE 

The FB Series was designed to 
provide an economical method of 
moving the tower away from the 
house. It will support the rower m 
a completely free-standing vertical 
position, while also having the 
capabilities of tilting the tower 
over to provide an easy access to 
the antenna. The rotor mounts at 
the top of the tower in the con- 
ventional manner, and will not ro- 
tate the complete tower. 

FB-45B.. 112lbs... ! 209 95 
FB-61 B.. 169 lbs. . . s 299 95 



ORDER 
FACTORY DIRECT 
1-800-634-6898 



ROTATING BASE 

The RB Series was designed for 
the Amateur who wants the add 
ed convenience of being able to 
work on the rotor from the 
ground position. This series of 
bases will give that ease plus ro- 
tate the complete tower and an- 
tenna system by the use of a 
heavy doty rhrust beanng at the 
base of the lower mounting posi- 
tion, while still being able to. tilt 
the tower over when desiring to 
make changes on the antenna 
system. 

RB-45B.. 144 lbs... 289* 
RB-61 B . . 229 lbs. . . s 379" 
RB-77B. . 306 lbs.. . S 569 9S 



w 



i\ 



i i 



— — — -m ^^& 



'j#i 

>*ii 



Til tiny the tower over is a 
one> man task with the Wil- 
son bases, IShown above is 
the RB-618. Rotor is not 

included,) 



Prices Effective 9-1-81 thru 9-3Q-S1 

Specifications Subject to Change Without Nonce 



w s I 



WILSON 

SYSTEMS. INC. 



428G S Poland A<*p L*\ Vpq^s N^Wddri 89103 



WILSON SYSTEMS INC. MULTI-BAND ANTENNAS 




- IN STOCK - 



A trap loaded antenna that performs like a monobander! That's the characteristic of trmsix 
element three band beam Through the use of wide spacing and interlacing of elements, the follow 
ing is possible three active elements on 20, three active elements on 15 and four active element! 
on 10 meters. No need to run separate coax feed lines for each band, as the bands witching is auto- 
matically made via the H*gh*G Wilson traps. Designed to handle the maximum legal power, the 
traps are capped at each end to provide a weather-proof seal ayamst ram and dust The special 
hhgh-Q traps arc the strongest available in the industry today. 
_ SPECll-JCAtlONS 



dSd) 

: SWH & • FMjr>i»MCi? 

^.b Rji«o 



14 2t 7B 
Lr Ml 

Ui- to 9dB 
1 3 1 
b0 oimi 
20uy w l*Mtw 



Ha ui fc«-menli 

lit , "LlillU* 

M^» i nj fit mMl dnwneier 
Sutljci di 



* 24 . 



2" 
6 

2B 2'. 

Z 

3 6 wi It 



Feed rrw inod j»m1I B 



»1 Mi 



jHr JdpproM I 




ADD 40 OR 30 METERS TO YOUR 
TRI-BAND WITH THE NEW 33-6 MK 




L^+ - IN STOCK - 

Now you can have the capabilities of 40-meter or 30 meter operation on the System 
36 and System 33* Using the same type high quality traps, the new addition will 
offer 200 HKZ of bandwidth at less than 2:1 SWR. The new 33-6 MK will fit your 
present SY36 or 3Y33, and using the same single feed line. 




SYSTEM 33 




- IN STOCK - 




Capable of handling the Leyal Limit, the "SYSTEM 33" *s trie finest compact in bander avail- 
able to the amateur. Designed and produced by one of the world's largest antenna mariufdtiuiers, 
the traditional M^al'iV °* workmanship and materials excells with the "SYSTEM 33" New boom - 
to-element mount consists of two 1/8" truck formed aluminum plates that will provide more 
clampiny and holding strength to prevent element misalignment Superior clamping power is ob 
td<ned watt the use of a rugyed 1/4" thick aluminum plate for boom to mast mounting The use of 
large diameter High Q traps in the "SYSTEM 33" makes it a high performing tn -bander and at a 
werv economical price, A complete step-by step illustrated instruction manual guides you to easy 
bly and the lightweight antenna makes installation of the "SYSTfcM 33" quick and simple 

^— SPECIFICATIONS - 






14 2\ 2H 

bt) ahn 

20 UB ui u-tiw 



Bown lOU * irrtgiM 
Ha of demenn 

Turning fiitiiUi 

WILSON 

SYSTEMS. INC. 



2" * 14'4" 
2 

27 4 
15 9 
2 O O 
5 7 id tT 



a U-M<|iri9 it SO . t 14 IIS 

Assembled **c>gfr\ Umi - J / ibi 

j^l lJi3t)Tu»| 42 tin 



ORDER 
FACTORY DIRECT 
1-800-634-6898 





WV-1A 

4 BAND 
TRAPVbRriCAL 
(10 40 METERS) 

No band switching 
necessary with this 
vertical An excellent 
low cost DX antenna 
with an electrical quarter 
wavelength on each band 
and low angle radiation, 
Advanced design 
provides low SWR and 
exceptionally flat 
response across the full 
width of each band 

Featured is the Wilson 

large diameter High-Q 
traps which will maintain 
resonant points with 
varying temperatures and 
humidity 

Easily assembled, the 
WV-1 A is supplied with 
a hot dipped galvanized 
base mount bracket 
to attach to vent pipe or 
to a mast dnven in the 
ground, 

Note: 

RadiaJs are required for 

peak operatton. 

(See GR-1 below! 






SPECIFICATIONS 

* 19' total height 

* Self supporting — no guys 
required 

* Weight — 14 lbs 

* Input impedance: 50 Si 

■ Powerhandling capability ■ 
Legal Limit 

* Two High-Q traps with large 
diameter coils 

* Low angle radiation 

* Omnidirectional 
performance 

* Taper swaged aluminum 
tubing 

* Automatic bandswitching 

* Mast bracket furnished 

* SWR: 1,1:1 or less on all 
bands 



GR 1 



The GR-1 is ihe complete 
ground radial kit for the WV 
1A, It consists of. 150' of 7/14 
stranded aluminum wire and 
heavy duty egg insulators, in- 
structions. The GR-1 wiJl in* 
crease the efficiency of the 
GR 1 by providing the correct 
counterpoise. 



PauiGrupp KA1LR 
73 Magazine Staff 



The Kenwood 
TR-7730 Transceiver 

let's get small! 



Time was, if you had a 
srnal I tar and wanted to 
put a synthesized two- 
meter rig in it, you either 
cultivated a sadistic 
disregard for your passen- 
ger's knees or got yourself 
one of the two rigs on the 
market with a compact 
separate control head. The 
new Kenwood TR-7730 is 
part of a trend that will 
change all that. Measuring 
a mere 2" high, 5.75" wide, 
and 775" deep, it will fit in 
the smallest of cars without 
usurping precious legroom 



and is even compact enough 
to fit in the extra radio slot 
located in the console of 
many newer cars. One might 
suppose that a great deal 
was sacrificed to cram ev- 
erything into such a small 
package. Surprisingly, this is 
not the case. Without fur- 
ther ado, lets take a tour of 
what the TR-7730 has to 
offer. 

The Features 

Starting in the upper left- 
hand corner of the front 
panel, we find the memory 



channel selector and two 
square push-buttons — one 
marked "M" and the other 
marked "MR", The "M" but- 
ton loads the frequency 
shown on the digital display 
into one of the five memo- 
ries. This frequency can 
later be recalled by pressing 
the "MR" button and choos- 
ing the desired position on 
the rotary selector. On 
memories 1-4, the transmit- 
ter offset is set with the 
switch on the far right-hand 
side of the front panel. 
Memory 5 programs both 




The Kenwood TR-7730. 



26 73 Magazine * DecembGf, 1981 



transmit and receive fre- 
quencies, allowing access to 
repeaters using non-stan- 
dard splits. 

Beneath the memory 
controls are the combina- 
tion power switch and vol- 
ume control and the 
squelch. Directly to the 
right of these is the main 
tuning knob, which steps 
through the band in a simi- 
lar manner to the knob on 
the TR-9000. 

Just to the right of the 
main tuning knob is a 
switch which selects either 
5- or1Q-kHz steps with each 
click of the main tuning 
knob, a high/low power se- 
lector, and an on/off switch 
for a user-installed CTCSS 
encoder. Directly above 
these are three switches as- 
sociated with the scanning 
circuitry. Pressing the 
"Scan" switch starts the 
7730 scanning up the band. 
It will stop on any signal 
that breaks the squelch and 
resume scanning when the 
signal drops If you hold 
down the scan button con- 
tinuously, the rig scans at 
twice the normal rate. If 
you wish to remain on a fre- 
quency, press the PTT 
switch on the mike or the 
"Hold" button on the front 
panel. Pressing the "MS" 
switch scans the five fre- 
quencies programmed into 





Top view of the Kenwood TR-7730. 



Bottom view of the Kenwood TR-773Q. 



the memories, The scan and 
hold switches work in both 
the band- and memory- 
scanning modes. The 
up/down switches on the 
microphone function only 
in the band-scanning mode. 

All displays are of the 
LED variety There is a bar- 
graph S/rf -meter similiar to 
that on the TR-7800, al- 
though the display on the 
TR-7730 seems to be less 
prone to flickering. Above 
this are three LEDs, The one 
on the far right lights to in- 
dicate that a repeater off- 
set has been selected, the 
middle when the unit is 
transmitting, and the left 
when a signal that breaks 
the squelch is present. To 
the left of this is the main 
frequency display. 

Most of the rear panel is 
dedicated to a heat sink for 
the final amplifier. In a clus- 
ter on the left side are the 
antenna connector, power 
cable, speaker jack, and a 
three^prong jack for a mem- 
ory backup power supply. 

Big Rig Performance 

Kenwood wisely avoided 
compromise in the rf stages 
in their down-sized rig. The 
transmitter and receiver 
stages are strikingly similar 
to those in the TR-7600, 
Space was saved by shrink- 
ing the control circuitry, re- 
placing some discrete com- 
ponents in the audio chain 
with JCs, and simplifying 
the final stage. Specifica- 
tions are virtually identical 



for the two rigs. Sensitivity 
is rated at better than .5 uV 
for 30 dB S/N. Selectivity is 
spec'd at 12 kHz at 6 dB 
down and 25 kHz at the 
— 60-dB point In the high- 
power mode, our unit ex- 
ceeded its rated 25 Watts at 
all frequencies between 
144 and 148 MHz Output 
in the low-power position is 
continuously adjustable, 
making it easy to match the 
rig to amplifiers requiring 
only 10 Watts or so of drive 
As with most commercial 
rigs, the deviation level was 
set slightly high for the 
close-talking most hams 
use to improve signal to 
noise in a car, but was easi- 
ly readjusted. 

In actual use, the 
TR-7730 is a champ. It 
worked perfectly the mo- 
ment it came out of the 
box. Both transmit and re 
ceive audio have the usual 
Kenwood characteris- 
tics— high fidelity with no 
sacrifice of intelligibility. 
The squelch is extremely 
sensitive and seems to latch 
up resolutely, without the 
mushtness encountered on 
many rigs. The controls are 
thoughtfully shaped and lo- 
cated—most of us should 
have no trouble putting the 
TR-7730 through its paces 
in a dark moving vehicle. 
The bar-graph S-meter, 
which first struck me as be- 
ing a gimmick of question- 
able utility, turned out to 
be extremely useful It's a 
lot easier to read at a 



glance than a D'Arsonval 
movement. 

The only thing more en- 
joyable than using this rig is 
deciding where to install it! 
It's so small that the possi- 
bilities are almost endless. 
After considerable debate, 
I removed the AM radio 
from my Dodge Colt's dash 
board and cut away the 
plastic faceplate with a 
fine-toothed saw and a cou- 
ple of files. I didn't know 
whether or not the rig 
would actually fit until the 
faceplate was completely 
cutaway. Behind the dash I 
found two metal braces, of- 
fering plenty of support. 
The fit is so tight that I 
didn't have to screw the rig 
down. I connected the re- 
mote speaker jack to the in- 
dash speakers supplied with 
the car. 

Not for the squeamish, 
an in-dash or console instal- 
lation can nevertheless be 
extremely satisfying, I used 
to enjoy having my car look 
like a mobile NASA control 
center, with rigs hanging 
everywhere, but I get even 
more pleasure from the 
clean setup I now have. If 
you decide to try an m-dash 
installation, just be sure 
that there is plenty of air 
circulation available. Inad- 
equate cooling can kill 
a rig. 

I used the Kenwood 
MC-46 DTMF mike, and I 
must admit I have a love/ 
hate relationship with it. On 
the plus side, it has all 16 



tones, which is useful, and 
the audio quality of the 
condensor mike element is 
unquestionably superior to 
the mike packed with the 
rig. On the negative side of 
the ledger, the mike is 
small! It took me a couple 
of days to learn how to han- 
dles it without inadvertent- 
ly pushing one of the but- 
tons on the pad The hang- 
up hook resembles those on 
other microphones I own, 
but it is slightly smaller, so 
it won't stay put in either of 
the mike holders in my car, 
The small size no longer 
bothers me, but I am still 
looking for something to 
hang the mike on when I am 
not using it. My advice is to 
check out the mike careful- 
ly before buying, and if it 
seems too small to cope 
with, pick up a Kenwood 
MC-45 You'll need to re- 
wire the mike connector, 
but the 45 is a solid, full- 
sized microphone, sure to 
please the most ham-hand- 
ed ham! The MC-46 has 
some nice features, though, 
and is probably well worth 
the effort required to get 
used to it 

Nothing is perfect, of 
course, and the TR-7730 is 
no exception. I found three 
relatively minor things I 
would like to see improved. 
First, the main frequency 
display is anything but easy 
to read. No doubt the loca- 
tion I chose for the rig 

Continued on page 196 



73 Magazine • December, 1981 27 



HUSTLER 

HF MOBILES 
DELIVER 
FIXED STATION 
PERFORMANCE 



Hustler HF antennos delivi 
outstanding signal reports 
Wherever you're mobile? 

Design your own HF mobile 
from a full selection of top- 
quality. US made stainless 
stee* ball mounts, quick dis 
connects, masfc. springs, ond 
resonators, You ran cover anv 
6-tr>80- meter bond Cboose 
from medium of Ngh power 
resonators with broadest 
bandwidth and lowest &rW for 
optimum performance on any 
band Easy band change and 
garaging with Hustlers fcrtd- 
cver most. too. 



Ask any ham — the best HF 

mobiles on the road come 
from: Hustler- still the 
standard of performance 



,^an -{ 




HV 



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Kissimmee, Florida 32741 



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S7FWT QllfiPS F Box 2335 Ipwnr-Air. b. n 17T. 



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PORTA-PEATER 
INSTANT REPEATER 



Command and control module makes an instant re- 
pealer from any ? radios with absolutely no modifi- 
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and imc jack? Perfect tor a personal emergency. 01 
lined repealer Write or call lo* dctHileri data manual Wp 
accept VISA and M/C Reoueat catalog 

• 4 Individual CW-lta(1K PROMJ 

• VOX— COR COR triggers 

• AdJ CMS mln ID cycle rimer 

• Ad] 0-15 mm. Time Out timer 

• Aoj 0-30 sec hang timer 

• Adj 2Mb local true amp 

• True repealer beacon, or manual modes 

• 350 volt switching capability 

• Complete gainiiniertacp controls 

• Complete technical manual 
#PCfl si*e5 l « r5'V 

• 3? pm edgecard interface 



$99. 



Assembled* 
Tested, 
00 Burned In, 

Programmed 
(Inc. S3, postage) 



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W-S ENGINEERING 

P.O. BOX 58 

PINE HILL, N.J. 08021 

24 HR. PHONE: 201-852-0269 



look here 



call toll free:nights 

(800) 231 -3057 

6-10 PM CDST, M.W.F. 
days: 713-658-0268 



ICOM 



Santec 
ETO 



Telrex 
Drake 

AEA 
YEASl 



IC720A/AC .... $1298 

IC 2AT 249 

IC 22U .., 269 

HT 1 200 299 

ST7 440 FM 299 

Alpha 78 2595 

76PA 1795 

I ^y ^^ ^ i»i i # « 4 i t i f t v * ^ -^ 

TR7/DR7 1349 

R7/0R7 1299 

Morse CK1 .-.„ 115.00 

FT707 „,„. 699 

FRG7700 449 

FT101ZD 

Mark 3 Umited ... 749 



Order KWM 380 Now 

OLD PRICE 

Rockwell Accessories in Stock 

O I I tl 1 VJ W ^\ 3 ■■■■■.■■■p lt | M | IM >1tll<4il*r.r,,H \ . kJ %J 

Bash Books 9.95 

Amphenof Silver Plate PL-259 1 00 
Antique/Rare Tubes Call 

Timex24bourWallclock 24.95 

Robot 800A 749 

Cubic 103 1195 

Bird 43 SLUGS 

Portable VJ Amplifier 

2 watts m 33 watts out .... 89 95 

Befden 9405 Heavy Duty 

Rotor Cable 2/M6, 6#18 .. 45C/fi 
Belden 8214 RG-8 Foam 36C/ft 
Belden 9258 RG-8X 

Mini-coax , , , 1 9C/ft 

Alliance HD73 Rotor 1 09 95 

Call for TS830S, TS130S. 
TS-530S plus accessories 

MASTERCARD VISA 
Air p'icps fob Houston except where indicated Prices 
s« ibjecr id cngnge without nonce, alt items guaranteed 
Sonme nems subject prjdf Texas residents odd 6% 

taj Please add sufficient ± qe. balance colled 




Electronics Supply 

1508 McKinney "* b 
Houston, Texas 77010 



28 73 Magazine • December. 1981 



Wl BACK EVERYTHING 
WE SELL WITH OUR 
PERSONAL CL ARANTEE 

PRICES F O B 
HOUSTON 

PRICES SUBJECT TO 

CHANGE VMTHOL1 
NOTICE 

ITEMS SUBJECT TO 
PRIOR SALE 





NEW NIGHT L1NF 
TOLL FREE 

1-800- 23 MO 57 
MON, WED, FRI, 6 PM-10 PM CT 




NEW 

fKENWOOD 

2m FM HANDIE 





IC-720A 

$1298.00 

ICOMs top of the fine - 9 band 
HF transceiver, genera! 
coverage receiver - 0,1 MHz to 
30MHz h 12 VDC operation 
(compatible with PS15 power 
supply) 2 VFO's built in, 




• programmable 
start 

• lithium memory 
back-up 

• power output 2.5 
watts ot 300 mw 

• "Slide Loc M 
battery park 

• tuneable sub- 
tone encoder 



CALL FOR QUOTE 



DONS CORNER 

Our service men note the new rigs coming out, and they are 
plentiful. Seem to be almosl failure proof the first leap out of 
the factory. The design is better. Quality-control seems to 
preclude the old warning JJ wait until a few get out" before 
purchasing; plus, the dealers seem to be getting better service 
info feedback from the factory, faster than ever. 

Word of Advice: Buy from a dealer that is AUTHORIZED or 

can guarantee you local service. Don't get stuck with a unit that 

must be factory repaired' unless that factory so stipulates. 

This month's best buy - Alpha Amps at cheaper than ever 

prices. 

Try our Service Department — you'll like it! Five People; 

One Tech for KWM38Q's only; one for digital equipment; one 

for tube sets: one for older Collins/Drake; one for general 

repair - odds and ends that you don't want to do. CALL US! 

Least we can do is tell you whether to put it on the shelf or send 

it to us, 

See you next month! 

P.S. Tu rns out Tang (our spy in Japan) was snortin' Saki when 
he reported on the Kenwood TS-840, 1 (flat doesn't exist, never 
has, never will I put him on probation. 



KWM 380 

LJST $3495 + filter 

Your Cost $3095 

fncl. filter 



r 



) 



Ffl ICOM 




IC2 AT 
269.95 

49.95 

BC-30- 

69.95 

CALL 

FOR 

QUOTE 



NEW!! 
YAESU FT ONE 



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LIST 
$2995.00 



three selectivity 
positions for CW (two 
for F5K!) using optiona 
filters 

73 MHz first IF 
0.3 uV sensitivity 
full break in 




CALL FOR 
QUOTE 



Curtis 8044 keyer 
available as option 
front panel keyboard 
ten VFO's 

one year factory 
warranty 



w 



UEMJ 




$910.00 
CALL FOR QUOTE 




i* A 



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NEW 
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220 mHz 

Call for 

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$299,00 
W/Pad 

$269.00 
W/O Pad 




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© 



RGft u 
Obi 5M*Jd 



p*rt 




^ 98UB 
65C/ft 



Foam 81 Vf 




RGB U 




8214 
38 C/ft 



3237 
32 C/ft 



RQ213 

Nqti -con I ami n»tm$ 

*- 8267 

43 C ft 




HI I 
I IK" 
7M> 

WW 

it) 

Htfl 

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9.541 Duke Drive 
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Joe Ham: The Consumer 

do you fit the mold? 



In spinning the dial across 
the various amateur 
bands, it is not unusual to 
find a QSO concerning ra- 
dio equipment. A typical 
QSO might be as follows: 

I am running a Satellite 
TS6 with a Pacific Kilowatt 
2 linear amplifier. My an- 
tenna consists of stacked 
verticals, 33 elements, up 

Purchased 

1 year (or less) 

2 years 

3 years 

4 years 

5 years (or more) 



about 1 00 feet. I also have a 
Demosthenes speech pro- 
cessor 

It appears that there is 
much interest in the types 
of radios and accessories 
being used as well as the 
reason for purchasing spe- 
cific radio products. Al- 
though there have been 
many formal studies con- 
cerning consumer behavior, 

Number of Amateurs (%) 

23 
20 
14 
10 
33 



Total 



100 



Table t, HF SSB radios — when purchased. 



the radio amateur as a con- 
sumer has been neglected. 
The purpose of this arti- 
cle is to present some ex- 
ploratory research findings 
on the influence of con- 
sumer behavior on the buy- 
ing habits of radio ama- 
teurs. 

Methodology 

The data in this study 
were gathered from ques- 
tionnaires sent to 300 radio 
amateurs in each of the ten 
United States call areas. 
The amateurs were selected 
by random sample from the 
7980 Radio Amateur Call- 
hook, The sample included 
amateurs from each of the 



fifty states, divided into 
three license class classifi- 
cation s — C e n e r a I , Ad- 
vanced, and Extra. Two am- 
ateurs were taken from 
each class for each state. 
The study was primarily 
limited to HF SSB radio 
equipment. 

The HF SSB Radio 

An important part of the 
study dealt with the types 
of HF SSB radios owned by 
the radio amateur, age of 
radio, where purchased, 
and purchasing influences. 
The following is a list of HF 
SSB radios, including manu- 
facturer and model num- 
ber, that were most fre- 



Source of Purchase 

Local Franchisee* Dealer 
Mail-order 
Another amateur 
Other (includes factory, 
swap meet, hamfest) 





Reasons for Purchase 


Number 


of Amateurs {%) 


N umber of Am at eurs (%) 


Reputation of dealer (including 




40 


52 


service) 






32 


Price 




44 


10 


Store personnel 




10 


6 


Other (includes availability, 
location of dealer, etc. 




6 



Total 



100 



Total 



100 



Table 2. Where radios were purchased. 
32 73 Magazine • December, 1981 



Table 3. Reasons for purchasing radio from dealer, etc. 










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Reasons for Purchase 

Reputation of Manufacturer 

(including quality) 
Features of the radio 
Convenience in operation 
Other (includes American-made, 

prestige, size, performance) 



Number of Amateurs {%) 


Purchasing influences 


45 


Advertisements 




Friend (Amateur) 


40 


QSO 


12 


Store display 


3 


Other (includes store salesman, 




family, used in contest) 



Number of Amateurs (%} 

42 
31 
15 
10 
2 



Total 



100 



Total 



100 



Table 4* Reasons for purchasing a particular brand of radio. 



Table 5. Other purchasing influences. 



quently mentioned in the 
survey*: Collins KWM2; 
Drake TR4C, TRF; Heathkit 
HW-101; Icom 701; Ken- 
wood 120S, 5205, 820S; 
Swan Astro 150, 102BX; 
Ten-Tec Triton IV, Omni 
A/D; Yaesu FT-101,101E 

It is interesting to note 
that only 25% of the ama- 
teurs surveyed had solid- 
state radios. The reason for 
this is probably because of 
the age of the sets. Table 1 
indicates that although 
33% of the amateurs have 
had their sets for 5 years or 
more, 23% have purchased 
new radios within the past 
year. 

Why A Specific 
Radio Was Purchased 

The buying environment 
is an important part of con- 
sumer behavior. Not only 
where a purchase was 
made, but why it was made 
are basic factors to consid- 
er. 

As shown in Table 2, 
most of the amateurs 
bought their radios from ei- 
ther a local franchised deal- 
er or by mail-order. The rea- 
sons for this are illustrated 
by Table 3. It can be ob- 
served that the reputation 
of the dealer, including ser- 
vice, and price are consid- 
ered to be the prime rea- 
sons for buying a set from a 
particular place. 

As discussed previously, 
the reasons why an amateur 
purchases a particular radio 
are important factors to 
consider in consumer be- 

*lt is not the purpose of this arti- 
cle to rate any one manufactur- 
er's product over another. Also, 
not all sets mentioned in the 
study are listed; only those ra- 
dios that were most frequently 
mentioned are given here. 

34 73 Magazine • December. 



Types of Antennas 

Triband yagi beam 
(3 elements or more) 

Dipole 
Vertical 

Quad 

Monoband yagi 
Minibeam 
Long wire 



Number of Amateurs (%) 


Reasons for Purchase 


48 


Efficiency and gain. 




Work ail bands. 




Best value for money. 


22 


Low noise. 




Fits limited space, 


10 


Low profile. 




Good construction. 


10 


Better DX. 


7 




2 
1 





Total 



100 



Table 6. Antenna systems and reasons for purchase. 



havior. Table 4 indicates 
that the reputation of the 
manufacturer, quality, and 
features of the radio are im- 
portant elements consid- 
ered by the amateur when 
purchasing an HF SSB radio. 

Additional factors that 
influence an amateur's buy- 
ing habits are illustrated in 
Table 5. It is interesting to 
note that 42% of those sur- 
veyed felt that advertising 
played an important part in 
influencing their final pur- 
chasing decision. Addition- 
al purchasing influences in- 
clude friends (31 %), QSOs 
(15%1 and store display 
[1096 J. 

Antennas 

There are probably more 
on-the-air discussions con- 
cerning antenna systems 
than any other piece of am- 
ateur equipment. The pur- 
chase of an antenna, there- 
fore, is an important factor 
to consider in relation to 
amateur buying habits, Ac- 
cording to Table 6, the tri- 
band yagi beam appears to 
be the antenna most pur- 
chased by radio amateurs 
48% of the amateurs sur- 
veyed used this type of an- 
tenna, Table 6 also indi- 
cates the reasons why a spe* 
1981 



cific antenna is being used. 

Radio Accessories 

An important part of am- 
ateur purchases includes ra- 
dio accessories. The most 
popular accessories being 
used by the amateur are lin- 
ear amplifiers, speech pro- 
cessors, audio filters, tun- 
ers, and keyers. Other ac- 
cessories include monitor 
scopes, frequency count- 
ers, phone patches, and 
computers, 

Occupations 

Occupation is a basic in- 
dex of social behavior. The 

Journalist Poet 

Architect 

Salesman 

Computer Programmer 

Asst V.P, Operations (Railroad) 

Engineer 

Lawyer 

Real Estate Broker 

Florist 

Electronics 

Post Office Department 

US Navy 

City Government (Administrator) 

Business Executive 

Teacher (1st Grade) 

Accountant 

Dentist 

Retail Bicycle Store Manager 

Social Worker 

Research (Medical) 



results of the study show 
that people from all walks 
of life are presently enjoy- 
ing the hobby of amateur 
radio. The occupations of 
radio amateurs as given in 
the survey include those 
shown in Table 7. 

Conclusion 

As previously discussed, 
this survey should be con- 
sidered merely as explor- 
atory in nature. The study 
was limited by the size of 
the sample obtained- This, 
however, is only a begin- 
ning in looking at the radio 
amateur as a consumer.B 

Veterinarian 
US Army (Captain) 
Astronomer 
Auto Mechanic 

Photographer 

US Air Force 

Housewife 

Plant Manager 

Telephone Installer 

TV Broadcast Engineer 

Marketing Product Manager 

US Coast Guard 

Musician 

University Professor 

Glass Blower 

College Baseball Coach 

Clergyman 

Farmer 

Retired 



Table 7, Occupations of hams, 



Radio Activity 

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►"See List of Advertisers on page 1&2 



73 Magazine * December, 1981 35 



Wilson Microwave Systems 





= 3 









> - 




Wilson Microwave Systems uses the latest state of the art 
method of manufacturing the parabolic designed antenna. 
Resistance to distortion and instability is increased with 
the addition of a full screen mesh sealed within the %" 
thick fiberglass. 

Wilsons unique "Vari Mount" provides the easiest installa- 
tion and mounting method available today. The 4pc 
construction of the dish provides easier handling, less 
installation time, and greatly reduced shipping costs, 

With the exclusive 4 point Williams' mount, you are assured 
a quicker installation and that the antenna will be more 
securely fastened to the Vari-Mount. The antenna struts 
aid in stabilizing the fiberglass for operational reception in 
winds of up to 50 60 MPH. 

A ball bearing race allows easy turning of the antenna in 
changing to the different satellites. A scale is included on 
the base to assist in their location. 

For those areas that require a larger dish than the 3.35 
meter, Wilson offers an addition that will increase the size 
to 4.0 meter. It is easily bolted to the outer edge and main- 
tains the strength, while increasing the performance. 




The optional remote control feature allows you to control movement of the azimuth and elevation positions of the 
antenna from the comfort of your easy chair — without having to go outside. This feature may be added later. 

Wilson can now supply you with a complete system for turnkey operation that includes everything that is required 
for installation. The package includes the fiberglass 1V antenna featured above, receiver, 120° LNA, modulator, 
and all cables required. Many options are available. 

DISTRIBUTOR & DEALERSHIPS AVAILABLE 

WILSON MICROWAVE SYSTEMS, INC. 

4286 South Polaris Avenue Las Vegas, Nevada 89103 
A NAME KNOWN TO THE COMMUNICATIONS INDUSTRY FOR OVER 12 YEARS 

FOR INFORMATION Call (800) 634-6898 or (702) 739-7401 



Alaska Microwave Labs 



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73 Magazine • December, 1981 37 



Bob Cooper: 
Profile of a Pioneer 



Editor's Note: In just thro© decades, television has won the hearts and minds of American society. Newsweek Magazine reports that the 
"average family member spends more than seven hours a day tethered to the tube/" Innovations like community antennas, cable TV, and 
now reception directly from the satellites have nurtured our passion for video. Perhaps you prefer an evening of rag-chewing on 75 meters or 
chasing DX on the low end of 20 to watching the one-eyed monster— even so, you can't deny the impact that television has had on 
everyone's lives. 



Tim Dantet N8RK 
73 Magazine SlafV 

SM fix meters is open. My lit- 
tle portable SSB rig is 
hooked to a jury-rigged 
VHF TV antenna and I'm 
copying stations as far 
away as Florida As I tune 
across the band, I find a 
pileup that rivals anything 
you hear on 20 meters. 
Eventually the furor dies 
down and I hear a weak but 
copyable signal: 

"This is VP5D; the name 
is Bob and my location is 
Providenciales, one of the 
Turks and Caicos Islands/' 

The voice goes on to say 
that this is not a DXpedi- 
tion, but rather a perma- 
nent station, so if you don't 
work it today, there will al- 
ways be another chance, 

VP5D is Bob Cooper, also 
known as W5KHT. When 
Bob is not handing out re- 
ports on six or ten meters, 



he is likely to be pursuing 
another form of electronic 
magic. Bob, you see, 
dreams about making higfrv 
quality, universally-avail- 
able television a reality- 
Cooper is the father of 
home satellite television. In 
just five short years. Bob 
ushered home reception of 
satellite TV from being a 
five-figure investment to 
the point where you can as- 
semble a complete system 
for about $2000. Along the 
way, he wrote dozens of ar- 
ticles, including one for 73, 
he had a column in QST t 
and he received coverage in 
publications like Mother 
Earth News and TV Cuide. 
Coop's fame extends be- 
yond the written word; 
he has appeared on Japa- 
nese TV news and more fa- 
miliar programs like "PM 
Magazine/' 

To trace Bob Cooper's at- 
tachment to video, we have 




Bob VP5D, 
36 73 Magazine • December, 1981 



to go back to the infancy of 
commercial television. The 
Cooper family lived just far 
enough away from the near- 
est station to make recep- 
tion a difficult task As a 
youth Coop combined his 
ham-radio-based knowl- 
edge of electronics with an 
enthusiasm for the growing 
world of TV. After all, build 
ing beams and preamps for 
VHF TV was not too dif- 
ferent than home-brewing 
gear for six meters. 

Bob's college training in 
broadcast journalism even- 
tually led him to the cable 
TV industry where he was 
involved with the publica- 
tion of trade magazines. 
When the satellite TV era 
began, Bob was already the 
veteran of the original TV 
explosion and the develop- 
ment of cable TV 

Coop's first exposure to 
satellite TV came at a cable 
TV trade show in 1975. 
Soon after, he began to 
work putting together a sys- 
tem of his own. By scroung- 
ing in the true ham radio 
fashion, he was able to 
build one of the first home 
satellite TV receiving sys- 
tems for far less than the 
$25,000 asking price. 

Along the way. Bob met 
other pioneers like Stanford 
University professor Tay 
Howard W6HD and Bob 
Coleman K4AWB who were 
working towards the same 
goal. Since new equipment 
was so expensive, these trail- 
blazers relied on surplus 



units or, failing that, they 
home-brewed. There were 
no plans to follow, no kits 
to buy — only imagination 
and patience. 

What Bob and a handful 
of other experimenters 
were accomplishing was of 
only passing interest to the 
professionals in the satellite 
TV field. The industry was 
content to keep satellite TV 
veiled in mystery and ex- 
pense. Cooper, realizing the 
potential for the mass ap- 
peal of home satellite tele* 
vision receive only (TVRO), 
decided to go public. He 
did it in a big way. The TV 
Guide article in October, 
1978, and subsequent cov- 
erage on the CBS Evening 
News alerted millions of 
people about the new 
technology. 

Overnight, Coop was be- 
sieged with thousands of in- 
quiries. He had created a 
demand which he is still 
striving to meet three years 
later. In those early days, 
there was no gear aimed at 
the home market. Before 
long, garage industries, 
often started by hams, 
sprang up It was (and still 
is) a seller's market and any- 
one with a background in 
electronics had a tremen- 
dous advantage. 

A digest for satellite TV 
enthusiasts, publishing 
manuals, and sponsoring 
seminars turned into a full- 
time endeavor and Bob 
made the plunge, commit- 
ting all his talents to the 




Bob utilizes his extensive knowledge of the broadcast and 
cable TV industries to make high-quality TV a reality, de- 
spite the remote location. To Bobs left is a vertical interval 
switching unit which allows him to change signal sources 
rapidly, without any gl itching. The monitor displays a 
computer-generated time r weather, and community infor- 
mation report. This is just one of the several ways that West 
Indies Video offers a local flavor to its programming. 



young industry. 

The early days were not 
all milk and honey. The first 
Satellite Private Terminal 
Seminar (5PTS) in Oklaho- 
ma City was almost can- 
celled. A last-minute court 
hearing decided that the 
freedom to share informa- 
tion superceded a cable TV 
supplier's desire to keep the 
subject a mystery. (The le- 
gal questions that surround 
the satellite TV explosion 
are just beginning to see a 
thorough airing.) 

Cooper was in on the 
growth of the industry from 
the start. Coop's Satellite 
Digest has become the fa- 
vorite source for update in- 
formation about the tech- 
nology and the satellites 
themselves, How-to manu- 
als, priced from $30.00, sell 
briskly. The thrice annual 
SPTS events are attracting 
over a thousand partici- 
pants who gladly pay the 
$150 admission price. Coop 
had started the wave rolling 
back in 1978 and he man- 
aged to climb on top for a 
very successful ride. He let 
others manufacture the 
equipment, sell the dishes, 
and install them. His bag is 
information, something 
that a young industry can't 
live without 



New Beginnings 

In 1980, the stage shifted 
from Oklahoma to a small, 
unknown island in the Carib- 
bean. Just as the home sat- 
ellite TV industry began to 
gain momentum, Coop 
pulled up stakes and 
moved his family to Provi- 
denciales, part of the tiny 
nation of Turks and Caicos. 
Besides donning a new call- 
sign, VP5D, Cooper was on 
the brink of yet another 
video revolution. 

The Coopers fell in love 
with the serene, isolated 
beauty of the Turks and 
Caicos on a vacation visit. It 
became harder and harder 
to return home on subse- 
quent visits, so Bob and his 
wife Susan began thinking 
about making the island 
their new home. The pros- 
pering monthly magazine, 
manuals, and seminars 
gave the Cooper family the 
independence to choose a 
life in a home alongside a 
deserted beach, far from 
the hustle-and-bustle black- 
topped world that most of 
us know Bob was more 
than willing to escape the 
day-to-day hassles of being 
an industry leader so that 
he could concentrate on 
writing and video work. 

The turning point came 




The thrice-annual Satellite Private Terminal Seminars (SPTS) 
are sponsored by Bob Cooper. They offer an outstanding 
way for both hobbyists and dealers to find out the latest in- 
formation about this dynamic industry. Approximately 
1000 persons gathered at the August 1981, seminar in 
Omaha. They had the opportunity to listen to such experts 
as Steve Cibson, who has combined the technology of com- 
puters and satellite TV for some very exciting results. 



when Coop presented the 
plans for his new home to 
the island officials. Their 
curiosity about the satellite 
dish (doesn't everyone have 
a dish in the backyard?) led 
to a proposal that Bob 
share his signals with the 
rest of Providenciales, 
Cooper, who was familiar 
with the long, involved TV 
broadcasting license proce- 
dures in the US, was easily 
convinced There were no 
existing rules for television 
broadcasting in Turks and 
Caicos. Being the first to at- 
tempt such a project meant 
that Bob would be able to 
write the book as he went. 
The first priority, after 
moving to "Provo," was get- 
ting West Indies Video off 



the ground. A 16-foot dish 
was erected to catch pro- 
gram material relayed 
through SATCOM F1. The 
satellite downlink receiver 
provides a baseband video 
signal that modulates an 
"STL" (studio-to-transmit- 
ter fink), in this case, a low- 
power transmitter on chan- 
nel 7. The STL signal is 
aimed at a pair of yagis 
located on Provo's highest 
point, Blue Hill. From this 
"mountaintop" location, 
the signal is translated to be 
broadcast on channel 4 
with 8.5 Watts of output 
power. 

From the project's begin- 
ning there was a dual chal- 
lenge. Establishing a reli- 
able, high-quality TV ser- 



73 Magazine ■ December, 1981 39 



vice is a major task by itself. 
Compounding those head- 
aches are the drawbacks 
that accompany life on a re- 
mote island. Just about ev- 
erything you and 1 take for 
granted has to be shipped 
in, involving a lot of ex- 
pense and time. Commer- 
cial air service is spotty, 
barge traffic infrequent, 
and mail delivery takes 
three weeks, if you're lucky. 

Many families have had 
the misfortune to move into 
a half-finished home, but 
how many have faced the 
challenge of setting up 
house in a TV station while 
the workmen are still ham- 
mering and sawing? The 
construction of a real home 
took a back seat to finishing 
the station. The control 
room doubled as an office, 
while the sound stage 
served as a bedroom for the 
two Cooper children 

The system on Provo 
evolved in stages. At first, 
the remote transmitter was 
powered by automobile 
batteries that required 
weekly recharging. Later, a 
solar-cell array took over, 
reducing the visits to once a 
month. 

Until programmable 
switching equipment is in- 
stalled, someone must be 
present in the control room 
every time a change in the 
program source is made 
When Bob is gone, this task 
falls on his twelve-year-old 
son, Kevin VP5DX 



Except for the fact that 
only one channel is avail- 
able, Turks and Caicos 
viewers are watching tele- 
vision like the premium 
cable channels available in 
the US 

Unlike most American 
television. West Indies Vid- 
eo has no advertising Dur- 
ing early stages of opera- 
tion, the company is giving 
away the service Because 
of the large expense of set 
ting up the station and the 
poor advertising potential, 
Coop is planning to scram- 
ble the signal and charge a 
monthly fee for a decoder, 

With 750 subscribers 
spread over seven islands, 
West Indies Video has 
chosen to use an address- 
able scrambler. After pay- 
ment is received, the de- 
coder will be activated for 
another month by a hurst of 
digital transmissions No 
money, no TV. 

The islands' version of 
the Nielsen ratings is the 
phone calls that Bob and 
his family receive from dis- 
satisfied viewers. Anyone 
wanting to invoke the wrath 
of an entire nation can do 
so by stopping broadcast of 
wrestling and boxing on 
I riday and Saturday nights. 
The most frequently heard 
complaint is that programs 
are not available 24 hours 
a day It seems as though 
IV has taken the people 
of Turks and Caicos from 
being bored and isolated 



to being entertained and 
informed. 

The low-power television 
(LPTV) concept which 
Cooper has proven in Turks 
and Caicos shows great 
promise for revolutionizing 



TV in the United States. The 
FCC is now allowing com- 
munities to enjoy special- 
ized (educational, regional, 
religious, commercial) pro- 
gramming broadcast by 
TO- to 100- Watt UHF and 




This is the site of the Cooper family's dream come true. 
Soon after this photo was taken, work began on a second 
building that will separate their home from the studio. 

40 73 Magazine • December, 1961 



August 14 r 1981 

Dear Satellite Enthusiast 

We all have different dreams and aspirations. For the 
Cooper family, it had long been our hope that we would one 
day be able to move, permanently, to some quiet, outoMhe* 
way Caribbean island where our children could be raised to be 
sel^sufticent, productive young people and where we could, 
as a family unit, make real and useful contributions to the de- 
velopment of "our island." 

Very few people have ever heard of the Turks and Caicos Is- 
lands. A country with around 7,000 total population is not 
often in the headlines. Many maps do not show us to be here; 
the popular Caribbean tourist guidebooks seldom notice that 
we exist. Those that do mention us often make the Incorrect 
assumption that the Turks and Caicos are an extension of 
and a part of the southeastern Bahamas. 

Getting here is very difficult. Mail service fs extremely poor 
telephone service is only slightly better. But within 30 days of 
our arrival here, the Turks and Caicos had live (satellite-deliv- 
ered) television. There was no national sport prior to our ar- 
rival; now, due totally to satellite television, professional 
wrestling is the national spectator sport. Nobody here had 
ever seen or heard world leaders before; they had never seen a 
baseball game T a play, or a movie. They had no idea what Ses- 
ame Street was, or where it was. They had never heard of 
James Bond or Barbara Walters, They were as far removed 
from the 20th century as a people could be. 

We take the responsibility of providing high-quality televi- 
sion to our country very seriously. We spend as much or more 
time making careful program selections as we do working out 
the intricate technical parameters of building a high-quality 
electronic service. 

Satellite television can, in varying forms and shades t do 
much the same thing for areas closer to you than the Turks 
and Caicos. as \\ has done for our country. The satellite ser- 
vice has changed the complexion of the world in just a few 
short years, \n the next five years, we will see such dramatic 
improvements and expansion of service that our efforts today 
will seem very primitive by reflection. 

This is the growth field of the 90s and beyond. This is where 
the most exciting opportunities of your lifetime are to be 
found. The opportunities in this young field are totally unlim- 
ited. You can do anything you want to do, if you carefully learn 
the basics, carefully plan each step, and carefully select 
where and how you will do it. 

Welcome to the 21st century. And if you are ever down our 
way, stop in and say hello to us on the shores of Grace Bay! 
We are the third satellite antenna on the left. 

Bob Cooper 

Reprinted with permission. Copyright 1981, Satellite Televi- 
sion Technology International, Inc. 





It takes a big dish to pull in studio-quality signals in the 
Turks and Caicos Islands. Boh, on the left, is with W2NSD/1 
and WA1KPS. 



VHF stations. Satellites will 
be the popular, low-cost 
way to distribute the video 
and audio to the local LPTV 
stations. Owning and oper- 
ating these stations will not 
require the investment that 
accompanies one of the full 
service stations. 

Ham radio operators 
have a long history of pio- 
neering and popularizing 
new methods of communi- 



cation Concepts like single 
sideband, and now satellite 
television, have been trans- 
formed from expensive and 
complex mediums into 
something that is easily un- 
derstood and affordable. 

For individuals like Bob 
Cooper, radio is accompa- 
nied by "magic," whether 
the challenge is receiving a 
4.0-GHz satellite signal or a 
pileup on six meters ■ 



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42 73 Magazine * December, 1981 



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Satellite Channel Guide 

part II 



Numbers in parens immediately following programming 
description indicate audio subcamefis) used for that par- 
ticular service, 



TR— 9 



TR— 1(1) 



TR-3(5) 



TR— 5(9) 



TR 
TR 
TR 
TR 
TR 



6(11) 
8(15) 
9(17) 
11(21) 

12(23) 



WUWESTAR1(99°W) 
Polarization: All Horizontal 

Occasional Transmissions— porting events, 
news, and network feeds (6.2/6.8) 
The Transtar Network (est. mid-Oct., 1961) 
Occasional Transmissions — sporting events, 
news, and network feeds (6,2/6.8) 
PET (Penthouse Entertainment Television)— 
aduitoriented programming (est. Oct 1, 1981) 
Setec TV— STV feed: first-run movies, concert 
specials, & sporting events (6,8) 
Occasional Transmissions— sporting events, 
news, & network feeds {6.2/6.8) 
Occasional Transmissions — sporting events t 
news, & network feeds (6.2) 
PBS (Public Broadcasting)— schedule A pro* 
gramming (6.8) 

PBS (Public Broadcasting)— schedule B pro- 
gramming (6.8) 

PBS (Public Broadcasting)— schedule C pro- 
gramming (6.8) 

P8S (Public Broadcasting) — schedule D pro- 
gramming (6.8) 
PBS Occasional Feeds (6.8) 



ATT/GTE COMSTAR 1/2 (95° W) 
Polarization: ODD— Vertical; EVEN— Horizontal 

TR — 1 Occasional Transmissions— teleconferencing, 

sporting events, news, & network feeds 
(5.8/6.2/6.8) 

TR — 2 Occasional Transmissions— teleconferencing, 

sporting events, news, & network feeds 
(5.8/6.2/6.8) 

T R — 4 Occasiona I Tra nsmi&sions — teleco nf eren ci ng , 

sporting events, news, & network feeds 
(5.8/6,2/6.8) 

TR— 6 Bravo— performing and cultural arts program- 

ming (6.8 stereo) 

TR— 7 NCN (National Christian Network)— religious 

(6.8) 

Escapade— "floated sex and actior>ortemed 
movies only 

44 73 Magazme • December, 1981 



TR-10 



TR- 13 



TR— 14 



TR— 15 



TR 
TR 



17 
18 



TR— 19 



TR— 21 



TR— 22 



TR— 24 



TR- 



TR-2(3» 



Occasional Transmissions— teleconferencing, 

sporting events, news, & network feeds 

(5*8/6.2/6.8) 

Occasional Transmissions— teleconferencing, 

sporting events, news, & network feeds 

{5.8/6.2/6,8) 

Home Box Cinemax {East)— time- structured 

HBO (6.8) 

Occasional Transmissions— remote feeds 

(5,8/6,2/6,8) 

Occasional Transmissions— teleconferencing, 

sporting events, news, & network feeds 

(5.8/6.2/6.8) 

Occasional Transmissions— teleconferencing, 

sporting events, news, & network feeds 

(5.8/6.2/6.8) 

TBN (Trinity Broadcasting Network)— religious 

(6,8) 

Home Box Office (East)— first-ru n movies, 

sports, & entertainment specials (6,8) 

Occasional Transmissions— remote feeds 

(5.8/6.2/6.8) 

Occasional Transmissions— teleconferencing, 

sporting events, news, & network feeds 

(5.8/6.2/6.8) 

Occasional Transmissions— teleconferencing, 

sporting events, news T & network feeds 

(5.8/6 2/6.8) 

Occasional Transmissions — teleconferencing, 

sporting events, news, & network feeds 

(5.8/6.2/6.8) 

Occasional Transmissions— teleconferencing, 

sporting events, news, & network feeds 

(5.8/6.2/6.8) 

Audio Services on COMSTAR 1/2 

7 Family Radio Network (East) (5.8) 
Family Radio Network (West) (7,7) 

WU WESTAR 3 (91 Q W) 
Polarization- All Horizontal 

Hughes Sports Netwoik— sports events feeds 

(6.2/6,8) 

Occasional Transmissions— sporting events, 

news, & network feeds (6.2/6.8) 



TR-3(5) 
TR— 5(9) 



TR — 6<ll> 



TR— 7{13) 



XEW-TV f Mexico City — Mexico's leading net- 
work station (6.2) 

Occasional Transmissions— sporting events. 
news, & network feeds (6.2/6.8) 
Private Screenings— sexploitation "R"-rated 
movies (6.2) 

CBS Network Contract Channel — Irvertaped 
network feeds (6.2/6.8) 
CBS Cable Network (est. 10-1241) 
Robert Wo4d Communications— occasional 
transmissions: sporting events, news, & net- 
work feeds (6.2/6,8) 

HTN (Home Theatre Network) — quality G and 
PG movies (6 J) 

SIN (Spanish International Network) (6.2) 
SPN (Satellite Program Network) — variety 
entertainment (6.8) 

ABC Network Contract Channel— iive/taped 
network feeds (6.2/6.8) 
CNN (CabJe News Network) Contract Chan- 
nel—news & sporting events feeds (6.2/6.8) 
Occasional Transmissions— sporting events, 
news, & network feeds (6.2/6,8) 
EWT (Eternaf Word TV Network) — religious 
(6.8) 

Studio li B" (Academy of Health Science)— 
medical (6.8) 



Editor's Note: This guide is reprinted with the permission of 
WESTSAT Communications. WESTSAT publishes the Satel* 
lite Channel Chart* six times a year. Subscriptions via first 
class mall are available directly from WESTSAT Communica- 
tions, PO Box 434, Pleasant on CA 94566. Part I of 73' s Satel- 
lite Channel Guide appeared in the November, 1981, issue. 



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Satellite Television Glossary 



part I 



Editors Note: Reprinted with permission of Reed Publications. This glossary is part of trie 86-page Satettiie Television Handbook available 
for $7,95 (add $2.00 for 1st class) from Global TV, PO Box 219-H, Maitland FL 32751. Pari II of the glossary will appear in the next issue of 73 
Magazine, 



Active Device. An electronics component made us- 
ing transistors to amplify or control a signal See 
Passive Device (next issue). 

Adjacent Channel Interference. Signal distortion 
because other signals in nearby frequencies are not 
properly filtered. A bandpass filter allows only the 
selected frequency band to pass through it removing 
adjacent channels. 

AFC (Automatic Frequency Control). A satellite TV 
receiver feedback circuit which prevents the tuning 
oscillators from drifting away from the center fre- 
quency of the selected channel due to temperature 
change or other instabilities. A phase-locked loop 
demodulator usually provides an AFC output back to 
the LO- 

AGC (Automatic Gain Control), A satellite TV 
receiver feedback circuit which controls the gain 
(amplification) of the i-f amplifiers so that the signal 
input to the demodulator will be constant, despite in- 
coming signals of varying strength from different 
satellite transponders. AGC can be overridden by a 
manual gain control to make signal strength mea- 
surements in most receivers. 

Alignment The process of tuning (or tweaking) a cir- 
cuit to compensate for the approximate tolerances 
of the components during assembly, using test equip- 
ment. 

AM (Amplitude Modulation). An easy method of 
transmitting program signals on a carrier frequency 
where the relative strength (amplitude) of the carrier 
is made proportionally equal to the amplitude of the 
program signal AM is simpler but more susceptible 
to noise than FM, Satellite TV uses FM for both audio 
and video modulation, but the user's TV set takes the 

46 73 Magaztne • December, 1981 



satellite TV receiver's output and detects the video 
as AM, the audio as FM. 

ANIK 1. A Canadian TV satellite operated by 
TELSAT, It has 12 transponders in the vertical format 
only and is located at 104 degrees west longitude on 
the geostationary orbit belt 

ANIK B. A Canadian TV satellite in the ANIK series 
located at 109 degrees west longitude, It has 12 ver- 
tical transponders. 

Aperture Efficiency. The ratio of captured signal to 
the theoretical maximum for a given dish anten- 
na/feed combination. The design goal is 100% aper- 
ture eff iciency, but most TVRO dishes perform at on- 
ly 50-60% to attain low noise characteristics and 
ease of construction. Some VHF/UHF antennas, on 
the other hand, can approach the 100% goal with an 
array of reflective elements. 

ARO (Audio Receive Only). Small dish antennas used 
by radio networks for music and news programming 
distribution from TV satellites (mostly WESTARS). 
Dishes 2 meters and smaller have been considered by 
radio broadcast stations. 

Artwork, A printed circuit design term which 
describes the printed circuit pattern of etched and 
conductor surfaces on a PC board. 

Attenuator. A passive device which causes a known 
insertion loss in the signal transmission line. It is com- 
monly used to prevent a very strong signal from over- 
loading a receiver. They are also used as test equip- 
ment and in VHF/UHF broadcast reception to elimi- 
nate weak ghost signals. 

Audio Subcarriers. The sound in a TV satellite com- 
posite signal is encoded in a narrow portion of the 















video carrier, usually a high-fidelity FM signal at 6.2 
or 6.8 MHz as measured after the main signal has 
been demodulated. Other satellite subcarriers can 
carry digital and text information as well 
Azimuth. Compass direction from due north 
measured in degrees clockwise, True north can be 
found by sighting the star Polaris at night or by ap- 
plying a local correction for magnetic deviation to a 
compass reading, 

Azimuth-Elevation Mount. An inexpensive movable 
dish antenna mount and aiming system. It works like 
an oarlock where one pivot allows rotation in the 
horizontal plane about the azimuth angle from due 
north. The other pivot is the elevation above the 
horizon. This mount can be more difficult to aim 
than a polar mount, See Polar Mount (next issue). 
Balun. An impedance-matching passive device locat- 
ed between a 750hm coaxial cable and a 300Ohm 
device, such as a TV set or VHF/UHF antenna. 
Bandpass Filter, A type of electronic frequency filter 
which severely limits signal frequencies above and 
below the selected frequencies, preventing adjacent 
channel interference Satellite TV receivers use these 
also to remove noise from around the edges of the se- 
lected channel, usually 30 MHz wide 

Baseband. This is the output signal of a video 
camera, videotape recorder, or satellite TV receiver 
before remodulation (so that it can be viewed on an 
ordinary TV set). A signal in a satellite TV receiver 
goes from 4 GHz through the downconverter to be- 
come i-f and then through an FM demodulator to be- 
come baseband. American NTSC TV bandwidth is 42 
MHz at baseband. 

Bearnwidth. The beamwidth of a dish antenna is the 
angle of sky which can be illuminated (picked up or 
sent out) by the dish. Within that arc satellites can be 
seen from the TVRO dish. Large dishes have narrow 
beamwidths which reduce noise from its sides. Small 
dishes have wider beamwidths and are noisier, but 
easier to aim. 

Bias. That part of an amplifier circuit which provides 
power for a transistor and supplies the energy for its 
output signal. On an LNA, the bias circuits are on a 
separate PC board. 

Bipolar. A type of silicon transistor used in LNAs and 
other high-frequency, low-noise devices. They are 
superior in noise quality to ordinary transistors but 
are inferior to FETs, especially CaAsFETs. 
Black Box. An engineering abstraction in which a 
device is considered only for its effect, not for its 
construction. Naive users can treat satellite TV com- 
ponents as black boxes until they are ready to learn 
more about them. They need to know only what they 
require and how to hook it together 
Blanking Pulses. That part of a video TV signal which 
for an instant blanks out the screen, enabling the 
electron beam to fly back to the start of a horizontal 
line or vertical frame. This is wasted time as far as in- 
formation transmission is concerned and some 
methods for multiplexing data channels into a TV 
picture use the vertical blanking interval. 
BNC Connector. Easy to lock coaxial cable fittings 
which interface signals in the i-f portions of a satellite 
TV receiver. They work well in the 70-MHz range. 
Breadboard Circuit. A prototype of an electronic cir- 






cuit in which changes are easily made, facilitating 
construction and debugging of the design. 
Broadcast Satellite. A form of international frequen- 
cy allocation where only the uplink stations are iden- 
tified (licensed). See Fixed Satellite for comparison. 
C Band, A loose military designation for 3J-4,2-CHz 
microwave frequency band used for the downlinks 
of satellite TV signals. Wavelengths are between 8.10 
and 7.14 centimeters (3.19 and 2.81 inches). 
ON (Carrier to Noise) Ratio* The ratio of the carrier 
strength and noise strength measured in dB The 
higher the C/N, the higher the S/N and quality of the 
resulting TV picture. Above 11 dB is superior, above 
7 dB is good, and below that the picture quickly be- 
comes extremely noisy. See also S/N (next issue) and 
FM Improvement (below). 

Cable TV. See CATV below. 

Carrier. A strong signal occupying a communications 
channel which is modulated (AM, FM, etc J to trans- 
mit program information. In an abstract sense, the 
carrier transports the program material from the 
transmitter to the receiver. 

Cassegrain Antenna, A folded beam antenna which 
enjoys the advantages of a long focal length (high 
aperture efficiency and gain} without the disadvan- 
tages of lengthy and awkward feed supports. The 
subreflector is hyperbolic in cross section and is 
precisely adjusted to concentrate the incoming mi* 
crowave fronts to a feed horn located at the center of 
the dish. If the subreflector is elliptical in cross sec- 
tion, the antenna is also called Gregorian. 

CATV [Community Antenna Television). Commonly 
known as cable TV r it has a central antenna tower 
(VHF/UHF/FM) together with a satellite TV dish 
antenna and captures high-quality broadcasts for 
subsequent sale through a signal distribution system, 
typically using coaxial cables to each home. 

CCIR (International Radio Consultative Committee). 

A division of the ITU (International Telecommunica- 
tions Union) which formulates international stan- 
dards for radio communications, including the pre- 
emphasis and de-emphasis of satellite TV signals in a 
receiver. 

CITT (International Telegraph and Telephone Con- 
sultative Committee). A division of the ITU (Interna- 
tional Telecommunications Union) which formulates 
international standards for telegraph and telephone 
communications including uplinks and downlinks of 
satellite TV. See also CCIR, 

Channel. A frequency band allocation which defines 
the limits of the contained broadcast carrier signal. 
In the USA, channels are allocated by the FCC. 
Chip. An integrated circuit or section of a silicon 
wafer. 

Chip Capacitor. A leadless capacitor small enough to 
be soldered directly on mtcrostrip or stripline micro- 
wave PC boards. They must be used instead of ordi- 
nary capacitors because the leads would alter the in- 
ductive characteristics of the circuit. They are used 
to build LNAs. 

Chroma, That part of the video signal which contains 
the color information. 

Circular Polarization. Right- or fefthand screw sense 
of microwave signal polarization used by INTELSAT, 
A hybrid mode feed should be used to avoid the 3-d B 

73 Magazine • December, 1981 47 









loss with standard linear (vertical and horizontal 
polarization) feeds. 

Circulator. See Isolator, 

Close-Captioned TV. A text service for the hard-of- 
hearing TV audience which decodes a text subcarrier 
and displays it at the bottom of the TV frame on the 
accompanying video picture. It does not interfere 
with the standard audio FM subcarrier, 
CNR (Carrier to Noise Ratio). See C/N, 
Coaxial Cable. A signal transmission line that is made 
using a center conductor separated from a shielding 
cylindrical outer conductor by a dielectric, usually 
polyethylene, sometimes air, in a low-loss applica- 
tion. 

Commercial TVRCh A strong dish capable of 
withstanding hurricane force winds, an LNA with a 
lengthy MTBF (Mean Time Between Failures) and 
good noise figure, a drift-free, low-distortion 
receiver, and a high-quality modulator; all operating 
at a 3<IB margin above the receiver's FM threshold. 
This system supplies programming for sale through 
MATV or CATV distribution. 

Common Carrier. An operator or lessor of satellite 
TV transponders which in turn leases them to other 
parties or transmits programming for others without 
controlling or owning the content. 4-CHz satellite TV 
is not legally a broadcast service and the FCC does 
not make the satellite TV common carriers (RCA 
Americom, Western Union ) abide by the con- 
straints of broadcasting law. 

Comparator. In an FM demodulator using a phase- 
locked loop (PLL) f this is the electronic component 
which compares the phase relationship of the input 
signal with the signal from the tracking local oscilla- 
tor (LO). The output signal from the comparator is 
proportional to the phase error between the two in- 
put signals and is used to control the LO. 
Composite TV Signal. This is a combination of video 
picture, color, audio, and synchronization informa- 
tion. 

COMSTAR I. An American satellite which can carry 
video but is operated by the telephone company, 
AT&T. Since it is underutilized, eventually it will 
carry more video. It has 24 transponders, 12 which 
are vertical linear polarized and 12 which are hori- 
zontal linear polarized. It is located at 128 degrees 
west longitude. 

COMSTAR II. An American satellite, second in the 
COMSTAR series, which has leased 11 transponders 
to RCA for cable video programming. It also has 24 
transponders and is located at 95 degrees west 
longitude. 

COMSTAR III. An American satellite, third in the 
COMSTAR series, which like its sisters can be ex- 
pected to carry more video programming in the 
future It also has 24 transponders and is located at 
87 degrees west longitude. 

dB (decibel). A ratio expressed logarithmically which 
allows easy calculation of losses and gains. Two sig- 
nals, S1 and S2, can be compared using dB according 
to the following equation: dB = 10 log (S1/S2). Often 
S2 is a known reference level. If a signal is 3 dB over 
the reference, then it is twice as strong; if it is — 3 dB 
under the reference, then it is half as strong. 
dBi Decibel gain of an antenna over a reference 



antenna. 

dBm. Decibel power of a signal over a 1 -milliwatt ref- 
erence. 

dBW, Decibel power of a signal over a 1-Watt refer- 
ence. 

De-emphasis. A selective restoration of the high- 
frequency end of a satellite TV channel within the 
satellite TV receiver. This is performed after the FM 
carrier is demodulated to baseband. See also Pre- 
emphasis (next issue). 

Detector. A demodulator circuit in a receiver which 
extracts the program signal from the carrier. 
Dielectric. An electrical insulator which can carry an 
electric field when near a conductor It is used to 
make transmission lines, microwave PC boards, and 
capacitors. 

Diplexer. A section of waveguide which joins two 
microwave signals in an uplink Earth station. 
Dipole. An active antenna element located in the 
feed which collects the concentrated satellite TV sig- 
nal and conducts it to the LNA, It is called a probe in 
this case. 

Directional Coupler, In an MATV or CATV signal 
distribution system, this passive device drops a signal 
line for a subscriber's TV set from the main trunk line. 
It is a superior performance signal splitter from the 
high level (strength) trunk line. 
Discrete Components- Unlike an integrated circuit 
(IC), in this assembly technique each part is built 
separately and then assembled. 
Discriminator. An FM demodulator circuit in a 
satellite TV receiver. 

Dithering, See Energy Dispersal Waveform, 
DOMSAT (Domestic Satellite). Distinguishes US and 
Canadian satellites from INTELSATs. 
Double Conversion. This downconversion technique 
converts from 4 GHz to the final i-f (typically 70 
MHz) in two stages instead of just one, so that poten- 
tial image noise from the first mixer stage is 
eliminated See also Single Conversion (next issue). 
Downconversion. The process of converting the 3J- 
4.2-GHz microwave signal down into a frequency 
range in which signal processing components are less 
expensive. Typically, this is a VHF frequency of 
70 MHz. 

Downconverter. A microwave part (consisting of 
local oscillators (LO), mixers, and bandpass filters) 
which accomplishes downconversion. This is the 
front end of a satellite TV receiver 
Downlink. The communication path from a TV 
satellite to its ground (Earth) stations. 
Duroid. The brand name of a microwave printed cir- 
cuit board specified in many LNA and downconvert- 
er plans. Mostly D-5880 22M27 from Rogers Corp. 
has been used. 

Dynamic Range. The weakest through strongest sig- 
nals that a receiver will accept as input. Signals 
which are too weak cause excess noise and signals 
which are too strong cause overloading and possibly 
modulation distortion. 

East Coast Feed. Satellite TV programming sched- 
uled for the convenience of US east coast viewers 
(Eastern Time Zone), 

EIRP (Effective Isotropic Radiated Power). A measure 
of the relative strength of the satellite TV signal ex- 



48 73 Magazine • December, 1981 



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pressed in dBW. The USA ranges from 30 in Florida to 
37 dBW at boresight in the midwest. Home satellite 
TV reception becomes much less expensive at 34 
dBW and above, Footprint maps showing relative sig- 
nal strengths in EIRP are filed at the FCC and ITU 
before the TV satellite is launched. 

Elevation, Angle above the horizon measured in 
degrees Zero is the horizon and ninety degrees is 
directly overhead. Elevation angles are used to aim 
the dish antenna at a TV satellite 

Energy Dispersal Waveform. This is a triangular- 
shaped signal at 30 Hz synchronized with the vertical 

blanking interval in the TV signal from the satellite 
which ensures that the signal will average its power 
out over the whole channel, even when just the car* 
rier is present. This waveform is removed by the 
receiver after FM demodulation. 

Etched PC Board. Acid is used over a mask (artwork] 
to dissolve away excess copper conductor leaving a 
conductor pattern on the PC board. 
F/D. Focal-length-to-diameter ratio of a given dish 
antenna. Generally higher ratios yield better aper- 
ture efficiencies, but may be more susceptible to 
sidelobe noise. 

FCC (Federal Communications Commission), The US 
agency which regulates communications, including 
satellite TV. 

Feed. The antenna feed is a section of shaped 
waveguide which correctly collects the dish's 
reflected microwave signal and conducts it to the 
LNA's probe Generally, a feed is uniquely designed 
for each dish antenna type- 
Feed. A programming term which means a stream of 
programming material, for example, in the process of 
transmission over the TV satellite. Examples of its 
usage are: sports feed, east coast feed, and network 
feed. 

Feedline. Coaxial cable running from the LNA to the 
satellite TV receiver. 

FET (Field Effect Transistor)* A low-noise, high- 
frequency transistor amplifier which has a current 
source, gate, and drain, The gate is a voltage* 
controlled resistor which regulates the power flow- 
ing from the source to the drain, 
Field-Strength Meter, A CATV and TV test device 
used to measure power levels on a transmission line 
or VHF/UHF antenna 

Fixed Satellite. A form of international frequency 
band allocation where all the sending (uplink) and 
receiving (downlink) stations are identified. This is 
the current status of the 4-CHz TV satellite system 
See also Broadcast Satellite above. 
FM Improvement The potential noise reduction in 
an FM signal due to the demodulation process in a 
satellite TV receiver. This figure is at most 38.6 dB 
and is attained above the FM threshold. Below this 
point it rapidly drops from 37.6 dB, Above threshold; 
S/N = C/N + 38.6dB, 

FM Threshold. An input signal level which is just 
enough to enable the demodulator circuits to extract 
a good picture from the carrier. With test equipment, 
static threshold is the point at which S/N drops more 
than 1 dB from the straight graph line: SN = C/N + 38 
dB. Typically, FM threshold is 7-8 dB in a satellite TV 
receiver with threshold extension. 

50 72 Magazine • December, 1901 



Footprint. A signal strength map showing the EIRP 
contours of equal signal from a TV satellite transpon- 
der on a given part of the Earth's surface. 
Frequency Agile. This is a feature of satellite TV 
receivers which enables them to tune in all the 12 or 
24 channels from a satellite Receivers sold without 
this feature are dedicated to one channel and can be 
tuned by switchable crystals. 

Frequency Coordination. A service which uses com- 
puters and a USA database to resolve potential or ex- 
isting conflicts between various users of the same 
+CHZ microwave band. The long-lines (long-dis- 
tance) division of the Bell networks uses 4-GHz 
microwave towers throughout the USA, A TVRO 
looking in the direction of a transmitter may be 
jammed unless shielding can be used. 
Frequency Modulation (FM). A method of transmit- 
ting program material which is more interference- 
free than AM, The frequency of the carrier signal is 
made proportional to the amplitude of the program 
signal. 

Frequency Reuse. See Polarization (next issue). 
Front -to-Back Ratio- The ratio in dB of the antenna 
gain in the forwards direction to the antenna gain in 
the rear direction It is a measure of the noise poten- 
tial from the rear. 

C/T (Gain over Noise Temperature)* A TVRO measure 
of quality expressed in dB. The higher this figure, the 
better the system. It can be improved by increasing 
gain or by decreasing the system noise, C/T (degrees 
Kelvin)= antenna gain/log (antenna noise tempera- 
ture + LNA noise temperature) 

GaAsFET (Gallium Arsenide Field Effect Transistor). 
This low-noise device, although expensive, is used in 
the highest quality LNAs. The term is pronounced 
gasfet. 

Geostationary. Dubbed the Clarke Orbit in honor of 
Arthur C Clarke who first described it, This circular 
orbit above the equator is precisely the altitude at 
which any size satellite will revolve around the Earth 
once every 24 hours, From the ground below, it thus 
appears parked in space overhead, and from above, 
one-third of the Earth's surface can be seen, TV satel- 
lites are separated by 4 degree intervals on this orbit 
to avoid mutual interference 38,000 km (22,300 
miles) high. 

Ghost. One or more dim copies in a TV picture 
caused by reflected VHF or UHF broadcasts. Also 
called multipath distortion, this is not present in 
satellite TV signals because extremely directional 
dish antennas are used. 

GHz (Gigahertz). The standard abbreviation for 
billions of cycles per second. 3J-4.2 GHz is the 
microwave frequency band allocated for satellite TV 
in the USA. 

Global Beam. An INTELSAT antenna downlink pat- 
tern covering a third of the Earth's surface, They are 
boresighted at the middle of an ocean to provide ser- 
vice to nations all the way around the ocean basin. 

Guard Channel, Unused portions of the frequency 
spectrum which are located between program chan- 
nels to prevent adjacent channel interference. 
Harmonics. Spurious signals produced by an oscilla- 
tor circuit which occur at integral multiples above 
the resonant frequency of the oscillator. They appear 



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73 Magazine • December, 1981 51 



like overtones on a single piano note They can cause 
design problems in a receiver circuit unless proper 
filters are used to remove unwanted harmonics, 
HBO (Home Box Office). The most popular pay-TV 
network which is distributed on SATCOM PL 
Headend. The point on a signal distribution system 
where UHF/VHF/FM and satellite TV signals are cap* 
tured, combined, and fed into the system. 
Hemispherical Beam. An INTELSAT antenna down- 
link pattern consisting of two overlapping spot 
beams to cover a hemisphere. 

High Pass Filter. A circuit which features high im- 
pedance for relatively low frequencies and low im- 
pedance for high frequencies, in effect blocking the 
low-frequency component in a signal. See also Low 
Pass Filter and Bandpass Filter* 

Horn Antenna. A type of satellite TV antenna which 
is shielded against sidelobe interference. The incom- 
ing signal is reflected 90 degrees into a cone-shaped 
feedhorn They are much more expensive than a dish 
antenna of the same aperture. 

IC (Integrated Circuit). A solid state complex device 
which is mass produced on single silicon chips. 
I-f (Intermediate Frequency). For satellite TV 
receivers, this is usually 70 MHz and is the frequency 
at which most of the signal processing takes place 
because the design is simplified and 70-MHz parts 
are less expensive than 4-CHz equivalents, 
I-f Strip. A PC module which amplifies and filters the 
output signal of the downconverter in a receiver and 
inputs it to the FM demodulater Its gain is controlled 



SUB AUDIBLE TONE 
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102 DTMF Repeater Controller 
The \ 01 DTMF Controller Is a modular system designed to provtde 
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52 73 Magazine ■ December, 1981 



by the ACC circuit. 

Image Noise, When a signal is downcon verted using 
a mixer and LO, noise can be passed through the 
system that is on the mirror image frequency from 
the selected channel with the LO frequency as the 
point of symmetry. Subsequent bandpass filters 
remove this noise in double-conversion downcon- 
verters. A preselector filter in single-conversion re- 
ceivers does the same thing. 

Impedance. The relative ease with which signals pass 
through a device or conductor measured in Ohms. 
Impedance Matching. The design of a signal inter- 
face such that the signal transmitted through it is 
maximized and the reflected signal is minimized. 
Standard impedance for LNAs is 50 Ohms and for 
satellite i-f circuits 75 Ohms. Most signal distribution 
systems interface at 75 Ohms impedance. 

INTELSAT, International (primarily non-communist) 
satellite agency whose member nations lease tran- 
sponder capacity on its satellite system It provides 
at least some TV in all parts of the world, but signal 
tIRP is often quite less than US domestic satellites. 

Isolator. A device which is a one-way valve for 

microwave signals which prevents stray receiver sig- 
nals from leaking out past the LNA onto the antenna. 
It also facilitates the design of the LNA by im- 
pedance matching the feed probe to the first LNA 
amplifier stage. Most LNAs have an isolator attached 
between the CPR-229 feed flange and the main am- 
plifier box. 

Kelvin. The scientific temperature scale which 
measures thermal noise characteristics of micro- 
wave devices. Performance improves with decreas- 
ing noise temperature 0° K equals ^273 degrees 
Celsius and —459 degrees F. The Kelvin scale starts 
at absolute zero and is graduated like the Celsius 
scale. 

Launch Vehicle. A NASA term for the rocket used to 
place satellites in orbit. For TV satellites this is usual- 
ly the Delta, although the Space Shuttle will take 
over this job in the 1980s. 

Level (High or Low). In communications, level means 
the same as amplitude or relative strength. 
LO (Local Oscillator). A closely-connected frequency 
source which is typically controlled by a resonating 
crystal or by an input voltage. See also VCO and VTO 
(next /ssuej. They are a major component of down- 
converters and demodulators in receivers 

Lobe. An area of strong reception in a graph of anten- 
na gain versus angle off boresight. In highly direc- 
tional dish antennas, the front lobe is high gain and 
the side and back lobes are much weaker. 

Look Angle. Pointing angles for aiming an antenna at 
a TV satellite for a given site This term is also used 
when referring to antenna elevation alone, It is im- 
portant when considering possible site obstructions 
or extra antenna noise due to a low elevation (look 
angle) 

Low Pass Filter A circuit which features high im- 
pedance for relatively high frequencies and low im- 
pedance for low frequencies, tn effect blocking the 
high-frequency component in a signal. See also High 
Pass Filter and Bandpass Filter above, 
Luminance. That part of a video signal which con- 
trols the brightness of the image on the TV screen, 

Reader Sen/tee tor t&cmg page ** 74* 



Movie Stars 
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Your favorite stj ommg nff the satellites right now in 

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The new Heathkit Earth Station 

It includes a 3-meter Sat*. Antenna with a single-axis 
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signals from the entire satellite arc. It s a heavy-duty, eommer- 
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Special L & Amplifier End Down-Converter converts 

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includes everything you need to determine a clear line-of-sighl 
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y Heathkit products 

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* 



ng of some satellite TV channels mav require the custom stain 



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TVRO Receivers: 
The Inside Story 

Satellite Central, part II 



Getting 4-GHz signals 
down to watchable 
video is no easy feat. Noted 
satellite TV pioneer Paul 
Shuch N6TX once observed 
that there are perhaps as 
many receiver designs as 
there are receiver desig- 
ners. Despite the fact that 
satellite TV is new, we've 
already experienced at 
least two generations worth 
of improvements in receiv- 
er design philosophy. Both 
methods employ your gar- 
den-variety superhetero- 
dyne conversion principle. 
But that's about the only 
similarity. 

The major hassle is deal- 
ing with the microwave sig- 
nal itself. The components 
are either too expensive 
and hard to get or they are 



incredibly fragile and roll 
over and turn belly up when 
you approach them with a 
soldering iron! So the logi- 
cal solution is to convert 
the troublesome 4-GHz sig- 
nal down to something we 
can massage with parts we 
can understand, like coils 
and capacitors rather than 
pea-sized chip caps and PC 
board traces that are al- 
leged to be tuned circuits! 
There will be plenty of time 
for that later. For the time 
being, let's just get our 
feet wet. 

Referring to Fig. 1 r we 
have a typical dual-conver- 
sion receiver design. This is 
the "classic" or "by-the- 
book" method used by 
most commercial firms to- 
day. A voltage-tunable lo- 



cal oscillator (LO) mixes 
with the incoming 4-GHz 
signal down to a 400- to 
1200-MHz first intermedi- 
ate frequency (i-f) t This is in 
keeping with the spirit of a 
textbook approach of se- 
lecting an i-f about one- 
tenth of the incoming signal 
(the "divide-by-10" rule}. 
After some needed amplifi- 
cation, the signal is mixed 
again down to what is 
known as baseband (be- 
cause we're done with con- 
version), amplified even 
more, and then detected 
with either a PLL or discrim- 
inator circuit. Baseband is 
generally 70 MHz, an in- 
dustry standard. 

So Much For Basics 

The key points worth 



SIGNAL 

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PROCESS 




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WIDTH 



PLL OH 
DISCRIMINATOR 



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AUDIO 2 



Fig. 1. Dual-conversion design The first VTO mixes with the downlink signal into the first i-f 
amplifier. The second VTO is fixed. Cain distribution may vary in different designs. The 
70-MHz bandpass filter must be flat in the passband for best results. 

54 73 Magazine * December, 1981 



noting here are conversion 
to a lower frequency where 
we can crank in lots of 
easy-to-find gain, and 
sticking to the rules. But 
why do that? Well, conver- 
sion makes a lot of sense 
After all, the incoming 
signal may very well be 
around — 50 to — 60 dBrn at 
4 GHz and a 564 PLL detec- 
tor chip wants something 
quite different before it will 
deliver pictures. 

But who made the rules 
about dividing by 10 and 
that nonsense? The guys 
that got there first, of 
course. They did some 
arithmetic and made a dis- 
covery of some impor- 
tance. A single-conversion 
design has problems if you 
chose a first (and only) LO 
just 70 MHz from the de- 
sired signal. You get down 
to baseband a lot quicker, 
but you get something else 
in the bargain. . the image 
signal as seen in Fig, 2. 

Remember from last 
month's Satellite Central 
that the satellite band (3.7 
to 4.2 GHz) is 500 MHz 
wide So even an LO spaced 
some distance away # 
whether above or below the 



desired frequency, can still 
convert an undesired image 
signal to baseband. 

Now you could filter out 
the image on the front end, 
but you would have to 
make the filter track with 
the LO to remove all im- 
ages as you tuned At these 
frequencies, a tracking fil- 
ter is no easy beast to tame. 
So rather than wrestle with 
the problem, receiver de- 
signers such as Stanford 
professor Taylor Howard 
W6HD adopted the dual- 
conversion philosophy and 
proceeded to knock 'em 
dead with the first low-cost 
TVRO! The design has be- 
come a sort of standard of 
this new industry with sev- 
eral manufacturers dupli- 
cating it piece by piece, 
even to the last resistor, 
probably because Howard 
made his complete design 
available to anyone. 

An Interesting 
Turn of Events 

As an historical note, 
Howard designed his re- 
ceiver with available com- 
ponents. The key word here 
is "available/' White you 
could indeed call Avantek 
and order an 8240 voltage- 
tuned oscillator (VTO) or 
call Vari-L for a DBM-500 
mixer, you also could sit 
around and tear pages off 
your calendar while waiting 
for delivery! I had time to 
traipse all over California 
scouting up surplus dishes 
as the clock ticked away. 

Clearly, something had 
to be done. Several ama- 
teurs, most notably Robert 
Coleman K4AWB, made an 
interesting discovery. Not 
only were surplus mixers 
lying around, but single 
conversion could be made 
to work! A quick doodle 
with pencil and paper sug- 
gested it might be worth the 
trouble. 

If we want to receive 
transponder 17 on SAT- 
COM 1, its frequency is 
4040 MHz, Setting the LO 
down 70 MHz, to 3970 
MHz, will indeed pull tran- 



sponder 1 7 into our 70-MHz 
i-f, but also the image fre- 
quency as well, which is 70 
MHz below the LO Now it 
happens that's dead-on 
transponder 10 at 3900 
MHz. So it can't possibly 
workl Or can it? We know 
that RCA and COMSTAR 
birds have 24 transponders. 
And we also know that the 
odd-numbered transpon- 
ders (such as transponder 
17) are vertically polarized. 
But if the even transpon- 
ders are horizontally polar- 
ized (such as transponder 
10), then our receiving an- 
tenna will be cross-polar- 
ized to the interfering signal 
and hopefully ignore it! 

So it appears that single 
conversion does indeed 
work despite the prospects 
of image noise. There is a 
limit. As a rule, cross-polari- 
zation may only reduce the 
image signal 20 dB, but re- 
cent efforts at image-reject 
mixer design and a new 
tracking filter eliminate this 
annoyance, as seen in Fig. 3, 

Baseband At Last 

Nearly all of the fore- 
going problems are a result 
of wideband FM video de- 
tection circuitry not work- 
ing too well at high inter- 
mediate frequencies How- 
ever, it can be made to 
work, A few manufacturers 
have designed excellent 
discrete PLL circuits that 
work at 700 MHz, making 
signal conversion a piece 
of cake. But 70 MHz re- 
mains as the i-f most used at 
the moment. 

As I mentioned before, 



OPTIONAL 
PRESELECTOR 



quite a few receiver designs 
utilize a 5b4 PLL detector 
chip at the end of the 
70-MHz hf chain. The prob- 
lem here is that the 564 is 
rated to only 50 MHz Still, 
a handful of 5b4s will al- 
ways yield several that 
work at higher frequencies, 
depending on the source. 
But a drastic improvement 
is 564 operation can be had 
by cleverly dividing the 
70-MHz i-f signals by two 
with a cheap JK flip-flop 
chip like a 74LS112 and op- 
erating it at 35 MHz! 

Other detector designs in 
use today are quadrature 
detectors and linear dis- 
criminators. They offer ad- 
vantages and disadvan- 
tages when compared to 
the PLL. While the PLL of- 
fers excellent performance 
at receiver threshold and 
below, it takes second 
place to the discriminator 
and quadrature-type detec- 
tor when signals are well 
above threshold. Remem- 
ber from last month that 
we must try for a carrier- 
to-noise ratio of about 10 
dB or better for clear pic- 
tures. (That translates to at 
least a 12-foot dish and a 
120° LNA for most loca- 
tions in the USA.) Still, you 
don't need nearly as much 
gain for a PLL as you do a 
discriminator. 

To work properly, the 
discriminator must see a 
signal that is amplified well 
into limiting This is the 
main reason why quality re- 
ceivers look bad compared 
to cheapy models when 
tested on marginal systems. 



3.7-4.2 0«l >- 




IMAGE 

REJECT 

MIXER 



5O0UHI TVRO BAUD 



I 70 TO 

urn M«f 



FREQUENCY 



^o 



I 



UHD£Si*fD 



QC*l*£0 
SWaAL 



Fig. 2. An in-band LO can 
produce an undesired image 

signal. Luckily, this image 
is cross-polarized to the 
desired signal. It's not 
enough for perfect pictures, 
so other methods are neces- 
sary to ensure adequate im- 
age rejection. 



SATELLITE TV 
HAM NET! 

Tune in Sundays at 1600 
GMT on 14,311 MHz for 
the Satellite TV Net. Lind- 
sey Riddle W5JG in New 
Orleans is Net Control. 
Then Ken Rae WB0POP 
takes the reins at 1900 
GMT. You* 1 1 be amazed at 
what you can learn in just 
an hour or so. 



J 



But just cranking up the 
gain is not enough, as some 
experimenters will tell you, 
because not all if amplifi- 
ers will limit symmetrically; 
A weak location or a 
smaller dish can still be 
made to work, thanks to the 
PLL. 

But suppose you've dug 
deep into your pocketbook 
and found enough money 
to allow you to build your 
system so it operates well 
above threshold^ Then the 
discriminator or quadrature 
detectors really shine be- 
cause the PLL can some- 
times break up an other- 



TRACKING 
FILTER 



h&^ 




70MH* 
BAND PAS S 



DLTfcCIOH 



PROCESS 



20 30MH1 
WIDTH 



PLL OR 
DISCRIMINATOR 



5D4b* 
GAIN 
t«C5t2J HiC 

MC i J50 MOT I 




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VTO 

lAVEMtlk 
0360) m 



DE-EMPHASIS 

AMD CLAMP 



VIDEO 



AUDIO 



6 ZMHl 



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AUDIO 1 



-• AUDIO 2 



Fig. 3. Single-conversion design. The problem with single conversion is that an image signal 
can be detected, Tracking filters and clever image-reject mixer design can reduce the image 
by 20 dB or more, A good high-gain LNA will overcome mixer losses in this design. 

73 Magazine • December, 1981 55 





HOfttfOMTJLL SYNC 
TIPS CL*M*»ED TO DC 



DC 



DC 



Fig. 4. (a) Video demodulator output showing video riding on energy dispersal wave, (b) 
Energy dispersal wave eliminated by dc clamp circuit. 




UNGLAUPED 
VID-EO IN >- 



OUT 




SYMC 

DET-TfltG 



I 



CLAMPED 
■*■ VIDEO 
OUT 



SAMPLE 

AND 

HOLD 



Fig. 5, Typical diode clamp circuit used in economy receivers vs. feedback clamping taken 
from voltage samples of the video signal during the sync pulse interval. 



wise fine picture when 
tracking wide deviations. 
You see an annoying streak* 
ing effect in the video. 
Tweaking the bandwidth 
can help to cure this 
problem. 

Now if the PLL works 
pretty well at the 35-MHz 
reduced i-f, you might 
wonder what would happen 
if we divided again and 
again down to nearly dc. 
Perhaps the only problem 
with that idea is that we 
bump into Carson's rule 
along the way + Simply 
stated, the practical band- 
width of a frequency modu- 
lated signal should be equal 
to twice the sum of the 
maximum frequency devia- 
tion and the highest modu- 
lating frequency. If we 
know the typical frequency 
deviation as 1075 MHz, 
then twice the highest mod- 
ulating frequency (how 
about 5 MHz for video?) 
when added to this devia- 
tion yields a projected 
bandwidth of 31 .5 MHz Ac- 
tually, it could be more if 
we lay in a 6.2-MHz or a 
6.8-MHz sound subcarrier, 
Bandwidth = 2 (10.75 MHz 
+ 5 MHz) =31 ,5 MHz. 

Watching Intelligent Noise 

Okay, how wide an i-f is 
necessary? It really de- 



pends on your carrter-to- 
noise ratio (C/N). If you 
have a small dish in a weak 
footprint, you may very 
well be at threshold or be* 
low. A wide i-f bandwidth 
will only make matters 
worse because you will 
appear to be seeing more 
noise than video. While our 
eyes tend to integrate 
enough to discern intelli- 
gence, nice and clear pic- 
tures are what we really 
want. If you worked out the 
downlink equations we dis- 
cussed last month, you well 
know that restricting the 
bandwidth by more than 
Carson's rule can make a 
big improvement in C/N. 
But there is a limit. 

The problem then is to 
figure out how to squeeze a 
wide car into a narrow 
garage! If we don't mind 
scratching the chrome, we 
can just barely get it in. 
Likewise, we can reduce the 
i-f bandwidth to 17 MHz or 
so and have viewable vid- 
eo, but at the expense of 
the finish on the pictures. 
More importantly, the carri- 
er-to-noise ratio may im- 
prove enough to make the 
pictures very watchable. 
That is until you wonder 
what happened to the def- 
inition and why the frizzy 
effect when flat color fields 



are transmitted. Clearly, 
there is a limit to bandwidth 
restriction. Whatever was 
out there at those wide 
deviations is gone now! 

You can reduce the dis- 
tortion somewhat if you 
turn down the color and 
watch everything in black 
and white, but that's taking 
a giant step backwards. In 
fact, you might just as well 
turn down the sound, too, 
because all you'll hear is 
the sound of birdshot being 
dropped on a cookie sheet! 
Nothing takes the place of a 
large dish and a good 
LNA . . nothing. 

Beyond Detection 

The sound channel is 
easy to detect. It is merely 
an FM subcarrier that may 
be 6.2 MHz or 6 8 MHz 
Most receivers are 
equipped to receive both 
inasmuch as detection for 
each subcarrier can be 
done in a single consumer 
TV sound section IC such as 
the CA3065 As a rule, 
6.8-MHz subcarriers are 
used on RCA/SATCOM 
birds, while 6.2-MHz sub- 
carriers are found on West- 
ern Union/WESTAR birds. 
Nothing is standard, so a 
switchable or tunable 
sound subcarrier detector is 
necessary. 



Other subcarriers may be 
located above video on 
some transponders. Back- 
ground music and slow- 
scan services as wel I as data 
transmissions can be found. 
We will be sure to look at 
methods of recovering 
these signals in future 
installments of Satellite 
Central. 

Satellite TV signals are 
pre-emphasized according 
to a CCIR curve. This 
amounts to a 10- to 12-dB 
boost on the high end of the 
video. An LC network 
smoothes the curve back 
out as well as wiping out 
the sound subcarriers 
before further video 
amplification. 

Fig. 4(a) shows the output 
of a typical detector after 
de-emphasis Notice the un- 
damped video appears to 
be riding on a triangular 
wave at the frame rate This 
is known as the energy dis- 
persal waveform and is 
mixed in at the uplink trans- 
mitter. It is simply a way to 
keep the main carrier mov- 
ing during the unlikely loss 
of video. That way, every 
microwave link in the coun- 
try on that frequency 
doesn't get sprayed with an 
interfering carrier from 
space. As a practical mat- 
ter, it's quite the other way 
around. In any event, a 
clamp nails the energy dis- 
persal waveform down to 
dc in Fig, 4(b) and we have 
clean video. If this wave- 
form is not removed, the 
picture will flicker at the 
304Hz rate- 
Some TVRO receivers 
have modulators in them so 
the detected video and 
sound can be fed directly to 
a TV set Others may only 
have a one-volt audio and 
video output While a 
cheap TV game modulator 
can be used to get the pic- 
ture into channel 3 or 4 of 
your TV, the results leave 
much to be desired. Some- 
times it's simply the result 
of poor design. But poor 
shielding is the likely cul- 
prit. The modulator output 



56 73 Magazine * December, 1981 



WE WILL NOT BE UNDERSOLD!! 

Complete Systems, Antennas, 
Receivers, LNA's & Accessories 

CALL US TODAY! 

812-238-1456 



Nation's Largest Total Communications Distributor" 
P.O. BOX 3300 • TERRE HAUTE, INDIANA 47803 - 



See if st of Advertisers on page 162 



73 Magazine * December, 1981 57 



manages to find a way back 
into your 70-MHz i-f chain 
(remember that channels 3 
and 4 would fall into the i-f 
bandpass of 55-85 MHz). 
The solution is to skip the 
re-modulation process and 
feed the audio and video in- 
to a quality TV monitor or a 
regular TV modified for 
audio and video input. On 
the other hand, an effort- 
less method is to simply 
feed the TVRO receiver in- 
to a video tape recorder 
and use its internal 
modulator! 

Obvious Differences 

While price may be the 
major obstacle to designing 
an ideal receiver, experi- 
ence with the problems 
you're likely to encounter 
runs a close second. As we 
learn more about what can 
and can't be done, we can 
make adjustments to our 
thinking and our design. For 
example, the VTO used in 
most receivers is a real has- 
sle. You have 500 MHz 
worth of tuning spread over 
about a 270-degree twist on 
the pot. That's a lot for 
manual tuning (over 470 
standard broadcast bands!}, 
so afc is needed, if not for 
sheer operator ease, then 
for the very small amount 
of drift you'll likely en- 
counter. Fancy receivers 
use a synthesizer and elim- 
inate the problem. That 
takes more parts, which 
adds to the price . . . but not 
too much if you do it 
yourself! 

You can sometimes dis- 
cern a quality receiver de- 
sign from an economy ver- 
sion by observing how well 
the energy dispersal clamp 
circuit functions. While 
simple receivers use a sim- 
ple diode clamp, more ex- 
pensive {and better de- 
signed) versions employ 
voltage feedback methods 
such as seen in Fig. 5. 

By far the most interest- 
ing difference in receivers 
today is the concept of 
splitting them up into 
pieces as some economy- 

58 73 Magazine ■ December, 



minded manufacturers 
have done. This eliminates 
the need for expensive coax 
to carry the 4-CHz signal 
from the LNA to the receiv- 
er. They simply mount the 
mixer, VTO P and first i-f at 
the dish and run the lower 
i-f to the house on RG-59, 
Some really clever LNA 
manufacturers are building 
the whole works into a sin- 
gle LNA and downconver- 
ter, calling it an LNC! 

Tricks Worth Trying 

If you want to try your 
hand at receiver design, go 
ahead with the certain 
knowledge that much of 
the foregoing works well 
enough to be a good point 
of departure for your own 
design fantasies. Micro- 
wave genius Steve Birkill 
G8AKQ, of Sheffield, Eng- 
land, downcon verts into a 
broadbanded UHF TV tuner. 
He does the first conversion 
to UHF at the antenna so 
that RG-59 can be used 
rather than the expensive 
4-GHz stuff. The UHF tuner 
then performs the second 
conversion down to an i-f 
the PLL can handle. 

The cost of tuners like 
Steve's is around 25 bucks. 
Some of the newer varactor 
tuners are very broadband 
except for a coil in the last 
stage. A few moments of 
work are all that's neces- 
sary to modify the stage for 
the wide bandwidth needed 
for good pictures. Does the 
idea sound interesting^ 
Then how about following 
the tuner with a very cheap 
TV IC amplifier chip such as 
the MC1350 for your i-f am- 
plifier? And if you don't like 
that PLL, then why not use 
an MC1357 FM quadrature 
detector chip instead? Rex 
Rhoads, an engineer with 
RCA, has done it with excel- 
lent results. By the way, the 
construction cost of his en- 
tire receiver using this very 
conventional circuitry (no 
secret chips or tricks) is way 
under $100! 

The time is right for you 
to join in the fun of receiv- 

1981 



The Nelson Parabolic TVRO Antenna Manual 

by Nelson Ethier 

reviewed by: 

S.F. Mitchell WA40SR and Richard Christian WA4CVP 

As the foreword in the Manual states, author Ethier has no 
formal microwave training, but "he is an excellent student of 
obscure textbooks and an avid do-it-himselfer. . . f 

The Nelson Parabolic TVRO Antenna Manual starts with a 
general discussion of parabolic dish design and describes 
the relative advantages of a parabolic antenna over the spher- 
ical antenna. These advantages include the fact that the 
focus never changes and that the entire surface works to col- 
lect the signal. A brief review of noise, noise measurement (dB 
and degrees K), calculation of antenna gain, wavelength, and 
formulas to find parameters follows. Nelson then gives the 
arguments for different focal ratios and the reasons why he 
selected an f/d (focal point to diameter) ratio of 0,375, 

Very detailed treatment is given to the calculation of the 
parabolic curve for his antenna. The formula and a method of 
laying out the curve on graph paper is presented along with a 
table with the curve calculated in one-half-inch steps for a 
10-foot dish with a .45 f/d ratio or a 12- foot dish with a .375 f/d 
ratio. These calculations are very simple and can be done on a 
calculator with a square root function, 

The most informative part for us was the section on choos- 
ing the antenna to suit the needs of a particular site. A brief 
discussion of the significance of the carrier-to-noise ratio 
(CNR) and an example of its calculation gives you an idea of 
the type of picture quality you should be able to obtain at your 
location, 

The material between page 11 and the Manual's end on 
page 31 is devoted to the actual construction of a 12-foot 
parabolic antenna, feed, feedhorn, and polar mount. The 
antenna is built on a form which must be fabricated with 
plywood and fiberglass rods, The form is constructed and 
covered with 0,020 sheet aluminum which must be cut and 
formed. Fiberglass is then applied to the back of the alumi- 
num. Reinforcing ribs of wood and urethane are then added 
and a second layer of fiberglass is applied. The finished 
antenna appears to be quite sturdy; Although no estimate of 
the antenna's cost is given by Ethier, we estimate that it 
would cost between $750 and $1000 and require as much as 
two months of steady work to complete. 

Pages 23 to 29 describe the fabrication of the feed, feed- 
horn, and mount. The feed itself is an aluminum tripod bolted 
to the rim of the dish. It appears that this system, which in- 
volves using an antenna rotator to turn the horn, may put un- 
due stress on the feed assembly. 

Overall, we feel that the Manual gives a lot of good informa- 
tion, but it gives very little that we haven't seen elsewhere. The 
best part of the manual is the first ten pages where antennas 
and system requirements in general are discussed. The ac- 
tual construction of the antenna may not be practical since a 
commercial antenna can be as cheap, if not cheaper. The 
Nelson Parabolic TVRO Antenna Manual is well worth $15.00, 
but at the $30.00 cover price we feel that it is very expensive. 
The Nelson Manual is available from the publisher, Satellite 
Television Technology, PO Box G, Arcadia OK 73007. 

This review is reprinted from 'Lite News, PO Box 973, Mobile 
AL 36601. 



ing TV from space. If you 
have a question regarding 
the topics we cover here, 
feel free to drop me a line 
(letters only, no calls 
please). Sorry, I can only an- 
swer mail that is accompa- 
nied by an SASE. 



You can find out more 
about receivers by reading 
two back issues of 73: No- 
vember, 1979 {"The Satel- 
lite TV Primer/' Bob Cooper) 
and December J 979 ("Low- 
Cost Receiver for Satellite 
TV," Paul Shuch).B 

Reader Se/vtee for facing page **331— 





•- 



® 



2-M Handheld FM Transceiver 



AZDEM PCS-3QO 



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6.fl* u 









SCAN 









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7-3" high by 2 .5" wide by 1.8' 



8 MHZ COVERAGE • 142 to 149,995 MHz in 5 kHz steps, including CAP and 
MARS. 

IDEAL SIZE & WEIGHT DISTRIBUTION 

deep; 1.4 lbs. 

MICROCOMPUTER CONTROL • All frequency operations are done by 
means of a microcomputer keyboard with acquisiuon tone. 

LCD DISPLAY WITH TIMED LAMP • Draws almost no current Lamp 
times out automatically after 20 seconds. 

16 KEY AUTOPATCH * Keyboard works as a Touchtone* pad while 
transmitting. 

PL TONE SWITCH * Actuates optional subaudibte tone module. 

PROGRAMMABLE "ODD SPLITS" • Transmit and receive on any 
possible frequency combination. Reset in seconds. 

9 CHANNEL MEMORY WITH SCAN • Eight addressable channels and 
one externally accessible upfdown channel retain frequency and standard offset, 
Backup drain is a scant 10 microamps! 

AUTOMATIC INCLUSIVE OR EXCLUSIVE PROGRAMMABLE 

BAND SCAN • Limits may be reset in seconds. Scans either inside or 
outside the limits. 

BUSY AND VACANT SCAN MODES • Scan for either an occupied or 
empty frequency. 

KEYBQARD LOCK • Prevents accidental change of frequency or scan status. 

TRANSMIT LOCK • Avoids unintentional transmission. 

DIGITAL S/RF AND MEMORY ADDRESS METER • Shows 

relative stgna! strength on receive, relative power on transmit. Also shows 
memory address. 

HIGH OR LOW POWER • 3 watts high, 1 watt low. Low power is 
continuously adjustable from 0.5 to 3 watts, 

TRUE FM * Not phase modulation - Unparalleled audio quality. 

AUTOMATIC FRONT END TUNING • RF stage is varactor tuned for 
superior sensitivity and selectivity 

RUGGED COMMERCIAL-GRADE MODULAR CONSTRUCTION 

The PCS-3QQ is built to tate years of the toughest operating conditions 

SUPERIOR RECEIVER • Sensitivity is 0.25 uV for 20 dB quieting, 
Q.2uVfer12dBSlNAD. 

BNC ANTENNA CONNECTOR • 

STANDARD ACCESSORIES • Heavy duty NICAD battery pack 1 500 
mAh), belt clip, hand strap connector, flexible rubber antenna, earphone, 
ac charging unit, and special stand for table-top operation. 

OPTIONAL ACCESSORIES * Deluxe feather case, mobile dc 
charging cord, external speaker/microphone, and PL tone module. 






JUFACTUF 




JAPAN PIE20 CO., LTD. 

chome *ku, Mitaka. Tokv Fetex 781-2822452 



EXCLUSIVE DISTRIBUTOR AMATEUR-WHOLESALE ELECTRONICS, INC. 

6817 SW 129 Terrace, Miami, RofKJaG 



Telex 60-3356 Toil-free (800) 



TS-130S/V 

"'Small wonder''..* speech processor, 
N/W switch, IF shift digital display 



The compact, all solid-state 
HF SSB/CW mobile or fixed 

station TS-130 Series trans- 
ceiver covers 3 5 to 29,7 MHz, 
including the three new bands. 

TS-130 SERIES FEATURES: 

• 80-10 meters, including the 
new 10, 18. and 2 4 -MHz 
bands. Receives WWV. 



TS-130S runs 200 W PEPH60 
W DC input on 80-15 meters 
and 160 W PEP/140 W DC on 
12 and 10 meters, TS-13QV 
runs 25 W PEP/20 W DC 

input on all bands, 
Built-in speech processor. 
Narrow/wide filter selection on 
both CW (500 Hz or 270 Hz) 
and SSB (1.8 kHz) with 
optional fitters. 



• Automatic selection of side- 
band mode (LSB on 40 
meters and below, and USB 
on 30 meters and above). SSB 
REVERSE switch provided, 

• Built-in digital display 

• Built-in RF attenuator. 

• IF shift {passband tuning). 

• Effective noise blanker. 

OPTIONAL ACCESSORIES: 

• PS-3Q base-station power 
supply. 

• YK-88C (500 Hz) or 
YK-88CN (270 Hz) CW filter. 

• YK-88SN (18 kHz) narrow 

SSB filter. 

• AT-130 compact antenna tuner 
(80-10 meters, including three 
new bands). 

• SP-120 external speaker. 



VFO-120 remote VFO. 
MB-100 mobiie mounting 

bracket. 

PS-20 base-station power 

supply forTS-130V, 




Optional DFC-230 Digital 
Frequency Controller 

Frequency control in 20-Hz 
steps with UP/DOWN micro- 
phone (supplied with DFC-230). 
Four memories and digital 

display. (Also operates with 
TS-120S, TS-530S. and 
TS-830S.) 




PS- 30 



SP-120 



TS-130S 



VFO-120 



sl MM 



i- 




£ 



:>a f''\ \ mm im tm. 







SP-230 



TS-B30S 



VFO-230 



AT-230 



'Top-notch 7 ' * • VBX notch, 
IF shift, wide dynamic range 



The TS-830S has every con- 
ceivable operating feature 
built-in for 160-10 meters (in- 
cluding the three new bands), 
It combines a high dynamic 
range with variable bandwidth 
tuning (VBT), IF shift, and an IF 
notch filter, as well as very 
sharp filters in the 455-kHz 
second IR Its optional 
VFO-230 remote digital VFO 
provides five memories. 



TS-830S FEATURES: 

• LSB, USB, and CW on 160-10 
meters, including the new 10, 
18, and 24-MHz bands. 
Receives WWV, 

• Wide receiver dynamic 
range, Junction FETs in the 
balanced mixer, MOSFET RF 
amplifier at low level, and 
dual resonator for each band. 

• Variable bandwidth tuning 
(VBT), Varies fF filter pass- 
band width. 



» Notch filter (high-Q active 
circuit in 455-kHz second IF 

• IF shift (passband tuning). 

• Built-in digital display (six 
digits, fluorescent tubes), 
analog dial, and display 
hold (DH) switch. 

• Noise-blanker threshold level 
control 

• 6146B final with RF negative 
feedback. Runs 220 W PEP 
(SSBJ/180 W DC (CW) input 
on all bands 

• Built-in RF speech processor. 

• Narrow/wide filter selection 
on CW. 

• SSB monitor circuit to check 
transmitted audio quality. 

• RJT (receiver incremental 
tuning) and XIT (transmitter 
incremental tuning). 



OPTIONAL ACCESSORIES: 

* SP-23G external speaker with 
selectable audio filters. 

- VFO-230 external digital VFO 
with 20-Hz steps, five 
memories, digital display. 

* AT-230 antenna tuner/SWR 
and power meter/ antenna 
switch 160-10 meters, 
including three new bands. 

* YG-455C (500 Hz) or 
YG-455CN (250 Hz) CW 
filter for 455 kHz IF. 

« YK-B8C (500 Hz) or 
YK-8BCN (270 Hz) CW filter 
for 8,83 MHz IF. 

* KB-1 deluxe heavyweight knol 

* (VFOs for TS-830S, TS-5305, 
TS-130 Series, and TS-120S 
are compatible with all four 
series of transceivers,) 



® KENWOOD 

TPfO-KFNWOOn COMMUNICATIONS 

1111 West Walnut, Compton. California 90720 




IF shift, digital display, narrow-wide 
filter switch 



TheTS-530S SSB/CW 
transceiver covers 160-10 
meters using the latest, most 
advanced circuit technology, yet 
at an affordable price, 

TS-530S FEATURES: 

• 160-10 meter, LSB n USB, CW, 
afl amateur frequencies, 
including new 10 P 18, and 24 
MHz bands. Receives WWV 
on 10 MHz. 



Built-in digital display (six 
digits, fluorescent tubes) h with 
analog dial, 



• 



MC-50 



W 



• IF shift tunes out interfering 
signals. 

• Narrow/wide filter selector 
switch for CW and/or SSB. 
Built-in speech processor, for 
increased talk power. 

• Wide receiver dynamic range, 
with greater immunity to 
overload. 

Two 61468's in final, allows 

220W PEP/180 W DC input on 

all bands. 

Advanced single-conversion 

PLL, for better stability, 

improved spurious 

characteristics. 

Adjustable noise-blanker, with 

front panel threshold control. 



• RIT/XIT front panel control 
allows independent fine-tuning 
of transmit or receive 
frequencies. 

OPTIONAL ACCESSORIES: 

• SP-230 external speaker with 
selectable audio filters. 

■ VFO240 remote analog VFO. 

• VFO-230 remote digital VFO, 

• AT-230 antenna tuner/SWR/ 
power meter 

• MC-50 desk microphone 

• KB~1 deluxe VFO knob. 

• YK-88C (500 Hz) or 
YK-88CN (270 Hz) CW filter 

• YK^88SN {1.8 kHz) narrow 
SSB filter. 



1 

- 






1 ' 

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mm 

Kg 




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SP-230 


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TS-530S 






VFO-240 



Mwmm — His-" 






m m m 






AT-230 




''Quad Bander"... dual 
scan, IF shift FM, SSB 

The TS-660 is a unique, alh 
mode transceiver designed for 
operation on 6, 10, 12, and 
15 meters. 

TS-660 FEATURES: 

• FM, SSB (USB), CW and AM 
operation. 

• 10 Hz step digital VFO. The 
frequency step is determined 
by mode of operation. 



VFOs, memory, 
,CW,AM 

• R STEP switch alfows alterna- 
tive step size in each mode. 

• Dual VFOs built-in. 

• 5 channel memory stores fre- 
quency and band information. 

• Memory scan scans all bands, 
skips channels not in use, 

• UP/ DOWN push-button fre- 
quency control on microphone. 

• UP/DOWN bandswitch. 



Frequency lock function 

switch. 

IF SHIFT circuit built-m. 

Fluorescent digital display 

shows Tx/Rx frequencies. 

Squelch circuit for FM, SSB, 

CW and AM. 

CW semi break-in circuit, 

with CW side tone. 

10 W RF output on SSB, CW, 
FM. 4 W on AM. 

Two antenna terminals 
provided. 



• RIT control, • Noise blanker. 

OPTIONAL ACCESSORIES: 

• PS-20 power supply. 

• SP-120 external speaker. 

• MB-100 mobile mounting 
bracket. 

• YK-88C normal CW, (500 Hz) 
filter or YK-88CN narrow 
band CW, (270 Hz) filter, 

• YK-88A AM (6 kHz) filter. 

• VOX-4 speech processor/ 
VOX unit 



55 



KENWOOD 

TRIO-KENWOOD COMMUNICATIONS 

1111 West Walnut. Comntnn California 90220 







I^^BHI^^^^^^^ 


MB tWBtHT 






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■ 1 1 




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'1S[ow hear this*,,, 
digital display, front 
speaker, easy tuning 

The R-600 is a high 
performance, general coverage 
communications receiver 

:overing 150 kH2 to 30 MHz 
in 30 bands, at an affordable 

irice. Use of PLL synthesized 

sircuttry provides high 

iccuracy of frequency with 
maximum ease of operation. 



R-600 FEATURES: 

• 150 KHz to 30 MHz 
continuous coverage, AM, 
SSB, or CW. 

• 30 bands, each 1 MHz wide, 

for easier tuning. 

• Five digit frequency display. 
with 1 KHz resolution. 

• 6 kHz IF filter for AM (wide), 
and 2.7 kHz filters for SSB, 
CW and AM (narrow). 

• Up-conversion PLL circuit, 



for improved sensitivity, 
selectivity, and stability. 
Communications type noise 
blanker eliminates "pulse- 
type" noise. 

RF Attenuator allows 20 dB 
attenuation of strong signals. 
Tone control 
Front mounted speaker. 
"S" meter, with 1 to 5 SINPO 
scale, plus standard scale. 
Coaxial, and wire antenna 
terminals for 2 MHz to 




Digital world clock with 
two 24-hour displays. 
quartz time base 

The HC-10 digital world clock 
with dual 24-hour display 
shows local time and the time 
in 10 preprogrammed ptus two 
programmable time zones. 



30 MHz. Wire terminals for 
150 KHz to 2 MHz 

• 100. 120. 220, and 240 VAC. 
50/60 Hz. Selector switch on 
rear panel 

• Optional 13.8 VDC operation, 
using DCK-1 cable kit 

• Other features include 
carrying handle, headphone 
jack, and record jack. 

OPTIONAL ACCESSORIES: 

• DCK-1 DC Cable kit. 

• SP-100 External Speaker 



R-1000 

"Hear there and everywhere?., 
easy tuning, digital display 

The R-1000 is an amazingly 
easy-lo-operate, high- 
performance, communications 
receiver, covering 200 kHz to 
30 MHz in 30 bands. This PLL 
synthesized receiver features a 
digital frequency display and 
analog dial, plus a quartz 
digital clock and timer. 



R-1000 FEATURES: 

• Covers 200 kHz to 30 MHz 
continuously. 



30 bands, each 1 MHz wide. 
Five-digit frequency display 
with 1-kHz resolution and 
analog dial with precise gear 
dial mechanism, 

Built-in 12-hour quartz digital 
clock with timer to turn on 
radio for scheduled listening 
or control a recorder througn 
remote terminal. 

Step attenuator to prevent 
overload. 



Three IF filters for optimum 
AM. SSB. CW. 12-kHz and 
6-kHz (adaptable to 6-kHz 
and 2.7-kHz) for AM wide and 
narrow, and 2.7-kHz filter for 
high-quality SSB (USB and 
LSB) and CW reception. 

Effective noise blanker. 

Terminal for external tape 
recorder 

Tone control. 

Built-in 4-inch speaker. 

Dimmer switch to control 
intensity of S-meter and other 
panel lights and digital display. 



» Wire antenna terminals fo; 
200 kHz to 2 MHz and 2 MHz 
to 30 MHz. Coax terminal for 
2 MHz to 30 MHz. 

* Voltage selector for 100. 120. 
220, and 240 VAC. Also 
adaptable to operate on 13.8 
VDC with optional DCK-1 kit 

OPTIONAL ACCESSORIES: 

* SP-100 matching external 
speaker. 

* HS-6 lightweight, open-air 
headphone set 

■ HS-5 and HS-4 headphones. 

* DCK-1 modification kit for 
12-VDC operation. 




SP-100 



R-1000 



HS-S 



4 fr 




\S 



TRIO-KENWOOD COMMUNICATIONS 

1111 West Walnut, Compton, California 90220 






JIG performance, small size, smaller price! 



"he TR-2500 is a compact 2 
neter FM handheld transceiver 
eaturing an LCD readout, 10 
:hannel memory, lithium battery 
nemory back-up, memory scan, 
programmable automatic band- 
scan, Hi/Lo power switch and 
juitHn sub-tone encoder. 

R-2500 FEATURES: 

Extremely compact size and 
light weight 66 (2-5/8) W x 
168 (6-5/8) H x 40 (1-5/8) D. 
mm (inches), 540 g, (1.2 lbs) 
with Ni-Cd pack. 
LCD digital frequency readout, 
with memory channel and 
function indication. 
Ten channel memory, includes 
*M0' memory for non-standard 
split frequencies. 
Lithium battery memory back- 
up, built-in, (estimated 5 year 
life) saves memory when 
Ni-Cd pack discharged. 
Memory scan, stops on busy 
channels, skips channels in 
which no data is stored 
UP/DOWN manual scan in 
5 KHz steps. 



CONVENIENT TOP CONTROLS 




2.5 W or 300 mW RF output. 
(HI/LOW power switch.) 
Programmable automatic band 
scan allows upper and lower 
frequency limits and scan 
steps of 5 KHz and larger 
(5,10.15, 20, 30 KHz... etc) 
to be programmed. 
Built-in tuneable {with variable 
resistor) sub-tone encoder. 
Built-in 16 key autopatch 

encoder. 

Slide-Jock battery pack- 
Repeater reverse operation. 
Keyboard frequency selection 
across full range. 
Extended frequency coverage; 
143.900 to 148.995 MHz in 
5 KHz steps. 




I I 

• Optional power source, MS-1 
mobile or ST-2 AC charger/ 
power supply allows operation 
while charging. (Automatic 
drop-in connections.) 

• High impact plastic case. 

• Battery status indicator. 

• Two lock switches for 
keyboard and transmit. 

STANDARD ACCESSORIES: 

• Flexible rubberized antenna 
with BNC connector 

• 400 mAH heavy-duty Ni-Cd 
battery pack. 

• AC charger. 

OPTIONAL ACCESSORIES: 

• ST-2 Base station power 
supply and quick charger 
(appro*. 1 hr). 

• MS-1 13.8 VDC mobile stand/ 
charger/power supply. 

• TU-1 Programmable "DIP 
switch" (CTCSS) encoder 

• SMC-25 Speaker microphone. 

• LH-2 Deluxe top grain 
cowhide leather case. 

» PB-25 Extra Ni-Cd battery 
pack. 400 mAH, heavy-duty. 

• BH-2 Belt hook. 

• WS-1 Wrist strap. 

• EP-1 Earphone. 

• RF power amplifier (To be 
announced,) 



"R-7850 

W, 15 memories/offset recall, scan, 
Tiority, autopatch (DTMF) 



enwood's remarkable 
R-7850 2-meter FM mobile 
ansceiver provides all the 
3atures you could desire, 
icludfng a powerful 40 watts 
utput A 25 watt verston, the 
R-7800 is also available 
R-7850 FEATURES: 

40 watts output, with selectable 
high or low power operation 
15 multifunction memory 
channels, easily selectable 
with a rotary control, M1-M13 
memorize frequency _ 
and offset (=600 KHz 
or simplex) 



M14 memorize transmit 
and receive frequencies 
independently for non-standard 
offset MO priority channel, 
with simplex -^600 KHz or 
non-standard offset operation 

* Internal battery back-up for 
memories Requires four AA 
Ni-Cd batteries, (not 
supplied) 



• Extended frequency 
coverage. 143900-148 995 
MHz m 5 or 10 KHz steps. 

• Priority aiert, Beep alerts 
operator when signal 
appears on priority channel, 

• Built-in autopatch encoder 
(DTMF) All 12 plus four 
additional DTMF signaling 
tones (With simultaneous 
push of REV switch.) 

• Autoscan of memories and 
entire band, Scan resumes 
automatically. 

• Front panel keyboard 

• Compact size 



#* 




Krni* 



£» 




tm--f 




• UP/DOWN manual scan of 
entire band and memories, 
using UP/DOWN microphone 
(supplied) 

» Repeater reverse switch 

• Separate digital displays for 
frequency and memory 
channel 

• LED S/RF bar meter 

• Tone switch 
Matching accessories for 
fixed station operation: 

■ KPS-12 power supply (for 

TR-7B50) 

• KPS-7 power supply (for 
TR-7800) 



SP-40 

Compact mobile speaker 
Only 2-11/16 W x 2-1/2 H x 
2-1/8 D (inches) 
Handles 3 watts of audio 




TRIO-KENWOOD COMMUNICATIONS 

1111 West Walnut Compton, California 90220 




The TR 7730 is available in two 
variations: a 16-key autopatch 
UP/DOWN microphone 
(M046) version, and a basic 
UP/DOWN microphone version. 



ENWDOQ ftnFM TRANSCEIVER 






L MINI 

1 1> t in 




StAN HOUJ 



OIS 







Miniaturized, 

5 memories, memory/ 

band scan 

The TR-7730 is a very compact 
25 watt, 2-meter FM mobile 
transceiver, reasonably priced, 

TR-7730 FEATURES: 

• Dimensions: 5-3/4 W x 2 H x 

7-3/4 D, inches. Weighs 

3.3 lbs. 



• Extended frequency 
coverage, 143,900-148.995 
MHz, tn 5 or 10 KHz steps. 

• 25 watts RF output power, 
with HI/LOW power switch. 

• 5 memories for operation in 
simplex or repeater modes. 

• Memory scan, plus automatic 
band scan. 

• UP/DOWN manual scan on 
microphone (supplied), 

• Four digit LED frequency 
display. 

• S/RF bar meter. LED 
indicators for BUSY, ON -AIR, 



*'ff*%r 




REPEATER offset. 

• Tone switch for internal tone 
encoder (not Kenwood 
supplied). 

• Offset switch, ±600 kHz. 
Non-standard offset uses 
fifth memory. 

OPTIONAL ACCESSORIES: 

• MC-46 16-key autopatch 
UP/DOWN microphone, 

• SP-40 compact mobile 
speaker. 

• KPS-7 fixed station power 
suppJy, 




TR-8400 

Synthesized 70-cm FM 
mobile rig 

• Covers 440-450 MHz, in 

25 KHz steps, with two VFOs, 

• Transmit offset switch for 

±5 MHz. Non-standard offset 
uses fifth memory. 

• HI/LOW power switch selects 
10 or 1 watt RF output. 
Similar to TR-7730 in other 
features, including five 
memories, memory scan, auto- 
matic band scan, UP/DOWN 
manual scan, four digit display, 
S/RF bar meter, LED indicators, 
tone switch, and same optional 
accessories. 





MC-46 16-key autopatch 
UP/DOWN microphone. 




"New 2-meter direction''.. compact rig 
with FM/SSB/CW, scan, five memories 



The TR-9000 combines the 
convenience of FM with long 
distance SSB and CW. it is 
extremely compact . . . perfect 
for mobile operation. Matching 
accessories are available for 
optimum fixed-station operation. 

TR-9000 FEATURES; 

• FM, USB, LSB, and CW. 

• Only 6-11/16 Inches wide, 
2-21/32 inches high, 
9-7/32 inches deep. 



- Two digital VFOs, with select- 
abie tuning steps of 100 Hz, 
5 kHz, and 10 kHz. 

• Digital frequency display Five, 
four, or three digits, depending 
on selected tuning step, 

* Covers 1439000- 
148,9999 MHz. 

• Band scan . . . automatic busy 
stop and free scan. 

* SSB/CW search of selectable 
9.9-kHz bandwidth segments. 



• Five memories . , , four for 
simplex or ±600 kHz repeater 
offsets and the fifth for a non- 
standard offset (memorizes 
transmit and receive frequency 
independently), 

•UP/DOWN microphone (stan- 
dard) for manual band scan. 

• Noise blanker for SSB and CW. 

• RIT {receiver incremental 
tuning) for SSB and CW, 

• RF gain control. 

• CW sidetone, 

• Selectable RF power outputs 
. . , 10 W (HIJ/1W (LO). 

• Mobile mounting bracket with 
quick-release levers. 

■ LED indicators . . . ON AIR, 
BUSY, and VFO. 



OPTIONAL ACCESSORIES: 

• PS-20 fixed-station power 
supply. 

• SP-120 fixed-station external 
speaker. 

• B09 System Base . . . with 
power switch, SEND/RECEIVE 
switch (for CW). memory- 
backup power supply, and 
headphone jack. 

• MC-46 16-key autopatch 
UP/DOWN microphone. 




PS-20 



TR-9000 



eo-9 



SP-120 



5/ 



KENWOOD 

TRIO-KENWOOD COMMUNICATIONS 

1111 West Walnut, Compton, California 90220 





TL-922-A 

Maximum legal power on 160-15 meters 



The TL-922A linear amplifier pro- 
vides maximum legal power on 
the 160-15 meter Amateur bands. 

TL-922A FEATURES: 

• 2000 W PEP (SSB)/1000 W 
DC (CW. RTTY) input power 
on 160, 60. 40, 20; and 15 
meters, with 80 W drive, 

• Excellent IMD characteristics. 
■ Pair of EIMAC 3-5G0Z high- 



performance transmitting 
tubes. 

• Safety protection. 

■ Blower with automatic turnoff- 
delay circuit. 

• Variable threshold level 
type ALC. 

• Two meters, one indicating 
plate current, and the other 
indicating grid current, relative 
RF output, and high voltage. 



SM-220 

High-performance 

oscilloscope (or 
various monitoring 
functions 

The SM-220 Station Monitor 
provides a variety of waveform- 
observing capabilities, and an 

optional pan display. 



A wide selection of optional 
accessories is offered for 
optimum operating flexibility. In 
addition to the optional items 
listed with each piece of equip- 
ment described in this catalog, 
the following accessories are 
also available: 





PC-1 phone patch with hybrid 
circuit and VU meter for null 
and audio gain measurements. 

DM-B1 

Dip meter 
performs many RF 
measurements 

The DIVf-81 dip meter is highly 
accurate and features, in addi- 
tion to the traditional inductive- 
coupling technique, capacitive 
coupling for measuring metal- 
enclosed coils and toroidal coiis. 

DM-81 FEATURES: 

• Measuring range of 700 kHz- 
250 MHz in seven bands. 

• Built-in storage compartment 
for all seven coils, capacitive 
probe, earphone, and ground 
clip lead. 

• All solid-state and buitt-in 
battery, 

• HC-25U and FT-243 sockets 
for checking crystals and 
marker-generator function. 
Amplitude modulation. 

• FET for good sensitivity. 

• Absorption frequency meter 
function. 

• Earphone for monitoring 
transmitted signals. 

• Capacitance probe for 
measuring resonant frequen- 
cies without removing coif 
shields, and also for measuring 
resonant frequencies of 
toroidal coils. 



MC-60 deluxe dual impedance 
(50KQ/500Q) desk microphone 
with 4-pin connector. Also 
available with UP/DOWN switch, 
in 6 or 8-pin connector versions. 




HS-6 lightweight, open-air 
headphone set. 




KPS-21 13.8 VDC fixed-station 
power supply, 21A intermittant 
16A continuous. 



\* 



KENWOOD 

TRIO-KENWOOD COMMUNICATIONS 

1111 West Walnut Compton, California 90220 



SM-220 FEATURES: 

• Monitors transmitted SSB and 

CW wavefofrns from 1.8 to 
150 MHz. 

• Monitors signal waveforms in 
receiver's IF stage. 

• Functions as high-sensitivity, 
wide-frequency-range (up to 
10 MHz) oscilloscope. 

• Tests linearity of linear amplifi- 
ers (provides trapezoid pattern). 

» Allows observation of RTTY 
tuning points (cross pattern). 
Built-in two-rone (1000 Hz and 
1575-Hz) generator 

• Expandable to pan-display 
capability for observing the 
number and amplitude of 
stations within a switchable 
+20 kHz/+100 kHz bandwidth. 

OPTIONAL ACCESSORIES; 

• BS-8 pan-display module for 
TS-180S, TS-530S, TS-83QS, 
and TS-620 Series. 

• BS-5 pan-display module for 
T3-520 Series. 




KB-1 deluxe, heavyweight, 
aluminum knob for TS-830S, 
TS-530S, TS-180S, TS-820S, 
and R-820. 




RD-20 50Q RF dummy load, 
(DC-500 MHz) 50 W intermittant, 
20 W continuous. 





MC-46 16- key autopatch 
UP/DOWN microphone. 

OTHER ACCESSORIES: 

MC-50 dynamic dual- 
impedance (50 kQ/500Q) desk 
microphone. 

MC-308 (500ft) and MC-35S 
(50 kQ) dynamic noise- 
canceling hand microphones. 

HS-5 deluxe SQ headphone set. 
HS-4 8Q headphone set, 

NOTE: Prices and specifica- 
tions of all Trio-Kenwood 
products are subject to 
change without prior notice 
or obligation. 




CQ... ALL AMATEUR RADIO CLUBS 
DIP YOU RECEIVE 73 '5 RAWO BOOKSHOP'5 
SPECIAL CLU& DISCOUNT OFFER? NO? 
DO YOU WANT TO SAVE YOUR CLUB $'s? 

JUST QSL WITH 
YOUR CLUB'S NAME, 
ADDRESS, ETC ,TO 
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peterborough nh 

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IDEAS 



Wayne Green Books announces 

April 1, 1982 deadline for 

submission of new manuscripts 

for consideration for 

the Fall Book List. 





cTVIA 





^MAGAZINE offers you 
—more pages of articles monthly than any other amateur radio journal 
—new products, reviews, construction projects 
—and ways to save hundreds of dollars. 

^MAGAZINE offers you a great way to say <£MERRY CHRISTMAS. 

What better way to say 

tfMERRY CHRISTMAS to: 
—your friend 

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than with a subscription to 

^MAGAZINE. 






ptfyear of 73 Magazine for Christmas (1 year/$25.00)- 

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Address ««_ 

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Please enter a one year gifl subscription to: 



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73 Magazfne • Bo* 931 • Farmingdale NY 11737 
All GhMylmas ^jilTl suoscnptitirts will begin with January 1962 issue. 



61D86 



66 73 Magazine • December, 1981 



WE SHIP WORLDWIDE 



WORLD WIDE AMATEUR RADIO SINCE 1950 



Your one source for all Radio Equipment! 



All Handy Talkies In Stock For Immediate Delivery! 

VoCom 2 meter 5/8 Telescoping Whip A Duckle 

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•ftm IV*?? JsflBm Call: 212-925-7000 



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Write or call today. 

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ROCKWELL/COLLINS 
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MURCH Model UT2000B 






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COMPLETE REPAIR LAB ON PREMISES 



MAIL ALL ORDERS TO BARRY ELECTRONICS CORP., 
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BARRY INTERNATIONAL TELEX 12-7670 212-925-7000 
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AUTHORIZED DISTS, MCKAY 0YMEK FOR 
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IN STOCK— NEW ROBOT MODEL #800, BIRD WATTMETER, HY- 
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DEALER INQUIRIES INVITED. PHONE IN YOUR ORDEH & BE REIMBURSED. 



Amateur Radio Courses Given On Our Premises 

" 30S Export Orders Shipped Immediately. 



t^See List of Advertisers on page t&2 



73 Magazine * December, 1981 67 



The Ace Portable 
Synthesized VHF Receiver 

for those times when listening is enough 



Karl T. Thurber, jr. WSFX 
317 Popia r Drive 
Miflbrook AL 36054 



The sight of a 2-meter 
handie-talkie (HT) 
strapped to the belt has 
long become a telltale sign 
that the wearer is an 
amateur radio operator — 
whether it be at a hamfest, 
on the street in a public 
place, or wherever. There's 
no question that the per- 
sonal two-way portable has 



revolutionized amateur ra- 
dio with a "go-anywhere" 
mobility and convenience 
that was unheard of just 8 
or 10 years ago. 

Nevertheless, there are 
times when even the small- 
est of amateur HTs are a bit 
much to tote around. In 
many situations, sporting 
an obvious HT marks one as 
a nut, freak, or fuzz and can 
even set one up for a ripoff . 
Frequently, it's not ab- 
solutely necessary to be 
able to transmit; a small 



|4l.000MHz 

I 



I5S.QOOMH; 



JGk.OOOMHl 

I 



1 69. 995 MH I 



TYPE -A 



TYPE-S 



TYPE-C 



TYPE-D 












TYPE-E 



I4I OOOMHl TO I69.999MHJ 



Fig. 1. 

68 73 Magazine • December, 1981 



monitor receiver may do 
the trick. What is P in fact, 
needed in many situations 
is an ultra-small, program- 
mable, synthesized monitor 
that is truly of pocket-sized 
dimensions. 

A few years back, the 
Henry Radio Co. took a 
giant step forward in this 
area by marketing a line of 
low-cost pocket receivers, 
available in several models: 
a VHF-high band scanning 
radio, a 12-channel non- 
scanner, a two-channel 
VHF-high monitor/paging 
receiver, and a single-chan- 
nel UHF receiver. These 
four radios, available with 
accessory continuous tone- 
controlled squelch system 
(CTCSS) and two-tone de- 
coders, filled a variety of 
needs as monitor or pager 
receivers for hams, volun- 
teer firemen, auxiliary po- 
lice, civil defense person- 
nel, and the like. The sets, 



with sensitivity typically in 
the range of 0.8 microvolts 
for 20-dB quieting and in- 
cluding an internal nicad 
pack, were not only shirt- 
pocket size, they were 
small enough to fit in the 
palm of the hand. Their 
main drawback, common 
to all such fixed-tuned, 
crystal-controlled receiv- 
ers, was the fact that they 
were just that, fixed tuned, 
meaning that additional (ex- 
pensive) crystals were re- 
quired for expanded fre- 
quency coverage. For ex- 
ample, in the case of a 
12-channel VHF receiver, 
$60 worth of crystals at $5 a 
shot would be required for 
full utilization. The same 
technical developments in 
frequency synthesis that 
caused the crystal-con- 
trolled HT to go out of 
favor have had almost the 
same effect on monitor re- 
ceivers such as these, as 



well as mass-market police 
and fire monitor table 
radios and scanners of the 
type made by Bearcat, Re- 
gency, and Radio Shack. 

A recently introduced 
VHF FM PLL synthesized 
monitor, the AR-22, manu- 
factured by AOR, Ltd. of 
Tokyo and sold in the US by 
Ace Communications, Inc , 
of Tustin CA, has effective- 
ly harnessed the new 
technology and made prac- 
tical a wide-range VHF 
communications receiver in 
a coat- or shirt-pocket 
package. The new radio, 
which isSW H X 2W W 
X 1" D, weighs but 7 A oz. 
(200 grams) with the battery 
pack installed. The AR-22 is 
designed specifically for 
applications where people 
on the move must reliably 
monitor transmitted VHF 
signals, even under adverse 
conditions. The AOR unit is 
capable of covering the 
VHF frequency spectrum 
from 131.000 MHz to 
179.995 MHz and is offered 
in five discrete ranges em- 
phasizing monitoring re- 
quirements of different 
radio services including 
amateur, police, govern- 
ment, marine, railroads, 
etc As can be seen from a 
look at Fig, 1, the two 
receiver configurations of 
most interest to amateurs 
are Type A, covering 
141000 to 149,995 MHz, 
and Type B, covering 
146 000 to 154.995 MHz. 
The maximum frequency 
coverage of each set is 
listed as 8.995 MHz with lit 
tie or no degradation of per- 
formance at the band 
edges. 

Designed for FM recep- 
tion, the radios feature PLL 
frequency systhesized, 
dual -conversion superhet 
circuitry with low-noise 
CMOS logic to cover the 
ft 995 MHz range specified, 
in 5-kHz increments. 

The direct frequency 
readout enables positive 

**SeG Ust of Advertisers on page 162 




For Serious 

Amateu 

Only 

The HQ2, 
Broad ban 
Tribander 
with no 
compromise 

You could spend a full day 
assembling and erecting 
this "highly visible" quad 
antenna. But. if you're that 
serious about your amateur 
hobby, youll be rewarded with 
antenna performance that puts 
you one step closer to your 
dream of an "ideal" installation 

The HQ2 is a 2-eiement quad antenna 
in a complete kit ready to assemble 
designed and tuned by the best 
antenna engineers in the industry. 
Heavy-duty construction includes taper 
swaged aluminum tubing, aluminum 
stranded wfre P die formed spreader-to- 
boom clamps, cycolac insulators, plus 
a universal tillable boom-to-mast 
clamp 





/if/qafia 



*-31§ T FtF X COMMUNICATIONS INC 

960C- AUicft Aui 5a 

22. r%mmm 



BROADBAND- Less than 
2;1 SWR across virtually 
the entire 10, 15 and 20 
meter bands. 

DIRECTIONALITY: F/B 

and F/S ratios better 
than3-elementyagis 
and forward gain 
comparable to TH3MR3, 

SHORT BOOM: Turning 
radius- 13% ft (4.1 m). 

SINGLE FEEDLINE: One 

feed line for all three 
bands 

SOLID TUNING: USS 

susceptible to 
surrounding objects and 
less critical of height. 

Tower shown is 
NEW Hy-Qain 
HG-37SS 

Self-Supporting 
Crank-Up Tower 




73 Magazine • December, 1981 69 



VOLUME CONTKGL- 
SOUELCH CONTROL 




DIGITAL 
SWITCHES 

POWEB ON /OFF 
AMD *5KHi SUDF 
SWITCH 



EAfl PHONE JACK 



Fig. 2. 




FLIP UP AMO PUSH 



Fig. 3, 

frequency control without 
the battery drain intro- 
duced by LEDs or LCDs. 



The two most significant 
digits are factory-pro- 
grammed. For example, in 
the Type A (2-meter) receiv- 
er, the base is 140.000 MHz; 
this does not require repro- 
gramrning. As indicated in 
Fig. 2, the third, fourth, and 
fifth digits are individually 
controlled and set by the 
three-section digital thumb- 
switch on the radio's top 
panel. The slide switch 
allows for 5-kHz reception 
increments — this feature 
allows the receiver to 
monitor the exact transmit- 
ted frequency or to be set 
for standby at a predeter- 
mined frequency. The re- 
ceiver is set to the desired 
frequency using the ( + ) or 
( — ) flip-up push-button 
located adjacent to the 
digit to be changed — the 



Frequency Range 
Maximum Frequency 
Coverage 
Receiving Mode 
Receiver System 

Usable Sensitivity 
Audio Squelch 
Sensitivity 
Selectivity 

Spurious and Image 
Attenuation 
Frequency Stability 

l-f Frequencies 
Audio Output Power 

Power Consumption 



Operating 

Temperature Range 
Battery 



Physical Size 

Weight 

Frequency Selection 

PCB 



Housing 

'Specifications subject 



Technical Data 

131.000 MHz to 179.995 MHz 

8.995 MHz with no degradation 

of performance 

Frequency Modulation, 16F3 

PLL frequency-synthesized duat- 

conversion superheterodyne 

0.?uV EIA 12dBSINAD 

0,2 uV at threshold squeich, 

adjustable 

Adjacent channel rejection 

±12,5 kHz) greater than 60 dB 

Less than 50 dB 

Within ± 10 ppm over the operat- 
ing temperature range 
1st 10J MHz, 2nd 455 kHz 
100 mW into M)hm load at 10% 
THD 

25 mA at receiver squelched 
100 mA at 100 mW audio output 
power 
-10'Cto +60°C 



Rechargeable nicad battery 
pack, 

4,9 volts and 225 mAh 
5%"(H) x 2W*m x 1-0"(D> with- 
out knobs 

7.1 oz. (200 grams) with battery 
pack 

3 digits of digital push switches 
and slide switch 
Double-side glass-epoxy printed 
circuit board 

High impact ABS plastic case 
to change without notice. 



Fig. 4. 



button is simply flipped up 
(+ or — ), then pushed 
down to set the desired fre- 
quency (see Fig. 3). 

The receiver's specs are 
impressive and are, in fact, 
comparable to good ama- 
teur HTs. Claimed sensitivi- 
ty is 0.2 microvolts EIA for 
1 2 dB SINAD, with an audio 
squelch sensitivity of 0.2 
microvolts. The radios in- 
corporate what the manu- 
facturer calls "electric 
stage tuning" for nearly 
9-MHz-wide coverage. As 
such, the input and rf stages 
of the set are tuned elec- 
tronically by variable tun- 
ing diodes which are in- 
serted into each stage to 
obtain maximum sensitivity 
as well as maximum selec- 
tivity and out-of-band spuri- 
ous and image signal rejec- 
tion. Adjacent channel re- 
jection is spec'd at ±12.5 
kHz at 60 dB down, while 
spurious and image attenu- 
ation is about 50 dB. Fre- 
quency stability is excel- 
lent, within ±10 ppm (parts 
per million) over the operat- 
ing temperature range of 
— 10 degrees C to +60 
degrees C 

The physical construc- 
tion of the little unit is very 
sturdy. The set is designed 
and tested to operate under 
adverse, knockabout condi- 
tions- The high-impact ABS 
plastic case housing pro- 
tects against physical 
shock, while the double- 
sided glass-epoxy printed 
circuit board ensures a tight 
ship inside. 

Audio output is suffi- 
cient, considering the 
physical size and power 
limitations imposed, Rated 
audio output power is 100 
mW into an 8-Ohm load at 
10% THD (total harmonic 
distortion); power con- 
sumption is but 25 mA with 
receiver squelched, rising 
to 100 mA at the rated 100 
mW audio output level. The 
internal battery furnished is 
a rechargeable 4.9-volt, 
225-mAh nicad pack. 



For a refreshing change, 
there are no accessories 
that must be purchased to 
achieve acceptable and 
convenient operation. In- 
cluded are a wall-type 
charger for charging the 
225-mAh nicad battery 
pack, the pack itself, stan- 
dard 7" and mini (4") helical 
(rubber duck) antennas, a 
20" wire lead antenna, and 
an earphone. The only op- 
tional accessories offered 
by the manufacturer are a 
leather carrying case and 
vehicular charger. 

The set's full set of specs 
is given in Fig. 4. How did 
the little radio perform on 
the go? 

We selected the "B" 
model, which covers 
1 46.000 to 1 54.995 MHz, for 
purchase. This choice al- 
lowed us to cover both the 
populous top 2 MHz of 2 
meters, plus a 7-MHz chunk 
of the adjacent public ser- 
vice and commercial bands, 
allowing bonus coverage of 
local police, fire, highway, 
paging, mobile radiotele- 
phone, and taxicab fre- 
quencies. The radio's bat- 
tery was found fully charged 
upon receipt (in use it takes 
about 10 hours to fully 
charge the radio with the 
set turned off). The fact that 
the battery was charged 
allowed us to check out the 
radio's performance within 
a few minutes of unpacking 
it. When used with the stan- 
dard-size (7") rubber duck 
antenna, we found recep- 
tion to be entirely adequate 
from medium- to high-level 
signal sources, actually 
about equivalent to that ex- 
pected of the typical ama- 
teur HT when using a rub- 
ber duck antenna. Recep- 
tion on the smaller (4") 
mini-duck was, predictably, 
not as good, but represent- 
ed a good space-saving 
compromise when receiv- 
ing strong local signals. The 
20" wire lead antenna did 
not seem to offer any im- 
provement in reception 
over the larger rubber duck. 



70 73 Magazine * December, 1981 



Frequencies were easily 
and rapidly punched in us- 
ing the three digital push 
switches and slide switch 
(for 5-kHjt split-frequency 
operation). The volume and 
squelch controls, located 
behind the earphone and 
antenna jacks, respectively, 
on the top of the radio, are 
very small and were very 
difficult to operate with the 
antenna and/or headphone 
plugs installed Fortunately, 
for most purposes, these 
controls can be set and 
forgotten except for occa- 
sional minor adjustment. 
Audio quality was excellent 
and was of more than ade- 
quate volume for most ap- 
plications; there was no 
trace of case vibration even 
at high audio levels. 

Other than the minor in 

convenience caused by the 
size and placement of the 
two top-panel controls 
(volume and squelch), no 
significant drawbacks were 
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thesized feature was found 
to be very handy, for the 
same reasons that prac- 
tically the only HTs sold to- 
day are synthesized mod- 
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The one real disappoint- 
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Fortunately, the radio's 
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The little radio fills a real 
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73 Magazine * December, 1981 71 



MICROLOG 




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Sales through your local dealer 

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v$ee List of Advertisers on page 182 



73 Magazine • December, 1981 73 



Paul Dmzer Nil t 
2 Dawn Road 
Norwatk C7 06851 



Beginner's Guide to Antennas 

not just for Novices 



For a number of years I 
have been teaching a 
ham radio licensing class 
on a more or less regular 
basis, and as many instruc- 
tors have found, the class 
itself is only a start. 

As the students receive 
their licenses, they invari- 
ably return with a set of 
questions which point out 
the difficulty of translating 
the knowledge, newly won, 
into practical use. The 
following conversation has 
been repeated dozens of 
times and is aimed at the 
universal problem of select- 
ing and erecting an antenna 
for a new ham station. 

Question: I just received my 
license and got a good buy 
on an allband rig. I am out 



of money, don't have much 
time, and want to get on the 
air as quickly as possible. 
What antenna and what 
bands should I start with? 
Answer: Put up a 40meter 
dipole This will give you a 
chance to make a large 
number of contacts, day or 
night, weekday or weekend. 
In addition, you can load it 
up on 1 5 and work DX if the 
sunspot cycle is in a favor- 
able position. See Fig. 1. 

Q« Can I use insulated wire? 
A, Sure— as long as you re- 
move the insulation at the 
point where you connect 
the feedline. Also, make 
sure that the wire you select 
does not stretch. If it does 

stretch, vou w «ll have to 
keep cutting the wire back 
to the proper length period- 



ically Your best bet is to 
buy copper-coated steel 
wire. The copper gives you 
good conductivity and the 
steel core keeps it from 
stretching. 

Q, I have a roll of "thin" 
coax [RC-58 or RC-59). Can I 
use it instead of buying the 
more expensive RG-8? 
A In the HF ham bands (80 
through 10 meters), as long 
as you have a fairly short 
feedline run, say, 100 feet 
or less, you won't notice 
any difference. 

Q. Gotcha! We learned that 
the feedline impedance 
should be 70 Ohms for a di- 
pole and some of these 
coax cables have a 50Ohm 
impedance. Can I still use 
them? 



A. Again, for short runs of 
feedline in the HF bands, 
there will be no noticeable 
difference. The swr might 
be a tad higher, but this 
won't make any difference 
Just one caution on coax: 
You can buy some relative- 
ly inexpensive coax that 
was originally sold to undis- 
criminating and unsuspect- 
ing CBers. It normally costs 
half or 2/3 of the cost of 
brand-name coax, and as 
you can guess, there is a 
good reason for the lower 
price. Be suspicious. Cut 
away a short section of the 
outside insulation and see 
how much of the inside in- 
sulator is covered by braid. 
If there are large spaces and 
you can see a good part of 
the inside insulation, be 
careful You may be invit- 



lengthunfeet)- 



V> 



y 



lit 



466 



FREQUENCY UK MM J I 



i¥ 



SOLDER 



COAT EXPOSED AREA WITH / 

"LIQUID ROBBER' GE "SILASTIC 11 
OR OTHER SEALANT —** 




-if- 



** 






SOLDER 



L 



SOLDER AFTER 
CHECKING SWR 



COAX FEEDLINE 



Fig. 1. For 40 meters at 7 A 25 MHz. L =468/7.125 =65. 6fl; or 



* fW 



65' 8 



RIG 




LOW 

FUSS 

FILTER 



COAX JUMPER 
AS SHORT AS 
POSSIBLE 




SWR 
BRIDGE 



ANTENNA 

SELECTION 

SWITCH 



Fig. 2. 



It 

It 



3=C 



ANTENNA 

TUNER 

lUATCHSOX) 




TO ANTENNA 
#2 

#a 

#4 



74 73 Magazine * December, 1981 



ing problems if you decide 
to use it 

Q. But what about the swr? 
Can I operate with a 2:1 or 
2.5:1 swr? 

A, Well, for many years the 
most popular ham antennas 
used an swr of 5:1 or 10:1. 
These antenna/feed line sys- 
tems used open-wire line, 
and the key here is low loss- 
es in the feed If your rig 
will operate with a high swr, 
there is no reason to fight to 
get the swr down to the nice 
round value of 1:1 as long 
as the loss in the feedline is 
low. Again, in the HF bands 
with short feedline runs, an 
swr of 3:1 won't affect your 
signal at all. 

Q. Will my rig operate with 
a 3:1 swr? 

A. Most rigs with tube finals 
will, as long as you don't 
keep the key down for long 
periods. Solid-state finals 

are a different problem. 
Most have swr protection, 
which means they sample 
the swr and reduce their 
power if the swr goes too 
high. Given a choice, I 
would try for an antenna 
with a low swr. But if it 
means spending 5 minutes 
tuning up every time I QSY 
(change frequency), I would 
accept the higher swr in the 
interest of convenience and 
extend the life of the finals 
by not keeping the key 
down so long tuning. 

Q, What about antenna tun- 
ers? In fact, I have read 
about tuners (matchboxes), 
low-pass filters, swr bridges, 
and coax switches. They are 
all connected to the rig. In 
what order do you connect 
them and why? 

A. See Fig. 2. Start at the 
coax jack of the rig and con- 
nect the low-pass filter with 
as short a coax jumper as 
possible. This means that 
harmonics will be attenu- 
ated before they have a 
chance to run around long 
pieces of coax and possibly 
radiate. Next in line is the 



swr bridge, since you are in- 
terested in matching the rig 
to whatever follows The 
tuner is the next item, fol- 
lowed by the switch and 
the antennas themselves. 
Thus, you select an antenna 
with the switch, utilize the 
tuner to make the antenna 
and feed look like an ac- 
ceptable load, and monitor 
the swr (and relative power 
out) with the bridge. 

Incidentally, it might be 
a good idea to make up a 
tuning chart for each of the 
frequencies you use, Write 
down the frequency, set- 
tings of the controls on the 
rig, settings of antenna tun- 
er controls, and antenna se- 
lected. When you want to 
QSY, simply set all controls 
as shown on the chart, and 
then tweak them to get 
maximum power out and 
minimum swr. Normally, if 
you operate all over a band, 
you don't have to log these 
settings any more than each 
50 or 100 kHz on 80 and 40, 
every 100 or 200 kHz on 20 
and 15, and 500 kHz on 10. 

Q, I live in a small valley 
surrounded by hills. Are 
there any special precau- 
tions 1 should take in select- 
ing an antenna? 

A. On 80 and 40, a dipole, 
inverted vee, or longwire 
will work fine. However, on 
20, 15, and 10, you might 
not want to pick a very high 
gain beam or quad A really 
good beam or quad radi- 
ates at a low angle, almost 
horizontally, and will sim- 
ply pump your precious rf 
into the hills. Antennas 
such as the popular triband 
beams have to sacrifice 
some of this low-angle char- 
acteristic in order to oper- 
ate on three bands. As a re- 
sult, more of the rf is sent 
up at a slightly higher angle 
(up to perhaps 40 degrees, 
or so) and this will probably 
top the hills around you. Al- 
ternately, seriously consid- 
er tilting the beam or quad 
so that it radiates up to 
clear the hills. 



3, LENGTH {FEEZ- 



ES* 



SOLDER 




FREQUENCY I IN Mm I 



ft ADlALS (LENGTH (5 ABOUT 3% LONGER THAN VERTICAL SECTION 

241 . 

FREQUENCY 



OR L* 



Fig. 3, 



Q> I can't put up a big an- 
tenna I don't have the 
space or my XYL/husband 
or neighbors would object 
to a big tower. How about 
one of these vertical anten- 
nas? See Fig. 3* 

A. Verticals, especially full- 
size verticals, work fine. 
But they do require radials, 
Each radial is about a quar- 
ter wavelength long, and 
while you would like over 
100 radials, you should 
have as many as you can 
put up for each band you 
will operate. I suggest 2 
each as a minimum on 80 
and 40 r and 4 each as a min- 
imum on 20, 15, and 10. 

Q. But I thought verticals 
were good where you don't 
have much space? 

A. They will work with only 
the coax feed acting as a 
single radial. However, they 
work much better when you 
add radials cut to the prop- 
er length, and they work 
best when you have a very 
large number of radials. Ev- 
ery experienced ham has a 
story of how he worked DX 
on a 10' wire hanging out 
the window, But for the 
most consistent and best re- 
sults, verticals need radials, 
and lots of them. 

Q, What about mobile 
whips? Can I mount one on 
the house and use it? Cars 
don't have radials. 




J/Bfl OlAMETEir x 21 m LONG 
ALUMINUM OH STEEL 



1/8-24 TH«EAD (TO HATCH 
STANDARD MOBILE 
ANTENNA MOUNTING BALL) 



I m 



~r 



Fig, 4. 



A. On a car, the metal body 
is used as the ground plane 
in place of radials. In addi- 
tion, this sort of antenna 
system is from 2% to 15% 
efficient. The physical limi- 
tations of a car make us ac- 
cept this loss, but you can 
do much better at home. 



Q. Speaking of cars, I sti 
have a standard mobile 
mounting ball on my car 
that I used to use for my CB 
antenna. Can I use it for a 
2-meter FM rig? 

A. You will have some loss 
and you will probably never 
get the swr down really low, 
but you have two choices 
First, you can buy one of 
the commercial 2-meter an- 
tennas which mount in the 
standard mobile ball 
thread. These are 5/8 of a 
wavelength long but have a 
loading coil which makes 
them look like 3/4 of a 
wavelength. This is an odd 
number of quarter wave- 
lengths, so the input imped- 









73 Magazine * December, 1981 75 



— 



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ance is about 60 or 70 Ohms 
and you can use the old 
mount and coax feeder. 
You also can take an alumi- 
num or steel rod, cut to 
about 20 inches, and thread 
the lower inch to match the 
thread in the ball (Fig 4). 
You now have a quarter- 
wave vertical again using 
the old ball mount and coax 
feeder, 

Q. As long as we are salvag- 
ing CB antennas, surely on 
10 meters I can use the 
27-MHz Loudengrabber V 
that I have mounted on my 
roof. 

A, You probably can use it 
on 10 with an antenna tun- 
er, but it might be less effi- 
cient than simply replacing 
it with a 10-meter vertical. 
If you want to try an experi- 
ment connect it to your 
2-meter FM rig. It might 
make a real nice (and quick) 
vertical for 2m. But don't 
try this unless your 2-meter 
rig has swr protection in 



case the swr turns out to be 
very high, 

Q. One final question: I 
have a wire which I used to 
listen to the ham bands be- 
fore I got my license. It runs 
out the window, over the 
roof, under the apple tree, 
and about 10' above the 
ground around the garage. 
If I use an antenna tuner, 
can I make do with this 
wire? 

A We would all like 90' 
towers and large array an- 
tennas. Most hams have to 
make do with what they 
have without structural 
steel work. Sure, you can 
use the wire, as long as it is 
high enough so no one can 
touch it while you are trans- 
mitting. Generally, you 
want any antenna to be as 
high and in the clear as pos- 
sible. But if you can only 
run a short wire, use it. It 
will work and you will have 
many hours of good con- 
tacts. ■ 



Interested In DX? 

Dick Bash says you need THE COMPLETE IDIOTS GUIDE TO 

DX (by Stu Gregg, NF4Z) if: 



.you think IRC means International Red Cross 
. you're still working on your DXCC 
.you think WAC means a female army person 
.you're not a BIG G UN (yet) 
.you think the 'BUREAU' Is where you put your 
socks 










The Idiot's Guide pulls no punches and doesn't 'snow' you 
with nonessentials, but it does unlock some DXers' secrets; 
for example: How to QSL, What to say, Where to place your 
antenna, How much power to use, Whose awards can you get, 
Why and When to use SSB or CW, and much more, < .things 
that you need to know, and information that Honor Roll mem- 
bers had to learn the hard way- 
Dozens of DXers have been interviewed and their suggestions 
have been included here. Take a tip from the "Big Guns'" and 
use their secrets and tricks. 

THE COMPLETE I DIOTS GUIDE TO DX is available at dealers 
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76 73 Magazine ■ December, 1981 




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NOW 399.95 




IC-2KI 160 l&m (WARC] solid state fmear 500 watts 

outouf With AC supply [Re& $1705) ..NOW $1395.00 

10 Meter Modification Kit 15.00 




IC-290A All Mode 2m mobile tor 143 8 148 199 Mh? 
1/10 watts, RIT, prog offsets. 5 memories. 2 VFOs. 2 
scanning systems. SSB squelch, priority channel, 
sidelong, blanker memory retention proviso T/T nuc 

G V* * 2' ' h ^S'.'d (Reg S549^... NOW $489.95 

IC-22U The 800 channel synthesized successor to the 
lamous IC22S Frequency selection by a pushbutton 
1/10 watts Microphone, mount. & DC cord 6- w* 

2V'w*8' d, 3 lbs (Reg $299) NOW 5269,95 

EX- 199 Remote frequency selector .,.. 35 00 

IC-25A Compact 25w 2 meler rig 5 memories 2 VFOs. 
priority channel, 2 scanning systems automatic scan 
resume, provision tor memory backup With T/T mic 
T\[ ' 5'^w - 7"rf (Reg $349).. ...„.,. NOW $319.95 



You pay LESS at AES. . .just Call TOLL FREE 
1-800-558-0411 - ask for our DISCOUNT DESK 



SAVE $100 




IC-730 Solid-state SO-IOm (WARC] HF Transcer* 
200w PEP input 2 VFOs. fi frenq memory IF shaft with 
FBI opbonal UP/DN tuning with optional mic B l 



h*10V4. lOfbs (Reg $829) 
FL 30 SSB filter (passband tuning) 
FL-44 455 KHz SSB titter |ffeg $159) 

FL-45 500 Hz CW Niter 

EX-195 Marker untl, 

FK 202 LOA interface 730 7KL AH 1 

EK-203 150 Hz CW audio filter 

EX-205 Transverter switching unit ... 
HM-10 Scanning microphone 



NOW $729 00 

59 50 

NOW 144 95 
S9 SO 

39.00 

,.,27.50 

. 39 00 

. 29 00 

39 50 



•**»**»»"' 




IC-25IA Microprocessor controlled 2 meter All mode 
Transcewertor 143 8 148 1999 Mh/ 7 digit display 10 
watts. 3 memories, mem scan & programmable band 
scan 600 KH/ offsets, variable splits with two built in 
VFOs. 13.8vtfc or 117vac w/ampl hand mic 4 1 %* 
9-Vw * TQ'/d, 11 lbs (Reg $749) NOW $669.95 

IC-451A UHF AH Mode Transceiver tor OSCAR mode B 
or J & simplex. For 430 440 or 440 450 MHz Features 
similar to the IC-251A (Reg 1899)....... NOW $79995 

IC-AG1 UHF Preamplifier (Reg $89].... NOW $79.95 

IC 551 All mode 6m transceiver lor 50 53 999 MHz. 6 
cJifiit display, 10 watts, 3 memory channels w/vanable 
scan, 2 VFOs & blanker 138vdc & 117vac 4 1 "h * 
9V'w« lO'/'d, 14 lbs (Reg $479),,.,. NOW $388.95 

EX-IOG FrV! adaptor (Reg $125) ..NOW 112.95 

EK 107 VOX unit (Reg $55) NOW 4995 

EK-108 Pfi tune/RF proc (Reg. $105) ... NOW 94.95 

IC-551D same as 551 but 80 watts EX 107 & It 108 

built-in. 13 8vdc@ ISA (Reg $699) NOW 568 95 

PS- 20 AC power supply (Reg $229) NOW 199.95 

CM Cooling fan lor PS-20 45.00 

EX-106FM adaptor (Reg $125) NOW 112,95 

IC-5G0 6 meter SSB FM & CW Mobile transceiver LED 
readout, 10 watts, 3 memories, memory scan & prog 
band scan GOO KHz offsets, 2 VFOs 13 8 VDC <£ 3 5A 
Microphone & mount IReg $489) NOW $439 95 




VISA 




- — SAVE $30 

IC-2AT Synthesized 2m FM Hand-held 
with built m T/T pad BOO channel in 5 
KHi step* 144 147 995 selected by 
thumb wheels & *5 KHz upshift swj!. 
± 600 KHz offsets With BP-3 250 ma 
mead part output is 15 LOW or 1 5* 
HIGH Optional packs for larger capac- 
ity or higher power Supplied with 250 
ma nicad pack wall charger llenble 
antenna, belt clip, strap, earphone and 
pings Model IC-2A does not have built 
pad 66"h*2 6"*- 14*d lib 

Regular SPECIAL' 
IC2AT HTw'TTP mead & chgr . . . . $269 50 $239 ^0 
!C ?A 2m HT * mead & wall chgr... $239 50 214 50 
ML] 2 3/10* 2m mobile linear ....... 8900 79 95 

IC3AT Z20HTTTP mead & chgr.... 299 95 26995 

IC-3A 220 HT/mcad & charger ..269 95 24995 

BC 25U Ettra wait charger 12 50 

BC-30 Dfoptn chatter fat BP-2.3 & S.«.«.— . 69 00 
BP r 450 ma ?2v mead p*. 1W output . 39 50 

BP 3 Eitra 250 ma mead pk. 1 5W output 29 50 

8P-4 Alkaline battery case 12 50 

BP-5" 450 ma 10 8n mead pk. 2 3W output ... 49 50 
CP1 Og Wgbtet plug &cord {BP 3) ............ 9 50 

DC 1 DC operation module ,. 17 50 

HM-9 Speaker microphone .„., 34 50 

leather case Ispecrl y radio). .......,., 34 95 

FA 2 F^ i rble antenna lor 2A, 2AT (BNC) 10 00 

2A TTN Tl pad for 2A„.„„ , 39 50 

3A-TTN TT pad tor 3A *.. ^ 39 50 

f BC 30 reqwred to charge BP 2 & BP 5 

IC-202S 2 meter portable SSB Transceiver 3W PEP 
output Uses regular "C" cells, optional Nicad pack & 
charger or IC 3PS AC supply/speaker With hand mic 
whip antenna and strap (Reg $279) NOW $249.95 

IC-20L 2m t lOw ampl (Reg $98) ...NOW 89,95 
IC-402 432 Mhz portable SSB Transceiver Features 
same as 1C202S above (Reg. $389) NOW $349.95 

IC40L 10*. 432 amp (Reg. $105),... NOW 94 95 
IC 502A 6m SSB port (Reg $239) NOW 214 95 

IC-3PE 3A ps/speaker (Reg $95) NOW 89.95 

IC-3PS ps/spkr - ports (Reg $95) NOW 89.95 

SP4 Remote speaker lor portables ■«... 24.95 

Accessories: 

HM-3 Delude mobile microphone $17.50 

HM-5 3 Or 4 pin Noi^e can?t microphone 34.50 

HM-7 8 pin amplrlred hand microphone 29.00 

HM-8 8 pm T/'T microphone 49.50 

HM-10 Scanning microphone 39.50 

SfVl-2 4-pin electret desk microphone..... 39.00 

SW-5 B pin eieclret desk microphone 39.00 

HP1 Headphones .,.. 34 50 

AES Store Hours: Mon t Tue P Wed 
& Fri 9-5:30: Thurs 9-8; Sat 9-^ 

(Las Vegas & Clear wa lei stores NOT open Thursday evenmgsj 

E-X-P-A-N-D^E D WATS PHONE HOURS 
Our Milwaukee Headquarters will answer !he 
Naiionwde WATS line 1-&O0- 558-04 11 until 8 pm 
{Milwaukee time) Monday thru Thursday 

%* AES S*«*<^ St**t - Clearwater, FL 
1898 Drew St Phone (813) 461-4267 



Call Toll Free: 1-800-558-0411 '" ~" "* 1SSS3ST "*" ""' 

AMATEUR ELECTRONIC SUPPLY,! 

4828 W. Fond du Lac Avenue; Milwaukee, Wl 53216 - Phone (414) 442-4200 

AES BRANCH STORES ASSOCIATE STORE 



Inc. 



WICKLIFFE. Ohio 44092 

28940 Euclid Avenue 

Phone (216) 585-7388 

Ohio Wats 1 800-362 0290 

Outside Ohio 1 800-321-3594 



ORLANDO Florida 32803 

621 Commonwealth Ave. 

Phone (305) 894 3238 

Fla. Wats 1-800-432-9424 

Outside Fla. 1-800-327 1917 



LAS VEGAS. Nevada 89106 

1072 N. Rancho Drive 

Phone (702) 647 3114 

Pete. WA8PZA & Squeak. AD7K 

Outside Nev. 1-800 634 6227 



ERICKSON COMMUNICATIONS 

CHICAGO. Illinois 60630 

5456 N Milwaukee Avenue 

Phone (312) 631 5181 
Outside ILL. 1-800-621-5802 



73 Magazine ■ December, 1981 77 



/ 



43 



VV 



W 



THE NORTHEAST'S LARGEST FULL LINE AMATEUR DEALER 





KENWOOD TS830S 




TEN-TEC 580 




AEA MM-1 



ICOM IC 720 




^^mm^-^^. 




COLLINS KWM-380 




YAESU FT707 



ROBOT 800 



DRAKE TR7-DR7 



ORDER TOLL FREE 1 -800-448-9338 

FEATURING: Kenwood, Yaesu, (com, Drake, Ten-Tec, Cubic, Dentron, Alpha, Robot, AEA, Telrex, Astron, 
Avanti, Belden, CES, Daiwa, J.W. Milter, Panasonic, B&W, Mirage, Vibropfex, Bencher, lnfo-Tech P 
Universal Towers, Callbook, ARRL, Astatic, Shure, Tempo, VoCom, KLM, Hy-Gain T Larsen, Cushcraft, 
Hustler, Mini-Products, Bird, CDE, Rohn, Alliance, MFJ, Bearcat, Telex, Nye, Palomar Eng., Kantronics, 
Hayden, Ameco, Collins, 

We provide factory authorized warranty service for most major lines of equipment, and after-warranty 
service on ail other brands. Write or call for a quote, You Won't Be Disappointed, 

We are just a few minutes off the N YS Thruway (I-90) Exit 32 



VfSA 



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ORISKANY, NEW YORK 13424 

^397 

N.Y. Res. Call (315) 736-0184 



Warren ■ K2IXN 

Bob-WA2MSH 
Al - WA2MSI 



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OVERLAND PARK. KANSAS 66204 



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master charge 

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NOTE: SEND S1.00 FOR OUR CURRENT CATALOG OF NEW AND RECONDITIONED EQUIPMENT, 

* ALSO WE PERIODICALLY PUBLISH A LIST OF UNSERVICED EQUIPMENT AT GREAT SAVINGS. 

A BONANZA FOR THE EXPERIENCED OPERATOR, 

TO OBTAIN THE NEXT UNSERVICED BARGAIN LIST SEND A SELF ADDRESSED STAMPED ENVELOPE. 



78 73 Magazine • December, 1981 



CABLE TV 
UHF UP CONVERTER 
$44.95 . . . (Reg. S59.95) 

(shipping $3.25) 




MICROVERTER VUC 36 

Converts Mid and Superband Signals to 
UHF Channels 43 to 83. Allows all sets to 
tune without costly separate selector 
boxes. 'Rated fl1. Accessory Kit available 
for $2.00, consisting of matching trans* 
former plus 2 jumper cables. 



Other 75 ohm Cable Supplies: 

2 way Cable Switch 

F59A Connectors* ...... 

MT6UVFM Back of Set XFMR. 

2-way Splitter. 

4-way Splitter 

F81 "F" Barrel 

RG-59/U Coax 100% Foil .... . 

InMne Grounding Block 

Outdoor Matching XFMR . . . 

Indoor Matching XFMR 

F61 Chassis Ml Female 



* ft #t+ VV 

10/S2.15 
...$2,39 
. . . $2.79 
. . . $4.39 
. ..$ .48 
$ .10/11 
...$1.89 
$2,25 
...$1.25 
. . .$ .48 



Parts shipping *dd 10%, 11,50 minimum, 
COD add Si. 50. Fir Res add 4%, 

MENIAL ELECTRONICS 

5685 SW 80th Street, Miami, FL 33143 
Telephone: (305) 861 -5534 **4ia 



introducing 




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Mobile Connection 



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AUTOPATCH FOR 
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ONLY 

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$199.95 

Shipptng S3 SO in U S.A. 
N V S Residents Add 
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NOVAX interfaces your standard 2 merer; 220; 450; etc. base station 
and DTMF telephone, using a high speed scan switching technique so 
that you can direct dial from your automobile or with the HT from the 
backyard or poofside— automatically. 

• SMALL SIZE— (5" x 6" x 2") 



STATE OF THE ART 
CIRCUITRY 12-16 V.D.C. 

ADJUSTABLE ACTIVITY TIMER 
(clears out if mobile is out of range) 



EASY INTERFACING with 

radfo autio & squelch circuit 

SINGLE DIGfT CONTROL 
(connect and disconnect) 

3 MIN. CALL DURATION TIMER 



TO ORDER— SEND check— money order (MasterCard or Visa accepted) 
to: R. W. D + Inc-, Oriskany MY. 13424 or call 315-736-3087 



HOLIDAY SPECIAL 

COMPLETE ASSEMBLED AND TESTED READY TO INSTALL NOT A KIT 
A*MTEUR TELEVISION MICROWAVE DQWNCONVERTER 

50+ dB SYSTEM CAIN 
TUNES 2.1 GHz. TTk GHt, 
PREAMPLIFIER 20+ dB GAIN U 2,5 dB NF 
OUTPUT TUNES TV CHANNELS 2 TO 5 
OUTPUT IMPEDANCE 75 OR 303 OHMS 
FULL YEAR WARRANTY 
PERFORMANCE GUARANTEED OR 
YOUR MONEY REFUNDED 

$ 1 7 9 m 9 5 ea 

INCLUDING SHIPPING (U.P.SJ 
TWO FOR S3(iS.qo DEC. 1981 ONLY 

VISA AND MASTERCARD ACCEPTED 




CALL (804)489-2156 



AVAILABLE SEPARATELY FULLY ASSEMBLED AND TESTED 
10* dB PREAMPLIFIER $49,95, SLOTTED WAVEGUIDE ANTENNA (15* dB GAIN J S29. 95, POWER SUPPLY &34.9S 



EXTRA 



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EXTRA 



WE NOW STOCK PLESSEY 1b00 SERIES ICS 
AVANTEK CPD SERIES AMPLIFIERS fGPD 401, GPD 402. CPD 403) 12 H dS GAIN 5 



500 MHZ. SPECIAL 525.00 ea 
AVANTEK VTO OSCILLATORS SI 30. 00 EA. CIRCUIT BOARDS FOR GPD *i00 SERIES AMPS S 7. 00 ea. 
VIRGINIA RESIDENTS PLEASE ADD 4% STATE SALES TAX ADD SI. 00 PER ORDER FOR SHIPPING 



ELECTRONIC HOBBY INNOVATIONS 

7510CRANBY STREET SUITE 207 NORFOLK, VIRGINIA 23505 U01) 489 2156 



4A? 



**See Lis\ of Advertisers on page 1S2 



73 Magazine • December, 1981 79 



• YOU ASKED FOR IT • 

A COMPLETE REPEATER STARRING 
THE MARK 3C SUPERCONTROLLER 





ALL tft* imk*u* Mum which m*k« 
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• Mlcrooroc«Mor control 

MARK &C CONTROLLER $1005 



AND NOW, twi ttw rvpaitor it bum In - 

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MARK 3CR REPEATER 
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CALL TOLL FREE 
1 -800-238-61 68 

In TN. call 901-683-9125 

MEMPHIS AMATEUR 
ELECTRONICS 

(Formerly-Germantown'Sere-Rose) 



Authorized Dealer for Kenwood, Yaesu, loom, 
Deake, Mirage, AEA InfoTech, Ten-Tec, MFJ, Cubic, 
and B&M 



MON-FRI 9:00—5:00 
SAT 9:00— 12.KX) 



vM39 



Write: 1465 Welts Stat Rd., Memphis, Ta 38108 



BA READER, 
A NAME YOU SHOULD KNOW 




11 






i iiM*Z 



: 



ptf*** 



fl^*^ - 



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What does MBA mean? it stands for Morse-Baudot and ASCI I. 

does the MBA Reader do? The RO model {reader only) uses 

a 32 character alphanumeric vacuum fluorescent display and 

takes cw or tty audio from a receiver or tape recorder and visually 

presents it oh the display. 

The copy moves from right to left across the screen, much like 
the Times Square reader board. Is the AEA model MBA Reader 
different from other readers? it certainly is! It is the first to give the 
user 32 characters of copy (without a CRT), up to five words at one 
time - it can copy cw up to 99 wpm and Baudot at 60-67-75 and 100 
wpm. Speeds in the : ASCII mode are 110 and hand typed 300 
baud, The expanded display allows easy copy even during high speed reception. 

The AEA model MBA has an exclusive automatic speed tracking feature If you are copying a signal at 
3-5 wpm and tune to a new signal at 90 wpm r the MBA catches the increaised speed without loss of copy. 
The MBA Reader allows a visual display of your fist and improves your code proficiency. It is compact 
in size, and has an easily read vacuum fluorescent display. 

The Reader operates from an external 12 VDC source. This allows for portable/mobile or fixed 
operation. 

Check the AEA model MBA Reader at your favorite dealer and see all the features in this new 
equipment If your dealer cannot supply you, contact m* h jj» 

Advanced Electronic Applications, Inc. J^ Eh J% Brings you the 

ro. Box 21 eo f . Lynnwood ( : WA 98036 Call 206/775-7373 MEiM Breakthrough! 

Prices and specifications subject to change without notice or obligation 



80 73 Magazine • December, 1981 



^2 



HENRY RADIO 

...the oldest and still the best 

It all began for Henry Radio in 1927. In 1981 we Ye still going strong. 

Now, more than ever before, we feel able to provide you with the world's finest and broadest line of amateur radio 
equipment. Whether you live in California, across the country or even across an ocean, Henry Radio still provides the 
most complete "one stop" shopping center for your radio equipment needs. 




The FT-ONE 

Yaesus top engineering team is 
proud to unveil the transceiver they 
"always wanted to design", a 
revolutionary blend of computer 
and RF technology. 
Full coverage, all-mode, fully 
synthesized, ten digital VFO's with 
memory, full CW break-in T plus many 
elite class performance features, . . 
everything buiit in. 




TR7 

Drake's top of the line solid state 
continuous coverage synthesized 
HF system. Offers advanced high 
performance transceiver design, 
true passband tuning, unique 
independent receiver selectivity and 
many, many more worthwhile 
features. 




ICOM'S BEST. . . the IC-720A 

A full featured solid state HF 
transceiver offering passband tuning, 
digital display of mode/VFO and 
frequency, 9 band Tx/Rx (new 
WARC bands included) and 2 VFO's 
buitt in. 



Alt the benefits that have made Henry 
famous around the world are still here 
for you, 

• Large stocks of the finest amateur 
equipment. 

• Generous cash discounts offer you 
low, low prices. 

• Trade allowances for your old 
equipment. 

• Expert technical and service staff. 

• Fifty years of responsible merchan- 
dising so you can be sure you will get 
what you pay for. 

Let us know how we can help you. 



Of course, we stock the full line of 
Drake t Icom, Kenwood, Yaesu, 
Cubic, Bird, Collins and Tempo 
products as well as many other fine 
names. Need an antenna, mast r 
accessories of any kind? Try us . . . 
we have a huge inventory. 

Henry Radio also offers the 4K- 
Ultra and the 3K Classic/X superb 
high power HF amplifiers plus a 
broad fine of commercial FCC type 
accepted VHFand UHF hand hefds 
and amplifiers for two way FM 
communications. 





KENWOOD'S 

"top notch' 1 HF transceiver . the TS- 
830S. Every conceivable operating 
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2050 ft Bundy Dr. Los Angeles, CA 90025 (213) 820-1234 
931 N, Euclid, Anaheim, CA 92801 (714) 772^9200 

Butler, Missouri 64730 (816) 679-3127 




2K CLASSIC 

The 2K Classic 
linear amplifier. : . 
the culmination of 
years of experience 
in developing and 
manufacturing the 
2K series, will loaf 
along at full legal 
power. 

Features heavy 
duty, top quality 
components and 
rugged 
construction. 



TEMPO S-5 

A thoroughly field 

tested, simple to operate 

fully synthesized hand 

held. The S-5 is 

extremely reliable and 

ruggedly built, 

assuring a long life of 

hard use. Provides 

5 watts output (or 

1 watt switchabie) 

in the 144 to 148 

MHz rangfe. 



TOLL FREE ORDER NUMBER: IflOOJ 421 0631 

For all states except California 

Calif residents please call collect on our regular numbers 



^34 



w*S&& Us J of Advertisers on page T65 



73 Magazine * December, 1981 81 



b 



The Daiwa Infrared 
Wireless Microphone 

is the mike cable obsolete? 



Dave Ingram K4TW} 
Eastwood ViUage §1201 South 
Route 11, Box 499 
Birmmgham At 352W 



If you're still fumbling 
with microphone cables 
that get entangled in auto 
steering wheels and gear- 
shift levers or continuously 
drag papers off the home 
station desk, Daiwa Indus- 
tries has a new item worthy 
of investigation — a cord- 
less infrared microphone. 
Reflecting shades of both 
Star Trek and James Bond, 
the infrared mike adds a re- 
freshing freedom to '"con- 
fined" activities in both 
mobile and home setups (al- 
though the system is pri- 
marily designed for mobile 
operation). While this little 
gem might be considered 
by some to be of question- 
able utility, I found it one 
of the most logical and 
useful items available in 
many moons. The only 
problem I've encountered 
is deciding which rig should 
be connected to the infra- 
red mike system. Imagine 
being able to move around 
your home desk or in your 
auto while using a small 
mike clipped to your shirt 
front or pocket, and you'll 
surely agree the mobility 



of a cordless mike opens 
many new possibilities for 
enjoyment of your radio 
equipment. 

How It Works 

The Daiwa infrared mike 
system is composed of 3 
items: the microphone, the 
infrared beam sensor, and 
the control unit Activating 
the microphone's push-to- 
talk switches on the mike's 
circuitry and the infrared- 
emitting LEDs which carry 
information to the small 
sensor unit Output from 
the sensor goes to the pro- 
cessor unit, which connects 
to the rig's microphone 
input 

The infrared ray is not di- 
rectly visible, indicating op- 
eration in the mid- to far-in- 
frared range of approxi- 
mately 2 to 15 microns (a 
micron is one-millionth of a 
meter). I suspect the sensor 
unit's front cover also acts 
as a tuned filter for the spe- 
cific infrared range used, 
since cigarette light, match 
or flame flicker, flashing 
LED readouts, etc., are 
completely ignored by the 
sensor. Some elaborate ray- 
modulation tricks may also 
be employed, but a sche- 
matic diagram wasn't avail- 
able for studying the sys- 
tem when my early unit was 
acquired. 



Only three connections 
are required for the sys- 
tem, and it's ready for use. 
First 12 volts dc is ap- 
plied to the controller; sec- 
ond, the sensor is plugged 
into the controller, third, 
the controller's output is 
plugged into the station's 
transceiver The system is 
shipped with a 4-pin con- 
nector wired for Kenwood 
rigs, but it can be quickly re- 
wired or replaced as neces- 
sary, A drop-in charger for 
maintaining the mike's 
small internal battery is in- 
cluded in the controller 
unit's left side, while audio 
processing circuitry is 

located in the unit's right 
side. 

The charger's operation 
is fully automatic with 
a single LED indicating 
functions. The LED illumi 
nates when the mikes de- 
pleted battery is being 
charged. The LED begins 
flickering approximately 
one time per second when 
the battery approaches full 
charge, and it extinguishes 
completely when the bat- 
tery reaches full charge. 
Since the charger then 
switches off, the mike can 
be left in its socket until the 
next time it's needed This 
means that in a mobile in- 
stallation, the mike can be 
left in the controller's case 



overnight for worry-free re- 
charging and storage. 

The infrared mike's effec- 
tive working range is be- 
tween 3 and 5 feet, as mea- 
sured from LEDs to sensor. 
This distance is substantial- 
ly more than necessary for 
mobile installations, since 
the sensor's suggested 
mounting place is above 
the windshield's indoor 
rear-view mirror. Audio 
quality of the infrared mike 
is extremely good; my unit 
actually sounds better than 
the factory mikes supplied 
with the rigs with which it's 
used (Kenwood, Yaesu, and 
Comtronix). Each time the 
infrared mike's push-to-talk 
switch is keyed, a piezo- 
electric beeper in the corn 
troller chirps softly to indi- 
cate proper operation of 
the system. 

Using the Infrared Mike 

Since this "liberated 
microphone" doesn't re- 
flect the common sensation 
of being in direct-wired con- 
tact with its associated 
transceiver, we suggest ini- 
tially using it with the home 
setup or a small audio am- 
plifier before using it mo- 
bile. This will allow you to 
become familiar with mike 
sensitivity, maximum sen- 
sor-to-mike working range, 
etc, I used the transmitter 



62 73 Magazine • December, 1981 



QUALITY parts at 
* DISCOUNT PRICES! 



4PDT PRINTED 
CIRCUIT 12 VDC 

14 pm iir 1 * 
3 »rne contort* 
BRAND HEW 
PC Hownl 

S 3.75 EA. 




OPDT RELAY 

AROMAT |2 VDC 
HL2-P-DC12VDC 

compact tin 
10 ■mp contact 
1 mowiH Ifl HW 



il •< 



KEY 




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RATIO 4 AMPS 

125 VOLTS 

$ 3.50 EA* 



4PDT RELAY 

■ IttnpctHilkcli 
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TRANSFORMERS 



120 voll 

primaries 



% 



6 VOLTS *US0mA fi.2s 
12 VXT at SOOmA 12 50 
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16 VOLTS tt 1 AMP 14.50 
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440/220 TO 110 VOLT 
TRANSFORMER 

SOLA* HTIBZfQO 
440 or 220 voMb 
id 110 volls 

Mt*4 100 VA 
$15 00 




SIZE 
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'JSto 3 vol** 75* M 
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750— eft 




COMPUTER 
GRADE 

CAPACITOR 

1,700 mfd. 150 VDC 

n/zVxiw 1 $2.00 
3.600 mfcl 

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Enjoy CW. See dealer or call MFJ today, 





TRS-80 Models I and 1 CW Transceive pro- 
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73 Magazine * December, 1981 83 



monitor in rny FT-901DM 
for this purpose. If your rig 
doesn't feature a speech 
monitor, mike operation 
can be monitored through 
the use of a stereo amplifier 
or transistor radio (tune 
radio off stations, and con- 
nect controller's mike out- 
put wires between the vol- 
ume control wiper and 
ground; one "side" of the 
volume control is usually 
connected to ground also). 
My home setup opera- 
tion with the infrared mike 
was so enjoyable that I 
postponed mobile use for a 
couple of weeks. The infra- 
red sensor was stuck to my 
wall-mounted speaker 
which was positioned sub- 
stantially lower and approx- 
imately twice the distance 
of Daiwa's suggested top- 
of -windshield moulding 
strip location. The system 
worked great, but the mike 
had to be held vertically 
and "talked across" be- 
cause of the low-mounted 



sensor. On-the-air compari- 
sons reported the mike 
sounds as good or better 
than my time-proven Shure 
526 or Yaesu mike. Since an 
in-shack television reacts 
wildly when my 2-kW am- 
plifier is going full bore, I 
expected problems with the 
cordless mike + Fortunately, 
however, I was pleasantly 
surprised. The mike per- 
formed magnificent- 
ly . and I could enjoy the 
flexibility of moving any- 
where around the operating 
desk without the ties of a 
mike cable. 

Mobiling with the 
Infrared Mike 

The true pleasures of a 
cordless mike operation 
were realized when I mated 
the unit with my 2-meter 
mobile rig. The infrared sen- 
sor was placed above the 
inside rear-view mirror 
while the controller was 
mounted with adhesive 
pads (supplied} to the trans- 



ceiver's bottom I could 
move anywhere within the 
[full-size 1981) car's interior 
and conduct smooth QSOs 
in a very enjoyable manner. 
Bright sunlight, unusual re- 
flections, and temperature 
variations had no effect on 
the system. The micro- 
phone worked as flawlessly 
as a wired mike. A slight 
amount of wind noise was 
noticeable when a window 
was open or the air condi- 
tioner was operating at 
maximum. Loud noises out- 
side the auto occasionally 
modulated the rig, empha- 
sizing the need for Daiwa's 
optional F-4 windscreen 
Since the system's audio 
processing circuitry doesn't 
skimp on output level, the 
windscreen is definitely 
beneficial for mobile 
operations. 

Summary 

The Daiwa infrared mike 
system is one of the most 
enjoyable accessories I've 



used with an SSB or FM 
transceiver The unit's ver- 
satility and relatively low 
cost are particularly attrac- 
tive, since it allows one to 
enjoy a touch of class with- 
out a drastic financial out 
lay ($79 95; 4 optional wind- 
screens, $7.95). My only 
complaint on the whole sys- 
tem is the somewhat flimsy 
push-to-talk switch on the 
mike (it's also a push- 
on/push-off, unless you 
have a light touch). The 
switch hasn't given any 
problems, and I'm not con- 
sidering modifying it— I'm 
merely finicky. I'm quite 
impressed with the sincerity 
and c red i lability of MCM 
Communications, the US 
distributor for many Daiwa 
products. They seem com- 
mitted to caring for their 
customers. For more infor- 
mation, contact MCM Com- 
munications, 858E Congress 
Park Drive, Centervilte OH 
45459, Reader Service nunv 
ber 477 ■ 




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84 73 Magazine * December, 1981 



EAST COAST #1 GOES 
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THE ANTENNA BANK is 
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ACCESSORIES 



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14AVQ 4 Bend Vertical UMOm , , , | 46 00 

18AVT 5 Band 10-80m Trap Vertical S 76 00 

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ROTORS & CABLES 



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Alliance HD73/U f 00 ..*.♦> , , . $92 00/42 00 

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information call {703) 569 1200 

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250 10 Tower Sectton - - $39 50 

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MO-1 MO-2 MF Mobile Mas I S 17 50 

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MFJ DIGI-DIAL ADAPTER 

turns your frequency counter into a 

DIGITAL FREQ. READOUT 




Calibrate control 

compensates for heterodyne 
errors and mode offset*. 




The MFJ DighDial Adapter turns your frequency 
counter into an accurate digital frequency readout 
lor your transceiver. Connects between external 
VF0 jack and frequency counter. 

Counter gives direct frequency readout lo right 
of decimal for 7, 14, 21, 28 MHz bands. Mentally 
replace digits to left of decimal with MHz band 
as you do now with your analog diaL For the 3,5 
and 28-5 MHz band Ignore digits to left of deci- 
rnal and mentally add 3,5 or 28.5 MHz, respec- 
tively, to counter reading. 

Calibrate for each band and mode <CW. USB. 
LSB, AM} to compensate for heterodyne oscillator 
errors (does -not read CW transmit offset) 

Digital mixer inverts VFO frequency to give 
correct frequency readout Normal/Reverse switch 
gives direct VFO frequency readout {for some rigs 
on some bands, like Drake TR 4). 

RF butter amplifier. Crystal reference oscillator. 
On/Off switch. "On" LEO. Biack t eggshell while at. 
cabinet 3%x1V«3vr. 9-18 VDC or 110 VAC 



with optional MFJ 1312 AC adapter. $9,95. 

Order MFJ 210 For any rig with 5 5.5 MHz 
VFO (TS52Q, 3, SE; TR 3, 4; HUM 00. T01, 
S&101, 102; Tritons; etc) Order MFJ 211 for 
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Order from MFJ and try it - no obligation. If 
not delighted, return it within 30 days for refund 
(less shipping), One year unconditional Q yarinleii 

Order today. Call toll free 800 647 1800 Charge 
VISA. MC or mail check, money order for $59 95 
plus $4.00 shipping for MFJ-210 or MFJ-211. 

Don't wart any longer to enjoy digital readout, 
order now. Call MFJ or see dealer. 



CALL TOLL FREE . . . 800-647-1800 



Call 601-323-5869 for technical information, or- 
der/repair status. Also call 601 323 5869 outside 
continental USA and in Mississippi. w? 

1MB I ENTERPRISES, 

IVIl W INCORPORATED 
Box 494, Mississippi Stats. MS 39752 J 



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Usr of A&vvrtisors on pag* 762 



73 Magazine * December, 1981 &5 



IT7T 



1-800-528-8960 



AZDEN 

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APPLE 

Apple II-48K -$1179 



ATARI 

400 -$349 800 -$740 

CW RTTY SYSTEMS 

RADCOM - Complete with Apple 
TU & Software - $259 




EGBERT - No TU 
Apple Software Decodes & 
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GALFO - Requires TU 
Apple Software • $29 

EPSON 

MX80 - $469 MX1 00 - $749 

IRL 

FSK500 - $229 FSK1 000 - $449 




KDK 

2025 - $299 

LOBO 

Apple/TRSSO Drive - $390/$390 



MONITORS 

APF-$125 Sanyo -$159 

MPI 

88G - $595 99G - $695 

MACROTRONICS 

M80-S159 CA650-$259 

SANTEC 
CALL 



OKIDATA 

M82A - $499 M83A - $749 

ZENITH 

219 -$775 289 -$2195 
Arizona 1-602-246-1783 



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Phoenix, AZ 35029 ^3 




Building A Transmatch? 
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B & W cods, switches, antennas 
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J W Miller parts 
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Toroids. cores deads baluns 
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Hammarlund — Millen 



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86 73 Magazine • December, 1981 



OVER 70 BRANDS WLAND-MOBILI 
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A microprocessor controlled keyboard 
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Morse Features: 

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RTTY Features: 

• 4 speeds 

• 2 shifts (170 & 850 hz) 

• built in AFSK 

• built in CWID 

• built in RY generation 

ASCII Features: 

• 110 A 300 Baud 

• 2 shifts [170 A 650 hz) 




Be sXr;s s 45o°° 

FO.B. Factory 



Other Features: 

• Built in quick brown for generator on all modes * CQ & DE special keys on all modes 
■ Automatic CR/LF • Keyboard control of ail functions 

• 700 Character Running Buffer » 4 row keyboard eliminates figures/letters 

• 10 recallable, L.ser programmable message shifting on RTTY 
memories of 120 characters each • Many more features. 



Order direct or from these dealers: 



Cohoon Amateur Supply 

307 McLean Avenue 
Hopkinsville, Kentucky A22AO 
(502) fla&4534 

Colmay Products 

14903 Beaclwiew Ave. 

While Hock, B.C. Canada V4B1N6 

(604) 536-3058 



IHFOTECH 



Gllfer Associates, Inc. 

52 Park Avenue 

Park Ridge. New Jersey 07666 

(20l)39i-7B87 

Global Cominur^carions 

60S Cocoa Isles Blvd. 
Cocoa Beach, Florida 32931 
{305) 783-3624 

Ham Radio Canter 

8342 Qiii/e Bvd 

St. Louis. Missouri 63132 

1-&m325-3636 

ELECTRONIC Michigan Radio 

EQUIPMENT! ME. Clemens, Michigan 48045 

{313) 469-4656 
^35 



Dialta Amateur Radio Supply 
212 48th Street 

Rapid City, Soulh Dakota 57701 
(60S) 343* 1 27 

Garmantown Amateur Supply 

3202 Summe-r Avenue 
Memphis, Tennessee 361 T2 
1^800-2386168 



Manufactured by. 

DIGITAL ELECTRONIC SYSTEMS, INC 

1633 Wisteria Court • Englewood, Florida 33533 ■ B13W 9518 



NAG Distributing 

7385 NW 1 2th Street 
Miami. Florida 33126 
{305) 592-96B5. 763-8170 

Radio Woftd 

Terminal Building 
Oneida Counly Airporl 
Oriskany. New York 13424 
{315) 736-0470 
1-800-448-9335 

flay's Amateur Radio 

1590 U.S. Highway 19 Soulh 
Clearwater. Florida 33516 
(813)535-1416 

Universal Amateur Radio 

1280 AirJa Drive 
Reyrtotdsburg, Ohio 43066 
(614) 6664267 



**See List of Advertisers on page 762 



MFJ VLF 

CONVERTER 

Receive 10-500 KHz on 
Ham rig or SWL receiver. 




$7095 



79 



Plug INs MFJ VLF Converter between your 
antenna and Ham transceiver or SWL receiver 
and tune the VLF 10 500 KHz band. 

Hear weather, ship to share CW traffic, RTTY, 
WWVB, navigation beacons, 1750 meter no 
license band, European broadcast, and more. 

MFJ 332 Ham version converts 10 500 KHz 
to 28.010 to 28.500 MHz Also adds standard 
broadcast band on 28.5 to 29.7 MHz. MFJ 331 
SWL version converts to 4.010 to 4.500 MHz. 

Read frequency directly on your receiver 
(ignore MHz). 

Low noise amplifier, 6 pole lowpass filter, 
double balanced mixer, crystal oscillator gives 
very sensitive and stable, BCB interference free 
signals. 

On/off- Bypass switch, LED tor power. 80 239 
coax connectors, 3x4xt inches. Black, eggshell 
white aluminum cabinet 9 18 VDC or 110 VAC 
wrth optional AC adapter, MFJ 1312, $9:95, 

VLF/MW/SWL Antenna Tuner 

Greatly improves 10KHz to 
30 MHz reception. 



$CQ95 



69 




This MFJ 955 VLF/MW/SWL preselecting 
antenna tuner greatly Improves reception of 
tOKHz thru 30 MHz signals, especially those 
below 2 MHz. 

Lets you peak desired signals while rejecting 
interference. Reduces overload, background 
noise, cross modulation, and intermediation. 
VLF signal come roaring in. 

Switch between two antennas and two re- 
ceivers, Bypass position connects antenna di- 
rectly to receiver. 5Vzx2x3 inches. Black, egg- 
shelf white aluminum cabinet 




$ 79 



95 



MFJ 1020 Tuned indoor Active Antenna, 
Can often exceed reception of outside longwire. 
Covers 300 KHz to 30 MHz. Has telescoping an 
tenna. Minimizes intermod, provides RF selectivi- 
ty, reduces noise. Also use as preselector. 

Order from MFJ and try it. If not delighted, 
return within 30 days for refund {less shipping). 

One year unconditional, guarantee, 

Enjoy VLF. Order yours today. See dealer or 
call MFJ toll free 800-647-1800. Charge VISA, 
MC, Or mail check, money order. Add $4 00 
each for shipping and handling. 



CALL TOLL FHEE . . . 800-647-1800 



Call 601 323 5869 for technical information, or 
der/repair status. Also call 601-323-5869 out 
side continental USA and in Mississippi. ^4? 

MEL I ENTERPRISES, 

IVIIlJ INCORPORATED 



V 



Box 494, Mississippi State, MS 39762 



73 Magazine • December, 1981 87 



mm 



YAESU 

450 FM 

Chmut 

SAVE 
$125 



VAESU FT 404R 450 MH; HanrJ held Sx cryslar 
channels wiihin a 3 MHj (?*) m 5 Mite (r*} spread 430 
to 450 MHi 2' W?00m* output With NrCad battery 
pack, wall charger, flex antenna, case, strap, earphone 
& 446 mHi simple*, V = h ■ 2V* ■ ? rtf, ] Id 

Regular $299 - Gtoseout$179** 

FT-404R TIP same lealures as FT 404R above, plus a 
factory installed 16 bunco touchtone pad 

Regular $325 - CloseoutS199 9S 

NCIA 15-hr drop in charger .. Sale $44.95 

NC3A DrojHOthRf/JU: adaptor,. Sale 79 95 

FBA I Battery sJeew tor NC1A/3A.., 8 00 

FflB-1 Extra reCad battery pack 2300 

NC-9B Extra 1 5- hr wall charger 10.00 

PA-2 Mobile DC DC adaptor & charger 39 00 



ll*l*l-l>14 



YM-24A Speaker /microphone 

FTS 32E 32 tone CTCSS encoder. . . . 
FTS-32ED 32 tone CTCSS enc /der 

Leather carrying case .,., 

MMB-10 Mobile bracket ... 



.3900 
4000 
. 75 00 
,. 35 00 
.. 15.00 



Crystal Certificates (2 per channel required) 
are $5.00 each when purchased WITH FT 404 
or FT-404R/TTP Purchased separately they 
are $8.00 each (no exceptions). 



NEW FT-208R 

Synthesized 2m FM HT 

SAVE $40 

Reg. $359 
SALE $319 

NC 7 Desk charger.,, $53" 

NC8 Quick desk charger S9 V- 

PA 3 Mob+et- adapter ch|r,..,39° 

FNB2 titra battery. ... 4 29* 

FBA 2 Bart sleeve NC 7 8 G» 
FBA 3 9eeve 208JI/IA/3A. 12* 

LCCi Carrying case. 35* 

YH-24A Speaker, mic 39* 

Quantity Limited. Send Check or Money Order For 
prompt shipment, call TOLL FREE 1-800- SSI 0411 
and use MASTERCARD or VISA: COD orders OK 
Allow J 5" tor UPS shipping charges ■ 48 States. 

AMATEUR 

ELECTRONIC SUPPLY- 

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A £5 BmncH Storw Ik Qearwdief , Ft • 

Orlando, FL • Wickirffe. OH • Las Vegas. NV 



88 73 Magazine • December, 1981 



WORLD TIME 
WATCH 

the first microprocessor watch 
made especially for hams 




24 hr. timer 

microprocessor 
water resistant 

solar assist 

New Low Price 
-$59.95 



The HAM-1 functions include local time, 
world time, fG.M.T. too) count -up and 
count down chronometer, day, month , 
date, alarm and hourly chime. It's ideal 
for lew- keeping, DX time conversion and 
10 minute 1-0- timing. The HAM-1 fea- 
tures a high contrast Seiko display and 
solar ceil battery assist. Battery life is 
better than 4 years. The HAM -1 is water 
resistant to 20 meters, the case is 100% 
solid stainless steel and the crystal is 
scratch resistant mineral glass. The HAM- 
1 is rugged and durable and has a 1 year 
warranty. 

2 METER AMPLIFIER 




• 2 Watts In, 10 Watts Out • V.S.W.R. 
Protected *Can be Used for F.M, St S.S. 
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Heatsink • Built In T/R Switch 

TEMPO S-1 UPGRADE KITS 
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Upgrade your early Tempo SO to cur- 
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Other Accessories Available: 

Spkr/Mic, Designed for S-1 # s. . . S24J5 

Heavy Duly Belt Clip 7,50 

Flex Antenna 6,00 
To Order Call or Write to: 

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Add $3.00 per order for shipping & 
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When it comes to 

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Here they arc* The latest editions. World- 
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Order from your deaJer or directly from 
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charge. Foreign residents add $4.55 for 
shipping. Illinois residents add 5% sales tax. 

SPECIAL LIMITED OFFER! 

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only S 2. 50 postpaid 



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CRYSTALS & KITS/OSCILLATORS * RF MIXERS ■ Rf AMPLIFIER • POWER AMPLIFIER 



OX OSCILLATOR 

Crystal controlled transistor type, 3 to 20 MHz, OX-Lo, Cat. No. 

G351 00- 20 to 60 MHz t OX-Hi, Cat. Na 035101 , 

Specify when ordering. $6.31 ea. 



MXX-1 TRANSISTOR RF MIXER 

A single tuned circuit intended for signal conversion in the 3 to 1 70 

MHz range. Harmonics of the OX or OF-1 oscillator are used for 

injection in the 60 to 1 70 MHz range. 3 to 20 MHz, Lo Kit, Cat. No 

035105. 20 to 170 MHz, Hi Kit Cat. No. 035106 

Specify when ordering $7,02 ea . 



0F-1 OSCILLATOR 

Resistor, capacitor circuit provides ose over a range of ft eq with 
the desired crystaJ 2 to 22 MHz, OF-1 LO. Cat Psfo. 03t108 p 18 
to 60 MHZ OF-1 H Cat. No. 035109. 

Speafy when ordering. $5.42 ea 



PAX-1 TRANSISTOR RF POWER AMP 

A single tuned output amplifier designed to follow the OX 

osctTlalor. Outputs up to 200 mw, depending on frequency 
and voltage. Amplifier can be amplitude modulated 3 to 30 

MHz, Cat. No. 0351O4. ^J 

Specify when ordering, $7,34 ea. 







SAX-1 TRANSISTOR RF AMP 

A small signal amplifier to drive the MXX-1 Mixer, Single tuned 
input and link output. 3 to 20 MHz, Lo Kit, Cat. No. 0351 2, 20 to 
170 MHz, Hi Kit, Cat. No. 035103. 

Specify when ordering. $7.02 ea. 



BAX-1 BROADBAND AMP 

General purpose amplifier which may be used as a tuned or 
untuned unit in RF and audio applications. 20 Hz to 1 50 MHz 

with 6 to 30 db gain. Cat, No, 0351 07. 

Specify when ordering. £7.34 ea. 





.02% Calibration Tolerance 

EXPERIMENTER CRYSTALS (HC 6/U Holder) 

Cat. No, Specifications 

031080 '3 to 20 MHz — For use in OX OSC Lo 56.88 ea. 

031 081 *20 to 60 MHz — For use in OX OSC Hi $6.88 ea, 

031300*3 to 20 MHz — For use in OF-1 L OSC $6.68 ea. 

031 31 *20 to 60 MHz — For use in OF-1 H OSC $6.88 ea. 

'Specify when ordering 



Shipping and postage (inside U.S., Canada and Mexico only) will 
be prepaid by International Prices quoted for US. h Canada and 
Mexico orders only. Orders tor shipment (o other countries will be 
qualed on request. 



DEKE 



^36 



INTERNATIONAL CRYSTAL MFG. CO.. INC. 
10 Norm Lee Oklahoma City, Ofela 73102 



MFJ KEYERS 

Uses Curtis 8044 IC. Iambic 
operation, dot-dash memo- 
ries, weight control, solid 
state keying. RF proof. 



95 




k#/*79 



$$$&£ 



The MFJ 406 Deluxe Electronic Keyer sends 
iambic, automatic, semi -automatic, manual. Use 
squeeze, single iever or straight fcey. 

Speedmeter lets you read speed to 100 WPM 

Socket for external Curtis memory, random 
code generator, keyboard. Optional cable, $4 95 

Iambic operation with squeeze key. Dot dash 
insertion. Semi-automatic "bug" operation pro- 
vides automatic dots and manual dashes. 

Orji-dash memory, self completing dots and 
dashes. iam proof spacing, instant start. WF proof. 

Solid-state keying: grid block, solid state xmtrs. 

Front panel controls: linear speed, weight, 
tone, volume, function switch. 8 to 50 WPM 

Weight control adjusts dot-dash space ratio, 
makes your signal distinctive to penetrate 0RM 

Tone control. Speaker, ideal tor classroom. 

Function switch setecte oft, on r semi automatic/ 
manual, tune. Tune keys transmitter for tuning 

Uses 4 C cells. 2.5 mm tack for power (6 9 
VDC) Optional AC adapter MFJ 1305, $9.95 

Eggshell white, walnut sides. 0x2x6 inches. 

MFJ 406. $69.35, like 408 less speedmeter 



'49 



95 




New MFJ-401 Econo Keyer II gives you a 
reliable, lull feature economy keyer lor squeeze, 
single lever or straight key. 

Has sidelone, speaker, volume, speed, internal 
weight and tone controls. Sends iambic, auto- 
matic, semi automatic, manual. Tune function. 
Dot-dash memories. 6-50 WPM W LEO. Use 
9V battery, 6 9 VOC, or 110 VAC with optional 
AC adapter, MFJ-1305, 19.95. 4x2x3W\ 

Reliable solid state keying. Keys virtually all 
solid state or tube type transmitters 




'64 



95 



MFJ 405 Eceno Keyer 8. Same as MFJ-401 
but has bunt-in single paddle with adjustable 
t ravel. Also [ack for external paddie 4x2x3 W . 

Optional: Bencher iambic Paddle. $42 95; 
1 10VAC adapter, MFJ-1305, $9.95 Free catalog . 

Order from MFJ and try it. M not delighted 
return within 30 days for refund (less shipping) 

One year unconditional guarantee. 

Order yours today. Can ton tree 800-647-1800. 
Charge VISA, Mk Or mail check, money order. 
Add $4.00 each for shipping and handling. 



CALL TOLL FREE . . . 800-647-1800 



Call 601-323-5869 for technical information, or 
der/repair status. Also call 601 323-5869 out- 
side continental USA and in Mississippi. ^4? 

1MB? I ENTERPRISES, 

IVIr W INCORPORATED 

^ Box 494 T Mississippi State, MS 39762^/ 



^ See us I of ACveHtsers on page 162 



73 Magazine • December, 1961 89 



PaufL. RmatdoW4RI 
1524 Spnngvafe Avenue 
McLean V* 22101 

Robert E. Brunmga W 84 A PR 
USS Blueridge fLCG7 9) 
FRO San FranchCQ CA 96625 



What's It All About, ASCII? 

RTTY technology update 



Authors 1 note: Since this article was prepared in early 1980, our experience has been that most stations that have computers also have 
dual-made originate/answer modems and do not require the modem translator at the repeater. They transmit with their modem In the 
Answer mode and switch to Originate for receiving. This makes all data on both the input a nd output appear at the 2025/2225* Hz tone pair 
which Is suitable for simplex operation. Also, since the 300-baud speed of the 103 modems is no better than we can do over the phone, our 
current activity is the collection of Bell 202 compatible modems that operate at up to 1200 baud. These modems are becoming available 
on the surplus market and require no modification for operating half duplex over the radio. They were chosen because they use the same 
familiar FSK as both the 103 and RTTY modulators but at a 1200/2200-Hz rate. 



On March 17, 1980, the 
Federal Communica- 
tions Commission (FCC) per- 
mitted the use of the 
American Standard Code 
for Information Inter- 
change (ASCII) in the 
Amateur Radio Service 

Specifically, the FCC per- 
mitted US radio amateurs 
to transmit: 

• ASCII as defined in the 
United States of America 
Standards Institute (ANSI) 
Standard X3. 4-1 968. 

• Speeds up to 300 baud 
between 3,5 and 21 .25 MHz 
using F1 emission, 

• Speeds up to 1200 baud 
between 28 and 225 MHz 
using F1 P F2 f and A2 emis- 
sion. 

• Speeds up to 19,600 baud 



on frequencies above 420 
MHz using F1, F2, and A2 
emission. 

The above permission 
was contained in the FCC's 
Third Report and Order 
under Docket No 20777. It 
represents a significant step 
forward and marks the be- 
ginning of a new era of data 
communications on the 
ham bands. Possibly, it will 
play a part in a marriage of 
personal computing and 
amateur radio. It is not as 
permissive as some had 
hoped for in order to be 
able to experiment with 
speeds higher than those 
permitted and to transmit 
other codes, including 
some not yet devised We 
look forward to additional 



^ 


7 




s 


7 


flCCEivcn 




fcs 


REPEATER 
TRANSMUTE* 






\y 






















ANSWER 
RECEIVER 


















AN $ wen 
TRANSMITTER 
















bi 


LTA LOOP AHOUN1 


} 





Fig. T« Addition of an answer modem at the repeater with 
its received data echoed to its transmitter allows multiple 
users to send and receive data using only originate 
modems at their stations, 

90 73 Magazine ■ December, 1981 



action by the FCC along 
these lines to liberalize the 
rules on digital transmis- 
sions in order to permit true 
experimentation in the 
Amateur Radio Service, 

Outside the United 
States, the use of radio tele- 
printer codes other than 
Baudot (otherwise known 
as the Murray code or the 
International Telegraph Al- 
phabet No. 2) varies from 
one country to another. 
Many have no regulatory 
mandate for the use of the 
Baudot code in the first 
place. Amateurs in other 
countries with import or 
monetary restrictions may 
have difficulty obtaining 
modern equipment employ- 
ing ASCII In Great Britain. 
amateurs can use any radio- 
teletype (RTTY) code de- 
fined by documents of the 
international Radio Consul- 
tative Committee (CCIR), 
according to a Home Office 
interpretation obtained by 
the Radio Society of Great 
Britain. 

In September, 1978, Ca- 
nadian amateurs were giv- 
en permission to transmit 
computer data in packet 
form on frequencies above 
144 MHz under a new class 
of license called the 
Amateur Digital Radio 



Operator's Certificate Ca- 
nadians have subbands 
221,0 to 223.0 and 433.0 to 
434 MHz reserved exclu- 
sively for packet transmis- 
sions. 1 - 2 > *> * 

While ASCII was origi- 
nated in the United States, 
it is well on its way toward 
becoming the world stan- 
dard computer and RTTY 
code. It also is known as In- 
ternational Standard 646 — 
ISO code (Reference 2)— 
and International Tele- 
graph Alphabet No. 5. Like 
the Morse code, variations 
of ASCII exist for the alpha- 
bets of other languages in- 
cluding Cyrillic, Kata Kana, 
Arabic, Hebrew, Creek, and 
special letters used in Scan- 
dinavian languages. 5 As in 
the US, it is a sure bet that 
radio amateurs in other 
countries will be among the 
first to use personal com- 
puters. Many industrialized 
countries have home com- 
puter stores. So, it is only a 
matter of time before 
everything falls into place 
for the marriage of amateur 
radio and computers on a 
worldwide basis, 

As soon as ASCI I became 
"legal" in the US, a number 
of amateurs went on the air 
to try out the new mode. In 
the Washington DC area. 



YAESU FT-207R OWNERS 

AUTO SCAN MODULE AND BATTERY 
SAVER KIT 



15 minutes to in- 
stall scan restarts 
when earner drops 
off: busy switch 
controls automatic 
scan on -oil. in- 
cludes module and 
instructions. 

Model AS-1. $25.00 



FT 207R BATTERY SAVER KIT 
MODEL BS-1 $14,95 




fr*Jl 



& 



WRITE FOR CLUB DISCOUNTS 



*No more dead batteries due to 

memory backup 

*30% less power drain when 

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•Simple to install; step-by-step 

instructions and parts included 

"4 mA memory backup reduced 

to SUM, 

*45 mA receiver drain reduced 

to 30 mA. 

•Improved audio fidelity and 

loudness. 



COMMENTS ON THE AS-1: 

Enjoy hands-free automatic band 
scan with your FT-207R The Model 
AS-1 provides true scan resume 
when the carrier drops of*. The AS-1 
fits in the bottom of the rig with 
plenty of room left for tone squelch 
boards. Hundreds of satisfied 
users say: 'The AS-1 is a real win- 
ner! Exactly the missing feature 
needed. I use the auto-scan mode 
most of the time and get added en- 
joy meht from my rig." 

COMMENTS ON THE BS-1: 

"I was just about to give my FT- 
207R away , when I decided to give it 
one last chance, and I ordered the 
BS-1 battery saver kit. Well, it made 
all the difference in the world, I 
can't believe it is the same rig, I 
used to carry around an extra bat- 
tery pack alt day, but now my batter- 
ies last about twice as long. I no 
longer have to worry about dead 
batteries. I used to worry about 
turning the memory off to conserve 
power, but with the BS-1 it doesn't 
matter any more- The audio has im- 
proved, and I really like my rig 
again,' 



n 



ENGINEERING CONSULTING 

P. O. BOX 94355 >" 400 

RICHMOND, B. C. V6Y2A8, CANADA 




INTRODUCING THE 

CES 500SA 

SIMPLEX 

AUTOPATCH 

The First Affordable 
Private Phone Patch 



As described In 73 Magazine, 6/81. 



Now, for the first timef Every amateur 
operator can enjoy the unparalleled freedom 
of a private phone patch in an economical 
package. 

The dramatic new CES 500SA Autopatch is all 
the equipment you need to patch an FM base 
station to your home or other telephone line, 
withotit expensive repeaters, cavities, or other 
equipment Connections with any standard 
FM base station are rapid and simple. 

Bypass the congestion and expense of shared 
repeaters — break through to greater privacy 
and convenience with the new CES 500SA 
Autopatch. 



COHERENCE IN 
COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY 



CES 



COMMUNICATIONS ELECTRONICS 
SPECIALTIES, Inc. 

PCX Box 507 

Winter Park, Florida 32790 
Telephone: (305) 645-0474 



MFJ SWR/ 
WATTMETERS 



HF SWR/Wattmeter 
reads SWR, forward, reflect- 
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95 




$ 49 



MFJ 614 

New low cost in-line HF SWR/Wattmeter. 

MFJ 814 lets you monitor SWR. forward, 
reflected average power in 2 ranges from 18 
lo 30 MHz. Read 200/2000 watts forward, 
20/200 watts reflected power. SWR, 1:1-6:1. 

Easy pushbutton switch operation: has power/ 
SWR. high/Jow range, forward/reflected push- 
button switches, SWR sensitivity control. 

Lighted meter (requires 12V). Rugged aluml* 
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SO 239 coax connectors, 2 color meter scale* 

MFJ VHF SWR/Wattmeter/ 
Field Strength Meters 

$og 95 

MFJ 812 

Hew low cost VHF operating aids. 

MFJ-B12, $29.95: Read SWH from 14 to 
1 70 MHz to monitor antenna and feed lines. 

Read forward and reflected power at 2 meters 
(144 148 MHZJ, 2 scales (30 and 300 watts). 

Read relative field strength from 1 to 1 7 
MHz. Binding post tor field strength antenna. 

Easy push-button operation: has forward/re 
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Aluminum eggshell white, black cabinet. 
4V4x2V4x2W. SD-239. 2 color meter scale. 

MFJ 810, $24,95: similar to MFJ 81 2 less 
field strength (unction. 

MFJ "Dry" 300 W and 
1 KW Dummy Loads. 





See Us I of Advertisers on page tB2 



MFJ 262 ^m^ *~ MFJ 260 

Air cooled, non-inductive 50 ohm resistor in 
perforated metal housing with SO-239 cormectors. 
Full load for 30 seconds, de- rating curves to 
5 minutes MFJ 260 (300 W). SWR: 1.1:1 to 
30 MHz, 1.5:1 lor 30-160 MHz 2Vix2V»xr. 
MFJ-262 (1KW). SWR 1.5:1*30 MHz 3x3x13". 

MFJ 10, 3 foot coax with connectors. $4.95. 

Order from MFJ and try ft. If not delighted, 
return within 30 days for relund (tess shipping). 

One year un conditiona l guarantee. 

Order yours today. Call toll free 800-647 1800. 
Charge VISA, MC. Or mail check, money order. 
Add $4.00 each for shipping and handling. 



CALL TOLL FREE . . . 800-647-1800 



Call 601 323-5869 for technical information, or- 
der/repair status. Also caJt 601-323-5669 out 
Side continental USA and in Mississippi ^ 4? 

lUIC I ENTERPRISES, 

IVII «J INCORPORATED 

Box 494, Mississippi State. MS 39762 



73 Magazine • December. 1981 91 



most radio amateurs in- 
volved with computers had 
equipped themselves with 
modems (modulator-de- 
modulators) for communi- 
cation on the phone lines. 
Baudot operation on 2 
meters had been dead for 
about a year in anticipation 
of the FCCs ruling. Eigh- 
teen stations were ready to 
go during the first hour that 
ASCII was allowed; 14 sta- 
tions made successful two- 
way ASCII contacts. We 
have heard scattered re- 
ports of 2~meter ASCII ac- 
tivity from other areas of 
the country. On the high- 
frequency {HF) bands, a 
number of stations were on 
the air using 110-baud 
ASCII on the RTTY frequen- 
cies. Many amateurs who 
wanted to get on ASCII as 
soon as possible did not 
want to reconfigure their 
stations until the details of 
the FCC ruling were known 
We hope to see them on the 
air soon. 

Technical Standards 

Comments on Docket 
20777 on file in the FCC 
public reading room in- 
dicated that the writers 
favored three basic ap- 
proaches, divided almost 
equally. About a third said 
the bandwidth should be 
limited. Another third sug- 
gested that speed be 
regulated. The remaining 
third took the FCC to task 
for trying to regulate some- 
thing best left to self- 
policing amateurs. The FCC 
decided to regulate speed. 
On other particulars, the re- 
spondents suggest that the 
FCC forget about specifying 
the parity bit because home 
computers tend to ignore it. 
They recommended mak- 
ing both synchronous and 
asynchronous transmission 
legal to permit experimen- 
tation. Finally, they recom- 
mended that the bit order 
be from the least to most 
significant bit according to 
common practice 

You will note that there 
are no restrictions imposed 



by the FCC on use of the 
parity bit, the number of 
stop bits, the use of syn- 
chronous or asynchronous 
transmission, the bit order, 
the maximum frequency 
shift for F1 emission, or the 
modulating tones for F2 or 
A2 emissions. These mat- 
ters are open to experimen- 
tation and will evolve ac- 
cording to the needs and 
preferences of amateurs. 

For starters, most ama- 
teurs wilt completely ignore 
the parity bit. In many 
cases, stations will transmit 
a parity bit, but the receiv- 
ing stations will not process 
it. However, some agree- 
ment on the use of the pari- 
ty bit is desirable because 
this feature can help reduce 
transmission errors The 
number of stop bits will 
I ikely be 2 for 1 1 baud and 
1 for 300 baud and up Two 
stop bits are needed by a 
number of ASCII printers 
which operate at 110 baud 

Most amateurs will use 
asynchronous transmission 
to begin with because of 
the availability of asyn- 
chronous equipment. Syn- 
chronous ASCII transmit 
sion is an interesting area 
for amateur experimenta- 
tion, The bit order is likely 
to remain least significant 
bit to most significant bit 
Frequency shifts and 
modem tones for amateur 
ASCII transmissions are 
unlikely to settle down for 
quite some time. Amateurs 
presently are using modems 
of the type used for Baudot 
RTTY and those designed 
for telephone line com- 
munications between com- 
puters. 

On the phone lines, the 
data communications con- 
vention for personal com- 
puters is to use a modem 
which uses Bell Telephone 
103/113 standards. This per- 
mits serial, asynchronous, 
full-duplex communication 
at speeds up to 300 baud on 
the telephone line. It uses 
audio frequency shift key- 
ing (AFSK) FM with frequen- 
cy assignments as shown in 



-I2v 



FROM 

WEPEATER 

RECEIVER 



1 



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CARRIER 
DETECT 

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ENABLE 



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1 

I2v 



Fig. 2. An RC combination with an emitter-follower slows 
down the carrier-detect signal from the receiver so that at 
least 4 seconds of carrier are required before the modem 

transmitter is activated. 



Table 1. 

Bell 103/113-compatible 
modems are available for 
personal computers in sev- 
eral different forms. One is 
the originate-only modem, 
the cheapest type, which is 
all one needs to originate 
calls to other computers. 
Originate-only modems use 
the "Originating End" tones 
given in Table 1 Another is 
the answer-only modem for 
computers which never 
make outgoing calls, The 
third variety is the origi- 
nate/answer modem which 
can handle calls either way. 

Separate for the moment 
the modem function from 
that of coupling to the tele- 
phone lines. The least ex- 
pensive route is to use an 
acoustical coupler which 
mechanically connects to 
the telephone handset 
Home-brew acoustical 
couplers can be made from 
small transistor radio 
speakers and spray-can 
plastic caps A direct con- 
nection to the telephone 
lines can be made by means 
of an FCC-approved tele- 
phone data coupler, which 
is considered a must for 
modems with answering 
capabilities. 

These modems and data 
couplers are now readily 
available to home comput- 
erists and will, no doubt, 



have an impact on the stan- 
dards to be employed by ra- 
dio amateurs The extent to 
which this will replace exist- 
ing amateur radio FSK key- 
ers and converters or tuning 
units (let's just call them 
modems) deserves some 
thought. 

HF ASCII RTTV 

It seems likely for two 
reasons that there will be a 
mixture of ASCII and 
Baudot on the HF bands for 
a while, using existing RTTY 
modems One is that some 
of the non-US amateur 
RTTYers find it difficult to 
obtain ASCII gear initially. 
Another is that the average 
HF RTTYer has hundreds of 
dollars invested m a good 
modem designed to copy 
through the noise, in- 
terference, and fading en 
countered on HF HF RTTY 
modems are far better in 
this respect than most Bell 
103/1 1 3 modem designs. So. 
it would be a step backward 
to ditch a well-engineered 
HF RTTY modem in favor of 
one designed for use on the 
telephone line Never- 
theless, some 103/113-type 
modem operation on the 
HF bands is to be expected, 
and the 200*Hz shift 
employed might not be too 
difficult to live with 

RTTY modems such as 



Function Originating End Answering End 
Transmit 1070-Hz space 2025-Hz space 
1 270-Hz mark 2225-Hz mark 

Receive 202 5- Hz space 1070-Hz space 
2225-Hz mark 127f>Hz mark 

Table 1 Bell 103/113 modem frequencies. 



92 73 Magazine * December, 1981 



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F/g, 3. A 555 oscillator at 2225 Hz can be used to fool an 
originate modem into thinking it is connected to an answer 
modem so that it will enable its transmit tones while 
operating half duplex. This is not required if a minor 
change inside your originate modem can be tolerated. 



the ST-6 can be modified 
easily to handle both ex- 
isting RTTY tones of 
2125Hz mark and 2295-H2 
space and 103/113 tones by 
retuning audio filters. Clear* 
ly, a contest of wills and 
pocketbooks is in the offing 
before this incompatibility 
is resolved. Our feeling is 
that the old 170-Hz shift 
should be kept for those 
stations still running 
60-wpm Baudot and that 
20OHz shift will be used for 
11Q~ and 300-baud ASCII. 

ASCII RTTY via OSCAR 
Satellites 

OSCAR satellites present 
a special problem for 
RTTYers for either ASCII or 
Baudot. The managers of 
the satellites do not like any 
type of FM (such as FSK) to 
be used because the signal 
has a 100% duty cycle. 
They prefer lower duty- 
cycle signals that are keyed 
on and off in order to keep 
overall loading on the 
satellite within reasonable 
levels. Thus, any RTTY 
modem for communica- 
tions via OSCAR satellites 
should be capable of on/off 
keying. Because of noise 
characteristics, for equal 
results a good on/off-keying 
RTTY demodulator needs 
to be a bit more sophisti- 
cated than its FSK counter- 
part. For the 1980s, an 
on/off keying capability 
will be a must for RTTY 
modems- 

VHF/UHF ASCII RTTY 

In contrast to HF and 



OSCAR RTTY, we expect to 
see ASCII with Bell 103/113 
tones dominate VHF/UHF 
RTTY. This seems fairly cer- 
tain because of the decline 
in Baudot RTTY activity on 
the VHF/UHF bands in re- 
cent months 

As noted earlier, the 
cheapest way of com- 
municating with a com- 
puter is to use an originate 
modem Manufacturers' 
surplus originate modems 
are available for as little as 
$25 This works fine if the 
originating station connects 
with another station which 
has an answer modem. An- 
other look at Table 1 will 
convince you that two 
originate modems cannot 
talk to each other. The 
same ts true of two answer 
modems Those with origi- 
nate/answer modems can 
talk to anyone; indeed, this 
is the case with many com- 
puter owners. 

Modem Translator 
Experiments 

A scheme was needed to 
make two originate mo- 
dems compatible The solu- 
tion: placing a modem 
translator at the WD4I WC/R 
2-meter repeater which 
serves the Washington DC 
area RTTYers and amateur 
radio computer enthusiasts 
lust as the repeater oper- 
ates on two radio frequen- 
cies to translate incoming 
signals to the correct out- 
put frequency, the transla- 
tor modem changes incom- 
ing audio tones from origi- 
nate modems into answer 



modem tones on the re- 
peater output. As a result, 
all originate modems listen- 
ing to the repeater output 
are able to copy all signals. 
The advantages of this 
scheme are: 

• Uses exactly the same 
modems as used over tele- 
phone lines, 

• Requires no special, 
unique hardware, 

• Eliminates the need for 
the more expensive answer 
modems at all stations. 

• Regenerates data at the 
repeater, realizing some im- 
provement in signal-to- 
noise ratio 

• Does away with the prob- 
lem of who is originating 
and who is answering, 
which normally is needed in 
duplex modems 

Implementation ; H a rd- 
ware installation was fairly 
simple. An answer modem 
initially was connected as 
shown in Fig 1 The lines re- 
quired to the repeater were 
an audio tap off the receiv- 
er and a tap into the trans- 
mitter audio line. The re- 
ceived data line coming out 
of the modem receiver was 
then echoed back into the 
modem transmitter so that 
an exact replication of all 
data present on the repeat- 
er input was reproduced on 
the repeater output, 

The only other signal re- 
quired is ar^ enable signal to 
tell the modem when to ini- 
tiate its transmit tones, This 
was done in the initial in- 
stallation by simply taking 
the received data carrier-de- 
tect line, delaying it up to 
five seconds with an emit- 
ter-follower and a capaci- 
tor, and using that to drive 
the transmit enable line of 
the modem transmitter 
With the resetting diode 
shown in the circuit of Fig. 
2 4 any momentary loss of 
carrier would reinitialize 
the five-second turn-on 
delay, thereby preventing 
the transmit tones from 
coming up on anything but 
a valid signal The controls 
as described above make 



the modem an autonomous 
device requiring nothing 
but power and the two 
audio connections. 

Controls. Later, addi- 
tional control circuitry was 
added to disable the func- 
tion entirely. This is needed 
during periods of experi- 
mentation with other types 
of modulation on the 
repeater and to aid repeater 
troubleshooting. A final 
refinement was to use the 
data carrier detect to open 
up the repeater audio line 
between the receiver and 
transmitter. This ensures 
that noise on the signal 
received at the repeater is 
not added to the transmit- 
ter output 

installation: To minimize 
repeater maintenance prob- 
lems, the answer modem 
described here was pack- 
aged in modular form. A 
separate ac power supply 
was included in the mod- 
ule. 

One Hitch: There is a 
minor problem with the 
scheme described here due 
to the manner in which 
commercial originate mo- 
dems operate, Many origi- 
nate modems wait for the 
receipt of the answer car- 
rier before the originate- 
transmit tones are enabled. 
This is done by sampling 
the receive carrier-detect 
line in the originate modem 
and looping it back to the 
originate-transmit enable. 
This feature poses no prob- 
lem for a station while 
receiving because it will 
hear the answer tones being 
transmitted by the repeater. 
But on transmit since the 
receiver is most likely 
disabled, the originate mo- 
dem will not hear the 
answer tones. Fortunately, 
this is a wiring change only 
for those individuals who 
are using surplus or home- 
brewed gear. They can wire 
the modem-transmit tones 
to come on only when the 
radio transmitter is keyed 
on. For the casual user who 
has a nice expensive com- 



94 73 Magazine * December, 1981 



mercial modem that should 
not be attacked with the 
soldering iron, there is 
another way to coax a mo- 
dem into originating tones 
first A simple switch in- 
serted into the carrier- 
detect line to enable or 
disable this function is a 
solution. Another one is to 
use a 555 timer in an oscilla- 
tor circuit to generate 
2225-Hz tones to foo! the 
modem into thinking it is on 
line. These tones may either 
be hard-wired or acoustical- 
ly coupled into the modern 
during transmit to enable 
the originate transmitter. A 
possible circuit is shown in 
Fig. 3 and can be construct- 
ed for less than $2. 

Conclusions 

FCC approval of ASCII 
will be a boon to amateur 
radioteletype activity, espe- 
cially on the VHF/UHF 
bands. It should help not 
only to get back some 
RTTYers who drifted off to 



play with computers, but 
also to stimulate some 
computerists to become 
hams. 

The repeater modem 
translator described above 
has been in place since 
March, 1979. It is an inex- 
pensive way to permit use 
of existing originate-only 
modems. ■ 

References 

1. Robert T. Rouleau VE2PY, 
'The Packet Radio Revolution — 
Pioneers, Take Note!", 73, De- 
cember. 1978. 

2. Ron Hesler VE1SH, "DOC 
Creates New Amateur License 
Class/' GST, December, 1978. 

3. Ken Smith VE3HQB and Glen 
Simpson VE3DSP, "Packet 
Radio (Using a 1802)/' AMRAD 
Newsletter, June, 1979. (From 
IPSO FACTO newsletter of the 
Association of Computer Ex- 
perimenters,) 

4. Ian Hodgson VE2BEN, "An 
Introduction to Packet Raglio," 
Ham Radio, June, 1979. 

5. R. W. Bremer, "Inside ASCII," 
Interface Age, May, June, and 
July T 1978. 



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73 Magazine ■ December, 1981 95 



Louis A< Smith U N3BAH 
RD #6, Box 479 
LatrobePA 15650 



The Radio Shack 
Pro-2002 Scanner 

a look at the Shack's latest 



When any manufac- 
turer bills a new rig 
as the "ultimate scanner/' 
naturally I'm skeptical, I've 
seen several of the new syn- 
thesized receivers which 
are promoted as being ca- 
pable of receiving every- 
thing under the sun. They're 
usually rehashed versions 
of the lower-priced rf pack- 
ages with some gingerbread 
knobs and switches added 
for color. These units are 
almost invariably full of 
bugs and prone to breaking 
down about one week after 
the warranty expires, so 
when Radio Shack an- 
nounced the introduction 
of their new microproces- 
sor-based scanner, I viewed 
it with anxious, but cau- 
tious, optimism. 

The Realistic Pro-2002 is 
Radio Shack's latest addi- 
tion to its line of scanners 
and is a replacement of the 
Pro-2001. It is cosmetically 
similar to its predecessor, 
being housed in the same- 
dimension case, but this is 



where the similarity ends. 
The 2002 is a totally new 
concept for Realistic and 
contains several features 
unique in scanner technolo- 
gy. The rig is microproces- 
sor-based and all functions 
are accessed via the 30-key 
front-panel keyboard. It 
covers the 30-50 MHz VHF- 
low, 108-136 MHz aircraft, 
138-174 MHz VHF-high, and 
410-512 MHz UHF bands. 
Fifty channels may be 
stored in five banks of 10 
each, as well as five search 
ranges, with individual de- 
lay, lockout, and priori- 
ty options. Volume and 
squelch rotary controls are 
large and conveniently lo- 
cated. Logging indicators 
are provided for easy return 
to a desired setting. A 
12-hour digital clock with 
am/pm indicator is becom- 
ing a standard feature in 
programmable units and is 
present on the 2002. Other 
useful functions are select- 
able scan/search speeds, di- 
rectional search, scan and 
manual controls, external 



speaker, antenna, and tape- 
out jacks. A 1 20A/-ac cord is 
built in and a jack for 12 V 
dc is provided along with 
cables and mobile mount- 
ing bracket. 

Due to the complexity 
and uniqueness of the Pro- 
2002, I will attempt to cov- 
er its features and func- 
tions individually rather 
than collectively. 

Frequency Coverage 

The 2002 has one of the 

most enviable frequency 
repertoires in the scanner 
industry. Bands covered are 
30-50 MHz in 5-kHz incre- 
ments, 108-136 MHz in 25- 
kHz increments, 138-174 
MHz in 5-kHz increments, 
and 410-512 MHz in 12,5- 
kHz increments. That's a 
total of 4000 low-band, 
1120 aircraft, 7200 high- 
band, and 8160 UHF chan- 
nels, or 20,480 discrete fre- 
quencies! Notice that 
among these bands are in- 
cluded 138-144 and 410-420 
MHz ranges, used by the US 



Government, which cannot 
be directly received by any 
other commercially avail- 
able searching synthesized 
scanner. 

Searching/Scanning 
Functions 

A maximum of 50 chan- 
nels may be programmed 
into the memory of the 
scanner. Channels are pro- 
grammed into the unit via 
the 30-key color-coded 
front-panel keyboard and 
are stored in banks of 10 
channels. These banks may 
be selectively scanned or 
locked out during scanner 
operation by using the ap- 
propriate bank- select 
key(s). Banks are labeled 10, 
20, 30, 40, and 50. For exam- 
ple, bank 30 would contain 
channels numbered 31 
through 40, In addition to 
storing channels to be 
scanned, these bank-select 
keys also perform double- 
duty as keys for selecting 
search ranges. Up to five 
ranges may be programmed 
into positions S1 through S5, 



96 73 Magazine * December, 1981 



Both the speed and direc- 
tion of the searching may 
be controlled. To initiate a 
search, the user enters the 
lower and upper search 
limits of the desired range 
and selects either the up- 
ward or downward direc- 
tion. Direction may be 
changed at any time during 
the search. Search speeds 
of 3 or 8 channels/second 
may be selected by using a 
toggle-action push-button 
control* Once programmed, 
search ranges remain mem- 
orized even when the unit is 
turned off or unplugged, 
provided the 9-V-dc backup 
battery is installed. Ranges 
may be selected or locked 
out using the bank/search- 
select keys. If two or more 
search ranges are pro 
grammed and locked in, the 
microprocessor will search 
through all ranges sequen- 
tially. For example, if range 
SI is programmed to search 
154-158 MHz and range S2 
is programmed to search 
453-456 MHz, the unit will 
begin to search at 453 MHz 
after it has finished 154-158 
MHz, If any other ranges 
are programmed and locked 
in, the searching will con- 
tinue through these other 
ranges. Upon searching the 
last range in the sequence, 
the unit will repeat the 
search beginning at the first 
range. If only one of the 
five ranges is programmed, 
searching will repeat over 
this range only. 

Scanning is controlled by 
using keys labeled scan, 
manual, delay, priority, and 
lockout Manual channel 
selection may be achieved 
by either stepping through 
the channels with the 
manual key or by selecting 
a particular channel with 
the digital keyboard. 

Lockout serves to elimi- 
nate a particular channel or 
channels from the scanning 
repertoire. Delay is used to 
add a three-second delay 
onto selected channels 
after a transmission is 
received and prior to the 
resumption of scanning. 



The priority key is used to 
assign priority status to one 
of the scanner's 50 chan- 
nels When a channel has 
been given priority, this fre- 
quency is sampled once 
every three seconds, for a 
period of 100 milliseconds, 
regardless of other scanner 
activity. If a signal is re- 
ceived during the priority 
sampling, the receiver im- 
mediately switches to this 
frequency for the duration 
of the message. 

The scan rate is select- 
able at either 3 or 6 chan- 
nels/second. For a rig with 
up to 50 channels to sam- 
ple, this is too slow Ideally, 
the rates should be select- 
able at either 1 5 or 20 chan- 
nels/second. With the ex- 
isting scan rate, however, 
I've found it to be practical 
to scan no more than 20 
channels (two banks] at one 
time. 

Miscellaneous Features 

The digital readout dis- 
play is comprised of seven- 
segment green LEDs and 
provides information con- 
cerning whether the unit is 
in the scan, manual , search, 
or program mode, if a chan- 
nel is programmed with a 
delay or lockout, if the unit 
is in the priority mode, and 
which is the priority chan- 
nel. Also indicated are 
which channel/search 
banks are active or locked 
out, channel numbers, and 
a seven-digit frequency 
readout. 

The frequency display 
also doubles as the readout 
for the digital clock, in- 
dicating hours, minutes, 
and seconds. The clock, 
which operates in the 
1 2-hour mode, requires con- 
tinuous ac or dc current to 
operate. Should power be 
interrupted or cut off, the 
display continuously flash- 
es "E00.00.00" until repro- 
grammed with the correct 
time. The clock cannot be 
programmed to automati- 
cally turn the scanner on or 
off at a desired time; it isn't 
a clock-radio. 



Should the user desire to 
conserve power when oper- 
ating the scanner from a 
battery, a switch is provid- 
ed on the rear panel to dis- 
able the clock. The clock 
may be displayed anytime 
simply by pressing the 
clock key. 

In order to stop the rig 
during the search mode, a 
monitor key is provided. 
This control also places a 
particular frequency from 
the search range into a 
special memory for future 
reference or transfer to one 
of the scanner's regular 
channels. 

A mobile mounting 
bracket is provided in order 
to permit installation in a 
vehicle. A unique three- 
wire dc power cable is also 
included, consisting of 
black, brown, and red leads. 
The black cable is connect- 
ed to negative ground and 
has an in-line connector for 
easy removal of the scan- 
ner. Red is connected to 
+ 1 2-V-dc continuous 
power source, and the 
brown lead is connected 
to +12-V-dc accessory 
fuse box terminal, [The 
purpose of the second 
+ 12-volt connection is for 
memory retention and 
clock circuits.) 

A single external anten- 
na terminal is provided, 
which is a decided advan- 
tage to the dual VHF/UHF 
inputs on previous Realistic 
models. 

Rf Comments, 
Specifications 

While the scanner is de- 
signed with both AM detec- 
tion and FM quadrature de- 
tector, the two circuits do 
not function simultaneous- 
ly on all bands. FM signals 
are received on all bands 
except the 108-1 36 MHz air 
craft range, which is only 
received in the AM mode. 
The AM detector does not 
function on any frequency 
outside this band. 

The Radio Shack Pro- 
2002 was added to its Real- 
istic line of scanners this 



year and is a replacement 
for the excellent Pro-2001, 
While the 2001 covered on- 
ly the conventional VHF- 
high/low and UHF bands 
(FM only) with 16 channels, 
it did so with overall sen- 
sitivity and audio clarity 
superior to the Pro-2002. On 
the specification sheets, 
both are listed as having the 
same sensitivity for VHF- 
high/low and UHF bands In 
operation, however, the 
2002 cannot receive and re- 
produce signals with the 
same clarity as its predeces- 
sor. Moreover; when field 
tested in mobile operation, 
the Pro-2002 had a high 
amount of static and igni- 
tion noise. Under the same 
conditions, the Pro-2001 re- 
ceived very little such inter- 
ference. Another disturbing 
point is the reception of im- 
ages and interference in the 
VHF-high band, especially 
in metropolitan areas with 
heavy signal density. 

It is unfortunate that, 
with all the features the 
Pro-2002 includes, the rig 
doesn't have a better rf 
package inside. If its receiv- 
er circuitry performed as 
well as that of its predeces- 
sor, the Pro-2002 would be 
superb. Nevertheless, the 
unit's frequency coverage 
alone places it in a category 
by itself, and VHF-high 
band sensitivity is very 
good, 

Should Radio Shack 
choose to re-manufacture 
the Pro-2002 and improve 
the VHF-high image rejec- 
tion, UHF sensitivity, and 
scanning/searching rates, 
the results would be truly 
appreciated by serious 
monitor enthusiasts. Such 
a revamping was done by 
Radio Shack under simi- 
lar circumstances with 
the DX-300 communica- 
tions receiver. 

The Pro-2002 program- 
mable AM/FM scanning 
receiver is available from 
Radio Shack, One Tandy 
Center, Fort Worth, TX 
76102. Reader Service num- 
ber 479. ■ 



73 Magazine • December, 1981 97 






Working a 

DX station? No 



Keeping a 
SKED? 



No 



Rag 

chewing? No 



WB6YXY is completing the final phase in the stringent quality control 
procedure that every Cubic Communications product goes through: An 
On The Air Test! 



We are not content to accept the fact that each transceiver goes through at 
least 30 quality control checks during manufacturing, or that each radio is 
given a 72 hour Burn-In, or that every transceiver must pass the torture of 
the Shake Table, We at Cubic feel that the ultimate test is to put each unit 
on the air and have it put through its paces by one of many hams on our 
staff- We could, as many of our fine competitors do, only warehouse & re-ship 
to the dealers with the hope that the equipment will work. That would be 
cheapen However, Cubic Communications is building equipment for hams 
by hams and when one of our staff has a QSO with a Cubic owner, they want 
to feel confident that everything that could be done, was done to assure 
satisfaction. 

1 CUBIC COMMUNICATIONS 




A membef ot ttto Cubtc Cot potation family of companies 

305 Airport Road, Gceanside CA 92054 (714) 757-7525 



^70 



98 73 Magazine • December, 1981 





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Dual VFOs Give You Two Radios for the Price of One! 



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Features: 



All band coverage including WWV 
and the new WARC bands 

DUAL VFO's each provide com- 
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limited to a single memorized fre- 
quency) 

235 Watts input, SSB and CW on 
al! frequencies 



Utilizes an 8 pole filter which is 
continuously variable for either 
high pass or low pass, 

CW Crystal Filter (optional). 
40GHz 6-pole 

Unique Visual Display of 
Passband 

External Receive Antenna Jack 
allows separate transmit and 
receive antennas 

Tunable Notch Filter when com- 
bined with passband tuning, 
provides the ultimate in removing 
interference 



Selectable hard/ soft keying 
makes the difference in pile up 

Continuously Variable AGC lets 
you hear the weak signal which 
would normally be masked by 
strong adjacent channel inter- 
ference 

Logrithmic Speech Processor 

AF, RF and IF Gain Controls to 
provide an infinite selection of 
receiver dynamics 

4 Function Meter reads S' units 
in receive, and selects forward 



power (calibrated in watts PEP), 
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transmit 

Military Quality PC Boards of dou- 
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Modulated Construction with PC 
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Catl or write for a Free Brochure 



IF Passband Tuning not to be con- Full or Semi CW Break-In 
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CUBIC COMMUNICATIONS 

A m&mt}Qr of ifte Cubtc Corporation tamify of companies 

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PSU-6A 
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Cart C. Drumeller W5U 
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An Easy L-Meter 

you'll need a frequency counter 



The measurement of 
small values of induc- 
tance often is difficult with- 
out specialized (and expen- 
sive) equipment. If, though, 
you have a frequency count- 
er, a handful of commonly- 
available parts, and a bit of 
ambition, the undertaking 
is much simplified, If you 
have a simple calculator, 
the math takes only sec- 
onds. 

The idea is not mine. It 
came from William Huff- 
man N5CC, who asked me 
to prepare an article on the 
subject. Bill built the ancil- 
lary device to be used with 
a counter. The design is 
straightforward and its con- 
struction should present no 
problem. A glance at Fig. 1, 



which shows the schematic 
wiring diagram, will reveal 
a simple Colpitts oscillator. 

This oscillator, which 
should have excellent 
short-term stability and 
good long-term stability, 
needs only the usual care in 
construction. The two fixed 
capacitors, constituting the 
combination reactance-di- 
viding network and capaci- 
tance portion of the LC cir- 
cuit, should be silver-mica 
or, preferably, polystyrene, 
for best stability. 

As built by N5CC, the os- 
cillator sits in a 12.5 
cm x 8.75 cm x 7 cm (5" x 
3" X275") cabinet The 
Radio Shack 270-251 will 




give you room to spare. In- 
ternally, the 9-V battery 
shares space with oscillator 
components. Externally, 
the front panel holds a 
push-to~make momentary- 
contact switch and a pin 
jack for bringing out the rf 
signal. On top is a pair of 
binding posts for attaching 
the inductor to be mea- 
sured. 

To use it, connect a 
counter to the rf output pin 
jack. Then calibrate the os- 
cillator 



Fig. T. Colpitts oscillator. Any high-beta NPN transistor 
should prove to be a reliable oscillator over a wide frequen- 
cy range. 

100 73 Magazine • December, 1981 



If you have an inductor 
of known value, this is a 
one-shot action However, 
if you don't (and most of us 
don't), you can do a fairly 
accurate job by averaging a 
number of marked induc- 
tors. That's what I did. My 
hellbox delivered up a num- 
ber of rf chokes marked 47 
jiH and 56 pH. In turn, each 
of these was attached to 
the inductor terminals and 
the resultant oscillator fre- 
quency was measured by 
the frequency counter. By 
presuming an accurately 
marked inductor, one can 
compute a presumed value 



for the internal capacitance 
of the oscillator circuit. 

Average a stack of these 
and you have a figure that 
quite probably is reason- 
ably accurate. 

Here are the simple math- 
ematical steps to follow in 
the computation of internal 
capacitance: 

4n 2 f I lC = '\ 

C = 1/4ttY*L 
C = 1/39.478/ 2 L 

Let an inductor marked 
47 jiH be attached to the os- 
cillator and the resultant 
frequency be recorded (in 
MHz). Presume it to have 
been 1 032 MHz Then, to 
have capacitance ascer- 
tained in picofarads, CpF = 
1/39.478 X(1.032) 2 X47 

xio-* 

= (1 X10*J/39.478X 

1 .065 X 47 

= (1X10W76 

= 0.000506X10* =506, 

Repeat this operation for 
a number of marked induc- 
tors and then average the 
results. In my case, the av- 
erage was very close to 500 
pF f which seemed to be a 



reasonable value consider- 
ing the components in the 
oscillator circuit. 

Going back to our origi- 
nal formula and using/ in 
MHz, L in Henrys, and C in 
picofarads, we see that: 

L H = 1/4rt/*C 
L H =1/39.478 p 500 
L H = 1/19739/* 
Lh=0,0000506// 2 . 

Now let's put an inductor 
marked 56 \A\ t 5%, in the 
oscillator. Its frequency 
measured 0.9648 MHz. 
Dropped into the formula: 

L H = 0.0000506/(0.9648) 2 
L H = 0.0000506/0.9308 
L H = 0.0000543 
L mH = 54.3 

[f we presume the induc- 
tor was correctly marked, 
the accuracy of the formula 
is confirmed. All you need 
to remember for future 
measurements is one con- 
cise formula: 

L u h = 50.6// 2 MH z- 

There are a few precau- 
tions to be observed. The 



lead from counter to oscil- 
lator affects frequency, so 
it should be precisely the 
same from calibration to 
use. 

The developer, N5CC, rec- 
ommends that several oscil- 
lators be used for enlarging 
the range of inductors to be 
measured, His prototype, 
which has 1000-pF capaci- 
tors in the LC circuit, works 
best in measuring low-value 
inductors. He suggests the 
use of 10,000-pF capacitors 
for inductors in thel-mH to 
1-H range, 

Note that the accuracy 
of inductor measurement 
hinges upon two factors: 
the accuracy of the fre- 
quency counter and the 
precise knowledge of the 
calibrating inductor. The 
former should present no 
problem, but finding an in- 
ductor of an exactly-known 
value is not easy! Take con- 
solation in the fact that its 
use is required only oncelB 



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73 Magazine ■ December, 1981 101 




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COMMUNICATIONS 
SPECIALISTS 

426 West Taft Avenue, Orange, CA 92667 
800/854-0647 California: 714/998-3021 




Kart J. Thurber, jr. W8FX 
31 7 Poplar Drive 
Mittbrook At 36054 



A Quad for Two Meters 

the Palomar portable power picker-upper 



For the most part, we 
take the ease and con- 
venience of two-meter FM 
operation for granted. 
Since it's possible to access 
a repeater in many areas 
with almost no antenna, 
there's a tendency to let the 
repeater do all the work, 
just getting by with an abso- 
lute minimum for a port- 
able or mobile antenna- 
rubber duck ( quarter-wave 
whip, or the like. This ap- 
proach works most of the 
time, allowing casual oper- 
ation through repeaters, 



but often falls far short of 
providing really good per- 
formance when working 
simplex and when used un- 
der demanding conditions 
of rough terrain, contest 
competition, and poor 
propagation paths. 

If your fancy turns to 
backpacking, mountaintop- 
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suits, the added forward 
gain and physical selectiv- 
ity offered by a small beam 
will reap handsome divi- 
dends. Most apparent will 
be the improvement in 





Portable two-meter quad from Palomar Engineers. 
104 73 Magazine • December, 1981 



transmitted and received 
signal levels, but — very im- 
portant to whose who regu- 
larly operate from the high- 
er elevations — the "physi- 
cal selectivity" (front-to- 
back and front-to-side dis- 
crimination) offered by a 
beam will make such opera- 
tion a great deal more or- 
derly, reducing the tenden- 
cy to key up several repeat- 
ers simultaneously and sort- 
ing out signals on the popu- 
lar simplex frequencies. 
One of the most suitable 
antennas to do these things 
is the quad. 

The quad is primarily 
considered an antenna for 
the HF bands, with its as- 
serted element-for-element 
superiority over the yagi 
and its potential for use of 
low-cost construction 
materials. But the quad is a 
good performer on any fre- 
quency, and in recent years 
has received increasing at- 
tention as an effective and 
efficient VHF and UHF 
antenna. 

There are a number of 
reasons for looking at the 
quad for VHF/UHF use. The 
antenna can be built of in- 
expensive and easily-ob- 
tained materials, and its 
performance can be equal 
to or better than other ar- 
rays of comparable size. 
Adjustments for resonance 
and feedpoint impedance 
matching are easily made, 
and the antenna readily 
lends itself to stacking 
either side by side, or one 



above the other, as with 
yagi arrays. Too, the quad is 
a relatively broadband an- 
tenna, making it particular- 
ly useful on the wider 
VHF/UHF bands. 

The basic quad consists 
of a full-wavelength driven 
loop and a reflector, which 
is cut about 5% longer than 
the driven element and 
spaced between 0.15 and 
0.25 wavelength. Closed 
loops can also be used for 
the directors, in which case 
they are made 5% shorter 
than the driven element 
Any reasonable number of 
directors can be added, un- 
til the antenna becomes too 
bulky and unwieldly and a 
point of diminishing returns 
is reached. 1 

As a rough guideline, 
when compared with the 
half-wave dipole, the two- 
element quad shows a gain 
of 6-7 dB, as opposed to 
a 5-dB gain for a two-ele- 
ment yagi. The three-ele- 
ment quad (reflector, 
driven element, and one di- 
rector) is capable of about a 
10-dB gain, while a five- 
element quad — generally 
considered impractical at 
HF frequencies except by 
the hardiest "antenna farm- 
ers"— checks in with a gain 
of 13 dB, 



^or a specialized discussion of 
the quad on the higher bands, 
refer to the RSGB VHF/UFH 
Manual, by D.S. Evans G3RPE 
and G.R. Jessup G6JP. A British 
publication, the book is readily 
available in the United States. 



Besides the plain-vanilla 
quad, there are several spe- 
cialized configurations 
popular on VHF and UHF. 
The so-called Swiss Quad, 
pioneered by HB9CV, is an 
all-metal, mechanically-ex- 
cellent, all-driven array hav- 
ing a radian pattern com- 
parable to that of the ordi- 
nary quad. The expanded or 
bi-square quad is a takeoff 
on the basic configuration, 
in which dimensions are ex- 
panded to two wavelengths 
for each loop (for added 
gain); dimensions are still 
practical even on the 
lowest VHF band, 6 meters, 
The Super Quad describes 
virtually any combination 
of standard (one-wave- 
length) or expanded (two- 
wavelength) quads stacked 
in various arrangements to 
yield very high gain figures. 
Finally, the Quagi, which is 
a hybrid antenna blending 
features of both the quad 
and yagi into a single de- 
sign, uses a standard one- 
wavelength quad driven 
element and reflector in 
combination with dipole 
(yagi) director elements. 
The result is an antenna 
boasting high gain, simpli- 
fied construction, and easy 
feed point matching. 

Regardless of type, sim- 
ple quads scaled to VHF 
and UHF dimensions are in- 
creasingly popular in moun- 
taintopping, Field Day, 
backpacking, and portable 
operation for reasons of 
economy, bandwidth, high 
gain, portability, and rela- 
tive ease of construction 
An interesting commercial 
two-meter portable unit — 
perhaps the first commer- 
cially produced — is the Pal- 
omar Engineers collapsible 
quad. Designed particularly 
to extend the range of low- 
power two-meter transceiv- 
ers by providing the gain 
and front-to-back discrimi- 
nation of the two-element 
quad, it is a good candidate 
for serious in-the-f ield work 
when one would like to 
have the effective gain of a 
linear amplifier but without 



being saddled with addi- 
tional battery power and 
weight requirements. 

The Palomar design is 
based on one of the several 
portable quads described 
by R.J. Decesari WA9CDZ/6 
in the September, 1980, 
issue of QST. 2 The Palomar 
antenna, presented as a 
good alternative to a stan- 
dard 4-element yagi, is ca- 
pable of up to 6 dB forward 
gain with an excellent front- 
to-back ratio 

The original WA9GDZ/6 
designs were the results of a 
quest to construct a highly 
portable (non-yagi) antenna 
that packed a substantial 
gain into a small package; 
efforts to design a collapsi- 
ble yagi had proved overly 
large and cumbersome, Sev- 
eral alternative designs were 
built, some with 45-degree 
diagonal polarization for 
good compatibility with 
both FM (vertically- 
polarized) and SSB/CW (hor- 
izontally-polarized) modes, 
and some with straight ver- 
tical polarization. Other 
models were built that used 
different methods of keep- 
ing the quad spacers erect. 
The Decesari antennas can 
be made from any of several 
hardwood, plastic, and Plex- 
iglas™ material; the loops 
are constructed of copper 
wire. 

Palomar Engineers are 
the exclusive manufacturers 
of the patented 2-meter ver- 
sion, which is based on the 
Fig. 7 design in the QST 
article. 

The antenna uses quad 
d riven-element, reflector, 
and spacing dimensions op- 
timized for 146-MHz opera- 
tion, with the feedpoint at 
one side of the driven ele- 
ment to yield a vertical po- 
larization characteristic for 
FM work. These figures work 
out to a driven element 
about 1,72' on a side, a re- 
flector 1.80' on a side, and 

'Decesari, RJ> WA9GDZ/6, "A 
Portable Quad for 2 Meters." 
QS T t September, 1980. 



an element spacing of about 
16", In this design, the ele- 
ments are made of #18 PVC 
hookup wire, the quad 
spider" is lucite, while the 
spacers, boom, and mast are 
of wooden dowel construc- 
tion. The storage contain- 
er/support is fabricated 
from cardboard and has a 
varnish coating. The anten- 
na uses knurled brace 
thumbscrews to hold the 
spacers in place. Four 
wooden spokes at the bot- 
tom of the storage container 
form a stand to provide sup- 
port for the antenna, both to 
keep it steady and to pre- 
vent its blowing over (mourv 
taintopping, you know!). To 
aid in 50-Ohm feedltne 
matching, a matching stub 
and trimmer capacitor ape 
provided. 

At present, the antenna is 
sold fully assembled. Ac- 
cording to Jack Althouse 
K6NY of Palomar Engi- 
neers, they plan to furnish 
them unassembled in the 
future. Also expected are 
some changes in mechani- 
cal details to lower the cost. 

We found the antenna to 
be an ingenious one, cer- 
tainly worth consideration 
by the serious backpacker, 
to whom portable means 
just that. When collapsed, 
the antenna folds com- 
pletely into the storage con- 
tainer/support tube, with 
the spacers folding along 
the longitudinal axis of the 
boom. Overall weight is but 
1-1/4 pounds, We did con- 
sider the antenna stand to 
be a bit on the fragile side, 
so one must take care in 
carrying it, in its installa- 
tion, and in its use. 

Although rigorous anten- 
na pattern and gain tests 
were not performed, the 
portable antenna exhibited 
a marked forward gain and 
front- to- back ratio. These 
characteristics were clearly 
evidenced when working 
through repeaters outside 
the local area, where rotat- 
ing the antenna produced 
the anticipated signal 
strength changes. The quad 



antenna's superior perfor- 
mance was quickly noticed 
when making comparison 
checks between it and a 
5/8-wave whip, when driven 
by a two-Watt handie-talkie 
(HT), When using several re- 
peaters 25-35 miles distant, 
the HT-mounted 5/8-wave 
resulted in marginal perfor- 
mance on both transmit 
and receive, while use of 
the quad made operation 
into several of these repeat- 
ers almost full quieting 
When the quad was com- 
pared with the HT's stock 
rubber duck, there was 
hardly any comparison at 
all: Some repeaters that 
were marginally readable 
on the rubber duck were 
very nearly full quieting, 
and it was often possible to 
access machines that were 
unusable before because of 
inadequate signal strength 
from the HT. 

What about swr? We 
found that the standing 
wave ratio was quite ac- 
ceptable across the entire 
frequency range covered 
by the antenna. Swr at the 
design center frequency of 
146 MHz ran about 1.1:1 
and changed almost imper- 
ceptibly over the 144-148 
MHz range. These measure- 
ments were made without 
any pruning of the antenna 
or adjustment of the match- 
ing stub Being very broad- 
banded, it's unlikely that 
any adjustments would 
have to be made. 

We found the little quad 
to represent a novel idea as 
far as VHF antennas go It's 
a highly compact but prac- 
tical package especially 
suited for on-the-go opera- 
tion. Perhaps a bit dear at 
$87,50, but with the price 
subject to downward revi 
sion when the antenna be- 
comes available as a kit, it's 
a very nice range-extending 
accessory to have and use. 

Who says hiking can't be 
fun? 

For more information, 
contact Palomar Engineers, 
Box 455, Bscondido CA 
92025. 



73 Magazine • December, 19B1 105 



INTIMIDATED BY 
MORSE CODE? 

THENEWAEA 
MODEL MT-1 
COMPUTERIZED 
MORSE TRAINER 
MAKES MORSE 
CODE EASY AND 
FUN TO LEARN. 

KT-1 Computerized Keyer With 
All Features of Above Trainer 
is Also Available in Same 
Package 

• Automatic Speed Increase, User May Program: Starting 
Speed, Ending Speed. Practice Duration; 5 Letter code 
Groups or Random Space; Common of Ail Characters, 

• Precise Speed Control 1 to 99 WPM {Tailor to Your Exact 
Requirements), 

• 24,000 Character Answer Book Available For 10 Starting 
Positions. 

• Random Mode For Practice (No Answers). 

• Operates from 12 V.D.C. 

Derrick Electronics 

714 We st Ken osha Broken Arrow, OK 74012 Toll Free 800-331 -3688 

A C A Brings you the 

^AEi^A Breakthrough! 





HfiL Communications Is Proud 
To Announce That Our 
Amateur Radio Products fire 
Being Stocked fit The 

Following Leading Amateur 

Dealer Stores: 



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(404) 432-8006 

GISMO COMMUNICATIONS 
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MADISON ELECTRONICS 
1508 McKinney Ave. 
Houston, TX 77010 
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2050 S. Bundy Dr. 
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(213)820-1234 



Coll Or Stop-In find See 
HfiL Equipment fit Your 
Favorite Amateur Dealer 



bHL 



Write today for HALs latest 

RTTY c dialog. 

HAL COMMUNICATIONS CORP 

Box 365 

Urbana, Illinois 61801 

217-367-7373 




106 73 Magazine * December, 1981 



HAL Puts MORE Behind The Buttons 



72 or 36 

Character 

Lines 



45-1200 Baud RTTY 
1-100 WPM Morse 



2 Page 
Display 



Code 



Black 
o, Half 

36 White » 

:ter Characters ^ Fu ' 

J Unshift ^P'" * 

Status I on Synchronous 

Indicator I Space Idle 

on Screen / (For Baudot) ("Diddle") 



Auto 

TX/RX 

Control 




Auto All 3 RTTY i 

Four Internal Mark-Hold Shifts 

RTTY Demodulators ("^h or Low Tones) 

. High Tones JU^ Standard) L£D Tuning | ndicafors 

• Low Tones (lARU Standard) p ? 

• 103 Modem (1070/1270 HZ) On-Screin Tunina Bar 

• 202 Modem (1200/2200 HZ) ° n Scr ^ || |™ mfl 

Ext. Scope Connections 



Audio or 
RS232 

Data 



Transmit 

and Receive 

With RTTY Loop Devices 

Audio Monitor 
ut Audio For Either 

From input or Output 

ver or Tape Signals 

Internal Speaker 
Plus External Output 



Input Audio 

From 

Receiver or Tape 




T2100 System: 

• CT2100 Communications Terminal 

• KB2100 Keyboard 

• Video Monitor 

• Printer (300Bd Serial ASCII-MPI 88G) 



RM2100 Rack Adapter 
MSG2100 2000 Character 
"Brag Tape" ROM 



• 24 Line Display 

• 2 Pages of 72 
Character Lines 

-or* 
4 Pages of 36 
Character Lines 

• Split Screen 
(withKB2100) 



Communication 9 Terminal 



CT2100 



CT2100 



m» 



& 






Monitor 



KB2100 




T A 





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HAL COM. 
BOX 365 

Urbana, Illinois 61801 
21 7-367-7373 



ATIONS CORP 



NOW! HAL Equipment is 
in stock at leading Amateur 
Dealers. 



ftVlM HELP 



I am in need of a schematic 
and/or operating manual for a 
Morrow MB-6 receiver. Ill pay 
postage and copying costs. 

Steve Stout KA5CRI/9 

1537 Winslowe Dr. #VB 

Palatine IL 60067 

I am looking for a cabinet with 
legs for a Tempo One. I am will- 
ing to pay a reasonable amount 



for it and the cost of shipping. 

In addition, I am looking for a 
manual or copy of same for a 
Heathkit Model Gt>lB grid-dip 
meter. 1 will pay postage and 
return original since I can copy if 
you cannot. Thanks. 

Doug Applegate KA8BDC 

9648 Reynolds Rd, NE 

Newark OH 43055 



I need schematics, service 
manuals, or connection instruc- 
tions for an Akai VG100 TV cam- 
era (s/n U51 11 5-9078) and 
VM100 monitor (s/n U51115- 
9073). I will pay postage both 
ways or Xeroxing costs, 

Peter Z. Simpson KA1 AXY 
18 University Dr. 
Natick MA 01760 

I need any info you may have 
on modifications to the Heatnkti 
SB-303 receiver and SB-401 
transmitter. I also would like to 
know if anyone has built a con- 
verter for the SB-303 for the 



SWBC bands (9,5. 11,5 r 17.5 
MHz f etc.). Til gladly pay for any 
photocopies sent. Thanks. 

Thomas W. Gates AB5G 

Rt. 1 , Box 572 

Deville LA 71326 

I would like to contact anyone 
who is using the Xitex MRS-100 
RTTY-CW computer interface, I 
am having trouble with the unit 
and t would like to be able to 
hook it to my HS or my H-89 
(preferably the latter). 

Robert W. Sioat K4VGN 

PO Box 05-37 

Tice FL 33905 



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WHAT IS AN AUDIO FILTER? 

Why buy a Ddtung audio filter when 
you can get other audio fitters fa* 
halt me prce^ 

To answer ihts you first need U 
re*ncmbe' thai the btie audio Nie*'" 
can mean anyfhario, even down to a 
couple oi 74 1 s and a handful o< 
parts Only by companng kfce with 

:an you make an informed 
decision Ttiisn^eansajrnpanng 
'eatures pedormanra and quality. It 
you send lor our free dala sheets 
and compare our products with the 
compeiition you will see that really there is virtually no composition 
at our chosen standard of performance 



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. Whal other audio filler can 
M tune into heterodyne 
A mtederence like tune>up 
wntsties and notcn them 
out automatically fcfce our 
m Mode^FLi^ Yet Model FU 
W is also such a good CW Gtef 
m M r^airtswidetyusedoy 
Hr omfessionvai traffic handier? 
W What other audo fitter has 
HF passband edges sharper tnan SSB 
ea^ crystal Inters and yel which can be 
tuned at will from 200 to 3500 Hi'* To pull off ihii trick our 
Model F 12 uses no lev. i inn 32 op amps plus siate-of-ihe- 
art pulse Width modulation lechmques. Two5-poJe elliptic 
filters and a 2^ pole peak or notch filter In one box all 
independently tuneable add up to a lot more; filtering 
capability lor SSB RTTY CW lhan you will Fund m any other 
audio filter that we know oi 
To answer our ouestion men an audio fairer tan oe almost 
any fl w q On tne other nana the phrase Oaionq Audio 
Fffte* rs a km more precise- M stands for state of me-ari 
Mte nn q backed by enlra capatawty e»t*a morouojh design 
and eiira quahty If you need confiirnatfon ask a user' ~ 
* dckhonal products 

Just as owf two auflo W i i rs set new standards tor nnovation and 
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you am it not tmt} anyrtfifli | else We 
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siory but our data in**** are 
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Model ASP The "'smarT rf 

The automate circuitry m Modal 
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maintain the degree of true rt 

clipping selected nn decibels) by 

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circuitry avoids "hang-up5 M by discriminating against notaespikes and non-speecn inputs Make no 

i r u h rake. Model ASP connects in the microphone line yel gives irue d dipping for speech 

enhancemenl with minimum dtslortlon. 

Model O70 The go -anywhere Morse Code Tutor 

Ettractmg suly hours ot code practice from a low cost nine volt battery ModeiOTO gives you freedom 

to practice anywhete to su*t your timetable and lifestyle Model D7Q s variable e*tra delay between 

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rmmwm 1 nMtr* cm 
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Model r*Ci : Adds f¥ti receive 
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^329 



108 73 Magazine ■ December, 1981 





TW 



Hand-Held to Mobile and Back Again! 

Simply plug in your loom IC-2A and your synthesized portable becomes a 25W 

synthesized mobile rig — take it out again, all charged and ready, when you want 
hand-held operation. 



RF POWER 

The Power Pocket accepts any version of 
the IC-2A, applies its output to a wideband 
rf amplifier, and delivers 25 watts to your 
mobile antenna. Mobile talk-out power! 

AF POWER 

The Power Pocket provides 2 h watts of 
audio output and a 4-inch speaker so 
that messages can be heard above road 
noise, even with the windows down. Also, 
by using the Power Pocket's audio ampli- 
fier, you can operate the IC-2A at low 
volume — thus lower drain on the power 
pack, 

CHARGING POWER 

The Power Pocket accepts and charges 
all Icom battery packs, Its spring-loaded 



charger pocket adapts to short or tall 
packs, assuring firm, positive contact for 
proper charging. The charging function 
has its own independent switch and indi- 
cator, so that you can charge the pack 
whether or not the amplifiers are turned on- 

MIC PREAMP 

The Power Pocket is compatible with any 
standard mobile microphone, thanks to 
its microphone preamplifier. It is also com- 
patible with the Icom speaker/mic through 
jacks on the front panel. 



Let Power Pocket add full mobile capa- 
bility to your hand-held IC-2A portable. 
Contact VoCom for the name of the dealer 
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icom and (C-2A are trademarks of Icom America inc 
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See List of Advertisers on page W2 



73 Magazine • December, 1981 109 




RTTY To Go. 

Loud and Clear. 



HE 



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77«' Portable HA I Telereader CWR-6S5A 



Now RTTY can hit the road with vou, when 
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HAL offers the smallest RTTY terminal 
you can find. It's easy to pack and go — on 
long drives, camping trips, boating, any- 

where away from home. 

Pick up your portable HAL Telereader at 
your favorite amateur dealer store todav — 
you can order it to go! 

See HAL RTTY equipment at your favorite 
amateur dealer store. 

Write or call us for more information. 




HAL Communications Corporation 
P.O. Box 365 
Urbana, Illinois 61801 
f 2 17)167-7373 



**345 



• Baudot. Morse. ASCII 

• Built-in RTTY Demodulator 

• High or Low RTTY Tones 

• Built-in 5* 1 Green CRT 

• Four-page Display 

• Compact Size (12%W x 5H x 1 V/iD) 

• With External Keyboard 

• Runs on 12 VDC 




e HAL mi 



110 73 Magazine * December, 1981 



©tfTIN© 4 




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500 Character text buffer with BREAK feature 
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Ten 40 Character programmabie message 
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Buffer can be operated in character. word T or 
line mode and preloaded for later trans- 
mission. Word mode allows you to send 
smooth code, even if you "hunt and peck." 
Each word can be typed in and edited before 
it is transmitted. Pressing the space bar will 
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Cassette interface allows you to record and 
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Built-in 110 VAC Power Supply 

Memory Expansion Option with Battery 
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RTTY Features include 60,66,75,100,132, 
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112 73 Magazine * December, 1981 






When it comes to 
AMATEUR 

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NOW READY! 



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Edition features over 400,000 listings, 
with over 70,000 changes from last 
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Place your order for the new 1982 Radio 
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^WHAT WILL YOUR NEW 

RIG BE LIKE? 



Read 73 and Find Out 



The magic of digital electronics is coming to ham gear - . . and you' II be able to read about these 
developments in 73. There probably will be more changes in ham equipment in the next few 
years than ever before in history. You'll see these changes coming in 73, where you'll read about 
the experiments and pioneering. 73 has more articles than any other ham magazine , 4 . often more 
than all the others combined. 

When sideband got started, it was moved along by the many pioneering articles in 73. In the 60s 
it was solid state, with several times as many articles on the subject than in all the other magazines 
combined. When repeaters and FM got going about ten years ago there were over five times as 
many articles on the subject published in 73 as in all other ham magazines combined, . and you 
can see what changes that brought to hamming. Now we're looking at exciting developments 
such as narrow band sideband for repeaters. . . which might give us six times as many repeaters 
in our present bands. We're looking at automatic identification systems which may make it possi- 
ble for us to read out the call letters of any station tuned in . , . and even the development of self- 
tuning receivers. 

Will stereo double sideband techniques make it possible to have up to 30 times as many stations 
within a given HF band as is now possible? Hams will be experimenting and reporting on these 
developments in 73, 73 is an encyclopedia of hamming. . . present and future. . . and just a bit of 
the past too, 

Without the endless fillers on station activities and club news, 73 is able to 
publish far more information . . . valuable information . , . on hamming and 

ham equipment. 

You may or may not be a pioneer, but you certainly will want to keep up 
with what is happening and what the new rigs are going to be like. And, frank- 
ly, your support of 73 is needed to keep this type of information coming* 



v» 



Name. 



g bill me for 1 year of 73 Magazine at 525X30 



31DB6 



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City 



State. 



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Canadian S27/1 year only, US funds. Foreign $35/1 year only. US funds 

Please allow 4 to 6 weeks for de#very 
73 Magazine «PO Box 931«Farmingdate. NY U737 




114 73 Magazine * December, 1981 






OMN1-C has what it takes to filter the 
crowds. To narrow the Amateur Radio 
wortd right down to the particular signal 
you want, The selectivity, sensitivity, dy- 
namic range and operational features 
you need to cut any crowd down to size. 
Tailored i-f response. OMNI is equipped 
with the potential for seven response 
curves to handle any listening situation. 

Standard filters include an excellent 8- 
pole 2.4 kHz crystal ladder filter and, in 
addition, a 150 Hz active audio cw filter 
with three ranges (450 f 300. 150 Hz). 

Optional filters include 1.8 kHz 8-pole 
crystal ladder ssb filter, 500 Hz 8-pole cw 
filter* and 250 Hz 6-poie cw fitter 

Front panel switches put any optional 
filter in series with the standard filter for 
up to 16 poles of filtering for near ulti- 
mate skirt selectivity. 

Four i-f response curves for ssb and 
three for cw. That's response tailoring, 
thafs crowd control 
Optimized sensitivity and dy- 
namic range. The OMNI sen- 
sitivity range of 0.3 ptV typical 
(slightly less on 160 & 80M) 
combines with a 90 dB dy- 
namic range to provide 
an ideal balance that will 
handle any situation 
from copying a weak 
signal half way 
round the world to 
keeping the next- 
door kilowatt 
from muscling 
in. And a PIN 
diode switched 
18 dB attenua- 
tor is included 
for extra insur- 
ance against 
overload. 
More crowd- 
handling fea- 
tures—and all 
standard 
equipment. 
Built-in notch 
fitter. To drop 
out unwanted 
signals or car- 
riers. Tunable 
from 200 Hz to 3,5 
kHz, with a 50 dB 
notch depth. 

3-made. 2-range 
offset tuning. To put 
you where the others 
aren't and where the elusive DX is. Move 
just the OMNI receiver, or just the trans- 
mitter section, or the entire transceiver 
^500 Hz or ^4 kH2. For complete free- 
dom of frequency movement to get away 
from the crowds. 

Built-in noise blanker for those times 
when your noise- generating neighbor is 
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dle the big signals easily. 

2-speed break-in. When QRM or 
QRN is heavy, switch to "Slow." Use 
'*Fasf for instant, full break-in for enjoy- 
able rag-chews or stalking DX. 
OMNI-C features stand out in any 
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All solid-state— from the pioneer, Ten- 
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Broadband design for instant band 
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Ten -Tec original. 



"Hang" AGC for smoother action. 
WWV reception on the 10 MHz band. 
Digital readout in two colors, red for 
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digit ( 100 Hz). Instant recognition 
Separate receiving antenna capability. 
Switch receiver to a common antenna lor 
Iransceive or separate receive-only an- 
tenna; the system also acts as receiving 
antenna by-pass with an instant break-in 
linear amplifier or transverter 
**S"/SWR meter, electronically switched 
200 watts input, all bands, with 50- 
ohm load. 5 year pro-rata warranty. 
100% duty cycle on all bands up to 20 
minutes. Full RTTYand SSTV power. 
Built-in VOX and PTTwith front panel 
controls. 

Built-in phone patch jacks for easy in- 
terface. 

Built-in zero-beat switch for spotting the 
exact frequency of a DX station. 

Built-in adjustable sidetone volume 
and pitch- 

Adjustable threshold ALC, op- 
timum power for driving a lin- 
ear. Provides means of 
working into a high SWR, 
Front panel control of 
linear or antenna. The 
rear panel bandswitch 
terminals control relays 
or circuits in step with 
front panel band- 
switch. 
Automatic 
sideband se- 
lection plus re- 
verse. 

Low distortion 
audio, less than 
2%; a Ten-Tec 
trademark. 
Clean signal, 
exceeding FCC 
requirements. 
High stability 
over wide tem- 
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voltage excur- 
sions. 

Built-in speak- 
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siorvloaded; in 
bottom of cabinet. 
Plug- in circuit boards 
for fast easy service. 
12-I4V dc power for 
easy mobile use. 
Full complement of accessories: 

►del 280 Dual Primary AC Power Supply. 
69, Model 255 Deluxe Power Supply/Speaker 
Comho. $199_ Model 243 Remote VFO, MS9. 
Model 215 PC Microphone. $34 30. Model 
214/234 Microphone/Speech processor 
$39/$ 139. Model 645 Dual Paddle Keyer. $£5_ 
Model 670 Single Paddle Keyer. $39: Model 227 
AntentM Tuner, $79. Filters, $55 ea. 

Made in the U.S.A. 

Model 546 OMNl-C transceiver $1289 

Get out of the crowds with OMNl-C. See 
your TEN-TEC dealer or write for details. 



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73 Magazine • December, 1981 115 



Cot in Richards 9M2CR 

73 latan Pantai 

Port Dickson. Malaysia 



it 



Chopstick" Helical for 432 

satisfies your Phase III appetite 



Forward gain, forward 
gain: that's the cease- 
less search in satellite work. 
It's a task that jumps to the 
forefront with the approach 
of a new breed of satel- 
lite—Phase 1 1 IB. 

The Phase 1MB satellite 
will be put into a "pseudo- 
synchronous" orbit — which 
means that it will offer 
many of the advantages of 
commercial synchronous 
satellites. It will swing 
around the bottom of the 
globe at a low perigee of 
1500 km and then hurtle 
out to an apogee of 36000 
km — and (here's the bonus) 
— its movement relative to 
an earth station for the 4 
hours spanning this apogee 
will be small. For four hours 
there will be an almost-sta- 



tionary satellite up there, 
covering half the globe 

For the first time, radio 
amateurs will be able to 
communicate on a world- 
wide basis using VHF 
+ UHF, thus skipping many 
of the baneful problems of 
HF propagation. What's 
more, Doppler shift at the 
apogee will be very slight — 
so that the skillful search- 
ing and re-tuning so essen- 
tial with low-orbit satellites 
will no longer be required. 

But there is a price to be 
paid for these advantages! 
Path length at apogee is vir- 
tual ly the same as that for 
commercial synchronous 
satellites. While they coun- 
ter this path loss by using 
giant 30-metre dishes and 
low-noise amplifiers on re- 



eff *.- &00* 



MATCHING 
SECTION 



* REFLECTOR 



ceive, cooled in liquid heli- 
um, no amateur can com* 
pete with this! But latest es- 
timates for Phase 1MB sug- 
gest that we can get by with 
an erp of 500 Watts— a tol- 
erably modest figure. Of 
course, a 500-Watt final is 
out of the question for most 
amateurs— so we have to 
get our gain elsewhere — 
notably from the antenna 
system. 

Phase 1 1 IB uplink will be 
centered on 435.215 MHz 
and will require clockwise 
circular polarization. 
So — how to make a high- 
gain antenna with circular 
polarization which can be 
hoisted into the air and 
pointed in the right direc- 
tion without too much trou- 
ble? That is the question. 



FEED iMPEpAHCE 
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1=435 »Hi 

* = 37 ft m 



Fig, 7, Ten-turn "chopstick" helical: gain 15 dB t beamwidth 36 degrees. 
11$ 73 Magazine • December, 1981 



Long-) ohn yagis — crossed 
and phased — could offer 
one solution, but at 435 that 
phasing harness could pre- 
sent problems, while im- 
pedance matching is also a 
chore. 

So, why not a helical? 
Here we have neatness, 
high gain, wide bandwidth 
and circular polariza- 
tion—all in one, Scanning 
the handbooks for design 
info on helicals showed 
that a ten-turn helix looked 
promising: a gain of 15 dB 
would persuade my 10-Watt 
output to masquerade as 
300 Watts, and a beam- 
width of 36 degrees ought 
not to be too finicky to 
point. The boom length at 
435 MHz would be about 6 
feet f with a reflector 28 
inches square — these 
seemed manageable dimen- 
sions. But what to use for 
the helix, how to form it 
how to keep it in shape? All 
pertinent questions at this 
particular QTH— with the 
nearest parts or material 
stores some 70 miles away. 

The boom was no prob- 
lem. A 6'4" length of 
VX1/2" meranti timber 
good and straight, looked 
just about right — with the 
1" edge vertical to avoid 




, Theta 7000E 
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New versatility 
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The perfect addition to any 
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Complete, automatic send/ 
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Baudot code (RTTY) and ASCII 
code (RTTY), Works with 
any video monitor 



7-Channel Battery Back- Up Memory, the Theta 7000 E has 
seven keyboard-selectable, nonvolatile, random access 
memory channels each of which can hold 64 characters. Data 
in these memories is alterable at any time and is retained 
when power is removed. Messages in these memory channels 
can be repeated 1 to 9 limes via keyboard command. All 
channels may be daisy-chained tor continuous read-out 
Channel number in use is indicated on display. 

Wide Range of Transmitting and Receiving Speeds, 5 to 50 

wpm in Cw with autotrack on receive. Standard RTTY speeds 
of 60, 67, 75, and 100 wpm Baudot code and 110, 150, 200, and 
300 Baud ASCII code. 

Self Contained Demodulator, three-step shift selects either 
170 Hz, 425 Hz or 850 Hz shift with manual fine tune control 
of space channel for odd shifts. High/low tone pair select. 
Mark only or space only copy capability for selective fading. 

CONVENIENT KEYBOARD FEATURES, automatic keyboard operated 
transmit, (KOX) or manual keyboard transmit. Unshitf on space, reverts 
to LETTERS case after reception of each space clwacier in Baudot 
code. CfVLF is automatically inserted every 60, 12 or 80 characters 
while transmitting. Cw identification, in RTTY mode. Echo function, 
prerecorded cassette tapes can be read and transmitted. Test 
messages, "RY" and "QBF\ Transmit word mode, characters can be 
transmitted in word groupings. 




Suggested 
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Model 7000 Drake Theta 7000E Terminal $1095.00 
Model 7009 Drake TR-930 Video Monitor $ 185.00 

Crystal Controlled AFSK Modulator 



High Tone Pairs 


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850 Hz 




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Low Tone Pairs 


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425 Hz 


850 Hz 




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1275 


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Space 


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1700 


2125 



• Printer Interlace for Hard Copy, at! modes for parallel ASCII printers. 
Loop keyer for conventional teleprinters. * Composite Video Output, for 
any standard video monitor -Kansas City Standard AFSK Output, KCS 
tone pair for ASCII. * Large Capacity Display Memory, two page display 
memory contains 32 X 16 lines per page. * Split-Screen, wjth a 
keyboard command, the display can be divided in two; the upper half 
for transmit and the lower half for receive Messages can be composed 
while receiving. * Buffer Memory, 53 character type- ahead keyboard 
buffer • Word Wrap-Around receive mode, word wrap-around 
prevents the last word on a line from becoming split in two. Moves 
whole word to next line. • Automatic Letters Code Insertion, if desired, 
LETTERS (diddie) code can be transmitted continuously \n a pause of 
transmitting from the keyboard, • Audio Monitor, a built-in audio 
monitor circuit with automatic transmit/receive switching enables 
Checking of the transmit/receive tones. * Transmitter Keying Circuitry, 
keys either grid block, cathode keyed, or sol instate transmitters. • 
Power Requirement The Theta 7000E requires only 13.6 Vdc ® 1 amp. 
Plugs into 13.6 Vdc accessory jack on PS7 or PS75 power supplies. * 
Effective Packaging for RFI Protection, well designed metal cabinet and 
protective circuits prevent RFI * Terminal Size: T5S*W x 11.8*0 x 
4.7" H (40 x 30 x 12 cm) * Weight: 11 lbs (5 kg) - Monitor Size: 0.7 "W x 
9<8"D x 8,9" H (22,1 x 24.1 x 22.6 cm) • Weight: 11 lbs £5 kg) 




Model 1230 LA7 Line Amplifier $49.95 suggested usi 



Line output* input Jevets as tow as 15 mV rms 
(47 kitohm) will result in an output of 1 mW 
nominaJ into a 600 ohm balanced line. Output 
level adjustable by internal pre-set level 
control. Interfaces low level audio to RTTY 




term mat unit or phone line that requires a 600 
ohm balanced/ unbalanced input. One 36 
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1.3" H x 2.5 "W (11.4 x 3.3 x 6.4 cm). Weight: 
.3 lbs. (.14 kg). 




ideations, avaifaatfuy ants pnces su&t&ct to change without notice of obligation 



R. L. DRAKE COMPANY 




DRAKE 



? 



540 RirJiarrj St Mtamisfcurg. Ohio 45342, USA 
Phone: (513} 866-2421 • Telex; 288-017 



73 Magazine • December, 1981 117 



any bending (as it hap- 
pened, the antenna itself 
turned out to be feather- 
light and easily supported 
by the 1"x1/2") But what 
about the helix, and what 
about the spacers? 

Copper tubing was unob- 
tainable; in any case, it 
would have been expen- 
sive, heavy, and difficult to 
shape. Someone, some- 
where had mentioned using 
coaxial cable: so why not 
RG-58? The outer screen 
would simulate a tubular 
conductor, the inner con- 
ductor is not needed but 
could be soldered to the 
screen at each end. Good 
grade coax has a tinned, 
close-mesh screen with an 
excellent weatherproof 
sheath What could be bet- 
ter? I promptly hunted out a 
25-foot length. 

Spacers were now the 
problem, Most handbooks 
showed 3 spacers per com- 
plete turn of the helix, each 
spacer being set at a 120° 
angle to the last Since the 
boom was rectangular, it 
seemed more sensible to 
opt for 4 spacers per turn, 
and to put them at 90° set- 
tings. The original plan was 
to use 1/4"-diameter plastic 
rod or wood dowel for the 
spacers, but nothing re- 
motely resembling such 
material was available lo- 
cally. Pondering the prob- 
lem over a tasty meal of Fu- 
yong egg, crispy chicken, 
and Cantonese bean curd, I 
suddenly saw the answer 
there in my right hand: 
chopsticks! Why not? 

Chopsticks are available 
in a wide variety of designs 
and materials in Malaysia. I 
chose simple, wooden, ev- 
eryday chopsticks (not 
bamboo) — undecorated — 
sold in bundles of 20 for 25 
US cents a bundle. As with 
most chopsticks, the lower 
half has a circular, tapered 
cross-section, merging into 
a rectangular shape for the 
upper half. It couldn't be 
better! I marked the boom 
at 1.7" intervals and drilled 
holes 3/16" in diameter — 



consecutively at right 
angles for its entire length. 
The boom was long enough 
to allow 3 to 4 inches to 
stick through the reflector, 
for clamping purposes. A 
3.4" piece of the same 
boom material was fixed to 
the boom at the reflector 
end, and the 17" intervals 
were measured from this. 
All this can be seen clearly 
from Fig. 1 

A drop of glue was put in- 
to each drilled hole, and the 

chopsticks were pushed in 
one by one until they 
wedged tight. A double- 
check made sure that they 
were put in with a clock- 
wise spiral, as viewed from 
the reflector forward (that 
is, from the back of the 
beam). When giving the fi- 
nal push, each chopstick 
was twisted so that the 
square sides were roughly 
in line with the path that the 
RC-58 helix would take. 
This made it easier to file a 
small U-shaped depression 
in the top to allow the 
RC-58 to sit in neatly, 

Chopsticks are generally 
about 10 inches long, and 
when pushed through the 
boom about 4 inches pro- 
truded on the other side. 
These bits were carefully 
sawn off. The helix diame- 
ter is 9 inches, so a mark 
was made on the last 4 
spacers at each end of the 
boom, at a point 4-1/2 inch- 
es from the center line of 
the boom. A fine hole was 
drilled at these marker 
points and thread strung 
along from first to last 
spacer in each of the 4 
rows. This enabled the oth- 
er spacers to be marked to 
show where they should be 
cut off. 

After trimming, the tops 
were filed into a U-shaped 
depression in line with the 

helix path, A small hole was 
then drilled, an eighth of an 
inch below the tip, so that a 
piece of waxed thread 
could be used to bind the 
RG-58 helix in place. 

One end of the 25-foot 
length of RG-58 was bared 




Colin Richards 9M2CR with the completed project 



for half an inch, the sheath 
and dielectric removed, 
and the screen and center 
conductor twisted together 
and soldered Starting with 
this end, the RG-58 was 
bound to the short, straight, 
end section (3.4 inches) next 
to the reflector position. 
The soldered tip was placed 
so that it would mate with 
the center terminal of an 
SO-239 socket which would 
be mounted on the back of 
the reflector. The RG-58 
helix was then wound care- 
fully around the spacers, 
one at a time, binding in 



each spacer before moving 
to the next. In this way it 
was possible to ensure that 
an even, circular spiral was 
created— with no bulges or 
flat sections, As we neared 
the tenth turn, there was 
about 8 inches of surplus 
RG-58, This was cut off, the 
end trimmed, and the outer 
screen and inner conductor 
were soldered together as 
at the start of the helix. 
The thread bindings were 
touched with glue, and the 
boom and chopsticks given 
a coat of clear varnish and 
set aside to dry. 




The helical at work — note that the reflector frame is now a 
lightweight bicycle wheel rim, which is "neater, lighter, and 
better looking/' 



118 73 Magazine ■ December, 1981 







ICOM 



FALL SALE 

Now! EEB Is The Only 

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Service Center 

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AT YOUR SERVICE 



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FULL 

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IC 2AT 

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IC 25A 
IC 730DC 
IC 720ADC 
IC251A 
fC 290A 
IC451A 



NET 

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$ 349. 
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FT708R 

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Becoming your #1 Amateur Store, 
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(800) 336-8473 





■'. 



Tue-Sat 
10am-4pm EST 

Technical information, 
VA orders (703) 938-3350 
Store opens 10am Tues-Sat 
Close 5pm Tues. Wed, Fri, 
Close 9pm Thurs, 4pm Sat 

516 Mill Street, N.W. 
Vienna, Virginia 22180 



OUR 10th YEAR 
SAME LOCATION 




DAI WA Communications 

Essentials 

Simultaneous SWR/Forward SWR & power METERS 
& Reflected Power Reading 



Tolerance: ± 107* full scale 
Input/output Impedance; 50 Ohms 
Connectors: SO-239 



Mode! CN-62QB {New 2 K w Scale) Model C N -720B (New 2 Kw Scale) 




Frequency Range: 1.8—150 MHz Frequency Range: 1.8—150 MHz 

SWR Detection Sensitivity; 5 Watts min. SWR Detection Sensitivity; 5 Watts mia 

Power 3 Ranges (Forward, 20/200/2000 Watts) Power 3 Ranges (Forward, 20/200/2000 Watts) 

(Reflected, 4/40/400 Watts) (Reflected, 4/40/400 Watts) 

Dimensions: 165 x 75 x 97 mm; Dimensions: 180 x 120 x 130 mm; 

6.5x3x4 in, 7x4.75x5 In, 

Model CN 630 

Frequency Range: 140—450 MHz 
SWR Detection Sensitivity: 5 Watts min. 
Power 2 Ranges {Forward, 20/200 Wat Is) 

(Reflected, 4/40 Watts) 
Dimensions: 180 x 65 x 120 mm; 
7,12x3,37x475 in 




Frequency Range; 3.5—30 MHz 
(Including WARC Bands) 
Power Rating; 500 Watts PEP 
Internal Dummy Load: 50 Watts/ 
1 Minute 

Impedance Matching; 15-250 Ohms 
to 50 Ohms Resistive 
input Power Required tor Automatic 
Tuner 1 . 5 or 10 Watts (Set by rear 
panel switch) 

Tune-up Time: 45 Seconds Max- 
Power Requirement: 13,8 VQCI2 Amp 




Coaxial 

Switch* 



Power Rating: 25 kW PEP t 1 kW CW 

Impedance: 50 Ohms 

Insertion Loss; Less than .2dB 

VSWR: 1:12 

Maximum Frequency: 500 MHz 



Isolation: Belter than 50 dB at 300 MHz; 

belter than 45 dB at 450 MHz; 

adjacent terminal 
Unused terminals grounded 
Connectors: SO-239 






4 Position/ 
Model CS-401 



Exclusive USA agent 
for these units; 
inquiries invited. 

Write for literature 




2 Position/ A 
Model CS-201 i 




BELL 

19070 REYES AVE « P.O. BOX! 
GOMFTON, CALIFORNIA 90224 

Phone (213) 537-5200 



See List of Advertisers on page 162 



73 Magazine • December, 1981 119 




i'2n EQUAL ANGLE 



1/tE* * i/Z«i GALV 
MESH OR ALUM 
FLY SC*EE« 



1/2 in EQUAL ANGLE 
ALUM BRACKET 
(BRACE) 



BOOM 1 PROTRUDES 
4 in.) 



SUPPORT PIECE 
EACH SIDE Of BOOM 



ALUMINUM 
MOUNTING PLATE 



MOUNTING BOLT 
NUTS 



1/2 m. EQUAL ANGLE 
ALUM SUPPORT 
STRIPS 



fig. 2. Front-view details of mounting the bracket on the 

reflector. 



The reflector came next 

(Note the later improve- 
ment in the photo of the he- 
lical at work.) Half inch- 
squared mesh CI screen 
was used, and a 28-inch 
square cut out and edged 
with 1/2" X 1/2" aluminum 
angle. A small sturdy alu- 
minum plate was used as a 
center mount for the reflec- 
tor (it was, in fact, an old 
door-lock plate!). An aper- 
ture 1" X 1/2" was cut in the 
center to allow the boom 



end to fit through and pro- 
trude 4 inches on the other 
side of the reflector. Above 
and below this aperture a 
hole was drilled for a 
3"X1/4" carriage bolt. The 
bolts were firmly screwed 
to the plate, with most of 
their length also protruding 
to the rear of the reflector. 
Two more lengths of alu- 
minum angle {1/2" x 1/2") 
were screwed across the 
plate in a vertical direction, 
to make the reflector rigid. 



\ 1 1 1 1 ■ 1 II 




_ _■ * ■ 




\ \ 






















, L 


-p i — | — 1 — f — i— < 1 +■ ■ — ► — j — 




J ___ — 


* 


■ 




^ S02^^ , 1 W T 




_ _ [ ' ' 1 H 








tin 














- 






\ \1 " 






n 


— _ L 




s 


■ii — — u 










TmiTI ' 




" : F" ■■'■ i " ■ " 


[ i 
















i ^_j . , L .„ 






T : ; ; : _Ti 




... .^ 


* ' ' M l l J ' 


H-. 


. _ 
-L-LJ—UJ 



STRIPS 



l/Zm EQUAL ANGLE 

ALUMINUM FRAME 
24 <n SQUARE 



1/2 in 6.1. MESH OR ALUM 

FLT SCREEN 

J im SHO*N FQ* CLArtrTY J 



I in ■ 1/2 m MOLE FOR BOOM 



ALUMINUM MOUNTING PLATE 



fig. 3« Details of the reflector 




50239 



MOUNTING BOLT 



BOOM PROTRUDES A m. WITH 
PIECE OF l in Jf 1/2 in EACH SIDE 

FOR SUPPORT 



2 ST ST rtOSE CLAMPS ABOUND 
BOOM AND MOUNTING BOLTS 



ALUMINUM MOUNTING PLATE 



Fig, 4. Back view of the mounting plate. 



The SO-239 socket fitted to 
the plate, facing rearwards, 
with its center terminal 
lined up with the end of the 
helix at section A in Fig. 1. 
The antenna boom was 
then pushed through the re- 
flector mounting plate, 
carefully squared up, and 
fixed firmly in place with 
two stainless-steel hose 
clips around bolts and 
boom. 



The reflector weighed 
about 8 pounds, whereas 
the antenna-plus-boom was 
only 2 pounds. A plywood 
bracket was therefore fitted 
at the balance point, just a 
few inches from the reflec- 
tor. Minor dents in the 
RC-58 helix were pushed 
gently into shape, and the 
ten-turn "Chopstick" heli- 
cal was ready for hoisting 
aloft! Almost ready, that is. 





Securing the boom to the reflector. 
120 73 Magazine • December, 1981 



The helix attached to the "chops tick" spacers. 




^449 



808 N. Main 




Evans vi lie. IN 47711 




SANTEC 




HT imo Large Slock 


Call 


ST JfrT in Sloe* 


Call 


All accessories m stock 




TEN TEC 




546QmnlC 


$1050.00 


580 Delta 


750.00 


525 Argosy 


480,00 


225 Power Supply 


115.00 


290 Power Supply 


150.00 


256 Power Suppiy.Spuker 


170.00 


243VFO-OrtW« 


1W0O 


2B3VFO- Delia 


1B9 00 


234 Speech Procataor 


12500 


214 Bectret Microphone 


36.00 


215 Ceramic Microphone 


25.00 


227 Antenna Tuner 


74.00 


1 F — F I Iters, Omni- Argosy 


49.00 


£45 Keyer 


77,00 


444 Hercules Amplifier 


1325.00 


ICOM 




iCr72Q*lftmef SuPWMfr 


J 12*5.00 


JO 730 


71500 


PS- 15 Power Supply 


tmm 


PS-20 Power 5upplyj"Spkr 


195.00 


IC25A Twenty- fivti Watt 2 Meter 


319,00 


IC 290A All-mode 2 meter 


465,00 


iC55lDw'FMop1k>r> 


679O0 


IC2Kl£oho State Amp 


Call 


IC3AT 220 MHz Hand-HeW 


Call 


if>2AT 2 meter Kenp-Held 


23900 


Most loom accmaeries *n siocm 




ARRLl382H»ndDOOk 


HO 00 


AEA 




MBA Reader 


S275.0O 


CK- 1 Memory Keyer 


117,00 


H4iBopoia 


36,00 


ALLIANCE 




HD 73 Relator 


199.00 


l> 100 Rotator 


45.00 


AM ECO PT 2 NF Ptesmp 


J72.DO 


A V A NTI T*o Meter on Glass Ani 


S31J00 


AZDEN 




PCS 3000 


429500 


PCS' 300 Two Meter Hand held 


CaH 


B & W Si *-P05it 1 on An 1 en rsa Sin itch 


122.00 


BASH Study Guides 


S9S5 


BENCHER By 1 Paddie 


S3«J» 


BUTTERNUT h^ 5 vnr vertical Ant 


tM-SG 


CALLBOOK 




tsaaus 


119.95 


1982 ox 


17.95 


CUBIC 




Astro 103 


*1 17500 


Astro 150A 


925.00 


WM2000A PEP Meier 


69.00 


DAfWA 




CN 520 HF Meter 


56300 


CNA 2002 Auto Turwr 


425.00 


HAL now m sl ock 


Cell 


H Y-GAIN large stock Call tar Discount 


Kantronics mini reader 


$265.00 


LARS EN 5/Bmag mount ant 


939.00 


M F J * roe st ock Call lor oiscouni 


MIRAGE 




2 M tr & 4*0 MKi Amps 


Call 


MF-VHF Meters 


10000 


SH U RE 444 D Microphone 


$46.00 


TRIONYXTfliOOOCounier 


149.00 


UNADILLA m Bsiun 


919,50 


VISTA B-amp supply @ 12 vollsdc 


970,00 


VOCOM 




2 in 25 ool 2 meter amp 


$75,00 


200 mW in 25 W Out 


•5.00 


2W.nWWout 


110.00 


2VWin lOOWout 


170-00 


SrS wave ant 


22.00 



A lot mora to list, no more room 



4m 



Marry ChrtBtmii from Dan & Sandi 

812-422-0231 

MON-FRI 9AM-6PM • SAT 9AM 4PM 

W T -.'ff to* Our n** a**t3 u }« e<jiii0(**nt 



I 




I 



aii sa iiiJiaaj) /jiDij 



i - 





i 



Transmits perfect Morse Code * Built-in 16 
character buffer * internal speaker and side- 
tone » Reed relay output eliminates keying 
problems * All solid state circuits and sockets 
for reliability * Speed range 5—45 WPM ■ Perfect 
companion to our MORSE-A-WORD CW code 
reader, 
MORSE-A-KEVER KIT, model MAK-K, Complete kit of parts & manual , . . . , $159.95 

MORSE-A-KEYER, model MAK-F, Factory wired & tested $199.95 

MORSE A^KEYER ESSENTIAL PARTS KIT, model EPK-K. . . $ 69.95 

(Essential parts kit for home-brewers consists of pc board, board parts and manual. 
You supply ASCII keyboard, cabinet, power supply & miscellaneous parts. J 

Send check or money order. Use your VISA or MasterCard. Add $5,00 shipping and 

residents add 4% Wisconsin State Sales Tax, 



handling 



or money 
for Continental 



U.S. 



your 
Wisconsin 



| ***& 



7%6cnot%cUt 



I 



Corporation Telephone: (414) 241 8144 

Post Office Box 513G, Thiensville, Wisconsin 53092 



New Automatic Antenna Tuner 

Auto-Track AT 2500 




Designed and Built by J, W. Miller Div. 



Check these state-of-the-art specifications 



■ 






Power Capability: 2500 W PEP. 

Frequency Range: Continuous 3.0 to 30 
MHz (including WARC Bands), 

impedance Matching: 10 ohms to 300 
ohms to 50 ohms resistive. 

Direct Reading SWfl Meter: 1:1 to infinity. 

Direct Reading Power Meter: Two meter 
scales from W to 250 W and W to 2500 
W; front panel switch selects FWD or 
Reflected Power (Mummated panel 1 meters). 

Power meter displays RMS with con- 
tinuous carrier and automatically displays 
PEAK when driven with SSB signal. 



Dealer 

Inquiries 

Invited 





Average "Automatic*' tune-up time: 15 
seconds or less. 

Tune-up time not affected by power level; 
can be as Jow as 1 W (5-10 W preferred). 

Power requirements are 115/230 VAC 50-60 
Hz, 10 W operating/5 W standby; or 13.5 
VDC, 1 A operating/.5A standby. 

Antenna tuner packaged in cabinet 17 "W 
x 5*i"H x t4*D (Front panel handles or 
rack mount optional at extra cost) 

Write for literature. 



Spectficj lions stjb|ecl lo change without nolle*. 



W. Miller Division 






BELL INDUSTRIES 

19070 REYES AVE ■ PO. BOX 5 
CQMPTON, CALIFORNIA 90224 

Phone (213) 537-5200 



**5ee List of Advertisers art page TGZ 



73 Magazine * December, 1981 121 



ALL NEW 
1 5 Meter Mobile CW & USB 




21.000— 21.450 MHz 

High I0W (PEP) low 2W (PEP); VFO tuning: noise blanker: fine- 
tune SB, KHz ± CW off-set: digital frequency counter; I 3 SVdc 
@ 3 A. negative ground; L 9.5* xW 9 kH 2 5 ; weight (2,3 kg) 
5 7 lbs ; mobile mourning bracket UNDER $300 

SERIOUS DEALER LISTS AVAILABLE 



Nt&tU 




.^311 



1275 N, GROVE ST. 
ANAHEIM. CALIF. 92806 (714) 630 4541 

NOTE: Price. Specifications subject to change without notice 

and obligation. 



SQZ39 



I Of * wi >A BOOM 




UPPEfl MOUNTING BOLT 



BOOM FfiOTmiDES THRU 



V M ". CT1 I l 



tOW£R MOUNTING BOLT 



ST 5T HOSE CLAMPS (2} 



ALUK'NUW tfC'UVTlNO PLATE 



Fig. 5. Side view of the mounting plate. 



There still remained the 
question of matching to a 
50-Ohm feeder The feed 
impedance of a helical an- 
tenna of this design is near 
enough 140 Ohms (this 
stays the same, by the way, 
regardless of the number of 
turns in the helix) A quar- 
ter-wave matching section 
should therefore have an 
impedance of about 84 
Ohms. The nearest coax is 
RG-62, which has an imped- 
ance of 93 Ohms. A quarter 
wavelength at 435 MHz is 
6.8", and the velocity factor 
brings this down to 5 7" 



(there's a trap here: solid di- 
electric coax like RG-8 or 
RC-58 has a velocity factor 
of 0.66, but is partly air- 
spaced and the factor is 
0.84). After many "cuts and 
tries/' the swr was brought 
down to 1:1.1- So this time 
the antenna was really 
hoisted in the air and put to 
work. Results? When used 
as an uplink antenna on 
OSCAR 7 t Mode B, signal 
reports have been encour- 
aging; downlink on Mode J, 
I can copy stations right 
down to the horizon I think 
it works! ■ 



J Reprinted from the December, 1980, Amateur Radio (Australia), 



TM 




ANOTHER AEA BREAKTHROUGH! 

PRICES 20% LOWER FOR IS0P0LE "ANTENNAS 

The IsoPole antenna has the reputation for high quality, unique design and superior performance 
IsoPoles have become the "standard of performance' in VHF/UHF base station antennas. 

The demand for IsoPole antennas has grown steadily since their introduction. To meet the demand, AEA 
has installed an automated production line. WeVe actually improved the quality of construction but most 
importantly we have lowered production costs. This lower cost is now passed on to you with the price of 
IsoPole antennas 20% lower 

The IsoPole is designed for ease of installation. You can customize your mounting by using low cost TV 
masting up to 1 % " diameter. (Mast not supplied.} More than ever, the IsoPole is the logical choice for a 
VHF/UHF base station or repeater antenna. 

The IsoPole antenna gives you exceptionally broad frequency coverage. You obtain maximum gain 
attributable to the antenna's length, plus a zero angle of radiated power. The unique cone design (pat pendj 
assures superior resistance to icing and 
wind IsoPole antennas are weather 
proofed and made of top quality compo- 
nents. They use stainless steel hardware, 
Ampheno! connectors, corrosion resis- 
tant aluminum alloys and a dielectricic 
material with excellent mechanical and 
electrical properties. 

Note the typical SWR plots for the 
IsoPole- 144 and the new lsoPole-440. 



There is an IsoPole antenna for 220 MHz also. See these fine antennas at your favorite dealer, or 
Advanced Electronic Applications, Inc. JA ■■§ A 

p.o Box 2160, Lynnwood, wa 98036 M% mm mm Brings you the 
Call 206/775-7373 #%fe»#^ Break t hi 

Prices and specifications subject to change without notice or obligation 
122 73 Magazine • December. 1981 








The communications terminal that does it ail! 




TERMINALL if, a hafdwam and software system 
wtucn converts your TR&-8Q* iModel 1 oi Mod* 
into a stale at the art communications ter minal. TEA- 
fcfllNALL is srmpte to u» TERMINALL g<ves you 
mote for you* money TERMINALL works with a 
genera* purpose computet aoti is expandable TfcR 
MINALLhas tt all I 

Simplicity 

TERMINALL was designed from in* oulser to be 
easy to connect to your radio and easy to use Plufl 
*nio your receive* headphone jac* ana copy Morse 
code or radioteletype IflTTYl Plug into your CW kev 
lack a nti send Mtirse code Attach a microphone con - 
nector and send Baudot Of ASCIt RTTY using audio 
lories lAFSKl That's all more is to hooking it up 

The software may be loaded into your computer horn 
cassette or disk. En let your callsign and ihe time and 
you wtH 518*1 tejeerviog >mmediate>y No settings pi 
adjustments s*e necessary to receive Morse code - 
fully automatic and it worts' You may type youi 
message while receiving or transmit itftg 

Yuu will he on Hie air, r&t:eivinfl and transmitting 
mode m minute* As we said. TERMINALL lasitnpre, 

More for your money 

■ TERMINALL has the RTTY term 1 demod 

and AFSiC bud? in This results m a iower total cost 
because separate terminal units usually cost at least 
5226 assembled, and most do not even have a crystal 

continued AFSK. TERMINALL film unions not 
the higher cost ol an external njrminnl unit but also 
eliminates the hassle of Inteffautrtg (0 another piece 
pi equipment 



■ Outstanding documentation. I' ml fraternally 
wtnten, 90 page user manual contains stf>r *p 
♦nsiructrons explicit examples numerc 
photographs and tHustrauor *?ory or opetal*on 

parrs layouts schemapc diagrams 1 rouble shooting 
guide 

■ Buiit in software backup - set up the progniui 
parameters and mi- . Him way vou like to opera (a 

Ihen have the prnc'i- W ■in~wcQpyotil5S.il 
oil her casselte or d 

■ Software supplied 00 both cassette and auto run 

(*tt& at no additional coat 

■ Built in separate, mutli-st&ga active filter 
RTTY and CW demodulators. Mp phase lock IpOpl 
RTTV demodulator ban 170 and 850 Hi shift -key board 
selectable and uses either ihe panel meter or scope 
outputs for easy tuning. Copy the weak ones Copy 
the nosy ones. Copy the lading ones 

■ Buitt in crystal controlled AFSK. Rock stable lor 
even the most demanding VHF or HF application 
must on many VHF RTTY repeaters 

■ Built in hardware clock - or ■►•■ m lorid readaul 
maintains correct time even during cassette 1 '0 User 
programmable tone ''dale lorrnat 

■ Built in 110 or 220 volt AC power supph/ 

■ Built m parallel t trhwr software Simpdy at 
tach a paraliei ASCII printer te g ihe EPSON MX 8Q> 

to your printer port to obtain hardeopy m all modes 

Note: parallel printers typically co*l toss than sane I 
ASCII printers. 



■ Fantastic Morse recaption; Six stage active filter 
demodulator copies the weak ones Auto adaptive 
Morse ajgonrhm copies the sloppy ones Keyboard 
selectable noise threshold R ece i ve d code speed 
displayed on slams line 

■ Word wrapping, wed mode eptimg. rtrddk?. ig 
nore carriage returns, user prog ram mu ble end of Ifoe 

Hfjquence, ad|ustable carriage width, Transmit delay 
lined, nonf* or aula adapttvel Break mode and morel 

■ The all-in one TERMINALL design "nakes il 
great for use on Hf of 'am. Commercial. SWL 
Of MARS* SWL s we wiM be happy to modify TER 
MINALL lor 425Hz reception instead of B5GH/ at no 
extra cost, i f FGQueslOd wilh your or do* tSome Mews 
«nd weather services use 425H7;' 

General Purpose vs Dedicated 

TERMINALL has capabilities far surpassing other 
"dedicated terminal* systems And vet, smce it worts 
on a general purpose computer the rnatonty of vow 
investment 'the TftS-BOl «s spread out over many dit- 

r it applicahons noi just Radio rtimmunrcalions 
And you i system is expendable For example. Disk 

based mailbox BoftvVflfO may 1 be added at any time. 

Simplicity of operation. Lower coir General pur- 
pose computer. What are you waiting for? This la 
ihe way to go' 

Complete with software on cassette and diskette. 
assembled and tested hardware, and e*tenstve in- 
duction manual Specify Model I nr Modef III Level 
II 1BK required. $495, 




We Discount EPSON Printers 

Call Now! 



/VWCROTRONrCS inc. ® 



1126 N. Golden State Blvd 
Turlotk, CA 



44 



To order tod free 1 -800 344-7493 

In CA and for service (209) 667-2888 

Of 634-8888 

15 Day Money Bach Trial Period. One year parts and labor limited 
warranty . Add $4 shipping in USA, CA residents add 6% sales lax. 

We continue to eipenence telephone difficulties! please keep trying 

* Recognised trademark of Tandy Corporation. 




TRS80' BUSINESS AND APPLICATIONS 

O B D £ R N O PROGRAM NAME P Ri C E 

33T&RD ClimafeCcimo iO^I 2 4 95 

0267 R Electfcmic Bfeadboarti (Tape) 4995 

025*Rt) F:nijrt Quick iDi- • 44 95 

CM68R Label (Tape) 94 95 

TRS80" UTILITIES 

ORDER NO. PROGRAM NAME PRICE 

024GR Compreiisppn UhMy PacMTapet 1995 

0232R Tm? Oisassptrtblet iTapti 9 95 

01B0RD Disk Editoi LDifth) 39 95 

Q139RP Disk Scope ■■ 1995 

023tflD DLDlSiDiski 19 95 

0?38fl Dynarmt Device Dnvfta (Taps) 19 95 

0199RD Dynamic Device Drives iD-ski 24 95 

Q250R Irv [TapPi 24.95 

Q350R0 try (Disk) 29 95 

0058R Programmer's Converter i Tape i 9 95 

&4QR PfD^ramTi^f ■. frirnfff |Tap€f 995 

QT33R Rtnum'CampfBia iTappi '4 95 

0230R TLDIS (Tape* 14 95 

50C3R Ultra Mon i Tag?} ->4 9$ 

rns-Bo* EDUCATION 

QRDE R N PROGRAM NAM E PRICE 

013frfl Begi" i»«an tfapei 995 

0137R £«ef>rta> Ow 9 95 

007l RO Geu^'apn* ftpign" USA (Oi 4995 

02T2RO in Q^h (D . 2^ 95 

Dia/fl S_ h« ^ape» 995 

0?t4RD Teac^ 39 95 

Q099R Typing Teache« »Tapei .95 



TRS-60" GAMES, SIMULATIONS AND ENTERTAINMENT 



OROERNO 

0O17R 

01O6R 

0?40R 

0213RD 

0O51R 

G223R 

0724RD 

0237ft 

5Q07RD 
5Q10R3D 
021BR 
01 71 fl 

0205HD 

L1519R 

D1S9A 

D37BRD 

Qtt/R 

0023 P 

Q12QR 

0043R 

033ZR 

0312R 

5012R 

50HRQ 



PROGRAM NAME 

i Tape* 
Aumiil P»or fTapet 
Alien At Jar •» Fors tTajjet 
The Att Stars i Dt 
Ball TunetGurmpF (TafMH 
Ramao'ourvf iiapei 
Cosmic Paifol (Tapei 
Ccvsmic Pahoi iP 
Dagger In Otb-t iTape» 
Dragonauesl <Tape| 
pragonqu^l idsM Model I 
Dragono/uBSl iDisfc) Model Ml 
Dr Chips (Tap&j 
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The Flymg CirtuMDi&M 
House of 30 Gables (Tape) 
Jel Fighter Piioi |Tapei 
Uasler R> Disk) 

Nighi Flight tTapei 
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1 Pong i Tapej 
San la Pi * ami 4 F<umacc<o (Tape* 
Spate Shu Hie i Tape « 

.imp Ait <Tap#| 
Te*nfiie of the Sun i Tac^ 



THS-S0" HOME AND PERSONAL 
OROERNO PROGRAM NAME 
0D64R Muv i. Mastei 1 1 

dl5iRD QSL V4"a^" -C i 



PRICE 
995 
995 
995 

3*95 

995 

9 95 

14 95 

1995 

U95 

1595 

; 155 

2195 

9 95 

14 IS 

39 95 

9 95 

14*35 

2995 

995 

995 

^495 

995 

M95 

H 

1995 
29 95 



PRICE 
t995 



APPLE' • EDUCATIONAL 
ORDER NO PROGRAM NAME 
0339AD I 

O2B3A0 Ru^n" Di*k iD - 



PRICE 

34 95 
24 95 



APPLE 

ORDER 

gi-e 

0161AD 

0254AD 

001 B A 

0025 ft 

00 79 A 

Q163AD 

00&OA 

0T74A 

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01BJA 
0271AD 



" GAMES. SIMULATIONS • ENTERTAINMENT 



NO PROGRAM NAME PRICE 

ft ■ r F U ghi Simutatio^ (Tape i 9 95 

Appfe Fun (D 19 95 

Df Chips <D 14 95 

GeitcTapei 995 

Mimic IT ape I 995 

OH Tycoon iTapef 995 

PatJrtle Fun (Disk* *9 95 

Sahara Warriors (Tape* 9 95 

SafitB Paravia £ Fiumaccro (Tap-Sf 9.95 

Santa Pargvra & Fiumaccio (EV.h ■ 19 95 

Sfcybombers |i (Tape) 9 95 

SfcytKunpers II rDiski 19.95 



Instant Software 



APPLE" HOME AND PERSONAL 

ORDER NO PROGRAM NAME PRICE 

0235 AD Sola* Er»e*g> for the Home iQtsk} 34 95 

0242AD Ailrolqqi tDiSUl 1095 

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TO ORDER: 

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Mon -Ffi a 00 am -4 30 pm £ S 
Include 2 50 for Shipping & Handling 






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A division of Wayne Green Inc 



"TRS-80 Is a trademark of Radio Shack a division of Tandy Corporation 
* " APPLE is a UademarK ot Apple Computer Inc. 



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YOUR NAIWE COULD 

BE HERE. CALL: 

1 800-258 5473 



OMO VALLf T ElECtAOMC SYSTEM* 

SOUNDS ELECPRDNIC SPECIALTIES; 

Mbrpullftwn 



Find out what you're missing. 

You heard the lady. Your microcomputing life is going to be very exciting. But don't 
leave it to chance — leave it to us! We have a brand new catalog full of packages and 
valuable coupons to help make it happen. It's free. . .if you fill out the coupon and mail 
it today. (Or make a photocopy and spare your magazine). 

NAME: 



ADDRESS: 
CITY: 



Instant Software Inc 



STATE: 



.ZIP: 



Peterborough, N.H. 03458 603-924-7296 -A80 



73 Magazine * December, 198T 125 



The Code Pet 



a Morse tutorial for Commodore's com 




Aiden Lamdowne AA&G 
335 North Vassar 
Wichita KS 67208 



Program for Morse code. 



YM jou're practically a 
shoo-in for that up- 
grade license if you can 
copy the code from this 
program written for the 
Commodore Pet™. You 
pick the speed from five to 
twenty words per minute 
and it sends perfect code in 
groups of five characters. 
Since this is a sound pro- 
gram, you will need an ad- 
dition to the Pet such as 
can be found in Kilobaud 
Microcomputing, Man h, 
1979. The article by Greg- 
ory Yob on page 71 ex- 
plains several ways to con- 
nect sound I strongly rec- 
ommend the method in Fig. 
4(b). By the time I isolated 
an amplifier with capaci- 
tors, I had distortion. The 
transistor seems to be best 
and also is easy to con- 
struct. 

After you enter the 
speed, the screen is 
blanked and you copy the 



code with pencil and paper 

as you would if you were 
performing for the FCC. 
After 100 groups of five 
characters (or five min- 
utes), the screen will show 
the text sent A completely 
random text of letters, 
numbers, and common 
punctuation will assure 
you of receiving all charac- 
ters equally 

Should you wish to stop 
before the computer is 
finished, type S and the 
computer will respond. 
Code ts sent as near the in- 
put speed as possible for 
me to program. (If you 
make improvements, please 
let me know J The basis for 
the time was reached by 
running the program, tim- 
ing for five minutes, and 
then counting the groups 
of five characters. Speeds 
under 13 words per minute 
are sent at 13 words per 
minute with additional 



IN PRItfT* WftSE CODE PROMPTER MQMtPH* 

110 PRINT "QQI Mia SEMD MORSE CODE AT RAMDWIN" 

12§ PftlNT GROUPS OF FIVE CHARACTERS AT THE" 

130 PRINT "Q5PEED YOU DESIRE. AFTER 100 CROUPS OF* 

140 PRIWT "^FlYE, A COPY DF THE SENT TEXT MILL* 

150 PRI2TT 1JAPPEAH. IF YOU WISH TO STOP BEFOflE" 

160 PfllJirpfH FINISHED, TYPE '%* m m 

170 PRINT 1||IHAT SPEED MOULD YOU LIKE HE TO SEND?" 

190 CLR 

200 INPUT *5j(5 TO 2fl WPM)*;P 

210 IF P<5 OR P>2ff THE?! 290 

220 IF PH2 THEN K*l: GOTO 24* 

230 Pt-ABS(P*I5§-I9ff): P*13 

240 P-ABSIP'3-Bfl) 

250 POKE 59409*52: REM TURN OFF VIDEO 

260 pRiivr ■§■ 

279 PRINT "LETTERS. HERE fS THE LIST TO CHECK - 

260 PRIST -YOUR ACCURACY # 

290 POKE 59464,0: POKE 59467 , 16 :££H SOUND 

300 POKE 59466,51 

310 A-IIfTER«Din*47)+44 

320 IF IA«*4} QR (*>57 WD A*£3) THEN 310 

J10 PRINT OtRJIA); 

340 FOR 1-44 TO A 

350 READ AS 

360 NEXT 

370 FOR J-I TO P; WEFT 

390 FOR 1-1 TO LEHIASJ 

390 0I^IQSt« f t t n 

400 IF DS="L" THEN L*3*P: REM D/W LENGTH 

410 IF DS^'S" THEN L»P: ft£M DIT LENGTH 

420 POKE 59464,211: REM TONE 

430 FOR J-I TO L: HEJCT J 

440 POKE 59464.0 



126 73 Magazine • December, 1981 



spacing between charac- 
ters. The timing for this is 
accomplished in lines 220 
through 240 Line 270 is in- 
complete, but before the 
screen is turned on, fine 
610 will finish the sentence 
and tell you how many 
groups you have copied 
Line 290 includes an extra 
POKE statement; however; 
without it, you would hear 
a false tone the first time 
you ran the program. 

This program uses the in- 
herent ASCII code in the 

Pet to reference a number 
to the corresponding ASCII 
character for display. Line 
320 removes the holes in 
the ASCII code. Line 300 
follows guidelines for 
sound pitch as in Kilobaud 
Microcomputing, Feb- 



ruary, 1979, page 9 If the 
tone is not right for you, 
change the 211 in line 420 
to any number between 1 
and 255. 

Line 600 turns the sound 
off. If you have inadver- 
tently pressed STOP, just 
type RUN 600 You won't 
see it on the screen until 
you have pressed RETURN, 
The program as shown will 
run until 100 groups have 
been sent. If you want to 
copy for only five minutes, 
add line 205 and change 
line 560 as in Version II. 

Learning code isn't al 
ways that much fun, so 
anything to ease us 

through this period helps! 
Good luck on the up- 
grade, ■ 



450 NOT I 

469 REM £MD OF LETTER, CHECK & GROUP 

47^ RESTORE 

m SET £$; IF ES-"S* BO 59# 

49* C-C+l 

5W IF OS THEN OH: GOTO 53P 

510 FOR J-I TO K: NEXT: REH WORD SPACE 

52* GOTO 310 

531 FOR 1-1 TO P*6+2*£: UIXT 

$4$ G-G+k H-H+l 

5S0 IF 06 THEN G-0: GOTO 5B0 

5$i IF H*1W THEN S9f 

570 PRIHT " ■; 

see GOTO 311 

590 REM END 

m POKE 59464,0: POKE 59466,0: POKE 59467,(1 

610 FKMT ^TOU HAVE COPPIED^H^GROUPS OF FIVE* 

621 POKE 59«i9,6fl 

63* PRINT m SQ^mm^^fmjQ^ 

640 END 

1100 DATA LLSSLULSSSl.SLSLSL.LSSLS 

If IS DATA LLLU i SLLLL,SSLLL t SSSa,SSSSl,£SlSS,L5SSS,LLSSS.LLLSS,LLLLS 

19Zf QATA 8,a,fl|B*&,SSLLS5 # 3 

1930 DATA SL t L55S ( LSL5 ,LSS f S ,SSLS ,LLS t S5SS ,55 ,SLLL t LSL ,SL5S ,U. ,1.5 »LLL ,SUS ,USL 

1040 DATA SL5,S55,L l 5SL t SSSl t 5LL f L5SL f L5LL,LL55 

VERSIOH El ADDITION 

205 Ml+iflttl 

560 IF TDT THEN 590 



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73 Magazine * December, 1981 127 



Paul Crupp KA1LR 
73 Magazine Staff 



No More Two-Tone Sidetone 

modify your AEA keyer 



The AEA CK-1 and MM-1 
are spectacularly versa- 
tile keyers, and after many 
months of using both of 
them I have only one com- 
plaint, a complaint that 
many others have voiced. 
The problem involves the 
sidetone. 

Let's face it — there aren't 
many keyers with a nice 
smooth sine-wave oscillator 
for the sidetone. On the 
other hand, most transceiv- 
ers offer excellent sidetone 
characteristics, Moreover, 
when using the transceiv- 
er's sidetone, you can avoid 
the embarrassment of hav- 
ing the keying cable go bad 
while you are sending, or 
[heaven forbid!) forgetting 
to flip the "transmit" 
switch. In both cases the 
sidetone on your keyer 
would percolate along hap- 



pily, giving no indication of 
the fault. 

So what's the problem? If 
you want to use the side- 
tone in your rig rather than 
the one on the keyer, you 
can simply turn down the 
volume control on the key- 
er, right? Wrong! If you turn 
down the volume control 
on the keyer, you won't 
hear the audible confirma- 
tion of each entry you make 
on the AEA's keypad. This 
can lead to errors in mes- 
sage loading and speed se- 
lection if you don't depress 
the keys firmly, or there is 
key bounce. 

The solution is ridicu- 
lously simple, Unlimber 

your soldering iron, and in 
less than five minutes you'll 
have your AEA keyer giving 
you audible confirmation 



of entry, but no sidetone. 
We'll start with the CK-1, 
since that keyer is nearest 
and dearest to my heart. 

Remove the two screws 

on the sides of the keyer 
and carefully separate the 
two halves of the keyer. On 
the circuit board, locate 
diode D1, which can be 
found next to U3, just south 
of the 7805 regulator. 
Check the pictorial in the 
manual if you are not sure 
that you have the right one. 
Now here comes the hard 
part. Brandish your solder- 
ing iron threateningly be- 
fore the keyer, and then un- 
solder one end of the diode. 
That's it! Tape the diode so 
it doesn't short out any- 
thing, and close up the 
keyer. 

The MM-1 is equally sim- 



ple to modify. The diode of 

interest in the MM-1 is the 
D1, located near the crys- 
tal. There are two diodes 
and a resistor in a row; the 
diode you're after is the sec- 
ond one from the resistor 
Unsolder one end of the 
diode, and you'll have veri- 
fication of key closure, but 
sidetone only from the rig. 
If you wish to use the 
keyers sidetone from time 
to time, you can simply in- 
stall a miniature SPST tog- 
gle switch to switch the 
diode in when you want to 
hear sidetone from the key- 
er. In the MM-1, the switch 
can fit in one of the holes 
drilled for the Aux jacks 
Space in the CK-1 is a little 
tighter, so you'll have to 
drill your own hole, but 
there is still plenty of 
room ■ 



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Monodes 

harbinger of a new age 



Everyone has doubtless 
heard, at one time or an- 
other, that there lurks at the 
far fringes of electronics an 
engineer's unicorn or will- 
o'-the-wisp known as the 
monode. Most of what you 
have heard is humorous 
and misleading in nature; 
this is simply a cover for a 
lack of hard facts. 

But with recent develop- 
ments promising to cata- 
pult it squarely into the 
limelight of the next wave 
of innovation, it has come 



time to broaden its ac- 
quaintanceship. Engineers 
and hobbyists alike stand to 
benefit greatly. Both will 
find the new information of 
prime interest. We will now 
proceed to unburden the 
monode of its undeserved 
myth of uselessness. 

Monodes have left their 
mark through much of early 
history This fact is now 
clearly seen from the new 
perspectives given to us by 
contemporary historians of 
technology, notably Y. 




Wat 



Chchcn Ttz4 




CoutUi* lUoki AriUives 



Fig. 1. Representative ancient monodes. 

130 73 Magaztne • December, 1981 



Coyte Dunbar-Dexter and 
Isadora Pisa Ferniccia. 
Specimens of early ones 
range from bits of copper 
embedded endwise into 
clay beads (Chichen Itza, 
Angkor Wat) to bronze pin- 
shaped leads in wooden 
beads or buttons (Gizeh, 
Jericho). Fig. 1 shows repre- 
sentative pieces from these 
sites, circa 2240 BC to 1680 
BC. 

This graphic argument 
needs no further justifica- 
tion. The ancients' failure 
to extract a usable perfor- 
mance from them, however, 
led to their continual burial 
and rediscovery in widely 
scattered places and times. 

There are historians who 
scoff at the ancient mon- 
odes theory, nonetheless. 
Most often, these are not 
technically oriented peo- 
ple, and so they put forth 
the rather tepid counter 
that the so-called monodes 
are often found in proxim- 
ity to such commonplace 
articles as combs and 
brushes (who among the 
present readership has not 
built a Wimhurst or Van de 
Graff machine?); some are 
even found right in a mum- 
mified corpse's hair! 

We can scarcely blame 
the ancients for burying 
these defiant devices with 
their frustrated and no 
doubt defamed inventors, 



perhaps wishing both a 
kinder break in the after- 
world. 

In point of fact Puck's 
Staff, as we might well call 
it, had been a thorn in many 
a Skyptickal Experimenter's 
side all through the Renais- 
sance, as welL The first rela- 
tively modern mention of 
them is found in a rough 
draft of a neveMinished 
monograph, as it identified 
itself, by Evangelista Torri- 
celli, in 1642, Fig. 2 shows 
this work. He had a vague 
notion that the strange 
forces found in amber, ani- 
mal fur, and the like had an 
affinity for metals and pro- 
ceeded to tackle electrode 
theory one electrode at a 
time. 

Since an electrode's prin- 
cipal characteristic seemed 
to be its length, he assem- 
bled one by putting mercu- 
ry in a glass tube and invert- 
ing it into a shallow dish of 
more mercury. This was to 
provide an easy means of 
varying its length, but he 
became so engrossed in the 
tricks the atmosphere 
played on it that he dropped 
further dead-end research 
in favor of the easier quar- 
ry. He invented the barom- 
eter the following year as a 
result. 

Benjamin Franklin also 
delved into the matter for a 




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73 Magazine * December, 1381 131 



time This has been deter* 
mined by piecing together 
scattered interviews biog- 
raphers held with younger 
contemporaries after his 
death. Franklin mounted 
ball-capped rods atop Ley- 
den jars (the now-familiar 
ball and stem most static 
electricity devices sport), 
but found that, when 
capped with wooden or gut- 
ta-percha insulators as 
monode theory calls for, 
tKey became quite refrac- 
tory to further experimenta- 
tion. He, too, gave up in de- 
spair Fig. 3 shows this relic 
of the lackluster side of 
science. 

Many nineteenth century 
luminaries also wrestled 
with the "wicked one- 
legged beastie/' as Samuel 
Morse referred to it But, 
with so many highly suc- 
cessful endeavors proceed- 
ing forth, this was scarcely a 
time for championing the 
lame ducks of technology. 

Michael Faraday at- 
tempted to derive the form 
of the Tubes of Force he 
would find around a mon- 
ode. His subsequent ner- 
vous breakdown forever 
sealed off any chance of 
knowing just how close he 
may have come to the truth 
of the matter. He became 
so distracted that he could 
only talk about irrelevant 
trivia for years, never 
touching on the subject for 
a moment Research is also 
in progress on the so-called 
heavy metal poisoning that 
afflicted Isaac Newton. 

Heinrich Hertz came 
much closer than anyone to 
seeing the monode in its 
own right. He attempted to 
ascribe to most common ar- 
rangements of matter a 
"monopolar character'' to 
account for the apparent 
lack of omnipresent elec- 
tromagnetic activity as ob- 
servable in his day. He was 
right, in that monodes do 
not make antennas, and 
vice versa. We will go into 
this in more detail. 

As twentieth century 



physics unfolded, portray- 
ing a world in defiance of 
common sensibility, the 
monode began to fall into 
line as a viable entity in its 
own right. Engineers and 
scientists here at Bull Lab- 
oratories have detailed its 
operating principles, and 
applications research is in 
progress at a rapid pace, 
aided by the sophisticated 
support technologies avail- 
able today, 

The basic stumbling 
block all along has been in 
the current mode assumed 
Both monodes and super- 
conductors, therefore, ex* 
hibit essentially surprising 
behavior in the macroscop- 
ic realm. 

Rather than burden the 
reader with quillets of 
theory, we will here take 
the more pragmatic and in- 
tuitive approach and de- 
scribe the appearance and 
measurement of basic mon- 
ode circuit parameters: 

Voltage — Voltage is a 
measure of electromotive 
potential difference be- 
tween two points. The volt- 
age of a monode with re- 
spect to any other point in a 
circuit can be measured 
readily enough, but the 
one-lead device cannot 
have a voltage drop as 
such Monodes do not drop 
voltage, so much as they 
never pick it up, 

Current — Current does 
not flow in monodes in the 
conventional sense. Kir- 
choff's Law still applies, 
however. The monode's 
voltage with respect to any 
other point in the circuit re- 
mains constant as long as 
currents flowing into the 
monode are equal in magni 
tude to the currents flowing 
out. The fact that both flow 
over the same lead simply 
means that conventional 
current meters register 
nothing. 

Resistance — Since this is 
defined as voltage drop per 
unit current we have a dou- 
ble dilemma, as witnessed 




; 



PER EVftMCELISTVH TOtWICELLl/FI AD. 1142 

P« Re 



(lignum,) 







E.E Bull-Private Collection 



Fig, 2, Torricelli's investigation. 



above. Is the monode's be- 
havior independent of the 
resistivity of its conductor? 
Does it display a tempera- 
ture coefficient of some 
sort? And what about het- 
erojunction effects? One 
might well ask. 

Ac measurements are al- 
so difficult, Since there is 
no externally definable cur- 
rent, how can it alternate? 
Ac monodies seemed a 
doomed cause until the in- 
vention of the alternating 
source in 1936 by Bull Labo- 
ratories founder General E. 
Fuller Bull. See Fig. 4 for op- 
erating details. Shown in 
the inset is a modern equiv- 
alent—an array of series 
connected photovoltaic 
cells is illuminated by an 
LED and mounted on a 
quartz crystal which is 
made to oscillate by a con- 
ventional oscillator circuit, 

You might now see why 
Hertz' original notion about 



ac and monodes is true. If 
we try to make a monode 
antenna, say, by topping an 
automobile radio antenna 
with a decorative foam 
ball, we are in reality going 
to be receiving signals from 
the lower segments of the 
antenna, which act as un- 
shielded conductors from 
the radio's coax connector 
to the top segment It is this 
top segment which, togeth- 
er with the foam ball, forms 
the monode. Hoping to 
force the top segment to 
become a monode/antenna 
by removing the lower seg- 
ments is of no use Now, the 
lower half of this segment is 
needed to connect the up- 
per half (the new monode) 
to the coax connector. It is 
this new unshielded con* 
ductor, of course, which 
picks up signals, Chopping 
away until only the foam 
ball remains, we at last see 
how poorly monodes func* 



132 73 Magazine * December, 1981 



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73 Magazine • December, 1981 133 



Ml (HdAen.) 



Clover* 
foodl 

or &iifta 
Battkof 



Sp^rh-fU^rJ'tmr 



£*rt* 




Fig, 3, Franklin's monodick apparatus. 



tion as antennas. 

The monode will see its 
first gamut of applications 
in the digital field, owing to 
its highly unary truth table 
and singularly consistent 
characteristics. Indeed, 
Buckminister Fuller has 
dubbed the monode "the 
unit of electrical behavior" 

As an example of its al- 
most trick logic, note Fig. 5, 
the data bandwidth dou- 
bles This feedthrough de- 
vice is crimped onto strand- 
ed hookup wire to increase 
its pulse bandwidth and 
functions as follows: 

Logic ones are conven- 
tionally communicated as 
current pulses (Comple- 
mentary codes exist, too; 
we will stick to this one for 
simplicity ,) These pulses ob- 
viously must flow over the 
low-resistance path offered 
by the wire. Logic zeroes, 
on the other hand, are rep- 
resented by an absence of 
current and thus obviously 
prefer the hrgh-resistance 
path formed by the two 
100-megohm resistors in se- 
ries, which prevent their be- 
ing swamped by ones. Since 
negligible current flows 
over this path, the two mon- 
odes terminate the path at 



source and destination for a 
healthy cost and weight 
savings over twisted pairs 
or coax. 

Monodes now largely use 
standard integrated circuit 
technologies owing to their 
availability However, new 
and more appropriate vari- 
ants are appearing, notably 
5EAMOSS (Superinsulating 
Epoxy And Metal Or Sub- 
stantial Substitute), based 
on the valence-filled NC (no 
connection) junction. 

Since monodes do not 
use conventional current, it 
must be bypassed. This was 
done at first in the power 
supply, using a hefty shunt 
resistor and an air gap or 
glass rod in series with the 
output, 

The development of the 
powerless monode did 
away with this, however. 
This three-terminal device, 
in addition to dissipating 
heat from the bypassed cur- 
rent, also dissipates "peat," 
or powerless heat, the zero- 
energy equivalent of heat 
dissipated by conventional 
current Thus, in addition to 
being mounted on an alu- 
minum heat sink with sili- 
cone grease, the device 
must also be attached to a 





ftUTifliutilJ 




Fig. 4. Early and modern alternating sources, 



transite pad with asbestos 
grease, for peat's sake, 

An even more recent de- 
velopment, allowing mon- 
ode ICs to be used in con- 
ventional circuits, is the in- 
corporation of bypass resis- 
tors into the IC case. These 
damp supply line ripple as 
an added benefit, since of- 
ten they have values on the 
order of .03 Ohms or less. 

The first digital monodies 
research was done in 1967. 
A team of Bull Laboratories 
scientists theoretically pre- 
dicted the properties of a 
monode gate which they 
proposed to call a "dis- 
latch." Upon fabrication 
and testing of the first unit, 
however, it was deemed a 
flop. 

There are two kinds of 
flop, J and K, which are 
identical, which is simply to 
add variety to texts on mon- 
ode theory and practice. 
Much of this would be 
stodgy pottage, indeed, 
without such details; the 
phenomenon is known as 
"monotony." 

The flop possesses a 
unique ability to keep cir- 
cuit complexity to a mini- 
mum. This is due to the fact 



that the output is indepen- 
dent of the input, folding its 
truth table down to a mere 
speck of ink on the printed 
page and making it highly 
noise-immune as well. The 
distinction between ripple- 
through and synchronous 
logic becomes superfluous. 

Some digital functions 
served exclusively by the 
monode and its MSI deriva- 
tives include the Cunn Ef- 
fect No-Shot Schmitt Trig- 
ger; its output is a blank 
when it is not loaded. 

The flop is also the ideal 
matrix element for the 
WOM or Write-Only Mem- 
ory. Far from being the 
white elephant many wags 
have painted it to be, it 
finds many useful applica- 
tions. It is usually function- 
ally organized as a set of in- 
terpenetrating spirals to 
form a circular file or data 
sink. 

One use, which may have 
far-reaching consequences, 
is in the capacity of a data 
terminator. Not knowing 
the inherent capacity of the 
Bit Bucket, which we must 
assume on thermodynamic 
grounds to be finite, it is 
wise to provide for the dis- 



134 73 Magazine ■ December, 1981 




f - - i 



iooriej 



D <£ 



vWA- 1 



Nwtw rttntlArJ mortodt 100 fltQ 

Bull UWvttones 



Fig. 5, Data bandwidth doubters. 



posal of spent data, rather 
than simply spraying It into 
the environment as noise. 
Future generations of com- 
puters will very likely be 
planet-sized, if not larger, 
and we are presented with 
the horrifying spectre of 
civilirations fighting over 
caches of transition-free 
space, Of course, this does 
not even take into consider- 
ation the cost of transport- 
ing it to work sites once it is 
staked out 

In the early days of com* 
puter technology, a pro- 
grammer was as often as 
not a jumper jockey, wiring 
by hand the controller 
boards used to program line 
printers and the like. The 
distinction between pro- 
gram and data was painfully 
clear. This separation is re- 
ferred to as Harvard Archi- 
tecture. Those who toiled at 
these tasks may at least 
console themselves that the 
knowledge so gained has 
been of great benefit in 
present-day technology. 
Many MSI integrated cir- 
cuits are in reality not logic 
circuits at all; like the con- 
troller boards, they are 
Readonly Memories. The 
chip engineer's job in many 



cases is reduced from te- 
dious design-from-scratch 
to literally writing functions 
onto standardized ROM 
formats. 

With flop-based ICs, this 
is destined to become an 
even greater boon. Since 
flop outputs do not follow 
their inputs, many func- 
tions to be written into 
WOMs can be deleted with- 
out any functional impair- 
ment. This has been dubbed 
Dropout Architecture. 

It is not difficult to prove 
that, using Dropout Archi- 
tecture and conventional 
ROM table-folding tech- 
niques, WOMs can be pro- 
gressively simplified to the 
point that they will vanish, 
making them extremely 
compact and versatile. Of 
course, There Ain't No Such 
Thing As A Free Lunch, as 
they say in the vernacular, 
in most cases, the ICs sup- 
ply bypass resistors will not 
share in these logic-derived 
benefits. Hefty power sup- 
plies will thus remain the 
rule, given the degree of 
supply bypassing previous- 
ly mentioned. Also, good 
design practice will still call 
for at least a label to indi- 




Fig. 6 Vanished "Hop-flip" case WOM. Case design would 

be unwieldy if chip existed. 



cate the choice of WOM 
not to be used. Fig. 6 shows 
a vanished WOM as it may 
appear and demonstrates 
an unusual benefit of the 
concept Proposed case 
outline MO-223 is a "flop- 
flip" case which can be not 
used in either a dual-inline 
or quad-inline circuit board 
location, 

Monodes entered the 
linear realm in 1972 with 
the invention of the Zero- 
Current Source. It is real- 
ized in chip form as two 
powerless monodes in a to- 
tem-pole arrangement, pro- 
viding a 100% offset with 
respect to both supply and 
ground simultaneously. 

This makes possible the 
infinite-output-impedance 
NOP-amp, which is ideally 
suited for unity gain appli- 
cations since the output im- 
pedance matches the input 
impedance. As long as no 
disturbing input signal is 
present, distortion is ex- 
tremely low. 

Other unique devices are 
exemplified in designs now 
on the drawing board at Na- 
tionable Nonconductor, a 
Bull Laboratories subsidiary. 
For example, the NN3160 



and NN3161 are, respec- 
tively, a suppressed-lead- 
ing-zero-to-analog convert- 
er and its trail ing-zero sis- 
ter The NN31246 is an In- 
definitely Long Delay Line 
or "Collander Brigade/' It is 
actually a 1xN analog shift 
WOM, of course. It is used 
to shunt signal quiescent 
periods away from sensing 
circuit inputs. 

A German research group 
has recently achieved a 
combination theory/prac- 
tice coup with the develop- 
ment of the C999, This 
Gottdeschaft device is a tri- 
ple negator and is used to 
cast out nines in decimal 
arithmetic units. 

We can expect the mon- 
ode to flood the market- 
place soon, one-upping 
many current two-lead de- 
vices. With the prospect in 
sight of a complete engi- 
neering revolution, as Drop- 
out Architecture's charac- 
teristic philosophy of mate- 
rial economy is applied to 
many other disciplines, 
physical technology itself 
will become a thing to be 
avoided. We will be ushered 
into a new Eden and rejoice 
in Eternal Oneness,! 



73 Magazine • December, 1981 135 



Michael 
PO Box 245 

Port Washington NY 11050 



Breaking the Decibel Logjam 

how to cope with nothingness 



The purpose of this arti- 
cle is to clarify what a 
decibel is and to explain 
why it acts the way it does. 
The average amateur seems 
to encounter difficulty 
when studying the subject. 
It is sometimes difficult to 
grasp the decibel because 
of its "nothingness/' It has 
no weight, it cannot be 
seen, and its taste and smell 
are nonexistent. 

Before going any further, 
it might be well to state that 
the decibel is a ratio, noth- 
ing more and nothing less. 
It merely represents the re- 
lationship between two 
quantities of energy. Unlike 
the meter, the pound, or the 
quart, it has no counterpart 
in wood or metal in the Bu- 
reau of Standards. It is an 
arbitrary standard original- 
ly set up by telephone engi- 
neers for their convenience 
in making measurements 
and calculations. 

The decibel is similar to 
the old "transmission unit" 
used for measuring the effi- 
ciency of telephone cir- 

136 73 Magazine • December 



cuits. The original unit was 
equal to the loss in a mile of 
standard telephone cable 
This mile of cable was used 
to compare the losses or 
gains in a circuit. 

The mile of standard ca- 
ble was too bulky to keep 
around so it was replaced 
by its electrical equivalent: 
an artificial line with a resis- 
tance of 88 Ohms and a ca- 
pacitance of 0.054 uF. For 
measuring purposes, the 
combination of these units 
was equal to a mile of stan- 
dard cable, If the input to a 
circuit was increased, the 
amount of increase could 
be measured by the number 
of mile-units which had to 
be inserted to bring the out- 
put back to the original 
level. 

The greatest defect of 
the mile of cable is that the 
cable, having a certain 
amount of inductance and 
capacitance, does not have 
a flat frequency response, 
and transmission efficiency 
depends upon frequency as 
well as power, In working 

1981 



with new types of circuits, 
there was a great need for a 
new unit of transmission 
which was independent of 
frequency. One was needed 
which was based on power 
alone, since the gain or loss 
in power is the true index of 
efficiency. 

Another measurement 
scale was devised and the 
basic unit of transmission, 
by agreement among the 
engineers, was the fee/. It 
was given this name in hon- 
or of Alexander Graham 
Bell, the inventor of the 
telephone. In common 
practice, one tenth of this 
fundamental unit is used; it 
is called the decibel and 
goes by the abbreviation 
dB, 

The decibel is a natural 
unit based on the way our 
ears respond to various 
sound levels. We rate the 
efficiency and power out- 
put of apparatus in Watts, 
but our ears do not respond 
to sound energy the same 
way a meter does. Instead 
of responding in direct pro- 
portion to the wattage, our 



ears respond logarithmical- 
ly with respect to the pow- 
er. 

For those who may have 
become a bit doubtful 
about their algebra, a little 
review may be in order be- 
fore continuing with the dis- 
cussion. 

Use of Logarithms 

The common system of 
logarithms uses ten as a 
base. The logarithm of a 
number is the power to 
which ten, the base, must 
be raised to equal the num- 
ber. For example, ten 
squared, or ten raised to the 
second power (10 2 ), equals 
100. Thus, the logarithm of 
100 is 2, If we raise ten to 
the third power, we have 
1000 (10 J = 1000k so the 
logarithm of 1000 is 3. 

The number which we 
have just found is called the 
characteristic of the loga- 
rithm and always has a val- 
ue of one less than the num- 
ber of digits in the given 
number. 1000 has four dig- 
its and so the characteristic 
of its logarithm is 3. Unless 



the given number is a direct 
power of 10, its logarithm 
consists of the characteris- 
tic followed by a decimal 
number known as a mantis- 
sa, which must be found by 
use of a table of logarithms. 
If we want to find the loga- 
rithm of 775, we know that 
the characteristic is one less 
than the number of digits so 
that makes it 2, By referring 
to a log table we find the 
mantissa to be ,8893 so the 
log of 775 is 28893. This 
means that if 10 were raised 
to the 2.8893 power, the re- 
sult would be 775. Numbers 
may be multiplied by add- 
ing their logarithms or they 
may be divided by subtract- 
ing their logarithms. 

Returning to the discus- 
sion of the decibel, suppose 
we had an amplifier with an 
even 1000 milliwatts out- 
put If the output were re- 
duced the least amount de- 
tectable by a sensitive ear, 
we would find that it had 
been reduced to about 794 
milliwatts, or to 794 of the 
original power. If once 
again the power were re- 
duced the slightest amount 
detectable by the ear (a 
good ear) and the output 
measured again, we would 
find that the power had 
been reduced to 0.794 of 
the 794 milliwatts, or to 
630 of the original power, 
[f we go so far as to reduce 
power another step, we find 
that the power has been re- 
duced to 500 milliwatts, or 
to one-half of the original 
amount. It took three steps 
(reductions of power) to re- 
duce the original power to 
one-half its value. 

The decibel, which is the 
new unit of transmission or 
power ratio, is supposed to 
be the smallest change in 
power that is audible to the 
trained ear. The formula for 
finding the decibel of a ra- 
tio between two power lev- 
els is: dB = 10 log 10 
(power,/power 3 ). 

Power 1 and power 2 rep- 
resent power before and af- 

*-Sae List of Adwftt*rs art page 162 



ter it has been reduced or 
increased. When substitut- 
ing, if the larger of the two 
is always placed on top, it 
will simplify solution. If we 
substitute 1000 milliwatts 
for p! and 794 milliwatts for 
p 2 , we will have the follow- 
ing: 
dB = 10 log, ,1000/794 
= 10log 10 1J59. 

The log of 1.259 is 0.100, 
sodB = 10 X 0.1, or, dB = 
1 

In substituting for the 
second and third reduc- 
tions, we find that we have 
reductions of 2 and 3 dB, re- 
spectively. This then gives 
us an approximate scale 
that is easy to remember: 
One dB reduces the power 
to 4/5ths of the original, two 
dB reduces it to 2/3rds of 
the original, and a reduc- 
tion of three dB brings the 
power down to one-half of 
the original. 

Practical Examples 

If these power ratios are 
memorized, almost any dB 
loss or gain can be figured 
quickly, For example, what 
power ratio would be repre- 
sented by a loss of 9 dB? A 
9-dB loss would be the 
same as three 3-d B losses 
Remembering that a 3^dB 
loss equals a power ratio of 
1/2 and also remembering 
that when the logarithms of 
a number are added the 
numbers are multiplied, we 
find the following: 

3dB + 3dB + 3dB 
= 1/2 x 1/2 x 1/2 = 9dB 

= power ratio of 1/8. 

To find the power ratio of 
a 7-dB loss we have the 
same as a 3-d B, 3-d B, and 
1-dB loss, so: 

3dB + 3dB + 1 dB 

= 1/2 X 1/2 x 4/5 = 7dB 
= power ratio of 1/5. 

When solving for gain, 
the problem is figured for 
an equivalent loss and the 
resulting power ratio is in- 
verted, For example, to find 
the power ratio of a gain of 
ten dB, we have to find a 
change of 3 dB, 3 dB, 3 dB, 



and 1 dB, so it follows that 

3dB + 3dB + 3dB + 1 dB 

= 1/2 X 1/2 X 1/2 x 4/5 

= 10 dB = 1/10. 

Inverting: 10 dB gain = 

power ratio of 10. 

This is another common 
ratio that should be com- 
mitted to memory, and it is 
easy to remember 10 dB 
equals a power ratio of 10 

Voltage or Current Ratios 

The formula so far has 
been for finding the decibel 
direct from the power mea- 
surements. When voltage 
or current readings are to 
be used in place of power, 
the formula must be 
changed to read: 

dB m 20\og^(y,fV 2 l 

The power in a circuit is 
proportional to the square 
of the voltage or current. As 
stated before, adding of the 
logarithm of a number to 
that of another multiplies 
the numbers, so two times 
the logarithm of the voltage 



or current ratio squares it 
and gives us the power ra- 
tio. Current values may be 
substituted for V 1 and V 2 , 
When using voltage or cur- 
rent values in the formula it 
is considered that the input 
and output impedances are 
the same. 

By substituting in the for- 
mula for power, we can 
work out the following 
table. 



Decibels 


Power 


Gain 


Ratio 





1 


1 


1.25 


10 


10 


20 


100 


30 


1000 


40 


10000 



By this we find that each 
time the level in decibels is 
increased by ten, the power 
is multiplied by ten. To in- 
crease the audio output of 
a piece of equipment by 40 
audible steps, or by 40 dB, 
the power output must be 
increased 10,000 times ■ 



Two-meter H.T. Amplifier Kit 






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Class C or AB1 



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QRO ENGINEERING Uk SEaSi£ 107 



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MM HELP 



I recently purchased an old 
Hallicrafters linear amplifier, 
Model HT 41. I need to get a 
copy of the schematics and, if 
possible, operating instruc- 
tions. If anyone can furnish 
these, I will gladly pay costs. 
Thank you. 

Glenn Churchill KA2IOI 

1 Meadow Rd. 

Hudson Falls NY 1 2839 



I need a schematic for a Navy 
RBH-2 general-coverage system 
CNA46188 receiver manufac- 
tured by National under its own 
model number NC154M. I am 
willing to pay a reasonable 
amount for the schematic and 
manual. Thank you. 

Terron 
9301 SW 4th St, 21 9 

Miami FL 33174 



73 Magazine • December, 1981 137 



Less Drain Is Your Gain! 

power-saving mods for the Wilson II and IV 



Photos by N3IC 




Scope display of power saver in action. Top trace — receiver power. Bottom trace- 
squelch voltage. 

138 73 Magazine • December, 1981 



Robin Becker KAJW 
2912 N> Calvert Street 
Baltimore MD 21218 



Wilson Mark II and 
Mark (V hand-helds 
are excellent performers. In 
many ways, they rival the 
premier Motorola HT-22Qs 
One way in which the Wil- 
son units come up short is 
on standby current. Wilson 
specifies the standby cur- 
rent at 15 mA; mine draws 
about 22 mA normally. A 
call to the factory con- 
firmed that this is par. While 
respectable, 22 mA, or 15 
mA for that matter, just 
doesn't compare to the 
HT-220's standby current of 
3.5 mA. Recently, while 
making a modification sug- 
gested by Wilson to reduce 
distortion in the audio 
stages, I decided to do 



something about this. The 
result was a reduction of 
the standby current to the 
outstanding level of 4 mA. 
Perhaps even more incredi- 
ble, the modification re- 
quires only about $2 worth 
of parts and just a slight wir- 
ing change to the circuit 
board f The details of the 
modification are described 
below, along with two other 
changes which conserve 
power on receive and trans- 
mit. 

The basic idea behind the 
modification is to switch 
off the power to most of the 
receiver as much of the 
time as possible, switching 
it on periodically for a brief 
instant to check for a re- 
ceived signal. When the re- 
ceiver is powered up, the 
presence of a quieted signal 
keeps it on and the absence 
of a signal turns it off again. 
Once turned off, the receiv- 
er is powered up again after 
a delay and the process re- 
peats If the turn-off occurs 
quickly compared to the 
time between successive 
turn-ons, substantial power 
savings result 

To implement this idea, 
logically it would seem that 
checking the squelch volt- 
age of the receiver would 
be sufficient to determine if 
a signal is present In fact, 
this Is the scheme that most 
scanners use to check for 
busy channels. However, to 
prevent noise bursts from 
coming through, squelch 
circuits open only after the 
presence of a continuous 
quieted signal for some 
fixed time period. Wilson 
set this time period to be 
from 40 to 1 20 ms, depend- 
ing on the squelch control 
setting. The squelch action 
of the Wilson HT is depict- 
ed in Fig, 1, which shows the 
voltage at the collector of 
Q14 for various signal con* 
ditions. If the squelch con- 
trol is set as tight as possi- 
ble, the receiver would 
have to be powered for 120 
ms before the squelch volt- 
age would indicate the 




presence of a signal. Thus 
the minimum power-on 
time would be about 120 
ms. 

To realize significant 
power savings, the receiver 
must be off for much longer 
periods than it is on If the 
receiver power-on period is 
set to 120 ms, the power-off 
period must be set to 1 sec- 
ond or longer. This is not ac- 
ceptable, since it results, on 
average, in the loss of the 
first 500 ms of any transmis- 
sion. If the power-on period 
could be shortened, how- 
ever, the power-off period 
could also be shortened, 
and hence the amount of 
any transmission that is 
missed would be reduced 
A power-on period of 10 ms 
followed by a power-off 
period of 200 ms, for exam- 
ple, would result in the loss 
of only 100 ms of signal on 
average, while still reducing 
power consumption consid- 
erably, A loss of 100 ms cor- 
responds to about one-half 
of a syllable and is not sig- 
nificant In fact this is com* 
parable to the amount of 



Top view of completed hoard, 

signal lost in normal opera- 
tion due to the response 
time of the squelch circuit 
(see Fig, 1 and note the time 
delay from signal onset to 
squelch opening). 

Thus, to design a success- 
ful power-saving circuit, a 
method of reducing the re- 
quired power-on time must 
be found. Although the 
squelch circuit of the re- 
ceiver takes up to 1 20 ms to 
open, it closes in at most 15 
ms (the squelch circuit 
closes in about 5 ms if the 
squelch control is set as 
tight as possible). There- 
fore, if instead of waiting 
for the squelch to open 
when the receiver is pow- 



ered, we instead somehow 
start with the squelch open 
and only wait for it to close, 
the power-on periods could 
be reduced to 15 ms or less. 
This coupled with power- 
off periods of 200 ms would 
yield fairly fast response 
and dramatic power sav- 
ings Unfortunately, the 
Wilson's squelch circuit al- 
ways closes after the receiv- 
er is powered. However, if 
the squelch circuit itself is 
always powered during re- 
ceive and the rest of the re- 
ceiver is powered up at in- 
tervals of more than 120 ms 
(the maximum time it takes 
for the squelch to open), 
then the squelch would 



Tf$HT SQUllCH 



NO SIGNAL 



SQUELCH 
VOLTAGE 



SIGNAL- 



NO SkGMAL 



/ 



SQUELCH 



LOOSE SQUELCH 



SQUELCH 
VOLTAGE 



SQUELCH 



i?Cmi 



CLOSED 



1 



-* OPEN 



/ 



^ 



CLOSED — * 



5mi 
CLOSED 



\ 



• 



OPEN 



19 mi 
CLOSED 



Fig. 1 , Squelch action before modification. 

73 Magazine • December, 1961 139 



■™ 




Bottom view of completed board showing method of installation in HT. 



always be open at the in- 
stant that the receiver is 
powered. The operation of 
such a system is shown in 
Fig 2. 

Although the system now 
seems complete, another 
problem has been intro- 
duced. Since the audio 
stages are turned on and 
draw power whenever the 
squelch is open, some addi- 
tional method must be used 
to keep the audio stages 
turned off during the time 
when the squelch is open 



and the receiver is not 
powered. This problem 
turns out to be easily over- 
come by allowing the re- 
ceiver power control signal 
to act as an auxiliary 
squelch control signal. In 
this way, the squelch con- 
trol signal is kept closed 
when the receiver is not 
powered. When the receiv- 
er is powered, normal 
squelch action controls the 
audio stages. 

A block diagram of the 
circuit is shown in Fig 3 



■MO SIGNAL 



SIGNAL 



^f»— NO SIGNAL 



RECEIVER 
POWfR 



•^200 mi 



SQUELCH 
VOLTAGE 



-I 



JOO 



-I 



*-ZOO 



SQUELCH -OPE 



4 4-c-l- 4- 



..-ii 



OPEN 



L_/L 

*|* -| OPEN [*C 



OPEN kCLOSCD 



CLOSED CLOSED 



CLOSED 



Fig. Z Squelch action after modification. 



SQUELCH 
tMFUT 



EQUELCH 
fUTKFACE 



H 



200 mS 
0**E-SHOT 



RECEIVER 
POWER 

SWITCH 

I fc *tf* SQUELCH 1 PTT 

OUTPUT »»*UT 



RECEIVER 
PO*FR OUTPUT 



Fig. 3. System block diagram. 



The squelch interface con- 
verts the squelch signal to 
logic levels and to some ex- 
tent duplicates the squelch 
control stage of the HT 
This is necessary because 
the solution to the problem 
mentioned above keeps the 
receiver squelch control 
stage clamped while the re- 
ceiver is not powered. The 
squelch interface circuit 
triggers the one-shot when 
the squelch closes. The one- 
shot sets the length of the 
power-off period. It also is 
used to keep the audio 
stages off during power-off 
periods via the auxiliary 
squelch output When the 
one-shot is inactive and the 
HT is in receive mode (PTT 
is high), the receiver power 
switch is closed and B+ is 
applied to the receiver 
When the one-shot fires or 
when the HT goes into 
transmit mode (PTT is low), 
the power switch opens and 
the receiver is turned off. 

The complete circuit is 
shown in Fig, 4. Transistor 
Q1 converts the squelch 
voltage to - 12 volts. The< 



one-shot is made from two 
Schmitt- trigger NAND 
gates, U1A and U1B These 
gates are very useful for 
fashioning one-shots and 
oscillators, and the spare 
gate can be used in some 
future project. When the 
output of U1B is low, it 
shuts off the audio stages 
through diode D2. U1C con- 
trols the receiver power via 
transistor Q2. The power 
pulsing action can be dis- 
abled by closing switch S1 
This keeps Q1 off, prevent- 
ing the one-shot from firing. 

The entire circuit easily 
fits into the area reserved 
for a tone encoder. Con- 
struction is quick using a 
perfboard, and a suggested 
parts layout is shown in Fig. 
5. I soldered the IC directly 
into the circuit although 
the board might still fit if a 
molex™ or a low-profile 
socket is used. Both unused 
gate inputs on U1 (pins 1 
and 2) must be tied high or 
grounded. I used 1/4 -Watt 
resistors and tantalum ca- 
pacitors because of their 
small size. All parts are 
readily available from 
many suppliers. One sup- 
plier is Digi-Key, PO Box 
677, Thief River Falls MN 
56701 i 

The wiring is as follows: 
Disconnect the wire from 
the emitter of Q29 (upper 
right of the circuit board) to 
the junction of R5, R6, R9, 
R11, R13, R14, and C46 
(middle of the circuit 
board) Connect + V on the 
new board to the collector 
of Q29 Connect the collec- 
tor of Q2 on the new board 
to the junction of the com- 
ponents listed above. Con- 
nect the PTT input on the 
new board to the emitter of 
Q29 Connect the squelch 
input on the new board to 
the collector of Q13 (near 
the top of the circuit 
board). Connect the auxilia- 
ry squelch output of the 
new board to the collector 
of Q1 4 (upper left of the cir- 
cuit board). Finally, con- 
nect the ground on the new 
board to the circuit board 



140 73 Magazine * December, 1981 



ground somewhere near 
Q14 (the exact location is 
not critical). 

If the disable function is 
desired, a small slide switch 
can be mounted on the perf- 
board. The switch should 
be bonded to the board 
(epoxy works fine). By cut- 
ting a notch in the case 
within the battery compart- 
ment, the switch can be 
conveniently reached with- 
out disassembling the case. 

Circuit operation can be 
checked by observing the 
one-shot output (pin 11 on 
U1) on an oscilloscope. 
With the HT turned on and 
the squelch control fully 
clockwise, a pulse train 
should be observed. The 
pulse should be high for 
about 5 ms and low for 
about 200 ms, Next, rotate 
the squelch control to its 
fully counterclockwise po- 
sition. The one-shot output 
should stay high and the re- 
ceiver squelch should open. 

If all is well, install the 
perfboard in the HT. The 
board may be glued in 
place if desired, although I 
have not found this to be 
necessary Insulate the 
perfboard from the circuit 
board using cardboard, 
foam, etc. 

The completed unit 
draws around 3.5 mA dur- 
ing power-off periods and 
normal receiver current (22 
mA in my case) during pow- 
er-on periods. With the 
squelch control pegged, the 
duty cycle is 5 percent or 
so, and as a result the aver- 
age current should be ap- 
proximately 4.5 mA. Mea- 
surement in the lab con- 
firmed this figure. The HT 
was also tested on a Cush- 
man, and no change in re- 
ceiver sensitivity was ob- 
served when switching be- 
tween pulse mode and nor- 
mal mode. 

Once installed, the oper- 
ation of the circuit can be 
verified by rotating the 
squelch control until the 
squelch threshold is just 
reached. Periodic noise 
pulses should be heard 



50UELCH 
INPUT 




RECCWER 
POWER OUTPUT 



AUX SOUELCH 
OUTPUT 



from the speaker if the 
squelch control is set right 
on the edge between open 
and closed. Otherwise, 
you'll never know it's work- 
ing unless you keep track of 
how often your batteries 
run downl 

Now on to some changes 
on the circuit board. These 
changes are not that easy 
and are only recommended 
for those persons experi- 
enced with tight circuit- 
board work. Although the 
changes only involve sub- 
stitution of components, 
access is difficult due to the 
cramped quarters With a 
little care they may be per- 
formed successfully, 

The first change further 
reduces receiver standby 
current drain, although on- 
ly by a little more than 5 
mA (from 4,5 to 4 mA). 
Change R48 from 18k to 
100k R50 should now be 
adjusted so that the audio 
output clips symmetrically. 
A value of 270k worked for 
me- A side effect of this 
modification is that the 
time it takes the squelch to 
open is increased by about 
20 ms + C57 could be re- 
duced to compensate for 
this, but then the squelch 
would close on shorter 
noise pulses than it did 
originally. I suggest leaving 
C57 at 1 uF, since the added 
time is not significant. 
Although this modification 
can be made without in- 
stalling the power pulsing 
circuitry, the benefit would 
be marginal in that case. 

The second change re- 
duces transmit current by 
about 20 mA. Change R93 



Ui- CD*033 or Ut*093 
PM T CHD 

ptn W *V 



Fig. 4. Power pa her schematic. 



[ZjH 




czn 



Fig. 5. Parts layout top view. 



from 470 to 4.7k. This 
change cannot be made 
unless the power pulsing 
circuitry has been installed. 
A similar savings in transmit 
current can be achieved 
without installing the 
power pulser, however, at 
the cost of about .7 V lower 
receiver voltage, by chang- 
ing Q29 to a Darlington 
(such as an MPS A13) and 
increasing R93 to 10k. 

In conclusion, I see no 
reason why the receiver 
power pulsing idea could 
not be adapted to other 
HTs. For synthesized HTs, 



power would have to be 
maintained to the synthe- 
sizer, since the lock-up 
times are probably on the 
order of 100 ms, Give it a 
try! 

Finally, I'd like to ac- 
knowledge the help of 
N3IC in kicking ideas 
around, designing circuits, 
and taking the photos, and 
also thank N3TE for spark- 
ing the whole process. ■ 

Reference 

Wilson Mark It and Mark IV 

Operation and Service Manual, 
Wilson Electronics Corp., 1978. 







Wew of switch cut-out in battery compartment. 






73 Magazine • December. 1981 t41 



Joel ischmann K9MLD 
8204 North 93rd Si. 
Milwaukee Wl 53224 



A Positive Supply 
with a Negative Chip 

one way to solve the parts problem 



From time to time you, 
like myself, have gotten 
into a situation where your 
junk box just did not have 
the right parts needed to 
build a project. You found 
yourself needing some criti- 
cal components not imme- 
diately available from the 
parts store — or maybe it's 
9:00 pm F Sunday night 

Well, this is a story about 
such a situation which I 
wish to share with you. 



One evening, while work- 
ing on a new ATV trans- 
mitter, I had a requirement 
for a good regulated power 
supply. A look into my junk 
box revealed a shortage of 
positive-reference regula- 
tors. 

Again, one of Edsel Mur- 
phy's laws prevailed: "If 
working on a new design, 
the most critical part wit! be 
missing." (Well, if that isn't 
one of Murphy's laws, it 




Fig. 1. 




20VDC 



F *r 



Fig. 2. 

142 73 Magazine • December, 1981 



sure is one of mine.) Staring 
into the junk box, I recog- 
nized some LM-337 regula- 
tors. This regulator is a neg- 
ative-reference voltage 
device, but did this matter? 

I walked over to the 
blackboard and quickly 
drew a schematic of a neg- 
ative-regulated supply (Fig. 
1). It became obvious that 
there was no reason not to 
use it. I located the other 
components needed for this 
power supply — which I 
was planning to make ad- 
justable to 135 volts— and 
laid out a breadboard. 

While working on the 
breadboard, certain bene- 
fits of this type of design 
suddenly became evident. 
Notice in the schematic 
that I have utilized collec- 
tor feedback for good regu- 
lation. (Of course, this re- 
quired a more available 
NPN transistor, as least as 
far as my junk box is con- 
cerned.) Now that is the first 
plus. The second plus in this 
design is the fact that we 
can ground to the chassis 
the collector of the pass 
transistor (Fig, 2). Plus 
number three: using a TO-3 
package allowed me to 
eliminate any need for iso- 
lating the case of the pass 
transistor as is required by 



every other supply. 

Wouldn't you think, with 
all these pluses, that 
although this supply uses a 
negative regulator it should 
come out plus? Hi! 

In previous designs (see 
"More Power to You/' 73, 
August, 1979), I discussed 
details of regulated sup- 
plies, current limit, regula- 
tors, crowbar circuits, etc. I 
wish to keep this design 
simple and very basic. With 
that in mind, let's examine 
it briefly. 

The transformer is an 
18-V, 4-Amp unit purchased 
at Radio Shack (PN 273- 
1514). Referring to Fig. 3, we 
can see the calculations to 
the rectifier assembly This 
rectifier bridge is from Ra- 
dio Shack (PN 276-1171) 
and has a rating of 100 piv 
at 4 Amps, 

A good rule of thumb for 
the filter capacitor is ap- 
proximately 3000 uF per 
Amp. With this 4-Amp sup- 
ply, I paralleled four 3300- 
uF units from my junk box 

Referring to Fig, 4 r we 
can calculate the dissipa- 
tion of the pass transistor to 
determine the proper heat- 
sink rating. Starting with a 
dc level of 25 volts from the 
unregulated supply and a 
regulated output of 13.5 V, 



(tVAC *I4*252VDC 




J0VAC 



Dl 



F/g. 3. Full-wave bridge, 
filtered and unregulated. 



Z5VDC 
UNREGULATED 




E«« UHV> « ] L Qi{>{ZAllfn ■ 23 WATTS 

f ig. < 

the difference voltage 
across the pass transistor 
will be 11.5 V The product 
of the difference voltage 
and the load current will be 
the power dissipation, in 
Watts, by the power tran- 
sistor For example, 11.5 V 
X 2 Amps {load current) 
equals 23 Watts of heat in 
the transistor With this in 
mind, I would recommend 
a 100-Watt power transistor 
like Radio Shack's PN 
276-2039. A companion 
heat sink could be the 
Radio Shack Universal {PN 
276-1 361 ), 

The remaining parts are 
not magic. Any Yi-Watt 
resistor can be used for the 
regulator bias Due to the 
fact that the supply was 
designed for 4 Amps, the 
LM-337 requires a heat sink 
to handle about 3 Watts 
(Radio Shack PN 276-1363). 

The only cautions to be 
exercised to keep the 3-lead 
regulator stable are lead 
length, wire routing, and 
grounding. Ground loops 
and stray current paths can 
cause stability problems 
resulting in the regulator 
not functioning under load, 
so lay out your package 
carefully. 

Edsel Murphy may have 
the corner on the unusual- 
situation market, but I have 
the first on a negative com- 
ing out positive!! 

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•Telephone: (203) 5266324 



73 Magazine • December, 1981 143 



\981 INDEX 



Compiled by: 
Jell DeTray WB88TH 
Tim Daniel N8RK 



AMPLIFIERS 

HA-202 GOES TO 220 MHZ 
THE GREEN GALLON 

ANTENNAS & PROPAGATION 

FOUR-BAND MOBILE ANTENNA 

TWO STATIONS, ONE ANTENNA 

THE ZL/DF SPECIAL 

FLEXI-PLANE ANTENNA 

ROTATOR RESCUE MISSION 

PERFECT PARABOLAS 

TWO-METER ANTENNAS 

THE 440-MHZ CURTAIN 

PARABOLIC MOUNT 

MULTIBAND GROUNDPLANE 

DISH IT OUT 

THE EARTH MOVER 

SAILING THE TRIBAND SLOPER 

STAY TUNED 

INSIDE COAX 

"NO ANTENNAS" ANTENNA 

DIGITAL CONTROL FOR BAM III 

ABOUT THE BEVERAGE 

DESIGN-A-DISH 

SHRINKING ANTENNA 

THE CCD ANTENNA 

THE BOBTAIL: ROUND THREE 

QRM-PREE ANTENNA TUNING 

SOLAR ALIGNMENT TOOL 

THE BETTER VERTICAL 

FOLDED UNIPOLE FOR 160 

PROPAGATION PROPHECY 

RINGO RANGER REDUX 

TRAVELING HAM'S ANTENNA 

ANTENNAS FOR BEGINNERS 

"CHOPSTICK" HELICAL FOR 432 



AMPLIFIER CONVERSION 
811A LINEAR AMP PROJECT 



SHARING SCHEME 

TRANSMITTER HUNT ANTENNA 

FOR 2-METER HT'S 

BRAKE MOD 

DISH DESIGN 

OMNIDIRECTIONAL THEORY 

TWO- BAY COLLINEAR 

HYDRAULIC SYSTEM 

OPEN WIRE FEED 

PARABOLIC REFLECTOR 

PARASITIC REFLECTORS 

HALF -WAVES FOR BOATS 

THREE TUNER PROJECTS 

QUALITY AND CONSTRUCTION 

INVISIBLE COAXIAL DIPOLE 

MOD FOR HAM III ROTOR 

RECEIVING ANTENNAS 

BASIC PROGRAM: PARABOLICS 

VERTICAL TOP HAT 

THEORY PLUS Q & A 

INVERTED BOBTAIL 

INEXPENSIVE NOISE BRIDGE 

FIND TRUE NORTH 

ELEVATED FEED 

TOP LOADED RADIATOR 

CALCULATE THE MUF 

ADDING RADIALS 

COVERS ALL BANDS 

NOT FOR NOVICES ONLY 

GETTING READY FOR PHASE III 



WA5VJB 


OCT 


48 


W3BYM 


OCT 


56 


K5PTC 


JAN 


129 


WA4RRB, WB4INC 


FEB 


70 


AD6Z 


MAR 


40 


N1PL 


MAR 


80 


K4GOK 


APR 


74 


W4UFT 


APR 


90 


WHS 


MAY 


12 


WA90ZC 


MAY 


22 


WD 4 MR J, KA4JYD 


MAY 


28 


W1GV 


MAY 


36 


W4NK 


MAY 


42 


W8HXR 


MAY 


46 


W8KXW 


MAY 


50 


STAFF 


MAY 


58 


WB6MMV/7 


MAY 


78 


WA9BBX 


MAY 


82 


WA0PBQ 


JUN 


18 


W2XQ 


JUN 


68 


W3KH 


JUN 


72 


W1GV/4 


JUL 


44 


W4FD, W4ATE 


JUL 


50 


W6RCL 


JUL 


92 


STAFF 


AUG 


40 


K6BW 


AUG 


48 


WD9AHH 


AUG 


94 


WB6ZYK 


OCT 


28 


AK0Q 


OCT 


70 


W1HHF 


OCT 


137 


W3JIP 


NOV 


100 


N1II 


DEC 


74 


9M2CR 


DEC 


116 



ATV & SSTV 

SLOW-SCAN BITS & BYTES 
SSTV SIGNAL ANALYZER 



MICROPROCESSOR & SSTV 
CHECK YOUR SIG 



K6AEP 

K7YZZ 



MAY 

NOV 



84 

46 



CB CONVERSIONS 

CB TO 10 AND BEYOND 

CB TO 10 

CYBERNET TEN-METER OFFSET 

CB-TO-10 



USE WITH 432 TRANSVERTER 
FART XXX: MIDLAND 13-866 
REPEATER OFFSET 
PART XXXI: SIMPLE OFFSETS 



WB3CDE 


MAR 


84 


GRANT 


APR 


104 


K3NXU 


AUG 


66 


WA7 ZGP 


NOV 


56 



CONSTRUCTION PRACTICES 

ALUMINUM COVERUP 

FLEXIBLE COUPLINGS 

HAM SHACK DESIGN FOR NOVICE 



PAINTING ALUMINUM WB0YTH 

COUPLING TWO CONTROL SHAFTS WB6GZW 
TIPS FOR EVERYONE Nil I 



MAR 
JUL 
NOV 



62 
90 
42 



CORRECTIONS AND FURTHER INFORMATION 

"SINGLE-TONE PAGING FOR WILSON HTS" (DEC 80) 
144 73 Magazine • December, 1981 



JAN 160 



tf 
n 



ii 



■i 
ii 



THE ODD COUPLE* (NOV 80) 

THE SWEET SOUNDING PROBE" (JUL 80) 

SUPER DUPER FOR FIELD DAY* (NOV 80) 

TRACKER - THE ULTIMATE OSCAR FINDER" (JAN 81) 

CB TO 10 - PART XXIX* (SEP 80) 

S-F MOD KITS* (JAN 81) 

A PROGRAMMER'S POTPOURRI" (SEP 80) 

CHEAP AND SIMPLE" (JAN 81) 

OPERATING OVERSEAS" (FEB 81) 

THE EARTH MOVER" (MAY 81) 

2L/DF SPECIAL* (MAR 81) 

THE NICAD CONDITIONER* (APR 81) 

MAYDAY 1" (JUN 81) 

THE ROBOT 80 0H" (AUG 81) 

QRM-FREE ANTENNA TUNING" (AUG 81) 

KENWOOD'S TR-9000" (AUG 81) 

THAT THEY MIGHT COMMUNICATE" (SEP 81) 

THE CONTEST COOKBOOK" (SEP 81) 

CONTROLLED CHAOS" (OCT 81) 

FOLDED UNI POLE FOR 160" (OCT 81) 

TRS-80: YOUR ELECTRONIC BRASSPOUNDER" (SEP 81) 



FEB 


124 


MAR 


106 


MAR 


106 


MAR 


106 


MAR 


106 


APR 


17 


APR 


17 


APR 


17 


JUL 


141 


JUL 


141 


JUL 


141 


AUG 


137 


AUG 


137 


SEP 


119 


SEP 


119 


NOV 


161 


NOV 


161 


NOV 


161 


NOV 


161 


DEC 


168 


DEC 


193 



cw 



SUPERNOVA STATION ORGANIZER 

ELECTRONIC BRASSPOUNDER 

KEYER MAGIC 

CW MUSIC KEYBOARD UPDATE 

THE CODE PET 

NO MORE TWO-TONE SIDETONE 



QRP ACCESSORY 

CW FOR LEVEL I TRS-80 

ALL TTL CW KEYER 

A GOOD DESIGN GETS BETTER 

CW ON YOUR COMMODORE 

AEA KEYER IMPROVEMENT 



W3BYM 

N0AGX 

N5DY 

K5KL 

AA0G 

KA1LR 



AUG 


26 


SEP 


90 


OCT 


80 


DEC 


20 


DEC 


126 


DEC 


128 



EQUIPMENT MODIFICATIONS 



POWER PLUS FOR THE OMNI 
OFFSETS FOR THE KDK-2015R 
A PATCH FOR THE TS-120S 
BETTER PILOT LIGHTS 
TR-7400 BEHIND BARS 
END TO REPEATER TIMEOUTS 
LIGHT-OPERATED RELAY 
ROTATOR RESCUE MISSION 
HELP FOR THE HW-2036 
TOUCH-TUNE 

DIGITAL CONTROL FOR HAM III 
MAXIMIZE THAT MULTIMETER 
ICING ON THE IC-2A CAKE 
IC-2A ACCESSORIES 
TRICK ING-OUT THE FT-901/902 
HA-202 GOES TO 220 MHZ 
MORE PUNCH FOR THE HW-101 
NEW HORIZONS FOR THE HW-8 
NEW FREQS. FOR THE IC-2 
MODS FOR THE CLIPPERTON-L 
AX-190 UPGRADE 
ACCURACY FOR HEATH CLOCKS 
NO MORE TWO-TONE SIDETONE 
LESS DRAIN IS YOUR GAIN! 



IMPROVING THE POWER SUPPLY 

ODDBALL SPLITS 

PHONE PATCH MOD 

LEDS FOR THE T-599D 

S-METER MOD 

CIRCUIT FOR IC-211 

USES CHANNEL BUSY LIGHT 

BRAKE MOD 

HUM MODS 

TACTILE TUNING FOR THE TR-4 

MOD FOR HAM III ROTOR 

MODS FOR HEATH IM-17 

NONSTANDARD OFFSETS 

BUILD THEM YOURSELF 

YABSU MODS 

AMPLIFIER CONVERSION 

ADD A MICROPHONE PREAMP 

EXPANDED FREQUENCY COVERAGE 

MARS CHANNELS 

IMPROVEMENTS 

USES COLLINS COMPONENTS 

REDUCES SETTING ERRORS 

AEA KEYER IMPROVEMENT 

POWER SAVERS FOR WILSON 



HA4 I QQ 


JAN 


60 


WB6MYF 


JAN 


62 


W5JJ 


FEB 


50 


K4ZHM 


FEB 


89 


WB3ATP 


MAR 


46 


VP2EZ 


MAR 


53 


PY2AUC 


MAR 


76 


K4GOK 


APR 


74 


K8KUZ 


APR 


96 


AA3S 


MAY 


54 


WA0PBQ 


JUN 


18 


STAFF 


JUN 


88 


WA4TEM 


JUL 


84 


AD5X 


AUG 


44 


W4ZCB, N4ML 


SEP 


54 


WA5VJB 


OCT 


48 


K5SE 


OCT 


52 


WlPQ 


OCT 


112 


KS4B/NNN0BKS 


OCT 


113 


K4JW 


NOV 


94 


VE7DLU 


NOV 


118 


N5AEN 


NOV 


124 


KA1LR 


DEC 


128 


KA3W 


DEC 


138 






GADGETS 



EMERGENCY TONE ALERT SYSTEM 
WWV-TO- 8 -METER CONVERTER 
UNPLUG IT, DUMMY I 
LINE NOISE SUPPRESSOR 
TRANSMITTER TUNE- UP AID 
A $10 PHONE PATCH 
A 60-HZ FREQUENCY MONITOR 
A 49-MHZ REPEATER 
THE NICAD CONDITIONER 



CAMPER POWER ALARM 



AUDIBLE POWER OUT INDICATOR 



LICENSE-FREE CB 

RIDS NICADS OF MEMORY 



WB5UVC ET AL. 


JAN 


42 


N7BH 


JAN 


48 


WB9SKX 


JAN 


58 


WA4PYQ 


JAN 


76 


WA4LBX 


JAN 


120 


NlII 


FEB 


68 


K0YMJ 


FEB 


72 


KL7GLK 


MAR 


44 


W2KPE 


APR 


106 



73 Magazine » December, 1981 145 



TOUCH-TUNE 
820S REMOTE VFO 



TACTILE TUNING FOR THE TR-4 
BUILD IT 



AA35 

VE5PZ 



HAY 

JUN 



54 
84 



HISTORY 

OVER THE HUMP; INTO HISTORY 

THE HISTORY OF HAM RADIO 

DXING THE PAST 

THE HISTORY OF HAM RADIO 

THE HISTORY OF HAM RADIO 

THE HISTORY OF HAM RADIO 

THE HISTORY OF HAM RADIO 

AERIAL HEIRLOOMS 

THE HISTORY OF HAM RADIO 



WW II AVIONICS 
PART XII: 1924-1925 
VISIT TO SIGNAL HILL 
PART XIII: THE OLD MAN 
PART XIV: 1925-1926 
PART XV: 1926 
PART XVI: 1920-1924 
EARLY RADIO TOWERS 
PART XVII: 1926-1927 



RITCHEY 


JAN 


78 


W9CI 


MAR 


54 


VE3CXL 


MAR 


88 


W9CI 


APR 


46 


W9CI 


MAY 


36 


W9CI 


JUN 


48 


W9CI 


JUL 


58 


AK0Q 


JUL 


66 


W9CI 


AUG 


88 



HUMOR 

HOME-BREW IN THE REAL WORLD 

MY INFERNAL TOWER 

MONODES 



CONSTRUCTION HUMOR 


WB1GVU 


MAR 


87 


ANTENNA HUMOR 


KC7M 


APR 


64 


DAWN OF AN ERA? 


CORNE R 


DEC 


130 



I/O 

TRACKER - THE OSCAR FINDER 

LOGIC PROBE 

UNDER SOFTWARE CONTROL 

REAL-WORLD CONNECTION 

APPLES: FIVE BITS OR EIGHT 

SLOW-SCAN BITS & BYTES 

DESIGN-A-DISH 

RALLYING THE HP- 5 5 

A STOUT HEART 

ELECTRONIC BRASSPOUNDER 

DIGITAL DEFENDER 

KIM'S MAGIC FINGERS 

THE CODE PET 



TRS-80 PROGRAM 

REPEATER CONTROL 
I/O PORTS FOR TRS-80 
RTTY FOR THE APPLE 
MICROPROCESSOR & SSTV 
BASIC PROGRAM: PARABOLIC S 
CALCULATOR PROGRAM 
KIM-1 SIMPLEX AUTOPATCH 
CW FOR LEVEL I TRS-80 
HAM SHACK SECURITY 
RTTY TRANSMIT PROGRAM 
CW ON YOUR COMMODORE 



WD8DRK, 

VERGONA 

WD8CHH 

K6EW 

WB6MEP 

K6AEP 

W3KH 

LUTZ 

WD8CHH 

N0AGX 

W7CRY 

VE1AKL 

AA0G 



K8UR 



JAN 


88 


JAN 


96 


FEB 


94 


MAR 


68 


APR 


66 


MAY 


84 


JUN 


72 


JUL 


80 


AUG 


70 


SEP 


90 


OCT 


116 


NOV 


112 


DEC 


126 



MISCELLANEOUS 

DIRECT-PRINTING FAX 

THE STRANGE PREDICAMENT 

VHF CONTESTING 

SELL 'EM WITH SLIDES 

SUCCESSFUL HAM CLASSES 

HOW FCC RULES ARE MADE 

AN OPERATING CONSOLE 

LIGHT-OPERATED RELAY 

IN THE STACK 

ALL THE NEWS THAT FITS 

THE HONEYMOON IS OVER 

DF BREAKTHROUGH 

PLAIN LANGUAGE RULES 

DAYTON DILEMMA '81 

GRANDMA PACKS A SEABAG 

WILD TURKEYS 1, FBI 

SAILPLANES ON SIX 

SOLAR ALIGNMENT TOOL 

NEWCOMER TO NICADS? 

FREE PR FOR HAM RADIO! 

THAT THEY MIGHT COMMUNICATE 

TED GAMLIN, A CONTESTER 

RADIO REHAB 

LLOYD AND IRIS COLVIN 

A VISIT WITH SV0AY 

X-BAND SWEPT SIGNAL SOURCE 

EYEBALL QSO WITH RADIO RSA 

JOE HAM: THE CONSUMER 



PART III 

ILLEGAL LISTENING-OE8WHK 

W1FC AND W8DJY 

A/V SHOWS 

GUIDE FOR ORGANIZERS 

THROUGH THE LABYRINTHE 

DESK CONSTRUCTION 

USES CHANNEL BUSY LIGHT 

SIX METER RADIO CONTROL 

CLUB NEWSLETTER 

HINTS FOR HAM HUSBANDS 

DIRECTION-FINDING SYSTEM 

FCC PROPOSAL DETAILED 

NEW GEAR: DAYTON HAMVENTION 

MERCHANT MARINE RADIO 

REPEATER JAMMING 

RADIO CONTROLLED GLIDERS 

FIND TRUE NORTH 

INFORMATIVE OVERVIEW 

NEWS MEDIA COOPERATION 

HANDICAPPED HAMMING 

PERSONALITY PROFILE 

HELPING YOUNG OFFENDERS 

PERSONALITY PROFILE 

AN EXOTIC QTH 

ONE FOR THE ROAD 

VOICE OF SOUTH AFRICA 

THE AVERAGE HAM 



WB8DQT 


JAN 


54 


WA4PYQ 


JAN 


66 


N8RK 


JAN 


100 


N8BPI 


JAN 


104 


WB1FOD 


FEB 


56 


WD4DAZ 


FEB 


62 


W8GI 


FEB 


84 


PY2AOC 


MAR 


76 


WB3BQO 


APR 


56 


N9YL 


APR 


60 


HR1ADF 


APR 


98 


W7BEP 


JUN 


32 


N8RK 


JUN 


125 


KA1LR 


JUL 


22 


K7NZA 


JUL 


102 


WA7UDO 


AUG 


12 


WB3BQO 


AUG 


20 


K6BW 


AUG 


48 


W60JF 


AUG 


100 


WD4NEK 


SEP 


50 


K7NZA 


SEP 


66 


KA1D 


OCT 


18 


WA6VIP 


OCT 


44 


KAlD 


OCT 


132 


N1BEP 


NOV 


36 


WlSNN 


NOV 


60 


PETERSON 


NOV 


82 


N6AVU 


DEC 


32 



146 73 Magazine * December. 1981 



MOBILE & PORTABLE OPERATION 



FOUR-BAND MOBILE ANTENNA 
DAZE OF WHINE AND NOISES 
SAILING THE TRIBAND SLOPER 
FLIER'S GUIDE 
TRAVELING HAM'S ANTENNA 
COLD COMFORT 



IGNITION NOISE 

HALF -WAVES FOR BOATS 

AERONAUTICAL MOBILE 

COVERS ALL BANDS 

WINTER HIKING WITH AN HT 



K5PTC 


JAN 


129 


K2PMA 


JAN 


146 


W8KXW 


MAY 


50 


WB6BHI 


AUG 


58 


W3JIP 


NOV 


100 


KA1D 


DEC 


12 



NEW PRODUCT ANNOUNCEMENTS 



ADVANCED ANALOG SYSTEMS 

AEA 

ABA 

ALUMA TOWER 

ARP 

AVANTI COMMUNICATIONS 

BENJ. MICHAEL INDUSTRIES 

BENJ. MICHAEL INDUSTRIES 

BENJ. MICHAEL INDUSTRIES 

BENJ. MICHAEL INDUSTRIES 

BILAL COMPANY 

CENTURY ELECTRONICS 

CHARLESWATER PRODUCTS 

CIRCUIT ELECTRONICS INC. 

COLTON CREATORS, INC. 

COMM. ELEC. SPECIALTIES 

COMMSOFT 

COMMSOPT 

COMMUNICATIONS SPECIALISTS 

CORNELL-DUBILIER 

COVOX COMPANY 

CUBIC CORP. 

CURTIS ELECTRO DEVICES 

CURTIS ELECTRO DEVICES 

CURTIS ELECTRO DEVICES 

CURTIS ELECTRO DEVICES 

DATAK CORP. 

DESCO INDUSTRIES 

ELECTRA 

ELECTRONIC SPECIALISTS 

FAXSCAN, INC. 

GEORGE RISK INDUSTRIES 

GROVE ENTERPRISES 

GROVE ENTERPRISES 

HAMTRONICS 

HAMTRONICS 

HAMTRONICS 

HAMTRONICS 

HEATH COMPANY 

HEATH COMPANY 

HEATH COMPANY 

HEATH COMPANY 

HUSTLER 

HY-GAIN DIVISION OF TELEX 

HY-GAIN DIVISION OF TELEX 

HY-GAIN DIVISION OF TELEX 

ICOM AMERICA, INC. 

INDIANA QUICK CHARGE 

INDIANA QUICK CHARGE 

INOTEK ENGINEERING 

J. W« MILLER 

JAMECO ELECTRONICS 

KANTRONICS 

KILOVAC CORP. 

M & M ELECTRONICS 

H-SQUARED ENGINEERING 

MACROTRONICS 

MANHATTAN SOFTWARE 

MATSUSHITA 



REMOTE CONTROL SYSTEM 
PFDF RADIO DIRECTION FINDER 
CW/BAUDOT/ASCII READER 
HEAVY DUTY TOWER 
AMATEUR RADIO PROFILES 
450 MHZ MOBILE ANTENNA 
17 3 A STATION CLOCK 
17 3D PRESENTATION CLOCK 
MODEL 273 CLOCK 
MILITARY-TIME CLOCK 
ISOTRON ANTENNAS 
GL-25 RESISTOR KIT 
CONDUCTIVE WRIST STRAP 
SQUELCH TAIL ELIMINATOR 
EZ CORD CONTROL 
ENCODING MICROPAD 
CW89 SOFTWARE PACKAGE 
CODEM CW INTERFACE 
TONE ENCODER FOR IC-2AT 
HAM-SP ROTOR 

MODEL I VOICE CONTROLLER 

ASTRO C HF TRANSCEIVER 

FIVE MODE KEYBOARD 

804 4M SPEEDKETER 

8044 KEYER CHIP 

LIL 1 BUGGER KEYER 

FLEXY-MARKER 

PRECISION TWEEZER 

BEARCAT 100 SCANNER 

ELECTRICAL POLUTION CONTROL 

BP-3 BEEPER 

KEYBOARD CATALOG 

10 KHZ-30 MHZ ANTENNA TUNER 

CODE BREAKER DESCRAMBLER 

UHF EXCITER & 2M XVERTER 

VHF/UHF/OSCAR CATALOG 

REPEATER MODULES 

VHF FM TRANSCEIVERS 

OP AMP INSTRUCTION PACKAGE 

512 MHZ FREQ CONVERTER 

GU-1820 PORTABLE GENERATOR 

SA-5010 MEMORY KEYER 

TEN-METER YAGI 

CRANKUP TOWERS 

V- DOUBLE ZEPP ANTENNA 

TRAILS RED TOWERS 

IC-3A/IC-3AT 220 MHZ HT 

QC500 NICAD CHARGER 

CW EXAM PACKAGE 

SIMPLE TUNER 

AUTOMATIC ANTENNA TUNER 

DUAL VOLTAGE POWER SUPPLY 

VARIFILTER 

MICROWAVE TRANSFER RELAY 

MSB-1 AUDIO FILTER 

HANDI-CON V VHF CONVERTER 

MAILBOX RTTY SYSTEM 

QSO LOG 

BONE-CONDUCTION HEARING AID 



JUN 


107 


JUN 


105 


NOV 


170 


APR 


123 


JUL 


136 


MAY 


121 


JAN 


34 


FEB 


30 


JUL 


37 


OCT 


168 


OCT 


167 


JUL 


138 


JUN 


105 


MAR 


36 


AUG 


129 


DEC 


189 


DEC 


190 


DEC 


189 


DEC 


189 


FEB 


120 


SEP 


144 


NOV 


171 


MAR 


107 


JUN 


106 


NOV 


169 


DEC 


188 


SEP 


145 


APR 


122 


SEP 


144 


APR 


122 


AUG 


129 


AUG 


128 


MAY 


122 


JUN 


105 


FEB 


30 


SEP 


146 


OCT 


166 


NOV 


170 


JAN 


34 


MAR 


36 


JUL 


136 


OCT 


168 


MAY 


120 


APR 


123 


AUG 


130 


SEP 


145 


DEC 


189 


SEP 


146 


OCT 


169 


NOV 


168 


FEB 


30 


JUL 


138 


JAN 


34 


AUG 


128 


MAY 


121 


OCT 


170 


JUL 


135 


NOV 


168 


OCT 


166 






73 Magazine • December, 1961 147 




m 



MCM COMMUNICATIONS 
MCM COMMUNICATIONS 
MCM COMMUNICATIONS 

Mr J 

MFJ 

MFJ 

MFJ 

MFJ 

MFJ 

MFJ 

MICRO-80 

MICRQCRAFT CORP. 

MIRAGE COMM, EQUIP, 

MOTOROLA 

MOTOROLA 

NON-LINEAR SYSTEMS 

NORDAL ELECTRONICS 

OK MACHINE k TOOL CO, 

PALOMAR ENGINEERS 

PALOMAR ENGINEERS 

PALOMAR ENGINEERS 

PHILADELPHIA RESIN CORP, 

PLAINVIEW ELECTRONICS 

PLYTUBE CORP. OF AMERICA 

POLY PHASER CORP. 

R.L. DRAKE 

RADIO SHACK 

RCA 

RICKER EQUIPMENT 

ROBERT LULY ASSOCIATES 

SABTRONICS INTERNATIONAL 

SCIENTIFIC DIMENSIONS INC. 

SGL WABER 

SPECTRUM INTERNATIONAL 

STANDARD COMMUNICATIONS 

SWITCHCRAFT 

TELTONE 

TEMPO 

TEN-TEC 

TEN-TEC 

TRAC ELECTRONICS 

TRANS COM, INC. 

TRI-EX TOWER CORP. 

UNIVERSAL ELECTRONICS 

VALOR ENTERPRISES 

VALOR ENTERPRISES 

VALOR ENTERPRISES 

VARIAN EI MAC 

VECTOR ELECTRONICS 

WRAASE(KW CONTROL SYS.) 

YAESU ELECTRONICS CORP. 

YAESU ELECTRONICS CORP. 



DAIWA CNA-2002 ANT. TUNER 

DAIWA INFRARED CORDLESS MIC 

CNW-518 & CNW-218 TUNERS 

HF WATTMETER 

KEYBOARD/KEYER 

VHF WATT/SWR METER 

3-KW TUNER 

P0LICE/FIRE EXPLORER 

CW COMPUTER INTERFACE 

VLF CONVERTERS 

SUPER LOG II PROGRAM 

MORSE-A-KEYER 

ALL-MODE 43 0-450 MHZ AMP 

FM IF CIRCUIT 

HYBRID COMPONENTS DATA BOOK 

TOUCH TEST 20 DMM 

ALUMINUM BOXES 

IC DISPENSER 

1750 METER TRANSMITTER 

TRANSCEIVER PREAMPLIFIER 

PORTABLE 2M QUAD 

TOWER GUYS 

LITHIUM BATTERY CATALOG 

TUBULAR PLYWOOD 

ZAP TRAPPER 

ESR 24 EARTH STATION RCVR, 

INSTANT-TUNING WEATHERADIO 

VP-3301 DATA TERMINAL 

SHACK DESK 

LULY POLARIZER 

MODEL 2020 DMM 

MOBILE RADIO SLIDE MOUNT 

POWER MASTER LINE MONITORS 

MMS1 MORSETALKER TUTOR 

TALKMAN TWO-WAY RADIO 

CONNECTOR CATALOG 

M-927 TOUCHTONE DECODER 

S~4 440 MHZ HT 

AIR COOLED DUMMY LOAD 

200 -WATT ANTENNA TUNER 

CW PROCESSOR AND KEYER 

TUNABLE CTCSS ENCODER 

120' ROTATING TOWER 

COAX SEAL 

COMM-X ANTENNAS 

OMNI-GAIN BASE ANTENNAS 

OMNI-GAIN MOBILE ANTENNA 

TUBE SOCKET REPAIR KITS 

BREADBOARD MATERIALS 

SC-422 SCAN CONVERTER 

FT-480R 2M TRANSCEIVER 

FT-902DM HF TRANSCEIVER 



SEP 


143 


OCT 


168 


NOV 


168 


APR 


122 


APR 


38 


MAY 


121 


MAY 


120 


JUN 


106 


NOV 


169 


DEC 


189 


MAY 


120 


SEP 


145 


OCT 


169 


JUN 


106 


OCT 


169 


JAN 


156 


JUN 


106 


JAN 


34 


JAN 


156 


FEB 


120 


JUL 


137 


MAR 


107 


JUL 


137 


SEP 


145 


MAY 


120 


NOV 


169 


SEP 


144 


AUG 


128 


NOV 


169 


DEC 


188 


DEC 


190 


AUG 


130 


JUL 


138 


NOV 


170 


DEC 


188 


JUN 


107 


MAR 


107 


APR 


122 


FEB 


30 


MAR 


36 


JUL 


136 


JUL 


137 


AUG 


129 


MAR 


107 


MAY 


120 


MAY 


121 


JUL 


137 


DEC 


190 


MAR 


36 


JAN 


35 


FEB 


30 


APR 


122 



OPERATING 



OLYMPICS TORCH RUN 

FEELIN" NO PAIN 

OPERATING OVERSEAS 

DXING THE PAST 

THE RACER'S EDGE 

BATTLEWAGON 

REPEATER AT 102,000 FEET 

MAYDAY I 

THE DX PRIMER 

10,000 QSOS FROM EASTER IS 

A VERY "SPECIAL* WEEKEND 

EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS 

A LOT OF HOT AIR 

DX PROGRAM ROUNDUP 

CONTESTING FROM VPS 



HAM RADIOS ROLE 
QRZ FROM LUCKENBACB 
LICENSING FACTS 
VISIT TO SIGNAL HILL 
SOAP BOX DERBY OPERATION 
MINI-EXPEDITION: USS TEXAS 
BALLOON REPEATER 
LOCATING DOWNED AIRCRAFT 
OPERATING TECHNIQUES 
DXPEDITION STORY 
HAMS & THE SPECIAL OLYMPICS 
GET SET FOR THE REAL THING 
BALLOON RACE COORDINATION 
DX NEWS ON THE SWL BANDS 
TURKS & CAICOS DXPEDITION 



KA2CNN, KA2DBW 


FEB 


36 


W5QJM 


FEB 


74 


A2CPS 


FEB 


78 


VE3CXL 


MAR 


88 


WD8JOI 


APR 


84 


WD 5 ICY 


MAY 


72 


VE4FK 


JUN 


12 


W2FJT ET AL. 


JUN 


78 


W8YA 


AUG 


50 


K4ESQ 


SEP 


12 


WB2CMB 


SEP 


22 


WA3REY 


SEP 


26 


WB6JBI 


SEP 


38 


PETERSON 


SEP 


84 


WB8BTH 


OCT 


12 



148 73 Magazine * December, 1981 



THE WINNING 
CONTROLLED CHAOS 
THE CONTEST COOKBOOK 
THE 160 WINNERS! 
TEN-METER LUNCH HOUR 



LIFE OF A CONTESTER 
STATE QSO PARTIES 
BASIC STRATEGY AND TACTICS 
160 METER CONTEST RESULTS 
HAM RADIO FOR SCHOOL KIDS 



WA3FUV 


OCT 


40 


W2XQ 


OCT 


62 


N60P 


OCT 


92 


KE7C 


NOV 


131 


WA8WTE 


NOV 


158 



POWER SUPPLIES 

CHEAP AND SIMPLE 

UNPLUG IT, DUMMY I 

LINE NOISE SUPPRESSOR 

THE POWER WASTER 

QRZ SUNSHINE 

HALF A LOAF 

THREE-WAY POWER SUPPLY 

THE NICAD CONDITIONER 

NEWCOMER TO NIC ADS? 

BATTERY CHECK 1 

POS. SUPPLY WITB NEG. CHIP 



13.8-V, 25-A POWER SUPPLY 
CAMPER POWER ALARM 

ADJUSTABLE LOAD 
SOLAR-POWERED REPEATER 
6-V BATTERY CHARGER 
VARIABLE OUTPUT 
RIDS NICADS OF MEMORY 
INFORMATIVE OVERVIEW 
TESTING NICADS 
SOLVING A PARTS DILEMMA 



WA9VLK 


JAN 


50 


WB9SKX 


JAN 


58 


WA4PYQ 


JAN 


76 


K6IQL 


JAN 


108 


WB3HXY 


JAN 


114 


NORDGREN 


MAR 


60 


W3HB 


MAR 


86 


W2KPE 


APR 


106 


W60JF 


AUG 


100 


PS7ZAD 


NOV 


64 


K9MLD 


DEC 


142 



RECEIVING 



THE FUN-CEIVER 



COMPANION TO FEB'S QRP XMTR WA0RBR 



JUL 



32 



REPEATERS 

REPEATER "REP" 

QRZ SUNSHINE 

SUB AUDIBLE TONE ENCODERS 

ADD RTTY TO YOUR REPEATER 

UNDER SOFTWARE CONTROL 

A 49-MHZ REPEATER 

LAST PL GENERATOR 

END TO REPEATER TIMEOUTS 

REPEATER AT 102,000 FEET 

MAYDAY I 

AMATEUR TELEMETRY 

A STOUT HEART 

2M GETTING A LITTLE BORING? 

CARTOGRAPHY FOR KERCHUNKERS 



AUTOPATCH DIALER 
SOLAR-POWERED REPEATER 
INSTALLATION TIPS 
VOICE OPERATION, TOO 
REPEATER CONTROL 
LICENSE-FREE CB 
TONE SYNTHESIZER 
CIRCUIT FOR IC-211 
BALLOON REPEATER 
LOCATING DOWNED AIRCRAFT 
REMOTE REPEATER MONITOR 
KIM-1 SIMPLEX AUTOPATCH 
TRY CROSSBAND DXING 
MAKING REPEATER MAPS 



K4ALS 


JAN 


68 


WB3HXY 


JAN 


114 


WA7LMO/N6XB 


JAN 


126 


WB4EMI 


FEB 


48 


WD8CHH 


FEB 


94 


KL7GLK 


MAR 


44 


WB2BWJ 


MAR 


50 


VP2EZ 


MAK 


53 


VE4FK 


JUN 


12 


W2FJT ET AL. 


JON 


78 


W2FPP 


JUL 


72 


WD8CHH 


AUG 


70 


WA3REY 


SEP 


34 


W4FXE 


NOV 


156 



REVIEWS 



ACE 
AEA 

AED ELECTRONICS 

ARRL 

ARRL 

A V ANT I 

AZDEN 

BASH EDUCATIONAL SERVICES 

BECKHAN 

BENJ. MICHAEL INDUSTRIES 

BREHN CORP. 

BUTTERNUT ELECTRONICS 

CALECTRO 

COLOGNE PRESS 

COMM. ELEC. SPECIALTIES 

CROWN HICROPRODUCTS 

CUSHCRAFT 

DAIWA 

DATONG 

DOPPLER SYSTEMS 

ELECTRA 

GENERAL ELECTRIC 



SYNTHESIZED VHP TRANSCEIVER 

CK-1 MORSE KEYER 

AED SCANNERS 

ARRL OPERATING MANUAL 

ARRL LICENSE MANUAL 

10-METER QUAD 

PCS-3000 TWO METER RIG 

IDIOT'S GUIDE TO DX 

310 DIGITAL MULTIMETER 

24-HOUR CLOCK 

HOW TO DEFEND AGAINST RADAR 

HF5V-III VERTICAL 

MULTI -TESTER VOM 

AMATEUR RADIO, SUPER HOBBY 1 

SIMPLEX AUTOPATCH 

ROM-116 RTTY INTERFACE 

SKYWALRER MONO BAND BEAMS 

INFRARED WIRELESS MIKE 

ASP SPEECH PROCESSOR 

THE DOPPLER SYSTEMS DDF3003 

BEARCAT 350 SCANNER 

PROGRAMMABLE CLOCK RADIO 



W8FX 


DEC 


68 


KAlLR 


JAN 


38 


WB6SMD 


JAN 


37 


RAID 


FEB 


118 


N8RK 


JUL 


48 


AE3S 


MAY 


99 


WA2JSR 


MAY 


68 


AG9V/1 


NOV 


80 


CLAWSON 


APR 


126 


W1XU 


MAR 


90 


N8RR 


AUG 


85 


KA1LR 


AUG 


34 


W8FX 


AUG 


80 


KA1D 


JUN 


96 


KA1LR 


JUN 


62 


KAlLR 


FEB 


32 


WB8BTH 


MAY 


98 


K4TWJ 


DEC 


82 


W8YA 


JUL 


118 


KAlLR 


JUN 


28 


WA4PYQ 


AUG 


78 


W8FX 


OCT 


66 


73 Magazine • 


December, 1981 


149 



^ 



GILFER ASSOCIATES 

HAL COMMUNICATIONS CORP. 

HAM RADIO PUBLISHING 

HAYDEN BOOK COMPANY 

HEATH COMPANY 

HEATH COMPANY 

ICOM AMERICA, INC. 

I SCAN ENGINEERING 

KANTRONICS 

KANTRONICS 

KENWOOD 

KENWOOD 

KENWOOD 

KENWOOD 

KENWOOD 

KENWOOD 

KRECO 

KRECO 

MCM COMMUNICATIONS 

MELCO PUBLISHING 

MPJ 

MFJ 

MFJ 

MICRO CONTROL SPECIALTIES 

MIRAGE COMM. EQUIP. 

NCG CO. 

PALOMAR ENGINEERS 

P ALOMAR ENGINEERS 

RADIO SHACK 

RADIO SHACK 

RADIO SHACK 

RADIO SHACK 
REX BASSETT 

ROBOT RESEARCH 

RSGB 

S-F AMATEUR RADIO SERVICES 

S-F AMATEUR RADIO SERVICES 

TAB BOOKS 

TAB BOOKS 

TAB BOOKS 

TET USA 

TET USA 

TRANSELECTRO-AMERICA 

UNIVERSAL COMMUNICATIONS 

VARIOUS PUBLISHERS 

VIZ MANUFACTURING CO, 

VOCOM 

VOCOM 

WELZ 

YAESU ELECTRONICS CORP. 

YAESU ELECTRONICS CORP. 



GUIDE TO RTTY FREQUENCIES 

DS2050 KSR RTTY TERMINAL 

GUNNPLEXER COOKBOOK 

DIGITAL ELECTRONICS 

IM-5228 VTVM 

GU-182 AC GENERATOR 

INVESTIGATING ICOM'S 730 

TR-9000 MEMORY SCANNER 

VARIFILTER 

MINI-READER 

TR-7 800 TWO-METER XCVR 

TS-83 0S 

T3-130S HF TRANSCEIVER 

TR-9000 2M TRANSCEIVER 

TS-530S HF TRANSCEIVER 

TR-7730 2-METER FM TCVR 

COAXIAL ANTENNA - C02A 

SC-150A TWO-METER COLLINEAR 

DAIWA'S NEW METERS 

HANDBOOK: 10 FM 

MFJ-1040 PRESELECTOR 

SHORTWAVE CONVERTER 

HFJ-102 DIGITAL CLOCK 

MARK 3CR REPEATER 

B1016 2M LINEAR AMPLIFIER 

NCG 15 M TRANSCEIVER 

INSIDE THE PALOMAR PREAMP 

A QUAD FOR TWO METERS 

REALISTIC PRO-2008 

DX-200 RECEIVER 

MICRONTA'S NEW MULTIMETER 

PRO-2002 SCANNER 

TLM-2 MOBILE MOUNT 

80 BE RTTY/CW/SSTV TERMINAL 

A GUIDE TO AMATEUR RADIO 

S-F MOD KITS 

OPERATING DESK 

HANDBOOK; FM AND REPEATERS 

10 FM FOR THE RADIO AMATEUR 

HANDBOOK: TABLES & FORMULAS 

GDX-1 DI SCONE ANTENNA 

SQ-22 2M QUAD 

AMATEUR CONVERSATION GUIDE 

2300-MHZ DOWNCONVERTER KIT 

4 BOOKS FOR EXPERIMENTERS 

WD-747 DIGITAL MULTIMETER 

COLLAPSIBLE WHIP FOR HT'S 

TWO-METER AMPLIFIER 

SP-300 SWR AND POWER METER 

FT~707 HF TRANSCEIVER 

FRG-7700 GEN. COVERAGE RCVR 



K8DIU/4 


AUG 


87 


KAlLR 


SEP 


42 


N8RK 


OCT 


54 


KA1LR 


FEB 


119 


N1BEJ 


MAR 


28 


AG 9 V/l 


OCT 


42 


K4TWJ 


NOV 


76 


WB8BTH 


SEP 


100 


wlxu 


MAR 


28 


WA4PYQ 


APR 


30 


KA1LR 


APR 


26 


WB8BTH 


MAY 


66 


KA1LR 


JUL 


38 


WB8BTH, N8RK 


AUG 


30 


KA1LR 


OCT 


26 


KA1LR 


DEC 


26 


KA1LR 


JAM 


157 


W8FX 


MAY 


110 


KA1LR 


NOV 


40 


KAlLR 


FEB 


119 


WA4PYQ 


FEB 


117 


KAlLR 


MAR 


89 


WA4PYQ 


JUN 


130 


RA1LR 


JUL 


46 


KAlLR 


OCT 


50 


KAlLR 


JUL 


42 


W8FX 


NOV 


52 


W8FX 


DEC 


104 


N3BAB 


FEB 


65 


W5JJ 


APR 


124 


K6UGT 


NOV 


92 


N3BAH 


DEC 


96 


KAlLR 


DEC 


18 


WB9PKD 


AUG 


92 


N1BEJ 


JUN 


97 


W4LVM 


JAN 


36 


K4TWJ 


JUN 


98 


KAlLR 


FEB 


lie 


KAlLR 


FEB 


119 


WD4LOO 


MAR 


90 


WA4PYQ 


FEB 


117 


KAlLR 


AUG 


99 


KAlLR 


JUL 


65 


K4TWJ 


APR 


30 


N8RK 


NOV 


54 


WA4PYQ 


OCT 


36 


H8FX 


MAY 


100 


N1BEJ 


JUN 


52 


KAlLR 


SEP 


46 


KAlLR 


MAR 


24 


KAlLR 


SEP 


30 



RTTY 



ADD RTTY TO YOUR REPEATER 

APPLES: FIVE BITS OR EIGHT 

SOLID COPY RTTY TU 

DS2050 KSR RTTY TERMINAL 

MORE FOR LESS 

KIM'S MAGIC FINGERS 

WHAT'S IT ALL ABOUT, ASCII? 



VOICE OPERATION, TOO 
RTTY FOR THE APPLE 
USES FLESHER TU BOARD 
HAL COMMUNICATIONS CORP 
RTTY TUNE -UP AID 
RTTY TRANSMIT PROGRAM 
RTTY TECHNOLOGY UPDATE 



WB4EMI 


FEB 


48 


WB6MEP 


APR 


66 


K1VIC/2 


JUN 


54 


KAlLR 


SEP 


42 


WB4PWC 


NOV 


50 


VE1AKL 


NOV 


112 


W4RI, WB4APR 


DEC 


90 



SATELLITES 



DIRECT-PRINTING FAX 
TRACKER - THE OSCAR FINDER 
COST-EFFECTIVE OSCAR 



PART III 

TRS-80 PROGRAM 

SOURCES AND SUGGESTIONS 



HB8DQT 
WD8DRK, K8UR 
KA5EIM 



JAN 54 

JAN 88 
SEP 70 



150 73 Magazine • December, 1981 



PHASE III AND BEYOND 

THE SATELLITE TV CHALLENGE 

SPACE SPINOFFS 

HOW BIG A DISH? 

SATELLITE CHANNEL GUIDE - I 

SATELLITE TV RECEIVERS 

BOB COOPER: A PIONEER 

SATELLITE CHANNEL GUIDE 

SATELLITE TV GLOSSARY 

TVRO RCVRSiTHE INSIDE STORY 

"CHOPSTICK" HELICAL FOR 432 



SATELLITE NEWS 

INTRO TO TVRO COVERAGE 

HAMS AND TVRO 

TVRO ANTENNA SELECTION 

PROGRAMS ON THE SATELLITES 

ALTERNATIVE DESIGNS 

PERSONALITY PROFILE 

PART II 

PART I 

SATELLITE CENTRAL, PART II 

GETTING READY FOR PHASE III 



N8RK 


SEP 


96 


N8RK 


NOV 


14 


WAlDCP r W2IKQ 


NOV 


18 


GIBSON 


NOV 


20 


WESTS AT 


NOV 


24 


K4TWJ 


NOV 


26 


N8RK 


DEC 


38 


WESTSAT 


DEC 


44 




DEC 


46 


GIBSON 


DEC 


54 


9M2CR 


DEC 


116 



TECHNICAL & THEORY 



HEAT SINKS 

SUB AUDIBLE TONE ENCODERS 

COMPUTERS AND HF 

DAZE OF WHINE AND NOISES 

THE ELUSIVE GROUND FAULT 

CAUTION: SOLID-STATE FINALS 

AF AND RF SPEECH PROCESSING 

TWO-METER ANTENNAS 

INSIDE COAX 

DF BREAKTHROUGH 

ABOUT THE BEVERAGE 

THE CCD ANTENNA 

KEYER MAGIC 

SPREAD SPECTRUM 

ANTENNAS FOR BEGINNERS 

BREAKING THE DECIBEL LOGJAM 



INSTALLATION TIPS 
USING MICROS EFFECTIVELY 
IGNITION NOISE 
REAL-LIFE ADVENTURE 
LIVING WITH NO-TUNE RADIOS 
PLESSY SL1676C 
OMNIDIRECTIONAL THEORY 
QUALITY AND CONSTRUCTION 
DIRECTION-FINDING SYSTEM 
RECEIVING ANTENNAS 
THEORY PLUS Q & A 
ALL TTL CW KEYER 
REPORT FROM AMRAD 
NOT FOR NOVICES ONLY 
COPING WITH NOTHINGNESS 



WA40SH 


JAN 


86 


WA7 LMO/N6XB 


JAN 


126 


W9JD/DA1FE 


JAN 


130 


K2PMA 


JAN 


146 


W50S 


FEB 


82 


N1II 


FEB 


90 


STAFF 


MAR 


72 


WHS 


MAY 


12 


WB6MMV/7 


MAY 


78 


W7BEP 


JUN 


32 


W2XQ 


JUN 


68 


W4FD, W4ATE 


JUL 


50 


N5DY 


OCT 


80 


WB3KDU 


NOV 


32 


NlII 


DEC 


74 


SARA 


DEC 


136 



TEST GEAR 

RX AND CX 

LOGIC PROBE 

THE POWER WASTER 

CAPACITANCE METER 

A 60 -HZ FREQUENCY MONITOR 

ADD-ON CAPACITANCE METER 

X-BAND WAVEMETER 

THE CALIBRATOR GATER 

TALKING FREQUENCY COUNTER 

MAXIMIZE THAT MULTIMETER 

THE MICRO-GENERATOR 

THE METERLESS OHMMETER 

QRM-FREE ANTENNA TUNING 

THE §50 SWEEPER 

DIODE DOCTOR 

SSTV SIGNAL ANALYZER 

AN EASY L-METER 






SUBSTITUTION BOXES 

ADJUSTABLE LOAD 
BUILD IT 

WORKS WITH FREQ COUNTER 

MOD FOR CALIBRATORS 

MODS FOR HEATH IM-17 
AUDIO SIGNAL SOURCE 
AUDIBLE CONTINUITY TESTER 
INEXPENSIVE NOISE BRIDGE 
AUDIO FUNCTION GENERATOR 
SIMPLE TESTER 
CHECK YOUR SIG 
MEASURING INDUCTANCE 



WD 5 CD J 


JAN 


84 


VERGONA 


JAN 


96 


R6IQL 


JAN 


108 


W4VGZ 


JAN 


132 


K0YMJ 


FEB 


72 


W4FEC 


FEB 


86 


W1SNN 


MAR 


64 


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MAR 


78 


WA0OHO 


APR 


52 


STAFF 


JUN 


88 


WA3RJS 


JUL 


94 


WB7NEZ 


AUG 


36 


STAFF 


AUG 


40 


K3LF 


OCT 


100 


NlII 


OCT 


131 


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NOV 


46 


W5JJ 


DEC 


100 



TRANSMITTING 



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73 Magazine • December, 1981 151 



From 



MAGAZINE 



THE 1982 EDITION 

GENERAL LICENSE 
STUDY GUIDE 

by Timothy M. Daniel N8RK 

This is the complete guide to the General License, 
Learning rather than memorizing Is the secret. This 
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The 1982 edition will be ready to ship in February. 



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152 73 Magazine • December, 1981 




NEW from 



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BY DR. RALPH E. TAGGART 

Here is the completely updated and revised edition of the best- 
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Are You a Big Gun 

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The small number of elite operators at the top of the 
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A WAYNE GREEN PUBLICATION 



156 73 Magazine * December, 1981 



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73 Magazine • December, 1981 157 



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158 73 Magazine * December, 1981 



FOR THE NOVICE 




hovke 







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NEW, UPDATED 

EDITIONS OF OUR 

FAMOUS NOVICE LICENSE 

STUDY GUIDE AND 
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FOR TOLL FREE ORDERING CALL 1-800-258-5473 



THE tS TECHNICAL LIBRARY 




WORLD 
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■BK73B3— by Dr. Haiph E. Taggart WB8DQT. Here is the 
completely updated and revised edition containing all 
the information on the most sophisticated and effective 
spacecraft now In orbit. This book serves both the ex- 
perienced amateur satellite enthusiast and the new- 
comer li is an introduction to satellite watching, pro- 
viding an I he information required to construct a com- 
plete and highly effective ground station. Solid hard- 
ware designs and all the instructions necessary to oper- 
ate I he equipment are included. For experimenters who 
are operating stations, the book details all procedures 
necessary to modify equipment for the new series of 
spacecraft. Amateur weather satettite activity repre- 
sents a unique blend of interests encompassing elec- 
tronics, meteorology and astronautics. Join the privi 
leged few in watching the spectacle of earth as seen 
from space on your own monitoring equipment. $6,95.* 

• MASTER HANDBOOK OF HAM RADIO CIRCUITS— 
9K1Q33— This Is an encyclopedia of amateur radio cir- 
cuits, cleaned from past Issues of 73 Magazine and 
carefully selected according to application. You'll find 
many you've never seen before, some new twists on the 
tried and true, and several that have been tong forgotten 
but are well worth remembering. Where your interest 
ranges from rag chewing to EME, from CW to slow-scan 
TV, from DX to county nets, this handbook will be a 
welcome addition to your shack IS 95 * 

• OWNER REPAIR OF RADIO EQUIPMENT— BK731D- 
by Frank Glass K6RQ. Here's a book that wili teach you 
an approach to troubleshooting without a shack lull of 
test equipment. Written in a narrative, non-mathematical 
style, ft will encourage you to successfully fix your own 
rig problems SO to 90% of I he lime, Even if you don't 
want to fix, you can learn a lot about how things work 
and tail Add to your library and personal expertise. 
$7,95.* 

• IC OP AMP COOKBOOK— BKf 028— by Walter G 
Jung, Covers not only the basic theory of the IC op amp 
in great detail, but also includes over 250 practical cir- 
cuit applications, liberally Illustrated 592 pages, 
5'A xBN. softbound $14.95/ 

• THE POWER SUPPLY HANDBO0K~BK73O5~ 

Need a power supply for a gadget you're building? In 
the POWER SUPPLY HANDBOOK there are dozens 
ready-to-buil d> plus detailed steps for designing your 
own. There are circuits and parts lists for ait kinds ol 
supplies, ranging from simple DC types to highly 
stable regulated versions If you need a circuit to con- 
vert a DC voltage to a higher or lower voltage, turn DC 
into AC, or AC to DC— then this Is the book you need 
With more than 400 pages, you should be able to find 
Just the circuit you need. WHhoui a doubt one of the 
best power supply source books available, compiled 
by the editors of 73. $9.95. - 



HANDBOOKS 
FOR THE 
HAMSHACK 

• THE TEN METER FM HANDBOOK -&K1 190— by Bob 
Heil K9€ID This handbook has been published to help 
the ten meter enthusiast learn more about the many 
methods of conversions and tricks that are used to m ake 
existing units work better. Join the great "tfnkerers" of 
the world on ten FM and enjoy the fantastic amount of 
fun in communicating with amateur stations w orl d w ide 
on ten meter FM. 94.95/ 

• THE PRACTICAL HANDBOOK OF AMATEUR RADIO 
FM REPEATfERS— BK11B6— by BUI Pasternak WA61TF 
(author ol 73 Magazines monthly column u Looking West") 
This is the book tor the VHFAJHF FMef, compiled from 
material submitted by over a hundred individuals, clubs, 
organizations and equipment manufacturers A "must 
have" for your ham shack shelf. 512.96, 



The 73 



Test Equipment 
Library 




• VOL I COMPONENT TESTERS— LB 7359 



how 



to build transistor festers (8), diode testers (3), IC tast- 
ers (3} r voltmeters and VTVMs (9), ohmmeters (8 differ- 
ent kinds), inductance (3 ). capacity (i), Q measure- 
ment crystal checking (6). temperature (2), aural 
meters for the blind (3) and all sorts of miscellaneous 
data on meters . using them, making them more ver- 
satile, making standards. Invaluable book. $4.95/ 

• VOL II AUDIO FREQUENCY TESTERS— LB 7360— 
. . .jam packed with all kinds ol audio frequency test 
equipment if you're into SSB, RTTY, SSTV\ etc.. this 
book is a must for you, . .a good book for hhfi addicts 
and experimenters, too! $4.95/ 

• VOL III RADIO FREQUENCY TESTERS— LB 7361 — 
Radio frequency waves, the common denominator of 
Amateur Radio. Such items as SWR. antenna Inv 
pedance, line impedance, rl oulpui rod Refcd sirongth, 
detailed Instructions on testing these Items includes 
sections on signal generators, crystal calibrators, grid 
dip oscillators, noise generators, dummy loads and 
much more. 14,95/ 

• VOL JV IC TEST EQUIPMENT— LB7362— Become a 
troubleshooting wizard! fn this fourth volume of the 73 
TEST EQUIPMENT LIBRARY are 42 home construction 
projects for building test equipment to work with your 
ham station and in servicing oigilai equipment, Plus a 
cumulative index for all four volumes for the 73 TEST 
EQUIPMENT LIBRARY. S4.95/ 

• RF AND DIGITAL TEST EQUIPMENT YOU CAN 
BUILD— BK 1044 — flt burst, function, square wave gen- 
era tors, variable length pulse generators — 100 kHz 
marker, l-t and rf sweep generators, audio osc, afrrf sig- 
nal Injector, 146 MHz synthesizer, digital readouts tor 
counters, several counters. prescaler r microwave 
meter, etc. 252 pages. $5.95/ 



*Use the order card In this magazine or Itemize your order on a separate piece of paper and mail to: 73 Radio Bookshop • 
Peterborough NH 03456. Be sure to include check or detailed credit card information No C O.D. orders accepted. All orders 
add Si 50 handling first book, it. 00 each additional book. $10 00 per book foreign airmail Please allow 4 6 weeks for 
delivery Questions regarding your order? Please write to Customer Service at the above address. (Prices subject to Change 
on books not published by 73 Magazine.) 



FOR TOLL FREE ORDERING CALL 1-800-258-5473 



ANTENNA BOOKS 5 new antenna books 




*VHF ANTENNA HANDBOOK- BK73BB— The NEW 
VHF Anienna Handbook details the Theory, design and 
construction of hundreds of different VHF and UhF an- 
tennas. , A practical book written for the average ama- 
teur who takes joy tn building, not full of compter for- 
mulas for the design engineer Packed with fabulous an 
tertna projects you can build. S5IK." 

« THE GIANT BOOK OF AMATEUR RA0IO ANTENNAS 
With the GIANT Book of Amateur Radio Antenna* 
BK1104— by your side, antennas will become the least of 
your worries Over 450 pages ol design Ideas, theory and 
reference data make this book live up to its title. The 7 
chapters cover everything from basic antenna theory 
through designs tor DIY accessories, as well as dozens of 
antenna designs. Whether planning to buiid or buy, 
design or admire, lest or enjoy a ham antenna— this is the 
book lor you From the editors of 73t published by Tab 
Boohs. J95S." 

• 73 DIPOLE AND LONG-WIRE ANTENNAS— BK 1016 
—by Edward M. Noll W3FOJ , This Is the first collection 
of virtually every type of wire antenna used by ama- 
teurs. Includes dimensions, configurations, and de- 
tailed construction data for 73 different antenna 
types. Appendices describe the construction of noise 
bridges, line tuners, and data on measuring resonant 
frequency, velocity factor, and swf. $5 50." 

e PRACTICAL ANTENNAS FOR THE RADIO AMATEUR 
— BK1015— A manual describing how to equip a ham 
station with a suitable antenna. A wide range of antenna 
topics, systems, and accessories are presented giving 
l he reader some food for thought and practical data for 
construction. Designed to aid the experienced ham and 
novice as well. Only $9.95. * 



• ALL ABOUT CUBICAL QUAD ANTENNAS (2nd edi- 
tion)— BKi 196 — The Classic on Quad design, 
theory, construction, and operation. New 2nd edition 
contains new lead and matching systems and new 
data. $5,95.' 

• BEAM ANTENNA HANDBOOK (New 5th edition)- 
BK1 W— Yagt beam theory, construction and operation. 
Information on wire beams, SWR curves and matching 
systems. A "must " for serious DXers $595" 

• VHF HANDBOOK FOR RADIO AMATEURS- BK 1198 
—Contains information on FM theory, operallon and 
equipment, VHF antenna design and construction, sateU 
ti!e~cM£» and the newest solid state circuits 16 95* 

• THE RADIO AMATEUR ANTENNA HANDBOOK - 
9KT199 — All about wire antennas, beams, tuners, 
baluns, coax, red ■ a is SWR and lowers Clear and com- 
plete information $6 95" 

• SIMPLE, LOW COST WIRE ANTENNAS FOR RADIO 
AMATEURS— BK 1200— All new data and everything you 
want to Know about low-cost, multi-band antennas, inex- 
pensive beams, invisible" antennas tor hams in 
"tough Ht locations $6.35* 

COOK BOOKS 

• TTL COOKBOOK— BK1G63— by Donald Lancaster 
Explains what TTL is. how it works, and how to use it. 
Discusses practical applications, such as a digital 
counter and display system, events counter, electronic 
stopwatch, digital voltmeter and a digital tachometer. 
$9,50 

• CMOS COOKBOOK — BK1011— by Don Lancaster. 
Details the application ot CMOS, the low power logic 
family suitable lor most applications presently 
dominated by TTL Required reading for every serious 
digital experimenter! 510.50.* 

• TVT COOKBOOK — BK1064— by Don Lancaster. 
Describes the use of a standard television receiver as a 
microprocessor CRT terminal Explains and describes 
character generation, cursor control and interface in- 
formation in typical, easy to- understand Lancaster 
style .89,95." 



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m HOW TO DEFEND YOURSELF AGAINST RADAR— BK120/I— by Bruce F Bogner and James R. Bodnar, a lawyer 
and rada* expert. This book gives you the ammunition to challenge the radar "evidence' that usually leads to a 
speeding convrction. The major part ot the book details the inner workings ol radar— you II become more of an ex 
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speeding ticket— the observations, measures and testimony you must obtain to defend yourself without the help of 
a lawyer The price is a lot less than a tine! 16-96* 



THE WELL 
EQUIPPED 
HAM SHACK 

*4» 



*^> 



*»> 



•wORJS 





• WORLD REPEATER ATLAS -BK73tS—CompfeTefy up- 
dated, over 230 pages ot repeater listings are indexe d by 
location and frequency. More than 50 maps pinpoint 2000 
repeater local tons throughout the USA Foreign listings 
include Europe, the Middle East. South America, and 
Africa. $495' 

• THE MAGIC OF HAM RAD!O^BK73l2— by Jerrold 
Swank r WBHXR begins with a brief history of amateur 
radio and of Jerry's involvement in it. Part 2 details many 
of ham radio's heroic moments. Hamdom's close lies 
with the continent of Antarctica are the subject of Pan 3. 
in Part 4 the strange and humorous sides of ham life get 
their due And what of the future? Part 5 peers info the 
crystal tan. $4.95." 

• A GUIDE TO HAM RADIO— SK7321— by Larry 
Kahaner WB2NEL What's Amateur Radio all about'' You 
can learn the basics of this fascinating hobby with this 
excellent beginner's guide It answers the most frequent- 
|y asked questions in an easy-going manner, and It 
shows the test way to go about getting en FCC license, 
A Guide to Ham Radio is an ideal int rod uc ho n to a hobby 
enjoyed by people around the world $4.95 * 

• WORLD RADIO TV HANDBOOK 1361, 35TH EDITION 
— BK1 184 — This book js the be Die of international broad 
casters, providing the onty authoritative source of exact 
information about broadcasting and TV stations world 
wide, This i98i edition is completely revised, giving 
comprehensive coverage of short t medium and long 
wave, 560 pages of vital aspects of world listening. 
S16.5Q 



MICROCOMPUTER BOOKS FROM 73 




• SOME OF THE BEST FROM KILOBAUD/MICROCOM- 
PUTING — BK731 1 — A collection of the best articles that 
have recently appear e£ .-. Kilobaud/ MICROCQMPUT 
IN& Included is material on the TR&40 and PET 
systems, CP/M. the 808080857280 chips, the ASR-33 ter- 
mi nai Data base management, word processing, text 
editors and file structures are covered too. Programming 
techniques and hardcore hardware construction proi 
eels for modems, hlg/h speed cassette interlaces and 
TVTs are also Included in this large format, 200 plus 
page edition. $10.95.' 

• 40 COMPUTER GAMES— BK7381— Forty games in all 
in nine different categories. Games for large and small 
systems, and even a section on calculator games. Many 
versions of BASIC used and a wide variety of systems 
represented, A must for the serious computer games- 
man $7,95* 

• THE NEW HOBBY COMPUTERS— BK7340— This 
book takes it from where "HOBBY COMPUTERS ARE 
HERE!' r leaves off, with chapters on Large Scale integra- 
tion, how to choose a microprocessor chip, an Introduc 

cost UQ for a computer, com- 
ig memory boards -and 
much, much more! Don't miss this tremendous value! 
Only $4.95.* 



k IWP I h PIV ww lw yi ^W^WUB U PIMUI **> 

tlon to programming, low co 
puter arithmetic, checkini 



• UNDERSTANDING AND PROGRAMMING MICRO 
COMPUTERS— 8K73S2— A valuable addition to your 
computing library This two-part text includes the best 
articles that have appeared in 73 and Kilobaud 
Microcomputing magazines on the hardware and soft- 
ware aspects of microcomoutmg Well-known authors 
and well-structured text helps the reader get involved. 

• HOW TO BUILD A MICROCOMPUTER-AND REALLY 
UNDERSTAND IT— BK7325-by Sam Creason, The elec- 
tronics hobbyist who wants lo build his own microcom- 

?uter system now has a practical ' Now-To " guidebook 
his book is a combination technical manual and pro- 
gramming guide that lakes the hobbyist step-by- step 
through the design, construction, testing and debugging 
of a complete microcomputer system. Must reading for 
anyone desiring a true understanding of small computer 
systems. 19 95.* 

• HOBBY COMPUTERS ARE HEREl^BK7322— If you 
want to come up to speed on how computers work. . . 
hardware and software, . this Is an excellent book, It 
starts with fundamentals and explains the circuits, and 
the basics of programming, along with a couple ol TVT 
construction projects, ASCII-Baudot, etc. This booH has 
the highest recommendations as a teaching aid $4.95 " 






*Use the order card In Ihis magazine or itemize your order on a separate piece of paper and mail to: 73 Radio Bookshop • 
Peterborough NH 03456 Be sure to include check or detailed credit card information. No COD. orders accepted. Ail orders 
add St. 50 handling lirst book, St. 00 each additional book, $10 00 per book foreign airmail Please allow 4-6 weeks for 
delivery Questions regarding your order? Please write to Customer Service at the above address {Prices subject to change 
on books not published by 73 Magazine.} 

FOR TOLL FREE ORDERING CALL 1-800-258-5473 






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Pag* 



ft,S. No 
2 a£a.' Advanced Electronic 

Application* 80. 122, 196 

478 ACE CommurncaMon 68 

329 AR Technical Products iQB 

44Q Advanced Comm Intranational 85 
40G Alaska Mi crowiva Labs 37,156 

20 All Electronics. &j 

Amaieur Electronic Supply 

77, BB. 102, 152. 156, 172 

5 Amateur-Wholesale Electronics .31 

461 Amneur-Whoiesiie Electronics 30 
33 1 Am a teur-Wholesake Electronics 59 

American Crystal Supply 201 

334 Amidon As40ca f - 102 

JSKf in mi OC1 ....... ........... IOf 

Antenna SanK .85 

63 Anitnna Speciallils, ...SO 

71 Applied Invention 158 

Appliance & Equipment Co., inc. 

■ 200 
8 Apiron Lata 106 

Associated Redid. . . . 78 

469 BG Carl Electronics 200 

11 Barker & Williamson 30,152 
305 Barry Electronics ... §7 
26 Bash Educational Services — 76 

440 Rev Basse it Electronics, Inc 170 

478 Rex Basselt Electronics* Inc 18 

420 Benjamin Michael Industries. .. 187 
10 BHilCo .30 

12 Bullet Electronics .220 

Butternut Electronics 63, 179 

321 Certified International .201 

13 Ctegg 155 
89 Outierfree Modular Consoles 41 

6 Code Quick 200 

480 Comrnsoft 190 

483 Commsoft - 188 

28 Comm, Center. NE 204 

382 Comm Concepts. Inc. ~. t5fl. 170 
377 Communications Electronics , 203 
487 Communications Electronic 

Specialties 189 

462 Communications Electronic 
Specialties . .,91 

443 Comm Specialists ...33 

t5 Comm. specialists 103 

438 Comm. Specialists 169 

444 Compute/ Plus, . . . 200 

Con ley Radio SupplyrAEA. ..... 10t 

Crown Micro Products 133 

70 Cubic Comm . 98. 99 

489 Curtis Electro Devices, Inc. .... . 188 

466 DB + Enterprises. ..200 



R S No Pa-ge 

330 Deoco Dectronics 127 

307 Debco Eleciromci. ..96 

Derrick Eleci ionics/ AEA. 106 

* Desktop Microcomputing 154 
411 DGM Electronics. Inc.. 112 

416 Qigi-Key 215 

Digital Research Parts. , ♦.♦,.,. 223 

43 ONE, Inc. ....,..,,,,,.**,*,,*. 193 

16 Downlink. Inc. 42 

425 Ooppler Systems 202 

R L. Drake Company 37, 117 

Dxpediuons International 42 

453 E.GE-, Inc IBS 

30 Microcomputing . .... 155 

91 ETCO Electronics. . ...... 113 

* Electronic Equipment Bank .. 119 
447 Electronic Hobby Innovations, 79 

82 Electronic Recyclers of MA 200 

24 Encomm, Inc ....,..* 163 

400 Engineering Consulting. . , 91 

Erickson Comm 187 

Everg>ades Communications . 42 

73 Eipotek 86 

85 FaMscait, Inc. 193 

439 Ben Franklin Electronics. , 201 

323 Fox-Tango Corp . . . 157 

* Global Electronics. 61 

417 Gotham Antenna 157 

% RnT F^aliairaaialir- ■ ■ I aCU • 

86 HJR Communications. . 37 
345 Hmt Communications 

.. 106, 107.110 

31 HaiTronn 76 

Ham Radio Center. ..... . HI 

* Ham Radio Outlet ..3 
449 The Ham Shack 121 

33 Hamtronics, NY 221 

460 HandlTek 202 

18 Hastings Antenna 51 

74 Heath Co. 53 

34 Henry Radio Co* H. 81 

72 Higam &eciron>cs . . . * 

320 Hoosker Electronic* . . .57 

Hustler, Inc 2B 

316 Hy-Gain Div of Telex Comm. 

69 71 

■> ■ | .■*»■ i ■■■■■>■■■-■ rai Wa. ■ ■ 

' ICOM ..10. 11, 18S 

78 I ndepenrJent Cry stal Supply Co. 

.-_., .***..ai-ai--t">B'aj-M>-aiBaT 4t%»P\/ 

35 Info-Tech 87 

414 Inoiek Engineering 200. 202 

insert Products. ,...158 

445 Instant Software 



Page 

124 
125 



RS.No 

Dealers 

Amateur Radio Progname. 
36 International Crystal 
409 JDR Microdevpcea. ■ 

38 Jameco Electronics., . 

39 Jan Crystal ... 179 

471 Johnston, Bill/N&Kfl , 157 

1 KB Microcomputing 155 

81 KDK Distributing 19 

MjJW . . i i ^ • i ■ ■ * ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ i ■ ' f ■ ■ * ■ i i • - «1 

Kantionic* ......... , .... 171, 170 

' Kirk Electronics. 143 

■ Kenwood CovIW.7,26,6&65 
457 Lewis Construct ion Co 45 

* Lfve-Via Satellite, inc. ..,,....^51 

481 Luly., 186 

451 MCM Communications ,,43 

477 MCM Communications.. ,.,82 

47 MFJ Enterprises 

.83.85,87,89,91,93 

482 MFJ Entsfpnsea 189 

48 MH£ Electronics .... 205-214 

77 M-Squaied Engineering 85 

5ft Maca* Electronics 173 

44 Macroiionics . ...... 123 

45 Madison Electronics Supply 

2A 7Q 

_ j I - i . i <■•■■] i ■■rBaaaar-->'l- SV| MbAf 

139 Memphis Amateur Electronics . . 80 

49 Micro Control Spec! allies. ..... 80 

61 Microlog . 72 T 73 

313 Micro Management Systems 

. ...108.193 

50 Microcrafi Corp 121. J58 
52 MidCom Electronics, Inc . 131 
308 J. W Miller ...119. 121 

84 Mirage Comm. -83 

318 National Comm. Group 95, 122 

412 Nemai Electronics 79 

327 Nordlund & Associates , 200 

* Of pit Magazine ......... 173 

PC Electronics . . 101, 128 

Palomar Engineers 4. 104 

421 Phillips- Teen Electronics 201 

300 Pipo Comm 170 

58 Poty Paks 102 

459 ORO Engineering . . . 137 

60 Quest Electronics ♦ . , 218 

42 RF Gain Ltd 157 

315 Radio Activity 35 

61 Radio Amateur Calibook. Inc 

88.113 

454 Radiottil. .. 86 

479 Radio Snack, , 96 

381 Radio Systems Technology. .... 201 



as. 

397 
62 



54 
418 

21 

378 

65 

304 

484 

■ 

64 

1 
349 



433 

367 



68 

436 

486 

46$ 

403 

30 

69 

316 

■ 

328 

76 

75 



311 
437 
485 
90 



79 

80 

■ 

29 
83 

336 



No. Page) 

Rad*o World ..... 78, 170 

Ramsey Electronics 217, 222 

Richer*'! Engineering. Ltd 201 

Robot Research 23 

flolin Distributors 102 

Rous Wire Die, Inc 79 

vifl * * 1 * * ■ m-4* * 1 4 > I it » i a> m m J 1 wO 

S F Amateur Radio Service 187 

Sabadia Export Corp. 42 

Sabtrontcs ISO 

SCAN 41 

Semiconductors Surplus - 218. 21 9 
73 Magazm* 
BooksJCati tor Manuscnpts. . 66 

Books/Ham Club Special 66 

73 Magazine 

Books 152, 153. 156, 159-181, 173 

Dealers Ad 194 

"Moving' .153 

Subscriptions . 1 14. 202 

University Mic/olilms 202 

Sherwood Engineering 201 

Skylec 201 

Step Electronics, 195 

Spacecoasl Research 42 

Spec Ironies ... S7. 224 

Spectrum Comm 129 

Spectrum international Inc 153 

Standard. .*, 166 

Star Trak Systems, Inc 51 

Stewart Quads. 28, 156 

Stnjjc Corp 202 

Surplus Electronics Corp. . . 202 
Tele* Comm Inc , , . , 69. 71 

Ten- Tec, Ire . . . 2V1 15 

Tax.a$ Microtrpnics - 48 

Trac Electronics 102 

Trans Comm. Inc, ,52 

Universal Communications. .49,84 

vg pfoducis. - . .. . t43 

Van Gordon Eng. 93,113 

Vanguard Labs ....202 

Vani-Ptate Co. 152 

Varian Eimac... 190 

VoCom Products Corp 109 

WS Engineering , . . , 28 

Wacom Products ,158 

Western. Eleclronlcs 152 

Wilson Systems. 24,25, 36 

Wind ward Jnc 171 

Yaesu Electronics Corp 

Co¥lll, 16.17 

ab ftmHS^^ Pv I U Jfm, m a ■ « . c b a iiiiiaai 



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162 73 Magazine • December, 1981 




INTR 




UCING SAIMTECS 



SANTEONOLOGY breaks into 

the 440 band with style! The new 
ST-7/T synthesizes the entire band 
in 5 kHz steps, works both up and 
down repeater splits and does it 
all right from your hand, with ver- 
satile power options of 3 watts, I 
watt or even 50 m ill r watts fall 
nominal), to reach out to where 
you want. The high power mode 
of 3 watts radiates on 440 [ike 5 
watts on 2 meters . . . and that's a 
handfullf 

Tones? This one has them , . . tones 
and subtones! The 16 button tone 




pad is a SANTEC Standard 
extra cost, and the ST-7/Ts op- 
tional synthesized subtone en- 
coder is controlled by the radio's 
front panel switch, 

All the regular SANTEC acces- 
sories used with your HT-I200 fit 
the ST-7/T as well, meaning that 
you can enjoy both bands fully 
with a smaller cash investment. 
Grab the new SANTEC ST-7/T and 
join the fun on 440 MHz. See your 
SANTEC Dealer for delivery 
derails' 




SANTEC 



ID . 1 




STILL THE LEADER 



*Safe of the ST-7/T is subject to FCC Certification 






SANTEC'S popular HT-1200 is the incom- 
parable 2 meter leader This little rig is hand- 
ing over quality power and features that 
you'd expect from something nearer the size 
of a bread box, SANTEC packs a 2 meter 
ham shack into the palm of your hand! 

You can carry scan, search, TO memories and 
fully synthesized key pad control around 
with you and sail get out with a big 3.5 
watts (nominal). Compare them apples to 
anything you want, and settle for nothing 
less. 




SANTEC 





r"~ 


Encomm, lr>C. 


nc» wnA rm mirr rftttfMIW **pul* 




2000 Avtrtue- G 


WJTEC HT.1300 




Sun* GOO 


VWTIC S* 




Bwio TX 75074 


*ur»* mi WtfEC Qt*m 



M*U 



The SANTEC HT-I200 is approved under FCC Part 15 
and exceeds FCC regulations limiting spurious emissions 

c 1981. Encomm, Inc. 

2000 Avenue G, Suite 800. Piano, Texas 75074 
Phone (2 1 4 [423 -0024 * INTLTLX 203920 ENCOM UR 



NAME 



GUI 



ADDKBS 



CJTY 



STWE II? 
YOU HAY SEND A DUPUCATE OF THIS FORM. 



1 
I 
I 

I 

I 
I 
I 
I 

I 
I 

I 



FUN! 



5 73 helped pioneer these 


22 Every pot has one— most 


machines 


repeaters, too 


6 Bonne chance, on CW 


23 Say die? 


7 73 used to track him 


26 Mexico prefix 


11 Component 


29 Civil defense (abbrj 


14 Former column (3 words) 


30 Popular bootleg prefix 


20 Costa Rica prefix 


32 Postscript 




John Edwards KI2U 
78 56 86th Street 
Gfendale NY 11385 



As the year draws to a close, our thoughts return home. The holi- 
day season arrives, and one longs to be with family. 

Well, it may not be family in the traditional sense, but "home 1 ' for 
the FUN! column is 73 Magazine^ This month* we take an affec- 
tionate look at the old homestead and contemplate, with some 
curiosity, what our hobby would be like without it, 

ELEMENT 1— CROSSWORD PUZZLE 
(Illustration 1) 



Across 

1 T^sQTH 

8 Pakistan prefix 

9 Norway prefix 

10 RTTY: cal 

11 73's digital section 

12 KP4-land (abbr.J 

13 Morse or ASCII 

14 Contest columnist 

15 Sweden prefix 

16 73$ is 21 

17 Test letters 

18 A clear band space 

19 Deface 

21 An ARRL section (abbr.) 

22 Cover artist; issues #1 and 



24 Cell type 

25 A 73 article, before pub- 
lished (abbr) 

26 K2AGZ 

27 Mr. FUN! (abbr.) 
29 Bolivia prefix 

31 Poland prefix 

33 Monthly feature (2 words) 

Down 

1 Belonging to "Looking 
West 1 ' columnist 

2 When W2NSD/1 , 

hams hsten 

3 Iran prefix 



250 










4 


73's original QTH 




i 




2 


3 




4 




5 






6 


7 




8 












9 




10 






11 




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13 










14 








15 






16 






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20 


ia 










19 








^B 








21 












22 




23 








24 
















25 1 












26 








^7 










29 


30 




31 


32 




33 


i 























ELEMENT 2— MULTIPLE CHOICE 

1) During this publications early days, Wayne Green would often 
extol the virtues of his favorite car. It was: 

1, a 1912 Buick 

2. a Porsche 

3. a Volvo 

4, a Flat 

2} When this column first appeared, in October, 1980, it was written 
by WB2IBE. Whatever happened to him? 

1. He quit to write a similar column for Creative Computing 
2 He died 

3. He retired 

4. He upgraded and changed his call to KI2U 

3) What was 7-Ts original cover price? 

1 + 37(t 
2.73c 
3. 75« 
4.88C 

4) How much did a life subscription cost in December 1961? 

1.S30 

2. $50 

3. $75 

4. $100 

5) Which person listed below has not been a DX columnist for 73? 

1. James Cain K1TN 

2, Floyd Vivmo WA2DCS 

3, Chuck Stuart N5KC 

4. Yuri Blanarovich VE3BMV 



ELEMENT 3— TRUE-FALSE 

1) During this magazine's first two years, it was 
printed on green paper to differentiate it 
from the competition. 



True False 



AAPROPAGAT I ONHA 


S M T T O F 


FCORUSHEL 


S V S K R E 


HLLH I NGBE 


O I H A T A 


FSUTTHEWT 


C N S I T I 


GDOR I DSBT 


I O D S Y S 


SROVLL I KE 


A C F E L J 


EA I GGFATR 


L F C WO B 


TWESTGGOS 


E E WO O I 


BAGEYWBTW 


V T R O P E 


RRENAHAKO 


ERBH I D 


LWJA IWPTM 


N Y J P L E 


HMAHWKOMJ 


T A Z K A D 


F TWOMHOOW 


S A A I J E 


MTROPERO I 


BSUCXMNK I NGMYDL 



Illustration 1, 
164 73 Magazine • December, 1981 



Illustration 2. 



2) From 1965 to 1971, the Cigar Smoker's Jour- 
nal was a 73 publication. 

3) Wayne Green once edited CO Magazine. 

4) The ARRL had a full-page ad in 73's frrst 
issue. 

5) A 73 FUN! editor once campaigned for ARRL 
office by handing out promotional rolling 
paper. 

6) 73 is available in microfilm from University 
Microfilm, Ann Arbor, Michigan. 

7) While this year + s M FUN! Polf* counted 612 
ballots, the actual response was closer to 
1,000. 

8) "RTTY Loop" made its 73 debut in the June, 
1977, issue. 

9) The first ft em ever described in 73's "New 
Products" section was an Allied catalog, 

10) Wayne Green, in addition to his many other 
responsibilities, is also the mayor of Peter- 
borough, New Hampshire, 

11) YA1NSD was Wayne's callslgn in 
Afghanistan, 

12) 73 also publishes HR Report, 

13) The ARRL subscribes to 73. 

14) Mickey Mouse once appeared on 73* s cover 

15) In 1976, 73 published 13 issues. 

16) Someone once wrote to "Ham Help" asking 
for assistance in building a particle beam. 

17) A 1980 73 profile of Dick Bash opened with 
the quote, ''Morality? Man t who am i to 
judge morality?" 

18) Before this 73, there were others, 

19) "73 ONTHE-AIR" is the name of 73's month- 
ly cable TV program. 

20) A 73 columnist was once interviewed by 
Johnny Carson on the "Tonight Show." 



ELEMENT 4— FILL IN THE BLANKS 

1) You are reading issue # (no peeking). 

2) Along with "Never Say Die/' the other three original 73 features 
still being run are , , , and , 

3) "WelL . , I Can , Can't I?" 

4) -ARRL Love it, Hate it T ." 



5} As editor of Astounding Science Fiction, he gave sci f i writers 
such as Isaac Asimov and Robert Hefnlein their first national 
exposure. Later, he wrote an article for the first issue of 73 and 
was listed as a contributing editor. His name was . 

ELEMENT 5— HIDDEN WORDS 
(Illustration 2) 

Hidden In this puzzle are the name often past and present 73 fea- 
tures. The words are formed in any direction— horizontally, verti 
cally, or diagonally, forwards or backwards. As you find each word, 
circle it. 



THE ANSWERS 



Element 1: 

See Illustration 1A. 



Element 2: 

1) — 2. Fun, if you can afford it 

2)— 4. A truly remarkable fellow. 

3)— 1 Imagine a time when 73<t was too much to charge for a 

magazine! 
4)— 1. Wayne told you it was a great deal 
5)— Z But he's available, 

Efement 3: 
1)— False 
2)— False 
3)— True 
4)— False 
5)— True 
6)— True 
7)— True 
8)— True 
9)— True 
10)— False 
11)— True 
12)— False 
13)— True 



14)— True 

15)— True 

16)— False 



Come on! 

Hardly. 

And it hasn't been the same publication since. 

Would you believe a classified? 

It seemed like a good Idea at the time — but I lost. 

Yeah, but I have to squint to read it. 

Next time, I'll wait longer before counting, 

And it's still going strong. 

To the delight of amateurs everywhere. 

At least f think not. 

Not recently. 

Right state, wrong company. 

Of course. My 73 issue #1, by the way, is stamped: 

'■Received: ARRL HO." I got it this year at a local 

flea market* A real collector's item, no? 

September, 1977, being printed on a Teletype. 

The usual 12, plus a special year-end "Holiday" 

issue. 

If this one were true, OSCAR might be in trouble. 



PET 


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R O U 


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liiustration 7 A. 



(PROPAGAT I 0~N) H A 
TOFFCORUSH e(l) 

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liiustration 2A, 
73 Magazine • December, 1981 165 



17)— True 
18)— True 



19)— False 
20)— True 



Morality? Man* I just take the cash and run. 
As you may have guessed. 73 was a popular title for 
various club newsletters and other ham publica- 
tions. The 1960 73 stuck. 
?3 K $ Tuesday night skeds. 
Johnny and I chatted back in 1969. 

Element 4; 

1)— 255; 2)— Propagation. Letters, New Products; 3)— Dream; 

4)" Don't care; 5) — John Campbell. 

Element 5: 

See Illustration 2A. 

SCORING 

Element 1: 

Twenty points for the completed puzzle, or 1/2 point for each ques- 
tion correctly answered. 



Element 2: 

Four points for each correct answer, 

Element 3: 

One point for each correct answer. 

Element 4: 

Four points for each blank filled. 

Element 5: 

Two points for each word found 

Think you know this magazine? 



1*20 points 
21-40 points 

41-60 points 

61-80 points 



"73 Magazine'? Oh, is that what Pm reading?" 
Once wrote a letter to Wayne complaining about a 

misleading question In the FUN! column. 
Bums issues off of friends. 
Is an ardent subscriber. 



81-100+ points Has memorized the yearty indices. 



/WARDS 



8/7/ Gosney KE7C 
Micro-80, Inc. 
2665 North Busby Road 
Oak Harbor WA 98277 

KOREAN AMATEUR 
RADIO LEAGUE AWARDS 

This week I was the happy 
recipient of a very nice letter 
from the Korean Amateur Radio 
League. Two very attractive 
awards were among the mate- 
rial received and it's my honor to 
share the KARL AWARDS with 
you now. 

AKA, the Worked Ail Korean 
Prefix Award, Is issued to ama- 
teurs and shortwave listening 
stations worldwide on payment 
of a fee of 5 IRCs and an award 
application. 

Each claim must be accom- 
panied by a list of Korean pre- 
fixes worked in prefix order. 
Each list must be accompanied 
by a signed verification of two 
amateurs that the applicant has 



confirmation of each contact In 
his or her possession at the time 
of application. Please do not 
send QSL cards; the verified list 
will suffice. 

Cards dated on or after Jan* 
uary 1, 1959, will qualify. Con- 
tacts made from any location 
within your call area are eligible. 
Contacts with HL9 stations will 
be graciously accepted. 

All correspondence should be 
sent to Awards Manager, Kore- 
an Amateur Radio League, CPO 
Box 162, Seoul Central, Korea, 

The HM Award, formerly 
known as HMA, has identical 
application requirements, with 
the exception that the award is 
issued for total HM/HL OSOs 
worked in any one of five Award 
Classes, The following classes 
apply; Class K, 0, R, E, and A. 
Spelling out the country's name, 
the classes require 5, 10, 20, 30, 
and 50 OSOs respectively to 
qualify. 




St* 




^ 



A K A 



U r * )t f\ 



: .• 



When applying for either of 
these classic Asian awards, tell 
our friends in the "land of morn- 
ing calm" that you read about it 
in 73 Magazine* 

BULGARIAN 1300 AWARD 

The Bulgarian Federation of 
Radio Amateurs introduces the 
award, Bulgaria— 1300, to com- 
memorate the 1300th anniver- 
sary of the foundation of the 
Bulgarian State, in 6S1 AD. 

This award will be issued to li- 
censed radio amateurs through- 
out the world having the 
necessary score for established 
two-way radio contacts with 
Bulgarian amateurs. To be eligi- 
ble, all contacts must be made 
in the period January 1, 1980, 
through December 31, 1981, 
This gives our readers only a 
month, so you'd better hurry and 
work a few contests before the 
deadline! 

The award is available in 
three categories: Class 1 — re- 
quires 1300 QSO points; Class 
2— requires 1000 QSO points; 
Class 3— requires 500 QSO 
points. 

QSO points are earned as fol- 
lows: 30 points for QSOs with 



m 



any Bulgarian amateur located 
in the capitals of Bulgaria work- 
ing with the prefixes LZ13. 
These are LZ13C (Sofia, The 
Centra! Radio Club); LZ13CSF 
(Sofia): L213CPL (PHska); 
LZ13CPR (Preslav), and 
LZ13CWT (Veliko Tlrnovo). Five 
(5) QSO points are earned for 
contact with any other LZ sta- 
tion irrespective of his or her 
callsign. 

Regardless of operating 
mode, contacts may be made 
once per hand. The award is is- 
sued free of charge and the only 
requirements of major concern 
are that your contacts should be 
listed in prefix order, and the list 
be verified by at least two fellow 
amateurs. 

Applicants may apply for this 
award any time up to December 
31, 1982. Remember, however, 
that all contacts must be made 
before December 31 1 1981, to be 
valid. Send your application to; 
P.R, of Bulgaria, Sofia 1000, PO 
Box 830. Bulgaria. 

WORKED LA3FUMM AWARD 

The three radio officers 
aboard the Royal Viking Sea, 
a Norwegian ship which cruises 




tku rrrttfitt that 




tut KOtlAH AMITtUt fADIO Lf*OUl inc 






166 73 Magazine * December, 1981 



LA3FL/MM 



Iffc? ••• 







all over the world, are offer 
mg free the Worked LA3FUMM 
Award. 

Applicants must work the sta- 
tion on CW in four different 



bands, minimum of 539 RST. A 
QSL card must be sent for each 
band to the LA bureau or to Per 
A. Mikalsen, Chief Radio Offi- 
cer, Royal Viking Sea, Rusel*k- 
kveien 14, Oslo, Norway. 



ROYAL VIKING SEA 



ftOTALMNNG HJNl 

■ 




AUKKED 



LA3FL/MM 



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FESSENDENS75TH 

Ouring the week of Christ- 
mas, 1981, AA1 A will be operat- 
ing most HF SSB phone bands 
to commemorate the 75th anni- 
versary of the experiments by 
Reginald Fessenden, who made 
two-way contacts with Scotland 
as well as the famous Christmas 
Eve voice broadcasts, Fessen- 
6en also was responsible for 
many radio firsts as well as 
many innovations such as the 
heterodyne principle and high 
frequency alternators. He later 
was the developer of sonar. 

Special QSLs will be sent out 
with more information to those 
who work us. We will be operat- 
ing near the lower edge of the 
General class bands. 

Two books are available for 
those interested in a famous 
early radio experimenter Fes- 
sendert, Builder of Tomorrows, 
by Helen M. Fessenden, and Ra- 
dio's First Voice, by Ormond 
Raby. 

BETHLEHEM, INDIANA, 
CHRISTMAS EXPEDITION 

The Clark County ARC, Jeffer- 
sonvllle, Indiana, will operate 
from Bethlehem, Indiana, from 
1700 UTC, December 12 to 1700 
UTC, December 13, Operating 
frequencies for W9WWI/9 will be 
3.905, 7,240, 14.290, 21.365 MHz 
on SSB as propagation permits, 
The N9RM 146,25/85 repeater 
will be used for local contacts. 

A special BVa M x11" Christ- 



mas season certificate imprint- 
ed with the unique Bethlehem 
postal hand stamps will be sent 
to all stations who QSL. Please 
OSL with a large SASE to Clark 
County ARC, PO Box 532, Jeffer- 
sonvi lie IN 47130. 

BETHLEHEM, WEST VIRGINIA, 

EXPEDITIONS 

The Triple States Radio Ama- 
teur Club will operate from Beth* 
lehem, West Virginia, from De- 
cember 17 to December 21, from 
1400 to 2300 UTC daily. Operat- 
ing frequencies for WD8DDU8 
will be 7.275. 14.325, 21.425, and 
28.550 MHz on SSB t and 7.110, 
14.075, 21.110, and 28.110 MHz 
on CW + 

A special holiday-season card 
will be sent to all contacts. 
Send an SASE to TSRAC, 26 Ma- 
ple Lane, Bethlehem, Wheeling 
WV 26003. 

BIG SKY 

WORKED ALL COUNTIES 

AWARD 

Recently, the Lower Yellow- 
stone Amateur Radio Club of 
the Sidney/Glendive area of 
Montana decided to sponsor a 
Montana Counties Award. The 
certificate was the idea of 
WB7UTJ and N7BMR. 

To quality for this award, any 
licensed amateur must contact 
and have received a QSL for all 
56 counties in Montana on any 
band or mode of operation. Re- 
peater contacts will not be ac- 
ceptable, and all QSOs to be val- 
id must have taken place on or 
after January 1, 1980, 

To apply for the award, have 
your list verified by two other 
amateurs and send an award fee 
of one dollar (US funds) and two 
first-class stamps to either 
WB7UTJ or N7BMR. 

The Kauai Amateur Radio 
Club is pleased to announce the 
establishment of five awards 
which are now available to ama- 
teurs worldwide. 

WORKED KAUAI AWARD 

The WK Award requires all 
contacts be made January 1, 
1980, or later on any band Of 
mode of operation. For appli- 
cants in all 50 states and Cana- 
da, five KARC member stations 
must be worked- DX stations 
need only three contacts with 
KARC members. General certifi- 
cation rules apply. 

WORKED HAWAII AWARD 

The WH Award has the same 
requirements of the WK Award 



73 Magazine • December, 1981 167 



except that for US and Canadian 
amateurs 50 Hawaiian contacts 
must be logged, five of which 
must be KARC members. For DX 
stations, 15 Hawaiian stations 
must be worked and one must 
be a KAHC member 

WORKED HAWAIIAN 
ISLANDS AWARD 

To qualify for the WHI Award, 
five Hawaiian stations must be 
worked on the following Hawai- 
ian Islands: Hawaii, Kauai, 
Maul, and Oahu, 

WORKED ALL 
HAWAIIAN ISLANDS 

The WAHI Award requires the 
applicant to work a minimum of 
one station on each of the 
following islands: Hawaii, 
Kahoolawe. Kauai, Lanai* 
Molokai, Maui. Niihau, and 
Oahu, 

WORKED ALL HAWAIIAN 

COUNTIES AWARD 

There are a total of five (5) 
counties in the state of Hawaii. 
To qualify for the WAHC Award, 
one Hawaiian station must be 
worked in the counties of 
Hawaii, Honolulu, Kalawao, 
Kauai, and Maui. 

Be sure to enclose $1,00 for 
each award being applied for 
the help defray costs incurred in 
maintaining this program 
series. All correspondence 
should be directed to the 
Awards Manager, KARC, PO 
Box 546, Kalaheo HI 96741. 

SANTA CLAUS, INDIANA 

The Pike County Amateur 
Radio Club of Wmslow, Indiana, 
and the Old Post Amateur Radio 
Society of Vincennes, Indiana, 
will operate a special events sta- 
tion from Santa Claus, Indtana. 

The caltsign wM be W9CZH, 
and the dates, December 4, 5, 
and 6, Starting time is 0000Z on 
the 4th, continuing on through 
to 2300Z on the 6th t Frequencies 
(plus or minus QRM): 21.410, 
14,305, 7,270, and 3-925 SSB, 
14.090-14.100 RTTY, and 146,52 
FM. 

A special QSUXmas card 
postmarked from the Santa 
Glaus post office will be sent 
upon receipt of an BASE. Send 
to Santa Glaus, PO Box 111, 
Ireland IN 47545. 

MOUNT SAINT 
HELENS AWARD 

Down the road a mere 180 
miles sits majestic Mount St 



Helens. We here in Washington 
remember the historic Sunday 
morning very well. Supported in 
the community by a Naval Air 
Station, we thought for sure 
bombing maneuvers were un< 
derway here on Whidbey island- 
Instead, what we were hearing 
was the explosion and the 
awesome eruption of Mount St. 
Helens, a devastating act of 
nature which had happened 
some 14 minutes earlier (took 
this long for us to hear it at the 
speed of sound). By this time, 
radio announcers had already 
received the unfortunate news 
over the wire services, and after- 
shocks were being experienced 
which were to continue for 
weeks and months to come, 

The amateurs throughout the 
area performed marvelously In 
the hours of desperation. It 
behooves all of us, sometime in 
our amateur careers, to contact 
amateurs from the region and 
listen to the story they have to 
tell! 

A unique photographic award 
of the M L St. Helens eruption on 
May 18, 1960, is now available, 
Two opportunities, with no 
mode or band restrictions, are 
provided to qualify for this very 
popular award: 

1) Contact S or more stations 
within the counties of Washing- 
ton that surround Mount St. 
Helens (Clark, Cowlitz. Skama- 
nia, and Lewis counties). All 
contacts must be made on or 
after March 27 t 1980, which was 
the actual first eruption of the 
mountain in over 123 years. 

2) Report one contact with 
W7AIA (Clark County Amateur 
Radio Club) during its operation 
from 0200 UTC May 16 to 0200 
May 18, 1981. That marked the 
first anniversary of the disas- 
trous eruption that took the life 
of Reid Blackburn KA7AMF, 
who was a member of this spon- 
soring organization. 

To apply for this award, send 
appropriate log information and 
$2.00 or more as a donation to 
the Reid Blackburn Scholarship 
Fund which has been estab- 
lished in memory of our dedicat- 
ed friend and fellow amateur. 
Forward your application to 
Awards Manager, PO Box 1424, 
Vancouver WA 98668. 

SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA 
DX CLUB AWARD 

This week I received a very 
nice letter from Norm Friedman 
W60RD, representing the 




C&OA 



Certificate Of Recognition 



V 



/// t f t tftjtraf* titt f/tr/f ft ft 

(ttHftfntt hi* /tt J ft fit h 




tn em ft 41 // ffa */* f/fftt at v fifth tttitt ? 

fter fin witftvf ffltj tffttt t/_ 



- - 









Southern California DX Club, In- 
corporated, In his letter, Norm 
announced a Certificate of Rec- 
ognition which is issued to ama- 
teurs throughout the world who 
can qualify. 

Each applicant must work 
and confirm contact with 35 cur- 
rent members of the DX Club on 
any frequency from 1,8 to 30 
NIHz, This will qualify the appli- 
cant for the basic award. A 
bronze seal will be issued for 75 
contacts, a silver seal for 100 
contacts, and a gold seal will be 
presented for 125 contacts with 



Southern California DX Club 
members. 

Verification of these contacts 
can be administered by any 
ARAL or IARU affiliated club. All 
contacts must be made on or af* 
ter January 1 f 1980, to be valid. 

Send your iist of contacts and 
$2.00 US funds or 10 IRCs to 
Norm Friedman W60RD. For a 
current membership roster of 
the DX Club members, send an 
SASE and 2 IRCs to Norm and 
he will be sure a copy is rushed 
to your door. 



( CORRECTIONS 



Figure 8 in "Folded Unipole 
for 160." on page 32 of the Oc- 
tober issue, refers to an swr of 
"0'\ Such a value is impossible 
to obtain. The graph should 
have a low point of 1.0. 

Also, the review of Kenwood's 



TR-900Q, beginning on page 30 
of the August Issue, refers to 
measuring power over a range 
Of 143.3 10 148.7 MHz. This 
should read: 143.9 to 148 J MHz. 

Tim Daniel N8RK 
73 Magazine Staff 



168 73 Magazine * December, 1981 




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214B SSB 144 146 MHf Boomer 6195 

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220B 220 MHZ Boomer 66 95 

All Ml 11-Flemenl 2m FM Beam 34 50 

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HY GAIN ANTENNAS 

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1 4 AVQ/WB 10-40 Verticil 50 77 

KLM ANTENNAS 

KT34A 4-£»emeni Tfrband Btram 320 75 

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144.148 13 LB 2m 13-EMmi«m wrlh btlwi 77 95 

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420-450 14 14-Rlement UHF S«am 37 54 

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420-450 ISC 1B-et€mBnr UHFtoroscsr, 58 70 

4 3? 16LB 430- 434 MH? bsjrm/balun 00 70 

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ASTRON POWER SUPPLIES 
RS7A 5 amps «mtOTU0**» 7 amp ICS 
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RS20S same as R520A 4- speaker 
VS20M samptjs RS20A+ meters Ef <iri|tJ5table 
HS35A 25 Amp continuouB, 35 amp ICS. 
RS35M sflmp «i5 RS35A + metera 
VS35 M same as RS 35 A + meters & adiusrablr 

MIRAGE AMPS & WATT METERS 
MP1 HF SWR/Wall Mele* 
MP2 VHF SWR/wati m#fet 
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TELEX HEADSETS- HEADPHONES 
C1210 

CI 320 Headphones 
PftOCOM 200 Hflarfsot/dufll imp, MIC 
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Orders: 1 -S0O- 336-4799 

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Mailing Address' 2410 Drexel Street 

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January 1 thru 3 



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— CALL FOR QUOTES — 

Send stamp for flyer, Terms: Prices do not include 
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•-'See Lr$t of Advertisers on page T62 



73 Magazine » December. 1981 169 



SOCWL EVENTS 



Listings in this column are space-available basis. The 
provided free of charge on a following information should be 



included in every announce- 
ment: sponsor, event, date, 
time, place, city, state, admis- 
sion charge (if any), features, 
talk-in frequencies, and the 
name of whom to contact for 
further information. Announce- 
ments must be received two 
months prior to the month in 



Take your favorite H.T. out 
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out with an input of 3 watts, and 15 watts out with 
only 1 watt in. Compatible with I02AT, TR-2400. 
Yaesu. Wilson & Tempo! Other 2 meter models are avail- 
able with outputs of 25W and 75W< In addition to a 100W 
amplifier kit for 430MHZ. ^ 332 

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which the event takes place. 

FAIABAULTMN 
DECS 

The Courage Center Hand*- 
Ham System will hold its annual 
winter hamfest on Saturday, De- 
cember 5, 1981 T at the Eagles 
Club, Fairbault MN. There will 
be a flea market, a dinner at 
noon, a program, and prizes. For 
more information, contact Don 
Franz WQFIT. 1114 Frank Ave* 
nue, Albert Lea MN 66007. 

HAZEL PARK Ml 
DEC 6 

The 16th annual Hazel Park 
Amateur Radio Club Swap & 
Shop will be held on Sunday, De- 
cember 6 T 1981, at Hazel Park 
High School, Hughes Street at 
9V? Mile Road, 1 mile east of 
I-75, Hazel Park ML Tickets are 
$2.00 and tables are 75c per 
foot. Doors will open at 8:00 with 
the main prize drawing at 2:00 
prn. There will be plenty of food 
and free parking, plus hourly 
door prizes. Grand prizes are in- 
cluded with the admission tick- 
et, Talk-in on 146.52. For more in- 
formation, send an SASE to 
Jack Field W8UPU, 1444 E. 
Evelyn, Hazel Park Ml 48030. 

SOUTH BEND IN 
JAN 3 

A hamfest swap and shop will 
be held on Sunday, January 3, 
1982, at Century Center, down- 
town on US 33 one way north 
between the St. Joseph Bank 
Building and the river, South 
Bend IN. Tables are $3.00 each. 
There is a half acre of carpeted 
room in the same building as the 
industrial history museum. Talk- 
in on .52A52, .99Z.39, <93/.33 s 
.78/, 18, ,69/.09, and 144.83/ 
145.43, For more information, 
contact Wayne Werts K9IXU. 
1889 Riverside Drive, South 
Bend IN 46616. or phone <219)- 
233-5307. 



WEST ALUS Wl 
JAN 9 

The West All is RAC will hold 
its 10th annual all-indoor Mid* 
winter Swapfest on Saturday, 
January 9, 1982, beginning at 
8:00 am at the Waukesha Coun- 
ty Exposition Center. Advance 
tickets are $2.00 and tickets at 
the door are $3,00. Reserved 
4-foot tables are $3>00 K at the 
door, $2.00, and on the balcony, 
free. Included with the ticket will 



170 73 Magazine • December, 1981 



be a 50c coupon toward a sand* 
wich purchase. Prizes wrN be 
awarded. For more information, 
write 1982 Swapfest, PO Box 
1072, Milwaukee Wl 53201. 

RICHMOND VA 
JAN 10 

The Richmond Amateur Tele- 
communications Society will 
hold its annual Frostfest on 
Sunday, January 10 t 1982, from 
8:00 am to 4:00 pm at the Virgin- 
ia State Fairgrounds, Richmond 
VA. Admission is $3,00 plus a 
table charge for exhibitors and 
flea-market displays. Overnight 
trailer parking with complete 
hookups will be available at 
$7.00 per night. Various prizes 
will be given away during the 
day with three main prizes to be 
awarded at 3:00 pm. There will 
be approximately on© acre of in- 
door heated and well-lighted 
space. Talk-in on 146.34/. 94, 
146.28/.88, and 146.52. For addi* 
tional information, call Joe 
Stern W4LD at {804}-7374)333, 



ARLINGTON HEIGHTS IL 
FEB 7 

The Wheaton Community 
Radio Amateurs will hold their 
annual hamfest on February 7 t 
1982, beginning at 8:00 am at the 
Arlington Park Race Track EXPO 
Center, Arlington Heights IL. 
Tickets are $3.00 at the entrance 
and $2.50 in advance. There will 
be free flea-market tables, ex- 
panded floor space, parking, 
awards, and a large commercial 
area, including the new com- 
puter section. Talk-in on 
146.01/.61 and 146.94. For com- 
mercial info, call WB9TTE at 
(312)-766-l684; for general info, 
call WB9PWM at (312J-629-1427. 
For tickets, send an SASE to 
WCRA f PO Box QSU Wheaton 
I L 60187. 



LIVONIA Ml 

FEB 28 

The Livonia Amateur Radio 
Club will hold its 12th annual 
LARC Swap 'n Shop on Sunday, 
February 28, 1982, from 8:00 am 
lo 4:00 pm at Churchill High 
School, Livonra Ml. There will be 
plenty of tables, door prizes, re- 
freshments, and free parking. 
Talk-in on 146.52. Reserved ta- 
ble space of 12*foot minimum is 
available. For further informa- 
tion, send an SASE (4 x 9) to 
Neil Coffin WA8GWL, c/o Livo- 
nia Amateur Radio Club, PO Box 
2111, Livonia Ml 48151. 

*-See List of Atfvertfsers on page 162 



Code reading 

makes ham radio 

more fun! 



CI J 




Field Day 2 



A code reader can add to the 
fun of ham radio by allowing 
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decode by ear. 

you can get in on such things 
as news-wire service transmis- 
sions, weather information and 
financial reports that are sent 
by radiotefetype (RTTY), ASCII 
computer language or Morse 
code. 

Some code readers only copy 
one or two types of signals, but 
the Kantronics Field Day 2 tm 
allows you to copy rtty at 60, 
67, 75 and 100 wpm. ASCII at 
110 and 300 (if sent as It is 
typed) Baud and Morse at 3 to 

80 WPM. 

The Field Day 2 even has an 
editing program to improve 
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code readers. With a Field Day 2 
you also get a 24-hour clock, 
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compatible demodulator out- 
put. 

The Field Day 2 is a complete 
unit in one package with a large, 
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Code reading makes ham 
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suggested price, the Field Day 

2- 

call or visit your Authorized 
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73 Magazine • December. 1981 171 



USED GEAR 



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AMCOMM 

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PT 2 Xcvr preamp $ 59 v 
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215X/N8 160 15m Xcvr 369 m 

AR-200 Power supply 59 w 

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110L Xcvi (RX+TX) 199 mf 

PS110H 12v ps 69 m 
CLEGG/SQUI»ES SAWDERS 

Interceptor Receiver S 99 m 

22V FM series 25 69 m 

FM-27B 2m FM Xcvr 129 e 

Oil Power supply 29 w 

Desk c&r for HT146 9w 
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75S-3B Rcvr (round) 4991 
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515*1 Rcvr (round] 1195 a 

3251 Transmitter 275 f 

325-3 Transmitter 425 mwi 

32S3 Xmtr (round) 475 m 

5I6E 1 KWM 1 DC ps 69 f 

35 ID I HWM 1 mount 49 w 

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351D-2 KWM2 mount 45 f 
DENTRON 

160-lOATSkw Tuner I S3« 

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AF-1A Rev audio proe 
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MS-4 Speaker 
4NB Blanker 
FL-250 Fitter 
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TR 3 Xcvr 
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RV4C Remote VFO 


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FF-1 Xtal adaptor 


19 1 


TR-6 6m Xcvr 


469 w 


TR-6/NB 6m Xcvr 


499 e 


AC 3 AC supply 


59 mwfci 


AC4 AC supply 


89 ail 


DC 3 DC supply 


49 me 


RV 7 Remote VFO 


139 m 


WH-7 Wattmeter 


89 m 


MN 75 Ant tuner 


179 m 


14 bnear amplifier 


599* 


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999* 


TR22 2m FM Xcvr 


99 e 


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49 w 


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ETO 




Vomax Processor 


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2 708 2m 2/70w amp 


79 * 


4 80BL 2m 4/80* amp 129* 


10-708 2m 10/70* 


89 e 


15 80BL 2m 15/80* 


119* 



KENWOOD 

R-599 Ham Rcvr S199fv 

R-599A Ham Rcvr 229 m 

R£99D Ham Rcvr 249 mf 

T-599A Transmitter 269 m 

T-599D Transmitter 299 mfv 
TS-900 Xcvf/PS^OO ps 399 m 
DS-900 DC supply 69 1 

TS-120S Xcvr 479e 

TS-130S Xcvr 529 m 
PS 30 Power supply 99 me 

TS iSOS Xcvr 499 1 
VFO 180 Remote VFO 99 e 

AM8Q Ant tuner 129 m 

TSb20 Xcvr 449 c 



TS-520S Xcvr 449 m 

TS820 Xcvr 499 f 

TS 82G/DG1/CW lilt 5991 

TS820S Dig Xcvr 599 ml 

1SB20S/CW niter 629 m 

TS820S/CW lilt/ DC 659 m 

SP-820 Speaker 49 1 

AT-200 Am tuner 115* 

R-300 SW Rcvr 189 mfc 

R 1000 SW Rcvr 299 m 

SP100 Speaker 29 mw 

TV 502 2m Xvtr 179 m 

TV-506 Sin Xvtr 179! 

TS-600 6m Xcvr 439 e 

TS-700A 2m Xcvr 3991c 

1S-700SP 2m Xcvr 4791 

TR2200A 2m FM Xcvr 129 ml 

1R-740QA 2m fM Xcvr 239*1 

TR 7400A/CES scanner 269 e 

TR7600 2m FM Xcvr 199 mw 

TR-76252mFM/TTPmic 269 m 

TR9000 2m Xcvr 349 m 

TR-8300 450 FM Xcvr 199 mv 

PS-20 Power supply 49 w 

iFJ 

949B Ant tuner S 79 m 

961 Ant tunei 99 m 

982 Ant tuner 129w 

989 Ant tuner 199 m 

721 SSB/CW titter 29 v 

751 SSB/CW hlter 39 we 

ilCROLOG 

AVR-1 Demodulator $349 m 

AVR2 Demodulator 499 m 

MIDUND 

13-510 2m FM Xcvi $229 mlc 

13-510A 2m FM Xcvr 249m 

J. W. MILLER t DAI WA) 

RF440 Speech proc $ 89 m 

MIRAGE 

MP l PEP wattmeter S 69 w 

NDI 

HC 1400 2m FM Xcvr $199e 

PALQHAR ENGINEERS 

RX noise bridge J 39* 

VLF converter 49 w 

REGENCY 

EC-175 C04jntei $ 99 m 

ROBOT 

61 Viewtmder $175 m 

70 Monitor 175 w 

30 Camera 179 m* 

SILT RON IX 

70OR Custom Rcvr S199m 

STANDARD 

H6 2m FM HI $ 79 m 

C-US 2m FM HI 79m 

SWAN/ CUBIC 

22 VFO adaptor S 19 mv 

412 DC supply 29 m 

P 1215 AC supply 49 

IO0MXA Xcvr 349 m 

Astro 150 Xcw 569 w 

PSU-5 Supply 129 mw 

I02BX Xcvr 599 e 

PSU 6 Supply 139 mfe 

300B Cygnet Xcvr 329 m 

350 Xcvr 199 v 

350C Xcvr 289 m 

500 Xcvr 249 f 

500C Xcvr 269*1 

SOOCX Xcvi 299 f 

HF-700S Xcvr 329 f 

11/X Basic AC ps 59 m 

117XC AC ps/spki 99mwtv 

230XC 110/220 ps 95 m 



PSU 3A Supply 
14-117 DC supply 
600 T Transmitter 
600R Custom Rcvf 
1CAF Audto notch 
NB 500 Blanker 
250 6m Xcvr 
WM 1500 Wattmeter 
irVM 200A PEP meter 
WM 2000 A PEP meter 
TPL 

702 2m 10/70* amp 
1202 2m 5/80* amp 
3 At 3 AD Nonreg ps 
TEMPO 
2020 Xcvr 
Tempo One Xcvr 
AC One AC supply 
VHF One Plus 2m FM 
S-l 2m FM HT 
3*11 2m HT/TTP 



U9t 

991 
249 le 
249 e 
19m 
29 r 
179 wf 
45 m 
59 m 
69 m 

$ 69m 

89 m 
39 m 

$499 mo 
289 mv 
89 mv 
1891 
169e 
199* 



TEN TEC 




200 VFO 


$ 49m 


505 Argonaut Xcvr 


199 mv 


206 Calibrator 


19 m 


208 Ext CW filler 


19m 


405 50w Linear 


119m 


570 Century/21 Xcvr 


239mw1cv 


574 Century/21 Digital 


289* 


670 fteyer 


19 mw 


276 Calibrator 


19 mlc 


540 Xcvr 


3991 


544 Digital Xcvr 


449 w 


544 */CW filt/NB 


469 m 


252G AC supply 


99 w 


262G PS/VQX/spfcr 


99 m wf e 


252M AC supply 


99 m 


262M AC supply 


99 m wie 


207 Ammeter 


9m 


242 External VFO 


99 w 


244 Digital display 


99mwe 


247 Ant tuner 


49 m* 


Omni A series B Xcvr 


5891 


Omni D series B Xcvr 


689 mfc 


252M/0 AC supply 


99 mf 


234 Speech processor 


99 m 


214 Microphone 


25 m 


285 CW filler 


35 m 



VHF ENGINEERING 
BLC10/70 2m amp $ 69 e 
PA 140-30 2m amp 99* 



YAESU 

FLOX 400 Transmrrter $249 e 

Fft'lOlS Receiv 249* 

FR-101 Digital 299 m 

FL 101 Transmitter 329 m 

FT 101 Xcvr 489rn*f 

FT- 101 B Xcvr 499 n 

FT-101E Xcvr 599 all 

FT-101E w/DrV hlter 629 m 

FHUIr. w/AM hlter 629m 

FT 101EE Xcvr 549 ml 

FT-lOlEE w/processor 579m 

FT101EE «/CW f 569 « 

FT-101E1 w/CW hlter 529 m 

FV-101B Remote VFO 99c 

SP 101PB Spkr/patch 49 c 

FT-30LS DIG 20w Xcvf 369 w 

FT-301 DIG Xcvr 469m 

R-301AO Dig Xcvr 469 1 
FP-301 AC supply 99 m* 

IT-30TD Delude ps 149 mw 
KV 301 Remote VFO 89 m 

U-301 Phone patch 35 m 

FT-7 20* Xcvf 329 mc 
FP4 Power supply 35 1 

FV-901DM Remote VFO 289 m 
SP-107P Spkr/patch 49 v 

IV 107 Remote VFO 99 me 

FT 707 X 549 . 

FT-221 2m Xcvi 349 m 

FT-225R0 2m Xcvr 499 e 

CPU-2500RK 2m FM 289 mv 

FT-207R 2m FM HT 199 e 
YC'3550 Counter 99 m 

Singer Gertsch 






■ H 

Co mm urn tat ions Generator/ Monitor* 

We have a FM 101 n HUM 1U fiM-3 
& ODM i f U r $4995°* aiHl * FM IOCS 

tf M 10A FIM 3 & OOM-1 lot 
S5995 5 *. Snoj iriese umL were ^ 

>ur shops only they tri n very 
,'uiai-; iHiiiiriiii! (in-vrrusudfui mobile 
or porf iansl M- ■•• Stare 



(1) Ihib l prepared from an in venter i taken on the date *ho*tt ' 

letl Itfif the prices indicate -n Atnch store t was located at 

thai time the quantities vary, In somt several ul an item 

lers, only unc- D\te to the lf»d and dihiobuiwu time ul tttii publtpafcof! 

ne ot the items may ha w already Oeen sold by thfi t> I eetiiisad 

HuAever due to the number ol \t* volved m eac& Jj> sot 

<n stock tftat .: ■ led (?JV, m 

po-' applies and accessories only witfi matching transmitters or 
tr^nsceivi . pendtng on mt stock situation (3> Son. sedgeai 

serviced after we receive your order Pleasti^illowfara few days delay m 
.uur order (4)Mo Irddtson used >]eai (5) Used^ear [ douul 

apply to Heh Equipment special. Qoseuat 



^ 



STORE HOURS: Mom. Tue, Wed & Ffi 9 5 30, Thurs 9-8, Sat 9-3 

(Us Vi*^ds & Cli j .i[rt<tter stores NOT opwi Thuisilay evenings} 

EXPANDED WATS PHONE HOURS: EvCfl lhaugh «ra have 
multiple WATS lines itijny customcii. iepoi1 thai in«y have 
ifouttk- getting tmough especially on Mundav^ Lines are itiss 
ested atieinoons evenings and towaids ltie end ot ihe ws- • 
To serve you Deller the Milwaukee headquarters will answer our 
Nationwide WATS line 1-8O0-S5B-0411 until 6 pm (Milwaukee 
lime) Monday trffu Thursday Orders- piqued Thursday evening 
can be shipped Friday and be in transit over the weekend 



Location 

m * Milwaukee, Wl 53216; 4828 W. Fond du Lac Ave 

w 

f 

c 

V 

e 



ckliffe. OH 44092; 28940 Euclid Ave 

= Orlando, FL 32803; 621 Commonwealth Ave .... 

= Clearwater. FL 33515; 1898 Drew Street 

= Las Vegas, NV 89106; 1072 N. Rancho Drive.. . . 
= Chicago, IL Erickson Communications (Associate) 



Local Phone 

..{414)442-4200 
..(216)585-7388 
. . (305) 894-3238 
..(813)461-4267 
..(702)647-3114 
..(312)631-5181 



Nationwide 
1-800-558-0411 
1 800 321-3594 
1-800 327-1917 

1-800-634-6227 
1-800 621-5802 



In-State 

1-800-242-5195 
1-800-362-0290 
1-800-432-9424 ^ 





VISA' 



172 73 Magazine • December, 1981 



FACTORY-DIRECT INFLATION FIGHTERS! 
PRICES SLASHED DRAMATICALLY! 



MULTIMETER WITH 
FOVWR METER 
MOO EL MM- 1 




The M*H « rt^i quafcty JOiS-ofwVVDC Muftmrtet uwofeai 
ffv SWfl/flBttCf Meter* w*fl E3y axswcOng the artraorul 
cxjf*r urvt ncKKJed 



12. 6, JO. *2a 400V fJOK-OfttrvVI 2 3% 
- 6, 30, 120, 600V |BK<ihm/V> i 4% 
— 60uA, 3. 300mA * 3% 

ftur. Rxta Rxiic 

—20 — «lfl — *32dBm 

?OQpF — O.SuF 

— 01, 10, 100mA 

J 5 — ISOMHj 

IP J I 

o — 2a 200. iqoow : 10% 

. DvrcbonaJ coup*? unt wtfi 'etevanc 

canrwior cacfe (nt toMb *«g tia&rry 

« t'|W1 ■ 6 *~|HJ ■ 2'fO) Moltmetrr 

4U-TW) * 2*"JH| ■ JlDf Cc*4*ct 

106«» |4gQcj<tfTi)| Mu^metEf 

75 Ito (340 grjmij Coupler 



DC Volt — 03, 

ACV0JI 

DC it A ...... 

OHM 

dB . 

I 

L_' ■ i . ... K b. « 

frequency Cwrrage 

Atceucv included 

D«tipriiM3ra 

fs*et *e>^nt t ..... 




StM? « POWER METER FOR KF/VMF BAND 
MODEL PM- JM V Ma 

Htghqurtty SWfl/Waa. meter drugnfti^SUl? ana power un 
tie measured inrfe^xJentiy ai a WW UAlft meter rilumirtittGn 
*XI "Ovtne-Aif mdKJtor tamp 



Sp*<JfT catkins: 

Prff jueocy Coverage 

RF Rawer Range , . 

ftower Source 
Accnsory JnciixJetj 

DwrneTSjcrts 



n — ISUMM/ 

— 20, 200. f.OOOW, 3 ranges ' 10% 

accuracy 

17V ACytX | to/ meter JllurnirviMon onlyj 

7ft long comecUx catrie wim Tuir 

Ibt rfmet flUmnnaooni purpose 







5MM A POWER METER FOR HF/VHF BAND 
MOOEL Ptf*HV 130. 

Compact ,ind fcgrt twtgnt SUffi/Wsf meter drvgned far 
mocme oper^oorr as wen m rxne stacon use 



Specific** lom; 
Frequency CoveriHje 
HF Ftowt 1 r Hjnge . . 

^cceMOfy Included 

Dimensions , 
Net UfeKjrit 



3 — ISDMHj 

20, 2oo, i .000*-. i range j to% 

Accuracy 

. . Vf/tio doutiJe tak*tk adheiiwf 
mounting for rnncnlr inscaJlflDDn 

I lb J044 kgjj 






Mfg. toyx akIGAIM* ELECTRONICS CORP, ■ EAcluitvc Dlnrlbuttru McCAW ELECTRONICS, INC. » P.O. Bom **; Crlib*d CA 

*j" 56 n fJu riot 'in ImIi i i 



92004; PnorMl |7»4) +34-I07A; TELEX: lfll?43 MACAW CSSD 

c and Mflrifihnij gnd an? subject (□ ciwnge 1 wtflipul noCKC 




zrFrom 



-MAGAZINE 




THE 

MOST 

UP-TO-DATE 

REPEATER 

ATLAS 
AVAILABLE! 

INCLUDES: 

•LISTINGS BY STATE AND COUNTRY 
•LISTINGS BY FREQUENCY 
•MAPS FOR EACH STATE 
• 28 MHZ THROUGH 1296 MHZ 
•PERFECT FOR MOBILING 

•WORLD REPEATER ATLAS -BK73 15 Completely 
updated, over 230 pages of repeater listings are in- 
dexed by location and frequency. More than 50 maps 
pinpoint 2000 repeater locations throughout the USA. 
Foreign listings include Europe, the Middle East, South 
America and Africa. S4.95. 

IN STOCK AND READY TO SHIP 

'Use the order card m the back of this magazine or itemize your order on a 

separate piece o( paper and mail to: 73 Radio Bookshop • Petertoorougrt NH 

03458. Be sure to include check or detailed credit card information. No 

C.O.D, orders accepted. Add $1.50 handling charge. Questions regarding 

your order? Please write to Customer Service at the above address. 

Please allow 4-6 weeks Iqf delivery. 

FOR TOLL FREE ORDERING CALL 1-800-25B-5473 






%fett^ 





ORBIT is the Official Journal for the 
Radio Amateur satellite corporation 
(AiviSAT), P.O. Box 27, Washington, DC 
20047. Please write for application. 

For a FREE SAMPLE COPY please 
send $1 to cover First Class Postage 
and handling to: Orbit, 221 Long 
Swamp Road, wolcott, ct 06716. 



See List of Advetusots on page tS2 



73 Magazine • December, 1981 173 



DX 




Yuri Bfanarovich VE3BMV 
Box 292 
Don Mills 
Ontario M3C 2S2 
Canada 

OX BULLETIN OF THE MONTH 

As we have mentioned in the 
past, it is extremely helpful to 
subscribe to one of the bulletins 
in order to be in touch with what 
is happening out there in the DX 
jungle. To show what one of the 
better OX bulletins looks like, 
let's take a look at The DX 
Bulletin. 

It's a weekly publication 
edited and published by Jim 
Cain K1TN, a well-known DXer, 
contester, and "well-cooked" 



ham. TDXB provides fresh and 
up-to-date information about DX 
activity, happenings that relate 
to DXing and contests, notes on 
equipment and conventions, re- 
cords of stuff worked on the 
bands, QSL information, and 
notes on propagation. All in all, 
it's a very well-written publica- 
tion. The subscription rates are 
$26 per year for W, VE t and XE 
(others: $35). The address is 306 
Vernon Ave, Vernon GT 06066. 

Well, Merry Christmas and 
Happy New Year! May you work 
all the new ones you still need! 

WELL-COOKED 
OR INSTANT HAM? 

During my summer vacations, 
thanks to the lousy rainy weath 
er, I had the pleasure to visit a 
bunch of really nice hams on 
Long Island (NY). Among other 
things, I also had an opportunity 
to lay my hands on a Signal One 
CX11. What a machines It's very 
tempting and makes you feel 
like mortgaging your house to 
get one. 



The main thing I would like to 
highlight is the people — true 
hams— whom I had the pleasure 
to meet. What is the big deal 
about this? 

What we are witnessing today 
is an influx of new "instant" 
hams who are the products of 
ham colleges which have all 
kinds of instant miraculous 
ways to get you legally on the 
ham bands and talking as soon 
as you can. Let's have a look at 
this group. Typically, they are an 
outgrowth of the CB generation 
in which, to get on the radio, all 
you had to do was pay your 
bucks and get the best (most ex- 
pensive) radio, big "shoes/ 1 and 
a tower. Typically, too, they got 
red up with at! the regulations 
and quickly found that there 
were more frequencies around 
than those they were "forced" 
to be on. So here comes the vfo 
and 1- or even 10-kW amplifier. 
They start using their "freedom 
of speech*' all over the bands, in- 
cluding commercial and ama- 
teur. They usually talk about 
nothing— and they can do that 
for quite a while. 

Then comes the discovery 
that there are hams who can use 
vfo's and kilowatts legally and 
that things are more decent on 
the ham bands. You don't hear 



so many carriers. They get in- 
terested and some of them sim- 
ply retune their rigs down there, 
pick a callsign, and you know 
(he rest. Some go and take 
courses, "suffer" through the 
"nonsense," and finally manage 
to get their tickets. You can tell 
them from the crowd if you 
listen in the pileups: they usual- 
ly call for five minutes without 
stopping. 

Our compliments to those 
CBers who are basically taw- 
abiding, got fed up with the 
mess around 27 MHz and then 
got genuinely interested in ham 
radio. They got their licenses 
and tried to learn as much as 
they could. They discovered a 
whole new world and enjoy 
learning more about alt the 
aspects of radio communica- 
tion: equipment, antennas, pro- 
pagation, etc. They are a 
welcome contribution to the 
hobby. 

If we look back a few years, 
when CB wasn't around, the sit- 
uation was different. You usual- 
ly started as an SWL or by see- 
ing another ham's station. The 
process involved not only talk- 
ing on the bands, but also a 
great amount of interest and ac- 
tivity in designing, building, and 
experimenting with equipment. 



The DX Bulletin 



tSSVI IQft lIFTDSim II. L48L 



rnru^TiMi i*» it, i«i» bora*. 

*** JU. U* fcml, &*p :-. itfh/La* fct- 
Ml. Sap U, liih Ug-m BHHM1 I*? 23. 
illkLu. t?ra*}, Uf Z*. Iifh Hihm:; 
'*+t *i, lLffc/L» *«rul, W* J*, 17. 
■ tfh Bar** I. h v 24. fU»ft7Aavw Vontl . 
*«T ?*, Hiih/lnJ* tonal; lap 10, R'tgh," 
AW* Bursal; <Ut I, flUgh N«rw*U ;ltt I* 
UihU/Lii* Kami; Oil J, lii„li formll tet 
4, *, Afcwy* N*>tH*L r TNI MU< 

t, fit AKDPPfi 

*n4 f«w coal* h*ai it tat MttfS l**t l*t- 
ur*By **i ni Lhaufa li »**w4 tba 

wtt*i* merit *** tipirnmii "vrmo* v 



■ t/m 



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LTLAIfcl w*a * d«*aiaat tat lu* niiim 
RtCftgtuI "t *.,: Hudion and at bat a*»- 
kli ut th* ^-rui|( ndio cluSij til* j irii 
a«G up miialjr |u w.'ik a Eh 1 tie be ttatfDn 
m .fcfjiciu, irtniL-h tfjp *L|rvin* "CIEr'V Thai 
runt act U*(<4 tm Biautu, full avail fcj 
(ha pra-irraatad acbaaliila with WJFwB • 
taw other at arum*. iac-ludi,ai ■ club ala- 
lia* 4m w**JU«|fua HVtC *A4 a at At 1 

i"*a chain lain*, tl iffaH ifcat 
h4B*ra4a *E .Hail bad heir 4 p| th* frla*' 
ita-i tehaaalr ««ti ii* *it a-j Mttltaal tai 
C*ll tro*- Ifcidpot *** Sip tpimrd Tl-7 tivm 



■ | • 



While mig ininfnal auttiut l**t ion lm 
I tir rraniBitunna had he an untamed, M 
*aa iiiUJ*«i Ifcaj itinat cm I « La would iv 
h* Kuunt ii j i ■ i t anybody h a IIICC; that waa 
not I ha Ida*. Th> lJ*p wa* to aaka a |*if- 
Ibat ftteaklbitrtjfcB LJwtrd *•»► OtirHM *aaV- 
taji oawratigii* in th« t«tur«. Apaaraintlf 
m lh«t raapaxt tba op«t at tam «aa a attd 
Tha atat-iiM taaU ha faaara *r tht 

n ¥QIUMU 

«irh Aaaat «vWnM • mil b «f*' iro» Poland, 
tapurta ttir cuiiwaul iOh ti a mi«Liil«d nvir tha 
5f4Mi club g|tJ -tj irttitharn Fa Land via a 
iHiccrit , wiEh iavaral hundratt haaa ttt it tan- 
4*ILC* dal^ll* tha tlk£fa««tn|kp 4«cp«r«t* 
UU*ii3q lha)la. at i ha *■*• na-. Eha 



nsllaa a-r tB« ktidantf Laitm waa haiftj 
aaW at lb* o|b«t anal n( lb* till at fa. m 
tha tAlttc Saa tu«t, 

lie* BBda olMwi J .000 cenluta feiaaaa U 

aJ WitC. ttua tba boa* at trnOl, and 
n^a i #c ad * I Lt.ll* tm an 1 Hilar* tinplta 
uhly, ftn SI 1 tapaatata yetj. tkaapUe HMtt| 
hwinrhraa radloa Hid itrVaraTVi p[ ab] uu , aaKiitu 
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eitltaiiai ixilkui radii> ia aliva and wa i L 

< ilidi ;iii«u[alLcn alaaallait a 
■otitra- i i^in id tiarapai that tf.l. Dlaii At* 
w*i» twvd dua ta raaaiiiiTH "hi 4 pww* r." 
AJitt aa«^2i a -■*■ ^1 th* tail t-mtn aaat 
■gltlr^laaWDa aiT*fh aravrai «r laa lo-c*l 
Mbtr* wn tuattf pl*«mlBf iacv taavra aoi 
auaJ aaiaimaa.Pvlaa a*a *i*o nof ^aE ! 
inlattataA id -uwing thair mm* pi:ail«cta 
tm »TT! axid 55ff - 

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tunvBDrian cMtiun ILfltM raparti ibmU 
IW »ttan4faef latt a**k*n4 twt tht* leaf 
euan^i( avefu . J.>va about ta* pv-icanc Ira* 
T"»;.-vi* jaara. fawttal Bwaiiaa «u 
vl tM ara> ■ J=a by Hich QrtliPTs, 

ia%lTL\ aJ iIpAa aaapLttMira. ami k* 
Atctslr». «■!£?, a*al *f«4a aa anlvblLU let 
•0 aaat IwJ BaEat*. 



Tba J]Jt HK Or TM It*.* etnvn a** plactd 
Lin rua daaarvint haad uf nl Inj Harre T HIAI, 
vIid via a Liu awardad a apecial 1 ruptiy Uuh- 

had th.a "(la.|Matai Uanga Ay. .J." Tl« 

Ll a l-jn au*T4 t*in| tatk U' th* aarv ba- 
ftnaini uf tba USUXCC CcnaanttLiD. 

aalt wa* rrpraf*vt«4 abli by fan 5«ircl!» 
¥1A1U. aaiil* th* aaatiDf waa mat;a4 «p 
naataf anUf tj*t tmftwmtmtmXiwWM ::a Ii- 
4i«na laaaai Jtv» ( *i laaaqaoii ■ > . Kitvadit 
laafka like a it»ii| Ji batapv; , ailh aar.t ta 
•ttfftdanc* iivw that a*t r*p*l it an art*, 

Tl,. Ul N-il*.ri« iW*f( ttnaiHTT I w 
mwUy In fat |w t 1 * "■ ** *M*.i C 

■Md WMUru. il> H |JKM» ||9 *ti PMI f^ t*\ 

HhWh u t Hi I I «■ Id* V*raaa 4p* \i 
Cf ban** *m-jm*-tm+ p»i^i p^nl ■■ tqwa 
CT PtaTTaJATTlaV hal iBBta - 1* fU 



012TIL and OtltTA km baa-p *att a<* 
tiaa *n Inaif Pacific qftat ■ 1 1 cmi . fine 
/KHh Amtlcih Ihpi. laml wik ■* U'JT* 
HLua- Thav war* a La tad ta I in Lab up 
rha ta about tap 1 5 and [ban □ pa rata In* 
Ton(* *J3 or Ihhalau 1HT until th* 2 (at. 
Altar thai tba laac lfgt at tba Etlp allt 
taclvda tba Kiribati* aaat baatisly mmuv, 
TcBtix acttvltr *a«aai ta baa* c*aK*«- 
tTBtad an Ol aarf they baa* h*«a wiiatlt 
aaaily ea m»*± 40 aaat aO fetaia. 

DJhSl atattad hi* Atticaa aprit a* 
irKadula Jrna) 1V7IL Sap tl and vu *■- 
yaejt#d to appaat froa Vniia aa ITZAa 

*a p It- IB. than Icltb tha CaaarcuLia TJ 
and finally hLa i»t twu daya Sap 1) 
and 32 ttvm iimbua. b> [»l^rai tc Ca r - 
mat iap 24- OH to DC9IS for all- 



-TH tt 1131111711 lEPTtHttt It, IN I 



f La** t il unii i. tSTTj baca ^ in* 
It-a^aa, »*y* hi* IfMTI tfparattsf. vaa 

JC> hatel* a«lr ahal IC Dlimii liaita- 

tioai, tart a* ta hinttaf aaatbar atc^r 

ta TufiiaU «ay act. b* |*j *it ¥ aaai «1 

a 1 ba vi 11 b* pi*par*d for all basda at 
that Cf 



Riiawra tnncarnin( Alltani* nmr ■**■ 
el> ctitut a,rwwDd kAflAJC, ah(* claiaai ta 
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tag fair Ih tba aaat aad aba vaas'il 



174 73 Magazine • December; 1981 



A number of inventions were 
made and hams contributed 
greatly to the art of community 
tions. Quite often seemingly im- 
possible things were done. This 
is the true nature of amateur ra- 
dio—experimenting. These peo- 
ple appreciate the privilege of 
being able to communicate 
around the world and want to 
preserve and not to destroy it. 
They are self-policing and stick 
to the rules, regulations, and 
ethics. They are always gentle- 
men. They are not afraid to 
experiment. 

This spirit is still alive and I 
had the pleasure to experience 
rt during my visits while I was 
down in \AMand. The "Old Ham" 
has some sort of home-brewed 
antenna, a scrounged tower, 
and good equipment which is 
quite often modified commer* 
cial or home-brewed. He is keep- 
ing up to date with technology 
and that gives him the edge in 
the pileup: His receiver has bet- 
ter selectivity and his antenna 
gives him an extra dB or two. 
This is what makes the Old 
Ham: experience and equip- 
ment. He hates lists because 
they are degrading the whole 
idea of the DX sport — chasing 
and nailing the DX. 

It is a pleasure to meet such a 



bunch, because you can talk 
about all the aspects of ham 
radio and share your exper- 
iences. Among others, my hosts 
included Bob K2US, who is ex- 
perimenting with antennas and 
decided to try one of the 
VE38MV razor beams; Gary 
K2UU, who enjoys working on 
antennas, working DX and con- 
tests, and is involved with the 
big multi*multi station of K2GL 
(better known as N2AA); Ovie 

N2AJ, who Is more technically- 
oriented; and Jack W2LZX, 
president of the LIDX Club and 
an old DX tiger. You can see that 
they can get excellent stations 
going by using their skills and 
experience when there is a lack 
of funds. In DXing, you can 
make up for the deficiencies in 
finances either by spending a lit- 
tle more time or by building and 
modifying equipment. A number 
of remarkable installations are 
around which rival some com- 
mercial radio stations. People 
such as K2GL h W2HCW, W2PV, 
KQRF, AB0l T and N5AU, to name 
a few, have stations which show 
a lot of work, love, and persis- 
tence, it is a sheer pleasure to 
talk to people like them. Be- 
cause they love their hobby, 
these "well-cooked" hams work 
at it and enjoy it* 



CHINA BREAKTHROUGH 

The Boeing Employees Ama- 
teur Radio Society (BEARS) 
delegation arrived in the 
Peoples Republic of China on 
September 4 T 1981 P and depart* 
ed on September 12. We were 
the first official international 
amateur radio delegation to visit 
China in more than 32 years. Our 
host was the Chinese Institute 
of Electronics, a branch of the 
4th Ministry of Machine Build- 
ing. The delegation members 
consisted of Pat West W7EA, 
Henry Oman K7HO, Bob Hudson 
K7LAY. and Bill Showers 
KC7CF. 

Sponsors included Boeing 
and the Western Washington 
OX Club. Contributors to our ex- 
pedition included the R.L Drake 
Company, which supplied two 
complete TR7 stations, Telex/Hy- 
Gain. which supplied two dipole 
antennas, and the ARRL, which 
supplied a copy of the film 
M Wide World of Amateur Radio" 
and a few books. 

Our delegation prepared and 
presented a four-hour slide pre- 
sentation covering amateur 
radio in the USA, This presenta- 
tion was made in each of the 
cities that we visited. 

Although we did not expect to 



operate, we were permitted to 
set up a demonstration station 
in Beijing and communicate 
with our home city, Seattle. This 
historic event occurred at about 
ten pmu Beijing lime, on Sep- 
tember 6th. Our contact in Seat 
tie, representing our two clubs, 
was W7PHO and our callsign in 
Beijing, also representing our 
two clubs, was K7LAY. We are 
very sorry that we could not talk 
to more stations. 

The Chinese advised us thai 
our transmissions were the first 
authorized amateur radio com- 
munication demonstration in 
more than 32 years— truly an 
historic event. This contact 
signifies the increasing friend- 
ship between our two nations. 

A second historic event oc- 
curred on September 9th, With 
the assistance of our delegation 
in Shanghai, the Chinese in Bei- 
jing installed a Drake TR7 sta- 
tion and the Chinese in Shang- 
hai also installed a Drake TR7 
station. Successful communica- 
tions were established between 
Beijing and Shanghai by Chi- 
nese operators, again for the 
first time in more than 32 years. 

The operator In Beijing was 
Chen Ren-Mo, and the operator 
in Shanghai was Hsu Y.C. Mr. 



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73 Magazine • December, 1981 175 



Hsu was licensed many years 
ago as XU8CH and C1CH. 

Although propagation was 
not good between the cities! 
communications were estab- 
lished about 10:45 pm on 
September 9th. The station in 
Beijing used the callsign CIE 
and the one in Shanghai used 
K7LAY. Both stations were 
heard In many countries with 



strong signals. The Chinese 
asked us to tell the world that 
their top government leaders are 
solidly behind amateur radio, 
and that before too long T China 
expects to establish many 
friends throughout the world 
through the medium of ama- 
teur radio. 

Our delegation was over- 
whelmed by the reception we re- 



ceived In China and very hon- 
ored to be the first official 
amateur radio delegation to Chi- 
na and to demonstrate amateur 
radio. In China, we met many 
old-timers and our meetings 
with them were precious events 
in all our lives. 

We are very appreciative of 
our host in China, The China In- 
stitute of Electronics, and also 



the China National Radio Sport 
Commission and the Shanghai 
Institute of Electronics. 

Editor's Note: This report is 
based on a press release from 
the US delegation, filed on Sep- 
tember 12 in Hong Kong. 73 
hopes to be able to report more 
details on the China break- 
through in the months to come. 



CONTESTS 




Robert Baker W82GFE 
75 Windsor Dr. 
Atco NJ 08004 



I've lost track of the number 
of times we've asked everyone 
to send in their information as 
early as possible, but I thought 
V6 better do It one more time. At 



least three or four contest an- 
nouncements were received too 
late for the last issue, Some 
came as late as four weeks past 
deadline. Just to show you what 



kind of lead time is involved, the 
material for this Issue had to be 
in my hands no later than Sep- 
tember 20th. To be safe, it 
should be sent directly to my 
home address and not through 
the magazine as that only tends 
to slow things up. It might be 
several weeks before mail rs for- 
warded to me from Peterbor- 
ough, If material is coming from 
overseas, send it as early as 
possible and use air mail to 
avoid delays, In all cases, try to 
get the information in as early 
as possible. 

In the results department, . , 
W1CCN finished third while 
K2SX finished fifth on CW dur- 
ing the 1981 RSGB 7-MHz Con- 
test. They were the only USA 
amateurs listed in the official re- 




MARSHALL CLOUSER MADISON COUNTY 
107 S. MADISON MADISONVILLE, TEXAS 77864 

QSL OF THE MONTH 

Bright, eye-catching color and humorous graphics made K5ZOO's card this month's winner. 

If you would like to enter the contest, put your QSL in an envelope and mail it along with your choice of 
a book from 73's Radio Bookshop to 73 Magazine* PEne Street, Peterborough NH 03458. Attention; QSL 
of the Month. Entries which do not use an envelope{the Postal Service does occasionally damage cards} 
and do not specify book choice will not be considered. Each month we consider a new set of entries, so 
you may want to resubmit your card in another month. 



suits, Maybe we can do a little 
better in '82. 

CONNECTICUT QSO PARTY 

Starts: 2000 GMT December 5 

Ends: 0200 GMT December 7 

Rest period: 0500 to 1200 GMT 

December 6 

Sponsored by the Candle- 
wood Amateur Radio Associa- 
tion (CARA). Phone and CW are 
considered to be the same con- 
test. Stations may be worked 
once on each band and each 
mode. 

EXCHANGE: 

Send QSO number, RSfT), and 
ARRL section or Connecticut 
county. 

SCORING: 

Out-of-state stations multiply 
total QSOs by the number of 
Connecticut counties worked (8 
maximum). Connecticut sta- 
tions multiply total QSOs by the 
sum of ARRL stations and prov- 
inces. Additional DX contacts 
count for QSO points, but only 
one DX multiplier overall is al- 
lowed. W1QI, the club station, 
will be operating CW on the odd 
hours and SSB on the even 
hours and counts as 5 points on 
each band and mode. Novice 
contacts count as 2 points each 
and OSCAR contacts count 3 
points each, 

FREQUENCIES: 

CW— 40 kHz up from the bot- 
tom of each band; SSB— 3927, 
7250, 14295, 21370, 28540; Nov- 
ice— 3725, 7125, 21125, 28125. 

ENTRIES A AWARDS: 

A Worked All Connecticut 
Counties certificate will be 
awarded to each station work- 
ing all Connecticut counties. 
Other awards given as usual, 
minimum of 5 QSO points! Logs 
must show category, date/time 
(GMT), stations, numbers, 



176 73 Magazine * December, 1981 




Ih« tattlcbuU 



yankee clipper 
contest club 



NEWSLETTER CONTEST WINNER 

This month, we salute the Yankee Clipper Contest Club 
(YCCC) and its publication, The Scuttlebutt, Despite the 
limitations of a small budget editor K1GQ produces a good- 
looking, information-packed, 10-page newsletter each month. 
What's the secret of this low-cost success? 

For starters, the editor leaves no stone unturned in his 
quest for cluh members with connections necessary to get 
The Scuttlebutt printed at the lowest possible cost, . , some* 
times for free! Occasionally, he cajoles a local firm involved in 
the ham business to pick up the tab, in exchange for a page of 
advertising. 

Typesetting for The Scuttlebutt Is a volunteer effort, con- 
tributed by club members with access to the required equip* 
ment. Mailing labels are similarly handled by a member who 
keeps the YCCC membership list on the computer in his of* 
fice. 

The editorial content of the newsletter is a cooperative ef- 
fort, too. with many club members helping out. The editor 
doesn't try to write the whole thing. 

The lesson to be drawn from The Scuttlebutt is that there 
are numerous untapped resources both within your club and 
within your community, Editors on a budget (aren't we all?) 
must seek out these hidden assets. Quality on a shoe- 
string—It can be done! 

Proud of your club's newsletter? Send it to: Newsletter Con- 
test, 73 Magazine, Peterborough NH 03458.— WBBBTH. 



bands, QSO points, and claimed 
scores. Enclose a large SASE 
for results, Logs must be post- 
marked by January 2nd and sent 
to: Steve Grouse KA1ECL, 3 
Queens Court, Danbury CT 
06610. 

G QRP-CLUB WINTER SPORTS 

Daily from 0900 to 2300 GMT 
December 26 to December 31 

All amateur radio operators 
interested in QRP are invited to 
take part in the club's activity. 
No special exchange informa- 
tion was mentioned in the infor- 
mation provided by the club. The 
operating schedule for each day 
is as follows: 

• 3560 kHz— 1200-1300, 1400- 
1500, 2100-2200 GMT. 

• 7030 kHz— 1100-1200, 1300- 
1400, 2000-2100 GMT. 

• 14060 kHz— 0900-1000, 1730- 
2000, 2200*2300 GMT. 

• 21060/28060 kHz— 1000-1100, 
1500*1730 GMT. 

Reports on the Winter Sports 
Activity should be sent to Gus 
Taylor G8PG, 37 Pickerill Road, 
Greasby, WirraL Merseyside L49 
3ND, England. 



CANADA CONTEST 

Starts: 0000 GMT December 27 
Ends: 2359 GMT December 27 

Sponsored by the Canadian 
Amateur Radio Federation 
(CARF), the contest is open to 
all amateurs. Use all bands from 
160 to 2 meters, CW and phone 
combined, and everybody works 
everybody. Classes of entry in- 
clude: single operator, all band; 
single operator, single band; 
and multi-operator, single trans- 
mitter, all band. All contacts 
with amateur stations are valid. 
The same station may be 
worked twice on each band, 
once on CW and once on phone- 
No crossmode contacts and no 
CW contacts in the phone bands 
allowed. 

EXCHANGE: 

Signal report and consecutive 
serial number starting with 001. 
VE1 stations will also send their 
province (NS, NB t PEl). 

SCORING: 

Ten points for each contact 
with Canada, 1 point for each 



CALENDAR 



Dec 5-7 
Dec 26-31 
Dec 27 
Jan 1 
Jan 2-4 
Jan 9*10 
Jan 16-17 
Jan 16-17 
Jan 30-Feb 7 
Feb 6-7 
Feb 20-21 
Feb 27-28 
Mar 6-7 
Jun 12*13 
Jun 26-27 
Jul 10-11 
Aug 7-6 
Sep 11 12 



Connecticut QSO Party 

G QRP Club Winter Sports 

CARF Canada Contest 

ARRL Straight Key Night 

Zero District QSO Party 

73s 40 and 80 Meier Phone Contest 

73' s International 160-Meter Phone Contest 

International SSTV Contest 

ARRL Novice Roundup 

RSGB 7-MHz Contest— Phone 

ARRL DX Contest— CW 

RSGB 7 MHz Contest— CW 

ARRL DX Contest— Phone 

ARRL VHP QSO Party 

ARRL Field Day 

IARU Radiosport 

ARRL UHF Contest 

ARRL VHF QSO Party 



14 

14 
14 
14 
14 

7 
7 

3.5 
3.5 
3.5 
3.5 



VE3DU 

VE4YF 

KL7JHD 

KA2EPS 

EA7AKQ 

VE7BS 
JL1CGL 

VE2JV 

KA8FAL 

WAODEL 

VE3LXL 



8,100 
3,720 
3,240 
3,152 
512 

8,932 
64 

8,000 
2,317 

1,872 
212 



79 

38 

360 

79 

20 

107 

14 

78 
51 
35 
15 



540 
372 

540 
394 
128 

636 

32 

800 
331 
234 
106 





RESULTS 

RESULTS OF THE 1980 CANADA CONTEST 




Class 


Call 


Score 


QSOs 


Points 


Mult. 


A 


VE5DX 


773,740 


1194 


7034 


110 I 


A 


VE3GCO 


299,390 


549 


3290 


91 


A 


VE7SK 


263,283 


360 


2831 


93 


A 


VE2DZE 


203.662 


351 


2578 


79 


A 


VE7CMK 


172,317 


436 


2427 


71 


MS 


VE7WJ 


600,516 


602 


4716 


126 


MS 


VE7CNY 


341,972 


691 


3638 


94 


MS 


VE6ANC 


251,251 


397 


3263 


77 


MS 


DA2CF 


31,220 


185 


1561 


20 


50 


JR3SOZ 





7 


7 





28 


VE6CKW 


39,160 


294 


1780 


22 


28 


VE7CXC 


35,000 


463 


1750 


20 


28 


VE4VV 


26,576 


351 


1208 


22 


23 


WA5QBO 


23,380 


183 


1670 


14 


28 


VE6BFN 


20,010 


280 


1334 


15 


21 


DF1EI 


1,000 


20 


200 


5 


21 


JA60KB 


654 


28 


109 


6 


21 


VE3KOY 


705 


42 


141 


5 


21 


JHflCXS 


20 


2 


20 


1 



15 

10 
6 
8 

4 

14 

2 

10 

7 
8 
2 



73 Magazine * December. 1981 177 



contact with others. Ten bonus 
points for each contact with any 
CARF official station using the 
suffix TCA or VGA. Multipliers 
are the number of Canadian 
provinces/territories worked on 
each band and mode (12 prov- 
inces/territories x 8 bands x 2 
modes for a maximum of 192 
possible multipliers). 

FREQUENCIES (as applicable): 

Phone— 1810, 3770; 3900, 
7070, 7230, 14150 f 14300, 21200, 
21400 T 28500, 50100, 146520; 
CW— 1810, 3525, 7025, 14025, 
21025, 28025, 50100, 144100. 
Suggest phone on the even 
hours (GMT), CW on the odd 
hours (GMT). 

AWARDS: 

The CARF Canada Contest 

Trophy will be awarded to the 
highest scoring single operator 



entry. Certificates will be award- 
ed to the highest score in each 
entry class in each province/ter- 
ritory, USA call area, and DX 
country, and to the highest 
score from those who have only 
their amateur certificates. 



ENTRIES: 

A valid entry must contain log 
sheets, dupe sheets, and a sum- 
mary sheet showing a chart of 
multipliers per band/mode and 
score calculation. Send your en- 
try with comments to: Canadian 
Amateur Radio Federation, PO 
Box 2172, Station D, Ottawa, On- 
tario, Canada K1P 5W4, post- 
marked within one month of the 
end of the contest. Results will 
be published in TCA t the Cana- 
dian amateur magazine. Norv 
members may include an SASE 
for a copy of the results. 



ZERO DISTRICT QSO PARTY 

Starts: 2000 GMT January 2 
Ends: 0200 GMT January 4 

Organized by the Mississippi 
Valley Radio Club, Stations out- 
side of Zero District will work 
Zero stations only. Zeros may 
work any station. The same sta- 
tion may be worked once on 
each band and each mode. How* 
ever, stations In the special 
mobile class may be worked 
each time they change counties. 

EXCHANGE: 

RS(T) and ARRL section. Zero 
District stations must also send 
county, 

FREQUENCIES: 

3560, 3900, 3725, 7060, 7270, 
7125, 14060, 14300, 21125. 
21060, 21370, 28125, 26060, 

28570, 



SCORING: 

Add the number of Zero 
District ARRL sections worked 
plus the number of Zero District 
counties, then multiply by the 
number of contacts. Zeros score 
by adding ARRL sections, Zero 
District counties, and DXCC 
countries worked and then mul- 
tiplying by total contacts. 



ENTRIES & AWARDS: 

Certificates will be Issued to 
all entrants who submit a log 
and SASE. Endorsements will 
be given for high score in each 
ARRL section, DX country, Nov- 
ice/Technician class, and Spe- 
cial Mobile class. Mail logs by 
February 15th to VWSl, 3518 W. 
Columbia, Davenport IA 52804. 
Include an SASE for log forms or 
results. 



MM HELP 



I need an M transformer for a 
Hammarlund HQ-170 receiver. It 
Is designated T1 on the sche- 
matic, and is Hammarlund part 
#K264Q2-1. It is a combination 
45&*kHz and 303^kHz trans- 
former that needs an exact re- 
placement. I will gladly pay a 
reasonable price for a suitable 
transformer. 



David Hansen KB6F! 
7484 Tustin Road 
Salinas CA 93907 

Information and/or schemat- 
ics wanted for conversion of 
Drake L-75 linear to 10 meters. 
Will defray all costs involved. 

E.V. Schoon maker N5CGE 

792-A Fa in/lew Avenue 

Annapolis MD 21403 



Wanted: work in KnoxviHe or 
Chattanooga, Tennessee, area* 
First ctass radiotelephone and 
Extra class license, 

H,F. Schnur 

115 Intercept Ave, 

North Charleston SC 20405 

I am in need of the following 
items: (1) manual/schematic for 
HalNcrafters HT32B; (2) a main 
power transformer for the HT32B 
(please state price), and (3) a 
manual or schematic for the 
Globe Electronics Hi-Bander 
VHF-62 transmitter. 

i will pay for postage and 
copying costs, 

Richard E. Duell W9LSD 
4415 N, Florence Dr. 

McHenry IL 60050 



I am trying to locate an 
instruction manual and sche- 
matic diagram for a Model 
Memo 512 keyer made by K* E. 
Electronics. 

I will pay for copy or copy and 
return original, 

William Hartley K2RDS 

1201 Paul Ave. 

Schenectady NY 12306 

I am in need of a Centralab 
switch, #PA076. I'll be glad to 
pay for it. 

Don Ramey WA4FQC 

Box 217 

Meridianville AL 35759 



I need an antenna relay for the 
Hammarlund HX-50 transmitter 
Also, information about any 
source for Hammarlund parts 
will be appreciated, 

Arnold Irvine KA9ELN 

5 Orumcliffe Drive 

Warren PA 16365 



Please; I need the manual tor 
a Peirson KE-93 receiver and an 
Etmac AF-67 transmitter. I will 
copy and return and pay mailing 
costs. 

Robert F. Voelker WA2PCL 

101*23 Lefferts Blvd. 

Richmond Hill NY 11419 



I am looking foraUAILOQSL 
card from before 1968 for my 

astronaut autograph collection. 
(UA1LO was Yuri Gagarin, the 
first man in space.) Thank you. 

Mike Smlthwlck AA6XI 

25215 La Lome Drive 

Us Altos Hills CA 94022 



I am looking for a book or in- 
formation on a 2-meter rig, the 
Setec-Elect FRT-20& It's an 
8-channel rig and I have no idea 
who made it, 

F. WhlttierWBICXX 

RFD #1, BOX 390 

Madison ME 04950 



1 



L 



STATEMENT OF OWNERSHIP, MANAGEMENT AND CIRCULATION (Required by 39 US.C 3685). 1. Title of publication, 73Magazine.2. Date of tiling. Oct 1. 1961-3, Fre- 
quency of issue. Monthly. A. No. of Issues published annually. 12. B. Annual subscription price, $25.00. 4. Location of known office of publication (Street, City, County, 
State and ZIP Code) (Not printers), 80 Pine Street. Peterborough, Hlllsboro County, N.H. 03456. 5. LocaHon of the headquarters or general business offices of the 
publishers (Noi printers), 80 Pine Street, Peterborough, Hlllsboro County, N.H. 03458. 6. Names and complete addresses of publisher, editor and managing editor. 
Publisher (Name and Addressi, Wayne Green, Peterborough. N.H. 03458. Editor (Name and Address), Wayne Green, Peterborough, N.H, 03450. Managing Editor (Name and 
Address}, Jack Burnett, 12-C Gran He St, Peterborough,. N.H. 0Q4$fi. 7. Owner (If owned by a corporation, iis name and address must be stated and also Immediately 
thereunder the names and addresses of stockholders owning or holding i percent of more of total amount of stock it not owned by a corporation, the names and ad- 
dresses of the individual owners must be given If owned by a partnership or other unincorporated firm, its name and address, as well as that of each individual must be 
given If the publication is published by a nonprofit organization, its name and address must be stated.) Name, 73. Inc., Peterborough, N.H. 03458- Wayne Green, Peter- 
borough, N.H. 03456. 8. Known bondholders, mortgagees and other security holders owning or holding 1 percent or more of tola) amount ot bonds, mortgages or other 
securities (If there are none, so state) Name, none, 9. For completion by nonprofit organizations authorized to mall at special rates (Section 132.122, PSM) The purpose, 
function and nonprofit status of this organization and the exempt status for Federal Income tax purposes (Check one) Not applicable, 10. Extent and nature of circulation. 
(X) Average No, copies each issue during preceding 12 months. (Y) Actual No. copies of single issue published nearest to filing date A, Totat No, of copies printed (Net 
Press RunHXt 70 .810 (Y) 61K253 B. Paid circulation 1, Sales through dealers and earners, street vendors and counters sales. {>Q1 1,964 (Y) 1 5,186. Z Mail subscriptions |X) 
52,747 (Y| 51,871, C. Total paid circulation (Sum of 10St and 10B2) |X)64 f 7l1 (Y) 67,057 D. Free distribution by mail, carrier or other means, samples, complimentary, and 
other free copies (X) 359 i Y) 400. E Total distribution (Sum of C and D| (X) 65,070 00 67,517. F. Copies not distributed 1 . Office use, left over, unaccounted, spoiled after 
printing <X} 5.024 (Y) 1,020. 2. Returns from news agents {Xj 716 (Y)71§. G, Toial (Sum of E> Fi and 2— should equal net press run shown In A} (X) 70,6 10 CO 69.253, 11. I cer 
tity that the statements made by me above are correct and complete. Signature and title of editor, publisher, business manager, or owner. Debra Boudrieau, Business 
Manager. 



178 73 Magazine * December. 1981 



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MAKE THE 2MCV TROMBONE THE 
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Gain: 6 dB 

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Write for free literature and complete 
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Amateur band models are inven- 
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Commercials to specs. 

Write or phone for free brochure 
and prices on Bassett mobiles and 
Helium Trap Antenna Systems, 



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Tel: 305/561 -1400 

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i 
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you waited to get into 
code reading until you found 
out what this latest fad was 
about? You can stop waiting, 
because it's no longer a fad. 

Amateurs everywhere 
are tossing the gigantic 
clanking monsters of yester* 
year that once performed 
the job of reading 
radioteietype. They are trad- 
ing them in for state-of-the- 
art code-reading devices 
that are incredibly small, 
noiseless if desired and in- 
finitely more versatile than 
their antique predecessors. 

Kantronics, the leader in 
code^reading development, 
has just introduced the latest 
and most-advanced break- 
through in the copying of 
Morse code, radioteletype 
and ASCII computer langu- 
age. 

The Kantronics Mini- 
Reader reads air three types 
of code, displays code speed. 
keeps a 24-hour clock, acts as 
a radtotetetype demodulator 
and reads all of its decoded 
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At 5314,95, the Mini-Read 
er outperforms anything 
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price range. 

Call or visit your Authoriz- 
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find out what the latest in 
technology has done to 
code-reading. 



Kantronics 

(913)842-7745 

1202 E. 23rd Street 
Lawrence, Kansas 66044 




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See List ot Advertisers on page T62 



73 Magazine * December, 1981 179 



W2NSD/1 

NEVER SAY DIE 

ed/tor/a/ by Wayne Green 



from page 8 



development in ihe past I've found 
older amateurs are generally rests 
tani to new ideas and really hate to 
have to read about them. But after a 
white, though I lose readers in the 
process, interest does come and fi- 
nally the other amateur publications 
reluctantly join me In publishing in- 
formation on the new technology. It 
worked this way with sideband, with 
transistors, with ICs, and with FM. so 
we'll probably see the same pattern. 
There are, obviously, far more ben- 
efits than just a wonderful emergen 
cy communications system which 
can come from this step ahead. If we 
are successful in establishing a sys- 
tem for getting the growth of amateur 
radio that we really need . . and that 
will be on the order of 33% per year, 
not 3% . . . we are going to have to de- 
velop much more efficient communi- 
cations modes. Anyone listening to 
the high end of twenty-meter phone 
any evening has to realize that new 
techniques are already needed.., 
seriously needed, With high-speed 
ASCII communications, we could 
easily accommodate a thousand sta- 
tions where we now have one and we 
could have room for the two million 
hams we should have right now and 
the three million we want to have 
by 1990 

This is a reasonable answer, too, 
for using the narrow bands available 
on our ham satellites 

If we develop the encoding tech- 
niques I discussed at the last NIAC 
meeting, our information exchange 
would immediately go from 6500 
words per minute to about 26.000? All 
this would be done via a simple inte- 
grated circuit chip which would en- 
code the 32,000 most used words be- 
fore sending them... and then de- 
code them upon reception. Further, 
the output could be in any language, 
allowing amateurs anywhere In the 
world to communicate with each 
other, regardless of their spoken Ian 
guage. Again, nothing has to be in* 
vented. We just have to write the 
computer programs to accomplish 
this and perfect our equipment, tech- 
niques, and protocols. 

A word ol warning, if I may. If we 
are going to turn around the disaster 
which has brought us to technologi- 
cal defeat at the hands of the Japa- 
nese, we are going to have to do more 
than nod our heads and adjourn until 
the next scheduled NIAC meeting. If 
we are going to be abte to provide 
anything of any great value In the 
way of emergency communications 
...if we are going to develop the 
systems which I have outlined. . we 
need to realty activate NIAC. ustng 
its com municat tons with the FCC to 
bring this situation to the attention of 
the White House. 

By ihe way. speaking of satellite 



communications: If we were to dedi- 
cate one channel of a satellite to a 
calling frequency, it would, using 
9600 baud, be abte to handle 216 T 000 
different calls per hour lor us, with 
each call consisting of the callstgn 
of the station called and the calling 
station. 

In terms of emergencies, tests 
have already been made which show 
that we can use relatively low-pow- 
ered emergency transmitters, and by 
measuring the signals received 
through a ham satellite, it is possible 
to determine the location of the 
transmitter to a surprising degree. 
Digitizing and automating this ser- 
vice would provide an emergency lo- 
cating system which would be sim- 
ple and inexpensive and work any- 
where in the world. . .whether it be 
used to locate a raft floating in Ihe 
Pacific Ocean or someone tost in the 
jungles of Sumatra. It is the digitizing 
and automation which bring this 
emergency service to anyone who 
needs it. 

So here we are. on the brink of yel 
another revolution in communica* 
tions. Will this be brought about by 
amateurs or must we wait for com- 
mercial and military systems to do 
what we could develop? A good part 
of the answer tor that lies, in my esti- 
mation, in whether we as a group will 
be able to start some action with the 
FCC and with our government which 
will result In a sudden and spectacu- 
lar growth of amateur radio. 

Most of you who are here today 
have made long trips and have to 
leave your businesses. You've car- 
ried the expense ol this yourselves. 
Now T while it is obviously an honor to 
be a member of a government advi- 
sory committee, it is an empty hon- 
or. . .worthy of no more than a line in 
a Who's Wno biography which will be 
read by few . . . unless we are able to 
actually accomplish something. 

As the only official interface be- 
tween the amateur radio community 
and the FCC, we have a responsibil- 
ity to our fellow amateurs to speak up 
for them As the group which I feel 
must shoulder most of the responsi- 
bility for the loss of our country's 
technological leadership of the 
world, we should speak up for radio 
amateurs and do our best to see that 
the FGC provides the incentive for 
amateur radio to grow again. We 
have to remember that even if we are 
able to spark a combination of events 
which gels amateur radio into a 
growth pattern which is three times 
our past highest growth, it will still 
take us at least ten years to catch up 
with the catastrophic losses we have 
suffered over the last 18 years. 

I believe that the FCC commission- 
ers will be interested in this situation 
and be responsive to our leadership, 
if we can provide it . and that, at the 
root of it, is the real purpose of this 
committee. 



1 suggest that we need more than 
an occasional meeting and minutes. 
more even than a report and recom- 
mendation, I suggest that we appoint 
an action committee to work with the 
FCC to develop both White House in- 
terest and the rules changes which 
might contribute to the goals we 
have in mind. 

Since my business is growing at 
an ever-increasing rate, now number- 
ing eight monthly publications plus a 
software publishing division, and 
with five more monthly publications 
in prospect, plus the opening of at 
least three more major divisions of 
the company, my own time is severe- 
ly limited, I would be happy to serve 
as a member ol an action committee, 
but I would not be able to provide the 
leadership and time that a chairman 
should devote to such a committee. 
Between my ham interests and my 
computer interests, I spend a good 
deal of time traveling. Last month I 
managed to get on the air for a short 
while as W2NSD/3D6, W2NSD/ZS, 
and as 7PBCA, ail while setting up 
South American and South African 
editions of one of my computer 
magazines, 

I did manage, just before leaving 
for Africa. . .and just after a trip to 
California setting up three prospec- 
tive new publications. . .to visit with 
FCC Chairman Fowler and discuss 
briefly some of the ideas which I have 
just covered. I found him most enthu- 
siastic and cooperative, so I be- 
lieve that if NIAC will appoint a sub- 
committee, an action subcommittee, 
we will be able to more than be re- 
warded for our time and money spent 
as members of NIAC. 

The job of such a committee and of 
the FCC is not an easy one. The polls 
of amateurs have shown clearly the 
strong feelings for maintaining the 
Morse-code requirement. Yet when 
one talks to people interested in be- 
coming radio amateurs, this is al- 
ways the major obstacle, Indeed, be- 
tween the wealth of destructive code 
teaching systems now available and 
the ability of even the best of us to 
put off an unpleasant job if at all pos- 
sible, it is a wonder that we have even 
maintained our present membership. 

As I have mentioned in the past be- 
fore this committee, r think I have 
heard every argument, both pro and 
con, on the subject of the code re^ 
quireinent for our amateur licenses. 
It is my belief, after giving considera- 
tion to ail of these arguments, that 
we should have a technical license 
exam, not one measuring a skill. I see 
not even the remotest connection be- 
tween a skill of Copying code and 
being a good amateur. Despite the 
attempts of the plain language pro- 
posals, I tend to define a good ama- 
teur as one who is pursuing any or all 
of the four major reasons set out in 
our rules. 97.1, for the existence of 
the service. 

It is increasingly difficult to remain 
blind to the success of the Japanese 
amateur radio system and I think we 
should put aside our "not invented 
here ' emotions and take advantage 
of an innovation which has obviously 
worked. Just as American industry is 
taking the Japanese Type-Z manage- 
ment system seriously and finding 
that this brings about remarkable in- 
creases in productivity for their firms 
...and a sudden drop in people 
changing jobs ..we should look 
pragmatically at the Japanese no- 



code license system as a possible 
solution to our problems. 

There will, I am sure, be resistance 
from older amateurs, I would be sur- 
prised if one or more of the ham mag- 
azines did not rush to take political 
advantage of the situation. But if we 
insist on trying to follow the system 
of doing only what the majority 
wants, we will have s technology as 
innovative as our television pro- 
grams. This is a time for leaders. . . 
leaders with confidence. We have a 
good example of this in our Adminis- 
tration, which has not been afraid to 
push against the tide toward goals It 
sees as important in the long run. I 
am hoping that NIAC will form an ac- 
tion committee which can do like- 
wise for the benefit of amateur radio 
and our country. 



Despite my plea not to be 
made chairman of a committee 
to tackle the problem, the new 
chairman of NIAC, Charlie Dunn 
K7RMG, immediately estab- 
lished an Action Committee and 
made me chairman. I was seri- 
ous about already having 
enough to do and was not pull- 
ing the old briarpatch tears. 
Well, okay, I'm chairman of a 
committee, and I'll do the best 
I can to get it organized and 
into action. 

The goal of the Action Com* 
mittee is to work with the FCC to 
establish a growth of amateur 
radio such as we have never 
seen before. I feel, as I said in 
my report, that we should aim at 
no less than a 33% growth per 
year and keep that up for a least 
ten years. 

Another task of the commit- 
tee is to work with the FCC to 
set up some system whereby 
amateurs can experiment and 
develop new modes of commu- 
nications such as digital high* 
speed interactive networks as 
cited in my report. 

Obviously, we have our hands 
full, so it Is going to take a 
lot of work and cooperation with 
this committee. . .which con- 
sists of Oorhoffer of CO, Imlay 
of QST T Curtis (who publishes 
books in the computer field), 
Harold Todd W7ZXM from Seat- 
tie, and me as chairman. 

\t you have spent any time 
mixing with would-be hams, you 
know as well as i that our Morse- 
code requirement is probably 
the major single obstacle which 
has been keeping down our 
growth, Yes T I know that most 
old-time amateurs are fiercely 
adamant about keeping the 
code test. But as I mentioned in 
my report, it has been years 
since I have heard a new argu- 
ment on the subject and the bal- 
ance, as far as I can see, is to- 



180 73 Magaztne ■ December, 1961 



wards making this a technical 
hobby instead of a skill hobby. 

Some of the wheezes which 
come to mind are as folio ws: 

1. Code is a ham heritage. So 
is QRM, but that's no reason 
to keep it. I am convinced that 
we will have more CW opera* 
tors than ever if we make It 
a fun part of hamming instead of 
obligatory. Besides, with more 
and more operators using 
Morse keyboards, what do you 
mean by heritage? Those key- 
boards and Morse code readers 
are selling like crazy. . Jf that 
tells you anything, 

2. Without the code test we' ft 
be swamped with lousy opera- 
tors. Oh my goodness, since 
when did learning the code 
make anyone a good operator? 
If you want to hear really good 
operating, not the jamming and 
pileups we ina^ige in here, listen 
to the Japanese operators. They 
were taught how to operate by 
their clubs but had no code test. 

3. in emergencies, code can 
get through when phone can% 
so everyone should know the 
code. Weil, that may have been 
true 50 years ago, but today 
most of your emergency traffic 
is on phone.., and sideband 
gets through as well as CW 
almost anytime. In the future, 
we will be running most emer- 
gency traffic over high-speed 
digital networks, not on code or 
phone, anyway. 

4* CW rigs cost tess than 
phone equipment, so by empha- 
sizing code we are enabling 
even the poor amateur to par- 
ticipate. In the pre-war years we 
could buy this baggage. When 
Heath brought out the HW figs, 
that argument went out the win- 
dow. , .where it still lies, . .and 
that was about 20 years ago. 
Let's try to get out of the past. 

5. With the current exams 
made stupid fy simpie by cheat 
books such as the ARRL Q & A 
Manual and the Bash books, we 
have to have SOMETHING to 
keep everyone out, I partially 
agree. . . but let's make it some* 
thing better than the Morse* 
code test. Perhaps we could 
change to a licensing system 
whereby new amateurs would 
have to qualify before a club 
board, showing that they know 
the rules and are able to operate 
a ham station. We might make 
the technical exam less vulner- 
able to circumvention by 
League and Bash Q & A books, 

6. // we don't keep the code in 
the ham test, code witl just die 



out. As I said, I think that once it 
is made fun instead of punish- 
ment, we will find a new enthu- 
siasm for the skill. Our clubs 
and publications can intensify 
this with contests, certificates, 
and articles on the subject. 

7. Just because the Japanese 
have had such incredible suc- 
cess merely by removing the 
code requirement is no reason 
why we have to imitate them. 
Well, 1 believe in learning. When 
someone does something new 
and it is a success and what I'm 
doing is an obvious failure, it is 
time to re-evaluate and not let 
Not invented Here stop me, 

8. / had to go through all that 
misery, so why should I want 
anyone to have it easier than t 
did? Golly, I don't have any real 
answer to that bit of garbage. 

9. Suppose you are stuck in a 
iife-and-death situation where 
all you have is a CW transmitter 
for communications? Having 
been in just such a situation, 
and having used CW to save 85 
lives, my answer is that the like- 
lihood of such a situation occur- 
ring is so remote that I really 
wonder if it is worth sacrificing 
the technology of America on 
such a remote circumstance. 

Yes, I know that there will be 
crowds of old-timers at Dayton 
looking for me with ropes, tar, 
and feathers. Well, I've leveled 
with you down through the 
years, never taking the easy way 
out. In this case, I think It Is 
time. . .way past time, actually 
, , Aq get serious about revamp- 
ing our ham exams and making 
our hobby a technical one rather 
than one limited mostly by an 
easily learned skill. 

Think of it like this. Sure, you 
and t know that it is not difficult 
to learn the code. Piece of cake, 
really. But you also have to ad- 
mit that when you talk with non- 
hams, you probably make a big 
deal of it. If you put yourself In 
the shoes of someone consider- 
ing being a ham, you will see, as 
they do, that the Morse code is a 
terrifying new language, . .one 
which they are not at all sure 
they can master. This fear Is in 
itself enough to turn tens of 
thousands away from amateur 
radio each year. 

Then, when someone decides 
that he or she is going to try any- 
way, the fear is enough to put off 
practice. Remember that no- 
where in our magazines or in 
talking with amateurs is any ref- 
erence made to code being fun. 
It is the major hurdle for new- 



comers and we make a big deal 
of it as such. So our talking gen- 
erates terror in the hearts of 
newcomers and makes practice 
all the more difficult . . , even im- 
possible. They know they are go- 
ing to fall, , .and they find this 
self-fulfilling, 

I've talked with thousands of 
people who wanted to be hams, 
but who were unable to sur- 
mount the code requirement. 
Most of them seriously tried but 
were conned into using a terri- 
ble code course and found 
themselves failing at it no mat- 
ter how hard they tried. Indeed, 
many of the code courses are ri- 
diculous. . .including the best- 
selling one of all. This single 
code course probably has lost 
us more hams that we've gained 
in the last twenty years. 

In speaking out against the 
code requirement, perhaps I am 
sowing the seeds of my own 
losses. The 73 Magazine code 
course, while it sells far fewer 
than does the ARRL series, has 
sold about 25,000 cassettes a 
year. Will \ be out of the code 
cassette business if we get rid 
of that element of the license? I 
think not... in fact I'm betting 
that I'll be able to sell more than 
ever. . .as fun. 

The recent OST polls showed 
that QST readers overwhelming- 
ly are in favor of keeping the 
code requirement, so it's Wayne 
Green against the world again. 
QST has been pushing code for 
as long as I've been hamming— 
over 40 years. This got them into 
trouble in the late 40s when a 
large percentage of the ama- 
teurs deserted the League to go 
with the National Amateur Ra- 
dio Council ... a phone-oriented 
group which got us expanded 
phone frequencies on 75m, the 
40m phone band, and more fre- 
quencies on 20m . . . over a lot of 
dead bodies, NARC, achieving 
Its goals, went away. 

So, if anyone has any other 
arguments which 1 have not enu- 
merated, I'll be glad to publish 
them, along with my ripostes. 
Let's get this out in the open and 
fight fair on it . „ . not let prej- 
udices left over from 50 years 
ago continue to stop our growth. 
When I first got into amateur 
radio, there was still a lot of 
smoldering anger over being 
forced off spark. Then I watched 
the same thing happen with AM 
phone, I believe in being conser- 
vative, but there is such a thing 
as carrying it too far. If you 
disagree with me, I ask you to 



fight fair. If you agree with me, 
fight with me for the growth and 
health of the very best hobby 
ever invented, 

FCC CASH-FLOW PROBLEMS 

With the Reagan administra- 
tion shaking every federal agen- 
cy to reduce expenses and lay 
off people, the FCC... which 
has been underfunded for years 
. ,.is in particular trouble. In- 
deed, if they had not been so 
prudent in the past, they would 
be far better able to weather the 
current storms. 

There has been some talk of 
getting government agencies to 
charge for services so they can 
get Into the black, If this talk 
persists, we may again see a 
charge for ham licenses. Since 
amateur radio takes up a minis* 
cule amount of the Commis- 
sion's time, our charges should 
be minimal, as they were the last 
try. But I think I have some ideas 
which might cut the cost of the 
amateur service even further for 
the Commission. 

A large percentage of the 
Commission time and money is 
spent on commercial broadcast- 
ers, so there is adequate reason 
to pass along this cost to them. 
After all, they are making a living 
out of the FCC work, I'd also like 
to see the common-carrier 
chaps pick up their end. It's 
about time,,. the television 
broadcasters using this service 
kind of snuck In through the 
back door, Indeed, I haven't 
seen any legal justification for 
them being allowed to use com- 
mon-carrier channels for televi- 
sion. That service was not de- 
signed for that use and, as 
far as I know, it was never au- 
thorized for that. WelL let's see 
that go through the legalities 
and be made official . . . with the 
common-carrier boys picking up 
the full tab. 

Perhaps I'm being a bit vin- 
dictive because this bunch of 
crumbs cost 73 tens of thou- 
sands of dollars in legal fees 
to fight their suit against us. 
A suit found without merit, 
which I feel was brought merely 
as an intimidation to try to 
prevent 73 from publishing 
2300-GHz articles. \ suspect that 
more is accomplished in our 
country via the threat of court 
cases than through the cases 
themselves. I know that few 
firms are large enough to absorb 
the costs the CCAT people put 
us through, and most would 
have shut up and blown away. I 



73 Magazine * December. 1981 181 



happen to think that freedom of 
the press for amateurs to learn 
about these things is worthy of 
such an investment, so we put 
up the money needed to fight 
these stinkers. 

Getting back to the FCC prob- 
lems. During the Carter adminis- 
tration, the FCC commissioners 
were so upset over amateur ra- 
dio as a result of the hearing 
over linear amplifiers that they 
virtually eliminated the division. 
Now what's left of the amateur 
division has to face across-the- 
board budget cuts. For those 
readers who are forgetful or in- 
attentive, let me remind you that 
this alienation of the Commis- 
sion came about entirely need- 
lessly. It was the testimony of 
one amateur which did it... 
and he was representing a well- 
known group, He stood up there 
and insulted the new commis- 
sioners, putting us all in the dog- 
house for four years. 

We have a new chairman of 
the Commission and several 
new commissioners, so we have 
a chance for a fresh start. 

There are three ways in which 
amateur radio is costing the 
FCC money these days. One is 
the cost of giving license exams 
and issuing licenses. A sec 
ond has to do with monitor 
ing our bands. A third is the 
cosl of handling our requested 
rule changes. 

On the first item t I think we 
could set up a system which 
would cut their expenses enor- 
mously. I've written about this 
before, but not recently, What 
I would like to see is a sys- 
tem whereby qualifying radio 
clubs would be permitted to 
give license exams. In order 
to get around hokey pokey. I 
would suggest that there would 
have to be three licensed am- 
ateurs present during any test 
administration. 

This could be almost com- 
pletely computerized as far as 
the Commission is concerned, 
with machine-readable cards 
being sent in by clubs for the 
issuance of the licenses. This 
would enable field offices to 
cut back substantially on per 
sonnel no longer needed to give 
and monitor these tests on a 
regular basis. 

This would enable almost ev- 
ery hamfest to have a licensing 
session, run by a local quali- 
fied ham club. It would further 
cut the cost for people want- 
ing ham tickets since they no 
longer would have to make the 

182 73 Magazine ■ December, 



long trip (for many) to a city hav- 
ing an exam center and lose a 
day or two of pay in the process. 
Most exams could be given at 
night or on weekends, at the 
convenience of the examinees 
and the club. 

By automating the process. 
the FCC wouldn't even have to 
have data entry people at Get- 
tysburg to enter the names and 
addresses of the licensees. This 
would be a further savings for 
them. And this move ahead to- 
ward automation would set the 
stage for almost instant licens- 
ing. The next step would be 
sending in the information over 
the telephone via a data ter- 
minal (or any microcomputer 
with a modem. . which ]ust 
about every club has at its 
disposal}. The exams could be 
given, the data typed in at the 
club, sent by modem to Get- 
tysburg, and instantly confirmed, 
along with the new call of the 
licensee. Gettysburg woutd for- 
ward the data to Washington, 
where the actual license would 
be printed out and mailed, much 
as is done at present. 

If we get into a charge for our 
licenses, each club could set up 
an account with the FCC which 
could be debited each time a 
new license was issued by them. 
This would give the FCC a nice 
float with which to work. If we 
had, say, 5,000 clubs participat- 
ing, with each depositing $500 
(towards licenses at $10 each), 
this would give the FCC a two 
and a half million dollar float. 
That would earn them about 
$30,000 a month in interest at 
15%. That in itself would pay the 
salaries of about 15 people at 
the FCC, 

With membership to the 
League costing $25 per year, 
perhaps that is a more reason- 
able price for us to pay for our 
licenses. Certainly the benefits 
of our licenses are more than a 
club membership. That would 
put a price tag on a five-year 
license at $125, which might 
seem a bit steep for youngsters. 
Of course, we have very few 
youngsters coming in at the 
present cost (nothing), so it is 
difficult to get emotional over 
any drop that $125 might entail. 

The fee would hit retired peo- 
ple hard... even though they 
seem able to come up with the 
money for the ARRL with no 
problem. It might come down to 
a choice between a license and 
a OST subscription. 

So what would be reason- 

1981 



able for a ham license, con- 
sidering where we are with in- 
flation these days? If $25 a 
year is too much, how much 
isn't too much? 

One way to look at th is is from 
the other side. What is it actual- 
ly costing the government to 
provide us with the license? Per- 
haps this makes more sense 
than going by how much it is 
worth to us, . .which is a lot in 
some cases. . .and not much in 
others. If we are able to help the 
Commission cut their expenses, 
we can rational i2e paying less 
for the service we are getting. . , 
and that is the key, to my way of 
thinking. I don't mind paying my 
share. I don't want to pay the 
share for someone too lazy or 
cheap to pay, someone who 
wants to ride on my coattails. 

if we are able to take the 
license examination adminis- 
tration off their hands, that 
will save them money. And, con- 
sidering the usual government 
efficiency, cutting that expense 
at one end should save sev- 
eral times the cost by the 
time the whole organization 
is considered. 

Then there is the matter of 
monitoring. Here we could cer- 
tainly help and would benefit in 
several ways as a result. The 
benefits would be fantastic. 
First, we would stop hearing 
from the Commission that ama- 
teurs are not permitted to ex- 
periment with new modes of 
communications Just because 
the FCC monitoring stations are 
unable to decipher our transmis- 
sions. That beauty of a rule ... a 
rule, by the way, which was 
never written into any of our 
regulations, but was just decid- 
ed unilaterally for us.. .has 
kept amateurs from developing 
any significant new modes of 
communications for the last 
twenty years or so. That has 
t^een one of the most destruc- 
tive unwritten rules in the 
history of amateur radio, as well 
as a direct violation of 97.1c of 
our written rules. 

Secondly, with a thousand 
amateurs available for monitor- 
ing for every present FCC em- 
ployee, we could do a job of 
monitoring which would be 
almost infinitely better than is 
being done at present, I know 
there are thousands of ama- 
teurs who would Jump at the 
chance to participate in such an 
operation, Indeed, amateurs 
could set it up. establish 
the computer communications 



which would make it work, de- 
velop automatic scanning 
equipment to monitor the entire 
spectrum, and so on. Between 
our retired hams, our handi- 
capped hams, and the coopera- 
tion of several thousand ham 
clubs, we'd have a bail . . .and 
do a splendid job. 

We also could save the FCC a 
bundle. , .passing along only 
those reports which were of 
importance to the few FCC 
monitoring stations still need- 
ed. You know as well as 1 that 
clubs would love to set up di- 
rection-finding systems to track 
down mysterious stations. . .to 
listen for emergency air or 
marine traffic. . .and so on. It 
would give us much more to do 
which would be both fun and 
beneficial to the country. 

On the matter of cutting down 
on legislative expenses, let me 
bring up an idea which I have 
written about every now and 
then down through the last thir- 
ty years. This has to do with 
amateurs taking the responsibil- 
ity for coming up with proposed 
rule changes. . .and working 
them out via a symposium simi- 
lar to that run by the ITU in Gen- 
eva every few years, We could 
have as a responsibility for our 
ham clubs the generation and 
forwarding of proposed rule 
changes. Then we would have a 
meeting every two years where 
club delegates could discuss 
and decide what actual changes 
we really want, 

We could, like the ITU, set 
up subcommittees to discuss 
and recommend action on each 
of the proposed changes. These 
committees would pass along 
their recommendations to a 
meeting of all club delegates 
for final voting and action, This 
process could save the Com- 
mission hundreds of thousands 
of dollars presently spent on 
trying to cope with proposed 
ham rule changes. It also would 
get us our rule changes while 
they are needed, not years later 
when they are a nuisance and 
long unneeded. 

In these ways, we could get 
amateur radio off the back of 
the Commission, saving them 
most of their present amateur 
radio expenses. In return, our 
service would be much more 
flexible and able to grow and 
develop, keeping up with... 
and preceding., .technology. I 
think we would start seeing in- 
ventions and pioneering of new 
ideas returning to amateur ra- 



dio . . . with benefits to our coun- 
try and the world. 

It is a shame that rn these 
days of digital communications 
amateur radio is held back by 
the FCC with the technology of 
twenty years ago. 

CLUB RESPONSIBILITY 

Just a few years ago t I ran 
a poll of ham clubs and found 
thai only about 1% were spend- 
ing time and effort to run ham 
classes to develop new Nov- 
ices. Perhaps I got overly abu- 
sive about this in my editor- 
ials, but the response was good 
and we got to a point where over 
50% of the ham clubs were run- 
ning ham c lasses, 

That seems to have dropped 
in recent months, . .probably 
due to the difficulty of finding 
candidates as interest in CB has 
diminished. Well CB or no CB, 
we need massive numbers of 
new hams. You read about that 
in more detail in my piece about 
NIAC and its recent meeting. 

Now, I can see where a small 
ham club, with perhaps a half 
dozen members, might have dif- 
ficulty in developing the re- 
sources needed to teach new 
hams. But if there are any larger 
clubs which are not holding up 
their end of this, let's get going 
immediately. Get those classes 
started, There are plenty of 
teaching materials, . .and you 
have members who will help 
out. . .if you will get moving. I 
want to see our next poll show 
that over 90% of the ham clubs 
are generating new licensees. 

What is a reasonable number 
of new hams to bring into the 
world? Well; since your club 
probably represents only about 
25% of the available local 
amateurs in your area, at best, 
you should aim for at Jeast 
matching the number of your 
present club members each 
year. We need an overall 33% 
growth per year in amateur li- 
censees, if we are able to get 
4,000 of our clubs to run classes, 
we need to generate 33 new 
hams per club this year, . .and 
45 per club next year. Obviously 
it can be done . . , if your club will 

start doing it and see that 

every other club in your area is 
working just as hard as you are, 

FAKE QSL CARDS 

The world of the DX Honor 
Roll is shaking as a result of the 
expose by W6NZX. In what ap- 
pears to be a classic case of 



shooting the messenger. Bob 
has been singled out to be 
pilloried, thus making sure that 
no one else rocks the boat. 

Since there is no known way 
to prevent cheating, either on 
the side of the Honor Roll ama- 
teurs or the DXpeditioners. per- 
haps it is time we gave some 
consideration to taking the heat 
off the whole situation by either 
getting rid of the lists in ham 
magazines. . .or making it pure- 
ly a matter of "claimed 1 coun- 
tries contacted. I hate to be the 
one mentioning this, but the 
whole matter is one of no impor- 
tance whatever. 

By attaching some impor- 
tance to the number of coun- 
tries contacted, we set up 
several undesirable effects. 
First, we have seen the develop- 
ment of a cult in amateur radio 
dedicated at almost any cost to 
staying on top of the list. This 
has gotten to unbelievable pro- 
portions, with the pursuit taking 
precedence over families and 
even over work. 

As the importance has been 
magnified in the minds of the 
cultists. any stratagem has 
become accepted toward the 
goal of staying on top of the list. 
These chaps are well aware that 
many of the cards they have are 
fakes in one sense or another. 
Indeed, the awards committees 
know this too* but have played 
along with the cultists (whom 
they have generated), accepting 
fakes at face value when there 
was no question in their minds 
about the invalidity of the cards. 

I've mentioned recently that I 
have a bunch of cards which I 
know to be fakes, but which I 
could submit for awards, . and 
get them. I'm not talking about 
cards from almost unknown sta* 
tions, but cards from some of 
the best-known DXpeditioners, 

Now what is a "fake" card? 
As minds crazed with getting 
ahead of others on The List 
churn, more and more fakes ap- 
pear. Some are transparent forg- 
eries, where the cards have 
been turned out in a local print 
shop with not even an effort to 
copy the original, I used to get 
those in abundance when they 
were submitted for our Worked 
The World award. Fortunately, 
being active in working OX, I had 
the real cards on hand for com- 
parison. 

Others are copies of the real 
cards. Now how is a person 
checking through a stack of 
cards going to be able to tell the 



difference between the real card 
and an exact imitation? Accord- 
ing to inside sources, the 
awards people have not figured 
this one out and so they have 
been accepting the cards at 
face value. 

With QSL managers all over 
the place, there is no way for a 
QSL printer to know that an 
order for 500 cards is from a 
chap {or group) about to put 
them out as counterfeit cards. 
Most people who handle our 
QSL orders {and 73 turns out 
around a hundred orders a 
week) know nothing about ama- 
teur radto. They just set the type, 
proofread it against the order, 
make up the printing plates, 
print the cards, package them, 
address them, and ship them 
out, I'm sure that most of 
the QSL printers work pretty 
much the same way. It's mass 
production, 

QSL managers, with thou- 
sands of blank cards^ have often 
been known to hand out sam- 
ples to friends. It isn't difficult to 
fill in a card and end up with 
something which is exactly like 
the real thing. With many cards 
coming in envelopes, even the 
lack of a postmark or QSL 
bureau stamp doesn't mean 
much. For the perfectionist, 
there are fake bureau stamps* 
brief notes from the real DX 
operator in answer to some 
question to provide the enve* 
lope. , .and soon. 

It does appear that for many 
OXers there is more fun and 
work involved in fooling the 
awards people than in the chase 
of the DX That has become a 
subset of the cult. 

DXpeditioners who do their 
own QSLing have given little 
thought to the counterfeit prob- 
lem and have often handed out 
souvenir cards to anyone ask- 
ing. Many of these have been 
filled out later and passed 
through the awards people for 
full credit. I've visited a number 
of rare spots and often have 
handed my cards out as souve 
nirs at hamfests. 

Some of the rarer spots from 
which I've operated are 3D6. 
7P8, 5Z4, 0O5, JY, YA, EP, YK. 
9N, VS6, HL, 3D2, FOB, FK8, 
5W1, KS6, KC4, 4U P etc, So pick- 
ing up a collection of my old 
cards could be of some help. 
You don't hea( a lot of YA and 
EP stations these days. 

Another type of fake card is 
the one from the DXpeditioner 
who isn't where he says he is. 



This type of cheating has been 
going on as Jong as I can re- 
member. The first really whole- 
sale case where I was shown 
proof of the cheating happened 
around twenty years ago and 
had to do with a chap operating 
out of a hotel in North Africa, 
signing the calls of one country 
after another as he went around 
on his imaginary DXpedilion. He 
was saved the problem of get- 
ting licenses, travel expenses, 
sand in the rigs^ and other 
unpleasantnesses of West Afri- 
can travel through the expedient 
of not bothering to move This 
was an inexpensive and creative 
solution to what otherwise 
would have been considerable 
aggravation. The cards are still 
acceptable for awards. 

The ruse was so transparent 
that it took no time at ail before 
other hams were using it and ex- 
panding upon it. This was a far 
simpler and cheaper way of get- 
ting to those out-of-the-way 
islands. . ,of operating from un- 
friendly countries. During the 
60s, all of us OX hunters built up 
our collection of fake cards The 
awards managers were well 
aware of what was going on, but 
didn't want to upset things by 
refusing to accept the cards, so 
a conspiracy of silence devel^ 
oped The rules were tightened a 
bit to make blatant cheating 
more difficult. 

Miller and his cohorts pushed 
things too far for even the con- 
spiracy of silence to swallow. Of 
course he went a step further, 
not only faking his operating lo- 
cations, but also charging the 
hell out of members of the cult, 
who by now would pay anything 
to stay on top. My understand- 
ing is that he charged $50 per 
new country for cultists and that 
this was bringing him a very nice 
income . on the order of over 
$50,000 a year. . .completely 
tax free. 

\ still run into hams in rare 
spots who remember Miller 
opening his mail, taking out the 
money and throwing away ev- 
erything else. . .piles upon piles 
of mail, I know that when I wrote 
my editorial and exposed some 
of the things he was doing, he 
sued me for $650,000 for cutting 
down his income. He sued the 
League for only $500,000 for be- 
smirching him , . ! and lost when 
it was proven that he had been 
operating from places other 
than he claimed. Despite all 
that, I believe that my cards 
from Miller are still valid 






73 Magazine ■ December, 1981 183 



for awards. . .and I have a lot 
of them. 

Just as an example, I got a 
card from him from Burma. 
Hmmm, I thought that no ama- 
teur radio was permitted in Bur- 
ma. So I went to Burma per* 
sonally and looked Into it I 
asked the government about 
hamming. . /'no way/' I asked 
the hotel where he said he had 
stayed and operated from... 
*' impossible/ 1 I asked the local 
amateurs (who had been put off 
the air and their equipment con* 
flscated). . ."totally impossi- 
ble." When I challenged Miller 
with this, he changed his story 
and said that actually he had 
operated from a hospital in- 
stead of the hotel, as he had 
claimed. Since the hospitals 
were under army control, not the 
control of doctors, that obvious- 
ly was a lie, too. But I wrote back 
and had that checked out.., 
"false," 

If ft were a matter of any 
significance about how many 
countries any of us has con- 
tacted, we might look into ways 
of trying to stem the cheating. 
But the Importance of this as a 
goal In life is about on the order 
of that of the Trobriand Island- 
ers and their fetish of growing 
pigs with reentrant tusks. 

My own experience has 
shown me that an amateur with 
a decent station and some oper- 
ating experience can whack off 
one hundred countries In one 
weekend (with the help of a con- 
test). It takes about a month to 
get 200 worked. , .and perhaps 
a year for 300, with some dili- 
gence. That's what it took me. 
Beyond 300 you get into cheats- 
ville and the DXpeditions, That's 
why f got my 300 and then 
stopped counting. Now and 
then I work a new one T but I don't 
know within 20 countries how 
many I've realty worked, . , and I 
don't care. 

If the DX awards would stop 
at 300, it would kill this whole 
cult and free up a few hundred 
people around the world to con- 
template living more productive 
lives. We might be able to leave 
the world of counterfeiting to 
those who arrange for fake 
passports and wills. 

Speaking of fake papers, I 
was in Asia one time and found 
that I had to have an authen- 
ticated shot which was not on 
my health record. A ham in the 
country fixed that easily. He 
scribbled In the shot informa- 
tion and stamped it with a 



checker and stamp pad. Looked 
great and got me through. I 
managed not to contract the 
disease during the visit... 
perhaps the checker did it. 

There are 300 legitimate coun- 
tries on the air and they are easy 
enough to contact, so the ten- 
dency to cheat might be avoid* 
ed. It's the fast few that bring 
out the worst in people. Remem- 
ber that if any one of the Honor 
Roll chaps misses one new coun- 
try which comes on the air, he 
is moved back one rung on the 
ladder. . . usually permanently. 
And that means falling way, way 
back. 

If we could take the pressure 
off, we might find more DX sta- 
tions on the air. I've mentioned 
frequently that when I visit rare 
spots I Invariably find that the 
operators feel harassed and are 
not very enthusiastic about 
hamming. You can't blame 
them; they are never permitted 
to get on and rag-chew. They are 
always haunted by ferocious 
pileups and demanding DXers 
who feel it is their right to make 
a contact of at feast ten sec- 
onds.,, and never mind what 
the operator in the rare country 
wants to do. 

I've heard DXers cursing out 
ops in rare spots who had given 
up to go to bed or to work. Well, 
if you are going to take it alt this 
seriously, then you have a prob- 
lem, not the DX. You are the one 
who has to decide whether It Is 
worth several days of your time 
to get a new country. I'll Invest 
up to ten minutes trying for a 
new one, but that's about the 
limit for me. 

At any rate, getting back to 
fake cards, it turns out that 
some of the West Coast gang 
have gone overboard and have 
been printing up rare cards 
wholesale and passing them 
around. Complaints to the 
awards people have gone un- 
heeded, There is no question 
about whether they really care 
or not. So when one chap 
brought it to a head by submit 
ting a pile of faked cards all in 
the same handwriting, he was 
given the shaft and everything 
else was quickly covered over. 
At least that is the story going 
around and, considering the his- 
tory, it's difficult to find a 
serious flaw in it. 

Even the change to computer- 
ized operating isn't going to 
make a significant difference as 
far as I can see. I can envision 
the day when a DXpedition will 



come on the air from Gherkin 
Atoll and make contacts auto- 
matically at the rate of several 
thousand a minute, with the 
logs being transmitted on a sec- 
ond channel as generated to the 
awards committees of several 
amateur radio societies. At 9 t 600 
baud, we can pass information 
through at an effective rate of 
about 7,500 words per minute 
without special encoding, so we 
will be able to get DXpeditions 
over in a few hours instead of 
weeks. The QSL manager would 
also be tuned into the log chan- 
nel and his computer would 
print out and send along the 
QSLs to the QSL bureaus. 

But what is to prevent any 
ham from programming his sta- 
tion to make contacts for every* 
one in his DX club? Or even to 
have them check in over a two- 
meter link and make their con- 
tacts? And, If you want to be 
nasty about it. what is the dif- 
ference? Any good station any- 
where in the world can make 
contact with a similar station, 
so all we are measuring with our 
awards is the amount of time 
someone Is willing to spend for 
the desired award. There is no 
real measure of the station, of 
the ability of the operator, or 
even of propagation conditions. 
The awards are, essentially, 
without any real merit. 

So, if you won't get rid of the 
Honor Roll and its pernicious 
undermining of our hobby, 111 be 
pushing forward toward com- 
puterized contacts and the day 
when we can work 350 to 400 
countries in a minute or so. 
Perhaps we will then set up 
awards for working 400 or 500 
countries every day for a year. 

Five hundred countries? Sure. 
That's part of the whole game. 
The awards groups set up their 
definitions of countries to suit 
themselves. No one likes it 
when he loses a country, The 
fun is in working ever more of 
them, so awards committees 
have to come up with new ra- 
tionalizations to provide us with 
more and more. They can whet 
our appetites by temporarily 
refusing to accept this or that, 
generating great and enthusias- 
tic controversy. 

Years and years ago. I got to- 
gether with Bill Orr in Nice and 
discussed the subject. He came 
up with a humor article on Coun- 
tries Galore in "64, Well, most of 
those enclaves he joked about 
at the time are now accepted 
countries. With the SARL ac- 



cepting Transkei and Bophu* 
thatswana as countries, how 
long will it take for more of the 
IARU societies to accept them? 
Bophuthatswana is a great one, 
being spread out into a lot of 
enciaves, We could make that 
into twenty or more separate 
countries without even trying. 
South Africa, in an effort to wig- 
gle its way out of segregation 
problems, has a lot more similar 
"homelands" which are being 
contemplated. . .each a solid- 
gold possibility for a new coun- 
try for us. 

Indeed, as I've hinted before, I 
have my eye on one such ter- 
ritory. As soon as it becomes a 
separate country politically, I'm 
planning to rush down there and 
set up a station and drive you 
crazy for a few days. I even have 
a call in mind for it... if this 
does not give anything away. Of 
course, well have to run It by the 
ITU first, but I think it is a winner. 
I've already asked for Q5R9 for 
my call Laugh, ) hope, but re- 
member that I said it. when you 
hear me. 

Though \ am perhaps critical 
of the DX awards committees 
for accepting known fraudulent 
cards, I can understand their 
problem. With so many of the 
DXers submitting them, and 
with it being almost impossible 
to really know for sure which are 
the reat and which the fakes, it is 
a no-win situation. But a simple 
returning of Bob's cards might 
have been more prudent, rather 
than making a martyr of him by 
trying to pillory him for forcing 
the issue and blowing the whis- 
tle. 

Keep on accepting the fake 
cards and shut up. Most of us 
don't really care. 

ZAP! YOU'RE ITI 

The September editorial piece 
about police radar brought in 
quite a reader response. A tot of 
you have been zonked by the 
police, not for actual speeding, 
but because your transmitter in- 
dicated speed on their radar 
units. You really are going to 
have to iearn from the misery of 
others and either cut out talking 
from your car or get a detector 
so that you know when to shut 
up. 

In case you think that being 
right cuts any mustard with our 
court system, forget it. I even 
have a case of a ham judge who 
refuses to pay heed to the ham 
interference defense. Some of 
us get so wrapped up in our rosy 



184 73 Magazine • December, 1981 



altruistic imaginations that we 
forget that the purpose of police 
radar is not to stop speeding but 
to make money for towns . , * 
and it is a fantastic money- 
maker. If they say you are guilty, 
you are guilty, and your best bet 
is to pay up and chalk another 
one up to our American judicial 
tax collection system. 

Getting down to radar detec- 
tors, I've been testing a few 
more. The newest one is by Fox, 
It's the smallest one yet and is 
unobtrusive on the shelf where it 
can took out of your front win- 
dow. It's as sensitive as any 
yet . . even matching the famed 
Escort, which I mentioned in 
September 

The Super Fox Vixen is about 
5 x 3*1/2" x 1-1/4" and comes 
with a plug for your cigarette 
lighter socket. Since you have 
no business smoking any more, 
this is a fine use for that other* 



wise wasted socket, On our new 
Datsun Maxima, where most of 
the Vixen tests have been run, 
the power socket is turned on 
and off by the ignition key, so I 
don't even have to remember to 
turn it off when I get out of the 
car. Most of the radar detectors 
draw enough current (300 mA) 
so you will find a dead car bat- 
tery if you leave 'em on while not 
using your car for a few 
days . . . like at the airport during 
a trip. 

The Vixen, in addition to be- 
ing small, has the benefit of be- 
ing distributed through car ac- 
cessory stores and many elec- 
tronic stores, so it should be 
simple to find. The cost is $250> 
right in there with the Escort 
($245). 

The only real difference be- 
tween the Super Fox Vixen and 
the Escort is that the Vixen has 
a buzzer and light indicator of 
radar, while the Escort has 



those plus an S-meter. Perhaps 
it is the ham in me that likes to 
watch the S-meter and see when 
I am getting close enough to a 
radar unit to know that it can 
pick up my ham rig. The Vixen 
will keep you out of trouble, 
which Is what you want. Be sure 
that you specify a Super Fox 
Vixen ... the superhet model , . . 
as the firm also puts out a Fox. 
which is a passive defector unit 
and about 1/100th as sensitive. J 
have one of those in our RX7 and 
it generally goes off just as I am 
passing a radar unit, right at the 
last minute. Since I have both 
2m and CB rigs in the can if t 
waited for the passive unit to 
alert me I would be off the road 
by now with too many tickets to 
drive. 

I've found that a small square 
of Velcro™ stuck to the bottom 
of the unit . . and another on my 
dash shelf allow it to be 
whisked off the shelf when I 



park the car in Boston or at the 
airport. There's no use dangling 
a $250 goodie right out there in 
front of thieves when you can 
flip it under the seat while 
parked in higlverime areas. Of 
course, in New Hampshire this 
just isn't a problem, 

Small world department: The 
people who handle the promo- 
tion and advertising for Fox ate 
the same people who handled 
DenTron. . .and are handling 
OSi. the computer firm. OSI t by 
the way, was bought by Macom, 
the firm which makes most of 
the Gunn oscillators for the 
superhet radar detectors, . .and 
which makes the 1Q-GH2 gear 1 
used for my DXing a year or so 
ago. Macom, formerly Micro- 
wave Associates, is where Sam 
Harris W1FZJ, the microwave 
genius, used tu work before he 
moved to Arecibo, The president 
of Macom is an old4ime ham, 
Dana Atchiey 



LETTERS 




DAY IN COURT 



Thanks very much. 

Your September issue of 73 
arrived the day after I got an un- 
justified speeding ticket backed 
up by police radar. Armed with 
the information in your editorial, 
I immediately ordered the legal 
index and bought an Escort. The 
delivery of both was very fast 
and arrived in time to assist my 
court preparation. 

You are too pessimistic. The 
court is an adversary relation- 
ship and the person with the best 
preparation (among other things) 
wins. A previously good driving 
record is also a must, In my case 
I was stopped for "37 in a 25 
mph zone" based on radar. I was 
sure I was not speeding and so 
informed the arresting officer. 
His comment was "tell it to the 
judge/' After obtaining the name 
of type of radar in use, noting 
the other traffic immediately be* 
fore me T etc., and fuming, I read 
73. After obtaining and reading 
the Fuzzbuster legal index and 
spending a few more hours in the 
local law library and in technical 
reading, I called the Common- 
wealth's attorney. His initial 
view was; Radar is infallible. 



Some states will listen to tech- 
nical arguments but not VA." 

After the roll was called in 
court (IV2 hours of calling the 
roll t listening to shoplifter cas* 
es, etc.), the court got started on 
the docket. In a lull, I reminded 
the Commonwealth's attorney 
that I intended to plead not guil- 
ty and of the technical basis for 
my defense (RFI from the ham 
gear causing spurious readings 
as adequately documented in the 
manufacturer's handbook, Bu- 
reau of Standards tests, etcj. I 
also mentioned the other traffic 
In the pattern which was pulling 
away from me but not stopped, I 
was supported by diagrams, 
texts, etc., in a large bundle 
under my arms. When the case 
came before the judge, the Com- 
monwealth's attorney recom* 
mended dropping the charges. 

It took a few hours, but just ice 
is worth the effort. The Escort 
works like a charm— I won't be 
surprised again, I may even not 
key the rig passing the radar 
next time. 

J.D. Peters K1 ER 
Manassas VA 

JO, you're not doing your 
homework completely. The Car 



& Driver article on American 
justice is necessary reading to 
dispel your euphoria. Being to- 
tally and demonstrably right did 
not help when the editor of Car &. 
Driver tost a clear-cut case 
. . , including two very expensive 
appeals. When t get complaints 
from hams in African countries 
about the sad shape of the 
courts there, I refer them to the 
article to show thai our courts 
are not any belter, , . the occa- 
sional lucky chap like you not- 
withstanding. — Wayne. 



SURVIVAL 

Your editorial statements and 
talks concerning the relation- 
ship between amateur radio and 
a productive electronic engi- 
neering industry such as that of 
Japan have intrigued me, I 
couldn't agree with you more! 
But I think that there is more to it 
than is indicated by the num- 
bers of amateurs in a country, or 
the licensing structure en* 
couragmg or discouraging the 
growth of the hobby. In recent 
times, the professional litera- 
ture in science and education 
has bemoaned what has been 
happening in our American 
society and its effect on school 
curriculum and the courses 
students take, both in the high 
schools and in the colleges. 
(One of the more recent articles 
for the general public appeared 
in the Washington Post on May 



31, 1961, and was written by 
David G, Savage.) For some 
years now many high schools 
have dropped math and science 
requirements for graduation. 
This is also true for many col- 
leges This is not true in Japan, 
The Japanese educational 
system is rigorous, with mathe- 
matics instruction being given 
in a more concentrated form 
and with more students taking 
the advanced courses. By the 
ninth grade, the Japanese stu* 
dent has had three years of 
geometry and one year of trigo- 
nometry. High school courses 
include calculus, probability. 
and statistics, Is it any wonder 
that (as pointed out in the article 
by Savage) Japanese leaders 
often point to the rigor of their 
educational system as a key to 
their economic success? 

In the United States, about 
5% of all bachelors and masters 
degrees are in engineering. In 
Japan, about 20% of the bache- 
lors and about 40% of the mas- 
ters degrees go to engineers. 
Between 1963 and 1977, produc- 
tivity in the US grew 39% and 
1.6% of our students became 
engineers. Productivity in Great 
Britain during this period grew 
51% and 1.7% of the British 
students became engineers. In 
West Germany, productivity 
was 114% and about 2,3% of 
West German students became 
engineers. In Japan, 4.2% of the 
students became engineers and 



73 Magazine • December, 1981 185 



productivity went up 197%. 
Make what you will of these 
figures!! 

As amateur radio operators, 
we look to the Japanese for 
much of our equipment and we 
are thus familiar with their 
engineering products and their 
quality. We hold long and friend- 
ly conversations with Japanese 
amateurs, Russian equipment, 
on the other hand and for the 
most part, is unfamiliar to us, 
The vast bulk of the QSOs be- 
tween American and Russian 
hams appears to be a mere ex* 
change of technical informa- 
tion. And nothing could be more 
deadly to a friendly QSL ex* 
change than PO Box 88 s Mos- 
cow! Yet their educational sys- 
tem and its productivity is 
almost awesome to an Ameri- 
can educator. 

In 1957, the Russians threw a 
piece of iron called "Sputnik" up 
into the heavens. America be* 
came frightened and began a 
frantic beefing up of its math 
and science programs. This 
lasted until the middle 60s. At 
that time, while our intense ef- 
forts began to go downhill, the 
Russians decided to go uphill. A 
recent study by the National 
Science Foundation indicates 
that the math and science pro- 
gram required for all Soviet 
students is far stronger than 
that of any other nation. Not on* 
ly do a considerably greater 
number of Soviet students fin- 
ish high school (our 75% to their 
98%), but their requirements are 
quite a bit tougher. For example, 
a high school graduate has had 
five years of algebra, ten years 
of geometry, two years of calcu- 
lus, five years of geography, five 
years each of biology and 
physics, and four of chemistry. 
By contrast In the United States, 
of the high school graduates, 
9% have had one year of phys- 
ics, 16% one year of chemistry, 
and 45% one year of biology. 
Savage points out that each 
year about five million Soviet 



high school students graduate 
with two years of calculus and, 
in contrast, about 105,000 
American students have had 
one year of calculus. 

One might argue that the 
forced curriculum of the Soviet 
Union does lead to a resentment 
of sorts among certain parents 
and educators, and ought to be 
tempered. But it might also be 
argued that lack of a rigorous 
math and science program in 
the United States may be at a 
price much more expensive than 
the diminution of the hobby of 
amateur radio. The price being 
survival. 

Marvin D. Solomon WB6VNP 

Okemos Ml 

Thanks. Marvin, for the 
statistics, which are interesting. 
Perhaps the tack of interest in 
science on the part of our 
students stems from a tack of 
motivation, if such is the case, if 
we could spark an interest in 
amateur radio within our high 
schools, then we might find our 
schools more pressed to teach 
math and science courses. And 
consider that, if amateur radio 
had continued its growth pat- 
tern from the 50s into the 60s 
and 70s t that atone would have 
changed our percentages of 
students becoming engineers. 
Were talking about a loss of 
around 60,000 technicians and 
engineers per year over the last 
generation. That magnitude of 
interest could have had a signifi- 
cant impact on our whole educa- 
tional system, 

tf we had continued our 
growth, I'm sure that amateur 
radio would be vastly dif- 
ferent. . .more advanced. * . 
than it is today. Much of 
amateur radio is stuck in the 
30s, fifty years behind the times. 
The rest of it is hung up in the 
50s, only thirty years behind 
technically. The amount of prog- 
ress and experimentation with 
modem communications tech- 
niques is negligible. It t am to 



HAM HELP 



I'm looking for information on 
an Ameco TX62 6-meter/2*meter 
AM/CW transmitter I will pay 
any copying and malting costs. 
Also. I am interested in any 
clubs in the Orange/E. Santa 

186 73 Magazine * December. 



Ana, California, area. Thank 
you. 

Dennis P. Breeden WB3KUM 
4623 East Washington Ave., 

Apt. rig 
Orange CA 92669 

1981 



fudge by ARRL surveys and my 
mail, most amateurs wilt fight 
hard to keep amateur radio from 
changmg. Heck, I stiii hear 
AMers on 75m holding forth, 
Witt we continue to be left 
behind as digital and high-speed 
communications systems are 
developed?— Wayne. 



TRICKED OUT 

We noted with interest the ar- 
ticle in the September issue on 
"Thcking-Out the FT-901f902." It 
refers to a bandpass tuning fea- 
ture developed by Bill Orr. 

We believe this to be an error, 
as this feature was first devel- 
oped by Buddy Alvernaz 
W6DMA when he was employed 
by Jennings Radio (now a divi> 
sion of ITT), 

There was an article in the 
May, 1958. issue of QST (page 
16) which described this feature 
and listed Buddy Alvernaz as the 
originator. 

ITT Jennings 
San Jose CA 



WACRAL NETS 



_J 



WACRAL (the World Associa- 
tion of Christian Radio Ama- 
teurs & Listeners— G3NJB) runs 
the following nets: 

• Sunday at 0830 on approxi* 
mately 3775 kHz t and at 1400 on 
7075 kHz; 

• Monday at 2100 on 3550 
kHz (the CW net); 

• Wednesday at 1030 on ap- 
proximately 3665 kHz; 

• Monday and Friday at 1900 
on 21,350 kH2 (the overseas net). 

The purpose of all the nets is 
to encourage and spread Chris- 
tian friendship and fellow- 
ship— the main aim and pur- 
pose of WACRAL Itself. 

Just as a point of interest, 
apart from the overseas net, the 
other nets have been In contin- 
uous weekly operation now for 
over seven years. There is al- 
ways someone on, and most 
nets are controlled by me. 

LD: Coiley G3AGX 

Micasa, 13 Ferry Road 

Wawne, Nr Hull 

HU7 5XU England 



ITALIAN LICENSES 



J 



the USA regarding amateur 
operators was reached. 

This department is ready to 
assist your military or civilian 
personnel holding a US amateur 
license to apply for a permit in 
case of a short visit in Italy or an 
amateur station license with al- 
location of an Italian caflslgn if 
resident. 

Please write for further 
information. 

Manuel F. Calero I4CMR 

ARI (Assoc iaz ion e 

Radioamatori Italian!) 

Reciprocal Licensing 

Department 

Via Giorgione, 16 

1-40133 Bologna 

Italy 



ROASTED FANNIES 



We have the pleasure to in- 
form you that on August 28, 
1981, a reciprocal operating 
agreement between Italy and 



For some time now, Radio 
Systems Technology has been 
designing hidden antennas for 
home-built plastic aircraft using 
the nonconductive structure of 
the aircraft to enclose the anten- 
na radiating rod(s). 

It has come to our attention 
that certain builders have been 
concealing the transponder or 
DME antennas rn close proximi- 
ty to the pilot or passengers. The 
usual location of choice has 
been directly under the passen- 
ger or pilot seat structure. 

RST would like to point out 
that this places, in effect, high- 
powered microwave energy In 
very close proximity to a rather 
sensitive part of the pilot/pas- 
senger's anatomy. Bluntly, it 
may be a little like sticking your 
fanny into a microwave oven. 

We are not clinical radiolo- 
gists, nor do we have the equip- 
ment necessary to determine 
the backscattered field strength 
of these antennas. We do know, 
though, that there will be some 
leakage around any ground 
plane. Until a competent profes- 
sional with the necessary train- 
ing and equipment will volunteer 
to make the measurements for 
the rest of the home-building 
brethren* RST is suggesting that 
builders who wish to install 
transponder/DME antennas un- 
der the seats also laminate a 
sheet of plain old aluminum foil 
Into the seat structure to shield 
the pilot from possible harm. 
(Microwave energy will not pe- 
netrate the thinnest of metal* 
lie foils.) 

Radio Systems Technology 
Grass Valley Ca 



Model 173DM 

Dual, independent clocks/Solid walnut case/ 

Functional and beautiful 

$69.95 (plus $3.00 shipping) 




Model 173B 

Internal backlight^Aluminum 

and Poly case/Portable 

$34,95 {plus $3.00 shipping) 



Independent Military Option 

Military time format clocks by Benjamin Michael. Independent of power 
lines these units are energy efficient, secure, and free to provide 
accurate quartz controlled time in any setting. Used by the Military and 
U.S. government agencies as well as many municipal taw enforcement 
and public safety departments, these units won't quit just because 
commercial power did. 

Exercise your independent military option now. 



^420 



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NOT Included 

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(CA Residents add 6% sales tax) 



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Bring ORGANIZATION & 
CONVENIENCE to your 
HAM Station! Eliminate 
clutter and provide lots of 
space for everything you 
need - Tuners, VFO, CW 
Keyers, Filters, Telephone, 
Log Book, Etc... 



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Dealers Inquiries Invited 



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With a REAL Purpose . . . 

Call : (213) 837-4870 or Write for Information 

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14384 Keystone Ave., Culver City, CA 90230 



For the best deal on 

• AEA*Alliance»A meco* Apple* ASP 
Avanti*8elden*Benctifir«Bird-C0£ 
CES-Corn muni cations Specialists 
Collirrs*Cushcraft»flaiwa*DenTrfln 
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Kenwood* Larsen»M3crotranFes*MFJ 
Midland* Mini Products* Mirage* Wosley 
NPC*Newtronics»Nve» Panasonic 

■ Palomar Engineers* Regency* Robol 
*Shure*Slandard»Sw3n* Tempo 

• Ten Tec»Transcom*Yaesu 

SEASON 'S 

GREETINGS! 

YAESU FL-101 HF Transmitter, 
close-out priced at $389 

KENWOOD TS-520S HF trans- 
ceiver, close-out $669 

SWAN MX? 00 HF Transceiver, 
close-out special $369 

ICOMIC-701 HFXcvr with mike 
& power supply, only $975 

KENWOOD TR-7730, TS-830S 
In stock Call for price 

YAESU 's New FT-20SR is now 
available from stock Call! 

APPLE Disk Based System: 
Apple II or II Plus with 48k 
RAM installed, Disk II with 
controller, DOS 3.3 $1899 

APPLE Game Paddles available 

Quantities limited... all prices subject to 
change without notice 

We always have an excellent 
assortment of fine used equip- 
ment in stocks, come in or call 

CALL TOLL FREE 

(outside Illinois only) 

(800) 621-5802 

HOURS; 9:30-5:30 Man.. Tues., Wed 8 FrL 
9:30-9:00 Thursday 
9:00-3:00 Saturday 



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COMMUNICATIONS 

Chicago. IL 60630 

5456 North Milwaukee Ave. 

(312) 631 -5181 Iwilhin Illinois) 



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tsSee List of Advertisers on page 162 



73 Magazine * December, 1981 187 



NEW PRODUCTS 



LULY POLARIZER 

Robert Luly Associates ha c 
introduced a new product for 
the satellite industry, the Luly 
Polarizer The Polarizer is an 
electronic rotator (no moving 
parts) that replaces the mechan- 
ical rotator which was burdened 
with freezing or burning up f 
twisting cables, and weight 
problems 

The Poianzer enables polarity 
shift from horizontal to vertical 
automatically The insertion 
Joss is equal to an N connector, 
a mere .15 dB. Operating current 
is 12 to 15 volts at 50 milliamps 
(available from standard receiv- 
ers). The polarity can also h p 
varied 0-180°, allowing for dual 
polarization realignment after 
moving the antenna from one 
satellite to the next. 

For more information con- 
tact Robert Luly Associates, PO 
Box 231 7 , San Bernardino CA 
92405, Reader Service number 
481. 



STANDARD 

COMMUNICATIONS TALKMAN 

Taikman is a miniature, 
lightweight, voice-actuated, 
hands free two-way radio; it is 
ideal for active bicyclists, snow 
skiers, hunters, and even those 
engaged in such pursuits as 
tower rigging and construction. 
Measuring only ZW wide, AW 
high, and 3/4" deep, Tafkman 
weighs less than one pound. It is 
available in any one of five chan- 
nels in the FM 49-MH? band and 
will transmit up to a quarter 
mile Power is provided with an 
easily obtainable 9-voit battery. 
The headset features a stow- 
able whip antenna and an ad- 
justable boom-mounted minia- 
ture voice- activated micro- 
phone. 

For more information, con- 
tact Standard Communications 
Corp., PO Box 92151, Los 
Angeles CA 9O0O9, Reader Ser- 
vice number 488. 







The Tafkman from Standard Communications, 



FLEA-SIZE KEYER 
FROM CURTIS 

A rugged, low-priced keyer 
from Curtis Electro Devices 
promises to be the tiny, no-frills 
unit CW buffs have been waiting 
for Although only 1.5*' square, 
3" deep, and 3.5 ounces in 
weight, the + Lil r Bugger/' as it's 
called, offers many of the fea- 
tures found on full-sized keyers. 
plus a few of its own. The front 
panel contains only a thumb- 
wheel speed control. Weighting, 
stdetone pitch, and volume are 
adjustable internally via small 
trimmers. The tungsten output 
relay will easily key any amateur 
transmitter, including really 



tough cases such as old ship- 
board transmitters. Jacks are 
provided for the keyline. side- 
tone output, and an external ac 
adaptor. The case also contains 
a compartment for an ordinary 
9-V transistor radio battery. 

The standard model K5 is 
equipped with the Curtis 8044 
chip. A second version of the 
unit (model K5B) uses the new 
Curtis 8044B IC which provides 
the squeeze-keying characteris- 
tics of the Ten-Tec, Heath, Nye, 
and Accukeyer, In these models, 
a squeeze released during a dot 
will automatically produce a fol- 
lowing dash. Similarly, a 
squeeze released during a dash 




The Polarirer from Lttfv 
188 73 Magazine » December. 1981 



The Lit' Bugger from Curtis Electro Devices, 






^tV^^feiycr ?%: + 




9 0C18S13 I 

202bSD 




Model SS-32M from Communications Specialists. 



will produce a following dot, The 
standard 8044 produces nothing 
after a squeeze release, Squeeze- 
key operators are divided into 
two groups depending on how 
they learned, so the K5 series 
accommodates both. Nnn- 
squeeze operators can easily 
use either version. 

The small size of the K5 plus 
the three-fugged leads provided 
for paddle connection allow the 
unit to be attached to the side of 
any standard paddle set with 
double-sided mounting tape. It 
fs ideal tor QRP, Field Day, DX- 
pedftions, or regular station use. 
Provision for a straight key is 
also made. 

For more Information, con- 
tact Curtis Electro Devices, Inc., 
Box 4090, Mountain View CA 
94040. Reader Service number 
489, 

TWO NEW VLF 
CONVERTERS FROM MFJ 

The MFJ-332 VLF converts an 
HF transceiver into a sensitive 



Very Low Frequency receiver. It 
converts 10 to 500 kHz to 28.010 
to 28.500 MHz, The MFJ-331 
SWL version converts 10 to 500 
kHz to 4,010 to 4.500 MHz. Both 
give direct frequency readout on 
your receiver. 

With a VLF converter, you can 
hear WWVB, ship-to-shore com* 
munication, navigation radio 
beacons, weather broadcasts, 
and even the standard AM 
broadcast band (with reduced 
sensitivity). 

Both units easily connect be- 
tween your transceiverfSWL re- 
ceiver and antenna, Tuning be- 
tween 28.010 and 28.500 MHz 
(4.010 to 4.500 MHz on the 
MFJ-331 versfon) lets you re- 
ceive the longwave band from 10 
kHz to 500 kHz. This gives direct 
frequency readout by ignoring 
MHz numbers. For example, 
28.050 (4.050 M Hz) is 50 kHz and 
28.375 MHz (4,375 MHz) is 375 
kHz, 

There is a red LED that in- 
dicates "on." The unit is by- 













MFJ-332 VLF converter 



passed In the off position for 
normal operation. The MJF-332/ 
331 VLF converters are housed 
in black and eggshell-white 
aluminum cabinets and require 
9-18 V dc or 1 10 V ac with the op- 
tional ac adapter 

The MFJ-332 and MFJ-331 are 
available from MFJ Enterprises, 
inc., PO Box 494 r Mississippi 
State MS 39782. Reader Service 
number 482. 

CTCSS ENCODER FOR 
ICOM IC-2AT HANDHELD 

Communications Specialists 
Introduces their new SS-32M mi- 
cro-miniature programmable 
CTCSS encoder for use In the 
(com IC-2AT hand-held. The unit 
Is based on the popular SS-32 
encoder and is programmable 
using jumpers. Measuring just 
^A5"xJ6"x.^3 1 ' 1 the SS-32M 
may also be used in other ap- 
plications where size is critical. 

For more information, con- 
tact Communications Special- 
ists, inc., 426 West Taft Avenue, 
Orange CA 92667: Reader Ser- 
vice number 488. 

600 SERIES CES/MICROPAD 

Communications Electronics 
Specialties introduces its new 
600 series encoding micropad 
with DTMF ANI and numerous 
other features ideal for mobile 
amateur operations. 

"The series 600 micropad/' 
according to CES President Ron 
Hankins, "Is compatible with 
any transceiver and offers a 
reliable and convenient design 
for the mobile radio operator, 
automatic PTT for "one-handed' 
dialing, and ruggedized com- 
ponents." 

The micropad incorporates a 
single-contact tactile keyboard 
for highest reffability. The series 
600 is crystai-controlled and 
features a quality dynamic car- 
tridge, adjustable tone level, 
and built-in tone monitor speak- 
er. Noise-free dialing is made 
possible by a design element 
which mutes the microphone 
when the tone pad is in use. 

600 series specifications in- 
clude: 10-15 V dc; 13 mA operat- 
ing current; -25° to 70* C tern- 
perature range; ANI speed of 5 
tones/second, and an ANI ca- 
pacity of 2 codes up to 15 digits 
each. 

For more information on CES 
encoders and other quality CES 
products, contact CES f PO Box 
50? \ Winter Park FL 32790. 
Reader Service number 487. 



ICOM IC-3A/IC-3AT 
220-MHZ HAND-HELD 

loom is very excited to an- 
nounce a second cousin to the 
popular IG-2A series—the IC- 
3AT lor coverage of the 220-MHz 
band. The IC-3AT is essentially 
identical in appearance, size, 
and operational features to the 
popular IC-2A series. 

Most importantly, all ac- 
cessories, including battery 
packs, chargers, microphone, 
etc, are completely compatible 
for the IC-2AT and I03A series, 
so a ham who has already in- 
vested in an IG-2A system with 
accessories can use those 
same accessories on the IC- 
3AT. 

The 1C-3AT also includes a 
16-button DTMF pad. It covers 

the entire 220-MHz band from 
220 MHz to 224.99 MHz and is 
set up for both repeater and 
simplex operation. The power 
output is nominally 1,5 W with 
the standard IC-BP3. The IC-3A 
system comes complete with (C- 
BP3 nicad battery pack wall 
charger, belt clip t rubber due kie, 
and wrist strap. 

For more information, con- 
tact learn America, fnc. p Suite 
307 t 3337 Towerwood, Dallas TX 
75234, 



COMMSOFT CODEM 

The COMMSOFT CODEM, a 
universal CW interface for per- 
sonal computers, is now avail- 
able for radio amateurs, The 
CODEM provides an easy way to 
get your Morse code software 
on the air Converting received 
CW audio to RS-232 or TTL 
signal levels and RS*232 or TTL 
signal levels to transmitter key- 
ing, the CODEM doubles as a 
code practice oscillator and CW 
regenerator. 

A sharp 800-Hz bandpass fil- 
ter, AM detector, and low-pass 
filter are designed into the CO- 
DEM to provide outstanding 
noise and QRM rejection, CW 
can be monitored using an Inter- 
nal 2 Tt speaker or an external 
high impedance earphone. 
Front-panel sensitivity; tone, 
and volume controls are provid- 
ed; The CODEM comes with a 
comprehensive manual which 
includes operating details and 
connection instructions. The 
CODEM requires an external 9 V 
dc power supply. 

For more information, con- 
tact COMMSOFT, 665 Maybeit 
Avenue, Pato Aito CA 94306. 
Reader Service number 483. 

73 Magazine • December, 1981 189 



— 



COMMDSOFT 



SfNSrTlVJT* 



TCWt 



VOLUME TOWfefl 



CW interface from COMMSOFT. 



CODE SOFTWARE PACKAGE 
FROM COMMSOFT 

Hams who own Heath com- 
puters can send and receive 
Morse code with the new CW89 
software package from COMM- 
SOFT. The program includes a 
split screen display, 4-99 wpm 
operation, receive autotrack T a 
1000-character pretype buffer, 
10 user*definable messages, 
unique break in mode, on- 
screen system status, disk I/O, 
hard copy, and a versatile code 
practice section. 

The CW89 program runs on 
the Heath H-8/H-19, H-89, or 
Zenith Z89 computers under 
HDOS. One disk drive and 32K 
RAM are required. A hardware 
interface, such as the COMM- 
SOFT GODEM. is also required, 
A complete package consisting 
of CW89. the CODEM. a com- 
puter interconnect cable, power 
supply, complete documenta- 
tion, and shipping is available. 
For more information, contact 
COMMSOFT, 665 Maybetf Ave- 
nue, Palo Aito CA 94306, Reader 
Service number 480. 

REPAIR KITS FOR 
EIMAC TUBE SOCKETS 

Varian Eimac announces 



PartsKtts— emergency repair 
kits for popular power grid tube 
sockets used in many broadcast 
and communications HF/VHF 
transmitters worldwide. 

PartsKits provide replace- 
ment items so the user can re- 
pair a damaged socket quickly 
and at a fraction of the cost of a 
new socket. 

Presently available through 
franc hised Varian Eimac distrib- 
utors are PartsKit-300 for the 
SK-300/300A sockets, Parts- 
Kit-840 for the SK-840 socket, 
PartsKit-1300 for the SK 1300/ 
1320 sockets, and PartsKit-1500 
for the SK-1500/1S10 sockets. 

For more information, con- 
tact Bill Orr, Varian Eimac, 310 
Industrial Way, San Carlos CA 
94070 Reader Service number 
485. 

DMM FOR MICROPROCESSOR 
INTERFACING 

Sabtronics announces their 
new model 2020 digital multime- 
ter with microprocessor inter- 
faces to adapt to all the popular 
home/personal computers. 

Combining a high-quality mul- 
timeter with a microprocessor 
interface expands the Sabtron- 




Modet 2020 DMM from Sabtronics 



ics product line to provide new, 
cost-effective solutions to data 
acquisition problems. 

The model 2020 DM MM has an 
impressive 0.1% basic dc ac- 
curacy with 3Vs digit large LED 
display for normal bench use. 
The new DMM is capable of di^ 
reef iy measuring ac and dc volts 
up to 1000 V, Ohms to 20 
megohms, and ac and dc cur- 
rent to 10 Amps 

Optical coupling between the 



DMM and the computer protects 
the computer from damage and 
also serves to isolate ground 
noises that can affect sensitive 
measurements. The model 2020 
DMM will mate with most popu- 
lar computers. 

For more information, con- 
tact Sabtronics International, 
inc., 5709 N 50th St. Tampa FL 
33610, Reader Service number 
484 





BEACON EXPERIMENT 

AUTHORIZED FOR 10, 18, 

AND 24 MHz 

The Federal Communications 
Commission has authorized the 
establishment of an experimen- 
tal radio beacon on the bands 
10.100-10,150, 18.068-18/168, 
and 24 890*24.990 MHz, these 
being the bands allocated for 
amateur radio use by the World 



Administrative Radio Con- 
ference, Geneva, 1979. The ex- 
periment is intended to permit 
amateurs to become familiar 
with the characteristics of these 
bands, simplifying the scheduled 
future changeover to amateur 
use. to improve amateur use of 
these new parts of the spec- 
trum, and to provide data on 
sharing between different ser- 



vices. An important element is 
securing data on propagation 
under weak signal conditions, 
typical of natural disaster situa- 
tions. It will be recalled that this 
use is one of the major reasons 
for these new authorizations, 
the first in many years. 

The experiments will include 
two emission types, three oper- 
ating modes, and two time 
phases, Basic emission is un- 
modulated carrier (A0), inter- 
rupted each ten minutes for an 
SSB {2.8A3J) identification and 
announcement, this occurring 
at 2, 12. 22, 32, 42, and 52 
minutes past the hour. An^ 



nouncement will be of the form: 
"This is FCC authorized ex- 
perimental station KK2XJM, 
Daytona Beach, Florida. OSL 
via W4MB. Next operation will 

be repeated on MHz 

starting on * and will be 

repeated. 

Initial operations will be at 3 
Watts ERP, on 10 MHz, com- 
mencing about the first of Octo- 
ber. In stages, the schedule de- 
pending on results, operation 
will include 18 and 24 MHz. Later 
phases will include operation at 
30 Watts ERP, with sequencing 
from band to band, sometimes 
weekly, sometimes daily, as 



190 73 Magaztne • December, 1981 



needed to make optimum use of 
the bands for propagation ex- 
periments, worldwide and to 
specific areas. 

Licensee for the experiment 
is Robert P. Haviland, amateur 
call W4MB. The success of the 
experiment depends on par- 
ticipation by amateurs and SW 
listeners, and on their reports. 
Information needed is date, 
time, and location of reception, 
strength of signal and of other 
signals on the band, and nature 



of the receiving installation, 
Afi reports will be acknowledged 
by G3L 

In addition to reception re- 
ports, proposals for special 
tests will be welcomed, subject 
to the limitations imposed by 
the license and by regulations 
for experimental stations. At 
this time, there fs no authoriza- 
tion for communication with 
amateur stations. 

Reports, requests for sched- 
ules r and proposals for experi- 



ments may be sent to W4MB at 
the Cailbook address, or to R.P. 
Haviland, 2100 South Nova 
Road, Box 45* Daytona Beach 
FL 32019. 



ID RULE CHANGES 

On October 1 t the FCC an- 
nounced a change to 97,84, the 
rule dealing with identification 
of an amateur station* Section 
(a) of 97.84 has been changed to 
read: 



M Each amateur radio sta- 
tion shall give its call- 
sign at the end of each 

communication, and ev- 
ery ten minutes during a 
communication." 

The change deletes the re- 
quirement for giving the callsign 
of the other station at the end of 
the contact. However, both calf- 
signs must be given at the close 
of any communication involving 
international third-party traffic. 



RTTY LOOP 



Marct, Leavey, M,D. WA3AJR 
4006 Winfee Road 
Randallstown MD 21133 




The original Waht cordless clipper, 



Let me take a look outside, at 
December in Maryland. Hmm. . . 
"The weather outside is freez- 
ing, and the RTTY machine is 
teasing. So since you've got 
nothing to do, caM CQ, call CQ, 
call CQT' Here we are again t 
with the holiday season fast 
approaching. Last year, I 
described several gift sugges- 
tions designed to gladden the 
heart of any RTTYer. By your 
response, I see that this outing 
was well appreciated. Let's do it 
again right now. 

I'm going to start by telling a 
story. Once upon a time, oh r say 
about 1968, a company out in 
Sterling, Illinois, introduced a 
cordless hair trimmer to the bar* 
bers and beauticians. Featuring 
a nifty little case which housed 
a nickel-cadmium battery, it 
dropped into a stand into which 
a charger was built. Convenient, 
portable, and well designed, the 
clipper was an immediate suc- 
cess in the industry, 

The company then decided to 
look around to see what other 
uses this little dynamo could be 
put to. Not having any precon- 
ceived notions, the engineers 
added a resistive element 
across the battery and came up 
with a cordless rechargeable 
soldering iron. Not only the com- 
pany's own marketing people, 
but also many others greeted 
this new device with less than 
total enthusiasm. 

Nonetheless, in late 1971, the 
Wahl Iso-Tip cordless soldering 
iron was introduced. By mid- 
1972, the product began to 
trickle down to consumers and 
we hams became the biggest 
boosters. For working on print- 
ed circuit boards, especially 
with static-sensitive com- 
ponents, the Iso-Tip is hard to 
beat. Because ft is not connec- 
ting to the line, the possibility of 
passing through a charge is mini- 
mized. Sitting In Its charger, the 



iron is always ready, reaching 
soldering heat within seconds. 

My iron quickly became one of 
the most used tools in the shack, 
whether for revising a circuit 
board, fixing a plug, or using the 
built-in light Eo illuminate the re- 
cesses of a piece of equipment. 
Since that time, the R&D 
boys at Wahl have not stood 
still. The original iron took 12 to 
16 hours to fully charge. This is 
fine if all you are going to do is 
an occasional job or two. The 
capacity of the iron, fully 
charged, is about 125 solder 
joints. So, if you have to hot-wire 
a board or fix a chip, all is well 
and good. But there is no way to 
build something complex, with- 
out stopping after an hour or so 
for recharging, A "quick- 
charge" model was then intro- 
duced, which charged to capaci- 
ty in three to four and one-half 
hours. By dropping the iron into 
the recharger between joints, 
larger jobs became more prac- 
tical. The latest development 
along these lines came in 1977, 
when the "iso-Tip 60" was intro- 
duced. This one will charge in 
only one hour, enough to keep 
anyone happy. 

Continuing the search for in- 
novative uses lor that nickel- 
cadmium battery, other items 
have been added to the line, A 
nifty little drill is available that 
slips over the top of any of the 
soldering irons. The drill holds a 
fine bit ideal for drilling out 
holes in printed circuit boards. 
Automobile battery charger 
cords and various soldering tips 
and bits round out the por- 
table line. 

That nice little drill, by the way. 
is also produced in a self- 
contained version, powered ei- 
ther by a transformer from the ac 
mains or an automobile battery. 
Another fine addition to the tine. 

When looking for a gift idea to 
satisfy the ham involved In RTTY 

73 Magazine • December, 1981 191 






The Wahl fso-Tip line. 



or computers, this line may just 
turn the trick. Prices range from 
a few dollars for a soldering tip 
to under thirty dollars for the 
basic iron with drop-In charger. 
The quick-charge Iron Is about 
five dollars more, and the drill at- 
tachment about twefve. Look for 
them at your local dealer, or write 
to the WahJ Clipper Corporation, 
2902 Locust Street, Sterling IL 
61081. Be sure to tell thern you 
read about the Iso-Tip here, in 73 
Magazine's RTTY Loop. 

In the market for something a 
bit more, shall we say, meaty? 
How does this strike you: a hard- 
limiting FSK demodulator, capa- 
ble of handling 17CK 42S, and 
850*Hz shifts; of Interfacing with 
20-mA or 60-mA loops or RS-232 
or TTL4evel logic; with autostart 
and built-in tone keying; ail in a 
case twr>thirds the size of this 
page and costing under S250? 
Well, it strikes me just fine, and 1 
call it (or more properly IRL calls 
it) the FSK500. This demodula- 
tor looks like the way to go for 
the ham looking for a compact 
but effective unit for a modern 
RTTY station Next monlh I will 

192 73 Magazine • December. 198 1 





The Waht printed circuit drill 



go over this beasty in detail, but 
if you want to pick one up now, I 
am sure that the folks at iRL 
would be happy to oblige. Drop 
them a note at iRL t 700 Taylor 
Road, Columbus OH 43230, Don't 
forget to plug RTTY Loop, OK? 

Now, let's look at a new RTTY 
activity. The Chicago Area RTTY 
Repeater Society (CARRS) has 
announced its first RTTY Art 
Contest. Running from Novem- 
ber 1, 1981, through February 28, 



1982, the contest seeks new 
RTTY art. All entries must be 
original to licensed radio 
amateurs and their immediate 
families and must not have been 
transmitted before November 1, 
1981. Entrants must supply one 
unspliced five-level tape and 
three prints for each entry sub- 
mitted. Format specifics in- 
clude no limit on running time 
and a maximum of 72 charac- 
ters per line. Entries must be 
compatible with machines run- 



ning **downshift-on-space." 
Each line should be terminated 
with a minimum of three func- 
tions; CR-LF-LTRS sequence. 
Entrants agree that the submit- 
ted picto re(sj may be used, du- 
plicated, and published for any 
purpose by CARRS. 

Judging will be by the CARRS 
Board of Directors and will be 
based on originality and tech- 
nique. The winning entry will 
earn the winner a reconditioned 



CORRECTIONS 



Several readers have pointed 
out a potential problem using 
my program for transmitting 
and receiving Morse code with 
the TRS-80 Level l f appearing in 
the September issue rTRS-80: 
Your Electronic Bra sspo under"), 

if the program is to be used 
only for transmitting code from 
the keyboard without first con- 
necting the 1NS8255 interface 



represented in Fig. 10{page94) t 
the program will lock up within 
the downtime loop between 
memory locations 4607h and 
461 4h of Fig. 3 (page 91 1 This 
problem may be solved by sub- 
stituting a JPTX statement for 
the CALL SKEY statement ap- 
pearing at memory location 
4583H, The resulting line would 
then appear as; 



4583 C34047 JP TX 
;Jump around SKEY 

If at a later date you wish to 
utilize the receive program, the 
statement may be reinserted 
without any difficulty. 

I have failed to provide the pin 
connection of pin $ of the 
1NS8255. This pin is the chip 
select, and for my purpose I 
have tied it to pin 7, making the 
chip always selected. 

There have been inquiries as 
to whether I have modified the 
program for Level II. The modi- 
fied program has the following 
improvements made to it: 
• The buffer space is cleared to 



Teletype* ASR-33 complete with 
modem, FOB Chicago. Send en- 
tries to Howie WA9KEK. 1752 
North Austin Avenue, Chicago 
IL 60639. 

As I mentioned a few para- 
graphs ago, the FSK-500 will be 
on tap for next month. Never one 
for organization, I might just 
scrape up another item or two— 
you'll have to wail ar\(S see. You 
never know what might turn up 
here, in RTTY Loop. 



prevent a garbage, end of buffer, 
flag from being inserted. 

• The video screen is cleared on 
program entry. 

• Return to BASIC is allowed 
from the program. 

• The operator is given a 
prompt for message entry. 

• Program is written in Assem- 
bly language using Radio 
Shack' s Editor/ Assembler. 

Anyone interested in obtain- 
ing a source listing may write 
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73Magaztne • December. 1981 193 



OSCAR ORBITS 



SATELLITE NEWS 



UoSAT OSCAR 9 Launched 

Satellite enthusiasts now have another "amateur* 1 bird to chase. 
UoSAT, a British satellite that combines research and amateur ap- 
plications, was successfully launched early on the morning of Oc- 
tober 6, Listeners were able to copy a signal from UoSAPs two- 
meter beacon, starting with the first orbit. Once aloft, the satellite 
was dubbed the "UoSAT-OSCAR 9 spacecraft. 



»i 



UoSAT is not a communications satellite but it will be transmit* 
ting on a variety of amateur frequencies. For a more complete 
description of the satellite's capabilities, which include slow-scan 
television, see "Phase Ml and Beyond" on page 96 of the September. 
1981, issue of 73* 



OSCAR 8 Still Flying High 

Despite the demise of OSCAR 7, hams are stiff communicating via 
satellite. Recent accomplishments made via the OSCAR 8 satellite 
include the first mode J Worked All States Award which is credited 
to WA6GVS. Following on his heels, W7UFE completed mode J 
WAS. In doing so, he has become the first person to accomplish 
W.A.S. on each of the satellite modes. A f B t and J. 

The DX scene was busy, too, with a record-setting mode J QSO 
between W4AU2 and GM41HJ. Details about tracking OSCAR 8 can 
be found in the November issue of 73. 



Phase III Looking Good 

Plans are being made for the launch of Phase IIIB, a replacement 
for the ill-fated original Phase tlf satellite. The third test of the Ariane 
rocket was a success, representing a tremendous breakthrough 
after Ariane's failure on May 23, 1 980. AMSAT officials are preparing 
for a Phase III B launch in the fall of 1982. For more details about the 
Phase III program and other aspects of the amateur satellite service, 
contact AMSAT, PQ Box 27, Washington DC 20044. 

An error crept Into the calculation of the OSCAR orbits published 
in the October and November issues of 73. As a result, the equatorial 
crossing times are Incorrect. Hopefully, the December predictions 
represent a great Improvement in accuracy. 



ORBITAL INFORMATION 



OSCA* I ORllTAL 1 KTGRHATlQl* ?QI SCCDIM* 



OSCAR 1 ORBITAL IStFOHHATmSi FOR JAMUAJtY 



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Selling 73 Magazine, the ham radio magazine 
that otters quality and quantity, brings the 
ham into your store. Once through the door 
you can sell him anything. 

Our dealers are telling us that "73" outsells 
them all. . .so call today and join the dealers 
who make money with 73 Magazine. 

For information on selling 73 Magazine 
call 603-924-7296 and speak with Ginnie 
Boudrieau, our Bulk Sales Manager. Or write 



to her at: 




194 73 Magazine * December, 1981 



MM HELP 



I would great ly appreciate any 
information (schematics, ser* 
vice manuals^ performance im- 
provement, etc.) on the follow- 
Ing equipment: 

a) Clegg Thor 6 transceiver; 

b) Simpson Model T marine 
transceiver; 

c) Konel Gemini III marine trans- 
ceiver; 

d) Johnson Ultracom 3l>5l>MHz 
FM transceiver; 

e) Lafayette PB-50 30-50-MHz 
FM receiver. 

I will copy and return manuals 
and refund postage costs. 
Thank you, 

Gary B. Trustle WB8SPV 

424 Franklin Ave. 

Waverly OH 45690 

Help, help! We have a Telrex 
beam, Model TBS~3Q8 f and need 
any information available on 
assembly details to permit cor- 
rect operation on certain fre- 
quencies. It is a tri-band beam, 
traps and all. apparently two 



elements on each band. Any 
data would certainly be appreci 
ated. Telrex Labs does not have 
data on this old a beam, I will 
cover any duplication costs if re- 
quired and postage. Thanks for 
any help. 

Paul Wlegerl W8TH 

1205 E Franklin Street 

Centervllle OH 45459 

I need manuals/schematics 
for the following units: EICO 752 
dc power supply. Standard Com- 
munications SR-C803L VHF FM 
transceiver, Triplett 3434 TV-FM 
sweep/marker generator, and 
Clegg HT-146 2-meter handle- 
talkie. 

I would prefer to buy, or copy 
and return your original, espe* 
cially on the HT-146 as Clegg 
does not have an original. And 
does anyone have a battery for 
the Clegg? 

John E. Carter WB4HLZ 

2622 Rolling View Drive 

Smyrna GA 30060 



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73 Magazine * December, 1981 195 



TR-7730 from page 27 

doesn't help matters much, 
but under most daylight 
conditions, the display is 
pretty hard to read The 
other two problems I en- 
countered involve the scan- 
ning circuit. There are an 
awful lot of 5-kHz split 
repeaters out there now, 
and it would be useful if 
the band-scanning circuitry 
stopped with the discrim- 
inator centered. There are 
currently only two rigs 
available that offer this fea- 
ture (that I am aware of)— 
the Azden and the KDK 



2025. Finally, for some rea- 
son the rig scans much 
slower in the memory-scan- 
ning mode than in the band- 
scanning mode. It should 
be easy to speed up the 
scan rate; the first person 
to come up with a good 
mod is guaranteed an arti- 
cle in 73! 



These last two points are 
purely personal opinion, 

and others may never com- 
plain The dim display is 
another matter and has 
plagued almost every two- 
meter rig I have used. It's 
time for the industry to 



correct this problem, I'd 
like to see a blue display 
like the one on the TS-830S, 
with a dim switch for night- 
time driving. I realize that 
it would be expensive, but 
the ultimate solution might 
be a light-sensing circuit 
like the one found on the 
IC-701. 

Conclusions 

Simply stated, the Ken- 
wood TR-7730 is one of the 
best two-meter FM rigs for 
mobile operation I have 
used. I have used rigs that 
offered more features, rigs 
with better receivers, and 



rigs with brighter displays, 
but I have yet to test any- 
thing that combines the fea- 
tures, performance, com- 
pact size, and reasonable 
price of the TR-7730, For 
home use I might prefer 
something with more mem- 
ories, like the new KDK, the 
TR-7850, or the Azden. For 
installation in the small cars 
that Americans are wont to 
buy, the TR-7730 is sublime. 

For more information, 
contact Trio-Kenwood 

Communications, Inc., 1111 
West Walnut Street Comp- 
ton CA 90220, ■ 




KAHANER REPORT 




Larry Kahaner WB2NEL 
PO Box 39103 
Washington DC 20016 

CORRECTION 

For those of you who wrote to 
me about my column on compe- 
tition for AT&T in the local and 

long-distance market (Oct., 81), I 
noticed the error also. Seven 
digits comprise a local phone 
number, not five as mentioned. 

STALKING THE WILD BUCK 

The buck never stops any- 
where in Washington. It just 
kind of makes the rounds. 

The FCC complains it lacks 
the power to do Its job, It says 
the Communications Act of 
1934 Is too out of date to allow 
the Commission the legal lee- 
way it needs to cope with our 
new technological age. The Act 
never envisioned millions of pri- 
vate radio users, large numbers 
of radio and TV sets, and an era 
where information would be a 
money-making, fast-trading 
commodity like rice and wheat. 

According to the FCC, the Act 
doesn't give it permission to pull 
licenses of violators— they must 
trek through lengthy court pro- 
ceedings—or set minimum stan- 
dards for receivers making them 
Less susceptible to interference. 

Congress, on the other hand, 
has tried to rewrite the Act every 
session for the last 10 years, but 
so far has only succeeded in 



tacking on some satellite 
amendments in the early 1960s. 
In addition, Congress com- 
plains that the FCC doesn't use 
the powers it does have under 
the Act and is afraid to flex Its 
muscles fearing some court will 
overturn the administrative deci- 
sions- The bickering is boring. 

During the peak CB surge of 
1977, the Commission logged 
more than 110,000 interference 
complaints. About 85% were 
traced to CDers overloading 
nearby TVs or assaulting them 
with harmonic radiation. Since 
then, the average number of 
complaints has never dipped 
below 60,000 per year. And 
that's half the actual count; the 
FCC estimates that that figure 
represents less than half of in- 
terference incidents. 

Again the FCC laments that it 
doesn't have the legal right to 
set minimum standards for TVs. 
Congress doesn't amend the 
Act, so nothing happens at all, 

But although the FCC sup- 
posedly wants that power, and 
some others, it's not helping 
Congress to rectify the situation. 

In 1978 t the FCC launched an 
inquiry Into interference. It was 
to be the final word on the sub- 
ject. Part of the reason for the in- 
vestigation was to present Con- 
gress with facts about interfer- 
ence so when the time came for 
it to tackle the problem, the law- 
makers would be well prepared. 

The unfinished 3*yearold re- 



port, broached at a recent FCC 
meeting, stated: "Minimum 
standards for receiving equip- 
ment might be necessary." It of- 
fered no details, no technical 
standards, 

FCC commissioner James 
Quello angrily referred to the 
sparse report during the June 17 
meeting and said; 'There hasn't 
been any movement since 1978, 
and the interference is getting 
worse. How many more years do 
we need?" 

The Commission wanted to 
present the report to Congress 
in response to several recurring 
bills to regulate TV susceptibili- 
ty to interference. Congress 
asked for FCC comments and 
guidance and this report was 
supposed to supply It, Said 
Ouello: "And what do we tell 
them [Congress]?" 

Commissioner Anne Jones re- 
sponded sadly; "Let's start with 
an apology." 

Even though the FCC is sup- 
posed to know more about com- 
munications than any other gov- 
ernmental agency, their input to 
Congress in this case appeared 
minimal 

This year, Congress seems 
closer to revamping the Commu- 
nications Act than during any 
other session. Although most of 
the bill — commonly referred to 
as the Domestic Telecommuni- 
cations Act of 1981 (S-898}— 
deals with common carrier and 
broadcast matters, some provi- 
sions affect hams, CBers, and 
other private radio licensees. 

Now that the bill heads for the 
Senate floor, the FCC has 
jumped up and put In its 2 cents 
worth. If the FCC suggested any 



courses for Congress to follow 
during the writing, the law- 
makers certainly didn't pay that 
much attention. Some FCC 
suggestions— called amend- 
ments—deal with semantics, 
others with substance. 

Without going into the bill's 
details, here are some FCC 
amendments submitted to 
Congress; 

• Give the FCC permission to 
employ volunteer amateur radio 
operators to administer tests to 
those seeking licenses of equal 
or lower rank, 

• Allow use of volunteer 
hams and CBers to monitor air- 
waves for violations. 

• Permit aliens to obtain op- 
erator licenses. 

• Allow elimination of C8 li- 
censes, 

• Allow suspension of li- 
censes of those who aid and 
abet violators. 

• Allow the FCC to issue 
cease and desist orders in 
cases of safety. 

The FCC proposes many 
other items, but these most di- 
rectly impact hams and CBers. 

You might know that the FCC 
doesn't need Congressional 
mandate to permit volunteer li- 
cense proctors. General ctass li- 
cense holders and above now 
administer tests to Novice 
hopefuls. Nor does the FCC 
need permission to allow aliens 
to hold licenses. It does that 
now in some cases. 

So, why bother? For one 
thing, a bill reassures the FCC 
that it really has all that power. 
Secondly, the Act ties It all up in- 
to one neat bundle, and the FCC 
doesn't have to take it upon 



196 73 Magazine ■ December, 1981 



LATEST RECIPROCAL LICENSING AGREEMENTS 



Hare's an updated reciprocal licensing/operating list: 






Argentina 

Australia 

Austria 

Bahamas 

Barbados 

Belgium 

Bolivia 

Botswana 

Brazil 

Canada 

Chile 

Colombia 

Costa Rica 

Denmark 

Dominican Rep. 

Ecuador 

El Salvador 

Fiji 

Finland 

France 

West Germany 

Greece 

Grenada 

Guatemala 

Guyana 

Haiti 

Honduras 

Iceland 

India 

Indonesia 

Ireland 

Israel 



itaiy 

Jamaica 
Jordan 
Kiribati 
Kuwait 

Liberia 

Luxembourg 

Monaco 

Netherlands 

Netherlands Ant, 

New Zealand 

Nicaragua 

Norway 

Panama 

Paraguay 

Peru 

Philippines 

Portugal 

St. Lucia 

Seychelles 

Sierra Leone 

Solomon Islands 

Spain 

Surinam 

Sweden 

Switzerland 

Trinidad & Tobago 

Tuvalu 

United Kingdom 

Uruguay 

Venezuela 

Yugoslavia 



LATEST THIRD-PARTY AGREEMENTS 

The FCC issued an updated third-party list: 



Argentina 

Bolivia 

Brazil 

Chile 

Colombia 

Costa Rica 

Cuba 

Dominican Rep. 

Ecuador 

El Saivador 

Gambia 

Ghana 

Guatemala 

Guyana 



Haiti 

Honduras 

Israel 

Jamaica 

Jordan 

Liberia 

Mexico 

Nicaragua 

Panama 

Paraguay 

Peru 

Trinidad & Tobago 

Uruguay 

Venezuela 



Also, ITU headquarters In Geneva, station 4U1ITU 



itself, administratively, to 
change any regulations 

No one knows if the bill win 
pass, even though it seems well 



on its way. However, if it speeds 
towards the president for his sig- 
nature, there's no guarantee 
that Congress will slow down 



and consider the FCC proposals. 

At presstime, the Senate 

unanimously passed bill S-929 

which gives the FCC absolute 
authority to set minimum stan- 
dards for TV sets and other re- 
ceiving equipment. Titled Ama- 
teur Radio Service and Private 
Land Mobile Services Act of 
1981, the bill won't apply to ex- 
isting equipment 

Other sections; License terms 
raised from 5 to 10 years, hams 
and CBers permitted to monitor 
the airwaves in their own servic- 
es for violators, and hams may 
administer licensing tests. 

The bill passed the Senate on- 
ly after it added an amendment 
giving the FCC permission to 
eliminate CB licenses. 



FCC chairman Mark Fowler 
lobbied for and received the last 
concession. He wants the Com- 
mission out of the CB licensing 
business and claims the move 
will save the FCC more than $Y* 
million a year. 

No one is sure if that bill will 
pass either. 

Note the wording in each bill. 
Each gives the FCC permission 
to do all these new things, but 
doesn't force It to do so. 

Perhaps it doesn't even mat- 
ter. Each side has excellent ex- 
cuses for not doing anything 
and neither wants to jeopardize 
that safe position. Make no deci- 
sions, make no enemies. 

And the buck just keeps on 
passing. 



LOOKING WEST 



Bill Pasternak WA61TF 

c/o The Wastlink Radio Network 

Suite 718 

7046 Hollywood Blvd. 

Hollywood CA 90028 

A CHRISTMAS PRESENT: 

SANTA BARBARA'S 
SUCCESSFUL REPEATER 

We begin this year's Christ- 
mas special with a true success 
story, the story of a two-meter 
repeater located near the city of 
Santa Barbara, California, What 
puts this system a cut above the 
rest? Think In terms of other 
stories you have read in this col- 
umn—stones depicting the rise 



and fall of other repeater sys- 
tems. Also remember that the 
2-meter FM scene in southern 
California has never been very 
stable. Rather, It's f actionalized. 
Where else In the nation are 
146.34/94 and 146. 16/. 76 still 
simplex channels for the most 
part? Yet the WR6ANW repeater 
has survived and prospered. Not 
because it's away from Los 
Angeles proper, but rather be* 
cause things were done right to 
start with. Here is the story as 
told by Jay Hennigan WB6RDV 
in the June, 1981, Issue of Key* 
KUx, the monthly newsletter of 
the Santa Barbara Amateur Ra- 
dio Club. 



A HISTORY OF KSTZm 
A Gift from Delco 

The SB ARC 2-meter repeater had 
Its humble beginnings as a portion of 
a gift of surplus Motorola radio 
equipment donated by Delco Elec- 
tronics. The equipment consisted of 
two 150-MHz dish antennas. AIJ of 
the above was immediately scattered 
throughout the county t with the ma- 
jority winding up m the garage of 
WA6GOO on Palisades Drive, This ar- 
rangement made it rather difficult for 
DarryJ to put cars in his garage, con 
sidenng that a certain individual had 
a Progress- Una autopatch and a 
jukebox or two stashed there as well, 
The dishes, and a lot of the Jess-im- 
mediately usable gear, wound up in 
the backyard of Sonatech, Inc., work 
QTH of WB6RDV, WA60QZ, and 
WA8LWJ, 

Where to Put It? 

Obviously, such a generous gJft 
was destined to become a 2-meter 
repeater. The only remaining ques- 
tions were at what location and on 
what frequency. Several physical lo- 



cations were scouted out, with the 
final location picked as the city radio 
site on Lavjgia Hill on the Mesa. One 
thing the city required was a state- 
ment by a licensed civil engineer that 
our tower, Identical to several other 
towers Installed by the city at the 
same location, would not fall down. 
This survey was provided free of 
charge by Dave Harris, father of 
KA0OFZ The next question was one 
of frequency. Some people within the 
club felt that our repeater should be 
on a "common pair" such as 146.34/ 
,94 or .16/76. In those days, 99-plus 
percent of amateur 2 meter gear was 
crystal -control led. which resulted in a 
conflict between having the repeater 
on one of these "common" frequen- 
cies, making It available to most 
amateurs passing through town, and 
the refusal of several hundred south* 
ern California FM pioneers to give up 
.94 and ,76 as simplex frequencies. 
The club looked into several other 
pairs and eventually a tape recorder 
was Installed at the site to listen to 
two different frequencies as possibil- 
ities (146.19 and 146.22), The selec- 






73 Magazine • December, 1981 197 



—■ 



tion was 146.10, having the least co 
channel interference, and a sanction 
was received from the Southern Cali- 
fornia Repeater Association lor its 
use. The club now had a location and 
a frequency, All that was needed was 
some personpower and a license. 



A Taste of Root 

In the good old days, licensing a 
repeater was about as much of an 
Of deal as licensing a nuclear power 
plant Is today. The FCC required 
numerous drawings, sketches, sche- 
matics, and calculations, and it 
seemed as if they were sadly lacking 
In the people needed to review and 
process all of this material. A thick 
packet was sent to Washington by the 
club's technical committee, and as 
we waited we were not Idle, The 
dupiexer, antenna, and lower were 
ordered and received, along with 
some 75*Ohm hardline, which was 
definitely not ordered. A call to the 
manufacturer revealed that It was 
their goof. UPS and the post office re- 
fused to cany the stuff back to LA for 
exchange, although it would and did 
fit in the back of a VW, Wlnnte, now 
KA60F2, ran It down to LA for ex- 
change. After what seemed like an 
eternity with no word from the FCC, 
K6YX, our then-trustee, called on 
them In Washington (in person) and 
was informed that the license had 
been processed with a call of 
WfleANW. The Identifier was pro- 
grammed and the repeater was test- 
ed. When the license arrived in the 
mall it had the call of WR6ANW and 
the root-beer box was born* 

Out ©I Control 

Although we now had a working 
repeater, there was no way to control 
It. The club had installed a telephone 
line at the site for a dial-up control 
system, but no such control system 
had been built. The trustee stated 
that if there was no control system by 
January of 1977. the repeater would 
go off the air, WB6RDV and company 
worked feverishly on New Year's Eve 
and came up with a dial-up control 
system. No tone decoders were 
available at the time, so the control 
codes consisted of dialing an 
unlisted phone number. One call 
would turn the repeater off and the 
next call would turn it back on, Every 
so often, the repeater would myste- 
riously go oft the air due to someone 
dialing a wrong number This "tem- 
porary" control system was upgrad- 
ed with the addition of some touch- 
tone™ decoders to give a more 
positive on-and-off command , and 
was to be replaced when the new 
cactus-style control system was 
completed. Parts were ordered and 
meetings held with Alan Burgstahler 
WA6AWD, who agreed to sell us 
blank PC boards and plans to build 
the sophisticated control system 
that we have today. 

The boards were farmed out to 
many club members for drilling and 
stuffing with parts. The temporary 
control system, it seemed h was going 



to be rather permanent as progress 
on completion of the new control 
system was exceedingly slow. A new 
receiver was donated by Dean Dods 
WB6IYW and installed to cure 
several problems which were devel- 
oping with the old tube-type receiver. 
it became evident that the newness 
was wearing off and several correc- 
tive maintenance items were neces- 
sary. Our new antenna was taken 
down for repairs and the duplexer 
had one cavity go bad {which was 
sent back to the manufacturer). In ad- 
dition, the city was in the process of 
expanding their building right over 
the area where the repeater was 
located. A work party retrenched the 
antenna cable and the repeater was 
moved to a wooden pail at about 10 
feet from its former location. The 
electric power and telephone line 
were brought out by extension cords 
draped through the bushes, and the 
"temporary" control system was still 
In operation some three years later. 

The Housing Crunch 

It became obvious that some sort 
of permanent structure would be nec- 
essary to enclose the repeater. 
SBARC went to tremendous effort to 
build a very rugged plywood box 
large enough to enclose the repeater 
and dup lexer, The box was delivered 
to Valley Telecom, Ino, the new busi- 
ness of WB6RDV, and it is still there. 
In the interim, the city had agreed to 
provide a separate building for the 
SBARC repeater. At some time dur- 
ing this period, the WR6ANW 
call sign expired and the new club 
call of K&TZ/R was programmed into 
the repeater. 

The Naw Machine 

As time took its toll on the older 
equipment and more frequent repair 
trips became necessary, it became 
obvious that the good old root beer 
box might not stand up during an 
emergency. In addition, the club 
wanted features such as auto patch. 
A grassroots fund raising was spear- 
headed by WB60BB and N6CPN and 
the club ordered a new all-solid state 
GE repeater. The pace picked up on 
completion of the cactus control 
system. The new machine arrived 
and was installed in its new house, 
originally without the new control 
system. FCC rules had relaxed, 
aliowing automatic repeater control, 
and the temporary control system 
was laid to rest along with the origi- 
nal repeater. The cactus control sys- 
tem, finally complete, was installed 
along with a 440-MHz control receiver 
and temporary autopatch on loan 
from W6YJO. The new control sys- 
tem functioned well for a time but 
was damaged by a nearby lightning 
strike during a storm. We are current- 
ly operating under automatic control 
once again. 

The Future 

Most of the problems with the con- 
trol system have been repaired and a 
new, more sophisticated autopatch 



is in the design stage. The repeater 
now has full battery standby power 
as well as standby ac power provided 
by the city generator. The new con- 
trol system is expandable to fulfill 
future needs, and the basic repeater 
has proved to be a very reliable 
machine. The SBARC repeater fund 
is still attempting to recover from the 
purchase of the new machine, and 
future improvements will be made as 
funds become available 

CHRISTMAS IN THE CITY OF 
THE ANGELS 

I guess you all know that this 
is a special time of year, Even 
here in Los Angeles, most of the 
major thoroughfares are alive 
with holiday decorations and 
the spirit of the season Is In the 
air. Also, on the air. Shortly, It 
will be time lor "Operation San- 
ta Claus 1981 1 " in which ama- 
teurs from all over the area take 
their portables and hand-helds 
into local hospitals so that 
children confined in those in- 
stitutions can get their chance 
to communicate with Jolly Old 
St. Nick. 

We have written about this 
topic before. We told you how it 
was started more than 20 years 
ago on the old Mt, Wilson 
WA6TDD repeater by W6AOP 
and K6SJJ, among others, and 
how this event has withstood all 
forms of adversity over the 
years, including some organized 
jamming in recent times. No 
matter what, "Operation Santa 
Claus" will happen. It's become 
as important a Los Angeles area 
tradition as the decorations 
along Wilshire Boulevard. It will 
happen again this year, and it 
will succeed again this year. 

Most hams belong to one or 
more radio clubs in their area. I 
wonder how many of you have 
ever thought of undertaking a 
project like "Operation Santa 
Ciaus." but failed to bring the 
idea to the attention of the rest 
of the members. True, it's a lot of 
work. You can't expect to start 
on Sunday with planning and be 
ready to roll the following 
Wednesday night. The logistics 
of this kind of operation are 
such that very careful consider- 
ation must be given to every 
detail. The obvious first step is 
to make contact with the hospi- 
tals in your area and simply of- 
fer the concept. Since this might 
be a bit of a job in itself, do give 
yourself ample lead time. Right 
now is a good time to plan for 
next year. The hardest part will 
be reaching the proper official 
with the power to make a deci- 



sion. You may have to work 
through an Intermediary, but if 
you've got the tenacity and can 
be convincing enough, you will 
probably get the green light. A 
good argument in favor of the 
project is the longevity of the 
Los Angeles area operation. 

Next, you must select your 
operating mode. Here VHF and 
FM are naturals, This is because 
of the lightweight portability of 
equipment and the fact that no 
connection to power mains is 
needed, Avoid hand-helds 
unless they are equipped with 
external speaker* micro phones. 
Many of the kids you will visit 
may not be ambulatory. As you 
know, using a hand-held while 
lying flat on your back is not the 
easiest thing to accomplish 
even for the trained operator. 
Now think of trying to be station 
in control for an invalid child 
who has never before seen a 
hand-held, if you don't have a 
speaker-mike for your rig, you 
might pluck that old TR-22 out of 
the closet and blow off the cob- 
webs. Radios like the TR-22, 
TR-33, and TR-2200 are best for 
this type of operation. 

it's also necessary to avoid 
massive equipment installa- 
tions which require outdoor 
antennas and connections to 
the ac power mains. If your par* 
ticular site dictates that you 
must operate from a fixed loca- 
tion using ac power, be sure that 
all equipment is grounded prop- 
erty using 3-wire line cords. Do 
not try to cheat the system with 
adapters and the like. Besides 
the fact that most hospitals will 
not permit this in the first place 
for safety reasons, you run the 
risk of personal liability if some- 
one should be Injured as the re- 
suit of your negligence. Remem- 
ber. You may be performing a 
public service, but you are still 
someone else's guest and you 
live by their rules. 

What about Santa Claus him* 
self and his North Pole home? 
Where should he be located? 
You play this one by ear. In Los 
Angeies, a large number of hos- 
pitals are visited every year. It 
would be all but impossible for 
Sid McCormack W6BWG, who is 
our Santa, to visit each. Sid op- 
erates from a centralized North 
Pole and communicates over a 
system of intertied repeaters to 
hospitals as far to the east as 
Riverside, to the west to the 
ocean, and to the south half the 
distance to San Diego, The lo- 
gistics of the LA Operation San- 



198 73 Magazine • December, 1981 



ta Oaus seem to grow each 
year, but each independent geo- 
graphic area and involved club 
will have to decide what's best 
for itself. 

For example, if you can only 
visit one hospital, Santa can be 
on site. That Is either in a vacant 
room, in his mobile, or anywhere 
near enough for full-quieting 
simplex operation, it's Junacy to 
tie up a busy repeater for an 
evening if Santa and his flock 
are within 3 few yards of one 
another. Also, avoid uninten- 
tional interference from outside. 
Stay off ,52 or any other heavily 
used simplex frequency in your 
area. Choose some oddbail 
away from the mainstream of 
2-meter activity. True, you will 
lose your outside audience, but 
you will also avoid problems 
from outside your operation. 

On the other hand, if logistics 
dictate the use of a repeater, 
possibly because your opera- 
tion is quite large in nature, then 
try to find one that has a low 
utilization factor. While you 
might find this hard to believe, 
there are some hams who will 
object to having their favorite 
rag chew session interrupted 
for any reason. These are the 
people who ratchet-mouth 
through tornado and hurricane 
alerts; unfortunately, we have 
our share of these un-public« 
spirited individuals among us. If 
you have no alternative but to 
use a specific system, then be 
sure to publicize the event well 
in advance. Make sure every 



member of the club knows that 
the repeater will be closed to all 
but the Santa Glaus operation 
and emergencies during a 
specific time period. List the 
operating schedule in your 
newsletter and have someone 
make periodic announcements 
at least two weeks prior to the 
event. Make sure that hams 
from other repeaters and clubs 
know as weli. Hot only may you 
pick up some needed extra help. 
but you will also avoid hurting 
anyone's feelings the day of the 
operation when alt on the fre- 
quency must be requested to 
vacate. Republication of your 
operating schedule will give all a 
chance to find alternate places 
to operate. 

If your area is plagued with 
malicious Interference— if the 
sick minds are out there just 
waiting to give some poor sick 
child a deluge of four-letter 
atrocities— then do not even 
consider the use of a repeater. 
Even a private tone-access 
system. Better you have a Santa 
on the run from hospital to 
hospital than demean the opera- 
tion by letting some half-crazed 
jerk spoil the fun for the kids in 
order to get his own kicks. If the 
distance between locations 
makes having a Santa on the run 
an impossible task, then you 
might consider borrowing some* 
one's remote base for operation 
from "Santa Central" to the field 
units. The very nature of a 
remote base, i.e., simplex chan- 
nel operation, tends to minimize 
the kook factor. Also, even with 



MM HELP 



I will pay someone with ex- 
ceptionally good reception to 
record shortwave programs and 
send me the tapes, 

Owen Aid is 

282 Cam I no Al Lago 

Atherton CA 94025 

I want a Polaroid CR*9 scope 
camera with #33-10 {87 x 
119 mm) hood, former Allied #s 
561-3301 and 561-3310. Or, just 
the CR-9 and lens, without hood. 
I will pay a good price for one in 
working condition. 

R.W. Burhans 
161 Grosvenor St. 
Athens OH 45701 

(61 4)- 593-6207 



I need an HP-2 matching unit 
for the Eiectrospace H V-5 anten- 
na, no longer in production. I will 
pay any reasonable amount* 

Also, I would like to hear 
from any Japanese ham inter- 
ested in trading Japanese 
stamps for US stamps. 

William H. Washburn W7UI 

291 Coachman Drive 

Eugene OR 97405 

I am looking for a manual for a 
Canadian Marconi DJ 30 and 
also one for an RCA Carfone 
150. Can anyone help? 

Fred Nordstrom N4EHV 
Rt 2, Box 26 

Calvin KY 40813 



a remote base, stay on some un- 
inhabited simplex channel. 
Most potential jammers are not 
all that astute. Very few will go 

out and purchase a 220-MHz or 
450-MHz synthesized radio in 
hope of locating your control 
channel just to cause you mis- 
ery. Even so, be prepared for any 
eventuality, for any trouble- 
maker who might come along, 
Some people no longer believe 
in Santa Glaus. Some of these 
object to you or anyone else be- 
lieving either. Need I say more? 
What about your Santa? First 
of all, he should have the kind of 
voice and personality that kids 
already associate with St. Nick: 
warm, friendly, and understand- 
ing. It will probably be hard to 
choose from among the many 
volunteers for the position. Who 
wouldn't want to be "Santa for 
a Day"? 

Since Santa is supposed to be 
live and direct from the North 
Pole, some North Pole sound ef* 
fects might be in order. Nothing 
elaborate,., and nothing you 
can't get from a Christmas 
sound effects record from your 
local five and ten cents store. 
Transfer the sounds you need 
onto endless loop cassettes and 
put the player within range of 
your mike. Adjust the volume to 
where the background on anoth- 
er radio seems real and there 
you have it— instant North Pole. 
Loop cassettes or, If you prefer, 
endless loop cartridge tapes, 
will keep you from having to re- 
wind tape at an inopportune 
time. Make a few different tapes 
or carts. If you have the equip* 
ment, you might want to edit 
and re-mix sounds for greater 
realism. You might even ap- 
proach a local radio station for 
help on this, which could bring a 
side benefit of news coverage 
as well A bit of good public rela- 
tions for our hobby never hurts. 
Also, in relation to publicizing 
your event to the general public, 
I suggest you read "Free PR for 
Ham Radio" in the September, 
1981, issue of 73. Rob Dief en- 
bach WD4NEK has been very 
successful in this department 
and his article shares his 
secrets with you. 

One note from someone In the 
business. If you make arrange- 
ments for TV coverage, keep 
that schedule to the second. 
Television news is a split* 
second industry and it's very 
easy to get an assignment edi- 
tor irate by having his crew show 
up to find nobody ready or the 



event completed. Blow it once. 
and you might as well forget it in 
the future, in news, especially 
electronic journalism, that's the 
name of the game. 

Finally, what should Santa 
say to the kids, and what should 
he avoid? In most cases, the 
kids will have a list of gifts they 
want. Unless your club has an 
unlimited treasury, there will be 

no way to deliver on promises 
made, so make no promises. 
One of the worst things an adult 
can do to kids is promise and 
not deliver Let Santa respond 
by saying something akin to "we 
will put it on the list and see 
what we can do," No hard and 
fast promises. Above all, keep 
conversations light, seasonal, 
and filled with "ho, ho, 
ho*s l \..and don't forget to ID 
at prescribed intervals. 

When your operation is over, 
hold a critique over a cup of cof- 
fee. If you are smart, you will 
have recorded your ''Operation 
Santa Glaus." Use these tapes 
to critique the operation. Video- 
tapes are even better. If you re- 
ceived TV coverage, chances 
are that the station probably 
sent a mini-cam crew to record 
the event. They probably record- 
ed a lot more tape than ever 
reached the air, and very quick 
action (within 24 hours, before 
the cassettes are bulk-erased 
for reuse) might get you a dupe 
of the raw or unedited shoot. 

Last year's Los Angeles 
"Operation Santa Ciaus" was 
the biggest and best to date. It 
was a delight to listen to and it 
received good press coverage 
from local TV, radio, and news- 
papers. What about this year? 
It's only a few days before I will 
know the whole story on "Opera* 
tion Santa Glaus 1981," 

SEASON'S GREETINGS 

I hope you have enjoyed this 
year's Christmas special. Next 
month, it will be business as 
usual We may have some in- 
formation on FCC actions 
against alleged (or proven) jam* 
mers, and definitely will have 
the last part of the SCRRBA 
series on voluntary frequency 
coordination for the 1980s. In 
the meantime, from those of us 
who write on the late shift in Los 
Angeles, our warmest wishes 
for a very Merry Christmas, Hap- 
py Chanukah, and... as the 
voice on the old WA6TDD re- 
peater ID tape used to say. . .a 
Happy and Preposterous New 
Year, See you in 1982, 



73 Magazme * December, 1981 199 



MICROWAVE ANTENNAS ** 



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200 73 Magazine * December, 1981 



_/THE HMR III 



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«*<$*« Ust of Advertisers on page 162 



73 Magazine • December, 1981 201 



WFVE GONE NATIONAL 

Strux Corporation manufactures and 
distributes National Radio, Inc. Com- 
ponents: Chokes, inductors, coils, and 
hardware, We also distribute fixed and 
roller inductors, contactors, mil-spec 
and designer knobs. For all your elec- 
tronic needs, contact Strux Corpora- 
tion, 100 East Monlauk Highway, 
Lindenhurst, New York 11757. 



ISTRUXl 

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LINDENHURST, NEW YORK 11757 



C.B. SPECIAL 

(Repeat of a sell out) 

CONVERT THESE TO 

IOMETER FM 

New Hy-Gam 40 channel pfinied circuit 
boards assembly {Squelch pot. volume 
control and channel switch no I included) 
&oarri& sold as is. Dimension 6"X6". 

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10-49 pes S6.50 ea, 

(White quantilbss last J 

REMOTE 40 CHANNEL C.B. 
Remotes have a metal frame Speaker, 
plastic Case, and control mic no* included. 



Sold as is 



$14.95 ©a 



C.B. BARGAIN 

CB hoards missmg parts or damaged 
Can be used tor spa* e parts Buy several * I 

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Order inform aHoft Please add $4.00 lot 
5'H w m UPS CODs accepted lor orders 
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Foreign orders US funds only add 20% lor 
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plus stripping Overnight delivery available at extra 
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loom — slides on bottom o* radio 
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DIRECTION 
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New Technology (patent pending) con- 
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202 73 Magazine • December, 1981 



Synthesized 

Hand-Held 

Scanner! 

Chances are the police, fire and weather 
emergencies youll read about in tomor- 
row's paper are coming through on a 
scanner right now. All scanners sold by 
Communications Electronics bring the 
real live excitement of action news into 
your home or car. With your scanner, you 
can monitor the exciting two-way radio 
conversations of police and fire depart- 
ments, intelligence agencies, mobile tele- 
phones, energy/oil exploration crews, 
drug enforcement agencies and more. 

Some scanners can even monitor aircraft 
transmissions! You can actually hear the 
news before it's news. If you do not own a 
scanner for yourself, now's the time to buy 
your new scanner from Communications 
Electronics. Choose the scanner that's right 
for you, then call our toihtree number to 
place your order with your Master Card or 
Visa. A scanner is an excellent holiday gift. 

We give you excellent service because CE 
distributes more scanners worldwide than 
anyone else. Our warehouse facilities are 
equipped to process thousands of scanner 
orders every week. We also export scanners 
to over 300 countries and military instat* 
lations. Almost all items are in stock tor 
quick shipment so if you're a person who 
prefers fact to fantasy and who needs to 
know what's realty happening around you, 
order your scanner today from CE! 

NEW! Bearcaf?350 

The Ultimate Synthesized Scanner! 

Afiow 30-60 days tor del/very after receipt of 
order due to the high demand tor thts product 
Lrst price S599.95/CE price $419,00 
7-Band, SO Channel • Alpha- Hunt a He • No- 
crystal scanner • AM Aircraft and Public 
Service bands* • Priority Channel • AC/ DC 
Bands: 30-SQ t 11 8- 136 AM, 144-174,421*512 MHz. 
The new Bearcat 350 introduces an Incredible 
breakthrough in synthesized scanning: Al pila- 
ff u me r re Display. Push a button— and the Vacuum 
Fluorescent Display switches from "numeric" 10 
word desenptions of what's being monitored 50 
channels in 5 banks. Plus* Auto& Manual Search. 
Search Direction, Limit & Count. Direct Channel 
Access. Selective Scan Delay. Dual Scan Speeds. 
Automatic Lockout, Automatic Squetch. Non- Volatile 
Memory Reserve your Bearcat 350 todayl 

Bearcat® 300 

List price S549.95/CE price $339.00 
7 -Band, SO Channel ■ Service Search a No- 
crystal scanner a AM Aircraft and Public 
Service bend** * Priority Channel • AC/ DC 

Bands; 32-50. 118 136AM, t44-174,42t+Sl2 MHz 
The Bearcat 300 Is the most advanced automatic 
scanning radio that has ever been offered to the 
public. The Bearcar 300 uses a bright green fluo- 
rescent digital display, so it's ideal for mobile 
applications The Bearcat 300 now has these added 
features: Service Search, Display intensity Control, 
Hofd Search and Resume Search keys. Separate 
Band keys to permit lock- in/ Jock* out of any band for 
more efficient service search 




Bearcat® 250 

Lisi price S429 95/CE pries 1269.00 
Q-BanQ% SO Channel • Grystalless • Searches 
Stores • Recall* a Digital clack • AC/DC 
Priority Channel • Delay • Daunt Feature 

Frequency range 32-50, 746-174, 420-512 MHz 
The Bearcat 250 performs any scanning function you 
could possibly want. With push button ease you can 
program up to 50 channels for automatic monitoring. 
Push another button and search for new frequencies. 
There are no crystals to limit what you want to hear. A 
special search feature of the Bearcat 250 actually 
stores 64 frequencies and recalls them, one at a time, 
Overseas customers should order the Bearcat 250 FB 
at $379 00 each This modef has 220 V AC/12 V DC 
power supply and 66-63 MHz (ow band coverage, 

NEW! Bearcat® 20/20 

List pnee $449 95/CE price $279.00 
7- Band t 40 Channel • Cryatallesa * Sear eh «« 
AM Aircraft and Public Service banda a AC/DC 
Priority Channel * Direct Channel Access • Detey 

Frequency range 32 -50, 118-136 AM, 144-174,420-512 MHz 

The Bearcat 20/20 automatic scanning radio 
replaces the Bearcat 220 and monitors 40 frequen- 
cies from 7 bands, including aircraft. A two-posit ion 
switch, located on the front panel, allows monitoring 
of 20 channels at a time 

Bearcat® 21 OXL 

List price £349 95/CE price $219.00 

6- Band, 18 Channel • CrymtaUesm a AC/DC 

Frequency range: 32-50. 144-174, 421-512 MHz. 
The Bearcat 21QXL scanning radio Is the second gener- 
ation scanner that replaces the popular Bearcat 2)0 
and 211, It has almost twice the scanning capacity of 
the Sea rear 210 with 18 channels plus dual scanning 
speeds and a bright green flu orescent display. Auto- 
matic search finds new frequencies Features scan 
delay, single antenna, patented track luning and more' 

Bearcat® 1 60 

List price $299, 95/CE price $184,00 
5-Bandf fB Channel a AC only e Priority 
Dual Moan Speeds * Direct Channel Access 

Frequency range. 32-50, 144-174, 440-512 MHz 
Would you believe... the Bearcat 160 is Ihe least 
expensive Bearcat crystalless scanner. 

This scanner presents a new dimension in 
scanning form and function. Look at the smooth 
keyboard. No buttons to punch No knobs to turn 
Instead, finger- lip pads provide control of a W scanning 
operations, including Qn/Qff, Volume and Squelch. Of 
course the Bearcat 160 incorporates other advanced 
Sea re a 1 features such as Priority, Direct Channel Access, 
Dual Scan Speeds, lockout. Scan Delay and more. 

NEW! Bearcat 8 100 

Thm firm f no- cry m tat p run ram m mbtw handheld scanner* 

Allow $0-120 days tor delivery after receipt of 
order due to the high demand for this product 
List price S449.95/CE price $299.00 
8- Band, 10 Channel a Liquid Crystei Display 
Search • Limit • Hold e Lockout a AC/DC 
Frequency range: 30- 5a 138-174. 406-512 MHz 
The workfs first no-crystal handheld scanner has 
compressed inlo a 3 r * 7" * 1 W case more scanning 
power than is found in many base or mobile scanners 
The Bearcat 1 00 has a full 1 6 channels with frequency 
coverage that includes all public servrce bands (Low, 
High. UHF and T bands), the 2-Meter and 70 cm 
Amateur bands, pius Military and Federal Government 
frequencies. It has chrome-plated keys for functions 
thai are user controlled, such as lockout manual and 
automatic scan. Even search is provided, both manual 
and automatic Wow ..what a scanner 1 

The Bearcat 1 00 produces audio power out put of 300 
milliwatts, is track-tuned and has selectivity of better 
than 50 dB down and sensitivity of 0.6 microvolts on 
VHFand 1.0 microvolts on UHF. Power consumption is 
kept extremely low by using a liquid crystal display and 
exclusive low power integrated circuits 

Included in our low CE price is a sturdy carrying case, 
earphone, battery charger/ AC adapler, six AA nl»cad 
batteries and flexible antenna For earliest delivery 
from CE. reserve your Bearcat 1O0 today. 



Bearcat® 5 



List price $134 95/CE price $94. OO 

4- Band, 8 Crystei Channels a Lockout a AC only 

Frequency range 33-50* 14&-174, 450-508 MHz 

The Bearcat 5 is a value-packed crystal scanner pull t for 

the scanning professional — at a price the first-lime 

buyer can afford. Individual lockout switches. Order one 

crystal certificate tor each channel. 



IV 



NEW! Bearcat® 350 



Bearcat 8 " Four-Six ThinScan 

List price S 1 89 95/CE price $1 24.00 
Frequency range: 33+47. 15 2*1 €4, 450-508 MHz. 
The incredible, Bearcat Four-Si* Thin 3ear*~ is like 
having an information center in your pocket. This four 
band. 6 channel crystal controlled scanner has patented 
Track Tuning on UHF. Scan Delay and Channel Lockout. 
Measures 2^ x 8V* x 1 1* Includes rubber ducky antenna. 
Order crystal certificate for each channel. Made in Japan, 

TEST ANY SCANNER 

Test any scanner purchased from Communications 
Electronics" tor 31 days before you decide to keep it J* for 
any reason you are not completefy satisfied, return ft in 
original condition with all parts in 31 days fc-r a prompt 
refund {less ship ping/ handling charges and rebate credits). 



Fanon Slimline 6-HLU 

List price Si 69 95/CE price $109,00 
Low cast O'channett 4-band scanner! 

The Fanon Slimline 6- HLU gives you six channels of crystal 
controlled excitement Unique Automatic Pea* Tuning Circuit 
adjusts Ihe receiver front end for maximum sensitivity 
across the entire UHF band individual channel lockout 
switches. Frequency range 30-50. 146-175 and 45G-512 
MHj Size 2 s * x6^ x l" includes aiooer ducky antenna. 
Order crystal Certificates for each channel Made in Japan 

Fanon Slimline 6-HL 

List price $149 95/CE price £99. OO 

a-Channal pmrtormmncm at 4-channa-f coat! 

Frequency rango: 30-50, 146-175 MHz 

It you don't need Ihe UHF band, get Ihis model and save 

money Same high performance and tea lures as the model 

HLU without the UHF band Order crystal certificates for 

each channel Made in Japan 

OTHER SCANNERS S ACCESSORIES 

MkTWt Regency 4 % 081 Scanner S3 1 9 00 

MEW! Regency* D300 Scanner . .521 9 00 

HEW! Regency* 0100 Scanner . St 69 00 

HaTWI Regency* H604 Scenner $129 00 

Regency* M400 Scanner „'. $259 00 

Regency* Ml 00 Scanner, ..,,♦♦♦ „ $199 QQ 

Regency* ft! 040 Scanner... $149 00 

SCMA-6 fanon Mobile Adapter/ Battery Charger. . , . £49.00 

CHB-6 Fanon AC Adapter/ Battery Charger SI 5 00 

CAT-ft Fanon carrying case with belt clip $15.00 

AUC-3 fanon auto tighter adapter/Battery Charger $ 1 5 00 
PSK-6 Base Power Supply/Bracket (or SCMA-6 . . S20.DO 
SPSO Bearcat AC Adapter . ..... 19.00 

SPS 1 Bearcat Battery Charger .,,,.. $9.00 

SPSS Bearcat 4-6 ThinScan* carrying case $12,00 

MA508 Regency carrying case for H604 $15.00 

FB*E frequency Directory for Eastern USA . . ... $12,00 

FB-W Frequency Directory tor Western USA ..... $1 2.00 

FFD Federal Frequency Directory tor USA ....... $12.00 

TSGTopSec*e1" Registry of U.S. Government Fre*V $'0,00 

B-4 f .2 V AAA N'-Cad batteries (set of four* S9.00 

A-I35cc Crystal certificate $300 

Add S3 00 shipping for alt accessories ordered at the same tune 

INCREASED PERFORMANCE ANTENNA* 

If you want the utmost in performance from your 
scanner, it is essential that you use an external antenna 
We have six base and mobile antennas specifically 
designed for receiving all bands. Order #A60 Is a 
magnet mount mobile antenna Order #A61 is a gutter 
dip mobile antenna. Order #A62 is a trunk-lip mobile 
antenna Order #A83 is a ^ inch hole mount, Order 
# A64 is a ^ inch snap-in mount and # A70 is an alt band 
base station antenna. All antennas are $35. 00 and 
S3 00 for UPS shipping in the continental United States. 

BUY WITH CONFIDENCE 

To get thatmmtomi dmtiwmry tram CcTof any scanner, send 
or phone your order directly to our Scanner Distribution 
Center!" Be sure I o calculate your price using the CE price a 
in thm ad. Michigan residents please add 4% sales tax 
Written purchase orders are accepted Irom approved gov- 
ernment agencies and most weU rated firms at a 10% 
surcharge for net 10 billing All sales Are subject to availa- 
bility acceptance and verification. All sales on accessories 
are (mat- Prices, terms and specifications are subject to 
change without nolice Out oi stock Items will be placed on 
backorder automatically unless CE is instructed differently. 
Most products I hat we sell have a manufacturer's warranty 
Free copies of warranties on these products are available 
prior to purchase by writing to CE International orders are 
invited with a $20,00 surcharge tor special handling in 
addition to shipping charges All shipments are F.O.B. Ann 
Arbor, Michigan. No COD'S please. Non-cart rued and foreign 
checks require bank clearance Minimum order S35 00 

Mail orders to: Communications Electron lesr 
Box 1002. Ann Arbor, Michigan 48106 USA Add 
$7,00 per scanner or phone product tor U.P.5. 
ground sh ipping and handling, or S 1 4.00 tor faster 
UPS, air shipping to some locations. If you have a 
Visa or Master Card, you may call anytime and 
place a credit card order. Order toll free in the 
USA Dial 800*521-4414. if you are outside the 
US or in Michigan, dial 313-994-4444. Dealer 
inquiries invited. Order without obligation today! 

Scanner Distribution Center" and CE logos are trade- 
marks of Communications Electronics" 
t Bearcat is a federally registered trademark of Electra 
Company, a Division of Masco Corporation of Indiana 
t Regency is a federally registered trademark ol Regency 
Electronics Inc 
Copyright' 1981 Communications Electronics" 





VISA 





rw 



.-377 



COMMUNICATIONS 
ELECTRONICS" 

054 Pnoenii [} Bo* i$Q2 G Ann Arbor, Mtchtgan 40106 U S A 
Call TOLL- FRE 1 1 eOO| S21 4* 1 4 Of outl'd • U 5 A { 3 13 1 »»4 ■ 444 * 

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SWR 

& POWER METER 

Tne cross-needle meter ndcaies Dotn torwam po*er via reflected potter on one 
meter and SWR is read direct! v at tne pomt *nere me needles intersect Boot power 
and 5 WR can be crocked mstantfy wrmout t>rnehconsum<ng sensitivity adjustments 
— even wnen using SSB 



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• FM/AM/SSBA^r¥tortde spectrum coverage • Dva^co nv er a ton m pe rt ie ter odyne 
circuitry of AM assures high sensitivity and interference rejection * Quartz- 
crysial. phase^ockep-koop frequency synthesis for all bands assures the inmost 
tuning stability, wjthout s trace of tuning drift • Direct-access, digital tuning 
keyboard and LCD digital frequency readout for quick, key-touch station selec 
lion— maximum accuracy and ease of use * Manual tuning and automatic scan- 
ning lor effortless signal searching, easy DXmg * 6-statK>n presets, plus 2 aum< 
fttfy presets . for mstanl reception of memorized nations on any band-ptas LDC 
memory indtcaixm • 5-step LED signal-strength indicator • LocetSNormeJAOX 
eansitrvny selector tor AM ■ SSB/CW compensaior tor tow-distonion recap- 
lion * Telescopic antenna, plus external antenna included • * speaker for full. 
rich sound * Slide-bar bass and treble controls » Sleep timer —with LCD 
readout— can be set in io-rmnute kicremenls for up to 90 minutes of play before 
automatic radio shut-off • Shoulder strap included * Integral stand allows lilt-up 
desktop placement ■ Tape recorder jack allows oft-the-air recording * Might- 
ftght k> LCO ■Uum.nat^ CAu FQR 0|Jft N£W LQW pR|CE 



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1 , Type: FM £ AM 

2. Frequency Range a )2fi— 57,095 
MHz Freq.Space 5kHz b) 56— 8fl MHz 
Freq. Space t2_5fcHt:c} 106— 1 80 MHz 
Freq Space 5 kHz; d) 380—514 MHz 
Freq. Space n 5 kHz 

3 Sensitivity FM a 126—180 MHz 
4trV S'N 12dB bj380— 514 MHz i OvV 
S N I2d6 AM. a)26— 180 MHz 1 QuV 

s n i0dB biaeo— 514 mhz 20W S'N 

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Low, Low Prices 
On Apple Computers & Accessories 
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7. Power Supply: 12V DC (included) 

B Antenna impedance: 50— 75 ohms 

vVhjp o* EKieirm* Antenna wrth LO'OX 

Control i?0 dQ ATT | 

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MHz. wilhirt 300 Hi 380 — 5T4 

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MAV $499 95 



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the JIL SX-100 + 




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16 Channels 30-54 MHz; 140180 
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Date Display no V AC or 12- 
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Stow 5ctv sec 
Bright Green 9 Digit Frequency Dis- 
play Ext Anienna Jack E*1 
Speaker Jack Large Top Mounting 
Bracket Scan Rate Fast Bch/sec^ 

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Scan Delay Time Variable 0-4 sec 

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ATA LOW 51 99.95 



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VISA 



204 73 Magazine • December, 1981 



■ 



a 



CIRCUIT BOARDS" 



* 



* INTRODUCING THE HOWARD/COLEMAN TVRO CIRCUIT BOARDS 

( Satellite Receiver Boards ) 

DUAL CONVERSION BOARD $25.00 

This board provides conversion from the 3,7-4.2 band first to 900 MHz 
where gain and bandpass filtering are provided and, second, to 70 MHz. 
The board contains both local oscillators* one fixed and the other 
variable, and the second mixer. Construction is greatly simplified 
by the use of Hybrid IC amplifiers for the gain stages. 

47pF CHIP CAPACITORS ..,-.... -. : : , ....• 6-00 

For use with dual conversion board. Consists of six 47pf. 

70 MHZ IF BOARD 25,00 

This circuit provides about 43dB gain with 50 ohm input and output 
impedance. It is designed to drive the HOWARD/COLEMAN TVRO Demodulator. 
The on- board band pass filter can be tuned for bandwidths between 20 and 
35 MHz with a passband ripple of less than % dB. Hybrid IC's are used 
for the gain stages. 

.01 pF CHIP CAPACITORS . . ...,..- 7.00 

For use with the 70 MHz IF Board. Consists of seven .01 pf. 

DEMODULATOR BOARD 40.00 

This circuit takes the 70 MHz center frequency satellite TV signals in 
the 10 to 200 millivolt range, detects them using a phase locked loop, 
deemphasizes and filters the result and amplifies the result to produce 
standard NTSC video. Other outputs include the audio subcarrier, a DC 
voltage proportional to the strength of the 70 MHz signal, and AFC 
voltage centered at about 2 volts DC. 



SINGLE AUDIO 



■ * •- » m 



15,00 



This circuit recovers the audio signals from the 6,8 MHz frequency. The 
Miller 9051 coils are tuned to pass the 6.8 MHz subcarrier and the Miller 
9052 coil tunes for recovery of the audio. 

DUAL AUDIO 25.00 

Duplicate of the single audio but also covers the 6.2 range. 

DC CONTROL 15.00 



SPECIAL SET OF FIVE BOARDS INCLUDING DUAL AUDIO {two single audio 

boards ) 1 Ml 1 ! J !!!!!!! M !!!!!!<!!!! M 1 !!!!!>! 1 •!! H ■■!!!!!>!!!!!! 1 !!!! 100. 00 

ALL PARTS AVAILABLE IN STOCK 



Toll Free Number 



ZZEZr' J>l c Hz electroqics 

(For orders only) ^^* 






73 Magazine • December, 1981 205 



"DOWN CONVERTERS" 

1900 to 2500 MHZ Microwave Downconverters 

In Regards to your request for information concerning our microwave receiver. This 
receiver is tunable over a range of 1900 to 2500 MHZ approximately, and is intended 
for amateur use. The local oscillator is voltage controlled (i.e.) making the I.F. 
range approximately 54 to 88 MHZ For Your Standard TV Set Channels 2 thru 7. 




P. C. Board with Data 



1 to 5 



$15.00 



6 to 11 



$13.00 



12 to 26 



$11.00 



27 



up 



P. C. Board with all chip caps solder on. 

P. C. Board with all parts for assembly. 

P. C. Board with all parts for assembly plus 2N6603 

P. C. Board assembled and Tested. 

P. C. Board assembled and Tested with 2N6603. 

HMR II Downconverter with power supply , antenna (Dish) and all Cable for 
Instalation.180 Day Warranty . 



1 to 5 $150.00 5 to 11 $140.00 12 to up 



$125.00 



Yagi Downconverter with Power Supply , Antenna (Yagi) and all cables for 
Instalation. 90 Day Warranty. 



1 to 5 



$150.00 



6 to 11 



$140.00 12 



up 



$125.00 



Yagi Downconverter as above but Kit. (NO CABLES) With Box. 



1 to 5 $125.00 6 to 11 



$115.00 12 



up 



$100.00 



HMR II Downconverter as above but Kit. (NO CABLES) With PVC. 



1 to 5 



$125.00 6 to 11 



$115.00 12 



up 



$100.00 



$9.00 
$30.00 



$49 
$69 
$69 

$79 



99 
99 



99 



99 



Special New Stock Of Carbide Drill Bits 



1 . 25mm 
1.45mm 
3.2mm 

3.3HIT1 

1/8 
3/16 
5/32 
7/32 

13/64 
19 



20 
24 
26 
29 
30 
31 
36 
37 

38 
39 



40 
44 
45 
46 
47 
48 
49 
50 
51 
52 



53 
54 
55 
56 
57 
58 
59 
60 

61 

62 



63 
64 
65 
67 

68 
69 

Your Choice $1.99 



Toll Free Number 
800-528-0180 
(For orders only) 



o^i ( ^j electronics 



206 73 Magazine • December, 1981 






ii 



FILTERS" 



Collins Mechanical Filter #526-9724-010 Model F455Z32F 
455KHZ at 3.2KHZ Wide. 



$15.00 



Atlas Crystal Filters 

5.52-2.7/8 5.52MHz/2.7KHz wide 8 pole 

5.595MHz/2.7KHz wide 8 pole upper sideband 
5.595MHz/. 500KHz wide 4 pole CW 
5.595MHz/2.7KHz wide 8 pole lower sideband 
5.595MHz/2.7KHz wide 8 pole upper sideband 
5.645MHz/2.7KHz wide 8 pole 
9.0MHz/ 8 pole sideband and CW 



5.595-2.7/8/U 

5.595-.500/4/CW 

5.595-2.7/LSB 

5.595-2.7/USB 

5.645-2.7/8 

9.0SB/CW 



Your Choice 
$12,99 



Kokusai Electric Co. Mechanical Filter #MF-455-ZL-21H 

455KHz at Center Frequency of 453. 5Kc Carrier Frequency of 455Kc 2.36Kc Bandwidth 



$15.00 



Crystal Fi 


titers 


Nikko 


FX-07800C 


TEW 


FEC-103-2 


Tyco/CD 


001019880 


Motorola 


4884863B01 


PTI 


5350C 


PTI 


5426C 


CD 


A10300 



7.8MHz 

10.6935 

10.7MHz 2 pole l5KHz Bw. Motorola #48D84396K01 

Thru #48D84396K05 

11.7MHz 2 pole 15KHz Bandwidth 

12MHz 2 pole 15KHz Bandwidth 

21.4MHz 2 pole 15KHz Bandwidth 

45MHz 2 pole 15KHz Bandwidth (For Motorola 

Communications equipment) 



10.00 
10.00 

4.00 
5.00 
5.00 
5.00 

5.00 



Ceramic Filters 



Murata 


BFB455B 


455KHZ 






CFM455E 


455KHz +- 


5.5KHz 




CFM455D 


455KHz +- 


7 KHz 




CFR455E 


455KHz +- 


5.5KHz 




CFU455E 


455KHZ +- 


1.5KHz 




CFU455G 


455KHZ +- 


lKHz 




CFW455D 


455KHZ +- 


lKHz 




CFW455R 


455KHZ +- 


3KHz 




SFB4550 


455KHZ 






SFE10.7 


10.7MHz 






SFG10.7MA 


10.7MHz 




Clevite 


T0-01A 


455KHz 






T0-02A 


455KHz 




Nippon 


LF-B4/CFU455I 


455KHz +- 


lKHz 




LF-B6/CFU455H 


455KHz +- 


lKHz 




LF-C18 


455KHz 




Tokin 


CF455A/BFU455K 


455KHz +- 


2KHz 


Matsushira 


EFC-L455K 


455KHZ 




R0TR0N MUFFIN FANS Model Mark 


4/MU2A1 





$ 2.40 
6.65 
6.65 
8.00 
2.90 
2.90 
2.90 
4.35 
2.40 
2.67 
10.00 
5.00 
5.00 
5.80 
5.80 

10.00 
4.80 

7.00 



These fans are new factory boxed 115vac at 14watts 50/60cps 
CFM is 88 at 50cps and 105 at 60cps. 



Impedance Protected-F 



$ 7.99 



SPECTRA PHYSICS INC . Model 088 HeNe Laser Tubes. 

Power output 1.6mw. Beam Dia. .75mm. Beam Dir. 

68K ohm lwatt ballast lOOOvdc +-I00vdc 3.7ma. 



2.7mr. 8Kv starting voltage 

TUBES ARE NEW $59.99 






73 Magazine • December, 1981 207 



"AMPLIFIERS" 



AVANTEK LOW NOISE AMPLIFIERS 




Models 

Frequency Range 

Noise Figure 

Voltage 

Gain 

Power Output 

Price 



UTC2-102M 

30 to 200MC 

1.5dB 

+15vdc 

29dB 

ldB Gain +7dBm 

$49.99 



AP-20-T 

200 to 400MC 

6.5dB 

+24vdc 

30d8 

ldB Gain +20dBm 

$49.99 



AL-45-Q-l 

450 to 800MC 

7dB 

-6vdc @ +12vdc 

30dB 

ldB Gain -5dBm 

$49.99 



AK-1000M 

500 to 1000MC 

2.5dB 

+12vdc <? -12vdc 

25dB 

ldB Gain +8dBm 

$69.99 



Mini Circuits Double Balanced Mixers 

Model RAY -3 

Very High Level (+23dBm LO) 70KHz to 200MHz L0,RF,DC to 200MHz IF 

Conversion Loss.dB One Octave From Band Edge 6Typ./7.5Max. Total Range 6.5Typ./8Max. 

Isolation.dB Lower Band Edge To One Decade Higher (LO-RF/LO-IF) 55Typ./45Min. Mid. Range 

(LO-RF/LO-IF) 40Typ./30Min. Upper Band Edge To One Octave Lower (LO-RF/LO-IF) 30Typ./ 

25Min. 

Price $24.99 

Model TSM-3 

Standard Level (+7dBm LO) .1MHz to 400MHz LO.RF.DC to 400MHz IF 

Conversion Loss.dB One Octave From Band Edge 5.3Typ./7.5Max. Total Range 6.5Typ./8.5Max. 

Isolation.dB Lower Band Edge To One Decade Higher (LO-RF/LO-IF) 60Typ./50Min. Mid. Range 

(LO-RF/LO-IF) 50Typ./35Min. Upper Band Edge To One Octave Lower (LO-RF/LO-IF) 35TYP./ 

25Min. 

Price $11.99 



Hewlett Packard Linear Power Microwave RF Transistor HXTR5401/35831E 



Collector Base Brakedown Voltage at Ic=100ua 
Collector Emitter Brakedown Voltage at Ic=500ua 
Collector Cutoff Current at Vcb=15v 
Forward Current Transfer Ratio at Vce=15v,Ic B 15ma 
Transducer Power Gain at Vce=18v,Ice=60ma,F=2GHz. 
Maximum Available Gain at Vce=18v,Ic=60ma,F=lGHz/F=2GHz 
Price $29.99 



35volts min. 
30volts min. 

lOOua max. 
15min,40typ«125max 
3dBmin,4dBtyp 
14dB typ,8dB typ 



Motorola RF Power Amplifier Modules 



Model 

Frequency Range 
Vol tage 
Output Power 
Minimum Gain 
Harmonics 
RF Input Power 

Price 



MHH612A 

146 to 147MHz 

12.5vdc 

20watts 

20dB 

-30dB 

400mw 

$57.50 



MHW613A 

150 to 174MHz 

12.5vdc 

30watts 

20dB 

-30dB 

500mw 

$59.80 



MHW710 

400 to 512MHz 

12.5vdc 

13watts 

19.4dB 

40dB 

250mw 

$57.50 



MHH720 

400 to 470MHz 

12 . 5vdc 

20watts 

2 ldB 

40dB 

250mw 

$69.00 



Toll Free Number 

800-528-0180 
(For orders only) 



(fJW^ljjz elect roityes 



208 73 Magazine • December, 1981 



66 



TRANSISTORS" 



WATKINS JOHNSON WJ-M62 3.7 to 4.2GHz Communication Band Double Balanced Mixer 



$100.00 



SSB Conversion Loss 4.9dB Typ. 

5.5dB Typ. 



SSB Noise Fiqure 



6dB Max. fR 3.7 to 4.2GHz 
6.5dB Max. fl DC to 1125MHz fL fR 

fl 880MHz fL fR 
fR 3.7 to 4.2GHz 



Isolation 
fL at 
fL at 



4.9dB Typ. 
5.5dB Typ. 



6dB Max. 
6.5dB Max. 



R 30dB 

I 25dB 

20dB 

15dB 

Conversion Compression 

Flatness 



Min. 
Min. 
Min. 
Min. 
ldB 



40dB 
30dB 
30dB 
25dB 
Max. 



Typ. 

Typ. 
Typ. 
Typ. 



fl 30 to 1125MHz fL fR 
fl 880MHz fL fR 

fL 2,8 to 5.35GHz 
fL 4.5 to 5.35GHz 
fL 3.6 to 4.5GHz 
fL 2.8 to 3.6GHz 
fR Level +2dBm 



.2dB Peak to Peak Over any 40MHz Segment of fR=3.7 to 4.2GHz 



Third Order Input Intercept +lldBm 



fRl=4GHz fR2=4.01GHz Both at -5dBm fL=4.5GHz 



Group 
VSWR 



Time Delay .5ns Typ. .75ns Max. fR3.7 to 4.2GHz fL 3480MHz 



@ +13dBm 



L-Port 
R-Port 

I-Port 



1.25:1 Typ. 2.0:1 

1.25:1 Typ. 2.0: 

1.4 :1 Typ. 2.0: 

1.5:1 Typ. 2.0: 

1.3 :1 Typ. 2.0: 

1.8 :1 Typ. 2.5: 



fL 2.8 to 5.35GHz 
fR 3.7 to 4.2GHz fL 
fR 3.7 to 4.2GHz fL 
fI=100MHz 
fI=500MHz 
fI=1125MHz 



fR 
fR 



SGS/ATES RF Transistors 






Motorola RF Transistor 


Type. 


BFQ85 




BFW92 


MRF901 


2N6603 


Collector Base V 


20v 




25v 


25v 


25v 


Collector Emitter 


V 15v 




15v 


15v 


15v 


Emitter Base V 


3v 




2.5v 


3v 


3v 


Collector Current 


40ma 




25ma 


30md 


30ma 


Power Dissipation 


200mw 




190mw 


375mw 


400mw 


HFE 


40min. 200max. 




20min. 150max. 


30?nin. 200max. 


30min. 200max. 


FT 


4GHZ min. 5GHz 


max 


.1.6GHz Typ. 


4.5GHz typ. 


2GHz min. 


Noise Fiqure 


1GHz 3dB Max. 




500MHz 4dB Typ. 


1GHz 2dB Typ. 


2GHz 2.9dB Typ. 


Price 


$1.50 




$1.50 


$2.00 


$10.00 


National Semiconductor Variable Vol 


tag 


e Regulator Sale 


1 1 1 I 1 ! 1 1 I 

* — •#*■* pa 




LM317K 


LM350K 




LM723G/L 


LM7 80 5/ 06/ 08/ 12/ 15/ 18/ 24 


1.2 to 37vdc 


1.2 to 33vdc 




2 to 37vdc 


5, 6, 8,12, 


,15,18,24vdc 


1.5Amps 


3 Amps 




150ma. 


lAmp 




TO-3 


TO- 3 




TO-100/TO-116 


T0-220/T0-3 




$4.50 


$5.75 




$1.00 $1.25 


$1.17 $2.00 





P & B Solid State Relays Type ECT1DB72 



*May Be Other Brand Equivalent 

Toll Free Number 

800-528-01 80 

(For orders only) 



5VDC Turn On 120VAC Contact 7 Amps 

20Amps on 10"xl0"x.062" Alum. Heats ink with 
Silicon Grease $5.00 



(fVf < 7{z elect roqicf. 












73 Magazine • December, 1981 209 



"MIXERS" 



WATKINS JOHNSON WJ-M6 Double Balanced Mixer 



LO and RF 0.2 to 300MHz 
Conversion Loss (SSB) 

Noise Figure (SSB) 

Conversion Compression 



IF DC to 300MHz 
6.5dB Max. 1 to 50MHz 
8.5dB Max. .2 to 300MHz 
same as above 
8.5dB Max. 50 to 300MHz 
.3dB Typ. 



$21.00 

WITH DATA SHEET 



NEC (NI PPON ELECTRIC C O. LT D. NE57835/2SC2150 Microwave Transistor 



NF Min F=2GHz 
F=3GHz 
F=4GHz 



dB 2.4 Typ. 
dB 3.4 Typ. 
dB 4.3 Typ. 



MAG F=2GHZ 


dB 12 Typ. 


F=3GHz 


dB 9 Typ. 


F=4GHz 


dB 6.5 Typ. 



S5.30 



Ft Gain Bandwidth Product at Vce=8v, Ic=10ma. GHz 4 Min. 6 Typ. 
Vcbo 25v Vceo llv Vebo 3v Ic 50ma. Pt. 250mw 

UNELCO RF Power and Linear Amplifier Capacitors 

These are the famous capacitors used by all the RF Power and Linear Amplifier manufacutures 
and described in the Motorola RF Data Book. 



lOpf 
13pf 
I4pf 
20pf 



22pf 
25pf 
27 pf 
27.5pf 



30pf 
32pf 
33pf 
34pf 



40pf 
43pf 
62pf 
80pf 



lOOpf 

120pf 
180pf 
200pf 



250pf 1 to lOpcs. .604 each 

820pf 11 to 50pcs. . 50<f each 

51 to lOOpcs. .404 each 



NIPPON ELECTRIC COMPANY TUNNEL DIODES 

Peak Pt, Current ma. Ip 

Valley Pt. Current ma* Iv 

Peak Pt. Voltage mv. Vp 

Projected Peak Pt. Voltage mv. Vpp Vf=Ip 

Series Res. Ohms rS 

Terminal Cap. pf* Ct 

Valley Pt. Voltage mv, VV 



MODEL 1S2199 
9ifiin. lOTyp. Umax, 
l,2Typ, l.Smax, 
95Typ. 120max. 
480min, 550Typ. 630max 
2.5Typ* 4max. 
1.7Typ. 2max. 
370Typ. 



1S2200 $7 * 50 
9min. lOTyp. Umax. 
!.2Typ, L5max. 
75Typ. 90max. 
440min. 520Typ. BOOmax 
2Typ. 3max- 
5Typ, 8max, 
350Typ. 



FAIRCHILD / DUMONT Oscilloscope Probes Model 4290B 

Input Impedance 10 meg., Input Capacity 6*5 to 12pf.» Division Ration (VoKs/Div Factor) 

10:1, Cable Length 4Ft- , Frequency Range Over 100MHz. 

These Probes will work on all Tektronix, Hewlett Packard, and other Oscilloscopes. 

PRICE $45.00 



MOTOROLA RF DATA BOOK 

List all Motorola RF Transistors / RF Power Amplifiers, Varactor Diodes and much much 
more. 



PRICE $7.50 



Toll Free Number 

800-528-0180 

(For orders only) 



o)M^z elect roqics 



210 73 Magazine • December, 1981 



"SOCKETS AND CHIMNEYS" 



EIMAC TUBE SOCKETS AND CHIMNEYS 



SK110 


Socket 


$ POR 


SK406 


Chimney 


35.00 


SK416 


Ch i mney 


22.00 


SK500 


Socket 


330.00 


SK506 


Ch i mney 


47.00 


SK600 


Socket 


39.50 


SK602 


Socket 


56.00 


SK606 


Chimney 


8.80 


SK607 


Socket 


43.00 


SK610 


Socket 


44.00 


SK620 


Socket 


45.00 


SK620A 


Socket 


50.50 


JOHNSON 


TUBE SOCKETS 




124-115-2/SK620A Socket 


$ 30.00 


124-116/SK630A Socket 


40.00 



SK626 


Chimney 


SK630 


Socket 


SK636B 


Ch i mney 


SK640 


Socket 


SK646 


Chimney 


SK711A 


Socket 


SK740 


Socket 


SK770 


Socket 


SK800A 


Socket 


SK806 


Chimney 


SK900 


Socket 


SK906 


Chimney 



$ 7.70 
45.00 
26.40 
27 . 50 
55.00 

192.50 
66.00 
66.00 

150.00 
30.80 

253.00 
44.00 



124-113 Bypass Cap. 
122-0275-001 Socket 
(For 4-250A,4-400A,3-400Z, 
3-500Z) 



$ 10.00 

10.00 

2/$15.00 



CHIP CAPACITORS 

.8pf 

Ipf 

l.lpf 

1.4pf 

1.5pf 

1.8pf 

2.2pf 

2.7pf 

3.3pf 

3.6pf 

3.9pf 

4.7pf 

5.6pf 

6.8pf 

8.2pf 



lOpf 
12pf 

15pf 
18pf 



PRICES: 



I to 10 - 

II to 50 • 
51 to 100 



22pf 
24pf 

27pf 
33pf 
39pf 
47 pf 

51pf 
56pf 

68pf 
82pf 

,99* 
.90* 
.80* 



lOOpf* 

HOpf 

120pf 

130pf 

150pf 

160pf 

180pf 

200pf 

220pf* 

240pf 

270pf 

300pf 

330pf 

360pf 

390pf 



430pf 

470pf 

510pf 

560pf 

620pf 

680pf 

820pf 

lOOOpf/.OOluf* 

I800pf/.00l8uf 

2700pf/.0027uf 

10,000pf/.01uf 

12,000pf/.012uf 

15,000pf/.015uf 

18,000pf/.018uf 



101 to 1000 .60* 
1001 & UP .35* 



* IS A SPECIAL PRICE: 10 for $7.50 

100 for $65.00 
1000 for $350.00 



WATKINS JOHNSON WJ-V907: Voltage Controlled Microwave Oscillator 



$110.00 



Frequency range 3.6 to 4.2GHz, Power ouput, Min. lOdBm typical, 8dBm Guaranteed. 
Spurious output suppression Harmonic (nf ), min. 20dB typical, In-Band Non-Harmonic, min. 
60dB typical, Residual FM, pk to pk, Max. 5KHz, pushing factor, Max. 8KHz/V, Pulling figure 
(1.5:1 VSWR), Max. 60MHz, Tuning voltage range +1 to +15volts, Tuning current, Max. -0.1mA, 
modulation sensitivity range, Max. 120 to 30MHz/V, Input capacitance, Max. lOOpf, Oscillator 
Bias +15 +-0.05 volts @ 55mA, Max. 



Toll Free Number 
800-528-0180 
(For orders only) 



( ^/i G t\z electroqic$ 






73 Magazine • December, 1981 21 1 



"TUBES" 



TUBES 

2E26 

2K28 

3B28 

3-500Z 

3-1000Z/8164 

3CX1000A/8283 

3X2500A3 

4-65A/8165 

4-125A/4D21 

4-250A/5D22 

4-400A/8438 

4-400C/6775 

4-1000A/8166 

4CS250R 

4X150A/7034 

4X150D/7035 

4X150G 

4X2 SOB 

4CX250B/7203 

4CX250F/7204 

4CX250FG/8621 

4CX250K/8245 

4CX250R/7580W 

4CX300A 

4CX35DA/8321 

4CX350FJ/8904 

4X500A 

4CX600J 
4CX1000A/8168 
4CX1500B/8660 
4CX3000A/8169 

4CX5000A/8170 

4CX10000D/8171 

4CX150O0A/8281 

4E27/A/5-123A/B 

4PR60A 

4PR60B/8252 

KT88 

DX362 

DX415 

572B/T160L 

811 

811A 

812A 

813 

4624 

4665 

5551A 

5563A 

5675 



PRICE 



$ 4 

100 

5 

102 

300 

200 

200 

45 

58 

68 

71 

80 

300 

69 

30 

40 
50 

30 

45 

45 

55 

100 

69 

99 

100 

100 

100 

300 

300 

300 

300 

400 

500 

700 

40 

100 

175 

15 

35 

35 

44 

10 

13 

15 

38 

100 

350 

100 

77 

15 



.69 
.00 
.00 
.00 
.00 
.00 
.00 
.00 
.00 
.00 

.00 

.00 
.00 
.00 
.00 
.00 
.00 
.00 
.00 
.00 
.00 
.00 
.00 
.00 
.00 
.00 
.00 
.00 
.00 
.00 
.00 
,00 
.00 
.00 
.00 
.00 
.00 
.00 
.00 
.00 
.00 
.00 
.00 
.00 
.00 
.00 
.00 
.00 
.00 

.00 



TUBES 



PRICE 



TUBES 



PRICE 



5721 


$200.00 


8462 


$100.00 


5768 


85.00 


8505A 


73.50 


5836 


100.00 


8533W 


92.00 


5837 


100 . 00 


8560A 


55.00 


5861/EC55 


110.00 


8560AS 


57.00 


5876A 


15.00 


8608 


34.00 


5881/6L6 


5.00 


8624 


67.20 


5894/A 


45.00 


8637 


38.00 


5894B 


55.00 


8647 


123.00 


6080 


10.00 


87 37/ 5894 B 


55.10 


6083/AX9909 


89.00 


8807 


1000.00 


6098/ 6AK6 


14.00 


8873 


260.00 


6115/A 


100.00 


8874 


260 . 00 


6146 


6.00 


8875 


260.00 


6146A 


6.50 


8877 


533.00 


6146B/8298A 


7.50 


8908 


12.00 


6146W 


14.00 


8916 


1500.00 


6159 


11.00 


8930/X651Z 


45.00 


6161 

*■ *"S rt i 


70.00 
125.00 


8950 


10.00 


6291 






6293 


20.00 


6BK4C 


5.00 


6360 


4.00 


6DQ5 


4.00 


6524 


53.00 


6FW5 


5.00 


6550 


7.00 


6GE5 


5.00 


6562/6794A 


25.00 


6G05 


5.00 


6693 


110.00 


6HS5 


5.00 


6816 


58.00 


6JB5/6HE5 


5.00 


6832 


22.00 


6JB6A 


5.00 


6883/8032A/8552 


7.00 


6JM6 


5.00 


6884 


46.00 


6JN6 


5.00 


6897 


110.00 


6JS6B 


5.00 


6900 


35.00 


60T6A 


5.00 


6907 


55.00 


6KD6 


5.00 


6939 


15.00 


6K66/EL505 


5.50 


7094 


75.00 


6KM6 


5.00 


7117 


17.00 


6KN6 


5.00 


7211 


60.00 


6LF6 


6.00 


7289/3CX100A5 


34.00 


6LQ6 


6.00 


7360 


11.00 


6LU8 


5.00 


7377 


67.00 


6LX6 


5.00 


7486 


75.00 


6ME6 


5.00 


7650 


250.00 


12JB6A 


6.00 


7843 

■■S rt v™ r\ 


58.00 


"WE ARE ALSO 


LOOKING FOI 


7868 
7984 


4.00 
12.00 


TUBES NEW/ US ED ECT." 


8072 


55.00 


WE BUY SELL 


OR TRADE 


8121 


50.00 






8122 


85.00 






8236 


30.00 






8295/PL172 


300.00 







NOTICE ALL PRICES ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE !!!!!! ! ! !!!!!!!! M !!!>!!!!!!! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! 



Toll Free Number 
600-528-0180 
(For orders only) 



J\f*^z elect rof|ic$ 



212 73 Magazine • December, 1981 



"MICROWAVE COMPONENTS" 




AIL 
ML 
AIL 
AIL 
AIL 
ARM 



ARM 
AHSA 

Alfred 
Alfred 
Alfred 

Aatrtccn 
Americon 
Qoonton 

Coatial Dynamics 
Coaxial Dynamics 
FXRyMierolab 
flA/MicroUfc 
ftA/Microlao 
FW/Hlcn>>*6 
FIR/Mlcrolab 
FIB/MicroHb 
General Microwave 
General Microwave 
General Mkrowave 
Hewlett Pfl^tard 
Hewlett Pacta rd 
Hewlett P«t*^ 
Hewlett Htk*r4 
Hewlett Packard 
Hewlett P*ci*rd 
Hewlett Packard 
Hewrett Packard 
Hewlett Packard 
Hewlett Packard 
Hewlett Packard 
Hewlett Packard 
Hewlett Packard 
Hewlett Pacta rd 
Hewlett Packard 
Hewlett Packard 
Hewlett Packard 
Hewlett Packard 
Hewlett Packard 
Hewlett Packard 
Hewlett Packard 
Hewlett Packard 
Hewlett Packard 



newlwtt 
Hewlett 
Hewlett 
Hewlett 
Hewlett 
Hewlett 
Hewlett 
Hewlett 
Hewlett 
Hewlett 
Hewlett 
Hewlett 
Hewlett 
Hewlett 
Hewlett 
Hewlett 
Hewlett 
Hewlett 
Hewlett 



Packard 
Packard 
Packard 
Packard 
Packard 
Packard 
Packard 
Packard 
Packard 
Packard 
Packard 
Packard 
Packard 
Packard 
Packard 
Packard 
Packard 
Packard 
Packard 



Hewlett Packard 
Hewlett Packard 
Hewlett Packard 
Hewlett Packard 



Packard 
Packard 
Packard 
Packard 
Packard 
Packard 
Packard 
Packard 
Packard 
Hewlett Packard 
Hewlett Packard 
Hewlett' Packard 



Hewlett 
Hewlett 
Hewlett 

Hewlett 
ilett 
rleti 
Hewlett 
Hewlett 
ilett 



Hewl ett 

Hewlett 

Hewlett 

Hewlett 

Hewlett 

K*j 

Ujr 

Ray 

M/ 

Uctroelc 

ML 
ICI 

HerrlMC 

Microtech 

miliary 

Military 

herd* 

Hard* 



Packard 
Packard 
Packard 
Packard 
Packard 



narda 
iuma 
PUrta 
Hardt 
Hard* 
Plardi 
Narda 
Narda 



70A 

70J0 

0/050 

07051 

07091 

UI520A 

24 16-20 

3*14-601 

4684-20C 

U51 
1152 
1153 
2000-6254 

2020- s&oo 

H-4B 

3Q23 

3025 

C*-A2l 

IT-A19 

S1MA 

M14A 

60IA07 

G&J1B 

K402A-3 

NH0-20 

4276-3 

G2S1A. 

H2B1A 

*2B1A 



HX292A 

3458 

6J47A 

KJ47A 

S347A 

K347A 

349ft 

35SC 

36QD 

G3B2A 

J382A 

P382A 

I38ZA 

4UA-210 

H42XA 

«42JA 

H424A 

477E 

G485A 

J4B5B 
JftflfiA 

H487B 

P487& 
1487 A 
148*8 



H532A 

J532A 

M532A 

P532A 

X532A 

538A 

GT520 

IT52A 

175K 

1752U 



7670 

7370 

G9108 

X9146 

2830A 

3503 

111 3 1A 

8435A 

W71A 

8472A 

8732A 

8H3A 

SOiOOB 

10855* 

J1660A 

U693A 

13510 

33001C 

J3I02A 

C?9~336fl2A 

3909BA 

JO- 0/4 320 

MM7B1 

7KIA 

792 1A1 

503* 

90LH26-1 

715- 1SZ 

ALN26A/ 

214972 

AT^68/UPH 

UG-52B/U 

70S 

792FK 

2361-20 

2301-30 

2366 

2863 

2864 

2979 

30QZ-I0 

3OOZ-20 

3003-10 

3003-30 

3004-10 



to 6Qiz 
to I2,4Gttz 
5 to 1GHz 6dB 



5 to LOHf 10* 
LOw 
lOw 
to UBfr 
to 50dB 
to 5048 
to 50dB 



3 95 to S.SSGc 
5.H5 to S.ZGc 
12.4 to 1B&C 



HlLHUHAVt: i&vaNim$ 

BoTse - Source - 

floue Source .1 to 2.6GHJ 

Noise Source 

Noise Source 7.05 to JOGH; 

Hon* Source 12.1 to IBGHj 

Vjt i«ble Attenuator 

Viable AUenultor 0-2048 

Variable Attenuator 0-6048 1 to 2wHf 

VtHlmlv Attenuator D-204B 3 to 49*2 

tarnble Attenuator 0-20dB 7 

Saacler Attenuator L to 20M* 

Sampler Attenuator 2 to 4GW* 

Sampler Attenuator 4 

Adapter X to SNA 8.2 

Directional Coupler 

Power DetecLor 

Directional po^r Detector 6&wfwd/15wr**/225-400im. 

Directional Power Detector 60wfwdr 1^^1)6- |SQk 

Coupler 

Crystal Detector 

Variable Attenuator D-50dB 2.6 to J, 95011* 

■-equentj Htter 3.95 to 11GHz 

Adapter 

Adapt*** 

Power Lie tec tor 

Directional Coupler 1 to a GHz ZGdB 

100:1 Divider IMC to 250HC 

tuimtt G to H 3.95 to 5.850c 

Adapter h to n 7.05 to 100c 

Adapter i to n 8.2 to 12.40c 

Adapter 10 to lS€c 

Adapter IS to 22fic 

Hoiw Source If W60tlc 

Moite Sowrce 3 95 to l.tSfir 

Hoise Somixo 7,05 to IDSc 

Hoiie Source 2.6 to 3- 950c 

Noise Source B.2 to 12.40c 

Noise 5Durct iOOMc to 40c 

friable Attenuator .5m DC to iGc 

Low Pas? Filter 4100Hc 

Variable Attenuator to 50dB 

Variable Attenuator to SOdB 

Variable Attenuator D to SOdB 

VirU&le Attenuator to 50e£ S.2 to I2-4Gc 

N tee For HI* 

Crystal Detector 7. 05 to lOGc 

CfysUl Detector 7.05 to tOGc Natciied Pair 

Crystal Detectot 7.05 to lOGt Hitched Pair 

Tnermiitar Mount For 430 Series lOHc to 100c 

Barretter Mount 1,9ft to 5,850c 

Detector Mourit 5.B5 to o>2Gc 

Thermistor Mount 5.85 to B*26c 

ThenBistor Mount 7,01 to IQGc 

THenrtitor Mount IB to ?Wc 

ThenrHtor Mount 12.4 to IBGc 

Thervtttor Mount 8.2 te I2.4fic 

Thermistor Mount S.2 to :Z.*Gc 

Frequency Meter- 3. 95 to 5.flS£c 

Frequency Meter 7.05 to lOGc 

Frequency Meter £.3 to H.20c 

frequency Meter ID to 150c 

Frequency Meter 12.4 to loGc 

Frequency Meter fi.2 to (2.46c 

Frequency Meter .94 to 4.20c 

Directional Coupler 2Qdfr 3.95 to 5.850* 

Directional Coupler 3dfl 8.2 to !2,«Gc 

Directional Coupler 10M 8.2 to 12,46c 

Directional Coupler 20dB B.Z to i2.*Cc 

Dual Directional Coupler .94 to 1.9750c 20dfl 

Dual Directional Cooler 1 9 to *Gc MdB 

01rection#l Detector 1.9 to 4.]Qc 

Termination 3.95 to 5.850c 

Moving Load S.2 to LZ.46c 

Sensor Oscillator 

Microwave Switch 500mc to 12.4f*c SP5T 

Bandpass Filter 1 to 40c 

8andoass Filter 8 to 12 *Gc 

KF Detector 

Crystal Detector .01 to 180c 

Pin Modulator 1,6 to 4,50c EOafi 

Pin Modulator J. 7 to fl.JGc ISdB 

Termination 50 ohms 

Preamp- ? to IJOGWc 

Tr 1c JHno One n tor Shunt 

Lfarfttr 

Tr'anaistor leit Jio 

Pin ftb&orptlvp Modulator 

Microwave Switch IDOMc to 1SGH4 

Microwave Switch DC to 180c 5PW 

Microwave Switch 

to I0ld8 Variable Attenuator DC to lfic 

Mofse Source 

Noise Source 10 to 9 QQMc 

Noise Source 10 to lOOONc 

Tube Mtg,/ Attenuator and 2K25 

X Band Load 

Directional Coupler 4 to BGc 20db (Narda 3044BZ0) 

801152 Variable Attenuator 

Microwave Switch 

Horn Antenna B.S to 9.60t 

5dB Attenuator 

Variable Attenuator Q to 4041 

rariab]e Attenuator 2 te 2.50c to l7dfi win, 

2.5 to 12.46c to 2048 win. 

Directional Coupler 2 to *Oc ZOdB 

Directional Coupler I to *Oc 30d8 

Variable Directional Coupler 1.2 to 1.40c 7 to I2d8 



Bidirectional Coupler 4 to BGc 20dB 
Directional Coupler .95 to 20c 10dB 
Directional Coupler + 95 to 20c 20dB 
Directional Coupler 2 to 40c 108B 
Olrectlonal Coupler 2 to *fic 30dB 
Oirectlonal Coupler 4 to 100c lOdi 



00 

00 



1 100 00 

100,00 

100. 00 

150.00 

?00.00 

100.00 

50.00 

50,00 

75.00 

75.00 

200.00 

200 00 

200.00 

75.00 

75.00 

75.00 

50.00 

10.00 

35.00 

35,00 

450.00 

450.00 

35.00 

35.00 

100,00 

75,00 

35,00 

50. OD 

IS 

35 

?5 

75-00 

200.00 

250,00 

250.00 

325.00 

250.00 

200.00 

150.00 

50.00 

500.00 

500.00 

350.00 

325.00 

35.00 

50.00 

200.00 

400.00 

75,00 

85. DO 
ISO. 00 

50.00 
135.^ 
155.00 

65,00 
.00 
.00 
500.00 
400,00 
500.00 
400.00 
350.00 
600.00 
200.00 
200.00 
200.00 
200.00 

50,00 

50.00 
200.00 

75.00 
100. 00 

50.00 
100. oo 
200.00 
200,00 

75,00 
100.00 
400.00 
350.00 

2500 
200.00 

50.00 
300,00 
150,00 
200,00 
100,00 

75.00 

100.00 

100. 00 

250.00 

200.00 

250 00 

50. DO 

50.00 

100,00 

75.00 

50 00 

25.00 

35.00 

10O. 00 

250-00 

100.00 

100. DO 

90.00 



100.00 
100.00 
100,00 
100.00 
100,00 
100.00 



73 Magazine ■ December, 1981 213 



a 



TEST EQUIPMENT" 






Z02J 


TEST EQWPHEKT 




450.00 


Kirda 


MICROWAVE COMPOKtNTS 
3004-20 Directional Coupler 4 to lOGc 20di 






Boon ton 


JW FH Signal fieneriLor 195 to 2?0MHi 


100,00 


Boonton 


2OZJ/20TH 


AH FM SlgnaJ Generator and Unlwerter 






Hirdi 


3032 


Hybrid .95 to 20c 3dB 




150,00 






LOOKHi to 55Mc and 195 to 270Hc 




600.00 


Naroa 


J033 


Hybrid 2 to 4Gc 3dB 




150.00 


CMC 


931 


Heterodyne Converter 200 to l200*t 




200.00 


PHrda 


3039-20 


Directional Coupler 125 to ZSONc 2006 




150.00 


QftSftpHI 


MCM5 


Hani tor 




750.00 


iarda 


3040-20 


Direct tonal Coupler 240 to SOOPat 20dB 




175.00 


Alfred 


aooo/?05i 


Sweep Hpetworft Analyzer LOOehj to 40Gc 




800.00 


Htrda 


3043-20 


Olrectional Coupler 2 to 40c 7041 




100,00 


RofHTS 


MSG-22S2* 


Standard Signal Generator For 01 




210.00 


iarda 


1044-20 


Directional Coupler a to 86c 20dt 




100.00 


Oertscti 


FrO 


frequency Meter 20 to lOOOMc 




150,00 


Naroa 


30U8Z0 


Directional Coupler 3.7 to S.JGc 20O8 




150,00 


Syjtnon Dormer 


1037/ 129 1A 


Frequency meter to 5Wt with P1<*o Jn 


to SOGPte 


500.00 


Kama 


3O45C30 


Directional Coupler 7 to 12.40c 30oB 




125,00 


Slnoer 


SPA3/25A 


Spectrum Analyier lite to 25Me and * G-6 Cimpanion 




Karda 


4035 


Hybrid 3d| 




150.00 






Sweep Generator tn ISHt and PS- 3 9 Power Supply 


1500,00 


Narda 


22006/ 


3043-20 Directional Coupler U to 4Gc 


2048 


100. 00 


Measurements 


in 


Standard Signal Gen era tar 7hHi to 35Mc 




250.00 


Narda 


22007/ 


3043-30 Directional Coupler 1.7 to 4Gc 


1MB 


100.00 


Measurement* 


uo 


Standard Deviation Meter 25 to lOOOMc 




200.00 


Hardi 


22011/ 


3003- 10 Directional Coupler I to 4&C 1MB 


100.00 


Polar ad 


MSI- 2 


Signal Generator 2150 to 4«O0Mc 




500.00 


Narda 


22012/ 


3003- 30 Directional Coupler 2 to 40c 3048 


100.00 


E.H. 


S74 


Microwave Swept Oscillator 8 to 12. 40c 




?50.00 


Narda 


22377 


Adapter I to M 8,2 to I2.4GC 




35.00 


HjJfrttfltO 


no; 


Tiwe Interval Plug In 




50,00 


mr** 


22538/ 


4014-10 Directional Couple*" 1-05 to BGc 


1048 


7500 


HJlttarj 


T5-1011/ 


UPMB4 5pectruB Mal/ier lOMt to *0Gc wi 


itn 




Narda 


27539/ 


4015CIC Directional Couoler 7,4 to 12Sc 


1044 


05,00 






LUcli Filter F3 35/7 33&/F337/f 338/ F34l/H«fl 




Narda 


22540A7 


4O13C10 Olrectional Cowfller 2 t* 45c ION 


75,00 






Attenuator CA411/CM10/QI409 ffw) lEarjh Adapter 




Narda 


22574 


Directional Coupler 2 to 4Gc lOdft 




100.00 






UG 1 239/UG 1 240/0* 1 24 1 /i*l 242 




1000.00 


Narda 


mm 


Directional Coupler IS. 6 to l?.3Gc 




12$,00 


General Radio 


so&c 


Standard Signal Generator lfttc lo SOMc 




300.00 


Narda 


22875/ 


4014C6 Directional Coupler 3.85 to ftk 


648 


100,00 


Hewlett Patfcird 


2JOA 


Power Amplifier 10 tn SQQrk 4,!iwatts 




100.00 


Narda 


23105/ 


4015C3O Directional Coupler 7 to l2.*Gc 


30dB 


100,00 


Hewlett Packard 


2308 


Power Amplifier 30 to SOOMc 4, Swatts 




800.00 


Normal 


14064-30 


Directional Coupler 6 to lOGc 30dB 




75,00 


Hewlett Packard 


240A 


Sweee Generator 4.5 to IZOMc 




400.00 


PRO 


C101 


Variable Attenuator 5.B5 to £,2Sc to 


60dB 


350.00 


Hewlett Pjciara 


HOC 


um U JOOMKz 




400.00, 


PND 


0101 


Variable Attenuator 12.4 to 180c to 60dB 


300.00 


Hewlett Packard 


4150 


SW Meter 




?50.00 


PNO 


205A 


Slotted Line with Probe 4 to lOGc 




100.00 


Hewlett PtcUrt 


43 LB 


Power Meter lOMc to 406c 




150.00 


PfS 


MM 


Frequent j Meter 8.2 to lOGc 




125.00 


Hewlett Fectae* 


606A 


Signal Generator SODtz to 65He 




BOO, 00 


PW 


U4I« 


«P TwiU li to It.Swc 




50,00 


Hewlett Picaerd 


con 


Signal Generator 10 to 42uHc 




•oooo 


PAD 


5815 


hravewter 7 to 10,60c 




75,00 


Hewlett Packard 


tost 


Signal Generator 10 to ASOfk 




500.00 


MB 


N6001 


CrySUl Switch 




50.00 


Hewlett Packard 


W8E 


Signal Generator 10 to 4B0Pk: 




1500.00 


PRO 


mm 


Themiitor Mount 8.2 to 12.4Gc 




125,00 


Hrwlett Packard 


50BF 


Signal Generator 10 to 455«c 




1500.00 


Ouantatron 


SIM 


Rodustub Tuner 




50.00 


Hewlett Pat Lard 


612A 


Signal Generator 450 to l?JOMc 




SOD. 00 


RLC 


A* 26 IOC 


Variable Attenuator 




50.00 


Hewlett Packard 


6144 


Signal Generator 900 to ZlOOMc 




^00.00 


Radar De&lgn 


01536 


Directional Coupler 




75.00 


Hewlett Packard 


ft&i 


Signal Generator IB to 4,2Gc 




400.00 


Sage 


rsa-i 


Coupler 




25.00 


Hewlett Pic* era 


M&6 


Signal Generator l.S to 4.20c 




500.00 


5age 


2503 


M1*er 




25.00 


Hewlett PjcKint 


M8A 


Signal Generator 3.8 to ?,6Gc 




400,00 


Sage 


775J.I 


Directional Coupler 4 to 50c 341 




50.00 


Hewlett Packard 


6108 


Signal Generator 3,8 to 7.6€c 




500,00 


Sperry NlCrOllfte 


12ft) 


Frequencj Meter 5. 84 to 8.20c 




700.00 


Hewlett Pack an* 


*20* 


Sifrial iwnrmr r to ltGc 




400. 00 


Stoddart 


40515 


1048 Atte* **• 




35.00 


Hewlett Packard 


6238 


Test Set S92S to TTSflPJc 




500.00 


Syitron Donoer 


PB1313A 


Tumble Detector 18 to 2«50c 




200.00 


Hewlett p itkard 


*I6A 


Signal Generator 10 to ISGc 




2000.00 


Tektronti 


SI 


Saeaplino Head 




Call 


Hewlett Packard 


628A 


Signal Generator is to 21Gc 




2500.00 


t ekl ron 1 i 


52 


Sampling Head 




Call 


Hewlett Packard 


940A 


Frequency Ooubler 26.5 to 40Gc 




1000.00 


Tettroni r 


S5D 


Pulie Generator Head 




Call 


Hewlett Packard 


3!j50A 


Portable Test Set 




3 000.00 


Tektron^ 


B170A 


170 ohm Variable Attenuator 




SO. DO 


Hewlett Pickird 


52451. 


Frequency Counter to SOMc 




1000. DO 


Telonlc 


T8P417-34- 


5CD2 Bandpass Filter 




15.00 


Hewlett Packard 


525JA 


Plug If For above 20 to lOOHc 




100-00 


Teucan 


51TF250-50O 


-3AA Tunablr fiandpaii Filter 250 to SOOMc 


250.00 


Hewlett Packard 


52 52 A 


Mug ]r> For above 100 to 350*c 




200.00 


Transco 


flfC70!DO 


SPOT Switch 




25.00 


Hewlett Packard 


52538 


Plug in For above SO to SoOUc 




350.00 


Uateltne 


■01 


Adapter i to TME 8.2 to 12.40c 




35.00 


Hewlett ?acurd 


5254B 


Plug In For above 20CMc to 3Gc 




750.00 


Uivellne 


9009-10 


Directional Coupler a to lOGc lOdtl 




100*00 


Hewlett Packard 


52&QA 


Frequerxy Divider to l2.*&c For above 




1000*00 


wave tea 


5O70 


to 7008 variable Attenuator 




75.00 


Hewlett Packard 


S26ZA 


Plug In For above Ttawj Entervat 




3 00.00 


Urinschel Cng, 


me 


#10 to bOot Vairable Attenuator 




5000 


Hewlett Packard 


53278 


DW and Frequency Meter to 550Mc 




i 500.00 


Microwave [qulpmem 

Hanufacture 

PKD 

Mewtett Packard 
Hewlett Packard 
Hewlett Pfcfcaro 


Model 








Hewlett Packard 
Ttktroirii 


DY5fi3fi 
491 


tt Band Genera tor /Test Set 7.1 to 8,50c 
Spectrum Analyzer Solid State lOMc to 


iOGc- 


100000 
70OOOO 


Description 




Price 


Micro Tel WSH903 Microwave Receiver to 40Gc Diqltal Readout 

Tektronl* 1908 Signal Genera tor JSWlz to 5QHc 

Telonic ZOO} Sweep/Signal Generator Systewi 

J305 5 to 1500MC Auiopie*^^3n 1 to 2000* Yjrufrle Marker, 3340 RFVOutyul 

Attenuator SO oftna>HSO ff Detector ,3360* Kite Modulation. 337001 iplay Frcoetstng. 


9000.00 
150.00 

1000.00 


3302L/U06A Standing wave Detector and Hatched Load 
805A Slotted Line SOOMHz to 4Qil 
805C Slotted Line SOOMHi to 4Gmj 
8091 with 8068 Slotted Line 3 to J?GHl/S81ul Slotted 
Lin* 3,95 to $.S56Hi/J*lOI Slotted tl"* 


5250.00 

200.00 
400,00 


Ttltimic 2003 Sweep/Signal Generator System 

3303 5 to 5O0MC Sweep* 1323 1 to ZOOOHe Variable Marker ,3343 RF /Output 


SO onm»3M0 






5,15 to 8.2GHj/u3lOfi Slotted tin* 6.2 to 
12.4GHZ/F8106 Slotted Line 12.4 lo 180HZ/ 
X281A A H281A Adapter/HX29?B Tapered 




RF Output/ Attenuator SO ohms, 3 350 fif Detector, 33&QA fcate MDdw1at!on,337Q Display 








Trin«ition/444A Probe 2.6 to l&GHz/ind a 




Process 1n$ k 








7&0.0O 






447B Probe/HtilOB Slotted Line 7 


OS to 10,5 


900.00 



Hewlett Packard 



8098 with 0068 Slotted Line 3 to L2GHZ/H8108 

Slotted Line 7,05 to I Q. SOU/ IS! 06 Slotted 

line 6.7 to )2.4tiHz/HX2?2E Tapered Transit lor. 

H to I/K281A I JttBlA/viin Probe. 444 ft 550.00 



cfM^Hz 



elecfroqic^ 



Toll Free Number 
800-528-0180 
(For orders only) 



(602) 242-8916 

2111W.Camelback 
Phoenix, Arizona 850 1 5 



*^4e 



214 73 Magazine • December, 1981 








rtiFkn*F 
iftwr Aid* 



2 For 1 Clock Sale 

UOStiMl I* 2 Fat t t,-fj«*ii 



iT^'^MiJiw *"* Clock Part With A Prafta "T 1 Ll DMA' 




'LjunM*Miiku»*ler«LEI)~»-l>atji Book* 




T7> H A|^* 



n 



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■^1 ITRI 



«!" WT4P DG«T* OC *f» M *f - Z"Z- Wlr Wt lit WO *f 

IIMTFCRATED CIRCUITS TT* A5 INSTRUMf Nt$ TtMtHM^RATUftE 

I.C. SOCKETS I PROG»AMMA8Lf«O0UL£ 



4* Hm frier Ihffrrrmrr IftBJ "t^WH 



. i * , « -» -» ^ i 1 1 1 " KA«m« vmuihd to nift* 

M A 1 U J 7 C I O l S« FAUAHMK EUCTIDtt TIC < 1MCITMI r *t*rtrtim. 




t -%**!& t* ofp<T Atot ■— m wrt thy 0>q> »>j mm te c tfJifcu Bj il lor g iwmw »MM*t tfwn rW »e naf Avtaimatefln N*tniiFgja» '^ HANDLING CHARGES VOLUME DISCOUNT 

» W»itaw^ »*» port «g«*«' *fr»* •»rr.<* a ^flvrordr- U*>l p» *f rht *v *•**• and app^T *t» fipprop*>«ff-»' I i wifctsW vto fNr >«• *«(**f*ekl* it«n rbensdri u fl.OO-t *.W 1M UDO ^ D.O0-* "J?.** Ntf 

rh» i.arvtiiHij (marge Tf> par oil 1 %*iiopmc. flod ifiwtnr fo oo*«»i m rhv U * 1 f Ofl Od tf flrtj Mf«tp wfrfci trmtk w HH i W f <*iw ottpnvan.P'. grUw f ifl 00^2300 A d-d *C 75 a l»MiH».W L#»» TO"'. 

WHIN QIM1IND IT MONI. CALI I 106 lit JU4 {»»_> 1... M., «« HI ill MJI|i tf m*A itM iw "H* f« DICI III. Hi.h«*t !3 Sarin. fWfl *J*i* Fifli M* itrgl i 3VC0 ug ?fl idtflO SO* J5O.O0 H«.M Lettll*. 

tssj tut p4f 6? tMfc nw»r Oi«*r MaiIi* Chflffli VLUw CO D D/GfKE V GUARANTEE; A^ o*n or prnduCU f««N»H* frmflTJ,gi k^ thai [Kn»* Tn &frf#riKf»« will vr * -l*%a «9.W Add 10.25 * _ JSS'SS "iTT*" "*' i^« ??-' 

fd 4jr Founded ■( rf^rnrrf •il'h.h flfl d^v frpin rr«eipl wilh i\ LH^f tit yinrf in*fli*i» Pncn •■■ I :Hlitf>VI wllPWuh ntMXe , *100.00 A, Up No Charge *11AJU.UU & Up leH ■" ; 



**See List of Advertisers on page 162 



73 Magazine • December, 1981 215 




FULL LINE ALL PARTS & COMPUTER PRODUCTS 



P.O. Box 4430M 
Santa Clara, CA 95054 

Will calls: 2322 Walsh Ave. 

(408) 988-1640 

Sim* day iftlpmtnt First ime parts only. Factory tested Guaranteed 
money back Quality IC's and other components at factory pnces 

INTEGRATED CIRCUITS Phone orders only (BOO) 538-8196 



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4116 200nj Dynamic RAM 
8*16.95 



ELECTRONIC SYSTEM KITS 

Apple Piripftf m Nits 

SERIAL 1 fKTEFIFACE id 30.000 baud 
Tft Input A o-jtpiit from monrtof or basic, or 
use Apple as mieJIiaenl lemnnai. Bd only (P N 2) 
$1*96, KJI iPN 2A) 151.25, Assembled (P'N 
20 $62.95, 

i WTOTYPInG BOAflQ (P/N W7] Hi ,16 
PARALLEL TRIAC 0UTPLJT BOARD fl tfiacs. 
etch can switch 1 10V. 6A loads. Bd onry [P-U 
2101 Stl^O, Kit {P/N 210AJ $119.56. 
OFT^fSOLATED INPUT BOAflO 8 mptrts. cart 
be driven from TTL «agic. Bd only IP-N 120) 
S15.65. Kit IPH 120A) SC9.95. 

Inlirlica KUt 

SERIAL PARALLEL INTERFACE Bidifsctional. 
Baud rales from 110 to 19.2K, sw selectable 
polarity of inpul and output strobe, S to B data 
oils, 1 Of 2 stop bits, parity odd or even or none, 
all characters contain a start bii. » 5 & —12V 
required 3d only (PN 101) I1lJ6 t M (P/N 
10lA|S42.ti. 

RS-232 J TTL INTERFACE BidireclionaL ft- 
qwres -12V. Kit iPN 232A) 11.19. 
RS-23220mA JNTfRFACE Bidirecnonal. 2 
passive opto-isotated okm. Kit (P N 7901 Ai 

mm 

BS-afi/TTY INTERFACE BitfiFeaional ZafifiH 
circuits, (P/N fiOOA) W-«, 

Suppllfli 

VERBATIM DISKETTES 

129.95, fl J ' |39 95 

FLOPPY DISK JACKETS Fits 3 ring binder. 5V*" 

tioWs2. 3 holds 1, Breach 



Oataliffl box of 10. 



5V 4 " 



PROM Eraser 

Wl erase 25 PflOWs in IS minutes Lirtravio*«, 
assembled 25 PftOM capacity 1 37.50 (wrtri 
timer S69.50V 6 PROM capacity 0SHA. UL vw- 
sion S7|,50 {wrth timer Si 01.50; 

Z80 Microcomputer 

16 bit 1/0, 2 MH2 clock. 2K RAM. ROM Bread- 
board space. Excellent for control. Bare Board 
120,50. Full Kit $99.00 Monitor 120.00. Power 
Supply Kit $35,00. Tiny Basic 130 00 

Modem Kit $60.00 

Stale of trie art. ong.. answer No tuning neces- 
sary 103 compatible 300 baud Inexpensive 
acoustic coupler plans included. Bd only 
$i 7.00 Ancle <n June flato Eieetrwm 

NiCad Battery Fixer Charger Kit 

Opens shorted cells that won't nolo a charge and 
then charges them dp, all In one kit wlull parts 
and instructions. 19.95 

60 Hz Crystal Time Bate Kit $4,40 

Converts dwjrtal docte from AC tine frequency to 
crystal time base QutsSandmo accuracy 

Video Modulator Kit 59.95 

Convert TV Mt into a fi»gh quality monitor wo 
itftctrnfi usage. Comp. lot wluil rnslruc. 

MuNi-volt Computer Power Supply 

Bv 5 amp. ±18v .5 amp, 5v 1,5 amp. -5v 
5 amp, 12v 5 amp, — 12v option, *5v, * 12v 
are regulated Basic Kit $35.95, Kit with chassis 
and all hardware $51 .95. Add S5 0Q shipping Kn 
Of hardware $16 00, Woodgram case $1000. 
$1 50 Shipping 







tUllBJy 



f/iHf 



RCA Cosmac 1802 Super Elf Computer 5106,95 

Tne Super Etf is a small smgte rjoard computer that for PC cards and a 50 pin connector slot for the 
does many Mo. trttngs Its an exceflent computer Quesi Super Expansion Board Power supply and 
for trartng and try teanwiq pro<yamm» no with as sockets tof aO IC's are trvJuded plus i aetata! 
machine tsnojuage and yel it's easily expanded 127 pg foliucbon manual wtiicn now tnduoes 
wnfi addittanal memory Full Basic, ASCII over 4C pos. of software uta. incijding a senes of 
Keytioards, video cterader g e a xiu ofi. etc. lessons to heip get you started and a muse pro- 
ROM montior State and Wode displays, Smote O™" 1 ^ O^phics taroet game Many schools 
step, Optional address displays: Power Supply; "* tinrversitjas are using me Super f as I 



Audio Amplifier and Speaker, M\v socketed for alt 
IC's: Full documentation 

The Super EH induces a ROM monitor for pro- 
gnm loading, editing and execution wim SINGLE 
STEP tor program d et w QQ>nq wnch rs not n> 
cWed *i others at me same price W<ffi SiHOlf 
ST? you can see the microprocessor crap oper- 
aong with i» aipn Onat address and data pus 
displays batav* bb1b| and ribr oecuting in- 
structions Also, CPU mode and iistrudion cycte 5&J00 l "*^*lf ffl ^^EP*L t5 ^ 1 at ! l * tCwl 



course of study OEMs use it for training and 
R&D 

Remember, other computers onry otter Super Ell 
features at additional cost Or not ai ail Compare 
before you buy Super Efl Kit $106 95. High 
address option M 95. Low address option 
$9.96 Cuiiom Catirwt with dnded and labeled 
ptaiotass front panel $24 95, AI mem Expansion 
Cat&net pav^d and sft screened, with room for 



Battery Memory Saver Krl W.96. All kits and 
options also completely assembled and lested. 

Quesldata, a software publication for 1802 com- 
puter users is available by subscription (or S12 00 
per 12 issues. Single issues $1 50 issues 1 -12 
bound S16 50. 



are decoded and displayed on B LED indicators 

An RCA 1361 tfdeo graphics chip allows you to 

conned to your own TV with an i nexp«nsiw! wtien 

modulator to do graphics and games There is a 

speaker system included lor writing your own 

music or usmg many music p^og/ams already 

Brtttn TriespeatoampW»Kfnayatsobeusedto Moews Video Graphcs S3.50. Games and Muse 

dnve relays tor cortrol purposes. $3, 00. Che 8 Nopreter $5-50, Starstip 4K cas- 

A24>^Ha^eyt0^rt^X4^^16^«^ gyspl^s setfefU.95. 

load, reset, run. wail, input, memory protect. 

monitor select and single step Large, on board Crap Id nanp hrnrhiirP 

di&piav& provide oilpui and optional Mgpi and taw r / ee '* r d U® DHJCnure 

adores* There rs a 44 pm standard connector slot 0l Complete Super El! System. 

Super Expansion Board with Cassette Interface $89,95 

This is irury an astounding value? This board has gram bugs quickly then follow with single step it 

been designed to allow you to decide now you you haw tne Super Upauion Board am Saav 

want i optioned Tne Super Expansion Beard Wanaar the monery >s up and running at tne push 

comes wMi 4K el low power RAM My adOress- of a but^n 

aba arywri ere n -64K wrtti i r*B Vin mamgry pro- cxher on board options route PWanit aaW aW 

Outaal Ports with luM twaajaaai Tneyataweasy 



toenmade lor all other options cm the same board 
and n fns neatly mlo the na rdwood cabinet 
alongside the Super Eh The board includes slots 
for up to 6K ot EPROM (2708, 2758, 2716 or J\ 
2716) and is fully socketed, EPROM can be used 
for (tie monitor and Tiny Baste or other purposes 

A 1K Super ROW Monitor S \ a 95 S avatoOie as an 
on board optjon in 2706 EPROM wtucti has been 



connection of an ASCII keyboard Id me input port 
RS 232 end 20 ma Current Loop tot teletype or 
'ii I'M device are on board and if you need more 
memory there are two S- 100 s3ots for static RAM 
or video boards Also a 1K Super Monitor version 
2 with video drwr for fuK capability display with 
Tiny Base and a video nteriace boam Parallel 
I Ports 59 85. RS 232 $4.50, TT> 20 ma I F 



p ie pi oqr anvr ied wirjt a program ioader edfey and $1,9S. S-100 $4.50. h 50 pai conned pr tat wJh 

error checking mutti He cassette read *me ribbon cable e avatabte at $15 25 for easy con- 

sottware, (rekxataOte cassette fie) another exdu- necbon between tr» $aaw W and me 8apar 

sws from Quest it includes register save and Eiaanaaa tart. 

readout, bloc* move capaWir, and vrteo graphics p^ s^^ m (or ^ cgn^g ^^ {m 

dnver with Hinting cursor Break points can be Mulli-volt Power Supply below) 
used with the register save feature to isolate pro- 



Quest Super Basic V5.0 
A new enhanced version of Super flastc now 
available Quest was the first company worldwide 
to stop a full see Base for 1803 Systems. A 
complete function Super Basic by Haa Ceakar 
mduding floating point capabity wrth soentitic 
notation {number range s 17E"). 32 bit mteoer 
-2 billion, mufti ^im arrays, stririg arrays; siring 



manipulation; cassette 1/0: save and load, basic, 

data and machine language programs; and over 

75 statements, functions and operations 

Mew improved taster version mctud re- 

Bwaaar and essentiaay aaWaBBi 

Also, m exclusive user expandable command 

library 

5cnal and Parallel i routines included 

Super Batrt on Cassette $55.00. 



1802 16K Dynamic RAM Kit $149.00 
BoandaoJe lo WK Hidden refresh W'docta up to 
A MH? mm wait States MeM 16K RAM $25.00, 
S-100 4-ttat BBasslon S 9.95 

Super MaaaarVl J Source lifting $15.00 



Super Color S-100 Video Kll $129.95 

Expandable to 256 x 192 high resolution color 
graphics 6847 with ail display modes computer 
controHed Memory mapped. IK RAM expand- 
able to M S-100 bus 1807. 8080, 8085. Z8C, 
etc Dealers Send kit ercellent pridnf/ 



Type*N-Talk by Votrax 

Text lo speech synthesizer with unlim- 
ited vocabulary, built-in text to speech 
algorithm, 70 to 100 bits per second 
speech synthesizer, RS232C Interlace 
$36900. 



81 IC Update Master Manual 559,95 



Ell II Adapter Kit $24.95 

Plugs into Elf II providing Super Elf 44 and 50 pin 
plus S-100 bus expansion. (With Super Ex- 
pansion} High and low address displays stale 
and mode LED's optional SIB 00, 



TERMS: $5 00 rntn order US Funds. Calif residents add 6°* tat. 

SID 00 min VISA and MasterCard accepted. Si Q0 insurance optional. 
Shipping: Add 5%; orders under $25.00—10%* 



FREE: Send for your copy ot our NEW 1981 
QUEST CATALOG. Include 88c stamp 



216 73 Magazine • December, 1981 



RAMSEY 
ELECTRONICS 
■'62 inc. 



PARTS WAREHOUSE 



We now have available a bunch of goodies too 
good to bypass Hems are limited $o ordpf toririy 



2575 Barrd Rd. 
Penfield, NY 14526 

716-506-3950 



MINI KITS - YOU HAVE SEEN THESE BEFORE NOW 

HERE ARE OLD FAVORITE AND NEW ONES TOO. 

GREAT FOR THAT AFTERNOON HOBBY. 



FM 

MINI 
MIKE 




A super high performance FM wire- 
less mike tail' TranamMs a stable 
ngnai up to 3QQ yards wrth excep 
horn I audio quality by means of its 
built m elecirei mike KM includes 
case mike, on-oft twitch antenna 
Penary and super instruct tons. This 
ti i he fittest unit available 

f MO Kit S14 95 

FM-3 Wired and Tesied if 05 



Color Organ 



music come 
ahve 1 3 different 
lights f ticker with 
music, One fight 
each for, high, 
mid-range and 
lows Each mdi- 
vidualiy adjust- 
able and drives up 
to 300 W funs on 
110 VAC 

Complete k*\ 
ML-1 
W 95 



VMM UodulaiO* MM 
Convavta any TV to nd» momlo* Super 
stable funab** awv eft a-& Runt on 5- 
iSV acc*pH iw vKfcononai Stir urn* on 
the market' Comfj+ele hii vD i S7.0S 



Lad Bllnfey Kit 
A great altenHon get- 
ter which alternately 
flashes 2 jumbo LEDs 
Use for name badges 
buttons warning 
panel lights, anything' 
Runs on 3 to IS volts 
Complete kit BL-1 
ttJt 




Super Staulh 
A super se n s i It ve a m pi i - 
fier which win pick up a 
pin drop at 15 leet' Great 
for monitoring baby's 
room or as general pur- 
pose amplifier Furl 2 W 
rms output, runs on 6 to 
15 volte uses B-45 ohm 
speaker 
Complete kit BN-9 

IS 95 




CPO-1 

Runs on 3-12 Vdc 1 wall out. 1 KHZ oood for CPO 

Alarm Audio Oaeii later Complete kit 12,9* 



Call Your Phone Order in Today 
TERMS: Satisfaction guaranteed or money 
refunded COD- add $3.00 Minimum nrder 
£6.00 ■ j sundeiSlDG0add$1.5rj Add 5 
tot postage i insurance, Handling. Overs I 
add 15 esidentsadd "i» 



CLOCK KITS 

Your old lavon1« ere ban again. Over 7,000 Sold to Data, 
Be on* of ihe gang and order yo-ura today 1 

Try your hand at building the finest looking clock on the 
market. Us satin finish anodized aluminum case tooks great 
anywhere, while six A" LED digits provide a highly readable 
display This Is a complete kit, no extras needed, and it only 
takes 1-2 hours to assemble Your choice of case colors 
silver, gold, black (specify) 

Clock kit. 12/24 hour DC-5 $24.95 

Clock with 10 mm ID limer. 12/24 hour. DC-T0 S29,*5 

Alarm clock, 12 hour only. DOS $23.95 

1 2V DC car clock, DC-7 $29,95 

For wired and tested clocks add $10 00 to kit price 
SPECIFY 12 OR 24 HOUR FORMAT 




FM Wlrelemt Mike Kit 

Transmits up to 300' lo 
any FM broadcast ra- 
dio uses any lype of 
mike Runs on 3 to 9V Type FM 2 
has added sens* live mike pre amp 
stage 

FM i kit tt.» FM ? kit U 0$ 



Whriper Lighl Kit 

An jnteresling kit, small mike 
picks up sounds and converts 
them to light The louder the 
sound the brighter the light 
Includes mtke. controls up lo 
300 W. runs on 110 VAC 
Complete kit. WL-i 
16.95 



-M 



Toot Decode* 

A complete tone deco- 
der on a single PC 
board Features 400 
5000 H? adjustable 
range via 3D turn pot. voltage regu- 
lation 567 IC Useful tor louch- 
tone burst detection. FSK etc 
Can also be used as a stable tone 
encoder flung on 5 to 12 wo 11 5 
Complete kit TO-1 £5 95 



Car Clock 

The UN- KIT. only 5 aoldar connection! 



Hera's a mpcr toeing, rugged and accural* anin cipch which i» a $nap to build and 
install ClDck move men i u completely Assembled — you only aoldar 3 wr&s and 2 
iwitxhei lakes aboui IS minutes' Display ft hn^hi green with automatic bngrnneii 
coniroi photocell — aaauiea you of a highly readable display day a* night Comei in a 
ulm lintan j nod 1 red aluminum case which can be aitach#d 5 diluent **vs uimg 2 noed 
rape Choice of felvei o'acN 0* goW cam <m>*c''*' 



DC 3 ail 12 hHMH lorinel 
DC 3 +r>**c arm ie»ted 



12* ts 

12**4 



UnHjeraa* Timer K.i 

Provide* me banc pa Ms and PC 
board required to provide a source 
oi precision liming and pulse 
generation Usee 555 timer IC and 
includes a range of parts for most 
liming needs 

UT-S Kil SS 95 



Mad Blaster Kit 

Produce* LOUD ear shattering and 
attention getting siren like sound 
Can supply up to 15 watts of 
obnoxious audio Runs on (MS VDC 



Siren Ktt 

Produces upward and downward 

wait characteristic of a police 

siren 5 w peak audio output runs 

on 3-15 volts, uses 3-45 ohm 

speaker 

Complete kit. SM-3 $2.95 



Calendar Alarm Cioc k. 
The clock thal's got it all 6-5" LEDs 
\2>2* hour snooze 2* hour alarm 4 
year calendar battery backup, and 
lots more The super 7001 chip is 
used Si*e 5x4x2 inches Complete 
kit, less case (not available } 
DC-9 *3495 



Wider Dam Car clock 

1 1 ?* four dorm ■* a h«MM p*»lftc uw J 
§ m<*-00 «£0 1605 *!•&*■ accuriry i QQl^i 
1 *■'» Hooigp fr*QH+ b w ifcj with igni(ion 
tufwr <ntlruclrfKtf Opi'Oiai d^mmff vluQfniilrffl'hr 
^dfusr* ditcitay to irnbumi light (e«el 
DC M tliK* win m1g braeum t^; « mi 

dM i d<mmei an»pt*f ItM 

a*J tio« Mir and t«i 



MB-1 Krt 



S4 9E. 



*0 M* Time Bau 
eum i>n S< IS VOC Low currpni i? Snui i 

re ?*ty st.H 



PARTS PARADE 



Video Terminal 

* L ompJH»ty w»1i-con|»in«3 Il«"d Hoie v-fleo I»**"'HikI i **i3 fl^auifPl Ciril^ ifi ASCII i-B>BO»rfl*rm T V 

mpi io r>»com^ t cow* p*et a iawwtna< %im* Fr*n>ir%*tt %m&*iv tuftpti, Hal tonitoMefl*ync tno baud 
mm i!d laOOi compvit (Mttpmar and fteyfrwc tontro e* ruiw !>><i r *f»ch co«iftf n 
*«epn Tut a t m nm «*,i ASCw pi^ pajjyiri My&w* input Thea«ii<«a4c«w bpiii 

RE tiif *»m«Tai eve ># >«M MO 00 *» mtf nMI) 



* * 



nr 



#.* 



lift** 

ion 

11iH 

it a* 



IC SPECIALS 



LINEAR 



301 
380 

MS 

7*1 

i*sa 

39O0 

aoaa 



«a> 



(35 

II SO 

I 44 

II 00 
1100 

ttoa 

HUM 

* M 

I SO 

Pt» 

12 95 



4f>11 
4Q13 
4046 

4049 



CMOS 



*0 



4t 

4518 
56» 



50 

.50 

*185 

,50 

moo 

$2.00 
$135 
S175 



READOUTS 

FftOHe rCC ti tO 

FNO»?"ST0 S C A T« 

MAN t ItHPTHQ JJ"C * 1 rjg 

HP7B41 4HCA 20a 



TRANSISTORS 

mm* hph c*f iiviiat 

C*r isvuat 

C-r * * ■! 1 aa 
?t*M «o ItFAj c- f in « 

saaattarcT'C'F a/itta 

MaKMaPQ* in x 

3»«aoot S*# * *i ** 

Jttjrr» m*H &Kon IT M 

jM4lTlU»**alHi* him 

fg.fi T*ft Ntm Aow Iffl « 
ntflW ?■» P**P 4QW l-l H 

MM lO*,-J«MM |.M 

NPN WW Type T*« Wia M 

PNP IHt TyiM T-R 90/12 M 
7M30JS 1*0 

2MM4*UJT 1414* 



TTL 



7 4S00 

7447 

7475 

7490 

74196 



$40 
$ .65 
$50 

S EI 
Si 3S 



SPECIAL 



Reaitlor A»n 
Assortment of Popular values - '. 
wall Cut lead lor PC mounting, '•*' 
center. "^" leads bag ol 300 Or 
more. 

$1.50 



Swilchea 
Mini toggle SPOT $1 00 

fled Pushbuttons n O 3/S1.00 



HC90 
1Q116 
7206 

7 207 A 
72160 
7107G 
5314 

5375AQ/G 
7001 



SI 5.00 
S 1 25 
S1750 
S 5.50 
$21 00 
$12,50 
$ 2 95 
S 2 95 
$ 6,50 



FERRITE BEADS 



WAm mfci ar 



■* t' 
sin 



Soc* tts 

a Pin 10.-S2.0Q 

14 pin 10.-S2.00 

16 Pm 10/1200 

24 Pm 4/12.00 

28 Pin 4/12.00 

40 Pin 3/12.00 



Olodet 
5 1 V Zener 20/11.00 
1tV9U Type 50/1100 
1KV 2Amp B $1 00 

100V lAmp 1S/S100 



Earphonei 
kaadt 8 on<*r good loi vntii tone 
a'aim cMKki etc 
5 f Of 11 0Q 



» Ohm Spf ak*r 
Approi 2 «" Oiam HowthJ 
lype fQt f»d«a5 n«ke tic 
3 lor 13 00 



Crytlalt 

3 579545 MHZ S1.S0 

10 00000 MHZ 15.00 

b 248500 MHZ 15.00 



AC JMtapHen 
Good for clock* riicad 
char^ers^aii 110 vaC rnuq 



HOO 
12 50 

WOO 



ti «i*C # 20 m* 
lft vac @ laOntA 
12 raci 250m A 



small 

• .;-£- 



cormpal ibfe 



Sotd Slate Bui »n 
i;rn aSO Hi 66 jB sound 
n S-12 *dc al 10-30 mA TTl 

ti SO 



Slug Tuned Coll* 
Small 3/16" Hex Sluga turned coil 
3 (Lima to for ti. 00 



AC Outlet 

Panel Mount witri Leads 

4/S1 .00 



CAPACITORS 

TANTALUM 

Q4BSW0 too** iNKtrelyipe 

1.5 uF 25V 3^1.00 2* S F J£\ n ' d * 

i.e uf 25v 3*1 oo ?S;J "v r; ;, n, « 

-22 uF 25V 3/Si 00 'r>^ hvh-j « io ji to 



OI3* CI AAHIC 

oi tev c^m nitH 
i i*v i vii no 

001 iSV TO n t» 

*O0of aavnoo 

O0«r aviiaa 



DC-DC Convert** 
>S irtSc mpuf prod -9 *dc # 30ma 
> 6 vdc produces -t£*dc#35ma f1 25 



2SH 20 Turn Tnm Pol ti 00 
IK 20 Turn Trim Pert I SO 



Ceramic IF Fillers 

Mini ceramic filters 7 kHz 

BW 455kK;ti 50 ea 



•It-* 



Trimmer Cape 
Sprague 3-40 pf 
able Polyprop/lenr* 
SOaa. 



Audio 
Preacaler 

Make high resolution audio 
measurmonls, great tor musical 
instrument tuning, PL tones, etc 
Muliiplies audio UP in frequency, 
selectable x10 or x100. gives 01 
HZ resolution with t sec gate 
time 1 High sensiiiviiy of 25mv. 1 
meg input z and built-m filtering 
gives great performance Runs 
on 9V battery, all CMOS 
PS 2 kit S29.95 

PS 2 wired $39 &5 




600 MHz 
PRESCALE 

Extend the range of your 
counter lo 600 MHz Works 
with all counters Less than 
150 mv sensitivity specify - 
10 or -100 

Wired, tested. PS-IB $59.95 
Kit, PS-IB $44.95 



30 Walt 2 mtr PWR AMP 

Simple Class C power amp features 8 times power gain 1 Win 
for 8 out, 2 W in for 15 out, 4W in for 30out Max outputof 35 W, 
incredible value, complete with all parts, Jess case and T-R relay 
PA-1 , 30 W pwr amp kit $22 95 

TR-1, RF sensed T-R felay kit 6.95 



M Pi F 23ft trans is lor as used m PA-t 
a-iOdogam ISO mm in 95 



RF actuated relay senses RF 

(tW) and c roses DPOT retay 

For RF sensed T-R relay 
Tfl-1 Kit $6.95 






r*t t m t * Supply KK 

Complete iripie r«gu<alec3 power 

supply provhdes vinaOJe 6 to 1 S volts al 

TOO ma and -5 all Amp Exce+ien! toad 

regulation good tillering and small 

live L e*s trans tor mors . require* 6 3V 

la 1 A and 24 VCT 

Complete hit. PS-3LT 16. »S 



Cryilal Microphone 
Small 1" diameter V Ihick 
crystal mike carindgt 1-75 



Coa* Connector 

Chassis mount 
BNC type Si .00 



2b AMP 

100V Bridge 
$1.50 catch 

Mini-Bfidge SOV 
1 AMP 

2 for $1,00 



Mini RG 174 Coan 
10 M lor SI 00 



t Yatt mmttmrr C**p* 
Np» Owal'Ty ttipl llerll 

*~ Hi*M»* Grommeli id t*r §1. 

I 



aui of c«Hn«a aoc caea I 
l'WMtm u ort^ v*C* c*tn vs 

1*1 t>*9 i in pet tt at «g D*e mo pc> o-sa 



B pm lyp* 9o*fl concacti for 
•ti* 1003 car clock *noduta 
prtc* Ti aw. 



L*da - your chofca piaase specity 

Mini Red, Jumbo Red, High Intensity Red. illuminator Red ■/$! 

Mini YgUOw, Jtimpp VaMqwr, Jumbo Green ft/ft 



Viietltft 
MoiorolB MV 2200 X) PF Nominal ctp 20-00 PF 

SO mc* <k 3 11 00 



TunaWa *anga 



OP- AMP Special 
euftTTLF 13741 - Direct pm tor pin 741 companble but 500.000 MEG 
input z. super low SO pa input current, low power drain 
Sir lor only $9 00 10 for 1300 



76MG 

79MG 

309K 

r«05 



II 25 
ISO 
S1.1S 
11.00 



% 



76-12 
7815 



191? 

7915 



11.00 
$1.00 

n 2* 

II 2$ 



thrtne TuOancj Nuba 
H>ct pracul pees ol *hn^t ut* i~ « - 
innnk to *" Great lor tpiicat i^fl.00 



TO-V2 n»at S*r*i 
niermanoy ara^d * ic* n oo 

To-220 Keet S^nht J lor 11 00 



Opto Isolators - 4N28 type 

Opto Reflectors - Photo diode * LED 



m 



$.50 oo. 
$1.00 ee 



Molai Pint 
MpJ»pi alr«a(]> pracul m longfh of 7 <Fvrt«cl 
lor 14 pm aocheti 20 iirtpa lo* H 00 



CDt Pbolocalla 

n*n nance variti *nn light. 230 ohmi lo 
a*mt 3 meg 3 low |1 Ot 



Us I of Atfrsftts&r* op page 162 



73 Magazine ■ December, 1981 217 




-« 2822 North 32nd Street. #1 



ATLAS FILTERS 



Phoenix. Arizona 85008 



Phone 602-956-9423 



ATLAS CRYSTAL FILTERS FOR 
ATLAS HAM GEAR 

Your Choice 



$15,95 ea 



5.645 
5.595 

5.595 

5.595 
9.0 



2.7/8 
2. 7 USB 
2. 7/8/L 
2.7 LSB 

. 500/4 
USB/CW 



Soldering Kit 



New Welter Soldering Iron Kit 

#SP-23F 9. 99 each 

Kit includes: 

1-25 Watt soldering iron, 
develops 750° of tip 
temperature 
3 - tips (screwdriver, chisel, 

cone) 
1 - soldering aid tool 
1 - coil 60/40 rosin core solder 

CERAMIC PLATE CAPS 

$1.09 each 
#1 type for 3/8 plate cap 
#2 type for 5/8 plate cap 



Used NiCads 



Used C Nickel Cadmium Batteries 

1. 8 amp hour 

Pack of ten $8. 99 per pack 

CERAMIC COIL FORMS 

$1. 99 each 
#1 3/16" x 4/8" 

#2 3/16" x 1/4" 

#3 1/4 " x 3/4" 

#4 3/8 " x 7/8" 

#5 3/8 " x 5/8" 

AH of the above have 
powdered iron cores. 
#6 1/2" x 2 3/4" 

NEW BOGNER DOWNCONVERTEK 

Industrial version. 

1 year guarantee $225. 00 

NOT FOR SALE IN ARIZONA 

UHF/VHF RF POWER TRANSISTORS 

CD2867/2N6439 

60 Watts output 

Reg, Price . $45.77 

SALE PRICE . . . . $19, 99 



CHOKES 



t X3 Uul » • • * * * • • * 

150 uH * -*»••••• 



.1-3 uH 
VTV .15 
VTV 150 

5-20 uH * 

Variable coil 10-80 uH - 
Transformer dual 8. 8 uH- 



.47uH 
-68uH 
1 uH 
1.2 uH 
1.5 uH 

2.2 uH 
2, 7 uH 

3.3 uH 

6.5 uH 

7.5 uH 

10 uH 



15 
20 
22 
33 
39 
47 
50 
56 
62 
68 



uH 
uH 
uH 

uH 
uH 
uH 
uH 
uH 
uH 
uH 



100 uH . 

120 uH , 

185 uH 

538 uH . 

680 uH ■ 

1000 uH 

1630 uH . 

-1 mH 

.2 mH 

.22 mH 

.27 mH 

.33 mH 

.39 mH 

.240 mH 

1.2 mH 

1.5 mH 

1.65 mH 

1.75 mH 

1* 9 mH 

1 mH 

1.88 mH 

2 mH 



2.4 

2.5 
2.7 
3.0 
3.6 
4.3 



mH 
mH 
mH 
mH 
mH 
mH 



1. 00 ea, or 
1.00 ea. or 
1.00 ea. or 
L00 ea. or 
1.00 ea. or 
1.00 ea. or 
1.00 ea. or 
1.00 ea. or 
1.00 ea. or 
1.00 ea. or 
1. 00 ea. or 
LOO ea. or 
1.00 ea. or 
1.00 ea. or 
1.00 ea. or 
1.00 ea. or 
1. 00 ea. or 



1. 00 ea. or 
1.00 ea. or 



1. 00 ea. or 
1. 00 ea. or 
1.00 ea. or 
1.00 ea. or 



• * 



* * * 



. . 



1.00 ea. or 



...2.99 
...2.99 

• • ■ z . y st 
...1.69 

* * * £t * *f •* 

* . . x. UU 

10/7. 50 
10/7. 50 
10/7. 50 
10/7. 50 
10/7. 50 
10/7. 50 

10/7. 50 
10/7. 50 
10/7. 50 
10/7. 50 
10/7. 50 
10/7. 50 
10/7, 50 
10/7. 50 
10/7. 50 
10/7. 50 
10/7. 50 
» . * £m y y 
...1.69 
10/7. 50 
10/7. 50 
... 2. 99 
...1.69 
10/7. 50 
10/7. 50 
10/7. 50 
10/7. 50 
. . . 1. 50 
... it . yy 

. . . £t . y y 

■ - - £- yy 

■ * . « . yy 
... 2. 99 
... 2. 99 

* + * u ■ yy 

* * * a. yy 
... 2. 99 

* * • z. yy 

• ■ . Z. WS 

... 2. 99 
... 1.69 

• - - o. 99 

. ■ » £t . y y 
... 2. 99 
10/7. 50 

... 2. 99 
... 2. 99 
...2.99 

r . . &. yy 



HIGH VOLTAGE CAPS 

420 MFD § 400 VDC 
600 MFD A 400 VDC 



3. 99 each 
3. 99 each 



4.7 mH - ..2.99 

d nii* - - * ....*•. .»■-.. ...6. yy 

5. 11 mH 2.99 

6 mH 2. 99 

7. 2 mH .- - — ...... 2. 99 

O. &9 J] 111 • ■ ■ . . - - * . . ... • *...£. *7i7 

Ot uC n n * ■ r 1 » . t i » 1 1 i £■ J* 

o.o mil »•***•.•#*---*..*..«. yy 
10 mH 2. 99 

12 mJn ..........**...... Z. 99 

A. iJ III IT ........ ...a>a.-a.O.VV 

17 mH . . .. 2.99 

19.6 mH 2.99 

20 mH . . _ . ~ . . . ,..2. 99 

20.5 mH 2.99 

U £t a V 1 iXl .. . . a ■ *. ... ...... *4Ua.7*tf 

z*i mri ...*•............. z. yy 

*jO . I i i « i • ■ £. 3i1 

29.9 mH 2.99 

30 mH 2.99 

36 mH 2.99 

UVi J 1 lUl .. a . . . a. . . ■•..*(..«■ 99 

" V I I I li ........ a m ...a w * m m w £tm V*f 

IV a at. lit] .... a.... ...... ■ i ■ £f WV 

1 O IJ] J 1 ... ■ . a .. a .. a f ... ■ * £• VV 

T . .................. 4b . V *J 

50 mH ...2.99 

59 mH . 2.99 

60 mH .......... 2.99 

71.5 mH 2.99 

( o ■ i mn ■ ..... .,+**. * » . . - ■ 6i yy 

86 mH 2.99 

luo mH ,.**.. ........... * z« yy 

A4U\f mti #•.••«... a... a aa. a ■£ . yy 

A DU nirl .••••#•* i ..... ... a £m. yy 

175 mH 2. 99 

zuu mil „.. ....•«*..... ... z. yy 

205 mH .2,99 

237 mH ...2.99 

240 mH 2.99 

300 mH 2. 99 

360 mH 2.99 

390 mH 2. 99 

TvU III IT- . . . . . » ■ . . a a a . . . a ■ * it- \3 tJ 

500 mH .-1.50 

D \J \J 1 1 IJ • * - - - . a -♦ + »-* . ■ ■ . . £ t Jt? 

1000 mH ......... 2. 99 

1.5 Hy .2.99 

2.0 Hy ....2.99 

£t m ♦/ 11 Y ........ ...I...... ■ - 4W . a? 7 

3.0 Hy 2.99 

5.0 Hy „ 2.99 

10 Hy 2.99 

New Fairchild Pre scaler Chip 

95H90DCQM 6. 50 each 

350 MHz prescaler divide by 10/11 



218 73 Magazine • December; 1981 



Johnson 
AIR Variables 



1/4 x 2 1/2" shaft 



RF Power Device 



MRF454 Same as MRF458 
12.5 VDC, 3-30 MHz 
UOWatts output, !2dB gam 

$17.95 ea 



E.F. JOHNSON 
TUBE SOCKETS 



#124-0311-100 6. 99 each 

For 8072 etc. 

H24-0107-001 13. 99 each 

For 4CX250B/R, 4X1 50A etc, 

#124-0111-001 4. 99 each 

Chimney for 4CX250B/R and 

4X150 

#124-0113-001 and 124-0113-021 

$12. 99 each 
Capacitor for #124-0107-001 

#123-209-33 Sockets 6. 99 each 

For 811A,572B I 866, etc. 



UNELCO CAPS 



6. 8pF 


47pF 


8.2pF 


62pF 


lOpF 


iOOpF 


!2pF 


160pF 


13pF 


l80pF 


14pF 


200pF 


20pF 


240pF 


24pF 


380pF 


33pF 


470pF 


36pF 


lOOOpF 


43pF 


350V $1,00 each 



96 Pin Moiurulv Bus Ed&t* Curineclurs 



Gold plated contacts 

Dial 43/86 pin 156 spacing 

Soldertail for PCB. 



^,. .$3.00 each 



110 VAC MUFHN FANS 



New . . 
Used . 



..... 



- $U-95 





$2.50 each 


193-10-6 


2. 2 to 34 pF 


193- 


1.5 to 27.5pF 


193- 


.6 to 6.4pF 




$1.00 each j 


160-107-16 


.5 to 12 pF 


193-10-9 


2. 2 to 34 pF 


193-10-104 


2.2 to 34 pF 


193-4-5 


3 to 30 pF 





2N2857JAN 

2N2949 

2N2947 

2N2950 

2N3375 

2N3553 

2N3818 

2N3866 
2N3866JAN 

2N3866JANTX 

2N3925 

2N3948 

2N3950 

2N3959 



2,50 
3.60 
15,00 
4,60 
8,00 
1.57 
5.00 

1.00 
2.50 
4,00 

10.00 
2.00 

25.00 
3.00 



Transistors 



2N3960JANTX 10.00 

2N4072 1,60 

2N4427 1,10 

2N4429 7. 00 

2N4877 1.00 

2N4959 2.00 

2N4976 15.00 

2N5070 8.00 

2N5071 15.00 

2N5108 4.00 

2N5109 1.50 

2N5179 1.00 

2N5583 4.00 

2N5589 6. 00 

2N5590 8.00 

2N5591 11.00 

2N5635 5.44 

2N5636 11, 6C 

2N5637 20,00 

2N5641 5.00 

2N5643 14,00 



2N5645 10.00 

2N5842 8.00 

2N5849 20,00 

2N5942 40.00 

2N5946 14,00 

2N5862 50.00 

2N6080 7.00 

2N6081 10.00 

2N6082 11.00 

2N6083 13.00 

2N6084 14.00 

2N6095 11.00 

2N6096 20.00 

2N6097 28.00 

2N6166 38.00 

2N6368 22.99 

A210/MRF517 2.00 

BLY38 5.00 

40280/ 2N4427 1.10 

40281/2N3920 7.00 

40282/ 2N3927 10.48 



High Voltage Caps 



30 MFb p, 500 

22 MFD t"' 500 
100 MFD (<* 450 
150 MFD <* 450 
225 MFD fii 450 
.00l/1000pF fe* 

.001 (" 2 KV 
.0015 (f<« 3 KV 

.01 ^ 4 KV 

-01 (a i.eKv 



VDC 
VDC 
VDC 
VDC 
VDC 
10 KV 



.02 

.01 



{" 



8 KV 
1 KV 



1.69 
1,69 

£i » Cm -it 

3.29 

4.29 

.89 

4/1.00 

3/1,00 

,79 

4 1.00 

2.00 

6/1,00 



NEW 2" ROUND SPEAKERS 

100 Ohm coil $.99 each 



PLASTIC TO- 3 SOCKETS 

4/ $1.00 

CRYSTAL FILTERS 

Tyco 001-1^*880 Same as 2i94P 

10. 7 MHz narrow band 

3 dB bandwidth 15 KHz min. 

20 dB Uindwidili 60 KHz nun. 

40 dB bandwidth ISO KHz mm. 

UltirnaLF 50 dB insertion loss 1 dB max. 

Ripple I dB max. Cl. Q+/-5 pF 3600 Ohms 

$3 99 each 

78M05 

Same as 7605 but only 1/2 Amp 

5 VDC . 49 each or 10/$3.00 

ORDERING 



TRIMMER CAPS 



Sprastut. Stable Polypropylene 
.50 each or 10/4,00 
not sold mixed 
1. 2 to 13pF 
2 to 30pF 
3-9 to 18pF 
3. 9 to 40pF 
3. 9 to 55pF 

Carbide Circuit Board Drill Bits 
for PCB Boards 

5 mix for $5.00 



l-Fet 



J310 N-CHANMEL J-FET 450 MHz 
Good for VHF/UHF Amplifier, 
Oscillator and Mixers 3, Si. 00 



MURATA CERAMIC FILTERS 


SFD 455D 


455 KHz 2. 00 


SFB 455D 


455 KHz 1.60 


CFM455E 


455 KHz 5-50 


CFU455H 


455 KHz 3,00 


SFE 10, 7MA 


10.7 MHz 2.99 



TEXAS INSTRUMENTTIL-305P 
5x7 array alphanumeric display 

$3. 85 each 

INSTRUCTIONS 

Check, money order* or credit cards welcome. (Mister Charge and VISA only J No personal check* or certified personal 
checks for Foreign countries accepted, Money order or cashiers check in U.S. funds only. Letters of credit are not acceptable. 

Minimum skipping by UPS is 12.55 with insurance, Please allow extra shipping charges for heavy or long items. 

AU parts returned due to customer error or decision will be subject to a 1 5*% restock charge, i f we are out of an item ordered, 
we will iry to replace it with an equal or better part unless you specify not to, or we will back order the item, or refund your 
money, 

PRICES ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE. Prices supersede alt previously published. Some items offer- 
ed arc limited to small quantities and are subject to prior sale, 

We now have a toll free number, but wt ail that it be used for ch&rge orders only. ] f you have any questions please use our 
other number. We are open from 8:00 a.m. - 5:00 p,m Monday thru Saturday. 

Our toil free number for charg * orders only is 800-321-361 1. 




2822 North 32nd Street. *l 



Phoenix Arizona 85008 • Phone 602-956-9423 






**See List of Advertisers on page f62 



73 Magazine • December, 1981 219 



**\2 





P.O. BOM 401244E GARLAND. TX 75040 214/270-3553 



^SUPERSTAR SALE!* 

ALL ITEMS WITH STARS 
BUY 3 GET ONE FREE 

-^L- (No Mixing) ^L 

^ OFFER EXPIRES DEC. 31, 1981 



•Sound Effects Kit $16.50* 



The SE-01 Sound Effects Kit has all you need 
to build a programmable sound effects 
machine except a battery and speaker Only 
the SE-01 provides you with additional 
Circuitry that includes a Pulse Generator, Mux 
Oscillator and Comparator to make more 
complex sounds a snap, Includes T1 76477, 
(w/specs) assembly instructions and 
programming examples. You can easily create 
Gunshot*, Explosions, Steam Trains, Wind & 
Surl and much more 
Complete Kit $18.50 

With quality PC Board 

{Less battery & spkr ) 
76477 Chip Is Included 
Extra chips S3. 15 ea. 



rfjje*/* Doomsday Alarm • 

If you hart trouble sleeping and you would like 
the rest of the neighborhood to share your mis- 
ery then this little kit will be for you' There 
ts no way lo accurately describe the unearthly 
howls, screams and tones that come out of this 
kit Four separate tone oscillators are mixed, 
cancelled and stepped at a varying rate 10 Waits 
of crazy sounds. A great fun kit or a practical 
burglar alarm Complete with t*C board am* all 
necessary components lea speaker, For 6-12 
VDC. Q QC ORDER 

KIT 



See Special Fall Prices Below 

PRICES GOOD THROUGH DEC. 31, 1981 
SHOP EARLY FOR CHRISTMAS! 



04-03 



7 Watt Audio Amp Kit S5-9S 

5MAU SINGLE MV&fttD lC AND COMPONENTS Fit ON A 7 ■ f PC 
BOAftD lUNCLUDEDl flU*+S ON 12VDC GREAT FQfl ANY PflOJEC T THAT 
NEEDS AN INEXPENSIVE AMP LESS THAN U* THO $ ft WATTS 
COMPATIBLE WITH SE-Ol SOUND KIT 



O v er volt age Protection Kit $6*95 

Protect your t&pensitre equipment liom ovtrvoltage 
conditions Every compute* snouW rtave one 1 Wo*** wHh any 
luatd DC pow tourca Irom 10 to 20 volts up to ?i amps 



* ZULU II Clock Kit • 

$19*95 LESS CASE 

• 1/2' LED Readouts 

• Quarts XTAL Time base 

• Calendar 

■ Unique NOX™ Circuit Will Display Readouts On 
Handclap 

• Q alter? Backup I oauery no: included) 

• High QuiJity Drilled & Plaited PC Boards: Clear 
instruction* 



PLASTIC CASE WITH FRONT & REAR 
PANELS FOR ZULU II $4.95.* 



Stereo AMP/Power Supply Board 

Tahei Ion* l«vtl audio and dtrrH B ijhm ^pctakm ON- 
BOARD RflCliftCTfi Jrtfl filler Supply pOw«r tef AMP 
AMD TUNER, VOLUME BALANCE 

PLUG C OMf> AT Aff LE and T ONE SL i OE CON TOOLS 

Willi TUNER 

HE QUIRES I2VAC $Ik9§ 

JHANSFOHMKR AT 400 MA 

(nol lutludfid^ tun O M L V 



FtATUflf S m ly 





TUNER ONLY 







Super Music 
Maker 

REVISION 2 

$1495 

(Basic Kit) 

POM *mi itKtuti* tHItf 
iw*tc*€l or 270BROU 

Now you can ptay hundred* of songs^usifirg I he 8u»ei Sup** 
Hut* M**#r The unn lufum a single (•dory 
programmed m>cro0roc**aof rC thai comes wiTM 20 pre- 
programmed short tunes By adding I he additional PflQMS 
(270S sg The system can be expanded lo play up to 1000 
note* per PROM. Just m.ru a compact eteclronic 

ihsfiymanl thai will play dozens, hundreds or even 
thousands of selections of music The kn comes wiih all 
•lee Ironic compcminli (lata the PROM), and a drilled, 
plaled and screened PC Board which measures 4" x 4 V 
The 7 wall amplifier section is on (he same PC board and 
drives an 8 ohm speaker (nol included), rrom a whisper lo 
ear spiiiimg. volume Smce the unii works on 1? VDC or 13 
VAC*, vehicle or portable ooeraliori ts poss^hle WHal do 
you 0*1 lor *24 »5? Everything but • tpMfcarf. frtrulomw. 
caaa. swtlchev and MOM. Addilionai 2706 albums 
COniammg popular Tunes are a va liable lor 115.00 each or 
you can program your own PROMS using information 
provided w>(h the *rt instrucltons Lists o* avatlabte PROM 
albums are availahre on fequesl rAiore Unit pity* 
tt+cifonic mtfStc one note era ttmw. if '3 nof possibte topiay 
chords of a mBlQ&p wtth harmony untuti&neauiiy. ) 

• EnwHlope control gives decay to notes 

* On board inverter allow* single voiiage (+12} operation 

OPTIONAL ACCESSORIES 

DIP Switch*! Ona a po S . One 5 pos 100 Set 

{Can he directly toldefed to PC Bd to Access tuness 

Rotary fr u rtteht Two 5 position 2.^0/tei 

[For remote wiring to PC Bd to access tun«i 



WaAeaug 

(For operation on 11 TV AC house voltage) 



Mft 



Microprocessor Station Clock $49*95 

The ZULU 3TZ is a full blown ROM and MICRO- 
PROCESSOR unlike other standard clock ICs, it allows 
exceptional flexibility. Almost a year in design, it is the 
most advanced station clock on the market. 

QUALITY SOLDER ZONE CHANGE 
MASKED & SCREENED FEATURE 

PC BOARDS MAKES Se,ect one of hree 

ASSEMBLY A SNAP 



Adjustable Brightness 
,6" - High Intensity 

Orange Led Readouts 
Seconds Reset/Hold 

provides easy 

syncronization with 

WVW 

Quartz Crystal 
Timebase and 
Battery Backup 



FALL SPECIALS:GOO0 THRU DEC. '81 

1. Super Music Maker with case and two 
5-DOsition rotarv switches $32.00 

2. Super Music with one 2716 2K X 8 PROM 
filled with over 50 selections of additional 
music (>1500 notes) $32,00 

3. The Whole Ball of Wax! f*2 + case and 
switches. $39.95 



$49.95 



$79 



Complme Kil 

Including Case § 

Wad plug XFMR 

*Or 1I7VAC 

Operation 




Wired 6 
i asted 



1 2 Volts 
AC or DC 



World Time zones, 

Local Time (12 Hr. 

format) and TWO 

24 hr, zones of 

your choice 

RFI Protected 

ID FEATURE 

LED Indicator lights 

when activated 

flashes at 10 min. 

Different audio 

tones at 

8 and 9 min 



* NO CO.D/t, 

* SEND CHECK MO. OR CHARGE CARD NO. 

* PHONE ORDERS ACCEPTED ON VISA AND MASTERCHABGE ONLY 

* ADD 5% FOR SHIPPING. 

* TX. RES. ADD 5% STATE SALES TAX, 

* ALL FOREIGN ORDERS ADD 30% FOR SHIPPING CHARGES. 
U S FUNDS ONLY, 

(214) 278-3553 



PS 14 REGULATOR CARD KIT 

This is the Regulator Card from our famous 
20A Power Supply KiL Although we ran out of 
the transformers and heatsinks, many 
customers have been able to locate their own. 
The regulator card performs the actual 
voltage regulation and has adjustable fold 
back current limiting. Output voltage is stable 
to 200MV from to 20 Amps and adjustable 
from 11 to 14 Volts. Designed to drive 2 high 
current NPN transistors (2N3771 2N5301 or 
equiv.) The unit assembles quickly. Included 
are all the on board components including a 
driver transistor and over-temp shutdown 
sensor. Designed to screw down to a standard 
3" diameter computer grade filter cap. The 
quality plated PC card is 3-1/2' 1 x 4 3/4", 

WITH INSTRUCT iONS 



REGULATOR CARD KIT 

HIGH CURRENT PARTS 

(2- 2N3772 & 25 A Bridge) 

51,000 MFD @ 40V Computer Grade 



$14.95 

$5.00 

$3.50 



Requires Transformer with 16 - 19 VAC Out @ The 
Current You Expect To Draw 



• FM 

• LINKS • REPEATERS • TRANSIT 

• RECEIVERS • PREAMPS • CONV 

• TRANSCEIVERS • POWER SUPPLIES 



nusHinn! QUALITY VHF/UHF KITS 



""s AT AFFORDABLE PRICES 



FM-5 PC Board Kit -ONLY $159.95 
complete with controls, heatsink, etc. 




1 watts, 5 Channels, f or 6M , 2 M r or 220 





HIGH QUALITY FM MODULES FOR 
REPEATERS, LINKS, TELEMETRY, ETC. 




R75 VHF FM RECEIVER for 10M, 6M ( 
2M, 220, or commercial bands, 4 fantastic 
sefectivity options. Kits from $84,95 to$1 1 9.95 

R450 UHF FM RECEIVER for 360-520 MHz 
bands. Kits in selectivity options from S94. 95 

R110VHF AM RECEIVER Kftforvhf aircraft 
band or ham bands. Only $84.95, 



COR KITS With audio mixer and speaker 
amplifier Only $29.95, 

CWID KITS 158 bits, field programmable, 
clean audio. Only $59,95. 

A1 6 RF TIGHT BOX Deep drawn alum, case 
with tight cover and no seams. 7x8x2 inches. 
Only $1 8.00. 

SCANNER CONVERTERS Copy 72*76, 
1 35*1 44, 240-270, 400-420. or 806-894 MHz 
bands on any scanner. Wired/tested Onty $79.96. 




T51 VHF FM EXCITER for 10M. 6M. 2M, 
220 MHz or adjacent bands. 2 Watts contin- 
uous. Krts only $54.95. 

T451 UHF FM EXCITER for 450 ham band 
or adjacent Kits only $64.95. 

VHF & UHF LINEAR AMPLl FIERS. Use on 

either FM or SSS. Power levels from 1 to 45 
Watts to go with exciters & xmtg converters, 
KftS from $69-95. 






VHF & UHF RECEIVER 

-^ »^ 

PREAMPS. Low noise, 



VHF & UHF TRANSMITTING CONVERTERS VHF & UHF RECEIVING CONVERTERS 



For SSS, CW, ATV t FM, etc Available for 6M T 2M. 
220 f 440 with many IF input ranges, Converter board 
Kit onfy at $79.95 (VHF) or S99.95 (UHF) or kits 
complete with PA and cabinet as shown. 



20 Models cover every practical rf and if range to 
listen to SSB t FM t A7V, etc. on 6M> 2M, 220. 440, and 
1 10 aircraft band. Even convert weather down to 2M( 
Kits from $39,95 and wired units. 



VHF Kits from 27 to 300 MHz. UHF 
Kits from 300 to 650 MHz, Broadband 
Kits: 20-650 MHz Prices start at 
S14.95 (VHF) and ST8.95 (UHF). All 
preamps and converters have noise 
figure 2dBorless, 



Call or Write for FREE CATALOG 

(Send S2.00 or 5 IRC's for overseas MAILING) 
Order by phone or mail • Add $2 S & H per order 
(Electronic answering service evenings & weekends) 
Use VISA, MASTERCARD, Check, or UPS COD. 



mironics, inc. 

65 Q MOUL RD. • HILTON NY 14468 

Phone: 7 1 6-392-9430 * 



Hamfroncci ' is a registered trademark 



iyiiv :i, the first name in Counters ! 



MUCLSi 



.III. 

AC I AC Mtefnti 

»P I N^id ^t i V 

Adipuit'CMr^r 

OV I Micrt' pffFir Orin 

Lnnr hut 

I in mil Lime tiiw Input 



ICH U 

II U 
I' m 



9 DIGITS 600 MHz 



The CT 90 ti the most versatile, feature patted counter available for teas 
than S3 00 .00' Advanced design feature* include three selectable Rate timev 
nine digit*, gate indicator and a unique display hold function which boldv the 
displayed count after the inpui signal is removed Also, 1 1 OmHz TCXO time 
base is. used which enables easy zero beat calibration checks against WW V 
Option ally; an inlemal mead battery pact extern a] n me base input and Micro- 
power high stability crystal oven time base are available The CT-90, 
performance you can count on! 



$1 ?Q9* 

wi** WI reD 



SPECIFICATIONS 



Range: 

Sensitivity: 

Resolution. 



Display 
Time base 

Power 



20 Hi to 600 MHz 

Le« than 10 MV to 150 MHt 

Lew than 50 MV to 500 MHr 

1 He 1 10 MHz ranged 

1,0 Hi (60 MHi range) 

10 Hz (600 MHz range} 

9 digits 0.4" LED 

Standard- J 0.000 mHz, 1.0 ppm 20-40° C 

Optional Micro- power ovan-0-1 ppm 20-40 a C 

8-15 VAC @ 250 ma 



7 DIGITS 525 MHz 



SPECIFICATIONS 



Raxne 
S«fuitj\itv~ 

Resolution: 



Display 
Time base 
Power 



20 Hi to 525 MHi 

Let* than 50 MV to 1 50 MHz 

Less than 1 50 MV to 500 MHi 

1.0 Hj (5 MHz range) 

10.0 Hi (50 MHt range} 

LOO Hi (500 MHz range) 

7 digit* 4" L£D 

1.0 pom TCXO 20-40° C 

12 VAC ft 250 ma 



WIRED 



The CT-70 breaks the prsce bamer on lab quality frequency counter* 
Deluxe features such u three frequency range*- each with pre- amplification, 
dual selectable gate times, and gate activity indjcau on make measurements a 
snap. The wide frequency range enables you to accurately measure signals 
from audio thru UHF with I ppro accuracy • that's .000 1%! The CT-70 ts 
the answer to all your measurement needs, in the Field, lab or ham shack. 



PRICES: 

CT-70 wired I year' 

CT 70 Kit. 90 day parts m 

raoty 

AC 1 AC adapter 

BP-I Nicad pack + AC 

adapter/charger 



ar 



199.95 

84,95 
*.*5 

12,95 



PRICES: 



7 DIGITS 500 MHz $7955 



MINT LOO wtred, t year 




warranty 


179.95 


AC-Z Ac adapter for MEN 1- 




IQO 


3,95 


BP- Z Nicad pack and AC 




adapter charger 


1295 



Here's a handy, general purpose counter thai provides moat counter 
functions at an unbelievable price The MINI- 1 00 doean'i Have the Full 
frequency range or mem impedance qualities found in higher price units, but 
for basic RF signal measurements* it can't be beat? Accurate measurements 
can he made from J MHt ill the way up to 500 MHi with excellent sensitivity 
throughout toe range, and the two gate timet let you select the resolution 
desired Add the mead pack option and the MINI- 100 makes an ideal arktitinn 
to your tool box for "in- the- field' frequency checks and repairs; 



WIRED 



SPECIFICATIONS: 



Scasitmtv- 



Dispiayi 



1 MHi to 500 MHz 
Less than 25 MV 
100 Hi (slow gate) 
1 KHz ( fast gate} 
7 digits. 4" LED 

20 ppm 2<wrrc 

5 VDC fe 200 ma 



8 DIGITS 600 MHz $159 






WIRED 



SPECIFICATIONS: 



** 



iiie 



Range: 
Sensitivity: 

Resolution; 

Dw play- 
time base 
Power 



20 Hi to 600 MHz 



The CT-50 is a versatile lab bench counter that will measure up to600 MHz "HUfcat 



Less than 25 mv to I 50 MHz wiLh 8 ^ predion. An ^ om f jt* best features is the Receive Frequency CP50 ^^ ' year warranty SI 59.95 



Less than 1 50 mv to 600 MHz 
t0 Hz^60 MHi range] 
10.0 Hi (600 MHz range) 
8 digits 0.4" L£D 
2.0 ppm 20-40' C 
110 VAC or 12 VPC 



Adapter, which rums the CT-50 into a digital readout for any receiver. The 
adapter is easily programmed far any receiver and a simple connection to the 
receiver's VFO is all that it required for use Adding the receiver adapter in no 
way limits the operation of the CT-50, the adapter can be conveniently 
switched on or ofT The CT-50, a counter that can work double- duty? 



CT-50 Kit, 90 day parts 
warranty 

RA'L receiver adapter kit 
RA-1 wired and pre- program- 
med ( send copy of receiver 

i 



119.95 
14.95 



29 95 



DIGITAL MULTIMETER $99^ 



i it lifc 



WIRED 



PRICES: 




DM700 winat ! year warrant) 


$99.95 


DM700 Kit, 90 day parts 




warranty 


79.95 


AC-I, AC adaptor 


3,95 


BP-3* Nicad pack +AC 




adapter/ charger 


19.95 


MP- 1 , Probe kit 


295 



The DM -700 offers prafetekmil quality pcrtormance at ■ hobby tst price, 
Fe*iuro include; 26 <iiffctmi ranges and 5 functions r all arranged in a 
tnnvenic-ni. raav to use formal Mr*iuremcnts arc displayed ho * large JH 
digit. 14 inch LED readout wrrh auionuTvc decimal piacemeni, automatic 
polar irv, overtange indication and overload protection up to 1 2 50 volts on all 
raftgro, m aid ng it virtually goo f-ptoo 11 The DM -700 looks great, u handsome, 
}et black, ruKKcd ABS case with convenient retractable tilt hail makes it an 
Ideal addition ro anv shop 



SPECIFICATIONS: 



DO AC volts: lOOuV to 3 KV, 5 ranges 


DO AC 




current 


0.1 uA to 2.0 Amps, 5 ranges 


Resistance: 


0. 1 ohms to 20 Megohms, 6 ranges 


Input 




impedance 


10 Megohms. DO AC volts 


Accuracy: 


0.1% basic DC volts 


Power 


4 "C cells 



AUDIO SCALER 



For high resolution audio measurements, multiplies 
U P m frequency 
» Great for PL toots 

• Multiplies by 10 or 100 

• 0.01 Hi resolution: 

S29.95 Kit £39,95 Wired 



ACCESSORIES 

Telescopic whjp antenna - BNC plug. 

High impedance probe, light loading 

Low pas probe,, for audio measurements 
Direct probe, general purpose usage .... 
Tin bail for CT 70, 90. MINI 100 
Color bum calibration unit calibrates counter 
against color TV signal 



........... . . 



1495 



COUNTER PREAMP 

For mewuitmg. rmemcly weak signals from 10 to 1,000 
M H ; SmaJ I ict. fxiw end by plug tr*n*iWmrt - rncEuded- 

• Flat 25 db gain 

• BNC Connectors 

• Great for stuffing RF with rack- up loop 

S34.95 Kit S44.95 Wind 



vis*. 



famsey etectronic's, inc. p_ 

2575 Baird Rd. Penfield. NY 14526 



.-62 



PHONE ORDERS 
CALL 716-586-3950 



• ■1u " lf > 0"»9' n P' i^'Wi '(>• =»lund Add b IftJ tTiippig 

■niu'OTM* >oo tiQi 'i^uiT 1 □< 1 ■ C 0««'itotadd M C OD add 
I? Om*'i .f^ttf * ' odd I ' *>& M''#*-4i«»i fldil? lai 



222 73 Magazine * December, 1981 



I 



i 



TOP QUALITY PARTS FOR LESS 



Precision Hybrid 
Oscillator Module 



Has both 1 MHZ and 2 MHZ TTL - 
outputs — Hermetically seated — 
Ultra high stability over wide temp, 
range — originally cost over $40 00 
each — We made a super purchase 
from a major computer manufacturer 
— 5 VoJt operation - fits standard 24 
pin socket - Manufactered by 
Motorola oscillator division 



NEO 2137 by NEC 

• Microwave R.F. transistor (N.P.N.i 

• Micromold package #37 

• Dual Emitter leads 
•FT to 4.5 GHZ 

• VCEO 10V-CC 20 MA. HFE 40 200 

• Gain10V'20MA-lGHZ = 14DB Typical 

• Very low noise- High gain 1.5 DB 
@ 500 MHZ 

• Cleared for high reliability space 
applications 



COMPARE 



MC6871A 

CRYSTAL OSC 
to MHz 



MC6871A 

3/20 



750 M 

f w/data 



POWER SUPPLY 
TRIPLE OUTPUT 

25 Volts @ 18A 
5 Volts @ ,8A 
15 Volts @ 125A 
Isolated independent 

OUtpUtS 

Positive or negative 
operation 

Constant Voltage Regu- 
lation 

25 Volt line adjustable 
with 10 turn pot from 
23.5 V to 28 Volts. 120 
Volt - 60 Hz input Fused - 
H=3tt" W=5V4" D=4" 



LM117 



An easy to use adjustable 
Voltage Regulator - only two 
external resistors needed to 
set the output voltage - TO 3 
Case - adjustable from 1.2 
to 37V - Regulator is floating, so it can 
be used in a wide variety of 
applications, as long as the input to- 
output differential voltage is 40V or less 
- 1,5A output current - house numbered ■ 
prime- Motorola. 



Video Game Board 

Hockey ■ Tennis* Handban 

• General Instruments AV3 8500 

• Features Exciting Sounds 

• On Screen Scoring 

• 1 ot 2 Players 
■ Speed 4 Paddle Controls 

• Works on 9 VoOs D C 

Each board comes with RF Modulator iCn 3 
or 4\ and schematic The only parts needed to 
complete game are speaker. 2 1 Meg Pots & 
Switches 



3 for 1 2 00 



Transformer 

32VCT® 1 amp *J25 
6V @ 1 amp -j 

Measures: 

2"x2y*"x2V4" 
2%" Mounting Centers 



Micro Mini 
Toggle Switch 

W - 



6 for 5 00 



—'* SPDT • Made in USA 
with Hardware 



SCOTCH LOK 

Great for connecting a wire to an 
existing Wire without stripping Afcso 
lijieiy invaluable in hard ro reac^ areas 
such as under car dash inside 
television, elc Simply put Scotch Lok 
over enisling wire Inseri new wire to be 
connected With a standard pair of 
pliers, compress metal on insuialn* Ho 
need for laps Super neat installation 
Once you use ihis. you will never qo 
back to the "old way T V V^ 

15/1 00 *&& 



Video Paddle 
Controls 



2 fori 



00 



Can oe used with 
game board at left 



IC Specials 

MC1488-1489 - RS232 Driver 
and Receiver qqc 

NE556-OualNE555 

2/125 

NE555 

3/1 25 or10/3 30 



JFETOPAMP 

Super High Input Impedance 
(10'* OHMS) — High Frequen- 
cy Response. TO 4 MHZ 
Large DC Voltage Gam 106 DB 
— New generation OP-AMP 
with Vastly Superior Features! 



LF356BH 



or 



>oo 



Fixed Inductors 

JOuh-6/1" 12.5 uh- 8/1 00 
500 uh- Hash Filter 

@2AmpS'4/1°° 



Molded Choke 

l3uh-W1 W 50mh.6/1 M 



Variable 
Inductors 

30*40 uh 

,9uh-l.2uh 

11 uh to 20 uh / 

.25uh-,35uh 
.85 uh ■ .95 uh 



EIAJ#1SS98 

NEC #498 1 -7 E 
Microwave * Schottky 

barrier diode 



HP-Hot Carrier diodes 
5082-2835 



• It 



o «r 6/5 00 



UNIVERSAL 

TIMER KIT 

* Adjustable from 1 sec 
to 1 hr 

• Control up to 1 amp 
'Turn Things On Or Off 

Kit includes all parts 
necessary to buiid this 
exciting kit Uses: Children's 
T.V. programs - Darkroom 
exposures - Amateur 10 mm, 
I.D.er - Egg Timer - Inter- 
mittent Windshield Wiper 
Absolutely endless uses. 
Complete kit including 
power supply, p.c board 
DPDT relay, and all parts to 
make timer operational 

95 



NEXT MONTH 



MOHO 



I > lu \v*m I i- ■ |Cl*il4l Ui m If) P S H 



• VIS* • M ASTERCAH0 • AMERICAN EXPRESS « 



The most exciting Item we have ever seen - 

Digital Research: Parts 

P.O. fen 401247 • Garland, T«ai 75040 

(214) 271-2461 



**Se* List of Advert t son on page 162 



73 Magazine • December, 1981 223 






INTRODUCING SONY'S NEW DIGITAL 
A-^ DIRECT ACCESS RECEIVER! 



L>> 



only 



$299 



95 

plus 
$5.00 

(NOW IN STOCK) shippin 9 



Oisr y 






Revolutionary 
Instant Access Digital 
Shortwave Scanner 

• Continuous Scanning of LW. MW, SW, & FM Bands 

• Instant Fingertip Tuning— No More Knobs! 

• 6 Memories for Any Mode (AM.SSB/CW. & FM) 
■ Dual PLL Frequency Synthesized— No Drift? 



A WHOLE NEW BREED OF RADIO IS HERE NOW! No other 
shod wave receiver combines so many advanced feaiyres for 
both operating convenience and high performance as does the 
new Sony ICF-2001. Once you have Operated this exciting new 
radio, you'll be spoiled forever' Direct access tuning eliminates 
conventional tuning Knobs and dials with a convenient digital 
Keyboard and Liquid Crystal Display (LCD) for accurate frequerv 
cy readout to within 1 KHz, Instant fingertip tuning, up to 8 
memory presets, and continuous scanning features make the 
ICF-2001 the ultimate in convenience. 

Compare the following features against any receiver currently 
available and you will have to agree that the Sony ICF 2001 is the 
best value In shortwave receivers today: 

DUAL PLL SYNTHESIZER CIRCUITRY covers entire 150 KHz to 
29,999 MHz band PLLt ctrcuil has 100 KHz step while PLL 2 
handles 1 KHz step, boih of which are controlled by separate 
quartz crystal oscillators for precise, no-drift tuning DUAL CON* 
VERSION SUPERHETERODYNE circuitry assures superior AM 
reception and high image rejection characteristics The 10,7 MHz 
IF of the FM band is utilized as the 2nd IF of the AM band. A new 
type of crystal filter made especially lor this purpose realizes 
clearer reception than commonly used ceramic filters ALL FET 
FRONT END for high sensitivity and interference rejection, Inter- 
modulation, cross modulation, and spurious interference are ef- 
fectively rejected. FET RF AMP contributes to superior image re- 
jection, high sensitivity, and good signal to noise ratio, Soth 
strong and weak stations are received with minimal distortion 



EXTENDED SPECTRUM CONTINUOUS TUNING 




AM 
50 to 29,999 KHz 




■*** 



.HA. 



LUO& 




A Enter Button 
B Signal Strength 

Indicator 
C Liquid Crystal Display 
D Memory Preset Buttons 
jE Antenna Adjustment 

Dial 



F SSB/CW Compensator 

Q Execute Bar 

H Manual Tuning Buttons 

I Scan Button 

J High/Low Limit Buttons 



OPERATIONAL FEATURES 
INSTANT FINGERTIP TUNING with the calculator-type key board 
enables the operator to have instant access to any frequency in 
the LW, MW, SW, and FM bands. And the LCD digital frequency 
display confirms the exact, drift-free signal being received. 
AUTOMATIC SCANNING of the above bands. Continuous 
scanning of any desired portion of the band is achieved by 
setting the "L, " and "Lj" keys to define the range to be scanned. 
The scanner can stop automatically on strong signals, or it can 
be done manually. MANUAL SEARCH ts similar to the manual 
scan mode and is useful for quick signal searching. The "UP" 
and "DOWN" keys let the tuner search for you. The "FAST" key 
increases the search rale tor taster signal detection MEMORY 
PRESETS, Six memory keys hold desired stations for instant 
one-key tuning m any mode (AM, SSB/CW, and FM), and also, the 
"L{* and M Lg" keys can give you two more memory Slots when 
not used lor scanning. OTHER FEATURES: Local, normal, DX 
sensitivity selector lor AM; SSB/CW compensator; 90 min. steep 
timer; AM Ant. Adjust. 



SPECIFICATIONS 
CIRCUIT SYSTEM: Fm Superheterodyne; AM Dual conversion 
superheterodyne. SIGNAL CIRCUITRY: 4 ICs, 11 FET's, 23 
Transistors, 16 Diodes. AUXILIARY CIRCUITRY: 5 lC + S t 1 LSI, 5 
LED's, 25 Transistors, 9 Diodes, FREQUENCY RANGE: FM 
76-108 MHz, AM 150-29.999 KHz. INTERMEDIATE FREQUENCY: 
FM 10.7 MHz ; AM 1st 66.35 MHz.. 2nd 10.7 MH2, ANTENNAS: FM 
telescopic, ext ant. terminal: AM telescopic, built-in ferrite bar. 
ext ant terminal POWER: 4 5 VDCH20 VAC DIMENSIONS: 12% 
(W) X 2 V* (H» X 6*i (0) WEIGHT: 3 lb. 15 oz. {IJi kg) 











/a 



Clock Modules MICROPROCESSOR COMPONENTS 




12V DC 

AUTOMOTIVE/ 

INSTRUMENT 

CLOCK 

APPLICATIONS: 
■ In-dath autDclOcM 

* AMprm|.|.«1 lulD,-' 
RU tlOtPi 

marina elk*. 

p Mt*t>4 A'bat tary 
po*»*rad MllUumHlt 
Faatu'ti B*>gni 0,3" jjr**n dupl**. Infernal cryitaE tiffi#- 
b*w 1 5 tat r'dty trar. Auto, dtjplwv br igh tntrts ee n trcH 
tooac. Ditpiay color f iltftfvbl* to blue, hjinnjraan. or«n & 
v#tJ<o%%. Compla**— jui* *dd twitch** and imi 

MA1Q03 Module um" ul^-h* ja-oi ■ $16.95 

CLOCK MODULES 

JUIA1023 .7" Had Digital LEG ClOcK Module 
MAI 026 . 1" Dlfl LED Alpim Oock/TherinDmalir 
MA 5036 ,3 J1 Rid Digits LED ClOcfc/Trmar 
MA1Q02 .5" 6*d Digit** LED Clock A Xformar 
MAlOfD 8 Rtd Diflita' LCD Clock 
MA1033 CBA J" CN#IUi LCD Cl*Kk 
MA1043 .7" Qnv) D>#t1«. L« D Clock 



8,95 

IB. 96 
5,95 
9.95 
3.95 

17 95 
B.95 

1 02 P30 Xtormw fvUA 1 Q23 1 043 & 50 3* Wool 3*9 
102-^22 Xtorrwiw for MA102» C«OC* WoCul** 3.49 

102 f*24 Hiotmm for MAlOtO Ctock Moduin 3 49 



80SDA7N«A SUPPORT DEVICES 

■a*. cr»u 

I J-eil Inmal/OUTDUt. 

1 PTlOltbj >1t*iPilpi Control 

I fllDliBtltlEiUII Bui DrltfH 

1 ClfKh QtMraiOt/OtlW 

I Bctf Of n*» 

I t«Vfl*m C«r*U [■■>*',-> J" Din^u 

I 5y"MB*"< CotlrBtpBr 

*J Ml I« t l* lt* la* ■ 3*J an 

I *t *■». C»ww J^3 tt/lAOTI 



*M 

s.w 

Ml 
i« 
*-* 

II 




<?££2*ri Sun Power Vow/ Electronics! 
<£S5^ SOLAR CELL PANEL KIT 

Niturtv; 

* Output: lGVDC, 10 IHfflA In S*fl#» 

fiV DC. la »OmA In Parallel 

• PataU nuy b* aaalr* eonnacttd lor 

or PiriW eti1 

II ■ I I I I 





1dailH*Hi *i~0 



TTw JEM low C*ii Pan**" KM COn<aW* 2D mc* tote* cafl*. Oh Mw 
panal DOM1 OT f>Olf*r lifM lap* whatl! *HO* Uat u**V 10 p*4*<t rtftaOBt 

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p*n*l can bd fur Ihw *ipind*d by eoupHrnj additional paneli In sanea 
tar mar* vDlkaa* cm In parallel for man currant The praynlurn (fade 
talar call* provide lha currant riaceteary lor tha operallon ol most po* 
labia liamlelc" radios, small biliary powered taitntl* la.p* bl*r* r * 
and unlimttid gpfwrimfinlii aalaj projittlt. 



JE305 



» 4 # i r w 



.$39.95 



EPROM Erasing Lamp 




- ErHH 2708, 2716. 1702A. 52030, 6204a «»■ 

* Efiaac up to < ctiipi, within 20 minutti. 

» Mtintsini conttint utpoiur* ditiartca at ona inch. 

* Rpoclil 0onductrw« fo»m I jn»r*liminaianiai^ buildup. 
« BuiIMn lafatv lock to prtVOflt UV vxpooir* 

* CoiBfWrt - onlv 7 6/ft M n 2 7/B" * T 

* CotnplMa wrth holding triv tot 4 cripi 
LfVS-IIEL R«pUoain«nt ftulb , . ll«JH 



UVS-11E 



- - ■ ■ 



• * • • 



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Ocljt Lilcnad Pvrtpharal Oi#ir 



DATA 

MnamcN 
APCtUiCCN 

CiAClOWLCK 

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ACOUIS1TION (CONTIWUEDJ— 
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Jt-HMQ/ACgqwItl |t Wl 4-m I 

» BUO/A CWMTter Jfi-Brh U*.j 
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■M BAUb UAAT 
MAArlS 



Iftaj 
11W 

5-» 



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LB 

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&BO0:BB00 SUPPORT DEVICES 

PpBPU 
V aunj -«h c*»ct , 



tj* 




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Mi 




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J-li) »l-*f*B««. Tf*BHMCiTll| 

MICROfflOCESSOH CHIPS 

1HIHK1 CPU [M*B*r*l <JMHi| 

^«3 * r raj. t] CPu [Vii* aidhrm t* MH: i 

COPWI CPU 

MU mi'" ' 

nMflaiAoc cPu 4-BiraiicilCan. TMAa.Qraai) 
MCMatt UPU -.'Clef* |HK Bvlai MvpvKBrrJ 

1 1 1 (aaai 1 1 wajh-hi nwn-uj] 

C*tr- Sat- c*ip HB« f i» *» »•» * ***i 
C*U Wbw RAVI 
cai>"«i hw »*»• 
CPW - 

Tujaaai-. 

SHIFT REGISTERS 




I. .VI 

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DvM H-tn Pt"* * < 
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AFHD-ICH 

"ilVJICl 

LiVIMCH 

LW1M2 

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LPajcN 

LPBUN 



bPintrui Acl l*» * ttlar fJn 

T-ciue^ Tan* l,dw Hii»n * m«' 
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aufj«r c*ilr» Q-p Ami 
€Dii|lknt Currant Saurci 
Tiwpamwra Tr*nuiut*i 
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i*inK» 4 IibM ArnBilfMHl 
Tw» C«"«. ■••«- Bar < 4*«m/C^ 
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T*:. CM flttT. and AlH 

I lOWftOf Dal tat af V9II ■!■■.» 

IJW p*ohI CH*. DSIDOQ, D5»H. O&7H00. ale. 

N aUoTiar Llnaar tJaia a oak 

llJTfl p*Qfl*| LH, LF. ADC. DAC, LH Sarlv* 
National SaflatBd Domtd LavalCan>|Hflai 1224 

Natlnruil ft! Logle Daia Book 

iP* iMig»!i 7*00 L LS L rH.S, and DUuTOrj SirtM 

iQiitni.T.iHii 




■rail ii 



(US .lor 




cr-cij aiiki i#jM pagi 



AC and DC Wall Transformers 



2LB 



("HA 

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TMIlDB 
JTIIiiHHtMlUTi 
irninlal Tl 
MB 



M Mil ■: 

- PflOMS /E f H QMS 

VH yv cnumtPRaM 

tH tPPUM 

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UK IP BOM |llnaJa*IV) 

DK EPRQM 

• H iL#HOM [itbr.fl l^pi -|V1 

HK €*BQM IHHatn MWUJUl 

J^M PBO** 

nxIFlQi' Ire :iK«rtfl 



M5 
LH 



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auifn-i: 
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ml mm rise UMtar *jc n tnm*9 w/Ofaaw 

uc Ma* mjf uhim f Mt tn * v ms^i 1 PW ufai 

Mi.rw*ir»P lBN»nl*iBm. Qnnir*l CHii up i 



IJ.U 



MICRDPROCESSDFl MANUALS 

MiH Um( trfanufl 

u -LDPIBH Utar Manual 

m mh uph Manual 

SPECIAL FUnrCTICKN 

&*•' MOI CW« 



7JH 





conav 



AV-MJOd 
AV-l-IMP 
AV-MKB 
AV4J!* 



Mean 
uwumn 



■tOata MAM 

A DkKl LED Orta */H BvH r#« 
B4H. VAC rtvU. L>iM«f [BV4ln at*. 

TELEPHONE/KEYBOARD CHIPS — 

Huih BuHnn Talapnpnt Dlalai 

CMQi Clack ainaritaf 
Kavt^B*ra: Enconpj 111 aayU 

kwIhfi Eneaaar |B m«vU 
p£*»i^#ri t ^urBaw |B Mnrll 
PTIIIHII I 



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Mill Jgr .tl Prilh- UtEPl, 
(iiiwi. pa**i luoplmi ti 
in, |'l|r 1Vf4 »l AH .ii 

Manila 



RTBO MTV/IOHj 12 VAC2SO^A S3 95 

AC 600 liTV/SOHi l2VACf>Ql3mA M »5 

AC 1000 11TV/«l>Hz 12 VAC t amo t5 95 

AC1700 117V40M1 S VAC T 7 amp S3 95 

Dv 9200 IITV/SOHr gvOCSOOmA S3 »$ 

DC #00 12QV/10HJ pVQCSQQmA S3 96 



CONNECTORS 




DBJE.r' 
DB25S 
D 204162 

D&eim 

22/44*E 

UOftSAJ 

UGB9/L 

UG179AJ 

S0239 

PU6S 

PL2B0 

UG2G0/U 

UG1094/U 



* an ■ at 



D SobmirnEtur* Plug , 

O Subrniniartura SoChai . . . . 

EefOnLocjt Hdw I2i OB?^S.? 

Caw for DB25P 1 , , 

PC Eda. 122/44 *nl . 
BNCPtut . - 
QHC -**ck . . 
UHF Aoaptar 
UHF Pana4 RaCp 
UHF Adapiar .... 
UHF PJufl 

QNCPlug ..*',*, 
BNC Bulkhead Racp 



■#*■!* 



P t ■> • -f # ■ 



t2S5 

S3&0 

^f &9 
. $1,75 

« 95 
- *1-T9 

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5 49 
. $121) 
, f 1 GO 
, *t GO 

. $1 29 



THS-16K4 *260NS . 



■ ■*■■+ + + + 



$24.95 
S19.9S 



VL-iM ft«y Vipl <ntM>* ( "t 




TROLCJlJCUrTS 

a* aa«naraa«aja| paaaaaapy 




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UBlfFV, At. Ba«an»ariOaa**)ai quia ULH 

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w,- 1 a nv?7 1 ? feeing 7 dq i apKim Iran « 1 iv t*n Ovihi ■ .iniiaiao 

SNJI1HH 4«4»UHH!Clvl-lKUl«r}NI U K 

&HKHM MiacMHji;rT<l t IUM>anH| M*4 



J&SK BK LilMaf Tapar Porj - - . . 

JS 100K 100K LrrvMt Tapv Pod , . , 

J VC 40 40K (3 r VaOflO CaWlttolkW in 



S5.25 



ALLIGATOR CLIP TEST LEADS 




IllamaWi, J tfaflBaQT QaP pa BBCfi BBC 15* 

#ALCP (10 per psck) S2.95/pkg. 




JE215 Adjustable 
Dual Power Supply 

Gen era I Dntcri prion. Th« JE215 ii • Dual Power 
Supply with independent adjustable positiva and negt- 
live output voltsges. A itparate ■druitment for each 
of lh» uippljii provides the user unlimarrj ippNtiTtrjni 
for IC currant vrjrtuje reoynrtmantL The supply an 
also be used as a general ill purpose virmblt power 

n*P0^ FfiATUHSB 

• Adjui|j1«b4« t*Qu L«*Bd DOiW *uOBli*». 

pot and iTiB 1 2VDC to iSVQC 

• PoAtr Output laacti pupplff ; 
5VDC » 500mA. 10VDC* 750nr,A. 
12WD-C*S00mA r and 
15VDC* UfimA 

■ Two, 3 larmlnal adj. IC rapulBTOri 
wlvh Charrnal ovprippti protPctiDH. 

• Haal ihrlr raguiator coding 

• LED "pn" Indicator 

• Pnrtiad 6 card ConiTruCnon 

• 12HVAC input 

• Sua 3 1/2* * $-i/1S u C a rM 

JEHSAdi Dual Power Supply Krt (as shewn] . . $24.|S 

i PhCTura not tTiOwfl BjT pimilaf In COntLtuCTJOn TO iCStif 
JiaOO flaa, Ptwaar Supply *tiH5VDC, lamp) 114 95 

JE?05Ad«VE«fSrd,Lfo JE2O0) i5,i9 S i12V *12»5 
J E 2 1 Vm r P>wr Spl Yj K i t. 5 15V DC. to 1. 5am p £ 1 9 .95 




JE60B PROGRAMMER 

2704V27M EPROM PROGRAMMER 




* T D 

* Ta obbbmh* tPHOHiai for 

* Tp anauUtai • awawaniRiad EBBOM 
■ To itara pnaftan In HAMS ior aHavaiiana 
> Tfvrta Mcarai* QlapJiy A«tihi: I LrlD'i Tor M« 
Rat anlrhH, 10 LCD'a fl* 1-| lor Addraaa Raglalar and • 
LED'* for Dila alamort A*gjal«r Tha Dala Mamory 
haflktar dltau r a In* c antanl ol tha HAM* Irpm th. fpnpy Chip 
m mm of a ribbon canl* rrom tha prcpiammar panal tail aorjlal lo Iht 
boahd PUUftd check 
ar Bftta Into BAIT 




DavilwrnanP v4 mkraprocaiior ay Hami pjr 
£>ftOH abcPai on Iha Maptat*O0Haor 



klM varff kJtlort at pfogrpmrneJ dat* ehanpaa Ui#J may man daU Irom a maala* ta HAM'i 
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>n.i LPPrDM rmrj-ininii- rn¥iilihiia, raT ft tlhay TtamaflBPlial n iitinrfl naiwirity. riraBB 
>*r arfl i poBar i n a fiH ai and a LHiffaa< ■aaaal Paa M Saai d aaia iMf . Tha taailwpii ai 




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JtOUOrv IV II »»»»p|p»f**a«ii«iic4*i'i«s.*«*.*«^* + i Od*S*»*BO 

JE608A Al««lTlbltd ind Tt«t*d $409,95 



OlttCIAL DEaCBlPTIOM 

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JE608-16K ADAPTER BOARD 
FOR 271 8/ 27 W EPROM S 



I4af*a 
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Board Kk .._.. . 
Sand aaaarrabaad JEflOB to ffactorv *or 
of the JcWfrTW Adupw Board KJt) 

JEWBA16K Hod. ftiMrrdiOd JEOOB w Ad«5t»r UEflOB-ISKl (ncQHw} 



■"■'■■+ + + B I 



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St 0,00 Mm Ofdar - U S. Fondi Only 
Calif. RaiidBrtti Add Q% S«fco» Tia 
PottBOB-Add 5%plui$1.S0 ImurancB 






ELECTRONICS 



Sfiac Shaati - 2bi 

Sand 86p PoLUpa fdf your 

FREE 1BB2 JAM ECO CATALOG 



PHONE 

ORDERS 
WELCOME 

141 5) 592 8097 



12/fll 



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1355 SHOREWAV ROAD. SELMONT, CA 94002 

PRICES SUBJECT TO CHANGE 



r^se 



JE610 ASCII 

Keyboard Kit 




Th* JEB10 ASCII Kavuoard Kit can bo lnt*rlac*4 Into 
matt inv cOmpuim iyctBrri. Thn kit comei tomplata 
with an induiTrial rjf«d# icavboard iwyitch alat-nrbly 
(fij>av»l, IC's. aockati. tsrm*tigr. n.ctironle tflmpj- 
n*ntt and A dour>1«>l4r>Bd prlniad -Airing OOard Tha 
k*v board BBBamblv raquhraa *5V • l4j0mA and -12V 
9 10 mA tor no at ai ton. Foauira* 00 fcav i gana* ala tha 
12* cnaTBctanv udoi' and lonn** caat ASCII tart Fuiry 
t>ufl*>fad. TpvO -.a*rd*fin* kayi pro^iOad for cuktBtm 
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trto CitipiiLi iii racily carnpatiOla wfEh TTL/DTL O* 
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treifi i/;* « HL iy Kay board, PC Boird. * 7Q Qt - 

K62 «-K«y kiy board (Keyboard only J . . .$ 34>95 
DTE-AK tt*i*only-3*"HaU"WKtia"D]$ 49.95 



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FULLfl-BIT 
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1ft KEV KCVBOARD 




Th* JEfrOQ Eijour itarp ooa'd Kit QrQaktW i*6 a a p a r aT 
haaadacimal Oifl4ia producad from a a qu antiat Kay Bntriaa 
to «HOw di'ad o^OtfrBrnmSftfj fo* ftoat mfcroornjt*ai»«>t 
or Sj-bli mamory clreurta. Thraa BOdUienal nyi iripn> 
tofcad tor upar ors*'*tion» A-ih pna navng a Puiabla 
output aval labia, Tha Outputi ar« latch #d and nnomtOfad 
uvlrh LED roadouTi Alio Includad la* kay an try ttrdba. 
Faaturai: Full B bit latch ad Output lOr nriieroproti#i*or 
uaa. Thraa u tar da lina kav< with Una b*ing blltlbla 
opffBtlon. Debauntf Elrculi provided for all Iii haya. 
B LED 'naojii to vafftfj) ftrnrlaa Earty inrarfar-lng with 
ttandard Iftpjn tC connacior Only +5VDC raouirad 
for operation £>«*- JK"H i B* W - fl Ik D 

|Aft*r HVmoM 
ii pis:yr*a ioa^a* 



JE600/DTE -HK 



syy.yb 



1 



JE600 Kit SemS^SSS^S^t .S59.95 

K19 If-Kay Karvooard (Kayooaro Ontyf ^ . - - SI 4.95 
DTE-HK icataoniy -3*rH»«Bj-T«iB|»j. ,r D] $44.95, 



TRS-80 
16K Conversion Kit 

Eapand yOuf 4K TflS-ot) Syttam to 16K 
Kit coma* tomplar* with; 

* S m. MM52D0 LUP041o/411«} 16K Dyn. Rwm i*rVS» 

■t Documentation for COfWOWpilfl 

TRS 16K2 M&ONS . 

TRS 16K3 -200MS 






See List of Advertisers on page 162 



73 Magazine • December, 1981 225 






<DEflLS) 
^DIRECTORY 



Phoenix AZ 

The Southwqt'i mat prop —I in communica- 
tions rornnanv nicking Km* rod, I com. 
Taaau. MR HiSS \ Astm. Limit. Cmfacrmft. 
Hy.Cain Bnmi and mm. Would like to 
serve juti! Po*rf Canumanaoatkins Corp.. I MO 
West CamcJbaca Rd.. flmmi AZ S3015. 
241-Witt, 

Culver City CA 

Jun\ Hertfntiici, 3Q195qpuKeda Blvd.* Coh*f 
City CA WE». 3904001 Tr*d« 4fi& iM&San 
Diep* Call in for ■ kr» ipiute 



FonUnaCA 

■ ICOM. 



NJ 

New fmfti iwily factor, iulhontrd (COM 
and YAESV distributor Lsrg? imeniory of isn* 
and used tpecials Mot oruj-nr brands in nock 
Complete \*ty ic* and xariiititi Raditn 
tnurnitad* 1760 E*&m Avenue, P.O. Bat 347. 
Stmwl NJ 08S73. 4GS-1599 

Amsterdam NY 
UPSTATE NEW YORK 

Kenwood. (COM. Drake. ptu» mam uiher 
ism's Amateur Dealer iWi7vrr35<i?an Adinm- 
d*c» FUdin Supph . Inc., 1*5 Wat Main Street. 
Amsterdam NT 13010. S42-8350. 



Tm-Tc 



Compart* lino ICOM. BenTran. 
Mirage, Cofaic, Lunar, wrr 4000 . 
pTuductx for hobbyist, technician, ripen- 
mentrr Ai» CB radio. Landroobilr Fanlana 
Elcctnna. 862S 9cm A**.. Fmlioi CA 
92335. «St-TTlf). 

SulcneCA 

SAN FRANCISCO BAY AREA 

HwrielHPe»taV rmt-vft- torn of ne* and used 
Hani Computer eeai and mcr.jxmrrns Srmng 
Harm t»no- |"5fi Wr cprc-ialur in ICOM. 
KIM. Mirage. Com pt rutin. Wr sJiiij ttorld- 
u,ide Trie-Corn Electronic*. 1*4*0 I'nion 
Avenue. San foat CA *S124. 377-4479. 

San Jaw CA 

Ba> area's nrhist Amateur Radio store New & 
used Amateur Radio aaks & rervkc. We feature 
Krnwtaid. ICOM. Artim, Yme»j. Ten-Tec* 
Santo. At m*nv mtn* Shaver Radio. |m., 1371 
So BanumA^.. San Joat CA 96 Itt, 99^1103. 

Denver CO 

Eipcrlmmicr t para dual Electronic and 
mechanical component* fot campuLrr people. 
flu dm |N»!|iU -. harm, r«boi hulldt-rv nprn 
[Tn*nu»rs Open yn dayi ■ wwii Gateway Dee- 
Ironies Corp., 2RJ9 W. 44th Ave.. Denver CO 
*0Ell,45fl-5444. 



Central NY 

Amateur radio hardvn ■ d display made hnnur 
H*nfirat**R ^calkrgnv plague*, awards or 
fjxcial order*. High qualm, fast tcrvtce. km 
pwa A.&M. Wandavrr, 3l3 N. Madison St.. 
PO. Ben 343. Rome M 13440, 337-5642. 



Syracuse-Rome-Utica NY 

FeBtimrtK- Kenwood. Yaau, ICOM. Drake, 
TenTflc. Sw an. IVflTfoiL Alpha, Robot. MF1 
Tempo, Astroo, KLM. Hv Gain, Modes. 
Lam. tWxraft . Hustler, Mini Products. You 
won't be disappointed with erruipment urr\xe 
Radio World, Oneida Countv Airporl -Termi- 
nal BuikUng. Oriskanv NT I34H, 537-0303. 



(Columbus OH 

Hv bteeect and best Ham Strae in tne rnirJwcat 
featuring quality Kenwood product*, with 
working dispLayv We aril onh the best. 
Authorised Kenwood Suivkw Universal 
Amitrur Radio Inc. \2hii Aida Dr.. 
Hcvoold&huTff [Columhus> OH 4306A 

MMat7. 



Miami FL 

Amateur Radio Oniir. Inc, "Kvervlhing (nr 
the Ainateur" Since IBflO. SSOS U.K. 2nd 
A i en ue, Miami FL 33! 37, 573-S383. TWX 
529035. 



Seranton PA 

[COM. Bird. CushCraft. Bot-kman, Fluke. 
Larsen. HiutW, Antenna Sntciiilistv. Asirtm 
Avjuiti, Belden, W2AU/W ? 2VS, CDE. Ar^A, 
Vibroplra, Ham-Ke>\ CES P Amphem4, Sonv. 
I-' iH luii < ."mmr r. BkW. Amwo, Shun\ Laftue 
Eleclronks, 11 12 Grand *icw St.. Scrantim PA 
IS50B, 343-2124. 



Smyrna GA 

Fcif your Kenwood. Va«u, J COM, Drake and 
other ii iim tni r necri* k conu" u, m ils, Brill's 
Two-W.v Ilurlto. 2M6 N. Atlanta Rd. h Smyrna 

<;a MM. M2-mw. 



Houston TX 

Kxperi menter V puradisvl Hlectronk? and itiu- 
rhanicai compiinents fur cinnput^r [wople, 
audit} |KHipJc k hanw, robot liiLjldcr%, cxperi- 
manteta, Opii six dav* a week. Gateway Elfc- 
Ironles Inc., B»32 Clprkcnsl. Houiton TX 
77063. H7^-B575. 



Preston ID 

Boh WBTBVZ, has the Urgrat Stick of Ama 
teur Gear In thr tutermmintajn Wesl and the 
Best Prices. Gal J mi- lor all nmr huai wwb. 
BtKs DiitHhiilinK, 7« So, State, Preston ID 
S32E3. N.i2-(WJ0. 



San Antonio TX 



Terre Haute IN 

Your ham hradiwattcn located In the heart of 
the midwert Hooiier Electronics, Iik , |9 
Meadows Center, P.O. Bot 3300. Trrre Haute 
IN 47JMI03. 23*- 14J», 



(Aiiiiultrti* 2 way service shop. Call Dee, 
W5FSP. St-llinji Antenna SpeciaUsU. AvunH, 
Ajfiden. Bird, Hv-ftain. Standard, Vibmpti-x. 
Midlmd, Henn, CunhCraft, Dielectric, 
Huvt|er P ICOM. MR, Nye, Shore, Cubic. 
T«p, Ten-Ttc and utnerv Appliance At 
Gqiupment Co., Inc., 3317 Vance Jackson 
Road, San Antonio TX 71213, 734-7793, 



Littleton MA 

Thr ham tforc of NX. you can reJv on. Km 
wood, ICOM, WOton, f aaw. Denfron, KIM 
amps. B&U iwitchea *r * at I meter* , Wrustka 
radar rletiirhm. Bearcat + Reaency. antennas bv 
Lawn, Wilson. Huttkr, CAM TEL-COM 
Inc. OMnmunk-at^Kis & tl«ifnnici. 673 Great 
Rd., R1 lift, Urtieion MA 01480. 4A6-3040 



Vienna VA 

Tbs- \\ KihmK*on metropolitan area's leading 
fupptfcrr of iha latest in Amateur Radio * nd Test 
Ecpupment On your nc&l trip to the Nation" v 
Capital f vtop rn and see us.. Elect rmic Equip- 
ment Bank. St*.. 51ft Mill Si. N.E., Vlema VA 
S2180. 93fl-3350. 



Hudson NH 

New Enajantj * Dntribotrrr and Authorized Ser 
Mce Center for all M#j<ir Amateur Lines Tufts 
Radio Electronics. Inc., 61 Lowell Road. Hud- 
mn NH 03051. 8S3-50Q& 



Casper WY 

Servtn* Wyoming Hams with iots of good stuff 
like Gallbook. antenna parts, ipeciaLt and 
bargains. Witly and Larry Dean invite you to 
drop in anytime. Radio Artrnr+. S31 W.Coilau 
Dr., Casper WT 83601. 837-5146 



Ann Arbor MI 

See us For products hie Ten- Tec, R. L Drake, 
Drntrun mod mans, more Open Mondav 
throtinri Saturday, u«30 id 1730 WB&VCfi 
WBSl^O, WDSOKN and WgRP behind the 
eonntrr Purchase RadioSupplv, 327 E. Hoover 
A%e.« Ann Arbor Ml 4A104 



Charlotte NC 

Santec. Hy-Cain, Cubic Comnv. liiHiim 
Special rtls. Witecm. W2AUW2VS, BAW. 
Palhcofn. Nse Viking Eketra. MFJ, Bash. CO. 
AttI.. Arneco. Callhonk Smice, Salet Neu &r 
Refurbished Home-Tronic*. 1217 Plata, 
t nartotte NC 282QS, 334-7V74, 



DEALERS 

Your company name and message 
can con tain up to 25 worth Jar as til- 
th as $150 tjearly (prepaid), or $15 
per month (prepaid quarterly}. So 
mention of mail-order business or 
area code permitted. Directory text 
and payment must reach us 60 days 
in advance of publication , For ex- 
ample, advertising for the February 
'82 issue must be in our hands by 
December 1st. Mail to 73 Mag- 
azine. Peterborough NH 03458. 
ATTN: Nancy C tarn pa. 



226 73 Magazine • December 1981 




PROPAGATION 




J, H. Nelson 
4 Plymouth Dr. 
Whiting NJ 08759 



EASTERN UNITED STATES TO 



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A = Next higher frequency may also be useful 
B ■ Difficult circuit this period F = Fair G = Good 
P = Poor * = Chance of solar flares; # m of aurora 



SUN 


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TUE WED THJ 


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THE EVOLUTION OF A CHAMPION ! 

FT-101ZD Mk III 







The FT-101ZD Mk III is the latest chapter in the success story of the FT-101 line. 
Armed with new audio filtering for even better selectivity, the FT-101 ZD now 
includes provision for an optional FM or AM unit. Compare features and you'll see 
why active operators everywhere are upgrading to Yaesu! 



Variable IF Bandwidth 

Using two 8 -pole filters in the IF, Yaesu' s pioneering variable band- 
width system provides continuous control over the width of the IF 
passband — from 2.4 kHz down to 300 Hi — without the short- 
comings of single-filter IF shift schemes. No need to buy separate 
filters for 1.8 kHz, 1.5 kHz, etc. 

Improved Receiver Selectivity 

New on the FT-101 ZO Mk III is a high-performance audio peak/notch 
fitter. Use the peak fitter for single-signal CW reception or choose the 
notch filter for nulling out annoying carriers or interfering CW signals. 
In the CW mode, you can choose between the 2.4 kHz SS8 fitter and 
an optional CW filter (600 or 350 Hz) from the mode switch. 

Diode Ring Front End 

The FT-1Q1ZD now sports a high-level diode ring mixer in the front 
end. This type of mixer, well known for its strong signal performance, 
is your assurance of maximum protection from intermod problems on 
today's crowded bands, 

WARC Bands Factory Installed 

The FT-101 ZD Mk 111 comes equipped with factory installation of the 
new 10, 16 p and 24 MHz bands recently assigned to the Amateur 
Service at WARC. In the meantime, use the 1 MHz band for monitor- 
ing of WWV! 

RF Speech Processor 

Not an additional-cost option, the FT-101 ZD RF speech processor 
provides a significant increase in average SS6 power output, for 
added punch in those heavy DX pile-ups. The optimum processor 
level is easily set via a front panel control. 



Worldwide Power Capability 

Every FT-101 ZD comes equipped with a mufti-tap power transformer, 
which can be easily modified from the stock 117 VAC to 100/110/200/ 
220/234 VAC in minutes. A DC-DC converter is available as an option 
for mobile or battery operation. 

Convenience Features 

Designed fundamentally as a high-performance SSB and CW trans- 
ceiver, the FT-101 ZD includes buift-in VOX, CW sidetone. semi- 
break -in T/ft control on CW. slow-fast-off AGC selection, level 
controls for the noise blanker and speech processor, and offset tuning 
for both transmit and receive. The Mk 111 optional FM unit may be used 
for 10 meter FM operation, or choose the optional AM unit for WWV 
reception or VHF AM work through a transverter (AM and FM units 
may not both be installed in a single transceiver). 

Full Line of Accessories 

See your Yaesu dealer for a demonstration of the top performance 
accessories for the FT-101 ZD t such as the FV-101Z External VFO, 
SP-9D1P Speaker/Patch, YR-901 CW/RTTY Reader, FC-902 Antenna 
Tuner, and the FTV-901R VHF/UHF Transverter. Watch for the 
upcoming FV-101DM Digital Memory VFO, with keyboard frequency 
entry and scanning in 10 Hz steps! 

Nationwide Service Network 

During the warranty period, the Authorized Yaesu Dealer from whom 
you purchased your equipment provides prompt attention to your 
warranty needs. For long-term servicing after the warranty period, 
Yaesu is proud to maintain two fully-equipped service centers, one in 
Cincinnati for our Eastern customers and one in the Los Angeles area 
for those on the West Coast. 



Note: A limited quantity of the earlier FT-101ZD (with AM as standard feature) is stilt available. See your Yaesu dealer. FT-101ZD Mk 
designates transceivers bearing serial #240001 and up, with APF/Motch filter built in and AM/FM units optional- 



651 



Price And Specifications Subject To 
Change Without Notice Or Obligation 




*^S3 



W 



The radio. 



YAfSU 



YAESU ELECTRONICS CORP., 6851 Walthall Way, Paramount, CA 90723 • (213) 633-4007 
YAESU Eastern Service Ctr., 9612 Princeton-Glendale Rd., Cincinnati, OH 45246 • (513) 874-3100 



m 



MIC-SHCAR AF GJuW-9-RF GAIN 



I 






' U J? * r n 



3 



SSS TRANSCEIVER TS-130S 



CAt Q'j 



-RlT-®h IF SHIFT 



I 



SEND 



MODE 

cw S ? B nev 




BAND 



POWEH 



NAN AMTT *• * 



Processor, N/W switch, IF shift, DFC option 





Ad incredibly compact, full-featured, all 
solid-state HF SSB/CW transceiver for 
both mobile and fixed operation. It 
covers 3.5 to 29.7 MHz (including the 
three new Amateur bands!) and is 
loaded with optimum operating features 
such as digital display, IF shift, speech 
processor, narrow/ wide filter selection 
(on both S5B and CW), and optional 
DFC- 230 digital frequency controller* 
The TS-130S runs high power and the 
TS-130V is a low power version for QRP, 

TS 130 SERIES FEATURES! 

• 80-10 meters, including three new bands 

' overs all Amateur bands from 3.5 to 
29,7 MHz, including the new 10. 18. and 

t-MHz bands. Receives WWV on 10 
MHz. VFO covers more than 50 kHz 
above and below each 500-kHz band. 

• Two power versions... easy operation 
TS-1305 runs 200 IV PEPj 160 W DC 
Input on 180-15 meters and 160 W 1'E 
140 W DC on 12 and 10 meters. TS-13QV 
runs 25 W PEP 20 W DC input on all 
bunds. Solid-state. Wideband final 
amplifier eliminates transmitter Lunim 
and receiver wideband RF amplifiers 
elimlnaic |> re se lector peaking. 

• CW narrow/ wide selection 

"N -VV" switch allows selection o! wide 
and narrow band widths. Wide CW and 



SSB band widths are ih« same Optional 
YK-SSC (500 H ir YK -88CN (270 Hz} 
filter may be Installed for narrow CW 

• Built-in speech processor 
Increases audio punch and average SSB 
output power, while suppressing sid< 
band splai 

• SSB narrow selection 

W" switch allows selection of narrow 
SSB bandwidth to eliminate QRM. when 
iptlonal YK 88SN (1.8 kHz) filter Is 
installed, (CW Kter may still be selected 
in cw mode J 

■ Sideband mode selected automatically 

LSB is selected on 40 meters and below, 
and USB on 30 meters and above. SSB 
REVERSE position on MODE switch. 
Butlt-in digital display 
Six -digit green fluorescent rube display 
Indicates actual operating frequency 
to 100 Hz. Also indicates external VFO 
or fixed-channel frequency. RIT shift, 
and CW transmit receive shifts. Backed 
up bv an analog subdlal , 

• IF shift 

Allows IF passband to be moved away 
from interfering signals and sideband 
splatter 

• Built-in RF attenuator 

For optimum rejection of Interniodulatlon 
distortion. 

• Single-conversion FLL system 
Improves stability as well as 
tra nsm it and receive spurious 
characteristics 



Built-in VOX 

r cot t v en lent SSB operation, as well 
as scmlbreak-ln CW with sldetone. 
Effective noise blanker 
Eliminates pulse-type interference such 
as Ignition noise. 

Compact and lightweight 

Measures only 3-3 4 inches high. 91/2 
inches wide, and 11-9/16 inches deep, and 
weighs only 12.3 pounds. 




Optional DFC-230 Digital Frequency 
Controller 

Allows frequency control in 20-Hz steps 
with UP ''DOWN microphone (supplied 
with DFC-230L Includes four memorlr 
(handv Tor split-frequency operation] 
and digital display* Covers 100 kHz 
above and below each 500-kllz band. 
Vcry com pari. 



Matching accessories for fixed station operation: 
PS-30 base-Station jiinvtr • SP 120 external speaker 

supply (remotely switch • VFO- 120 remote VFO 

on and off with TS-I30S • MC-50 5QkO_ 5QQQ desk 

power switch). microphone 

Other accessories not shown: 



More information on the T5-130 Series Is 
available from all authorized dealers of 

» Trio-Ken wood Communications 
till West Walnut Street. Compton. 
California 90220. 



KENWOOD 

, . , pari setter in amateur radio 



• YK 8SC 1500 H/i and YK-88CN 
(270 Hz) CW fitir; 

• YK 885N (1.8 kHzl narrow 
SSB llller 

• AT -130 compact antenna tuner 
180-10 m, Including 3 new 

bands) 

• MR 100 mobile mounting brocket 

• MC 305 vitid M< 35S noise 
cancelling hand ti iter op hones 



■ PC-1 phone p.ilch 

• TL-922 A linear amplifier 

• MS 5 and HS 4 headphone** 

• HC-10 world digital clock 

• PS 20 base-station power 
supply for TS- 130V 

• SP 40 compact mobile 
speaker 

• VFO- 230 digital VFO with i 
memories 




Specifications and prices are subject fo change without notice or obligation,