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Full text of "73 Magazine (February 1982)"

February 1982 $2.9S 



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73Magaztne • February, 1982 3 



INFO 



Manuscripts 

Oofltrttmilons In the form of minu- 
icrtpts with dfvwirigs and/Of ptioto 
grap^i ara welcome and wtll te cofv 
»id«r»d itm possible publicatkMi. We 
etifi t«sum» no rsspQr(3iblltlY for loss 
or damA^i to any matdrial. Pl«a5« 
ti^closs a aTainp9d, seif-addreisad 
anvelot>« with oach submis^loi), Pay- 
mom for thu U3« of any un&ol^cllad 
rriatorlal will ba made upon acoap^ 
t»nc^. Alt contributions should b9 dl- 
reclftd (o the 73 editorial offices. 
"How to Wrlie tor 7T guldahnea are 
aval table upon request. 

Editorial Offices: 

f'ine Street 

PetBrt)orough NH 03458 

Ptmne; 103^4-3673. §24^74 

Advdflllslng Offices: 

BmSt/eet 

Petefborough HH cmse 

PhOfw: e03^4.7!;te 

Circulation Offices: 

EimStraei 

P»t«nMrougH HH 03456 

Phone: Q||3%4>7296 

Subscription Rates 

In IM UnUad States and Posacaalmvi: 
One Yur f12 iasuaa) S25.00 
Two Yeaf^ (24 Issues) $38 00 
Three Yman (36 ia^u^) £5100 

fisewhere: 

Canada^W7.00/1 year only, U.S. 
funds. Fofeign surface maia--i35.0C^1 
yair only, U.S. funds. Fomian air 
mail— $62,00/1 y«ar only, U.S. lunda, 

To subscribe, 

renew or change 

an address: 

Write lo 73 Mag&£(tie, Subecrlptkin 
D«$}af1ment, PO Box 931, Farming- 
da la NY 11737, Fof renewala and 
changes of addreea, lF>c]ude thb ad- 
Ctm^ l«bet from your mc^ lecefit 
iaaua of 73. For gift stitacftptlQrm. in- 
ctude iNiur nama and adcfrms ae well 
as tlwsa of gift radplents. Rosimaster: 
Sand ftarm 1(3679 to 73 Magsim^, Suth 
icnptk>n Sef¥lcaa, P.O. BonSS!. Farm- 
ingdaie. NY 1*737. 

Subscription 

problem or 

question: 

Write (O 73 Msg&ittm, SubscHinion 
Department PO Box 931, Farminodala 
NY 11737 Pieafl9 l«ioliid« an address 

73 MsgaiinB (l$5N 0096-9010) ts pub- 
tl«t^ed monttily by 73, Inc., 80 Pine 
Streeip Peterborough NH 03456. Sec- 
or^d olas9 postage paid at Peterbor- 
oogh NH 03458 and al additional mail- 
ing offices. Copy rig hi (c) 1961 by 73, 
Inc. All riflhlta reaerved. No pari of this 
I publication may be reprinted or oiher^ 
I w^se repfodiiced wlihout written per- 
I mission from the publisher. Microfilm 
I Edition— University MIcfotilm, Ann 
I Arbor Ml 48106. 



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4 73 Magazine • Februarv* 1992 



The Fun-Oscillator 

— a simple, goof-proof vfo for your QRP 
transmitter.. „„.,WA9RBR 



Build this Afitennalyzer 

—you'll need a weekend 



12 



...WIBG 16 




hb. 82 



MAGAZINE 



The Father of FM 

— the tragic story of Major E, H. Armstrong 
, , Hammond 

The Art of Listening 

—audio accessories explored ...W8FX 

A Dish Antenna Anyone Can Build 

— no hyperbole, just a parabola 

W8DIY 




h4itoft*'4 



50 



64 



68 




Police Freqs for the TR-2400 

—a sleepless night for the mod squad 

Those Amazing Bobtails 

—the current-fed connection W1XU 

Shoot the Moon! 

—visual tracking for your EME array 

W9CCA 

CQ MARS de IC-2A 

— work new worlds............. ., 



26 



30 



34 



WDSJLW 46 




^b's Own LNA 

— rolling your own takes patience 

..,. , WA4CVP, WA40SR 92 

Microwave Master 

—you might not need a 

mountaintop. ...... ................WB4APC 96 

CW Interface 

[3 -^let your computer do the copying 

W9fD 104 




Never Say Die — 6, Social Events — 48, OSCAR Orbits — 83, Ham Help — 98, 122, 139, Reader Service — 114, 
Review — 118, Letters— 120, Fun! — 123, Awards — 1 25, Kahaner Report — 127, Contests— 128, RTTY Loop — 134, 
New Products— 135, Propagation — 178 

Cover Pastel lliustration by Wiltiam Geise, Wrfton NH. 



J 



73 Magazine • February, 1982 5 



W2NSD/1 

KEVER SAY DIE 

ec/itor/a/ by Wayne Green 




NOW, THE GOOD NEWS 

The easy passage of the Gold- 
water ham bilt through the Seiv 
ate was certainly good news. . « 
and will bring closer some badly 
needed changes In the funda- 
mental rules by which the FCC 
has had to operate. 

Another bright spot was a bill 
entered m the House (in Novem- 
ber) by Rep, Timothy Wirth of 
Colorado. Let me gtve you 
quotes on some ol the provi- 
sions of this bill. . . 

Authorize use of smaieur volunteers 
for examiRation prdparation 

Section 44f> is amend©<i by adding 
at the end thereol the (ol lowing new 
subsections: 

"4{f){A) Noiw I 111 standing Ihe provi- 
sions of Part III of Title 5, United 
States Code or 31 U.S.C, 5665(b). for 
purposes of administering any exam- 
tion for an amateur station operator 
license, the Commission may accept 
and employ the voluntary and un- 
compensated services ot any indlvld- 
yai who holds an amateur station op- 
efalor license of an equal or higher 
Class than the class license for 
vvhich the examination is bemg pre- 
pared. Any person vwho provides ser- 
vices under this paragraph shall not 
be considered, by reason of having 
provided such sen/ices, a Fedeiai 
employee for any purpose.** 

Explanation 

This proposal would provide a stat- 
utory basis for present practice at 
the Commission, and would allow ex- 
panslon m the Commission's use of 
volunteers. The amendment would 
have no discernible effect on our 
budgeta ly req u i re me n t s. 

''Mf%5} Notwithstanding the provi- 
sions of Part III ol Title 5, United 
States Code or 31 U.S.C. §665(b), for 
purposes of administering any exam- 
ination for any amateur station oper- 
ator license, the Commission may 
accept and employ the voltjntarv and 
uncompensated services of any indt- 
vidua! who holds an amateur station 
operator license of an equal or higher 

€ 73 Magazine • February, 1982 



class than the class license for 
which the examination is being con- 
ducted. Any person who provides vol- 
untary and uncompensated services 
under this paragraph shall not be 
considered, by reason ot having pro- 



vided such services, a Federal effV 
ployee for any purpose." 

Expf a nation 

The present practice of the Com^ 
mission is to permit volunteer licens* 



$$ HOME-BREW CONTEST $$ 

For some of us, there is no more satisfying experience than 
designing and building a piece of electronic gear. Now there's a 
chance for you honne-brewers to receive special recognition for 
your achievements. It's the 73 Magazine Home-Brew Contest. 

Between now and April 1, we1i be looking for articles de- 
scribing the best home-brew protects in the lar>d for under 
SI 00. All useful projects will be published in 73, and the cream 
of the crop wift share $500 in cash prizes. Top prize in the con- 
test is $250, with $10Q going to the second place project and 
$50 to each of three honorable mentfons. These prizes are 
over and above the payment that all authors receive for hav- 
ing their artictes published in 73, 

Contest Rufes 

1. All entries must be received by April 1,1982. To enter, write 
an article describing your best home-brew construction pfo- 
ject, and submit the article to 73 Magazine. Any construction 
article received before the April 1 deadline is aulomatically 
entered in the contest. If you haven't written for 73 before, 
please send an 5ASE for a copy of our author's guide. 

2. The total cost of the project must not exceed Si 00. even if 
al I parts are puchased new. Be sure to i nclude a detailed parts 
list, with prices. 

3. All parts used In the project must be available to the aver- 
age radio amateur or electronics experimenter. To be on the 
safe side, include sources for any unusual components. 

4 Projects will be judged by the 73 technical staff on the 
basis of usefulness, reproducibility, economy of design, and 
clarity of presentation. The decision of the judges is finaL 

5, All projects must be original, i.e., not previously published 
elsewhere. 

6. All rights to articles purchased for publication become the 
property of 73 Magazine. 

Send your entries to: 

Home-Brew Contest 

73 Magazine 

80 Pine Street 

Peterborough NH 03458 

Winners will be announced in the June^ 1982, issue of 73. 
Have fun! 



ees holding an Amateur Extra^ Ad- 
vanced, or General Class license who 
are al least 16 years of age to admin- 
ister Novice Cfass operator license 
examinations. The proposed amer>d- 
rttent would give statutory recoflni- 
lion to this practice and would allow 
the Commission to 6)clend tr>6 praCr 
UcB lo examinations tor other 
classes, al the discreUon of the Com* 
mission. 

This program would help to corv 
serve Commissiori resources and ad- 
ditlonal benefits would result from 
the fact that applicants would likely 
be able to take examinations within 
their communities, as opposed to 
having to travet to FCC field offices 
for testing. 

Once the FCC has t>een auth- 
orized to let amateurs prepare 
and administer exams, we have 
the path open to set up a system 
whereby certain clubs might be 
able to hold classes to teach the 
needed theory, rules, and opera- 
tion skills to prospective 
hams. . .followed by oral exams 
and a demonstration of skills. 

While there are some ama- 
teurs who believe that the ten- 
sion and panic of an FCC-ad- 
ministered exam are beneficial 
in some way, that was not my 
experience... nor the experi- 
ence of anyone Tve talked with 
about it. There seems to be a 
general concept that we should 
do everything possible to keep 
enthusiastic people out of the 
hobby rather than doing all we 
can to interest people In it. , , 
and making their entry an enjoy- 
able experience, 

There seems to be some wari- 
ness that we will suddenly find 
ourselves with a system where 
we are bringing in people who 
will be rotten hams and thus 
spoil the hobby. I wouid say two 
things to those worriers . . . first, 
we already have a fine system 
for bringing in lousy hams, one 
which has been working with a 
high degree of perfection. On© 
has only to visit Los Angeles to 
get the full flavor of the 
I980s-type ham in full bloom. 
It should be obvious that the 
present system of filtering out 
the weirdos is not working 
worth beans. 

Secondly, t know of no one in- 
terested in opening the flood 
gates to CBers to come into am- 
ateur radio for a tree ride. Not 
even CBers have suggested any- 
thing that preposterous, I do 
hear hams opposing it, but 
these chaps are merely lighting 
their own straw man, not any* 
thing ever seriously proposed. If 
some hams are gullible enough 
to get excited over such ma- 



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• Up'conversion PLL circuit. 



for improved sensitivity, 
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Communicatrons type noise 
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IRF Attenuator allows 20 dB 
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Tone control 
Front mounted speaker. 
"^S" meter, with 1 to 5 SINPO 
scale, plus conventional 
"S" meter scale. 
Coaxial, and wire antenna 



Digital world clock with 
two 24-hour displays, 
quartz time base 

The HC-10 digital world clock 
with dual 24*hour display 
shows local time and the time 
in 10 preprogrammed plus two 
programmable time zones. 



terminals for low impedance 
(50 0), Wire terminals for 
high impedance (500 Q). 

• 100. 120, 220, and 240 VAC, 
50/60 Hz. Selector switch on 
rear panel. 

• Optional 13,8 VDC operation, 
using DCK-1 cable kit, 

• Other features: carrying handle, 
- S headphone jack, and record jack. 

OPTIONAL ACCESSORIES: 

• DCK 1 DC Cable kit 

• SP-100 External Speaker. 




R-iaao 

^ear there and everywhereT.. 
easy tunings digital display 



The R-1000 is an amazingly 
easy-to-operate, high- 
performance, communications 
receiver, covering 200 kHz to 
30 MHz in 30 bands. This PLL 
synthesized receiver features a 
digital frequency display and 
analog dial plus a quartz 
digital clock and timer. 

R-1000 FEATURES: 

* Covers 200 kHz to 30 MHz 
continuously. 



30 bands, each 1 MHz wida 
Five-digit frequency display 
with 1-kHz resolution and 
analog diai with precise gear 
dial mechanism. 

BuiltHn 12-hoyr quartz digital 
clock with timer to turn on 
radio for scheduled listening 
or control a recorder througn 
remote terminal 

Step attenuator to prevent 
overload. 



• Three IF filters for optimunn 
AM, SS8. CW. 12-kHz and 
6 -kHz (adaptable lo 6-kHz 
and 2.7-kHz) for AM wide and 
narrow, and 2, 7 -kHz fiiter for 
high-qualitv SS8 (USB and 
LSB) and CW receptioa 

• Effective noise blanker 

• TerminaJ for external lape 
recorder. 

• Tone control 

• Built-in 4-inch speaker 

« Dimmer switch to controf 
intensity of S-meter and other 
panel lights and digital display. 



• Wire antenna terminals for 
200 kHz to 2 MHz and 2 MHz 
to 30 MHz. Coax terminal for 
2 MHz to 30 MHz. 

• Voltage selector for tOO, 120, 
220. and 240 VAC. Also 
adaptable to operate on 13.8 
VDC with optionai DCK-1 kil 

OPTIONAL ACCESSORIES: 

• SP-100 matching external 
speaker 

• HS-6 lightweight, open-air 
headphone set. 

• HS-5 and HS'4 headphones. 

• DCK-1 modification kit for 
12-VDC operation. 




SP-100 



R-1000 



HS>S 



^ ► 



\# 



KENVUOOD 

TRIO-KENWOOD COMMUNICATIONS 

1111 West Walnut, Compton. California 90220 



STAFF 



EXECirriVE VfC£ Ff«£SlDiKT 

ASSISTANT PUftllBHEIUlDiTOn 
JefJ D-eTray WB$aTM 

ASSOCIATE PUBLlSHtE A/ OJ RECTOR 
OF PUBLICATIONS 

Edward Fermfln WATUFY 

MANACilNCI EDITOR 
John fiufnall 

A5ST. MANAGING EDITOR 

Susan PhiF^nck 

EDrroniAi assistants 

CONTfl'»'i^^C: eDlTOHS 
John - T AG^ 

Tim OaAi«i NSf^K 
Urry ftanai)**^ WS2NEt 

ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT 
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ASSOCIATES 

RoberTSflk^FWe^GFE 

Bill Gosrt»y Kf 7C 

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Dave ifiEfrim KiTWJ 

Joe Kaster Q3ZCZ 

Dr. Mafc Leav&y WA3AJR 

Bill Pasternak WAfilTF 

Pete; Slarh K20AW 

PRODUCTION MANAGEIlf 

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neuvers, then we should consid- 
er them part of the problem, not 
part of any solutions. 

No, I think it is plain to just 
everyone that our present lic- 
ensing system stinks. Here we 
have a Morse code test which a 
four-year old has passed with 
flying colors... big deal filter. 
We have a technical e^am that 
few people even bother to study 
for. . . why bother when you can 
buy the test answers from Bash 
and just memorize the answers? 
That Includes questions on 
rules^ so we don't even have to 
know them anymore. It Is no 
wonder that we have jamming of 
repeaters, foul language on the 
bands, stupid pileups of DX sta- 
tions, and a situation on two 
meters in Los Angeles that has 
to be heard to be t>el]eved. 

Not only are things going to 
hell in a basket^ but we have the 
spectacle of thousands of hams 
doing all they can to protect this 
terrible system and make sure 
that we get even more of the 
same kind of hams. 

Yes, I do have some ideas on 
what to do about the situation. 
And I think they will work. They 
certainly are right up the alley of 
the current FCC changes. The 
Commission has two major in- 
terests these days . . . deregula- 
tion and cutting expenses. I 
think that we can take advan- 
tage of these and at the same 
time improve amateur radio 
substantially. 

Let's take a look at some ba- 
sics, Firstiy, yes. . . we do have 
some terrible hams in our ranks. 
But we recognize that, as much 
of a pain in Ihe ass as these 
bums are, they are a distinct mi- 
nority. Okay . . . there's a hint foi 
us ... a clue on how to start get* 
ting out of this miserable 
situation. 

To me, one of the foundations 
of amateur radio Is the ham 
club. 1 believe that every ham 
should belong to and support a 
ham club. This is one of the big 
strengths we have. This also is a 
key to our separating the good 
from the bad and the ugly, for 
few of the really bad eggs ever 
join clubs. The same behavior 
which makes them despicable 
on the air keeps them from hav- 
ing friends off the air. And what 
few do have the guts to come to 
club meetings, knowing what 
others think of them, are not 
thought well of for it. Thus, \ sus* 
pect that the more we can in- 
volve our clubs In the training 



and licensing of newcomers, Ihe 
tietter class of hams we will 
have on our bands. Perhaps we 
could even consider some sort 
of trial period for newcomers t^e- 
fore their licenses are perma- 
nent so that we could observe 
them on the air. 

We already know that the 
most vicious and obnoxious of 
people are quite capable of 
learning the code. In fact, since 
some of the worst hams we have 
had have been Extra class, per* 
haps there is some correlation 
between ugliness and adapt* 
ability to code (I'm kidding. . . 
aren't I?). I think that CW is one 
of the most treasured aspects of 
amateur radio, but I also think 
that the ability to copy the code 
ES meaningless as far as deter- 
mining whether someone is go- 
ing to be a good ham. I think that 
once we make code ability hon- 
orable and stop forcing people 
to learn It for the test, we will 
take a lot more pride in it. Who 
can really take pride In some- 
thing which he has to do, 
whether he wants to or not? 

Clubs are an answer to many 
of our problems. If we are going 
to get amateur radio into any 
serious growth pattern we are 
going to have to have many 
more and stronger ham clubs, I 
would like to see ham clubs set 
up in every high school in the 
country. Td like to know that 
every ham club has classes to 
teach newcomers the theory, 
the rules, and how to operate. If 
the Wirth bill goes through. It 
will open the way for clubs not 
only to teach the fundamentals 
of amateur radio, but also to 
make up and administer the ex- 
ams. Talk about a service being 
self-sustaining! 

This also would cut the cost 
to the FCC substantially, I don*t 
know how much they are paying 
their people to keep writing new 
test questions to try to stay 
ahead of Bash and his cheat- 
sheets, but it must be a substan- 
tial amount. Then there ts the 
cost of printing and distributing 
the tests. If the field personnel 
of the Commission did not have 
to sit around and administer ex* 
ams they would be freed up for 
more productive work... or 
even to go into the private sector 
and earn money for taxes in* 
stead of spending It. We sure 
have a need for engineers and 
technicians these days in indus- 
try ... a desperate need. 



Monitoring 

Another provision of the Wlrth 
bill is as fottows. , ,. 

Aiithofko u»« Qf vmatAur volimt*»ci 
tor ffiontiorlng 

'*4(f)^ For purposes of monitonng 
arty violation of any provision of this 
Act, and of any regulation made by 
the Commission pursuant to this Act, 
felattng to the amateur radio service, 
the Gommtssion, notwithstanding 
any provisions of Part III of Title 5, 
United States Code or 31 U.S.C. § 
665(b), may fl) recruit and train any in- 
dividual licensed by tlie Commission 
to operate an amateuf station; and (li) 
accept and employ the voluntary and 
uncompensateij services of such in- 
dividual. For purposes of recruiting 
and training such individual, the 
Commission may also accept and 
employ the voluntary and uncompen- 
sated services of any amateur sta- 
tion operator organ iiat ion. Any per- 
son who provides voluntary and urv 
compensated services under this 
paragraph shall not be considered, 
by reason of having provided such 
services, a Federal employee for any 
purpose." 

Explanation 

The volunteers' monitoring author- 
ity should include the monitoring of 
amateur licensees transmitting on 
frequencies not assigned to the ser* 
vice and i$ intended to permit volun- 
teers to collect violation reports and 
annotate arKJ summarize them few the 
convenience ol the FCC. 

Enactment of this proposal would 
enhance the Commission's enforce- 
ment efforts and bolster efforts to de- 
tect and prosecute rule violators. To 
ensure that a volunteer monitoring 
program helps rather than hinders 
the enforcement progi'am, it Is Impor- 
tant that violation reports undergo 
preliminary review by volunteer 
organizations to help FCC personnel 
cfetennine which alleged violations 
represent the most promising targets 
for the Commission's limited en- 
forcement resources. 

This amendrs\ent would not in- 
crease our budgetary requirements. 
It may help us to conserve our en- 
forcement resources or, at least, im- 
prove the efficiency of our enforce- 
ment program. 

If the Commldsloh Is to fully utilize 
the services of volunteer amateur llc' 
ensees for monitoring, as envisioned 
by this proposal, there should be an 
exception to Section 605 to permit 
(he monitoring groups to receive end 
fiisctose informaUcfi transmitted ty 
amateur ticensees antS opera tors^ 
(See proposed amendment to Sec- 
tioft 60S, infrs.) 

Exempt amateur 

rodiio communications 

ynder certain circumstances 

Section 805 is amended by striking 

the last sentence thereof and adding 

the tohowinQ: 

Continued on page 131 



73Magaiine • February, 1982 



/*■ 



^ 



^<^ 



Store 

commands, 

as well as text, 

for automatic execution 

The Heathkit /xMatic Memory Keyer's custom 
microprocessor stores up to 240 characters of 

text or commands. Variable-length buffers elim- 
inate wasted memory space. "Command strings" 
allow text to be stored in several buffers, then 
strung together in any sequence for most effi- 
cient use of memory. Command strings can 
also select speed, weight, spacing and auto- 
repea! count. 

No external key to buy 

Integral capacitive "touch^" paddles unplug and 
store in their own compartment inside the Keyer 
when not in use. Left handed? A touch of the key* 
pad and the paddles are reversed. Choose any 
speed between 1 and 99 words per minute, and 
any of 1 1 weight settings. Special rear-panel jack 
connects mechanical paddle. 

Great code practice machine, too 

A "practice" mode sends random code groups of 
random length and selectable types for a total of 



Heathkif 



6,400 different practice sessrai 

Each sequence sends approximately 3,0i 

characters before repeating. 

Other features: 

Built-in sidetone oscillator and speaker have 
pitch and volume controls. Phone jack and ear- 
phone are included for private listening. Complete 
details on the great new ^fvlatic f^emory Keyer 
are in the latest Heathkit Catalog. Or see It at 
your nearby Heathkit Electronic Center* 

Send for free catalog 

Write to Heath Company 

Dept. 011-864, Benton Harbor. Ml. 

in Canada, coniact Heam Company. 

1480 Dundds Slf«6t E . Misstssauga. ONT L4X 2R7. 

Visit your Heathkit Store 

) Where Heathkit 

jL^t^^ products are 

^ displayed, sold 

/ and serviced. 

^,See your telephone 

white pages for locations. 

• Unrt? of ^fe^lechrtok)gy 

he US 



f 



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**^ 



1 ^. 






EtectFOfucs Cof pcrat»on m ihe 



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/ 








^ I 



COM SPEC 
'C-107 







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I 00 



c»*5 



l.^ 



^ ^ 



cow^ 



^^07 



ftitf ^^ 







w 








A fresh idea! 

Our new crop of lone equipment is the freshest thing growing 
in the encoder /decoder field today. AH tones are instantly 
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Frequency accuracy is an astonishing ± , 1 Hz over all temper- 
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since the dip switch may be remoted. Our SS-32 encode only 
model is programmed for all 32 CTCSS tones or all test tones, 
touchstones and burst-tones. 
And, of course, there's no 

need to mention our M^^n^'WJ^^ TS-32 

1 day delivery and 
1 year warranty* 




TS-32 Encoder-Decoder 

•Size: 1.25" x 2,0" x .40^ 

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• Meets all new RS-220-A specifications 

• Available in all 32 EIA standard CTCSS tones 

SS^32 Encoder 

•Size: .9'^x L3"x •40" 

• Available with either Group A or Group B tones 

Frequencies Available: 



Group A 


67.0 XZ 


91.5 ZZ 


118.8 2B 


156.7 5A 


71.9 XA 


94.8 ZA 


123.0 3Z 


162.2 5B 


74.4 WA 


97.4 ZB 


127.3 3A 


167.9 6Z 


77.0 XB 


100.0 IZ 


131.8 3B 


173.8 6A 


79.7 SP 


103.5 lA 


136.5 4Z 


179.9 6B 


82.5 Y2 


107.2 IB 


141.3 4A 


186.2 7Z 


85.4 YA 


110.9 2Z 


146.2 40 


192.8 7A 


88.5 YB 


114.8 2A 


151.4 5Z 


203.5 Ml 



Frequency accuracy* ± • 1 Hz maximum - 40''C to + 85°C 
Frequencies to 250 Hz available on special order 
Continuous tone 



Group B 


TEST- TONES: 

600 

1000 

1500 
2175 
280S 


TOUCH-TONES: 

697 1209 
770 1336 
852 1477 
941 1633 


BURST-TONES: 
1600 1850 2150 24O0 
1650 1900 2200 2450 
1700 1950 2250 2500 
1750 2000 2300 2550 
1800 2100 2350 



• Frequency accuracy, ± 1 Hz maximum - 40X to + 85°C 

• Tone length approximately 300ms* May be lengthened, 
shortened or eliminated by changing value of resistor 

Wired and tested: TS-32 $59.95, SS-32 $29.95 





COMMUNICATIONS SPECIAUSTS 

426 West Taft Avenue, Orange, California 92667 
(800)854-0547/ California: (714)998-3021 




*^15 



Mark Oman WA0RBR 
528 De'tnes Court 
Ft CoUins CO 80525 



The Fun-Oscillator 

a simple, goof-proof vfo 
for your QRP transmitter 



Hole: A complete kit of parts, mclyding PC board, is available from RAOIOKIT, Box 41 15. Greenville N H 03043 for $34.95 plus $2.50 shipping 
and handling. 

The Fun-Mitter (Febru- 
ary, 1981, 73) and Fun- 
Ceiver (|ulv, 1981. 73) pro 
vided the home-brew-ori- 
ented amateur with the ba- 
sic components for a home- 
brew station setup. 

Many amateurs have re- 



sponded by saying that they 
need more frequency f!exj» 
bility for their Fun-Mitters. 
The simple vfo described 
in this article is the result of 
those requests. It allows 
greater frequency excur- 
sions than the simple vxo 

Photos by Duane Bertsch 



circuit of the Fun-Mitter to 
provide approximately the 
same frequency coverage 
as the companion receiver. 

The vfo follows the same 
guidelines as the two pre- 
vious articles and should be 
as easy (or easier) to con- 




A Fun-Station! 



struct and to get operation- 
al. 

For those unfamiliar with 
my earlier articles, this 
series of articles focuses on 
simple, easy-to-construct, 
easy-to-operate gear with 
all parts available from 
local Radio Shack outlets. 
Size and appearance of the 
vfo match the transmitter 
and receiver to provide a 
nice looking station pack- 
age. 

Of utmost importance is 
the fact that no modifica- 
tions have to be made to 
the Fun-Mitter to use the 
vfo. It simply plugs in where 
the crystal was (unless Copi 
was installed). This allows 
for either crystal or vfo 
operation of the Fun-Mitter 
Also, it can be constructed 
for either 40 or 80 meters It 
provides about 70 kHz of 
coverage on 40 meters and 
about 50 kHz on 80. 

The Circuit 

The vfo should be the 
most goof -proof of all three 
pieces of gear as evidenced 
by the schematic of Fig. 1. 
The basic frequency-deter- 
mfning portion of the vfo is 
identical to the vfo of the 



12 ?3Magazine • February J982 




m 




Internal view of vfo. 



Fun-Ceiver. This allows for 
ease of understanding and 
construction as well as simi- 
lar frequency range. 

Before I began this series, 
I developed a set of guide- 
lines for the items to be de- 
signed. Based on this crite- 
rion of setting goals in ad- 
vance. ! developed the fol- 
lowing goals for the simple 

vfo. 

• Good performance [no 
chirp, minimal draft, clean 
waveform) 

• Simple construction [PC 
board use, less than four 
hours total build time, mini- 
mum parts count} 

• Cost — less than $20 with 
new parts 

• Minimal modification to 
the Fun-Mitter 

• Full output from the Purr- 
Mi tter 

• No variable capacitors or 
inductors 

The final version of the 
vfo meets the above goals. 

Only three transistors are 
used in the vfo, one as the 
oscillator (Q1), one as a 
class-A amplifier (Q2X and 
one as an emitter-follower 
buffer [Q3]- This final ver- 
sion of the vfo went 
through three revisions 
from the original form. This 
was necessary to maintain 
good performance while 
still keeping things simple. 
The original design includ- 
ed only two transistors, but 
at times chirp was detected 



on the transmitted signal 
The main advantage of the 
circuit of Fig. 1 is that only 
one tuned circuit is used 
(LI). This means modifying 
only one inductor! 

Q1 operates as a parallel- 
tuned Colpitts oscillator 
with LI. CRl, CR2, Cr C2, 
and C3 being the frequen- 
c y-d etermining compo- 
nents. The oscillator is 
tuned by varying the volt- 
age at the junction of the 
two diodes. This, in turn, 
varies the capacitance of 
the diodes which varies the 
frequency of the oscillator. 
LI is a modified Radio 
Shack 10-|iH rf choke It is 
modified, as described lat- 
er, to provide the needed 
inductance. The last few 



Front view of the completed Variable Fun-O^cittator. 



turns of the modified choke 
are spread out over the 
choke body to provide an 
easy means of setting the 
oscillator frequency. 

As mentioned in the re- 
ceiver article, the capaci- 
tors needed to build a sta- 
ble vfo are not ea<;ify found 
at Radio Shack. NPO-type 
capacitors from a large va- 
riety pack again are used in 
parallel and series combi- 
nations to obtain the need- 
ed capacitance for CI, C2, 
and C3. Silver-mica or poly- 
styrene capacitors will give 
even better results. 

Output from Q1 is taken 
through a coupling capaci- 



tor, C4. This capacitor 
should be kept as small as 
possible to isolate the oscil- 
lator from toad variations 
which can cause chirp. The 
capacitor is attached to the 
next stage, Q2, a class-A 
amplifier. This amplifier 
raises the level of the signal 
to the level needed to drive 
the Fun-Mitter. 

Q2 is direct-coupled to 
the final stage, Q3, an emit* 
ter follower. This stage pro- 
vides excellent isolation be- 
tween the oscillator and the 
transmitter as well as pro- 
viding an impedance match 
between the two. Without 
Q3, as in the original design, 



CI 



Llj 



« J I 1 J 1^ 

f — 1 /A At 



C«2 



*tav rro fni 

4 



3900 






itl03 
220 



m 



»00^H 




m 



09 



C114 



^ 



iff 



f»04 

in 



4» 






F\^ 1, Schematic of vfo. 



73 Magazine • February, 1982 13 




*kZV (TO Stl 



TO L 



EXT 



CR3 



PC layout for vfo. 



PC boards for the vfo are avaifable from the author for S7 
ppd. PC boards for the previous articles also are available as 
follows: FunMltter— S7 ppd; Fun>Cftiv0r— $7 ppd; Filter'— 
$3,50 ppd* 







Parts List 


Radio Shack 


Designator 


Value 


Part Number 


CI 


200 pF NPO (approx.J 


272 801 


C2.C3 


4?0pFNPO 


272«I1 


C4 


10 pF (use two 4,7 in 






para 1 lei) 


2-272120 


C5. C6, C9 


0-1 mF 


272-135 


C7.C8 


0.01 hF 


272-131 


CR1 CR4 


1N914 

On 80 meters, for CR1 and 
CR2, use two 1N9145 in 
paral el for each (piggybacH) 


276-1122 


J1-J3 


phono jack 


274-346 


LI 

1 


eOm: Two 273-101 inductors 
in series: one with no turns 
removed, one with 10 turns 

removed 

40m: 10 turns removed from 

273-101 inductor. 

For both 80 and 40 m the 

last 3 turns of the modified 

inductor should be spread 

out over rest of the form 




L2 


100->iH inductor 


273*102 


Q1 


FET 


276-2035 


Q2. Q3 


RS2033 


276-2033 


R1 


100k, 1/4-W 


27V1347 


H2 


10k. 1/4-W 


271 -1335 


R3 


4Jk, 1/4-W 


271-1330 


R4R6 


470Q. 1/4^W 


271-1317 


Not or> PC 






board: 






Lfixt 


lOO-^H inductor 


273-102 


, R101 


agk. 1/4-W 


271^1329 


R102 


10k linear pot 


271-1721 


R103 


220Q, 1/4'W 


271 1313 


R104, 






R105 


Ik. 1/4-W 


271-1321 


S1 


SPST switch 


275-612 


case 




270-251 


knob 




274-392 



TO JZ 
tOUTl 




Component location. 



the vfo is not stable when 
the transmitter is keyed. 

CR4 is used to shift the 
frequency of the vfo when 
the transmitter is not in use 
and you are Mstening to the 
receiver. It does this by 
changing the voltage at the 
junction of CRl and CR2, 
which shifts the oscillator 
frequency. Without this 
feature, the vfo signal 
would appear on the listen* 
ing frequency and make lis- 
tening impossible! 

Construction 

The construction of the 
vfo is Intended to be goof- 
proof. It is built on a 2 ^/4''x 
3" single-sided board just as 
the transmitter and receiver 
were It cannot be overem- 
phasized that the circuit 
should be built on a PC 
board. Nearly all of the 
problems that readers had 
in building the previous two 
pieces of gear were due to 
breadboard or point-to- 
point construction. If you 
are an inexperienced home- 
brewer, it is fairly easy to 
make mistakes when wiring 
the circuit apart from a 
printed circuit board. 

I built my vfo in an enclo- 
sure that matches the en- 
closures used for both the 
transmitter and receiver. 
Also, the front-panel layout 
was made compatible to 
enhance the appearance of 
the gear. 

As can be seen in the 
photographs, the tuning 



potentiometer (R7) is 
mounted on the front 
panel The associated re- 
sistors and inductor (R6, R8, 
L3) are also mounted on this 
potentiometer, and wires 
run from there to the appro- 
priate circuit points. 

The rear panel contains 
three jacks. One is for 
the vfo output signal, and 
one is for the vfo offset. The 
connection between the 
vfo and transmitter should 
be made with coaxial cable 
[RC-174or RC'58) 



Operation 

The vfo is best operated 
with a battery rather than 
an ac supply. This elimi- 
nates any possibility of ac 
hum on the transmitted sig- 
nal. It also helps improve 
frequency stability Two 
6-volt lantern batteries m 
series will power the vfo for 
a long period of time. If the 
Fun-Mitter is powered by 
batteries, the needed 12 
volts can be tapped from 
those batteries. 

Tuning and operation are 
very easy: Only one adjust- 
ment needs to be made- 
setting the vfo on frequen- 
cy. This is accomplished in 
the same manner as was 
done in the receiver. Using 
a separate receiver, listen 
on the frequency you want 
the low end of the vfo to be 
set on (for example, 7100 
kHz], Drape a length of wire 
near the vfo and attach the 
other end to the receiver 



14 73 Magazine • February, 1982 



antenna input. With the vfo 
on and warmed up, slowly 
spread or compress the last 
few turns of LI until the vfo 
signal is heard in the receiv- 
er. This adjustment should 
be done with the tuning po- 
tentiometer (R7) fully 
counterclockwise. Finally, 
verify that the vfo covers 
approximately 70 kHz if 
built for 40 meters and 50 
kHz if built for 80. That's all 
there is to the adjustment. 

To operate the vfo, two 
connections need to be 
made— one to the transmit- 
ter crystal socket and one 
from the vfo offset input to 
J 3 of the Fun-Mitter. (This 
jack was added to provide 
receiver mute operation for 
the Fun-Ceiver.) 

If Copt w^^ rtot included 
in the Fun-Mitter, then the 
vfo signal can be applied di- 
rectly to the crystal socket 
terminals (see Fig, 2), If Cgp^ 
was included, remove its 
connection and connect 
that terminal of the crystal 



socket to ground. An in- 
spection of the Fun-Mitter 
schematic will reveal that 
even this step is not neces- 
sary if a method can be de- 
rived to connect the shield 
of the vfo cable to ground 
of the Fun-Mitter, Alterna- 
tives such as a rear-panel 
phono connector on the 
Fun-Mitter also can be used. 
A plug can be made easily 
from two Vi'' to Va'' lengths 
of #12 gauge copper wire. 
Solder the vfo signal and 
ground leads to these wires 
and plug them into the ap- 
propriate crystal socket 
pins. 

Once the vfo is plugged 
in and turned on, verify that 
the transmitter operates as 
it did before. With the vfo 
in use and all connections 
in place, the vfo signal 
should be heard only when 
the transmitter is in the 
transmit mode (due to the 
vfo offset feature). Zero- 
beat the vfo with the trans- 
mitter in the transmit posi- 



TO y 3 " 



-®-< 



I 



JACK I 
I 

J3 i 



€) I 



+ 24V 



CRYSTAL 
SOCKET 



H^iJA i^msm 




I 



fig, 2. Connections between vfo and Fun-Mitter 



tion and the key down. Re- 
member that when using a 
direct-conversion receiver, 
you must zero-beat the cor- 
rect side of the signal you 
are listening to. 

Crystal operation still 
can be used by simply re- 
moving the vfo leads and 
plugging the crystal back 
in. 

It should be possible to 
use the vfo with low-power 
solid-state transmitters 
other than the Fun-Mitter, 
However, modifications 
may be necessary to the 



transmitter if the oscillator 
is not configured as in the 
Fun-Mitter. 

Conclusion 

The vfo should be simple 

to build and goof-proof in 
its operation. Many more 
contacts now should be 
possible due to the ability 
to move to the frequency 
the other station is on. This 
series will be continuing in 
the months to come with 
additional goof-proof proj- 
ects. Meanwhile, enjoy the 
Variable Fun Oscillator! ■ 



THE RTTY ANSWER 



IBLFSK-500 



T HRtSl^LEt 



plot f 1 ti 



1 ]« I orr 



X t % \ % 



iHk fSK-iOOO . 



MAlti; 



nrjuirt 



LIMIT 



mPUT tlvtL 



SW^Cl 



WIDE 



^UT0i>1 ^n t . 



(Air i OFf I LINt 



TMRtbltOLD 



MtK 



frlV 6io 



FSK 



LtjLAL 



Sl-Ad 



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Photos by W1GSL 




Penn Ciower Wl BC 
459 Lowetl Street 
Andover MA 0131 



Photo A. Front view of the dummy toad/wattmeter/rf bridge. 
The resistance dial i$B 2-7/4'' diameter plastic skirt attached 
to a standard knob. 

16 73 Magazine * February, 1982 



Here is a weekend proj- 
ect that combines two 
instruments and an old 
technique into a very handy 
gadget to have around the 
shack. First, it's an 8-to-IO 
Watt 52-Ohm dummy load 
with a calibrated wattme- 
ter: perfect for tuning up 
low-power transmitters. 
Second, it's also a calibrat- 
ed rf resistance bridge 
which can make antenna 
adjustments a lot easier by 
telling you more about the 
nature of a mismatch than a 
plain swr bridge will The 
old technique provides a 
nice tie-in between these 
two instruments and gives 
some benefits besides: The 
dummy load is also a resis- 
tive power divider that pro- 
vides a low-level driving sig- 
nal for the rf bridge. 

One benefit of this ar- 
rangement is that the power 
source sees a load which is 
essentially independent of 
the bridge load. That means 
you can load your QRP 
transmitter into this instru- 
ment put that new antenna 



on the bridge output, and 
fool around to your heart's 
content without risk of 
damaging the transmitter or 
even detuning its output 
stage. In addition, the 
power delivered to a 50- 
Ohm load is only about 40 
mW when the power com- 
ing out of the transmitter is 
5 Watts. That is a 21 dB 
reduction, and it means 
that any signal you radiate 
while adjusting the antenna 
is 3-1/2 S-units less than it 
might have been — certainly 
a neighborly gesture on to- 
day's crowded bands. 

Background Theory and 
Circuit Description 

There is nothing new or 

unique about the circuits 
described here. Rf resis- 
tance bridges have been 
around longer than the 
more familiar high-power 
swr bridges and there are 
several examples in recent 
publications,^'^ The dummy 
load/power divider tech- 
nique was described in 
Solid State Design for the 



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HAL COMMUNICATIONS CORP 
Box 365 

Urbana, Illinois 61801 
21 7-367-7373 



Radio Amateur (ARRL) and 
recently used in a trans- 
match tuning circuit de- 
Scribed in QSTJ 

What I hope to empha- 
size here is this instrument's 
usefulness as a matching 
aid, the simple and inexpen- 
sive nature of the circuit, 
and the fact that the same 
circuit can be used as a 
dummy load with a built-in 
calibrated wattmeter. Ifs 
like getting two instruments 
for the price of one, and the 
final result is a very handy 
piece of test gear. 

The resistive rf bridge is a 
simple modification of the 
classic low-power swr 
bridge, so before getting 
down to circuit details let's 
consider swr bridges in gen- 
eral for a moment. There 
are two main types of 
bridges used for measuring 
swr, and the most common 
type is a high-power han- 
dling circuit meant to be 
left in the transmission line 
for continuous monitoring. 
Usually, this type of bridge 
requires a minimum of 5 
Watts or so driving the load 
before the meter readings 
are large enough to inter- 
pret accurately. This occurs 
because the bridge itself is 
very loosely coupled to the 
transmission line, typically 
through a few picofarads or 
several inches of wire run- 
ning parallel to the center 
conductor of the main line. 

The other type of bridge 
is inherently a low-power in- 
strument. The driving signal 
runs right through the resis- 
tive elements which make 
up the bridge, so the bridge 
itself must be able to ab- 
sorb a large fraction of the 
input power. The resistive 
bridge doesn't find much 
use in amateur circles be- 
cause it requires only a 
Watt or less of drive and 
can't be left permanently in 
the line; it's strictly an 
occasional-use test instru- 
ment 

There is nothing wrong 
with continuous swr moni- 

18 73 Magazine • February, 1982 



toring. After all, the familiar 
deflections of the high- 
power monitor do give a 
constant verification that 
the transmitter is tuned and 
the antenna connected. The 
low-power test instrument 
described here has some 
advantages over the usual 
swr bridge, though, espe- 
cially for initial antenna ad- 
justments, because it tells 
you more than just the mag- 
nitude of a mismatch. 

Swr can be defined sever- 
al ways, and one is the ratio 
of a load impedance to the 
transmission line's charac- 
teristic impedance (which is 
almost always near 50 
Ohms in current amateur 
usage). For example, to 
cause a 3:1 swr, a 50Ohm 
cable could be terminated 
with either 150 or 16.6 
Ohms. These are purely re- 
sistive loads, but there is 
also an infinite number of 
reactive loads which would 
give the same 3:1 swr, and a 
common swr bridge can't 
tell the difference between 
any of them. You can build 
a bridge to measure both 
the reactance and resis- 
tance present in a load/'^'* 
but such bridges tend to be 
too complex for my taste 
and requirements. 

When matching a load to 
a 50-Ohm line, I generally 
have two questions. Is it 
resonant, and what's its re- 
sistance? If a load is reso- 
nant (and that's how I want 
all my antennas to be), then 
it has no reactive compo- 
nent—just resistance. If I 
know the value of that resis- 
tance, then I know the swr 
and whether I need more or 
less resistance to get a 
match, rll give an example 
at the end of the article, but 
right now let's look at the 
schematic shown in Fig. 1. 

There really isn't much to 
the circuit diagram. The in- 
put signal is terminated in a 
53-Ohm dummy load con- 
structed with a series-paral- 
lel resistor assortment. The 
voltage development across 
the 10-Ohm portion of that 



dummy load drives a sim- 
ple bridge circuit made up 
from a 250-Ohm pot, a 
51-Ohm standard resistor, 
and the load impedance. 
The bridge error signal ap- 
pears between the output 
connector and the poten- 
tiometer arm and is detect- 
ed by a germanium diode. 
The result is then indicated 
by a TOO-uA meter in a volt- 
meter circuit. 

Bridge operation is 
equally straightforward. 
When input power is ap- 
plied to the instrument, it 
develops a voltage across 
the 53-Ohm dummy load. 
About 1/5 of this voltage 
appears across the 10-Ohm 
portion of the dummy, and 
this is the driving voltage 
for the resistance bridge. 
Some fraction of this driv- 
ing voltage shows up be- 
tween the potentiometer 
arm and ground, the exact 
amount depending, of 
course, on the shaft posi- 
tion. Similarly, there is 
some other fraction of the 
bridge driving voltage ap- 
pearing across the load ter- 
minal, this fraction depend- 
ing on the load resistance 
connected there. 

If there is no load con- 
nected, then the entire 
source voltage appears 
there and well make use of 
that fact later to calibrate 
the wattmeter portion of 
this instrument. If a 51-Ohm 
load is connected, then ex- 
actly half the source volt- 
age will be there. The differ- 
ence between the output 
voltage and the potentiom- 
eter arm voltage is rectified 
by the diode and drives the 
meter through the sensi- 
tivity control, so with the 
51-Ohm load the bridge will 
show a null when the pot 
travel is exactly centered. 
Other load resistances will 
show nulls at other posi- 
tions and the potentiometer 
dial may be calibrated by 
marking the nulls corre- 
sponding to a whole series 
of load resistances. In 
theory, the bridge should 



show nulls for every load re- 
sistance between zero and 
infinity, but in practice this 
doesn't happen because the 
potentiometer isn't infinite- 
ly adjustable. 

The circuit c^n be cali- 
brated pretty accurately for 
resistances between 5 
Ohms and 1 k, with the best 
resolution around the 
center of the dial at 20 to 
150 Ohms, Notice that the 
bridge cannot be nulled 
completely if the load has a 
capacitive or inductive 
component since such a 
load would introduce a 
phase shift between the 
bridge source voltage and 
the bridge load voltage. As 
there is no corresponding 
phase shift between the 
bridge source voltage and 
the potentiometer arm volt- 
age, there never will be a 
point where the diode volt- 
age will be zero and the 
meter nulled, Even when 
the voltages at each end of 
the diode are equal in am- 
plitude, the fact that they 
are phase-shifted with re- 
spect to each other guar- 
antees that there will be a 
sine wave or error voltage 
for the diode to rectify. In 
practice this means that un- 
less the load is a pure resis- 
tance there will not be a 
true null but only a partial 
dip in the meter reading as 
the potentiometer shaft is 
turned, 

A true rf impedance 
bridge would have two null 
adjustments: one for rf re- 
sistance and one for reac- 
tance. With such a bridge 
you can completely define 
any mismatch, but, as 
noted earlier, that's often 
unnecessary, especially in 
antenna work where the 
goal is to tune out reac- 
tance by resonating the 
antenna. You can always 
tell when a load is resonant 
with the resistance bridge 
because at resonance the 
null will be complete. Then 
steps can be taken if 
necessary to transform the 
remaining impedance to 
match a 50-Ohm line. 

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POWER >— ^ 




LOAD 



SEE TEXT 



MET 



exER 



Fig, t. Schematic diagram of dummy load/wattmeter/rf 

bridge. R1 is chosen as necessary to calibrate the wattmeter 



This same bridge circuit 
can be used to measure the 
power delivered to the 
dummy load by the trans- 
mitter, A glance at the 
schematic will assure yo^J 
that with no load connected 
to the bridge and the resis- 
tance dial set to zero Ohms, 
the voltmeter circuit will in- 
dicate the rf voltage across 
the 10-Ohm portion of the 
dummy load. Knowing that 
voltage, we can easily cal- 
culate the voltage across 
the whole dummy resis- 
tance, and knowing that, we 
can calculate the power 
there from P = V2/R. The 
calibration can be accom- 
plished using only a dc volt- 
meter and will be described 
shortly. 

Construction 

A lot of articles begin 
their construction descrip- 
tion with the assurance that 
"the layout is completely 
noncritical/' That is certain- 
ly not true here, but "criti- 
cal" is also too strong of a 
word, so let me just caution 
you to be careful with lay- 
out. There are three main 
areas that can cause trou- 
ble. 



First, it's best to arrange 
the dummy load portion of 
the circuit so that current 
flowing in the ground path 
from the bottom of the 
dummy load back to the in* 
put terminal does not share 
any conductor with part of 
the bridge circuit. If it does, 

20 JSMagazine • February, 1982 



then variations in the input 
power will shift the null po- 
sitions on the resistance 
dial. Photo B shows one 
way to solve that problem 
by bringing the input power 
and its ground return to the 
dummy resistors on a single 
piece of coax, thus avoiding 
the temptation to ground 
the bottom resistors to 
some point on the chassis. 

Second, the detector di- 
ode should have one end 
connected directly to the 
output jack. My first few at- 
tempts had more compact 
physical arrangements with 
the diode connected to the 
bridge output terminal with 
lengths of wire or brass 
strips. This always inter- 
fered with getting good 
deep nulls on both ends of 
the resistance range. 

Third, the detector 
should not be a silicon 
diode, since the 0.6-volt 
threshold of a silicon diode 
will cause the bridge nulls 
to be too wide. With a given 
load termination there 
should be a single, sharp 
deep null on the dial, not a 
dead zone covering several 
degrees of rotation. My col- 
lection of diodes is pretty 
large, and the best of the lot 
turned out to be some ger- 
manium 1N34 equivalents I 
paid 10^ each for some 15 
years ago! Radio Shack's 
276-1123 diodes cost the 
same today and should 
work as well. 



The dummy load nomi^ 
nal value is about 51 Ohms 
with the circuit shown. I 
used an assortment of resis- 
tors from the junk box, so 
feel free to substitute val- 
ues, but do observe a few 
simple rules. Wire-wound 
resistors are definitely out 
because they look like coils 
at radio frequencies. Also, 
stick with carbon resistors 
having values less than Ik. 
When paralleling resistors, 
try to have them all of the 
same value so they dissi- 
pate equal amounts of pow- 
er. Keep the leads short and 
the wiring direct; this keeps 
the dummy load looking re- 
sistive at the higher fre- 
quencies and prevents stray 
coupling which might inter- 
fere with the bridge nulls. 

The rest of the physical 
arrangement is pretty clear 
from the photographs with 
the exception of the bridge 
potentiometer mounting. A 
similar bridge is described 
in WeSAI's 1962 Radio 
Handbook^ and the author 
there cautions that stray ca- 
pacitive coupling between 
the potentiometer resistive 
element and ground can 
cause frequency sensitive 
errors in calibration. 

The suggestion made 
there, and followed here, is 
to cut a large hole in the 
box (say, 1-1/2" in diameter) 
and mount the pot in the 
center of this open space 
using a piece of insulating 
plastic, bakelite sheet, or 
unplated circuit board for 
support. This insulates the 
pot body from ground and 
thereby greatly reduces the 
capacitive coupling be- 
tween the pot resistive ele- 
ment and ground. It seemed 
like a good suggestion so I 
followed it. I can't strictly 
say it is necessary because I 
didn't try it the other way, 
but it sure can't hurt. 

The skirt on the resis- 
tance dial covers the hole 
from the front of the box. If 

you want to use a smaller 
knob with a pointer, you 
could mount a rectangle of 



insulation over the hole 
from the front side of the 
panel and use that to hold 
the pot and the calibration 
marks. The actual value of 
the bridge potentiometer is 
not too critical It should be 
at least 50-Ohms so that it 
doesn't draw too much 
power, and anything over 
Ik is probably asking for 
trouble with stray capaci- 
tance. If you have anything 
inside that range, try it 
before you buy a new 
250-Ohm unit. 

The box shown is a cut- 
down Bud minibox that 
started out as 3"x4"x5^ 

The 3" height was reduced 
to just under 2" because it 
fit the hand better, but 
there is nothing magic 
about these dimensions. 
Use anything of roughly the 
same size as long as it is 
made of metal. You also 
will note in the photographs 
that BNC connectors are 
used instead of the more 
common (in amateur cir- 
cles, anyway) UHF series. 1 
don't run enough power to 
require RG-fl, and I find the 
smaller quick*connect BNC 
connectors more conve- 
nient for my home-brew 
projects, Naturally, if all of 
your antenna cables have 
UHF connectors, then you 
also should use them on 
your bridge. 

Calibration 

There are two things to 
calibrate here: the watt- 
meter and the bridge scale. 
The meter serves as a null 
indicator when using the 
bridge, so the wattmeter 
calibration can be done 
after the bridge has been 
checked out* 

The bridge dial can be as 
simple or fancy as desired 
but it should be large 
enough to read easily. The 
skirt on my dial is 2-1/4" in 
diameter You probably will 
want to start with a paper 
scale and save the fancy 
artwork until everything is 
working properly. 

Assemble a collection of 
carbon resistors covering as 



many values as possible be- 
tween 5 and 1 000 Ohms and 
then Qui the leads to about 
1" in length. The leads are 
bent so the resistors can be 
spring loaded into contact 
with the bridge output con- 
nector. If you have a lot of 
spare connectors, you also 
could make up a number of 
dummy loads with the dif- 
ferent resistors similar to 
the one shown next to the 
bridge in Photo B. 

Any layout problems will 
be more pronounced at the 
higher frequencies, so fire 
up a 10-meter rig if you 
have one and feed several 
Watts of rf into the bridge. 

(I've used this instrumefit 
only on 10 meters, but it 
might work all right up to 6 

meters.) With the bridge ex- 
cited, check the nulls at 
both ends of the range, say, 
with a 10-Ohm then a 
680-Ohm toad. 

Both nulls should be 
deep and well defined. If 
one isn't as deep as the 
other, then there is prob- 
ably something wrong with 
the physical layout of the 
bridge elements. Try mov- 
ing things around some or 
try another ground routing. 
If you followed the layout 
shown, then there really 
shouldn't be any trouble. 
Remember that this is an rf 
resistance bridge and with 
resistors on the bridge out- 
put, the nulls theoretically 
should be right down to 
zero meter movement In 
practice, stray reactances 
prevent the nulls from be* 
ing perfect but they should 
come pretty close to it If 
the load does contain some 
reactance, there still will be 
a dip but it won't be to zero 
as previously mentioned. 

When you're satisfied 
with the basic bridge opera- 
tion, make a temporary 
scale and mark off the posi- 
tions of the nulls due to the 
collection of sample resis^ 
tors. Standard resistor val- 
ues aren't nice round num- 
bers, but with enough cali- 
bration marks you can 




Photo fi. Interior of the instrument, showing layout and construction details. The obiect in 
the foreground is a dummy load typical of those used during calibration. 



make a final scale with lines 
at 5, 10, 20, 30, etc.. Ohms 
as shown on the front panel 
in Photo A, 

The wattmeter scale can 
be calibrated easily using a 
dc power supply and a 
good dc voltmeter. Remem- 
ber that the wattmeter is ac- 
tually reading the rf voltage 
across the lOOhm portion 
of the dummy load when 
there is no bridge load and 
the bridge pot is set to zero 
Ohms, Under these condi- 
tions, the 00027-uF cou- 
pling capacitor [that's not a 
critical value — anything 
from 001 to 0,05 will work 
as well) will charge to the 
peak value of the rf sine 
wave. 

Since the peak value of a 
sine wave is 1 .41 4 times the 
rms value, it is easy to cal- 
culate a dc value which, 
when fed into the instru* 
ment, will read the same on 
the meter as some given rf 
power. A conversion chart 
for the 53-Ohm dummy 
load is given in Table 1 
along with the equation 
necessary to calculate your 
own equivalents should you 



use some other combina- 
tion of resistors. Since I was 
interested in converting CB 
sets, I calibrated my watt- 
meter for a full-scale 
reading of 5 Watts, even 
though the resistors can 
handle 10 Watts for short 
periods. To make the 
5- Watt calibration, feed a 
measured 22.9 volts into 
the unit, turn the sensitivity 
control ail the way down 
(maximum resistance), and 
select a value for R1 that 
gives a full-scale meter 
reading. 

Now comes the hardest 

part: making the meter 
face. I don't like conversion 
charts so I made a whole 
new face for my meter. It's 
not as difficult as you might 
think, but it does require a 
steady pair of hands. 

Open the meter, remove 
the two screws holding the 
faceplate in place, and 
remove the faceplate while 
taking care not to damage 
the meter pointer Glue a 
clean piece of white paper 
over the old faceplate using 
paper paste and not liquid 
white glue (which tends to 



dampen the paper so much 
that it wrinkles). Be sure to 
cover the faceplate evenly 
with paste so the paper 
won't have a chance to 
wrinkle. The pointer travels 
close enough to the face- 
plate that it can get stuck 
on wrinkles, 

When the paste is dry, 
use a sharp knife to trim off 
the excess paper, and a pin 
to punch through the screw 
holes. Now a drawing set 
with an ink compass can be 
used to draw in a nice arc 
for the baseline of the new 
scale. Remount the face- 
plate, center the meter zero 
adjustment, and make a 
light pencil mark under the 
pointer tip to define the 
zero rest position. Reapply 
the 22,9 volts and make 
another pencil mark to spot 
the 5-Watt full-scale posi- 
tion. Now go down the list 
in Table 1 and mark off 
each intermediate point, 
checking occasionally that 
all of the poinb are repeat- 
able and properly marked. 

Finally, remove the face- 
plate again and finish off 
the scale graduations with 



73 Magazine • Fabruary, 1982 21 



TAP POSITION 
SeT &1 FACtOftT 



TR^NSMrSSlON 



< 



\ 



VERTICAL AAlKitTOR 

OF AQ4UStJlSL£ LEffGTM 



LOAC^ING COIL 



'"''"=*"'f='>'^'^ ^ V j MATCHING COII- 

LINE TO RtQ ^ 1 f 



J_ CAPAtiTlVE COUPLIMO 

seao^asopFi TO sflouNG 



77//////////////// 

aRDU»iD P'lANE - THE CAR ROOF 

fig. 2. Shortened haded verticai a CB mag-mount whip. 



ink or dry transfers using 
the light pencil marks as a 
guide. With a little care, the 
results can be pretty profes- 
sional. One real bonus of 
this technique is that the 
calibration is correct with 
the particular diode, resis- 
tors, and meter actually 
used, since the whole cir- 
cuit is calibrated at once. 
That's important because 
the diode is not a perfect 
rectifier and the meter 
scale will be influenced 
slightly by the characteris- 
tics of the particular diode 
used* 

An Application Example 

The most obvious use for 



Input Power 


Dc Voltage 


Watts 


Equivalent 


5.0 


22.90 


4.0 


20.49 


3.0 


17.74 


2.0 


14.49 


1.0 


10.24 


0.5 


7.24 


0.4 


6.48 


0.3 


5.61 


0.2 


4.58 


0.1 


3.24 



Table 1. Wattmeter calibra- 
tion. Input power levels cor- 
responding to dc voltage 
equivalents. Values ar e cat- 
culated using E = V 2RP, 
where P = rf power [in 
Wattsl R — total dummy re- 
sistance, and £ = ofc input 
voltage (where E is peak 
value of rf sinewave}. Cau- 
tion: With these dc inputs, 
the dummy load is dissipat- 
ing twice the indicated rf 
power, so be careful not to 
overheat the resistors. 

22 73 Magazine • February. 1982 



the rf resistance bridge is in 
making matching adjust- 
ments to antennas. Some 
antennas^ dipoles, for ex- 
ample, are easy to adjust 
with an swr bridge since 
their feedpoint impedance 
at resonance is already 
close to the typical cable 
impedance. When a dipole 
is fed with either 52- or 
73-Ohm coax, its swr at 
resonance is bound to drop 
to somthing like 1.5:1. This 
isn't true with shortened an- 
tennas such as mobile 
whips since their feed im- 
pedance may be only a few 
Ohms. 

There are two adjust- 
ments necessary to get a 
low swr with such an anten- 
na: one for resonance and 
one for impedance match- 
ing. Making these two ad- 
justments With only an swr 
bridge can be very difficult 
because a low swr will re- 
sult only when both settings 
are correct. With a re- 
sistance bridge, the adjust- 
ment is much easier. 

Consider the antenna 
shown in Fig. 2, a magneti- 
cally-mounted, base-load- 
ed CB whip. The antenna 
really has two adjustment 
points, although the tapped 
loading coii is normally ad- 
justed and sealed at the fac- 
tory and all that is neces- 
sary for 27-MHz operation 
is a slight height adjust- 
ment. Putting this antenna 
to use on 10 meters or using 
a different length whip sec- 
tion may change things 
enough that a low swr can- 



not be achieved without a 
change to the coil size or 
tap position. 

For example, I am using 
one of these antennas on 
the roof of my house as a 
loaded ground plane. The 
eight 1 /4A radials laid out on 
the roof do not provide the 
same type of ground return 
as the roof of an automo- 
bile. In addition, a 5' whip is 
being used as a radiating 
element in place of the orig- 
inal 3' length. This longer 
length lets me use a smaller 
loading coil with lower 
losses I built this test irv 
strument partly because of 
the difficulty I was having 
trying to tune this antenna 
with only an swr meter and 
grid dipper. 

Adjusting such an anten- 
na is a lot simpler with the rf 
resistance bridge, but first 
the bridge must somehow 
be connected to the base of 
the antenna, ft would be 
nice to locate the bridge 
physically at the base of the 
antenna but this isn't 
always practical For one 
thing, the bulk of the oper- 
ator's body would probably 
upset the antenna tuning If 
the bridge is connected to 
the antenna through a 
length of coaxial cable then 
that cable length must be 
chosen carefully because 
the impedance seen look- 
ing into a transmission line 
depends on three things: 
the line impedance, the 
load impedance, and the 
line length. 

Luckily, it happens tiiat a 

section of transmission line 
which is some multiple of a 
half wavelength in length 
will have an input imped- 
ance almost exactly equal 
to its toad impedance. Us- 
ing such a line makes it pos- 
sible for the bridge to be 
located at some convenient 
position and still indicate 
the antenna base imped- 
ance At 28 5 MHz, a half 
wavelength in free space is 
16' 5" and in coaxial cable it 
will be about 2/3 of that or 

If you have a section of 



cable this length, it is easy 
to check its electrical 
length with the bridge. First 
put a 10-Ohm resistor dh 
rectly on the bridge and 
check for the null at 10 
Ohms Then insert the cable 
section between the bridge 
and resistor and see that the 
bridge still reads a resistive 
10 Ohms, If it is a little off, 
as indicated by an incom- 
plete null somewhere near 
10 Ohms on the dial, you 
may want to change the 
transmitter frequency a bit 
to adjust the operating 
wavelength to the line's 
physical length. 

lust for fun, you might 
try a quarter wavelength of 
cable and verify that it 
transforms the 10 Ohms in- 
to 270 (52'Ohm cable). In 
fact, you might get out a 
good article on transmis- 
sion-line matching sections 
and try a number of things 
with different loads and 
line lengths — it's fun and 
really brings that dry old 
theory to life. 

With the antenna fed 
through some multiple of a 
half wavelength of cable, 
the radiator length can be 
adjusted for resonance as 
indicated by a complete 
null of the meter reading. 
The resistance indicated at 
resonance is the feedpoint 
impedance of the antenna, 
and the ratio of that imped- 
ance to 52 Ohms is the swr 
on the cable — assuming 
you're using 52-Ohm cable. 
If the swr is more than 21 
(antenna impedance great- 
er than 100 or less than 25 
Ohms), then you may want 
to change the coil tap posi- 
tion. It probably is easier to 
change the inductance be- 
low the tap by squeezing or 
separating the coil turns 
there slightly than it is to 
unsolder and move the tap 
itself. These adjustments 
can be pretty fine and you 
probably won't end up 
changing the coil size by a 
whole turn's worth anyway. 

With the inductance 
changed, look for the new 
null on the bridge and, once 
again, adjust the antenna 



i 



height until the feedpoint 
impedance is pure resis- 
tance. Depending on 
whether that resistance is 
closer or further from the 
52-Ohm target, you now 
know in what direction the 
coil must be altered to ef- 
fect an acceptable match. 

Conclusion 

Of course, there are 
many other tuning applica- 
tions for this instrument 
besides CB antenna conver- 
sions. You will find it more 
useful than an swr bridge 
for any application which 
requires both resonating a 
load and transforming its 
impedance. As a bonus, you 
can use it to measure swr 
when the load impedance is 
mostly resistive. The inter- 
nal dummy load lets you 
adjust and modify antennas 
without danger to your 
transmitter and without 
putting a big signal on the 
ait YouH also find that the 
dummy load and calibrated 



wattmeter are a valuable 
QRP tune-up aid Last, but 
not least, you can develop a 
real understanding of trans- 
mission-line matching tech- 
niques by using the bridge 
to verify some of the theory 
you read when studying for 
your ticket] ■ 

Referdnc«8 

1 a KISnet WB6BIH, ^'Home- 
Brew Rf Impedance Bridge/' 75, 
May, 1980. 

2. J. Sevick, "Simple Rf 
Bridges/' OST, April, 1975. 

3. W. Vissers, "Tune-up Swiftly, 
Silently, and Safely," OST, 
December, 1979. 

4. R. Luetzow. "Build an Oper* 
ating Impedance Bridge," QST, 
November, 1979. 

5. R. Hubbs and R Doting, 'Im- 
provements to the RX Noise 
Bridge/" Ham Radio, February, 
1977, 

6. J. Hall and J. Kaufmann, "The 
Macro-Matcher/' QST, January, 
1972, 

7. W. Orr, editor. The Radio 
Handbook, Editors and Engi- 
neers, Ltd.. 1962, 



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Police Freqs for the TR-2400 

a sleepless night for the mod squad 



I do not need to extol the 
bounty of convenience 
and luxury Kenwood's new 
TR-2400 hand-held 2-meter 
transceiver has brought to 
VHF enthusiasts. Most 
hams, no doubt, have seen 
or read of its features— no- 
tably 10 channels of pro- 
grammable memory and its 
ability to scan these mem- 
ories, stopping on active or 
inactive channels. Being 
strictly a VHF enthusiast, 
my mind began to drift 
when my TR-2400 arrived to 
what the next advance in ra- 
dio/scanner technology 
would bring forth. It didn't 
take very long to imagine 
the first tri-band program- 
mable hand-held scanner 



It 



4i. 







IC 



It 



I 1 I v^« 



< COLLECTOR 




fig, 1. Vco location, 
26 73 Magazine * February. 1982 



After alL the TR-2400 had 
broken the ground, at least 
in a single-band version. 

I also began to ponder 
the possibilities of convert* 
ing the TR-2400 to the "ac- 
tion band/' One sleepless 
night was spent tracing the 
schematic lines and deci- 
phering its method of oper- 
ation. I would like to thank 
Trio-Kenwood Corporation 
for their practice of supply- 
ing block diagrams and full 
schematics with their prod- 
ucts. 1 wish all manufactur- 
ers would make it a policy 
to do the same with every 
unit This ham, for one, dis- 
trusts "black boxes." 

Several possibilities 
emerged to modify the 
TR-2400 so that reception in 

the 154- to 158-MHz range 
would be possible. Three of 
them will be outlined here, 
from simple to complex. 
The simplest of these is cur* 
rently working in my rig 
The second requires moder- 
ate circuit modification, 
but may not work depend- 
ing on the range of the vco. 
The third method requires 
additional parts and good 



instruments to adjust but is 
sound in theory. I present 
these here in hope that 
someone else will follow 
my theories, try to imple- 
ment them, and report their 
results. I cannot because 1 
begin Navy pilot training at 
Pensacola, Florida, within 
two weeks of writing this 
draft and don't have the 
time! 



Theory in Operation 

The operation of the 
TR'2400 is fairly straight- 
forward as frequency syn- 
thesizers go. Referring to 
your owner's manual (pages 
14 and 15) with the follow- 
ing description may be 
helpful, but not necessary, 
to follow the principle of 
the synthesizer. 

Transistors Q7 and Q8 
and associated power sup- 
ply pass transistors Q2 and 
Q3, respectively, form a 
complementary electronic 
switch — i.e., when Q2 is ON 
during receive, Q3 is OFF, 
and vice versa during trans- 
mit Q2 controls the fixed 
frequency receive beat os- 
cillator/tripler (XI, Q1), Q3 



controls the transmit beat 
oscillator/tripler (X2, Q4). 
During transmit positive 
bias on the base of Q7 
causes it to conduct to 
ground and turn off Q2 and 
Q8, which turns on Q3 and 
Q4. 

The output of Q4 (138.5 
MHz) and the VHF voltage 
controlled oscillator [vco, 
QIO) are mixed, filtered, 
and amplified by Q5 and 
Q6 This forms a downcon- 
verter, much like the i-f sys- 
tem when in a receiver. As 
shown on the block dia- 
gram in the manual, the 
output of Q6 is always be- 
tween 5,5 and 9.5 MHz for 
2-meter operation (144.0 — 
138.5 = 5.5 MHz). The full 
range is 5 4 MHz to 9,995 
MHz, In receive mode, pass 
transistor Q2 activates Ql 
(127.8 MHz) and D3. The 
output of Ql is lower than 
Q4 by 10.7 MHz, which is 
the i-f frequency in order 
to keep the output of Q6 
between 5,5 and 9,5 MHz, 
the vco must drop its fre- 
quency by 10.7 MHz, too. 
Most of this drop is ac- 
complished by D3 bypass 
ing C27 when forward bi- 



ased, effectively increasing 
the value of C26 (the value 
of two capacitors in series is 
lower than the smallest 
value; bypassing one of 
them therefore increases 
the value of capacitance in 
the circuit). This lowers the 
vco frequency by about 
10 7 MHz. 

IC Q20 is a binary-en- 
coded 3 Vi -stage decade 
programmable counter (i.e,, 
it divides by any integer, 
not just powers of two). Ac- 
tually, as used here, only 3 
decades are program- 
mable: units (A1-D1), tens 
(A2-D2), and hundreds 
(A3-D3). The thousands half 
stage (A4-B4) is wired at one 
thousand (i.e., A4 goes to 
Vdd and B4 goes to ground, 
a binary one). Frequency 
division of the signal from 
Q6 is therefore 1000 plus 
whatever is loaded into 
Q20 by the microprocessor, 
Q25 (and interface ICs Q23 
and Q24). Divisors range 
from 1080 at 143.900 MHz 
to 1999 at 148.495 MHz, the 
limits of the TR^2400. 

The phase comparator 
reference frequency (5 kHz) 
is derived from X3 (10.240 
MHz) and fixed binary di- 
vider IC Q22. To get 5 kHz 
in this case, a divisor of 
2048 is used, which is 2^\ 
hence pin Q11 on the sche- 
matic. 10,240 kHz -s- 2048== 
5 kHz. 

The divided outputs from 
both IC Q22 (reference) and 
ICQ20 {signal} are fed to IC 
Q21 , the phase comparator. 
Any difference between 
phases in the two signals 
(usually caused by a dif- 
ference in frequency) causes 
an error voltage to appear 
at pin 1, ''AMP OUT." This 
output is proportional in 
magnitude to the phase dif- 
ference of the two signals. 
This error voltage is applied 
to D2 (actually a varactor 
diode) to tune the vco fre- 
quency and hence correct 
the phase difference the 
comparator in IC Q21 
senses. Simultaneously, this 



voltage is fed to four varac- 
tors In the front end (Dl-4) 
to ensure peak tuning 
across the band in the re- 
ceiver front end. The error 
voltage was measured at 
nearly 1/2 volt per mega- 
hertz of frequency change. 

Back to the beginning for 
a moment. The trans- 
mit/receive switching volt- 
age used to drive Q7 and 
Q8 is closely associated 
with the biasing voltage for 
diodes D9 and D8/D27. 
These diodes select the 
routing of the vco output 
signal to either the receiver 
(D9) or the transmitter 
(D8/D27) as it is needed. 

To complete the theory 
of operation, the deviation 
for transmitting is devel- 
oped in the vco. Output 
from microphone amplifier 
IC Q13 is applied to D5 in 
the vco, another varactor. 
Thus, modulation is true 
FM, produced directly at 
the VHF frequency without 
the use of frequency multi- 
pliers. 

Conversion 

The most commonly 
used portion of the VHF-hi 
public service band of 
usual interest lies almost 
exactly 10 MHz above the 
2-meter amateur band (154 
to 158 MHz). The transmit- 
ter frequency from the vco 
(1 43.9 to 1 48.495 MHz) is an 
appropriate injection fre- 
quency to the receiver for 
nearly the same range 
( + 10.7 MHz = 154.6 MHz 
to 159.195 MHz). 

The only trick necessary 
to accomplish this higher 
injection frequency is to 
use the higher-frequency 
transmitter beat oscillator 
(Q4) with the receiver and 
turn off the receiver beat 
oscillator (Ql) and D3. Two 
wires can be rerouted 
through the S. TONE switch 
(if not being used) to shift 
the receiver up band. No 
critical or sensitive circuits 
are disturbed, so perfor- 
mance is virtually ensured. 



9.6 V DC 



4eJEerfiMH£ 



if f ^ TO C2. C4 

JUNCTION 




*ro ca 



vcv 



TO VCV LINE 



Fig. Z Suggested circuit Note: LM358 is a dual op amp /n ar} 
8-pin DIP designed for single-ended power supplies. 



In operation, the collector 
of Q7 is bypassed to 
ground, which switches the 
oscillators, as needed, but 
not the radio circuits. 

The Mod 

Turn the radio off and 
the TX offset to BU OFF. Re- 
move the four rear screws, 
back cover, battery cover, 
battery pack, and the two 
screws beneath the battery 
holder. Disconnect the bat- 
tery. Locate the empty area 
in the center of the rear cir- 
cuit board where the tone 
board would go. Find the 
red {V + ) and black 
(ground) wires and short 
them together (use a piece 
of insulated wire if you 
like). The red line will be 
disconnected from V+ in a 
moment. Replace the back 
cover without screws. 

Turn the radio over, face 
up. Carefully lift the face 
plate up and off to the right. 
All these ICs are CMOS and 
could possibly be de- 
stroyed by statWfc charges on 
loose fingers or tools. There 
is no need to touch these, 
so donV Note: You will be 
on a remote lead of the 
microprocessor (PA2), but 
this lead has static protec- 
tion (C9, R66). 

Find the 5. TONE switch 
assembly in the top, center. 
Just to the right of this 
switch is a black wire 
marked B1. Follow this wire 
down to the bottom edge of 
the board. Remove this one 
end of the wire from this 
point by cutting or un- 
soldering it. This discon- 
nects the red wire on the 



bottom board from V + . 
Lay the black wire aside. 

In the lower left corner is 
a shielded portion of the 
circuit. This is the vco. At 
the top of this box is tran- 
sistor Q7 and its associated 
resistors. To the right, in the 
2 o'clock position, is R18. 
See Fig. 1. The wire lead of 
R18 is the connection point 
for the end of the black 
wire removed above. The 
lead on R18 has a ceramic 
coating for insulation, part 
of which must be removed 
to make a place to solder 
the black wire. This coating 
will chip away easily under 
a pen knife, razor blade, or 
even serrated plier tips if 
done very gently. After 
removing the insulation, 
solder the black wire to the 
resistor lead quickly. These 
small resistors won't handle 
much heat for long. Don't 
break the circuit. This is just 
a convenient attachment 
point. 

That is the entire modi- 
fication. Put the case to- 
gether, careful not to pinch 
any wires, and connect the 
battery pack. Be careful not 
to overtighten the screws. 
Turn the radio on before 
moving the TX OFFSET 
switch from BU OFF, 

Operation 

This modification causes 
the ON AIR indicator to be 
on when the S. TONE 
switch is depressed. The 
transmitter is not on. The 
microprocessor (pin PA2) 
reads the collector of Q7, 
which you just shorted to 
ground, as the transmitter. 



73 Magazine • February, 1982 27 



\^ 



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Only the transmit beat os- 
cillator is on. While in this 
mode, I suggest you keep 
the F LOCK ON and the TX 
switch in the STOP position 
to avoid inadvertent trans- 
mission while monitoring. If 
you do transmit, the trans- 
mission will be in the 
amateur band as usual. The 
transmitter is not shifted up 
band by this modification. 

To receive the desired 
new channel, subtract 10/7 
MHz from the known fre- 
quency (e.g., 155.61 MHz — 
107=^144.91). Make sure 
the S. TONE is off (up po- 
sition] and program the 
radio as usual for the cor- 
rected frequency (e.g., 
4.910). Now depress the S, 
TONE switch. As the ON 
AIR flag appears, your 
radio is tuned to the new 
channel. 

While in this mode, the 
keyboard wit] not function, 
just as if you were transmit- 
ting; thus, there is no band 
scan or memory scanning, 

28 TSMagazme * February, 19S2 



These features may be re* 
gained by the more com- 
plex modifications, or by 
isolating pin PA2 of the mi- 
croprocessor and keeping it 
near Vcc (which I do not 
recommend). If the radio is 
turned on with the S. TONE 
switch already depressed, 
an incorrect display is likely 
to occur. Simply turn the S. 
TONE switch off, then on 
again to correct the read- 
out. Receiver sensitivity in 
the new band will fall off 
because varactors D1-D4 
(front end) are not being 
properly tuned for this high- 
er range. However, sensitiv- 
ity remained sufficient to 
receive my local sheriff's 
department near the edge 
of the county. 

Other Theories 

The best theory requires 
some careful circuit work, 
but has great promise. Ba- 
sically, if you add 2000 to 
the divisor at IC Q20, all fre- 
quencies would be shifted 



up by exactly 10.0 MHz, 
This is easily done by lifting 
B4 from ground and con- 
necting it to Vdd, or A4. 
Thus, programming would 
be just as on 2 meters — just 
the last 4 digits of the fre- 
quency, without the need 
for a correction factor. Us- 
ing this higher divisor would 
allow using the receive beat 
oscillator and keep band 
and memory scan capa- 
bility. 

The easiest way to keep 
the vco working 10 MHz 
higher than usual above the 
receive beat oscillator is to 
isolate D3 in the vco by 
breaking the control line 
from Q2. An additional 
switch would be needed to 
switch it back in for normal 
two-meter operation. 

A more extensive circuit 
addition may yield better 
results. The AMP OUT line 
from IC Q21 goes from 
about 1.2 volts to 3.4 volts 
(a range of 2.2 volts) from 
143.9 MHz to 148.5 MHz (a 
spread of 4.6 MHz], or 
roughly +.5 volts/MHz. 
Thus, to go 10 MHz higher 
would require about 5 volts 
more, in addition to 3.4 
volts, for a maximum swing 
of 8.4 volts. This is below 
the battery voltage and is 
therefore feasible, but may 
not be practical. There are 
several limiting factors that 
must be checked before im- 
plementing either modifica- 
tion: T capacitance range 
and response curve of D2 
for these voltages; 2. main- 
taining the supply voltage; 
and 3, will tC Q20 handle an 
input frequency of 20 MHz? 

The output of the AMP 
OUT line of ICQ21 is limit- 
ed to Vdd, the supply volt- 
age from regulator Q9, This 
is 6 volts, or about 10 MHz 
of total possible spread, us- 
ing 1 volt as a minimum 
figure and linear mode of 
operation from D2. One 
possible solution to this 
limited voltage swing is an 
amplifier stage with a volt- 
age gain of 2 connected to 
the battery line. The output 



would feed varactors D2 
and D1-D4 in the front end. 
This may tune not only the 
vco over the full 15 MHz, 
but also the front end to 
maintain sensitivity. How- 
ever, it may be impractical 
to use the unregulated bat- 
tery voltage. Low batteries 
and varying load conditions 
(e.g., audio) may cause volt- 
age fluctuations and insta- 
bility in the vco. 

Still one more option ex- 
ists. Alternating X2 with a 
crystal for 45,9333 MHz 
would shift the transmit 
beat oscillator exactly 10.0 
MHz above the receiver os- 
cillator instead of 10.7 
MHz. These crystals would 
be switched in or out by 
means of their ground con- 
nection. These two crystals 
(X2 and X2A) would differ 
by less than 250 kHz, so the 
bandwidth of the oscillator 
should not be a problem. 
The accurate tuning of 
these crystals is imperative. 
To tune the front end, an op 
amp could be used in a volt- 
age summing circuit. (See 
the suggested circuit in Fig. 
2.) 

The trimpot would be ad- 
justed to add a preset value 
to the vcv (varactor control 
voltage] line to feed the 
front end (only) when 
switched in. When not in 
use, both sides of the pot 
would be grounded so it 
would add zero votts for 
normal operation. Note: 
X2A may also work on the 
receive oscillator side if Q1 
is broadband enough, and 
D2 will work on a higher 
voltage. If so, change R3, 4, 
and 5 (Fig. 2) to 220k and 
connect the vcv line to D2 
as welL Eliminate the con- 
nection to Q7. This will re- 
store memory scan again. 

It is my hope that some- 
one else will pick up on 
these ideas and work them 
out to completion. In emer- 
gencies, such capability to 
switch between ham and 
police or fire department 
channels could prove very 
valuable. 

Good monitoring! ■ 





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73 Magazine St^H 



Those Amazing Bobtails 

the current-fed connection 



The Bobtail antenna sys- 
tem described in the 
references has created 
quite a stir Various com- 
binations of construction 
methods and feed systems 
have been suggested 
through a great deal of cor- 
respondence between vari- 
ous amateurs. 

A nagging problem has 
been the lack of a satisfac- 
tory explanation of the op- 
eration of the antenna 
when it is current fed. It is 
hoped that this article may 
shed some light on this sub- 
ject and spur others on to 
try this excellent antenna. 

To begin, we need a cou- 
ple of definitions: 1) Volt- 
age feed — feeding an an- 
tenna at a point where a 
voltage loop (or maximum) 
occurs, 2) Current feed — 
feeding an antenna at a 
point where a current loop 
occurs. 

Antenna theory shows 
that whenever you have 
two vertical radiating ele- 



ments spaced 1/2 wave- 
length apart, the radiation 
will be reinforced in a direc- 
tion perpendicular to a line 
drawn between the anten- 
nas. By using three vertical 
radiating elements Cor four, 
five, or morej all spaced 1/2 
wavelength apart, the radi- 
ation will be reinforced in 
the same directions as be- 
fore, approximately propor- 
tionally to the number of 
radiating elements. Such an 
antenna is known as a cur- 
tain, Because our antenna 
has only three elements, it 
is known as a short, or Bob- 
tail, curtain. 

Curtain antennas of the 
type described are bidirec- 
tional, with radiation pat- 
terns that look like elongat- 
ed figure-eights viewed 
from the top of the antenna 
looking down. The figure- 
eight pattern extends per- 
pendicularly from a line 
drawn between the anten- 
nas, and when many ele- 
ments are phased, the fig- 



ure becomes longer and 
skinnier and the result is a 
bidirectional beam: a 
broadside array. 



^r-T 



(NSULATQfT 



I Ma, 




iMib 



Fig. 1. The current-fed Bobtait. 

30 73 Magazine • February, 1982 



In order to understa 
the operation of the Bobtail 
curtain antenna, one must 
consider the antenna cur- 
rents in terms of their mag- 
nitude and phase relation- 
ship. Ideally, in an antenna 
of this type, all radiation is 
from the vertical elements, 
and little or no radiation oc- 
curs from the horizontal 
sections (flat-top portion) 
because these exist merely 
to achieve the proper phase 
relationship between the 
vertical elements. 

Heretofore, the Bobtail 
has been voltage fed by 
means of a coupling net- 
work attached to the bot- 
tom of the center element, 
although it is possible, if de- 
sired, to attach the cou* 
pling network to the bot- 
toms of either of the verti- 
cal end elements 

For many reasons, in- 
cluding convenience, ease 
of matching, simplicity, 
eltmiriation of coupling net- 
works, and other factors, it 
has been considered desir- 
able to find another way of 
feeding the Bobtail, and 
such a method has been 
reported as having been 



used with success by a 
number of different ama- 
teurs. Here's how it works: 

In Fig. 1 observe that the 
Bobtail array, as before, 
consists of the three quar- 
ter-wave vertical elements 
at A, B, and C, The two end 
elements at A and C are es- 
sentially a portion of the 
flat-top and connected di- 
rectly thereto. 

The center vertical ele- 
ment is separated from the 
horizontal flat^top portion 
by a small insulator at C, 
and the conductors of a 
coaxial feedline are at- 
tached to the flat-top and 
to the vertical element, 
across the insulator, with 
the center conductor con- 
nected to the vertical, and 
the braid connected to the 
exact center of the flat-top, 
at B. 

Vertical element A is sep- 
arated by 1/2 wavelength 
from element B, and verti- 
cal element B is separated 
by 1/2 wavelength from ver- 
tical element C Flat-top 
sections A-B and B-C act as 
phasing lines to make the 
current relationships in the 
antenna come out properly, 
i.e., the current in section 
A-B is iaO<^ out of phase 
with the current in B-C, and 
therefore they cancel. 



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The currents in the ver- 
tical elements are in phase 
and add because the cur- 
rent is traveling tn the same 
direction at any given in- 
stant (but the currents are 
not equal tn magnitude). 
The reason for this is that 
the vertical elements are 
each only 1/4 wavelength at 
the operating frequency. 
The current divides be- 
tween the vertical elements 
in 3 ratio of two to one. 

In order to satisfy the 
phase requirements, the 
magnitude of the current in 
the end elements must 
equal the magnitude of the 
current in the center ele- 
ment. Since there are two 
end elements and only a 
single center element, the 
current in the center ele- 
ment must be twice that in 
each of the end elements. 

If you study Fig. 1, you 
will notice that for a par- 
ticular given half-cycle, the 
+ and — signs are as 
shown, changing sign at 



each T/2-wave point. We 
have assumed the feedline 
to be exactly 1/2-wave- 
length long. The arrows be- 
tween the plus and minus 
signs show the direction of 
current during the particu* 
lar half-cycle we've chosen 
to illustrate. During the 
next half cycle, note that 
the polarity at each of the 
half wave points will 
change and the current ar- 
rows will reverse direction, 
but also note that, once 
again, the currents in flat- 
top sections A-B and B-C 
will cancel. The currents in 
the vertical elements will 
again add in-phase in spite 
of the fact that their direc- 
tion is reversed. Thus, on 
each half of every full cycle 
the vertical elements al* 
ways add irnphase and the 
flat-top sections always 
cancel. 

ialeresting Side Notes 

If you turn a current-fed 
Bobtail upside down, it 



looks like a much more 
familiar antenna system. By 
eliminating the phasing line 
(flat-top) and substituting 
ground, you have three 
1/4-wave verticals spaced a 
1/2-wave apart. This is very 
common practice in anten- 
na systems, for example, in 
the broadcast industry for 
directional beaming. 

The disadvantage of all 
but perfect ground systems 
is the resistance loss in im- 
perfect conductors Con- 
sider, now, what happens 
when we use the Bobtail ar- 
ray: The "ground" becomes 
the horizontal wire or flat- 
top—nearly loss-free com- 
pared to ordinary ground 
and, better still, elevated 
above earth by at least a 1/4 
wave. 

What this means is that 
the antenna becomes more 
efficient and the radiating 
portion is raised The high- 
current portion of an anten- 
na is the portion which does 
the biggest share of the 



radiating and that is why it 
is best to get it as high and 
as in the clear as possible. 
The Bobtail array accom- 
plishes these things and, 
therefore, is a good antenna 
compared to one in which 
the radiating portion is low 
and the losses in ground re* 
sistance are high* 

One more item. Radia- 
tion from a Bobtail is ver- 
tically polarized and there* 
fore, when placed as in the 
configuration shown in Fig, 
1, exhibits not only gain, but 
a very low angle of ''take- 
off/' as is typical of many 
vertical radiators. Hence, 
it's a good DX antenna. ■ 

References 

1. Jerroid A. Swank W8HXR, 
"The 2aMeter Double Bobtail," 
73 Magazine, May, 1980. 
Z Jerrotd A. Swank W8HXR, 
"The Amazing Bobtaii. . .Our 
Headers Respond," 73 Maga- 
zine, Decembef, 1980. 
3, Alan Kaul W6RCL, 'The Both 
tail Curtain: Round Three," 73 
Magazine, Ju\y, 1981. 



Wc VI c<»rnefed iJ^e DirkeJl 



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32 73 Magazine • February, 1962 



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19070 REYES AVE ■ P.O. BOX 5625 
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Phone (213) 537-5200 






See List of Advertisers on pag^ 114 



73 Magazine • February, 1982 33 



David I, Brown W9CCI 
Route 5, Box 39 
Noblesviile IN 46060 



Shoot the Moon! 

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(51 

P?DW- 


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f/g. 7. Video monitor screen presentation. White squares 
with nunnbers are the maximum number of squares that can 
be lit Dark areas are never lit One possible moon image is 
shown by circle G7, This would light squares 6, 70, 17^ and 
14. Adjust your lens or lenses for approximately this kind of 
spot size. The numbers correspond to the LDRs in Fig. 10. 

34 73 Magazine • February, 1982 



IS your OSCAR or EME 
array all automated for 
tracking? Mine is, but 1 still 
wanted a means of visually 
tracking in a manual mode- 
This article details the sim- 
ple "moon" camera I came 
up with to look at the moon 
while I stayed comfortably 
in my basement (Indiana 
winters get cold!). It also 
makes a fine motion detec- 
tor or low-resolution sur- 
veillance camera. 

Take a look at Fig. 1 for a 
moment. What I have is the 
screen of a TV set or, in my 
case, a video monitor. 
There is no reason why you 
can't feed the video output 
of my simple camera to one 
of the TV game modulators 
and pipe it into any TV set 
as rf on whatever channel 
the game modulator out- 
puts on. 

As shown, the spot or im- 



age of the moon has been 
concentrated into a round 
circle that just illuminates 
one or more of the photo- 
sensitive devices (more on 
them later). Whenever light 
shines on these devices, 
their resistance is greatly 
lowered and I sense that 
change to light a square on 
the monitor screen. In order 
to have the different posi- 
tions on the screen repre- 
sent different aiming posi- 
tions of the antennas, there 
are two main requirements. 

The first and easiest is 
that the camera be phys- 
ically boresighted to the 
antenna. That's just a fancy 
way to say that it has to be 
aligned to look where the 
antenna is looking. 

Secondly, the photo de- 
vices must be arranged in 
an array that duplicates 



what you want to see on the 
screen and then scanned in 
step with the monitor scan- 
ning. These last two require- 
ments are met easily using 
the circuitry and board lay- 
outs provided by this arti- 
cle. 

Since I have started you 
out at the photo-sensing 
end, let's begin there on the 
circuitry and boards. The 
first thing you will notice is 
all the boards are round in- 
stead of square or rectangu- 
lar. This allows for mount- 
ing in a round enclosure 
(details later, under Me- 
chanical Assembly). The 
first board to consider is the 
LDR Board, shown in Figs. 2 
and 4. I used light-depen- 
dent resistors (LDRs) as pho- 
to devices; mine are about 
V4 " in diameter at the light- 
input end. This allows the 
array of 16 LDRs you see 
the pattern for to fit easily 
on my round board. 

To mount the LDRs in the 
board, you need sockets of 
some kind. This avoids di- 
rect soldering and the pos- 
sible altering of the resistive 
characteristics of the LDR. I 
highly recornmend an item 
called a matrix pin by AMP, 
Inc.; it is their part number 
380598-2. These are single- 
terminal push-in sockets 

and are sold by many parts 
houses and the magazine 
advertisers. Just drill out 
the circles to hold the 
sockets of your choice and 
load the board up as shown. 
All leads come to the 
board from the copper side 
and pass through their 
holes, leaving a small 
amount of the stripped lead 
on the copper side to solder 
to, When this board is com- 
plete, there should be 
seventeen leads 4'' to 5" 
long coming off the copper 
side. (Use different colors 
to avoid confusion.) 16 
leads are to one side of 
each LDR, and one lead is 
common to all LDRs and is 
called the video lead [VI D), 
There is really no easy way 
to test the board at this 
point, so set it aside and go 
to the counter chain sche- 




matic in Fig. 3. The cor- 
responding foil and compo- 
nent sides are shown in Figs. 
5 and 6. 

The counter chain should 
go together quickly, and it 
can be checked out fully 
when completed — less any 
other boards. Load the 
board as shown and then 
check the test points using 
a frequency counter or os- 



Fig. 2, Foil side of LDR board. 

cilloscope at each test 
point against Table 1. The 
starting point is at the 555 
IC, as this is the master 
clock. It should run at 
122.88 kHz, and you adjust 
to that using the PC board 
thumbwheel pot, Ra. The 
set you use for a monitor 
will more than likely lock 
up [have steady sync] if the 
clock is from 122.0 to 123.5 



kHz, but you may have 
something called flutter 
due to a difference be- 
tween your divided-down 
vertical (59.57 to 60,3 Hz in 
the clock range just given} 
and the proper 60-Hz rate 
used to avoid beats against 
the power line 60 Hz. 

The wide range of toler- 
ance on most TV sets 
allows you a lot of leeway 



-!.lAfll"<>j-ji^,-JO*iJ^w»'l^>I'^"!^l^^l"W^i-%»^'^'! 



TO FtG 7 
DECODERS 




TO PIS. t 
DECODERS 



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7490 






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Fig. 3. Counter chain. Set for a frequency of 125 to 126 kHz at Frp test point For this appli- 
cation, CI = 220 pF, Ra - 10k thumbwheel PC pot Rb = 18k, V4-W fixed resistor. General 
formula is: f = 1/7 = (1A4]/Ra + 2Rb) X C 

JSMagazine • February, 1982 35 



TO DECODER SOA^D A 











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• L€AeS fROU DCCOOEft 
B0&RD e 

riiSERT FROM CORPCn SiDC- 
SOLDER -CLIP EKCESS OM 
eOJHPOMENT SIDE SEfORt 
INSERTtiie LORS 



o AMP SO€fC£T P\H 

U P MOUNTING 
POST LOCATION 

•'^ PLUG m LOR 
Hei TOTAL 



NOT£ - SEE TEJCT 

M P MOy»«TING POST 
LOCATIONS 



^\-^ cAPAcrroR 

0^^ JUMPERS 



TEST PT. 

Fig, 4. Component side of LDR board. M.P. designates 

mounting post (threaded spacer) locations. Use alternate '''S 6. Component side of counter chain board. Standard 
locations between any board pair, thus only three spacers schematic symbols are used to show component mounting 
looking like a triangle between any board pair. Small circles locations. Solid lines connecting dots indicate jumper 
are socket pins for LDRs. Solid dots are leads from decoder i^^ds. Circled x indicates test point 
board B and should be inserted and soldered from the cop^ 

per side and excess lead on component side clipped off in the setting of Ra where using a 10k pot for Ra and 
flush with board. Resistor symbols are LDR locations. the set will lock up and look junnpers in the fixed Ra 

atright. If you can't get positions, a smaller pot can 
things as good as you want be used along with fixed re- 
sis toKs) to allow Ra to ef- 
fectively tune slower. You 
would have to find the two 
extremes of Ra settings that 
create a locked-up picture, 
measure the resistance of 
Ra in each case, and use the 
difference as the new Ra 
value. Then fixed resistors 
make up the jumpers. Re- 
member, the total must be 
10k. 

Example: If the set 
locked up alright on resistor 
Ra settings of 2500 Ohms to 
7500 Ohms, use a new Ra of 
5k and one fixed resistor of 
2500 Ohms in either fixed 
Ra {jumper) position. Your 
new range then becomes 
2500 to 7500 Ohms. 

Ignoring the +V and 
ground leads needed by all 
boards except the LDR 
board, there are only six 
leads leaving the counter 
chain board (A. B, C A', B\ 
CI and they all go to the 
Fig. 5. Foil side of counter chain board. points lettered the same on 

3fi 73 Magazine • February, 1962 




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decoder board A (Fig. 7). If 
these points are outputting 
according to Table 1, the 
7442 decoders (I CI. IC2) 
will decode the BCD line 
codes into one of ten out- 
puts. Since the D line is not 
used off the 7490s, the 7442 
becomes a one-of -eight 
decoder. In IC1, positions 1 
to 7 represent seven verti- 
cal columns across your 
monitor screen. Position is 
left as horizontal retrace 
and is covered on the vid- 
eo/sync board. ICl runs the 
sequence of 1 to 7, then 0, 
32 times before any change 
occurs in the vertical scan 
decoder. This means 32 
lines that are identical In 
vertical coding across the 
screen. This is accom- 
plished by placing a fixed 
divide-by-32 chain between 
the horizontal and vertical 
counters. 

In the case of the number 
1 LDR, if light is shining on 
it each of the 32 lines will 
go white from a black 
screen as it scans over the 
column position 4 (center). 
When this happens 3 times, 




fig. 8. Foil side of decoder board A. 



a white square is formed at 
the top center of your 
screen. When you have all 
your camera boards to- 



gether but no optics or 
lenses over the LDRs, the 
monitor screen will tight 



white squares in the same 
pattern as the LDRs are laid 
out on the board if 




Fig. 7. Schematic of decoder board A. 

31 73 Magazine • February. 1982 



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m p 



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H 



M.P. 



e 



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T404 




MP 



*" T M W 



e» c» JUMPERS 

M P MOUNTINS POST 
LOCATIONS 



EXCEPT FOR LETTERS 
V a M TO VIDEO/SYNC 
BOARO 

LETTERS THRU K 
AND 3 THRU Z TO 
O^CODCR aOARD B 



Fig. 9. Component side of decoder board A. Letters Vand H 
are leads to video/sync board. Letters D to K and StoZ are 
leads to decoder board B (except Vand HI Solid lines corh 
necting dots are jumpers on component side. 



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73Magaifne • February, 1982 39 




COi_rilCJW 0€C0[)EII9 



OPTION i -MQVKS kOA # » 

FRiJM C0L-4/flaW4 (CENTER! 

TO cat- 4 /HOW r ibtm center} 

CHANOE ICe-l^ Z, 3 AS SHDWRf 



I 






E> 



BTW CENTER 

fWSTEAO pf CEIiTER 
OF SCREEN 



Fig. 10. Schematic of decoder board B. Option 1 moves LDR 
#9 from column 4/row 4 (center) to column 4/row 7 (bottom 
center). Change iC8 pins 1, 2, and 3 as shown, and load LDR 
at bottom center. 

light is falling on all the possible7X7 or49-position 

resolution. The complexity 
is not worth it, and the 
camera functions just fine 
using only 16 of these 49 
possible locations. This is 
accomplished by allowing 
the focused moon image to 
be larger than one square of 
resolution and using multi- 
ple lit boxes to show where 
the image is relative to 
center screen (on target) A 
perfectly aimed antenna 
will produce a white + sign 
at the center of the monitor 
screen. 



LDRs. This will be a fina 
check that all is working, 
before the mechanical 
assembly. 

The row decoder (IC2) 
does the same job as the 
column divider (IC1) but at 
a slower rate, to handle 
horizontal rows Therefore, 
it advances one position 
after each 32 horizontal 
lines This happens seven 
times, forming 7 horizontal 
rows of 32 lines each- If 
more LDRs and decoding 
were used, the camera has a 



IC3, tC4, and IC5 are 
merely inverters to get the 
low 1-of-8 outputs of the 
7442s back to highs that 
can be gated together in 
further TTL logic. Figs. 8 
and 9 show the foil and 
component sides of 
decoder board A. 

The last of the decoding 
occurs in Fig. 10, decoder 
board B, where 7403 gates 
are used to detect which of 
the 49 squares the monitor 
is scanning over and en- 
able the proper LDR for 
that segment. Figs, 11 and 
12 show the foil and com- 
ponent sides of decoder 
board B. 

For the positions that 
have no LDRs, as you will 
see more clearly next on the 
video/sync board, there will 
be no LDR enabled and the 
video (VI D) tine will be at or 
very near +V. This +V on 
the V ID line will represent a 
black screen on the monitor 
in the final video com* 
posite. For those squares 
that have an LDR sensor, 
each has a corresponding 
7403 gate section. When 
the gate is enabled, the 
open collector output tries 
to pull + V down to ground 
through a load resistor. All 
the LDRs are in parallel by 
the video line, but only one 
at a time can be considered 
in the circuit— the one en- 
abled by the scanning 
chain. 

Going briefly to point C 

on Fig. 13, the video/sync 
board, you wit! see a 10k re- 
sistor to H- V in the base cir- 
cuit of the first video stage. 
The circuit is really a 
voltage divider consisting 
of that 10k at all times, in 
series with either (1) an LDR 
that is in series with the out- 
put transistor of its 7403 
gate to ground, or (2) the 
10k alone with no enabled 
LDR for those positions not 
having LDRs. 

Remember, I said + V on 
the VI D line meant a black 
screen. Automatically, you 
have 33 positions represent- 
ing no LDRs and a black 
screen. In the 16 positions 



having LDRs, the LDR rep- 
resents the lower resistor in 
a voltage divider and as 
such will cause the voltage 
at point C to be very close 
to +V [LDR off- no light), 
or very close to ground 
(LDR on — light shining on 
it). My LDRs swing from 
several megohms (dark) to 
about 400 Ohms (light). 
That means the voltage 
divider changes from (1) 
+ V through 10k through 
megohms to ground, caus- 
ing the junction of the 10k 
and LDR to be very close to 
+ V, to (2) a series of +V 
through 10k through 4(X) 
Ohms, causing the junction 
of the 10k and LDR to be 
very close to ground. This 
junction voltage controls 
the base of the first video 
stage. 

Following through the 
video for an example of one 
LDR with light on it. the VID 
line and point C wilt be low 
or near ground, The first 
video stage is just an emit- 
ter follower, so no inversion 
occurs and the base of the 
second video also will be 
low and the transistor at or 
near cutoff. When it is cut- 
off, the collector rises to at 
or near + V, and this repre- 
sents white on the screen. 

The last stage is also just 
an emitter follower to allow 
enough current to drive a 
750hm cable and the 75- 
Ohm load presented by 
either the game modulator 
or the video monitor input 
If the monitor has a gain or 
video drive control, jumper 
A to C in the last video emit- 
ter circuit and omit the on- 
board gain pot, RL, If the 
monitor has no control or 
the game modulator no in- 
put gain adjust use RL and 
jumper B to C to allow 
some means of adjusting 
overall composite video 
level. 

The base of the final vid- 
eo stage has control from 
two more points that 
should be covered here. 
The two transistors with H 
and V for inputs are the 
sync mixer and make up the 



40 73 Magazine • February, 1982 



final composite video. Each 
time the H line goes high 
[every horizontal line, posi- 
tion 0) or the V line goes 
high (every vertical scan or 
field, position 0), the base 
of the final video is 
dropped to approximately 
0,2 volts, or close enough to 
be called ground. This is 
sync-voltage output in my 
camera. 

If the video example 
were reversed, using a dark 
or absent LDR position, the 
second video stage can turn 
on only to the point where 
its collector is at 1.4 volts. 
This is caused by the two 
diodes in its emitter for 0.6 
volts apiece and the 0.2 
volts from emitter to col- 
lector on the second stage. 
This 1.4 volts becomes our 
black level, and allows for 
the normal video com- 
posite of sync being blacker 
than black. If you consider 
my composite video as 
0.2-volt5 sync, 1.4 volts- 
black, and 5.0-volts white, 
then divide it down with the 
level control, you will end 
up with video composite of 
very close to the standard 
of 1,0-volt video, 0.4-volts 
sync. It at least seems to be 
close enough for a perfect 
picture with stable sync, 
and I felt that trying to get 
any closer was not worth 
the time or extra com- 
ponents. Foil and compo- 
nent layouts for the 
video/sync board are shown 
in Figs 14 and 15. 

That about completes 
the electronics package, 
and if you have a power 
problem, the 74Cxx equiva- 
lents can be used for ail the 
TTL devices except the final 
7403 decoders The 555 is 
running well below its max- 
imum + 18 volts, but seems 
content and quite stable on 
+ 5 volts. 

Mechanical Assembly 

The area of mechanical 
assembly will vary, as with 
most ham projects, along 
with its uses. For that rea- 
son, rll outline how I did 
mine and you can carry on 




Fig. n. Foil side of decoder board B. 



or modify from there. As il- 
lustrated in Fig 16, the 
housing on my camera is 
PVC plastic pipe! That's 
why all the boards are 
round and separated by 
three spacers between each 
board. You can, thereby, 
build up a board-over- 
board sandwich by skipping 
every other hole of the six 
given per board to set the 
spacers on. 

Looking straight into the 
LDR board, it is spaced 
from the board below it by 
3 spacers in a triangle, The 
next board befow, by 3 in an 
inverted triangle, and so on, 
I used 4-inch id. black pipe, 
and would suggest that 
whatever you use be black 
inside to avoid light re- 
flections and stray light. 
You can buy end caps for 
the pipe, and I used one as 
is on the rear of the camera. 
It was stuck on with rubber 
cement for easy removal. 
One hole in this cover al- 
lowed the RG-59 feedline to 
exit through, and a second 
would have to be provided 
if the on-board level control 
is used — I did not use it. 

The front cover 1 made 



from another end cap, but 1 
sawed off the entire lip 
from the horizontal center 



line down. This allowed me 
to add small aluminum 
brackets to one side To the 







■4 JUMPER 



# , LTR tN/OUT LINES 

M P MOUNTING POST 
LOCATION- SEE 
ASSEMGLV NOTES 

Fig. 12. Component side of decoder board B. Numbers and 
letters indicate proper placement of input/output leads to 
other boards. Solid lines Connecting dots are jumper leads 
on component side. 

73Magazfne • February. 1982 41 



FIG ID 




HI 'LEvei. 
TEST POINT 




COttPOSiTt 



*5V 



©r'^O Q^ 



I 



;>o)c 




PA»*EL Trt^E 
FEMALE ftHC 



-0 



nc T 






F/g, 13. Schema f/c of vic/eo/sync board. Al! transistor de- 
vices shown are smail'Signal NPN devices in an RCA IQ 
CA3046. Numbers shown around the e-b-c of devices indi- 
cate pin numbers of that /C for reference and 
troubleshooting. Note: If cable is terminated in 75 Ohms at 
the monitor or a drive-level pot (usually 50 to 100 Ohms in 
monitorsl use H from A toC and omit pot RL. If no drive 
level is used on your monitor, jumper B toC and use RL as 
your drive control to prevent overtoad. 



bracket is attached a rod 
that runs down the side to- 
ward the rear to a small, 
sealed, metal box that 
holds a 4-rpm dc motor I 
had lying around. It is much 



like the ones the advertising 
signs use, and I think it was 
for 6-V dc battery opera- 
tion. Plus 5 votts runs it just 
fine, if a bit slow. This al* 
lows me to remotely rotate 



a 'iens cover" of sorts on 
and off the end of the pipe 
to keep rain, snow, dirt, etc., 
out of the lens area. 

On the topic of lenses, or 
optics, I am still trying for a 
better setup, but one of my 
prime criteria was that it be 
cheap. After all, I'm trying 
to avoid using an SSTV or 
FSTV monitor camera be- 
cause of cost, so why use a 
camera lens that costs more 
than the system electron- 
ics? So far, the best combi- 
nation I have found is with 
dime-store magnifying 
glasses with their handles 
removed. 

I fixed-mounted one that 
was right at 4 inches o.d. at 
the center of a 6-foot piece 
of PCV pipe, and that al- 
lows me to slide the elec- 
tronics in and out towards it 
from the rear. I also have a 
33-inch lens mounted in a 
4-inch collar that I can slide 
in and out from the front of 
the pipe to form a com- 
pound lens system. That is 
the area of experimentation 
at the moment and 1 don't 
mind admitting my physics 
classes were too long ago. 
Optics was never really my 
bag, nor was photography, 
so all help offered will be 



Signal 


Location 


Measured Frequency 


1- F,^ 


556 IC pin 3 


122.880 kHz (for H 


2. A 


Column *C pin 12 


61.440 kHz 


IB 


Column IC pio 9 


30.720 kHz 


4.C 


Column IC pin 8 


15.360 kHz 


5.0 


-i- by IC pin 11 


960 Hz 


6.Q 


-i- by IC pin 12 


480 Hz 


7, A' 


Row IC pin 12 


240 Hz 


6. B^ 


Row IC pin 9 


120 Hz 


9.C' 


Row IC pin 6 


60 Hz 



= 1 5,360 Hz, V = 60 Hz) 



This has the horizontal sync running about 400 Hz low, but allows the vertical sync to be 
correct to avoid vertical ^'flutter/' This is a compromise to reduce system electronics, but 
all sets tried pulled in easily to the tower horizontal rate. The following is a representation of 
ttie VID Ime with light shining on all LDRs. L rs TTL low pulses. Scope Horz, rate = 1/60 sec 
per full horizontal scan or about 3 ms per cm on a 6~cm Horz. scale. 



HHHLHHHSHHLHLHHSHLHLHLHSLHLLLHLSHLHLHLHSHHLHLHHSHHHOHHHS 



H is TTL high, S is sync (app. 0.2 volts). is option LDR 9 



Table 1. 



i 

4 



gratefully accepted. 

The limitation of this sys- 
tem would seem to be use 
only during full moonlight, 
but that depends on the 
response of the photo de- 
vice you use and the lens 
system you end up with. As 
it stands now, 1 can track in 
some very hazy conditions, 
and even clouds don't con- 
fuse things too much. Next 
to try is a full-blown in- 
frared system, I think I 

For all the OSCAR fans 
who read on when the name 
was mentioned in para- 
graph one, I have not gone 
bananas enough to try visu- 
ally tracking an OSCAR sat- 
ellite with the LDR system. 
However, the same elec- 
tronics system is being 
tried, mounted in the same 
waterproof 'type housing 
with two full caps. The dif- 
ference is that the 7403 out- 
puts will be used to activate 
PIN diodes [or similar 
switching devices) on the 
downlink antenna system. I 
am trying to build onto the 
outdoor, steerable OSCAR 
antennas something like my 
Twin lead Terror antenna 
system [73 Magazine, No- 
vember, 1977, p. 54J, and 
then do the video add-on at 
the monitor end using the 
sync/white commands com- 
ing down the 75-Ohm cable. 
The video then would be 
derived from some form of 
the receiver age. I men- 
tioned this earlier, in the 
Twinlead Terror article 
twhich got titled, "Cheap 
Ears for OSCAR" V 

You can do some posi- 
tively wild things with 
scanned and electronically- 
steered antennas when you 
have only receiver power 
levels to worry about. It 
becomes even easier when 
you have a full-duplex, two- 
band arrangement like the 
OSCAR uplink/downlink. 
The receive antennas scan 
at a high enough rate to be 
above audio, so you can 
easily filter out the switch- 
rate whine A I! you hear is 
the additive result, but each 
antenna's age product is 



42 ?3Magaime • February, 1982 




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73 Magazine • February. 1982 43 




Fig. 14. Foil side of video/sync board. 



sampled, and only the high- 
est is used to light the white 
box on the monitor — sort of 



a sample, hold, choose-the- 
highest-figure, and use*for- 
displav system. 



INPUT LRD VIDEO 
FflOM ytD 
OH LRD BQ 



INPUT \/ERT SVNC 
FROM DECODER eOARD A 
HOLE V 



INPUT HO 2 SYNC 
FROM DECOOER 
BOARD A- HOLE H 




I am still deciding wheth- 
er to use steer antennas to 
produce center-box white 
scheme, or sample and dis- 
play all levels as boxes in 
the same arrangement in 
which the antennas are me- 
chanically set up. The latter 
has the advantage of being 
able to tell what polarity 
sense the signal really is, at 
the antennas, by observing 
what box(es) are lit the 
brightest, and to what 
polarity you have those 
antennas aligned. It does re- 
quire small changes in the 
video stage of the camera, 
however, so you don't get 
just saturated white or 
black off positions in- 



tentionally chosen for the 

EME arrangement 

1 have tried several sam- 
ple-and-hold circuits and 
antenna positionings so far 
and have found none to be 
the perfect result I want 
Many such circuits are al- 
ready around as described 
in the articles over the past 
couple of years and IO- 
meter antennas are easy to 
build, so you may have 
your system running before 
1 have mine complete. I am 
working hard on the EME 
version at the moment, but 
should get back on the 
OSCAR version soon. 

The cost of the A-to-D 
converter IC is quite attrac- 
tive now, and with my love 
for digital circuits I am go- 
ing to try one more sampie- 
and-hold circuit using that 
type of device. It is an 
analog in, 3 digits in BCD 
output device covered a bit 
further as an antenna read- 
out device for use with CDE 
Ham 3 rotator controls in 
Ham Radio, January, 1979, 
p. 56, The device used there 
is an AD 2020 by Analog 
Devices, Norwood, Massa- 
chusetts. 

If there are any ques- 
tions, please include an 
SASE, and HI sure try to 
help you. if you come up 
with other uses (surveiU 
lance, etc.), please write, as 
several people have al- 
ready approached me with 
ideas beyond what I had in 
mind. Til try to act as a go- 
between as best I can for 
any new ideas for my 
camera. Good lookin'.B 



use i^Af^m HOSE clamps 

TD ANGLE tnOhl FOR AlOUP^TmC 



CABLE WITH 
+ 3V AND 6N13 



TARGET 



CAP 

ROTATES 



ROD AND 
BRACKET 



JUMPER 



(^'vv^^ RESISTOR 



MP. MOUNTING 

POST LOCATIONS 



IN9(^ diode: 

Fig. IS. Component side of video/sync board. Schematic 
type symbols are used to show hading placement of com- 
ponents. Solid lines connecting dots are jumpers on compo- 
nent side. 




MOVABLE 
LENS 



LEVEL 
CONTROL SHAFT 

OF REQ'Dl 



nS^ED LENS 
CAMERA 



4" PVC PiPB 



RG-59 




Fig. 16. Mechanical assembly of the camera. 



44 73 Magazine • February. 1982 



f^esder S^fvice for facing page ^331^ 



^ 




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K H ) 



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Being a group that takes 
pleasure in passing 
along useful information to 
fellow hams, Technical 
Clinic sends this public in- 
formation bulletin on the 
10-minute frequency modi- 
fication for the new I com 
IC-2A hand-held. The short 
and simple job will allow 
operation (depending on in- 
dividual radio characteris- 
tics) from 141.000 MHz to 
149 995 MHz 

TC was pleasantly sur- 
prised to discover that 
Icom has made another rig 
that lends itself to tinkering. 



This happened while one 
was on the bench for a 
product development 
experiment, 

You will need only solder 
and a low-wattage solder- 
ing iron. The two-step oper- 
ation is as follows: 

1. De-solder the brown 
jumper wire from the MHz 
BCD thumbwheel switch. 
This will allow the MHz 
switch to run through its 
whole range. 

2. Solder a small piece of 
wire (or form a solder 
bridge) at the position 



where the cellophane PC 
harness terminates at the 
programmable divider IC, 
as shown in Fig, 1. This 
allows the radio to recog- 
nize a request for 148 and 
149 MHz. 

That's it. You now have a 
radio with MARS/CAP capa- 
bility which has not had any 
of its normal operation im- 
paired one bit. It is hoped 
that all present and future 
owners of this rig will take 
full advantage of this mod 
once their individual war- 
ranties expire. ■ 



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ATIONS I 

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73 Magazine • February, 1982 47 



SOCIAL EVEHTS 



Listings in this column are 
pro^iiiefS free of charge on a 
$pace'av3if3t>fe basis. The 
fotiowing inform&tion should be 
inctuded in every announce- 
ment: sponsor, event, date, 
time, place, city, state, admis- 
sion charge (if any), features, 
tafk'in frequencies, and the 
name of whom to contact for 
further information. Announce- 
ments must be received two 
months prior to the month in 
which the event takes place. 

knuHtnon heiqhts il 

FES 7 

The Wheat on Community 
Radto Amateurs will hold their 
annual hamfest on February 7, 
1962, beginning at S:00 am at the 
Arlington Park Race Track EXPO 
Center, Arlington Heights IL. 
Tickets are $3.00 at the entrance 
and $2.50 in advance. There will 
be free fiea-market tables, ex- 
panded floor 3|mce, parking, 
awards^ and a large commercial 
areai, including the new com- 
puter section. Talk-in on 
146.01/Jt and 146.94. For com- 
mercial info, call WB9TTE at 
{312>-765-16S4; for general info, 
call WB9PWM at (312)^29-1427. 
For tickets, send an SASE to 
WCRA. PO Box QSU Wheaton 
IL 60187, 

TRAVERSE CITY Ml 
FEB 13 

The Cherryfand Amateur Ra- 
dio Club will hold its ninth annu- 
al Swap 'N Shop on Saturday. 
February 13, 1962, from 8:00 am 
through 2:30 pm at the Immacu- 
late Conception Middle School 
gymnasium, 218 Vine Street, 
Traverse City Ml. General admfs* 
slon Is $2.50 and single tables 
are $3.00. Talk-in on 146.35 and 
146.52. For further information^ 
contact Jerry Cermak K8YVU, 
Chairman, 3905 SI usher Road, 
Traverse City Ml 49684. An SASE 
wJ]] be appreciated^ 

MARLBORO MA 
FEB 14 

The Algonquin Amateur Ra- 
dio Club will hold en electronics 
flea market on February 14, 
1962, at the MarltHDro Junior 
High School cafeteria, Marlboro 
MA. Sellers will be able to set up 
from 9:00 am to 10:00 am and 
doors will be open from 10:00 am 

4t 73 Magazine • February, 1 



until 2:00 pm. Admission is 
$1.00. Tables are $5.00 if a writ- 
ter> reservation is made before 
February 7, 1982, and $7.50 for 
any tables remaining after that 
date. Refreshments will be avail- 
able. Tatk-in on *01/-61 and .52. 
For reservations, contact Mac 
W1BK. 128 Forest Avenue, Hud- 
son MA 01 749. 

MANSFIELD OH 
14 



The Mid-Winter Hamfest/Auc- 
tion wHI be held on Sunday, Feb- 
ruary 14, 1962, at the Richland 
County Fairgrounds, Mansfield 
OH. Doors will open to the pub* 
lie at 8:00 am. Tickets are $2.00 
in advance and $3.00 at the door. 
Tables are $5.00 in advance and 
$6.00 at the door. Half tables are 
available. Features will Include 
prizes, an auction, and a flea 
market, all in a large heated 
building. Taik^in on 146.34/. 94. 
For additional information, ad- 
vance tickets, and/or tables, 
send an SASE to Harry Friet* 
Chen K8HF, 120 Homewood 
Road. Mansfield OH 44906. or 
phone (419^529-2801. 

VERO BEACH FL 
FEB 20 

The Treasure Coast Hamfest 
will be held on February 20, 
1982, at the Vero Beach Com* 
munity Center, Vero Beach FL 
Admission is $2.00 in advance 
and $2.50 at the door. Features 
will include prizes, drawings, a 
QCWA funcheon, and tallgatir^g. 
Talk'in on 146.1 3/ J3, 146.52/.52, 
146 04/64, and 222.34/223.94, 
For additional information^ write 
PO Bojc 3088, Beach Station, 
Vero Beach FL 32960. 

FAYETTEVILLEWV 
FEB 21 

The Plateau Amateur Radio 
Association will hold Its fourth 
annual hamfest on Sunday. Feb- 
ruary 21 ^ 1982, at the Memorial 
Buildfng, Fayettevflie WV. The 
doors will open at 9:00 am. Ad- 
mission is $2.50 and children 
will be admitted free. Flea mar- 
ket tables are $2.00, AiJ activi- 
ties will be indoors and wilt in- 
clude ARRL displays, forums, 
exhibits^ door prizes, and wom- 
en's programs. Hot food, re- 

982 



freshments, and free parking 
will be available. Talk-in on 
.19/, 79 or .52. For more informa- 
tion* contact Bill Wilson 
WA8YTM. 302 Central Avenue. 
Apartment 2, Oak Hill WV 25901, 
or phone (304)-469-99l0 or 
(304)-469'93l3. 

LANCASTER PA 
FEB 21 

The Lancaster Hamfest will 
be held on Sunday, February 21, 
1982, at the Guernsey Pavilion, 
located at the Intersection of 
Rtes, 30 and S96, east of Lan- 
caster PA. Doors will open at 
0800. General admission Is 
$3.00; children and XYLs admit- 
ted without charge. Each 8rfool 
space with a table »s $5.00 
(limited to two tables for norv 
commercial use and six tables 
for commercial use). All inside 
spaces are by advance registra- 
tion only, and the registration 
deadline is February 10, 1962. 
All vendors myst set up between 
the hours of 0600 and 0800; 
reservations will not be held 
past 0900 hours without prior ar- 
rangement. There will be free 
tailgating In specified areas out* 
side (if weather permits) on a 
first'Come, first-served basis. 
Food will be served at the 
hamfest. Talk*in on 146.01/.61 or 
146.62. For advance registration 
or more information, write 
SERCOM, Inc., PO Box 6082. 
Rohrerstown PA 17603. 

ELKIN NC 
FEB 21 

The fifth annual Elkin Winter 
Hamfest will be heid on Sunday, 
February 21, 1982, at the Elkin 
National Guard Armory, iocated 
one mile from Interstate 77 at 
exit 85, Elkin HO. Breakfast and 
lunch will be served at the ham- 
fest by the Foothills ARC of 
Wilkesboro NC and the Briar- 
patch ARC of Galax VA. Talk-in 
on 144.77/146.37. 146.22^146,82, 
and 146.52, For table reserva^ 
tions, ticket inquiries, or other 
information, contact Earl Day 
WB4GQP, 131 Harris Avenue, El- 
kin NC 28621, or phone (91 9)-835- 
3509. 

MORRIS PLAINS NJ 
FEB 25 

The Split Rock Amateur Radio 
Association will hold its annual 
eq uipment auct ion on Thursday, 
February 25, 1962, at the Morris 
Plains VFW Post #3401, located 
on Route 53 in Morris Plains NJ. 
Doors will open at 7:00 pm to 
unload and Inspect equipment 



and the auction will get under- 
way at 6:00 pm sharp. Admis- 
sion is free. Please limit your 
items to working electronic 
equipment — no lunk — and make 
sure any loose parts are bagged 
or boxed. The club will take a flat 
10% commission on all sales of 
Individual items up to $50. 
Above $50, the club will take a 
$5.00 commission on each In- 
dividual sale. All commissions 
are payable In cash only. There 
will be refreshments available 
and the site has plenty of park- 
ing. In case of inclement 
weather, the auction will be held 
on Thursday, March 4, 1982, at 
the same location and times. 
The Morris Plains VFW Post is 
located approximately 1 mile 
north of the intersection of 
Routes 202 and 53 in Morris 
Plains WJ. For more informa- 
tion, write PO Box 3, Whippany 
N J 07981 , 

GLASGOW KY 
FEB 27 

The annual Glasgow Swap- 
fest will be held on Saturday, 
February 27, 1982, beginning at 
8:00 am CST at the Glasgow 
Flea Market Building, 2 miles 
south of Glasgow on Highway 
31 E. Admission is S2.00 per per- 
son with no extra charge for ex- 
hibitors. One free table will be 
provided per exhibitor with extra 
tables available at $3.00 each. 
There will be a large heated 
building with plenty of free park- 
ing. No meetings or forums will 
be held— just door prizes, free 
coffee, and a large flea market. 
Talk-In on 146.34/.94 or 147,63i 
.03. For additional information, 
contact Bernie Schwitzgebel 
WA4JZ0, 121 Adairland Ct., 
Glasgow KY 42141, 

VIENNA VA 
FEB 2B 

The Vienna Wireless Society 

will hold the 9th annual ARRL- 
approved WINTERFESTTm ^32 

on February 26, 1982, beginning 
at 8:00 am at the Community 
Center, 120 Cherry Street, Vien- 
na VA. Tickets are $3.00 and in- 
clude one chance for the prize 
drawing* Prizes will include a 
Kenwood TS*630S HF transceiv- 
er, an Icom IC-26A 25- W mob its 
2-meter rig, and a Santec 
HT-1200 hand-held, as well as 
accessories and books. Excel- 
lent food service will be avail- 
able. Featured will be deaiers* 
and manufacturers' displays, an 
Indoor flea market, and outdoor 
frostbite tailgattng. Tables are 



$5.00 and $10.00. Talk-in on 
.31/.91 and 146.52. For addition- 
al information, send an SASE to 
WINTERFEST"^f^ ^82, Vienna 
Wireless Society, PO Box 418, 
Vienna VA 22180, or phone Ray 
Joiinson at (703)-938^3ia 

DAVENPORT lA 
FEB 28 

The Davenport Radio Ama- 
teur Ciub will hold its 11th an- 
nual hamfest on Sunday, Febru- 
ary 28, 1982, from 8:00 am to 4:00 
pm in the Davenport Masonic 
Temple, Highway 61 (Brady 
Street) and 7th Street, Daven- 
port !A. Tickets are $2.00 in ad- 
vance and $3.00 at the door. Ta- 
bles are $5.00 each, with a $2.00 
charge for an electrical hookup 
(limited number). Hotel dis- 
counts, food, and drinks will be 
available. Talk-in on 146.28/.B8, 
W0BXR, For advance tickets 
and table reservations, write 
Dave Johannsen WBOFBP, 2131 
Myrtle, Davenport I A 52804. 

LAPORTE m 
FEB 28 

The LaPorte Amateur Radio 
Club Winter Hamfest will be 
held on Sunday, February 28, 
1982, at the Civic Auditorium, 
LaPorte IN, beginning at 3:00 am 
Chicago time. The donation is 
$2.50 at the door and reserved 
tables are $2-00 each. For res* 
ervations, write PO Box 30. 
LaPorte IN 46350, 

AKRON OH 
FEB 28 

The Cuyahoga Falls Amateur 
Radio Club will hoid its 28th an- 
nual electronic equipment auc* 
tion and flea market on Stinday, 
February 28, 1982, from 8:30 am 
to 4:00 pm at North High School, 
Akron OH. Tickets are $2.00 in 
advance and $2.50 at the door, 
Sellers may bring their own ta- 
bles or rent a table for $2.00. 
There Is plenty of space and lots 
of free parking. Prizes include a 
Kenwood TS-ISOS, an I com 3AT, 
and an loom 2AT, A 16KTRS'80 
Model III will be raffled at $2.00 
per chance. Talk-in on 146.04/ 
.64. For more details, contact 
CFARC, PO Box 6, Cuyahoga 
Falls OH 44222, or phone K8JSL 
at (216)-923-3630. 

LfVONIA Ml 
FEB2S 

The Livonia Amateur Radio 
Club will hold its 12th annual 
LARC Swap 'n Shop on Sunday, 
February 28, 1982, from 8:00 am 

t^See List of Adv&rtis&rs on page 114 



to 4:00 pm at Churchill High 
School, Livonia Ml. There will be 
plenty of tables, door prizes, re* 
freshments, and free parking. 
Talk-in on 146.52. Reserved ta* 
ble space of 12- foot minimum is 
available. For further informa- 
tion, send an SASE (4 x 9) to 
Neil Coffin WA8GWU c/o Livo- 
nia Amateur Radio Club, PO Box 
2111, Livonia Ml 48151, 

PHILADELPHIA PA 
MAR 7 

The Penn Wireless Associa- 
tion, Inc., will hold its Tradefest 
'82 on Sunday, March 7, 1982, at 
the National Guard Armory, 
Southampton Road and Roose- 
velt Boulevard (Rte 1), 2 miles 
south of exit 28 on the Penn- 
sylvania Turnpike, Philadelphia 
PA. General admission Is $3.00 
and a 6'x8' seller's space is 
$5.00 (bring table) with an addi- 
tional $3.00 for a power connec- 
tion (limited number). There will 
be prizes, displays, refresh- 
ments, rest areas, and surpris- 
es. Talk-in on 146.115/.715 and 
,52, For additional information, 
contact Mark J. Pierson KB3NE, 
PO Box 734, Langhorne PA 
19047. 

WINCHESTER IN 
MAR 14 

The Randolph Amateur Radio 
Association will hold its 3rd an- 
nual hamfest on Sunday, March 
14, 1982, from 8:00 am to 5:00 pm 
at the National Guard Armory, 
Winchester IN. Tickets are $2.00 
\n advance anf^ $3.00 at the 
door. Table space Is $2.50 and 
table space with table is $5.00. 
Setup times are 6:00 pm to 8:00 
pm on Saturday and 6:00 am to 
8:00 am on Sunday. For reserva- 
tions or additional information, 
contact RARA, PO Box 203, Win- 
chester IN, or phone W9VJX at 
(317)'584'9361. 



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73 Magazine * February, 1962 49 



The Father of FM 

the tragic story of Major E. H. Armstrong 




teanne H^mfnond 



Atop the Palisades at 
Alpine, New lersey, 
across the Hudson River 
from Yonkers, stands a tail 



1 * 





i g^^— -- 




Armstrong if} WW I uniform. (Photo by Bradley B. Hammond) 

50 73 Magazine • February, 1982 



Armstrong's radio tower atop the Palisades at Alpine, New 
lersey, as seen from Yonkers. (Photo by leanne Hammond) 



three-armed tower. It is ac- 
cepted as part of the land- 
scape by those who five on 
the river's east bank and is 
seen daily by thousands of 
commuters on Conrail's 
Hudson Division trains, yet 
few know what this tower is 
or how it has affected their 
lives. 

The tower and its ac- 
companying radio station 
were built in 1938 at a cost 
of over $300,000 by Edwin 
Howard Armstrong, pioneer 
radio inventor, to demon- 
strate the superiority of his 
new system of radio broad- 
casting-frequency mod- 
ulation (FM). After Pro- 
methean battles with the 
broadcasting industry, 
which fought to preserve its 
investment in the estab- 
lished system (amplitude mod- 
ulation— AM), FM was finally 
accepted and today is the 
preferred system in radio, 
the required sound in TV, 
and the basis for mobile 
radio, microwave relay, and 
space communications. 

As fittle known as the sig- 
nificance of the tower is the 
man who built it. Armstrong 
was born in New York City 
in 1890. When he was 
twelve years old, the family 
moved to 1032 Warburton 
Avenue — known to family 
and friends simpfy as 
"1032" -in Yonkers. The 
house, which still stands 
just up from the Greystone 
railroad station, was de- 
clared an historical land- 
mark in 1 978 by the Yonkers 
Historical Society. 

Next door, on the north 
side of the house at the cor- 
ner of Odell Avenue, was 
1040 Warburton Avenue, 
the home of Armstrong's 
maternal grandparents. The 
members of the two fam- 
ilies were a gregarious lot, 
and Howard's childhood 
was a happy one filled with 
large gatherings of rel- 
atives, many of whom were 
teachers. Learning was 
prized. "Quick, boy! How 
much is nine times five. 




Howard Armstrong, about six years old, with his sister, Ethel 



minus three, divided by six, 
times two, plus nine?' His 
great uncle, Charles Hart- 
man, principal of New York 



City Public School 160, 
would quiz his nephew to 

encourage his mental agili- 
ty. 



When Howard was four- 
teen years old, his father, 
who was American repre- 
sentative of the Oxford 




1032 Warburton Avenue, Armstrong's boyhood home in Yonkers. His earliest experiments 
were carried out in the cupola on the third floor. 

73 Magazine • February, 1982 51 



I 




His bedroom/workroom in the cupola looked out on the spot on the Palisades where his 
radio station would later be (Photo by Bradley B. Hammond) 



UniversitY Press, bought 
him (on one of his yearly 
trips to London) a book, The 
Boys Book of Inventions. 
Reading of Guglielmo Mar- 
conTs sending of the first 
wireless message across the 
Atlantic so excited his imag- 
ination that he determined 
then and there to become 
an inventor. 

In his attic room in the 
cupola overlooking the 
Hudson River, Howard 
Armstrong began tinkering 
with radio. In those days, 
broadcast sound consisted 
of Morse code signals 
picked up with earphones. 
The incipient young invert- 
tor set out to make them 
louder. He was dogged in 
his search and developed at 
this early age a capacity for 
infinite patience in his ex- 
periments which was to 
mark his life's work. 
"Genius is one percent in* 
spiration and ninety-nine 
percent perspiration/' he 




« 



I 






J 

Armstrong consiructed /arge anlenna kites which he flew 
from the upper stories of '103T" in an attempt to improve 

reception. 

52 73 Magazine • February J9B2 




The young inventor at work on the '1032^' pole. 



used to say in later years, 
quoting Thomas Edison. 

Armstrong explored 
many paths in his attempts 
to strengthen the sound. 
Reaching up into the air to 
better catch the broadcast 
signals, he flew from the up- 
per stories of 1032 large an- 
tenna kites which he had 
built with the help of his 
Yonkers friend, Bill Russell. 
He built a 125-foot antenna 
pole, the tallest in the area, 
in the south yard. His youn- 
ger sister, Edith T'Cricket'l 
helped in the construction, 
holding the guy wires and 
handing him buckets of 
paint as he swung aloft in a 
boatswain's chair. Neigh- 
bors watched with awe and 
apprehension. His mother, 
however, had complete 
faith in her son. When a 
neighbor telephoned to say 
that Howard was at the top 
of the pole and it made her 
nervous to watch, "Don't 
look, then/' was her confi- 
dent reply. 

Howard attended Public 
School 6 in Yonkers and 
Yonkers High School, and 
went on from there to Co- 
lumbia University, com- 
muting on a red motorcycle 
his father had given him as 
a high school graduation 
present. His interest in radio 
led him to the study of elec- 
trical engineering. 

In his junior year at Co- 
lumbia, Armstrong's dil- 
igent search for improved 
radio reception paid off. He 
invented the regenerative- 
oscillating, or feedback, cir- 
cuit which greatly in- 
creased radio signals, made 
them loud enough to be 
heard across a room and 
led the way to transatlantic 
radio telegraphy. His sister^ 
Ethel, remembers vividly 
the night it happened. 
''Mother and Father were 
out playing cards with 
friends and I was fast asleep 
in bed. All of a sudden 
Howard burst into my room 
carrying a small box. He 
danced round and round 
the room shouting, 'Tve 




Major Armstrong's sister, Ethel, and her husband, Bradley Hannmond, listen to a crystal set 
With their evening meai around 1920. [Photo by Bradley B. Hamniond) 



done it! Kve done it!' 1 real- 
ly don't remember the 
sounds from the box. I was 
so groggy, just having been 
wakened, I just remember 
how excited he was/' 



Later, another inventor, 
Lee DeForest, challenged 
Armstrong's priority for this 
discovery and the issue was 
twice argued before the US 
Supreme Court — which 



found in De Forest's favor. 
However, the scientific 
community has always 
credited Armstrong for the 
invention and he received a 
gold medal for it from the 




Thomas j. Styles, Armstrong's longtime associate, Ethel Howard, and his mother. (Photo by 
Bradley B. Hammond) 



73 Magazine • February, 1982 S3 




Billboard in Yonkers dating around 1921. [Photo by Bradley B. Hammond) 



Institute of Radio Engi- 
neers. Years later, the report 
accompanying the presen- 
tation to him of the Franklin 
Medal, by the Franklin tn- 




stitute in Philadelphia, also 
credited him with the inven- 
tion of the regenerative cir- 
cuit. 

After graduation from 
Columbia in 1913, Arm- 
strong worked as an inr 
structor at the college. 
When the US entered the 
war in 1917, he Joined the 
Army Signal Corps and rose 
to the rank of Major— his 
preferred title for the rest of 
his life. While in the service, 
he invented the super- 
heterodyne circuit which 
amplified even further the 
sound of radio transmis- 
sion. This invention brought 
him into contact with David 
Sarnoff, who later became 
President of Radio Corpora- 
tion of America and whose 
bright and attractive secre- 
tary, Marion Maclnnis, he 
later married. 

After the war, Armstrong 
returned to Columbia 
where he worked as an as- 
sistant to Professor Michael 
I. Pupin, famed physicist 
and inventor. When Pupin 




Armstrong and his wife, Marion, by the "1032" pote. (Photo 
by Bradley B. Hannnnond) 

54 73 Magazine • February, 1982 




Close-up of the tower. (Photo by Bradley B. Hammond) 



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73 Magazine • February, 1982 55 



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In 1923, to celebrate the opening of New York's first radio 
station — and to impress his fiancee — Armstrong cavorted 
atop the new WjZ transmitter tower, (Photo by George 
Burghard] 



died, Armstrong took over 
his professorship and, fi- 
nancing his own research — 
his inventions had by now 
made him wealthy — con- 
centrated on the eiimina- 
tion of static. 

In 1933, Armstrong se- 
cured four patents which 
were to be the basis for fre- 
quency modulation. This 
was an entirely new system 
of broadcasting. Unlike 
amplitude modulation 
which varies the amplitude 
or power of radio waves to 
transmit sound, frequency 
modulation varies the num* 
ber of waves per second 
over a wide band of fre- 
quencies. As static is trans- 
mitted by amplitude modu- 
lation and cannot break in- 
to the wide band of fre- 
quencies of frequency 
modulation, the latter is 
virtually static-free. Arm- 



strong, who enjoyed apho- 
risms, liked to quote defeat- 
ists who said, ''Static, like 
the poor, will always be 
with us/' He proved them 
wrong. 

The first public broad- 
cast of FM was made in 
1935 from the home of his 
friend C.R* (Randy) Runyon 
at 544 North Broadway in 
Yonkers. Runyon was a ham 
who operated under the 
call letters W2AG and 
broadcast from a tower in 
the yard of his house. The 
tower and the house are no 
longer standing. The Run- 
yon living room served as a 
studio for a demonstration 
of different kinds of sound 
that were broadcast to a 
meeting of the Institute of 
Radio Engineers at the Engi- 
neer's Building on West 
39th Street in New York City, 
Water was poured, paper 




Armstrong receives the Meda! of a Chevalier de la Legion 

d'Honneur for his contributions to wartime wireless, from 
General Ferrie, head of French militarY communications. 



was crumpled, and live and 
recorded music were 
beamed from the Runyon 
tower to the audience forty 
miles away. 

Although the engineers 
marveled at the fidelity of 
the sound, FM did not im- 
mediately take off and it 
would be some time before 
it would become a commer- 
cial success. "If you build a 
better mousetrap the world 
doesn't necessarily beat a 
path to your door/' Arm- 
strong said ruefully in later 
years as he fought for the 
acceptance of his new sys- 
tem of broadcasting. As a 
matter of fact, FM was so 
revolutionary that an entire 
industry had to scrap its 
hardware and start over 
before its potential could 
be realized. Understand- 



ably, the establishment was 
less than enthusiastic at the 
prospect 

However, for several 
years RCA gave Armstrong 
experimental broadcast 
privileges in its studio at the 
top of the Empire State 
Building But in 1937, say- 
ing that they wished to de- 
vote the space to the de- 
velopment of TV, they 
asked Armstrong to with- 
draw. 

More determined than 
ever to prove the superior- 
ity of FM, Armstrong built 
his own station in Alpine, 
New Jersey. The site he 
chose had been visible to 
him as a boy from his attic 
cupola at 1032, and it 
served his purpose well. It 
was one of the highest 



56 73 Magazine • February, 1982 



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for example: How to QSL. What to say, Where to place your 
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points in the region and had 
unobstfLTCted space around 
it for the broadcast of the 



station's signal. 

Programs originating 
with WQXR in New York 



City were transmitted by 
wire to Alpine and broad* 
cast first under the call let- 
ters W2XMN and later, 
WE2XCC. Today, the sta^ 
tion is owned by UA Colum- 
bia Cabtevision Company 
of Oakland, New Jersey, 
and is operated for closed 
circuit TV transmission. 

During the Second World 
War; Armstrong devoted 
himself to military research 
and allowed the govern- 
ment to use his patents 
royalty-free. He received 
the Medal of Merit for his 
contributions- 
After the war, Armstrong 
turned his attention once 
more to the promotion of 
frequency modulation. He 
saw it grow in popularity as 
a broadcasting medium as 
more FM stations went on 
the air and more FM sets 
were sold to receive the 
programs. However, few 
outside the industry had 
ever heard of Edwin 
Howard Armstrong — the 
man who invented it Fur- 
thermore, manufacturers 
began to build and sell FM 
equipment ignoring his pat* 
ents. Goaded perhaps by 
the bitter memory of losing 




Armstror}g at his desk at W2XMN. 
58 73Magazine • Februafy, 1982 



hfs regenerative patent 
years before, Armstrong be- 
came embroiled in twenty- 
one infringement actions to 
adjudicate hts FM patents. 
Battling giant corporations 
with batteries of lawyers 
used up his resources. Final- 
ly, in 1954, ill, disillusioned, 
and his fortune gone, Arm- 
strong took his own life. 

After his death, his wid- 
ow, Marion, set out to finish 
what he had started. She 
continued the lawsuits, sit- 
ting in the courtroom each 
day following the argu- 
ments and watching as tes- 
timony was given. Her first 
victory, over RCA in 1954, 
gave her funds to continue 
the other suits. In 1967, with 
the victory over Motorola, 
she had won all twenty-one 
and established clearly and 
decisively that Edwin 
Howard Armstrong was the 
inventor of frequency mod- 
ulation. 

Today, the Alpine tower 
stands as a monument to 
the brilliant man whose iri- 
ventions touch our lives 
every day. His contribu- 
tions are perhaps best 
summed up by Lawrence 
Lessing in his biography of 
Armstrong, Man of High 
Fidelity (J, B. Lippincott 
Company, Philadelphia and 
New York, 1956). "The lone- 
ly man listening to music in 
the night, the isolated farm- 
er hearing nightly the news 
of the world, the airplane 
pilot guiding his craft safely 
through the ocean of the 
sky, the astronaut now in 
his capsule gathering in the 
whispers from space, the 
earth bound emergency 
crew contending with some 
mission of mercy or di- 
s aster, the army on the 
move and the man in his 
armchair, charmed or in- 
structed for an hour by a 
great play, a symphony, a 
speech, a game of ball — all 
owe a debt to this man who, 
in some forty years of high 
fidelity, fashioned the irir 
struments illimitably ex- 
tending these powers of hu- 
man communication."B 



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1301 Massachusetts Ave 
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With the completion of our recent move to HUDSON, NH 
TUFTS ELECTRONICS is ready to bring you more ex- 
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60 73 Magazine • February, 1982 



DISCOUNT CATALOG 



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73 Magazine • February J982 61 



DXPEDrnoNS international 



THE WEEKLY DX NEWSLETTER FOR ALL AMATEURS 



I =., 4 




52 WKS 



$28 (US) 
$40 (US) 



N. AMERICA 
ALL OTHERS 






Name 



^ 






r 



A 






.^A 



il^''* 



Address 



City. 



SI. 



Zip 



DXI, 999 WILDWOOD RD,. WAYCROSS, GA. 31501 



A TRUE STATEOFTHE-ART 
COMMUNICATIONS TERMINAL! 



NEW 




from 

INFO-TECH 

$1475.00 

(with 12" Monitoi) 

$180.00 

MEMORY EXPANSION BOARD 
(10K of Memory) 

For use by amatetir fadio operators In itue 
tfansmissiofi aixj receptiao of RTTY (ASCII & 
Saudol) and Morse code Micrc3proce5sof con- 
Irolltd with 20K of memofy {BK ROW, dK RAM. 
4K video RAM) 

User programmable messages, SelCal, 
WRU, mailboK, real lime clock, large running 
bLftfsrs, buffers for printers, basic word pro- 
cessing for on-screen editing, full and half 
duplex, casserte tape interface. ^Iit screen 
for mais, ASCII or Baudot prir^tef outputs, au o- 
Slart, push lo talk, accessory switches, pro t- 



Order direct or from these dealers: 




(contains mailbox systems) 



^ons fof tmUBty baok-yp, many other featufes 

The M-500 consists ot jhfee parts: 
1 KEYBOARD Connected !o mamframe tjy 
5 -ft umbilical cord for maximum operating fSeKi- 
bilify. Entire system keyboard controHed. 
2. MAIN FRAME Houses 95% ot the elec- 
tronics, all! /O jacks, power supplies, modulator. 
demodulators. Mela -I fram^ cabinet is tabfe fop 
or rack mounted. 

3 12" VIDEO MONfTDR Htgh quality to insure 
undistorted video, provrde flexibility for operai- 
wyq position placement. 



Carltof) 

Msamh Florida 33173 
(305) 271-3675 

Colfflty Prodiiet& 

14903 Beachvlew Ave 

White Rock S C Canatk V4Blht3 

(604^ 535-3056 



Dislls Amittiif Rattta Supply 

2n 4«m Si 

Rapid Cilv, Sum Ekkoia S7701 
(Bm 343'6t27 

Electrcink Equipmant Banli 
5ie MiNSI 

VtBFtiu, vimtvA 2nBa 



INFOTECH 



RECTRONIC 

EQUIPMENT 



AtSMiiter Int. 

52 ParJ< Ave 

Parn Ridge. Niw Jetsey 07fi56 

{201) 39l'7aB7 

Global Cammunkcatlcifis 
606 Cocca isles evd 
CiMX»a Be^cti, FlofHla 32931 
f30S) 753 3624 

Him Ridllo CtflUf 
S343 Qliv« BMt 
St. Louis Wci$<un B3132 
1B0Q 3?5 3636 



DIGfTAl ELECTRONIC SYSTEMS. INC. 

1633 Wisteria Court * Er>gl&wood. Florida 33533 
Bl 3474 9518 



1445 WMs SWkon Rd. 
Manplvs. Tsnntssn 38108 
t-8O0-Z3B'616B 

Miclijgjn Rjdkl 

.38??0 Mast 

Mt_ Clemens. MJchigan 4^045 

f3l3| 463-465G 



II & & mstnbgllfii 

7201 mt vm SI 

Miami. Flwicta 33t3f6 
(3G5J 592-9685, 763-8170 

Um World 

Tormmal Building 
On«ida COiinty Atrport 
Orishany. ftew York 13424 
(315^ ne-0470 
T'9X 448-9338 

Ray' I AitiMfur Radii 
1590 u : '^ i^***i iSSoath 
Cteifwa;--. - ^'Kte 33516 
\t\%\ 535-1416 

UntVBrul AmalsiiT RaiNo 
1280 A^ Dr 

fleynotds&urg. Otito 43060 
{614) 866-4267 






For the best deal on 

AEA* Alliance* Ameco* ASP* Beldeo 
Bencher«Bird«CDE*CES« Collins 
Commufiications Specialisls* Cubic 
Cushcraft«D3iwa*0enTron*Dr3ke 
HAL«Hustler»Hy Gain»lcom»IRL 
KLM« Kantrortics* Kenwood 
Lirsen* Macrotronics* NIFJ 

MinJ-PrQducts*Mirage«NPC*Nye 
Panasonic* Palomar Engineers 
Regency* Robot*Shure*Sony 
Slafidarrf*TfirTtpo*Ten-Tec 
Transcflm*Y3esu 

FEBRUARY 
FINDS 

ICOIVI IC-730 HP Xcvr. regular 

$829 special $729.95 

(less $40 factory rebate... 
in effect througli February!] 

KENWOOD TR-25G0 new 2-M 
tiand-held in stock $299.95 

HAL CT-2100 Communications 
Receive Terminal $759.95 
KB-21G0 Keyboard $157.95 

YAESU FT-208R compact 2M 
liand held Calll 

YAESU FT-708R compact UHF 
liand-lieid Catll 

Quantities limited... all prices subject to 
change without notice 

We always have an excellent 
assortment of fine used eguip- 
ment in stock... Come in or call 

CALL TOLL FREE 

(outside HHnolt only) 

(800) 621-5802 

HOU RS: §] 30-5:30 Mon., Tues., Wed, & Ffl. 
f^^^' 9:30-9:00 Thuriday 
9:00-1:00 Saturday 



ERICKSON 

CQIVIIVIUNICATIONS 

Chicago. IL 60630 

5456 North IVIifwaukee Ave. 
|3l2|631-5t8l|wahintiimDisi 



Ir^J 



.- *, r 



62 73 Magazine • February, 1982 



AEA 



ADVANCED ELECTRONIC 
APPLICATIONS, INC. 







MM 1 Morse Matic ProgrammabJe ht^yer 16 button pad tailors 
ufiil to operate as a Memory Keyer, Mofse Trainer, Beacpri, or 
Automat^c Serial Number Sequencer. Speed 2-99 wpm, 500 
charade f memory. Use with all popular paridtes Keys gnd block, 
calhode or transistor cucuits. 91&vdc @ 350 ma 

Regular $1 99-^ - Sate Price $t79^^ 

IIT-1 Morse Trainer Generates random Mocse characters at 
pcecjseJy calibrated speeds. 1-99 wpm. One character speed can 
be seJected with another (sioiwert actual speed. Two levels of 
difficulty Select five -letter code groups, or random won} length 
Programmable aytomattc increase m speed from a beginning 
speed to an ending speed over » duration of .1-99.9 minutes. 
NormalFy operates in a random mode, but for cfiechmg progress, a 
24,000 character answer bookie! is supplied S-lSvdc (§5 200 ma 

Regular $99^^ - Sale Price $89^ 

WT-IP Morse Trainer Portable version of the MT-1. Take it with 
you! Contains a rechargeable battery pack which provides hours of 
practfce between charges.. With battery pack and charger. 

Regular $139'' - Sale Price $125^' 




CK-l "^ "^-^ "^ IIKI 

CX*1 Contest keyer. Incorporates virtually afl of the features of the 
famous MorseMatic, with the ejtcephon of the Trainer and Beacon 
modes. Two pre set speeds for fast recall and a stepped variable 
speed control for contesting, 199 wpm. 9 16vdc @ 350 ma 

Regular $1 29^' - Sale Price $116^'> 

KT-1 Keyer/Tratner. All of the features of the MT-1. However, 
except for the on /off volume control all other functtons including 
speed, stdetone pitch, wejghtmg. tune & more, are programmable 
by using the keypad to address the internal microprocessor Speeil 
variable, 1-99 wpm. Automatic tune function aJlows two harnfed 
Amtr luning Trainer provides a sequence of 24,0OD characters with 
10 starfine positions or a random point 9'16vdc @ 350 ma 

Regular $1 29^^ - Sale Price $t t6»« 

MK-1 Morse Keyer Features s^rmlaf to the keyer portion of the 
KT' 1 without automatic tune tunctron 9^I6vd€ @ 350 ma 

Regular $79^'- - Sale Price $74^ 

Keyer & Trainer ^ccessorie*. 

WE-l 20O0 character meniory expansion for MM- L...... S59*' 

AC I I2vdc/600ma. AC adaptor for MMl with ME-L 14*^ 

AC 2 12vdc/350ma. ACadaplor .,.,... 9** 

DC-1 Cigarette lighter cord for all except MMP 5** 




AEA MBA-RO Basic CW/ASCIl/Baudot Reader, feadsand displays up to 99 wpm 
CWcopy. 60-67-75.100 Baudot & ASCII at 110 baud [hand typed. 300 baud) 32 
character floyrescent display shows up to 5 words af one time 12vdc 

Regular Price $299^^ - Sale Price $269^' 

ll8A-ftC DeJuxe Reader /Code COriverter Simitar to the MBA-ftO with the addition 
of 3 code converter which converts Morse CW input (o Baudot or ASCIi TTY output 

Regular Price $399^^ - Sate Price $359^^ 




A£A PFDF Radio Direction Finder Locates signals quickly and accuritely; even 
those appearing for only a split second. Self-contained computer drives eJectroni 
cally spun array antenna, computes relative bearing within I"" and shows it on 3 
digit Lf display arid 16 LEO nng quadrant display Works with any FM receiver 
4ust plug rnto externsl Speaker jack: has self-contained aiMlK) amplifier & speaker. 
Inclydes 130-180 MHz VHF antenna. 

Regular Price $749^^ - Sale Price $674^^ 

AEA ISOPOLE Ommdirectionai VHF Base ^tion Antenna A tin ique. efficient twin 
H-waveier^gth design using resonant decoupimg sieeves. Factory tuned, low SWR 
over entire band |ust assemble and install on I '4" mast Connections and 
impedarjce matching network weather protected, wind survival 80+ mph Jr. 
modeis are shorter, ^^wavelength design. All models are UPS shfppahte. 

ISOPOLE 144 2 meter base station antenna , , , , 

ISOPOLE 144 Jr. 2 meter base station antenna . , 

ISOPOLE 220 220 MHz base station antenna 

ISOPOLE 220 Jr 220 MH^ b^se station antenna 

ISOPOLE 450 450 MHz base station antenna (Reg, $69^^) ...... . ,SAU 

Afl pricei and ipedficationi. subject to change without nor/ci* 



« f q ¥ r 



3995 



MosterCard 



Call TOLL FREE 

& 

Use your Credit Card 




WW 



New AES Branch Store. . . 

CLEARWATER, Fl - 1898 Drew St Ph. (813) 461-4267 

Store Hours: Won, Tue, Wed & Fri 9-5:30; Thurs 9-8; Sat 9 3 

fl^ ViCAS & CLiARWATtR ifofes nor opf n Thursday evf^nings^ 
E-X-P-A-N-0-E-D WATS PHONE HOURS 



Our MILWAUKEE Headquarters wilJ answer tfie Nationwide WATS line 
1 -800-558-0411 until 8 pm {Milwaukee time). Monday thru Thursday 



Call Toll Free: 1-800-558-0411 



I 



I 



Inc. 



WICKLIFFE. Ohio 44092 

28940 Euclid Avenue 

Phone (216) 585-7388 

Ohio Wats 1 800 362-0290 

OutsideOhio 1-800-321 3594 



ORLANDO Florida 32803 

621 Commonwealth Ave. 

Phone (305) 894-3238 

Fla. Wats 1 800 432 9424 

Outside Fla 1-800-327-1917 



LAS VEGAS. Nevada 89106 

1072 N Rancho Drive 

Phone (702) 647-3114 

Pete. WA8PZA & Squeak. A07K 

Outside Nev 1-800-634-6227 



ERICKSON COMMUNICATIONS 

CHICAGO. Illinois 60630 

5456 N. Milwaukee Avenue 

Phone (312) 631-5181 
Outside ILL. 1-800-621-5802 



In WIteontin (ouitldt MHwmukaa Uatro Ana) 

1-800-242-S1 95 



4828 W. Fond du Lac Avenue; Milwaukee, Wl 53216 - Phone (414) 442-4200 

AES BRANCH STORES ASSOCIATE STORE 



73 Magazine ■ February, 1982 63 



mt 



Kart T. Thurber, Ir WBFX 
117 Faptar Drive 
Mittbrook AL 36054 



The Art of Listening 

audio accessories explored 




I 

A high-quatity station receiver having attributes of acceptable sehctivitY, serjsitivity, 
stability, image and spurious signal re/ectfoa and accurate readout forms the heart of any 
installation --amateur or SWL Due to cost considerations, front-panel control space limita- 
tions, and other factors, not all desirable features can be included. In this article, we look at 
important audio-related accessories that can be used in tandem with a good set for 
outstanding performance and versatility. These include proper headphones and speakers, 
audio filters, and tape recorders. The front-panel phone jack provides the umbilical con- 
nection for these devices. The Kenwood R-1000 receiver pictured here has one interesting 
feature of special interest to SWLs: The function switch at upper left controls a timer used 
to turn on the radio for scheduled listening or to control a recorder through a remote ter* 
minai (Photo courtesy of Trio-Kenwood Communications, Inc.) 

M 73 Magazine • February J 982 



In this interesting and high- 
ly-readable article, WBFX 
highlights in a casual, non- 
technical way some impor- 
tant considerations in 
choosing key audio acces- 
sories for your station. 
Whether a licensed amateur 
or a serious shortwave lis- 
tener, we think you will be 
interested in what he has to 
say about speakers, head- 
phones, tape recorders, and 
filters for the ham shack. 

No transceiver or re- 
ceiver is perfect, and 
none comes complete with 
all possible accessories to 
fill every operating need. 
The design of such a radio 
would certainly push the 
technical state of the art, 
not to mention that it 
would most certainly be 
cost-prohibitive. Various 
accessories and modifica- 
tions narrow the gap be- 
tween needs and reality and 
allow one to tailor perfor- 
mance accordingly. 



There are many receiver 
audio add-ons one can 
build or purchase: external 
speakers, headphones, tape 
recorders, audio interfer- 
ence filters, phone patches, 
radiotetetype (RTTY) and 
Morse code readers, slow- 
scan television (SSTV) view- 
ers, and monitorscopes, to 
name but a few perfor- 
mance-enhancing accesso- 
ries. 

In this article, we will 
look at construction and se- 
lection considerations for 
the first four groups listed 
above. Our review will high- 
light a number of commer- 
cial phone-jack products 
from the standpoint of their 
contributions to material 
reception improvement 
and making on-the-air oper- 
ating a more convenient 
and enjoyable pastime. 

Let's begin with the main 
link between your rig and 
your ears— the speaker. 

Speakers: A Special Breed 

Anyone who rates him- 
self or herself a hi-fi buff 
knows just how important 
the speaker is to overall au- 
dio system performance. 
Unfortunate (y, the speak* 
er's importance to receiver 
or transceiver performance 
is too often forgotten— by 
the individual ham and by 
manufacturers as welL 
Most amateur equipment 
made today, whether of 
domestic or Japanese orh 
gjn, contains but an under- 
sized, inexpensive, and in- 
adequate loudspeaker This 
results in poor audio perfor- 
mance from otherwise ex- 
cellent equipment. Defi- 
ciencies are magnified 
when equipment is stacked, 
since the speaker is normal- 
ly mounted on the top or 
bottom of the radio where 
its output will be muffled 
by the operating desk or 
other equipment above or 
below the radio. 

Most radios have provi- 
sions for using an externa! 
speaker, and I recommend 
you use one to help attain 



the overall performance 

you expect from your set. 

Fixed station external 
speakers. It's a good idea to 
obtain the matching acces- 
sory speaker at the time of 
the receiver or transceiver's 
purchase. However, you 
should be able to use al- 
most any communications 
speaker as long as the voice 
coil impedance matches 
that of your sets output, 
normally 8 Ohms [4-16 
Ohms is the usual range]. 

Only a commun/caf ions- 
type speaker should be 
used, however, as the re- 
stricted frequency response 
of these units is optimized 
for speech reproduction. 
Hi-fi speakers, though per- 
haps of superior overall 
quality, will unduly accen- 
tuate any low-frequency 
hum as well as high-fre- 
quency noise and back- 
ground hiss. 

Of late, I've observed 
that accessory speakers of* 
fered by some manufactur- 
ers are marginal in size and 
quality; hooking up one of 
these units will not produce 
the improvement one 
would expect from an exter- 
nal speaker. A possible rem- 
edy is to scour the next 
hamfest or swap meet for 
one of the 8- to 12-inch 
boat-anchor speakers of the 
1950s and 1960s bearing 
such names as National 
Hallicrafters, Collins, and 
Hammarlund. These units, 
if in good condition (voice 
coil intact and speaker 
cone undamaged], will run 
rings around the 4- to 5-inch 
jobs seen today. A little 
clean-up, and possibly a 
paint job, will do wonders 
to restore a unit to respecta- 
bility. 

You can "roll your own'' 
versions of these increas- 
ingly difficult-to-find ac- 
cessory speakers, too; your 
effort will likely be reward- 
ed with superior speech 
quality and intelligibility. 
Send for the catalog of 
McCee Radio and Electron- 
ics, 1901 McGee St., Kansas 
City MO 64108. It's chock 




[■•■■■I 




An external speaker is a near-must in view of the minimal 
speaker usual ty provided in most amateur gear produced 
today. The Kenwood SP-180 shown here is designed for use 
with the 75-780 series of gear; it has a few "'belts and 
whistles^' of its own. These include three selectable tone 
filters and two-channel selectable input The headphone 
output can be routed through the tone filters, too. 



full of speaker and enclo- 
sure possibilities at moder- 
ate prices. Select a 6-inch- 
diameter or greater unit 
that will handle 5 to 10 
Watts of audio power. 

For the experimentally 
inclined brasspounder. Sky- 
tec offers an unusual de- 
signed-for-application CW 



speaker- This acoustically 
tuned unit develops virtual- 
ly single-stgnaf selectivity 
for excellent Morse recep- 
tion. The CW-I combines an 
acoustic filter resonant at 
about 750 Hz with a loud- 
speaker in a small enclo- 
sure; a sleeve in the output 
opening may be extended 




SJi^ytec CW-1 speaker is an unusual device that is expressly 
designed for receiving CW radiotelegraphy. The unit com- 
bines an acoustic filter resonant at about 750 Hz with a 
loudspeaker to closely approximate "single-signal'' selec- 
tivity. (Photo courtesy of Jim Bowles W6DLCI Skytec) 

73 Magazine • February, 1982 65 






1* 




HDP 1228 

Mobile instal fat ions can benefit most of all from a 
carefully-chosen and proper/ y-rmta//ed external speaker. 
Built-in speakers found in most HF and VHF/UHF mobile 
sets are inadequatety sized and positioned to compete with 
road noise, car sounds, and passenger chatter Inexpensive 
CB-type units usually work welt or a special ly-designed 
unit such as this Heathkit^ portable twin speaker can be 
used. Unit includes a visor mount to help direct sound 
downward to overcome road noise. (Photo courtesy of the 
Heath Company] 



to varv the resonant fre- 
quency slightly. 

How does it work? In the 
Skytec speaker, back radia- 
tion fronn a vertically 
moLinted loudspeaker near 
the base is deadened by 
sound-absorbent materraL 
A cylindrical sound cham- 
ber (tube) is coupled to the 
front of the speaker 
through only a small hole in 
a plate that otherwise clos- 
es the lower end of the 
tube; the tube's upper end 
is open to the room. At the 
frequency at which the 
chamber length is acousti- 
cally one quarter wave 
long, it is resonant and acts 
as a matching section be- 
tween the high impedance 
fto sound) of the small hole 
at the speaker end and the 
low impedance to the room 
of the open end. Audio en- 
ergy transfer is very effi- 
cient at this frequency but 
it falls off sharply off- 
resonance. 

Using this special-pur- 
pose speaker desired sig- 
nals can be peaked consid- 
erably (on the order of 
about 20 dBl while adja* 



cent channel signals still 
can be heard in the back- 
ground. This feature allows 
the band to be conveniently 
scanned without the need 
to switch back to the regu- 
lar station speaker. The 
speaker can be used in con- 
junction with standard in- 
termediate frequency (j-f) 
filters and narrow-bandpass 
audio-frequency (af) filters, 
as well However, the filters 
must be compatible; that is, 
bandpasses must be cen- 
tered on the same frequen- 
cy. Thus, other filters may 
or may not be used to ad- 
vantage with the CW-1, de- 
pending on whether their 
peaks may be set such that 
the audio pitch that results 
is within the speaker's re- 
sponse capability. 

You also may want to 
route your radio's output to 
a remote location such as 
the workshop, patio, bed- 
room, or yard. A general- 
purpose PA type speaker 
(weatherproof for outdoor 
use) will usually fill the bill. 
It's advisable to allow 
switching between the in- 
shack speaker and the ex- 



tension, and also for sepa- 
rately controlling the vol- 
ume on the remote speaker. 
An FM wireless mtke mod- 
ule also may be used to 
broadcast received signals 
to any standard FM receiver 
in the home or around the 
yard — more on this possi- 
bility later. 

You may have noticed 
that many of the bells and 
whistles now standard on 
the latest transceivers and 
receivers are finding their 
way into accessories of all 
kinds. For example, the ex- 
ternal speaker for my Ken- 
wood TS-180S is not iust a 
speaker, but a triple audio 
filter, audio distribution 
point, and headphone jack 
box; it can handle the out- 
puts of two receivers, or a 
receiver and a transceiver 
The two af filters are fixed- 
tuned and push-button-se- 
lectable to attenuate either 
low-frequency (below 400 
Hz) or high-frequency (1.5 
kHz or 3 kHz up) signals. 
The headphone output is 
switchable through the fil- 
ters, as is the output from 
either audio source A line- 
out jack on the rear apron 
provides a convenient 
source of filtered audio for 
RTTY^ SSTV, monitorscope^ 
and other applications 
where receiver audio is re- 
quired. 

The speaker's fixed filters 
can't compete with sophis- 
ticated "active" audio 
filters, but can do a good 
job augmenting existing t-f 
filtering. The narrowing of 
the af bandwidth to at- 
tenuate the noise compo- 
nent after i-f processing can 
materially enhance recep- 
tion. 

Speakers for the mobile 
rig. Practically all mobile 
amateur transceivers con- 
tain small internal speakers. 
The harsh sound and re- 
stricted size and range of 
most puts a crimp in the 
quality of reception of all 
signals. Although many ra- 
dios have the speaker in- 
stalled on the top of the rig 
so that the driver will hear it 



best, most sets aim the 
speaker downward — the 

worst possible direction. 
The set's full audio output 
is directed where it is large- 
ly absorbed by floor mats 
and carpeting. Even with 
solid-state equipment, 
cranking up the audio gain 
to overcome road noise and 
passenger conversation can 
result in microphonic-type 
squeals from the transceiv- 
er due to acoustic coupling 
back through the rig's in- 
nards. 

Thus, even more so than 
in fixed-station operation, 
an external speaker is clear- 
ly desirable. Extension 
speakers markedly improve 
intelligibility when posi- 
tioned and aimed better 
than the rig's internal 
speaker and will probably 
be more efficient than the 
set's speaker. This fact 
allows the transceiver's 
usual 2- to 3- Watt audio 
stage to be throttled back, 
resulting in less overall 
distortion — a real problem 
with some of the less- 
weighty mobile rigs, par- 
ticularly handie-talkies. 

A hi-fi speaker, such as 
that used for automobile 
F M/ A M/t ape-deck use, 
should not be used for the 
same reasons discussed pre* 
viously. Instead, a 1- to 
5-Watt communications- 
type speaker should be pur- 
chased, one designed ex- 
pressly for the speech 
range, 300 to 3000 Hz or so. 
An inexpensive source of 
this kind of speaker is the 
CB market still flooded 
with a mass of unsold ac- 
cessories as well as two-way 
radios The quality of CBr 
type units varies all over the 
spectrum, but with speak- 
ers sometimes going for $4 
to $5 at discount and parts- 
store sales as well as ham- 
fests and CB coffee breaks, 
it's not too much of a risk to 
try one out. Other sources 
of quick-and-easy mobile 
speakers are the small 
speaker boxes which are a 
part of many telephone am- 
plifiers, such as the Radio 



66 73 Magazine • February, 1982 



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t^Bee List of Adverrisers on page 1 M 



73 Magazine * February J982 67 



Shack 43-230 and similar 
units. Though small, these 
units seem to be adequate 
for casual FM-style mobile 
work. Old police or taxicab 
speakers in good condition 
also can be used. 

For the operator who 
likes to occasionally use his 
handie-talkie in the family 
buggy. Heath's HDP-1228 
clip-on sun visor speaker is 
a good bet. The 7-oz. dual 
speaker has two large 
mounting fingers (similar to 
those used on visor mirrors) 
to hold the speaker onto 
the visor just above the 
driver's head. This method 
of mounting allows opti- 
mum positioning of the 
speaker to direct the sound 
downward where if s need- 
ed to overcome road noise. 
An eight-foot-long cord and 
mini-plug allow easy con- 
nection to the HT or any 
other mobile transceiver. 
(This item, manufactured 
by Superex Electronics 
Corp., may have been dis- 
continued by Heath, as I 
haven't seen it advertised in 
recent catalogs,) 

lust about any CB4ype 
external speaker will yield 
adequate results. However, 
there is one new amateur 
unit on the market that war- 
rants mention; the Ken- 
wood SP-40. This is a com- 
pact, but high-quality, light- 
weight (.44-lb,) speaker hav- 
ing a power handling capa- 
bility of 3 Watts with a fre- 
quency response of 400 to 
5000 Hz. Although speaker 
size is only 57 mm, the little 
unit appears to be quite ef- 
ficient and free of annoying 
resonances and vibrations 
that too frequently plague 
lesser CB counterparts The 
speaker leg has a magnet so 
that it easily can be mount- 
ed on any magnetic sub- 
stance. If the speaker is to 
be installed in a location 
where the magnet can't be 
used, mounting screws or 
double-faced adhesive tape 
also can be used. Some- 
what on the expensive side 
[about $25), the unit never- 
theless represents good 



value (I own two, one for 
each automobile). The 
speaker's aircraft-instru- 
ment styling makes it an es- 
pecially attractive comple- 
ment to any mobile installa- 
tion. 

Headphones for 
the Ham Shack 

Loudspeakers are great 
for armchair-copy SSB work 
and for casual, FM-style op- 
erating. But there are a 
number of advantages in 
owning and using a good 
set of headphones as an ad- 
junct to the trusty station 
speaker. 

Many DX signals are too 
weak and QRM-obscured 
to be properly copied on a 
loudspeaker; a good set of 
phones will be of consider- 
able value in increasing 
your ability to pull weak 
and near-buried signals out 
of the pack, particularly on 
CW. Room, household, and 
outside distractions also 
will be markedly reduced, 
allowing maximum concen- 
tration on the signal being 
copied. The overall effect 
of using headphones can be 
about equivalent to dou- 
bling received signal 
strength, when compared 
with straight loudspeaker 
listening. This may mean 
the difference between a 
solid DX contact and none 
at all. 

A secondary, yet impor- 
tant, reason for using head- 
phones is that the phones 
isolate the ham shack from 
the rest of the household, 
whose members may not 
appreciate the objection- 
able whistles, squawks, and 
other noises that are music 
to the ham's ears. This is 
especially important when 
practicing code, since 
Morse blasting forth at 750 
Hz can have a very shrill 
and unnerving quality that 
readily penetrates wails, 
ceilings, and floors — not to 
mention people! Apart- 
ment and condo dwellers 
are well aware of how un- 
popular Morse can be with 
the neighbors. 



. 0-> .:.:.uB.iuv>X'C°0^: 






/ built a small FM rebroadcaster for cord-free headphone 
monitormg /n my ham shacL The unit shown uses the 
100-mW Ramsey FM module, which easily can be tuned to 
a clear spot on the FM band. Output of the station's 
TS-WOS, FRC'7, or R-1000 is fed through the Autek Re- 
search QF-1 audio filter to the FM unit. A pair of lightweight 
''radio headphones'' completes the installation. 



Communications phone 
requirements. Many begin- 
ners start out by appropriat- 
ing the closest set of stereo 
hi-fi phones for their rigs, 
with little thought of wheth- 
er the unit can do the job. 
Most decent stereo phones 
can be used, but because 
they are designed for high- 
fidelity reproduction, their 
wide frequency response 
may elevate internal receiv- 
er hum and noise to an ob- 
jectionable level; also, some 
lead-switching needs to be 
done to adapt them for 
monaural use. 

Far better, and a more 
suitable investment for a 
lifetime amateur radio ca- 
reer, is a good pair of com- 
munications-type head- 
phones. Such phones wilt 
boast a relatively narrow 
frequency response, high 
sensitivity, and easy physi- 
cal adjustment. They also 
will be designed for com- 
fortable wearing over ex- 
tended periods, and the ear- 



muffs will be effective in 
isolating the operator from 
distractions. Several manu- 
facturers sell communica- 
tions-type phones, includ- 
ing Telex, Superex, Radio 
Shack, and Amplivox. Ma- 
jor ham gear manufacturers 
such as Kenwood and 
Yaesu offer a selection of 
radio headphones designed 
to both physically and elec- 
tronically match their 
equipment lines. 

Several considerations 
emerge. Input impedance 
should match the output 
impedance of the receiver 
or transceiver's audio stage. 
In almost all solid-state am- 
ateur gear this is low imped- 
ance, in the 4-tCh16-Ohm 
range; normally, 8-Ohm 
headphones should be ob- 
tained, though lower-im- 
pedance units will probably 
work nearly as well Some 
older ham gear was de- 
signed for high-impedance 
phones, usually Ik to 5k 
Ohms, however; imped- 



68 73 Magazine • February, 1982 




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See List of Advertisers on fiage 114 



73Magaztne ■ February, 1982 69 




A good pair of headphones will last a lifetime of hamming. 

Though communications-type phones are usually recom- 
mended, high-quality stereo headphones are often pre- 
ferred because they usually sport extra'Soft, oversize 
cushions and padded, adjustable headbands. An adapter 
cord or plug would be required to convert a stereo phone 
such as this Radio Shack unit for monophonic use with your 
receiver or transceiver. (Photo courtesy of Radio Shack) 



ance matching is more criti- 
cal in such instances. Most 
military surplus head- 
phones, often attractive be- 
cause of their rugged con* 
struction and oversize ear- 
muffs, are 500-to-600-Ohm 
units, though they are 
sometimes seen in higher- 
and lowerHmpedance ver- 
sions. 

Sitting in front of a ham 
rig for many hours at a 
stretch is fatiguing. Doing 
this while wearing an un- 
comfortable set of head- 
phones, sporting a tight and 
close-fitting headband, is 
torturous. For reasons of re- 
taining one's sanity and a 
pleasant disposition, it's 
critically important to pur- 
chase earphones having 
good earmuffs; the muffs 
keep the signal in and dis- 
tractions out. Thick, but 
soft flexible pads are what 
are required; they should be 
held fairly tightly against 
the head by the headband's 
pressure, though not so 
tightly as to be noticeably 
uncomfortable. One should 
be careful in purchasing 



used headphones, even !f 
they're OK electrically, be- 
cause old earmuffs even- 
tually become shopworn 
and stiff, primarily due to 
their having been soaked in 
the operator's perspiration. 
Deterioration of the high- 
frequency response is the 
result, along with a reduced 
isolation ability. Overly 
large, heavy headphones 
should be avoided due to 
the discomfort caused by 
carrying their weight over 
an extended period. 

Some features to look for 
include a coiled cord, ir^ 
dividual headset volume 
controls, interchangeable 
or easily-replaceable ear- 
muffs, type of headband 
construction (single, dou- 
ble, padded, etcl and a 
means of adjusting the 
headband. These factors 
may be either pluses or mi- 
nuses, depending on indi- 
vidual operator prefer- 
ences. 

I have found that buying 
headphones is one task that 
is best done in person, not 
by mail. It's important to try 



out the phones, if possible 
with the radio with which 
they will be used, both from 
the standpoint of equip- 
ment compatibility and op- 
erator comfort. All the 
printed specs in the world 
are useless if you can't 
comfortably wear the 
phones over a long time^ 
span. If possible, borrow 
several different phones 
from friends and check out 
their suitability in your own 
station before making your 
choice. 

Except for mobile work, 
where a single headphone 
may be worn in conjunction 
with a boom mike/headset 
combo, a pair of head- 
phones is universally used. 
Since the human hearing 
system tends to cancel out 
noise which is applied 
equally to both ears, adding 
the second headset allows 
recognition of signals sever- 
al dB lower in level than 
with a single headset. Also, 
most people do not have 
equal or symmetrically bal- 
anced hearing in both ears; 
dual phones tend to mini- 
mize this anomaly. 

A few headphone operat- 
ing tips should prove help- 
ful: 

1) Try using a pair of fit- 
ted earplugs under the 
headphones. Desired sig- 
nals will come through the 
earplugs fairly well, while 
noise will be suppressed. 
Using earplugs is particular- 
ly effective when working 
on an extremely noisy band 
for a long stretch. You abo 
may find fatigue is reduced. 

2) Experiment with revers- 
ing the audio leads to one 

headphone. The human ear 
tries to cancel out noise 
which is presented irnphase 
to both ears; swapping the 
normally in-phase headsets 
can produce a substantial 
readability improvement 
while letting the signal of 
interest through with mini- 
mum impediment- If results 
are favorable, you may 
wish to install a switch to 
conveniently reverse phase 
for routine listening. 



3) Learn to "ride gain" on 
your set's rf and af gain con- 
trols, avoiding "blasting/' 
which will have the tempo- 
rary but undesirable effect 
of desensitizing the ears. 
Generally, best CW copy is 
had by running with the af 
gain wide open (or nearly 
so) and working with the rf 
gain control, keeping levels 
low enough to avoid receiv- 
er and headset overloading, 
A good receiver age system 
makes doing this a lot easi- 
er. 

4) When operating on 
CW, carefully adjust the 
set's main tuning or beat 
frequency oscillator [bfo, if 
the set has one) to produce 
a strong yet pleasant audio 
tone. Don't opt for a too- 
low pitch; around 750 Hz is 
usually about right, give or 
take 100 Hz, or so. 

5) If you're an inveterate 
SSB contester, consider the 

use of a boom mike/head- 
set combo. This device re- 
places, or supplements, the 
transceiver's existing mike 
and speaker. The boom is 
attached to the back of one 
of the headphones and 
curves around the opera- 
tor's cheek, thereby posi- 
tioning the mike directly in 
front of the mouth for 
close-talking and essential- 
ly hands-free operating. A 
press-tCHtalk [PTT) switch is 
part of the cord itself, 
though most boom-mike as- 
semblies can be 'hot- 
wired" and a foot-switch 
used for PTT switching for 
true hands-off operation. 
Use a double-headset type 
for fixed-station operation 
and ensure that mike and 
headphone impedances are 
right for the transceiver or 
receiver/transmitter pair 
with which the combo is to 
be used. Avoid cheap CB- 
type boom assemblies like 
the plague! 

6) If you want to try cord- 
free headphone operation, 
purchase a pair of light- 
weight, cordless FM radio 
headphones — the kind that 
has a built-in FM or AM/FM 
radio inside the headphone 



70 73 Magazine • February, 1982 




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73MagazinB • February, 1 982 71 



itself— and feed your rig's 
output to a small wireless 
FM broadcaster module. 
Doing this allows true cord- 
free flexibility in the ham 
shack by doing away with 
clumsy, entangling head- 
phone cords. The setup also 
has the benefit of allowing 
one to monitor band or net 
activity anyplace in the 
home or yard by tuning in 
the rebroadcaster on any 
standard FM receiver. Ram- 
sey Electronics, 2575 Baird 
Rd., Penfield NY 14526, 
sells a simple, SOOfoot- 
range kit for $335. Food for 
thought] 

Using stereo phones. We 
have cautioned against us- 
ing stereo hi-fi headphones 
in the ham shack, regard- 
less of their quality and 
comfortability. Headphones 
with extremely wide fre- 
quency response character- 
istics simply reproduce 
additional interference, de- 
tracting from desired sig- 
nals. Nevertheless, many 
hams will wish to use a pair 
of existing stereo phones 
for reasons of economy or 
personal preference. Hands- 
on experimentation will 
reveal if the pair will, in 
fact be suitable for use. 

Unfortunately, you can't 
just plug a set of stereo 
phones into your ham rig. 
Almost all such head- 
phones use a SQ-cdlled stan- 
dard three-conductor (in- 
cluding ground) plug, one 
circuit being used for each 
channel Most amateur 
equipment uses a two-cir- 
cuit (including ground) jack 
for use with monaural com- 
munications headphones. 
This fact requires replace- 
ment of the headphone's 
3-circuit plug with a single 
circuit plug and the 
paralleling of the two 
separate leads so that the 
receiver's output will be fed 
to both headset units. Alter- 
nately, the stereo head- 
phone's plug can be left in- 
tact and an adapter pur- 
chased or fabricated to 
convert the stereo-config- 
ured cord to monaural use. 



Using an adapter has the 

advantage of allowing the 
headset to be used as a 
stereo unit whenever de- 
sired, without making fur- 
ther wiring changes. 

If you do purchase a set 
of stereo headphones to 
use with your ham rig, con- 
sider a suitable pair that has 
an internal ''stereo-mono'' 
switch. This feature allevi- 
ates the need for an adapter 
plug. I own a Calrad 15-135 
headset that does a credit- 
able job both in the ham 
shack and with a small 
stereo set and it boasts in- 
dividual earphone volume 
controls, a coiled cord, and 
comfortable muffs 

IVe indicated that the 
stereo headphones' wide 
frequency response may be 
annoying when used with 
ham gear. This may be par- 
ticularly aggravating if you 
try to use a pair of stereo 
phones in tandem with an 
active audio filter, since the 
filter may emphasize resid- 
ual ac hum and noise pres- 
ent in the receiver or trans- 
ceiver's audio output You 
can minimize this problem 
by adding a 50- to 1 50-Ohm, 
1/2 -Watt resistor in series 
with the headphone lead to 
cut down their low-frequen- 
cy response and overall sen- 
sitivity. The exact value to 
use must be determined by 
experiment 

Tape Recorders 

Though by no means 
necessary accessories, tape 
recorders represent often 

overlooked but very useful 
station adjuncts. There are 
countless practical uses for 
recorders, many of which 
are suitable for the ham 
shack. In fact, many ama- 
teurs wouldn't be without 
one any more than they 
would be sans mike or key: 

Ham shack apptications. 

Small recorders have a 
wide range of applications 
in the ham shack that is 
limited primarily by the in* 
dividual operator's ingenui- 
ty and imagination, Record- 
ers can be used for such di- 




v^ 



Using a high-qualftY pair of communications-type head- 
phones has several advantages. Switching from speaker to 
headphones can material ly improve the readabiHty of 
received signals and keep distracting room noise out 
Lightvi/eight units with soft cushions that are peaked for 
communications-range audio are best Low-impedance 
models, such as the Yaesu headset shown here, are suitable 
for most modern solid*state receivers and transceivefs. 
(Photo courtesy of Yaesu Electronics Corporation) 



2] Signal reporting. An- 
other common use is to pro- 
vide ''live'' signal reporting 
to others, Most hams are 
genuinely surprised to learn 
how they really sound over 
the air, particularly at a far- 
distant location. They are 
usually highly appreciative 
of an offer to play back 
their signal to them as 
much more meaningful 
than a simple readability- 
and-strength report If you 
make a practice of pro- 
viding on-the-air playback, 
keep the engineering prac- 
tice up to snuff; hardwire 
the connections (no mikes 
placed up against the set's 
speaker), and ensure that 
your wiring arrangements 
permit professional switch- 
ing between mike and re- 
corder. Random bleeps and 
fast-forward monkeychat- 
ter are not well received 
over the air A recorder with 
an accurate tape counter is 
a near-must. 

3} Transmitted signal 
quality checking. A good 



verse purposes as recoromg 
DX and other important 
contacts, verifying trans- 
mitted audio quality, re- 
cording messages and traf- 
fic, code practice, making 
short CQ and other trans- 
mission tapes, signal report- 
ing, and SSTV signal orrgi* 
nation, to name but a few 
popular uses. Let's look at 
some of these: 

1) Taping contacts. This 
represents the most com- 
mon, obvious use of the re- 
corder. The machine is sim- 
ply connected to the receiv- 
er's output jack, either 
through a Y-plug across the 
speaker or, in some sets, to 
an auxiliary tape-output 
jack- The tapes made can 
serve as documentation for 
exceptionally rare QSOs 
and as a logging aid in fast- 
paced DXing and contest 
work. (In the latter applica- 
tion, a reference time is re- 
corded at the beginning of 
the tape so that log entry 
times can be conveniently 
determined.) 



72 73 Magazine • February J982 



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See List of Atfwftts^^s otipAge ff4 



73 Magazine • February, 1982 73 




The uses for a tape recorder in the ham shack are legion: tap- 
ing QSOs, CQs, code practice, traffic for relay, etc. The 
recorder is probably of most use to the SSTV enthusiast in 
editing programs and recording QSOs— though recorders 
for SSTV work must be a cut above the average home-typ^ 
cassette. The Sony C-104, shown above, is ideal for these 
purposes. 



way to find out how your 
own signals sound is by us- 
ing your recorder to tape 
them. You will need an aux- 
iliary receiver for the pur- 
pose, one whose antenna 
can be disconnected or 
which has an attenuator to 
eliminate front-end over- 
load by your own signal. 
You can record your actual 
on-the-air transmissions and 
QSOs, of course, but if you 
do any extensive "hello. . . 
testing" for the specific pur- 
pose of making a tape 
check, be sure to use a dum- 
my load rather than radiat- 
ing a signal. 

4) Code practice. You 
easily can make custom 
code-practice tapes using 
your key, keyer, audio oscil- 
lator, and/or keying moni- 
tor in your transceiver or 
transmitter to feed the re- 



corder's input. If you have 
an open-reel machine, you 
can in most cases vary the 
recorder's speed in a 2:1 
ratio, that is from 1-7/8 to 
3-3/4 ips, or from 3-3/4 to 7 
ips- This capability allows 
code tapes recorded for the 
level of instruction desired 
(audio pitch will change, 
naturally). The recorder 
also can be used to tape on- 
the-air code practice ses* 
sions regularly broadcast 
by WlAW, the ARRL sta- 
tion at Newington, Connect- 
icut for later playback and 
practice> 

5) Traffic handling. Using 
a recorder as a running 
backup in traffic handling is 
a good idea practiced by 
many experienced brass* 
pounders. If you handle a 
great deal of traffic, you 
know that a telephone call 



or other unwanted interrup- 
tion can make you miss part 
of a message or cause you 
to hold up your net while 
you get d ''fill." Using the 
recorder, you can effective- 
ly tape your own fills. 

6) Taping CQs and other 
transmissions. There is 
nothing wrong with prere- 
cording phone CQs, if the 
practice isn't overdone and 
technical quality is main- 
tained. For the most part, 
tape-recorded CQs are not 
necessary, and those using 
them often sound a bit silly. 
However, for contesting 
and some DX work, there 
ate time-saving possibilities. 
A related application lies in 
making extended antenna 
adjustments and TVI check- 
ing. Since radiating an un- 
modulated carrier is illegal 
(except for short periods), 
you may want to prerecord 
a signal which can be 
played through your trans- 
mitter again and again. For 
both these applications, 
special continuous-loop 
tapes are available; these 
come in various lengths to 
fit the desired transmission 
message length. Again, the 
watchword is modera- 
tion—don't overdo a good 
thing! 

7) SSTV recording and 
play back. The tape record- 
er is a "must" for the 
SSTVer, who finds a wide 
range of specialized ap- 
plications. These include 
generation of gray scale, 
test pattern, and other 
reference signals; im- 
mediate playback of the 
other fellow's over-the-air 
picture; and building a li- 
brary of interesting pro- 
grams from two-way con- 
tacts. By far the most im- 
portant use is in prerecord- 
ing one's own "programs'" 
for later broadcast, This 
allows for careful prepara- 
tion and capturing of art- 
work and photography, 
tape editing, and review. 
The judicious use of a sinrv 
pie tape machine has en- 
abled many SSTVers to pro- 
duce very smooth, interest- 



ing and professional-quality 

program material that's a 
pleasure to watch, 

8) Computer interface. 
Small cassette recorders 
provide the basic means of 
programming home-type 
microcomputers If you're 
equipped with a microcom- 
puter with an electronic 
RTTY and/or CW interface, 
the recorder provides the 
means to set up the com- 
puter for RTTY or Morse 
transmission and reception, 
and it also serves other an- 
cillary functions. For exam- 
ple, in the author's Macro- 
tronics M^650/PET 2001 
system, the recorder is used 
to prerecord messages for 
later transmission and to 
record received messages. 
So-called "brag tapes" and 
artwork can be stored on 
the tapes and exchanged 
with others. 

Besides these specific 
uses, it's often handy to use 
a tape recorder to verbally 
document equipment set- 
tings and alterations, meter 
readings, and test results. 
The work being done is de- 
scribed as you're doing it 
with the recorder doing the 
"writing." Subsequent play- 
back of the tape, and writ- 
ten transcription to a 
notebook or log if required, 
may be helpful in inter- 
preting and analyzing re- 
sults and in learning from 
past mistakes. 

Technical considerations. 
Authentic high-fidelity 
sound reproduction isn't a 
necessity in a ham shack 
recorder, though a few re- 
quirements do exist. The 
recorder should be of rea- 
sonably good quality [not a 
child's toy, to be sure), 
feature low distortion, have 
an auxiliary input for direct 
connection to the receiver's 
speaker, and include a 
recording level meter and 
tape counter. A "pause" or 
"edit" control is also a 
desirable feature. Re- 
quirements are tighter if the 
unit is going to be used to 
record SSTV signals or in* 
terface with a microcom- 



74 73 Magazine • February. 1962 



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73 Magazine • February, 1982 75 



puter; in these cases, a top- 
qua! ity recorder having low 
wow and flutter should be 
selected Other desirable, 
though not absolutely es- 
sential, features include a 
monitoring and/or auxiliary 
speaker jack, public ad- 
dress (PA) mode, automatic 
shutoff or track reverse, 
and fast forward and re- 
verse capability A mono- 
phonic unit is fine; there is 
little advantage in using a 
stereo unit. 

Several tape formats are 
suitable: eight-tracic, reel- 
to-reeL and cassette. The 
eight-track recorder, oper- 
ating at 3-3/4 ips, uses 
1/4-inch tape in a track con- 
figuration that allows eight 
mono channels or four ster- 
eo channels to be recorded 
Since the cartridge is ac- 
tually an endless tape loop, 
it will run continuously if 
left to play out Very short 
length cartridges are avail- 
able, making this format ex- 
cellent for phone CQs and 
even short SSTV "takes." 
The eight'track format does 
have its drawbacks, howev- 
er, in terms of less-than- 
optimum audio quality, a 
tendency for tapes to be- 
come jammed internally, 
and the objectionable 
"click" and momentary loss 
of audio when tracks are 
switched. 

The open-reel recorder is 
hard to beat for quality. Us 
distortion figures and fre- 
quency response are best 
among the three formats. 
Various combinations of 
reel size, tape length, 
speed, and available acces- 
sories add up to maximum 
versatility and flexibility. 
Recorder mechanical de- 
sign is relatively straightfor* 
ward (when compared with 
eight-track and cassette 
models), and maintenance 
is less difficult and costly to 
perform. However, the 
open-reel recorder — at 
least a good one — is ex pen- 
sive, and tapes are not as 
convenient to use as in the 
other two formats, manual 
tape threading being re- 
quired on most models 




Tape recorders fmd many useful applkattons in the harr} ^hack. A growing use h connec- 
tion with digital microcomputers, where they are used for loading and recording of cassette 
programs and data. Radiotetetype (RTTY) and Morse code interfaces are available from 
several sources for popular home computers such as the Apple, PET, and TRS-80, shown 
here in addition to the basic program-hading function, the recorder can be used to digital- 
ty record on-the-air transmissions and to prerecord outgoing messages (including ''brag 
tapes''} fof later broadcast (Photo courtesy of Radio Shack] 



The cassette machine is 
the most popular for ham 
shack use today, for rea- 
sons of relatively low cost, 
operating convenience, and 
steadily increasing quality. 
The cost of a small cassette 
unit is certainly not pro- 
hibitive, with usable ma- 
chines available for as little 
as $25 to $30. Even high- 
quality monophonic por- 
tables come in at less than 
$100 The ever-increasing 
popularity of cassette ma- 
chines is due in large mea- 
sure to the ease with which 
tapes can be selected, load- 
ed, recorded, and removed 
from the recorder, features 
that are very attractive for 
station use. Tapes in prac- 
tically any length can be 
obtained for recording peri- 
ods up to 120 minutes or 
more, using the standard 
cassette speed of 1-7/8 ips 
The biggest disadvantages 
are that cassette editing 



isn't practical, the low tape 
speed mitigates against top 
quality recording, and ac- 
curate cueing is difficult. 
Most portable machines 
have an audio response that 
is entirely adequate for 
ham-band and shortwave 
signal reproduction, howev- 
er. 

An SSTVer, 1 opted for 
the Superscope C-104, a 
very high quality mono por- 
table that includes such de- 
sirable features as cueing 
capability, pause control, 
nicad operation, built-in 
condenser mike, PA func- 
tion, and variable tape 
speed The front-panel con- 
trols and meter make it es- 
pecially convenient for 
stacking above the station 
speaker or receiver — you 
don't have to look down on 
the recorder to operate it 
as one must do with most 
small portables. 



Standard front-loading 
stereo decks offer excellent 
potential though probably 
represent an overkill in 
quality. A stereo deck or 
recorder obtained at a rea- 
sonable price could likely 
be put to good use in the 
shack, though the second 
channel would be wasted. 
The micro-cassette record- 
ers also offer good possibili- 
ties. Many of these units are 
quite small, can be operat- 
ed vertically, and thus can 
be sandwiched in between 
equipment units on the op* 
erating console. 

In using a recorder in 
your station, you may ex- 
perience trouble with rf 
pickup, making it unusable 
when transmitting. The 
problem can be acute in 
solid-state units and comes 
about because of audio rec- 
tification of your signal by 
the set's amplifier stages. 



76 73 Magazine • February. 1982 



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73 Magazine • February, 1982 77 




ERC SL-55 audio filter is said to improve SSB and CW recep- 
tion under severe conditions. The unit contains three 
separate filters: independent and continuously-adiustabie 
bandpass f liters as welt as a fixed tow-pass filter that can be 
cascaded with the others. The unit generates 1 Watt of au- 
dio and has an input/output in}pedance of 8 Ohms. (Photo 
courtesy of Electronic Research Corporation of Virgina) 



Simple RF [-preventive mea- 
sures, such as installing an 
rf choke and bypass capaci- 
tor in the recorder's mike 
and/or auxiliary input leads 
and bypassing tine audio 
output leads and ac line, 
will often do the trick, 
unless you have a very poor 
station ground or are using 
a voltage-fed antenna that 
produces an inordinate 
amount of stray rf in the 
shack. 

Various patch cords, con- 
nectors, switches, and 
jumpers may be required to 
conveniently use the re- 
corder with your equip- 
ment; these only can be 
determined after deciding 
which functions the record- 
er is to filL Using shielded 
cable for all audio connec- 
tions should go a long way 
in reducing rf feedback, 
noise, and hum pickup. 

Audio Filters 

The congestion on the 
amateur bands has placed a 
premium on receiver/trans- 
ceiver selectivity. Simple 
fixed-bandwidth i-f crystal 
filters were good enough 
for the 40s and SOs, but not 
good enough to adequately 
handle present-day QRM 
conditions. Densely-packed 
and overlapping SSB sta- 
tions, closely-spaced CW 



signals, and RTTY reception 
through potentially obliter- 
ating heterodynes demand 
complex i-f filters or other 
means of achieving a high 
level of receiver selectivity. 

Many upper-end receiv- 
ers of 50s and 60s vintage 
contained special i*f cir- 

cuitry using double-conver- 
sion techniques to allow 
the operator to peak the de- 
sired signal or null out an 
offending one. At the time, 
the best way to improve se- 
lectivity on inexpensive re- 
ceivers was to add an out- 
board i-f -stage ''Q-multipli- 
er/' which enabled the op- 
erator to either peak a de- 
sired signal or null out an 
offending one by manipu- 
lating one of several panel 
controls. The Q-multiptier 
(the best-known being 
Heath's QF-1) was capable 
of doing a good job, but 
some practice was required 
in using it It went out of 
favor as the once-standard 
455 kHz i-f frequency was 
largely abandoned for high- 
er and lower i-f frequencies 
in double-conversion con- 
figurations. The transition 
from tube to solid-state de- 
signs also had a lot to do 
with the Q-mu!tipUer's de- 
mise. 

The basic means of at- 
taining the desired amount 



of receiver selectivity today 
is by means of an i-f stage 
crystal or mechanical filter, 
Most high-quality transceiv- 
ers use a filter with a steep 
shape factor to reduce out- 
of-passband signals and 
noise; the same fitter is 
usually used on transmit. If 
your receiver or transceiver 
has provisions for optional 
i-f filters for reduced-band- 
width SSB and CW recep- 
tion, it's a wise investment 
to obtain them— especially 
the CW filter. Some manu- 
facturers^ such as Ken- 
wood, also offer provision 
for adding a second (dual) 
SSB filter assembly to fur- 
ther sharpen the response 
curve and improve the i-f 
stage's signal-to-noise (S/N) 
ratio Addition of the sec- 
ond filter also has a benefi- 
cial effect on transmit, 
allowing a greater degree of 
speech compression to be 
used without a significant 
increase in sideband splat- 
ter and resultant band- 
width. 

While most i-f filter ar- 
rangements don't offer true 
single-signal reception, 

those receivers and trans- 
ceivers that have provision 
for shifting the center fre- 
quency of the i-f crystal 
filter (variously known as 
i-f-shift or passband tuning, 
depending on the manufac- 
turer) offer additional possi- 
bilities for minimizing QRM 
and further improving over- 
all S/N ratio. 

Even in those sets having 
adequate i-f filtering, the 

addition of an audio filter 
can enhance performance. 
The audio filter acts in two 
ways: 1 ) It cuts down on the 
wideband noise generated 
by the set's i-f chain, 
preventing amplification by 
the sef s audio stages, and 
2) it further narrows the 
receiver's overall response 
curve, often allowing true 
single-signal reception. 
Both characteristics signifi- 
cantly aid reception when 
the QRM level is up and 
when working under weak- 
signal conditions. 



Passive audio filters, A 
fixed-tuned, passive (norh 
amplifying) audio fitter can 
do a great deal to improve 
the selectivity of a receiver, 
especially one without an 
i-f filter; in some inexpen- 
sive sets, an audio-stage 
filter is the pnmary selectiv- 
ity-determining device. 
Many hams found that war 
surplus radio range filters 
inserted in their radios" 
headphones lead did a 
good job in separating 
closely-spaced CW signals, 
though the filter frequency 
of most of these units was a 
bit high-pitched to suit 
many and receiver tuning 
and stability became criti- 
cal when using very narrow 
bandpass filters. 

More sophisticated de- 
signs have been developed 
over the years, using large 
fixed-value inductors to 
achieve the desired degree 
of selectivity at audio fre- 
quencies. The radio hand- 
books are full of good pas- 
sive filter designs, especial- 
ly for use on CW. A particu- 
larly good one is the six- 
element L/C CW bandpass 
filter designed by Ed Weth- 
erhold W3NQN. It appears 
on page 8-27 of the 1980 
ARRL Radio Amateur's 
Handbook. Other W3NQN 
designs appear in the De- 
cember, 1980, QST Anoth- 
er practical filter approach 
is that of Del Crowe! I K6R I L 
that appeared in the March, 
1968, CQ Magazine in his ar- 
ticle, "Adding CW Selectivi- 
ty for Transceivers," 

Passive filters are brute- 
force devices, however; 
they are lossy — very notice- 
able if one wants to drive a 
loudspeaker. Though easy 
to build, the passive de- 
vices rely on large, cumber- 
some and often hard-to-find 
toroidal inductors, Also, 
there is no flexibility in set- 
ting the center frequency 
and bandpass curve or 
changing these characteris- 
tics during operation. A far 
more satisfactory approach 
lies in the use of the active 
audio filter. 



78 73 Magazine • FebriraryJ982 



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press 
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73 Magazine • February, t982 79 



Active audio filters. The 
active, or tuned, amplifying 
audio filter uses RC net- 
works in conjunction with 
solid-state amplifiers to 
synthesize the inductor 
characteristics. The simu- 
lated inductance is resonat- 
ed with a capacitor to pro- 
duce a tuned'filter effect. 
What makes this kind of 
filter so popular with hams 
is that the filter can be con- 
structed with variable Q 
and variable center and 
cutoff frequencies; this 
allows convenient front- 
panel control of the filter's 
operating characteristics 
that the operator can 
precisely tailor to suit his 
mode of operation, per- 
sonal preferences, and 
band conditions. 

The current spate of 
solid-state active filter 
designs are descendants of 
the classic National Radio 
"5electH>|ect" audio filter 
that was immensely popu- 
tar about 30 years ago. This 
tube-type accessory was a 
handy, quick-and-dirty sup- 
plement to a receiver hav- 
ing little real setectivity. 
Present-day active filters of- 
fer a number of spec J at J zed 
features that make them of 
great Interest to both CW 
and SSB operators. 

An active audio filter can 
be built from one of the 
many designs regularly fea- 
tured in the ham maga- 
zines; several are In the 
Handbook, At least a dozen 
firms sell these very cost- 
effective QRM-suppressors 
that allow even a modest 
receiver or transceiver to 
come to life in the selectivi- 
ty department, particularly 
on CW. Manufacturers in- 
clude Autek Research, Kan- 
tronics, M&M Electronics, 
Datong, Electronic Re- 
search Corp of America, 
Palomar Engineers, MF| 
Enterprises, and several 
others. 

Typical handbook and 
commercial designs enable 
operation on either CW or 
SSB, though a few less- 



expensive filters are for 
CW-only or SSB-only use. 
The majority are self-con- 
tained and include their 
own power supply or draw 
power from the receiver or 
transceiver's accessory 
jack. Most are connected to 
the set's audio output jack 
and contain a small internal 
audio power amp to direct- 
ly drive a speaker or head- 
phones. The filters enable 
the operator to adjust selec- 
tivity from a few Hz, for 
razor-sharp CW perfor- 
mance, up to a completely 
flat response. Many have 
separate high-pass and low- 
pass operating modes, es- 
pecially useful on SSB; oth- 
ers have a deep notch fea- 
ture that is used to null out 
an interfering signal or 
heterodyne without degrad- 
ing the desired signal A few 
sophisticated models allow 
dual (simultaneous) notch- 
ing and filtering; at least 
one model contains a built* 
in noise limiter. 

Using the active filter on 
SSB is a gratifying ex- 
perience, especially if in 

conjunction with a modest 
set — though top~of-the-line 
models will benefit as well. 
By proper control-knob ma- 
nipulation, if s possible to 
dramatically improve sig- 
nal readability under condi- 
tions of QRM, static, splat- 
ter, and the like— reducing 
operator fatigue and mak- 
ing listening a great deal 
more pleasant. SWLs, IO- 
meter AMers, and CB oper- 
ators should be interested 
in the capabilities of the ac- 
tive audio filter, too. Selec- 
tivity on the crowded AM 
shortwave and standard 
broadcast bands is consid- 
erably improved, and sta- 
tions just a few kHz apart 
can be separated with little 
cross-channel interference. 

The real thrill comes 
when using one of these 
filters on CW. Used in con- 
junction with a set's existing 
CW i-f filter, results can be 
truly impressive. With the 
active filter, the desired 
signal can be peaked with 




Palomar Engineers' CW filter connects between the receiver 
and a set of stereo headphones. There are actually two 
filters, a narrowband one with an 80-Hz bandwidth 

(centered at 800 Hz) and a wideband one that cuts out hum 
and high frequency interference but passes most of the 
receiver audio signal. The narrowband signal goes to one 
ear, the wideband to the other, giving simulated-stereo 
reception. The effect is to offer a signal ''mrx" that is an /n> 
provement over either filter alone: The off-frequency 
signals appear in one headphone, the desired signal in both. 
The operator's mind concentrates on the desired signal and 
rejects the interference. Long operating periods are said to 
be less fatiguing using such an arrangement (Photo 
courtesy of Palomar Engineers) 



an effective bandwidth 
measured in tens of cycles, 
even in the presence of 
close-by strong signals that 
have managed to bull their 
way through the radio's i-f 
strip. Even with a sharp i-f 
CW filter installed, it's 
possible to actually tune 
through the set's i-f pass- 
band with the audio filter 
and discover several in- 
dividual CW signals that 
can be brought up to solid- 
copy levels that were un- 
readable or scarcely detect- 
able without the filter. Of 



course, there is a limit to the 

degree of selectivity one 
can crank in; with too much 
selectivity, filter ''ringing" 
becomes objectionable. Al- 
so, using the notch feature, 
very pronounced unwanted 
signal rejection [sometimes 
70 dS or more) can be at- 
tained by proper control 
manipulation. 

Space-age f Uteri ng. A 
couple of takeoff s on ac* 
tive filtering techniques 
have surfaced in recent 
years. One is the concept of 
simulated-stereo reception. 



SO T3 Magazine • FebriiaryJ982 



Same peopU u/tont t^ ^cH€4t, 

Introducing the New Loiv Cosi Spectrum 
SCR-77 Repeaters— 2M, 220 & 440 MHz! 



SPECTRUM COMMUNICATIONS 

SES11 FM REPEATER 



rvioaE 



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AC t,tMB ' mil AC |3Cl^WEtl 



LQCAC IV1ICI 



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15 or 30 Wt xmtrs. 



Includes: •Q.aS^V Rcvr. d Pole IF Filter 

• Crystals— high stability .0005% 

• Local Mic 

• Your Cat! programmed into IDer 

• Provision for Auto-Switchover to Btry, Pwr. 

• Builtnn AC Supply; basic Panel Controls, Spkr, 
LED Indicators 

If you're looking for a new Repeater, but you real- 
ly don't need (or can't afford) all the features and 
options on our world famous, 'super deluxe' 
SCR1000/4000, then our new economy line of 
SCR77 Repeaters is ideal for youf 

These new Repeaters maintain the quality of design, com- 
ponents and construction which made Spectrum gear 
famous. However, ail of the "bells & whistles" which you may 
not need or want have been eliminated— af a large cost sav- 
ings to yoal The SCR77 is a real "workhorse" basic machine 
designed for those who want excellent, super reliable perfor- 
mance year after year— but no fnlfsf ('PL' 12 Pole IF Filter, 
Ffont End Preselector, and a 30Wt. Transmitter are the only 
"built-in" options available; but Autopatch, Remote Con- 
trol, and other equipment can be connected via the rear 
panel jack) 



"Y^ ^ eomfdete (me 

caMe , etc,, C^ aJUa^ ^u^atiaHe* 



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Of course, if you do want a fuij reaiured/super defuxe 
repeater, with higher power and a full list of available 'built-in' 
options, then you want our SCR1000 or 4000 *'Dream 
Machine", These units will continue to be available for those 
who want The Ultimate in Repeaters'. 
SCR77 Pricing (15Wt,): 2M qx 220 MHz, $995.00 Amateur Net. 
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An ^'outboard'' active audio filter can yield surprising per- 
formance benefits in conjunction with even the most ex- 
pensive receiving equipment Assuming such a filter is used 
witti a receiver or transceiver having reasonably good i-f 
selectivity wrth good "skirts/" weak and QRM-plagued SSB 
signals can be made to ''jump out of the noise'' in many 
cases. And in the sharpest modes, several CW signals may 
be copied within the set's passbandand tuned in separately. 
Autek filter shown here is based on a design pioneered by 
the firm in 1972, (Photo courtesy of Autek Research) 



described by Max Blumer 
WA1MKP in his October, 
1974, Ham Radio article, 
"Enhancing CW Reception 
Through a Simulated Stereo 
Technique." In this ap- 
proach, an active filter is 
used. Unprocessed receiver 
audio is fed to one ear, and 
filtered (processed) audio is 
fed to the other ear. This 
technique allows v^u to 
read slightly off-frequency 
CW stations white simulta- 
neously hearing the desired 
signal, in the clear, in the 
other ear. The brain does 
the ultimate filtering — it 
"hears" all the signals, but 
the processed signal stands 
out so f idly, with the others 
mentally rejected. The bot- 
tom line is that the filter 
allows greatly improved 
reception of the desired 
signal, but also allows you 
to hear off-frequency re- 
plies to your CQs; it's also 
easier to scan the band us- 
ing the simulated-stereo 
technique. A stereo head- 
phone is required for this 
type of filter, which is of- 
fered commercially by both 
Palomar Engineers and 
MFJ. 

Especially interesting is 
the automatic-tracking au- 
dio filter offered by Da- 
tong. In addition to some 
impressive narrowband tun* 

82 73 Magazine • February, 1982 



ing capabilities, the FL-1 
frequency-agile audio filter 
features fast automatic sup- 
pression of interfering het- 
erodynes in the range of 280 
to 3000 Hz by means of its 
sea rch-lock-and- track 
notch fitter. The tracking 
notch can be left in the cir- 
cuit with no audible effect 
until a whistle appears, the 
circuit then goes after it 
and will suppress it within 1 
second. 

How does it work? Two 
phase-sensitive detectors 
control signals used for 
automatic tuning. One pro- 
duces a voltage propor- 
tional to the degree of 
mi stun ing, and the other 
produces a logic level in- 
dicating the presence of a 
signal within the filter pass- 
band In the absence of 
such a signal, the integrator 
becomes a sweep genera- 
tor. But when a signal is 
detected, the sweep stops, 
the unit's lock lamp il- 
luminates, and the integra- 
tor becomes part of an au- 
tomatic frequency control 
(afc) negative feedback 
loop. The filter then re- 
mains locked to the "caf>- 
tured" signal and will track 
it, if required, throughout 
the filter's range of 280 to 
3000 Hz. This capability al- 
ows the routine use of an 



extremely narrow (20 Hz) 
notch which does not no- 
ticeably affect received sig- 
nals and which would be 
nearly impossible to manu- 
ally tune and maintain in 
tune. Of interest to CW ops. 
an attenuated afc voltage is 
also used in the manual tun- 
ing mode to allow the filter 
to automatically track drift- 
ing CW signals over a 
100-Hz range! 

Whether you opt for a 
simple or complex filter, 
youH likely be glad you 
made the investment. Dol- 
lar-for-dollar, an audio filter 
is one of the best accessory 
aids you can buy for your 
receiver or transceiver, 

Wrap4Jp 

In this article, we have 
discussed a wide range of 
basic, yet important, 
phone- jack accessories: 
headphones, speakers, re- 



corders, and filters, with a 
view to obtaining maximum 
usefulness from dollars 
spent on station equipment 
For most hams, this group 
of reception accessories 
probably represents the 
most important initial ac- 
cessory investment- For this 
reason, and for space limi- 
tations, we've not discussed 
exotica which might other- 
wise fit the article's "phone- 
jack'' scope, such as SSTV 
viewers, RTTY/Morse de- 
coders, monitorscopes, 
phone patches, and the like. 
We'll reserve discussion on 
these "second-leveT' ac- 
cessories until a later time. 
In the final analysis, you 
must decide which, if any, 
accessories to build or buy. 
Hopefully, the criteria, sug- 
gestions, and observations 
provided in this article will 
help make your decisions 
both logical and wise.l 



Further Reading 

The following reference sources provide addttionai infor- 
mation, theory, and construction details. Several contain fur^ 
ther references to other information sources you may wish to 
consult: 

Jim Ashe. *'How to Use Hi-Fi Headphones," Poputar Elec- 
tronics, July, 1972. 

Ronald M, Benrey, ''Adapting Stereo Phones for Hams/' Efec- 
trorrics illustrated, May, 1972. 

Fred Blechman K6UGT, ''How to Use a Tape Recorder In Your 
Shack," Electronics Illustrated, July, 1962. 

Max Blumer WAIMKP, '^Enhancing CW Reception Through a 
Simulated Stereo Teohnique,'* Harr\ Radio, October, 1974. 

Len Buckwalter, "CB Scene" column in Popular Electronics, 
May, 1974. 

Richard Humphrey, "Accessories for Yoyr CB Rig/" Popular 
Electronics, October, 1973. 

Del Crowell K6RIU "Adding CW Selectivity for Transceivers/' 
CO Magazine, March. 1968, 

James R. Kates WB8TCC, ^'Put a Tape Recorder to Work in 
Your Shack/' CQ Magazine, December, 1977, 

The Radio Amateur's Handbook, Newington, Connecticut, 
American Radio Relay League, 1980 edition. 

Charles Schauers W6QLV/4, ^'Ham Clinio" column in CO 
Magazine, May and June, 1961. 

Karl T. Thurber, Jr. W8FX, "Ham Shack Accessories: What 
You Really Need/' Ham Radio Honzons, December, 1979. 

Karl T. Thurber, Jr. W8FX, "Ht^Tech Gear for Hams and 
SWLs/' Popular Electronics, August, 1980. 

William G. Welsh W6DDB. "Headsets and Ham Radio/" 73 
Magazine, February, 1972. 

Edward E Welherhold W3NQN, **Modern Design of a CW 
Filter Using 88- and 44-mH Surplus Inductors/* QST, 
December, 1980. 



OSCAR ORBITS 



OtCML • OfiBITAI iivoiHAnov r&x mwgjjt 



d«CU ff QUITKL lirQiRATll?* FClfe ftWAXr 



• Th© Amsat Software Exchange has recently been formed and is 
now accepting orders. The first program being made available is the 
orbital prediction program written by Df. Tom Clark W1IWJ, it is 
available for most popular machine environments, with other ver- 
sions being developed. Presently available are TRS-80 disk and cas- 
sette versions. Apple/M diskette. Microsoft BASIC, and PUI-BO. This 
progrann will accommodate the elliptical orbit tracking required for 
the Phase III satellites. For complete information on versions 
available as well as new additions and ordering information, send an 
SASE to: AMSAT Software Exchange, Sox 338, Ashmore IL 61S12. 

• The early months of amateur radio's newest satellite, UoSAT- 
OSCAR 9, were full of developmental work. The Surrey, England- 
based ground crew concentrated on generating and relaying to the 
bird a computer program that will allow the craft to stabilize itself via 
on-board torquing coils and a gravity gradient boom. Once this is ac- 
complished, the experimental part of the mission will commence. 

• AMSAT, the people who organize ham radio's space communica- 
tions program, received a "royal boost" from JY1, Jordan's King 
Hussein. While visiting the US In early November, the King ex- 
pressed his support to AMSAT President Tom Clark W3IWL 

• Although the AMSAT financial picture has been brightened by 
several large donations, there is still a need for grass-roots support 
by the entire ham population* You can find out more about AMSAT 
by writing to: The Radio Amateur Satellite Corporation, PO Box 27, 
Washington DC 20044, 

Information for this column comes from the AMSAT Satel- 
Me Report. 



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WHAT IS AN AUdfO RLTER -^ 

W^v buy a Dalong audio tiliar wtusfi 

yc3u can get o{^>ef audo HtBri lor 

naif the ptice'^ 

To answef this you Brsi n«d to 

f gm c m te f fiatiha iie suciiohH^ 

C8n mi^an aili^^hin^ even down to 3 

coup{€ of 74 1 s and a handfur o< 

parts OnJy bv compafHig hke- mtifi 

me can you make an iRfornred 

decision This means comparing 

features, performs ixie and qu rill tv I' 

you send lor our free daia sheets 

and compare our producls wi4h ihe 

CGNtipelitKin vtHj will ^>e that reaiiy ifiere ts wirtuaiiy nooomjsetrttoti 

iEt Oijr chdsen standard of peftormance 



r 





. What other aide Wer can 
A tyiie ^140 heteiodyn 

j^^l wMsHes snd notdi itieiTi 
■'^^H out i4iiioffi J tteeiiy Wte our 
B ^ ModeiFLt'' YetMbdeifLi 
H am *5 also such a good CW filter 
H V^ thai itiswidi^^yu^eKiby 
|H ^^ pro(ess«onaMria(fi€ handlers, 
^1 # What olher aiidio filler ha^ 
I^Jr passband edgtis sharper itran 5SB 
i^iir ciysial f trters and yc\ which can be 
tsm&a at wiU from 200 lo 35O0 Hz*^ To puii oft itits inclt ouf 
Msde^ FL3 tees rip ie$§, Ifian 32 op amps plus ^ale-of-the- 
art pM^te iividRh rfwdutatun technKiuas Two^-pcs^eeipta: 
liters and a 2-$Kiie|»aii^ notch hhptfiKineboi ai 
irviepeiideii%tijwabie add up toa koi Ftiore ItHerK} 
Capabtirty 1^ ^O. FUTV CW ttian you wiiH find in arty oCt¥T 
auOio tinner" that we^noAr of 
To answer our question (Hen. an 'audio 'titer' ' can tw almost 
anything On the oih-er hand, (he phra-Mt " Daiong Aydto 
Filt^F" 15 ^ loi mote pf«ise IT aiartds Tof staie-of the-art 
filTenrtg biaci^ed by exlra capabilitv o^lra Itiorough desigh 
and exira rraality If you need conlirmaljon ask a user* 

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some riosons EachD'ier^aLtfVpieoomtmsioiDliedSurKwhcfi' 



Model ASP: TTie -smart" 

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The automatic circuiifY ^ Model 

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maintain the deqrwe of true r! 

dipping selected fin decibels) by 

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.^329 



i^See Li^t of Adverfisers on page 1 14 



73 Magazine • February, 1982 83 



ANNOUNCING 

A newr standard of comparison for 




the all NEW 





BROADBAND WITHOUT COMPROMISE 

For years now, whenever hams got together and talked about the performance of 
any triband antenna, they would invariably compare it to the famous Hy-Gain 
TH6DXX. Now, there's a new standard of comparison— the NEW Hy-GainTH7DX. 
This amazing new tribander. using a dual driven element system, maintains a 
VSWR of less than 2:1 on all bands, including ALL of ten meters. Hy-Gain didn't 
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back ratio of 22dB on 20 and 15 meters, and 17dB on 10 meters. The TH7DX, 
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HIGHEST TRIBAND PERFORMANCE, BUT 
MANAGEABLE SIZE. 

The broadband TH7DX has high performance specifications that meet or exceed 

the monster antennas that seem to take up most of your real estate and part of 



20 Mo1«r« 




ISlMers 



,'V 



\ 



y 



v 




to Mttlon 





^ 



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t*« ■!*«.■ a. ■■■■«■ ■■■■■«« 



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*!# ?!■ ttj ¥ij »« ni irt» 



m KH 



Write for our technical data report and oonnparative test results. 



your neighbor's. However, with its short 20 ft. (6.1 m) turning radius and 31 ft. 
(9.4 m) longest element, it's no more imposing than a THSDXX.lfs easy to assemble 
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MECHANICALLY SUPERIOR 

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Hy-Gain hasn't forgotten about the thousands of proud TH6DXX owners, A conver- 
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Ifs easy to assemble, andwhencompleted. you have the 
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86 73 Magazine • February, 1982 






Birth of a legend 

National Microtech, Inc. introduces 
Apollo « X9 Satellite Antenna $1995* 



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If you are interested in buying or selling Apollo 




systems, give us a call today. 

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t> 100 



A Dish Antenna 
Anyone Can Build 

no hyperbole, just a parabola 



Michael Brown WSDjY 
6297 Brown Run Road 
Middletown OH 4S042 

Are you contemplating 
the challenge of oper- 
ating on the amateur micro- 
wave bands? What about 
getting in on the excitement 
of receiving satellite TV sig- 
nals? These and similiar 
projects usually require a 
dish-style antenna. You 
could buy one or, better 
yet, you can build one. This 
article will tell you how. 

I wanted to put a signal 
on the 1296-MHz band. To 
do the job right I needed a 
dish antenna. I took the 
plunge at a hamfest, buying 



a surplus military job made 
of spun aluminum, about 6 
feet in diameter. It was one 
of those good deals you 
can't pass up, 

Now my "good deal" sits 
in the corner collecting 
dust, waiting to be sold at 
the next hamfest. I man- 
aged to get a signal on 1296 
using a dish two meters in 
diameter that 1 built myself. 
The design is one which 
uses easily-obtained materi- 
als and has a total cost of 
less than $100, Best of all Jt 
need not be a long, in- 
volved project. In fact, you 
can build a dish like mine in 
a single weekend. 



Photos by Tim Daniel HBRK 




Photo A. The finished dish is light enough to be moved easi- 
fy; the author stores his away each winter. 

73 Magazine * February, 1962 



Some Theory 

Before we jump into the 
details of construction, it 
would be a good idea to 
took at the basics of dish 
design, The dish, resem- 
bling an oversized child's 
snow saucer, is a parab- 
oloid. Its unique geomet- 
ric properties cause it to 
collect a beamwidth of 
energy from a distant 
source and reflect it to a 
central point known as the 
focal point, or focus. Sinni- 
larly, a signal radiated to- 
wards the dish from the 
focus will be effectively ra- 
diated by the antenna. 

The important dimen- 
sions of a paraboloid are 
shown in Fig. 1. The reason 
my ''good deal/' dish turned 
out to be a piece Of junk 
was that the relationship be- 
tween the focal point and 
the diameter was all wrong. 

Known as the f/d ratio, 
this relationship is very im- 
portant when it comes time 
to feed the dish. Experience 
shows that dishes with f/d 
ratios of 0.5 and greater 
can be fed easily with a 
horn-style array, (My com- 
mercial dish's f/d ratio was 
about 0.25 and was difficult 
to feed.) 

The diameter (d) is impor- 
tant in determining how 



much gain the antenna will 
have. Obviously, a dish 6 
feet in diameter will collect 
more signal than a 3-foot 
dish. Each time you double 
the diameter, the gain in- 
creases by a factor of four 
(6 dB). The actual gain of a 
dish depends on its efficien- 
cy and the frequency it is 
used on. Assuming a rea- 
sonable efficiency of 50%, 
a 2-meter dish should have 
about 25 dB of gain over a 
dipole source at 1296 MHz, 
The 3-dB beamwidth will be 
about 8 degrees. Fig. 2 
shows these relationships. 

Once you have chosen 
the desired diameter, you'll 
know where the focal point 
should be to achieve an f/d 
ratio of about 0.5. In the 
case of a 2-meter dish, f will 
be at one meter. 

The exact curvature 
needed to obtain a parabo- 
loid with the desired focus 
and diameter can be found 
using the equation y^ = 4fx. 
By calculating a number of 
points for x and y, you'll 
have an accurate plot of 
the shape required. Let's try 
an example for a dish with 
the focus at one meter: The 
X value corresponding to 
the y point of 0.5 is found 
by solving the equation 
0.5^ = 4n)x. A little algebra 
yields: x = 0.5V[4(1)]. 



10 
9 




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1 




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4 

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7 


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FOCUS -1 METER / 


9 


1 


t 


3 


4 » e T a • 10 / 


y»=4fit 


y=1,x = .25 


y = .9, X = .2025, 


y = .8, x = ,16, 


ysj, x = .1225 


y=. 


6.> 


t = ■ 


09 





d>Z METERS 



y = 


.5, 


x = 


.0625 


y = 


^4. 


x = 


.04 


y= 


.3, 


X- 


.0225 


y= 


X 


x = 


01 


y= 


.1. 


)C- 


,0025 



fig. 1. Dish dimensions. Width (c) is found by solving: 
f = d'/16c. 



Punching the calculator 
keys, we come up with the 
answer x = 0.625 meters. 
Fig. 1 also shows that the 
total width of the dish, c, is 
found with the equation 
f = d^n6c. 

That's all there is to de- 
signing the reflective part 
of the dish. Now let's look 
at how to build it For 
starters, you should be 
prepared to work with 
metric measurements of 
length I found that the use 
of meters and centimeters 
helps to ensure accurate 
results. For noncritical mea- 
surements, we'll refer to 
English units. 

Once you have a set of x 
and y values, it is time to 
fabricate a surface that ac- 
curately depicts them. Any 
irregularities will impair the 
antenna's gain. At 1296 
MHz, deviations of up to 
1.5 cm are tolerable. As the 
frequeocy increases, this 
tolerance decreases. Using 
care, this dish can be built 



with deviations of less than 
0,5 cm. 

Making the Ribs 

The structural elements 
that give the dish its 
strength and special shape 
are eight wooden rtbs. I 
made mine from scrap 
3/4-inch white pine. Each rib 
was cut from a 40" x 14'* 
piece. Any available substi- 
tute should work, provided 
that it is reasonably light 
and can be cut to the need- 
ed shape. 

Carefully draw a center 
line lengthwise. 5 8 cm from 
one edge of the board, as 
shown in Fig. 3. Work from 
this line to lay out a 
parabola, using the points 
generated by the y^ = 4f)£ 
equation. The more points 
you use, the more accurate 
your paraboloid will be. 
Carefully draw a line to 
connect the points on the 
inner surface. The outer sur- 
face should have a shape 
like the one shown. The 



** 30 




OUHETCR iM ttCTEffS 



Fig. 2. Dish rf/a meter/gam relationship. 



lower flat edge will be at 
the center of the dish, while 
the upper end will be at the 
edge, fastened to a ring of 
aluminum tubing. 

After checking the lay- 
out, the eight ribs can be 
rough-cut to about 0.2*cm 
accuracy using a band or 
saber saw. Final trimming 
should be done by sand- 
ing. Be sure to keep the 
flat edge parallel to the 
center line. 

The ribs are all joined at 
the dish's center by a 
3/4-inch-thick plywood 
mounting plate like the one 
shown in Fig. 4 Ribs A and 
B are mounted first, using 
1-1/2Hnch wood screws. All 
the other ribs must be short- 
ened to obtain equal inside 
diameters. Ribs C and D 



have 3/8" removed from the 
inside end. Ribs E, F, C, and 
H are shortened 3/8" and 
mitered with two 45* an- 
gles as shown in Fig. 4(a). 

Finally, aft the remain- 
ing ribs are fastened to 
the mounting plate, first 
with glue and then with 
wood screws. 

To add strength to the 
dish's outer edge, I encir- 
cled it with 1/2-inch alumi- 
num tubing. Four six-foot 
lengths were used. To bend 
the tubing into a circle, one 
end is plugged, then the 
tube is filled with sand and 
carefully bent into shape. 
This was easier to accom- 
plish than 1 thought it 
would be. An undersized 
piece of tubing is used for 
coupling between the sec- 




Photo B. A feedhorn can be easily constructed. The pickup 
is a simple, nnonopole element 

73 Magazine • February, 1982 89 




Photo C A circular plate holds the reflective screen mg in 
place at the dish's center. 



tions The shaped lengths 
are fastened to the dish per- 
imeter with 5-cent con- 
duit clamps as shown in 
Fig. 4(b). Since the ribs give 
the dish its shape, getting 
the outside circle perfect is 
not necessary. 

Covering the Frame 

The next step is to cover 
your frame with a reflective 
surface- I used 1/4-inch 
hardware cloth because it 
was cheap and avaiIab!e.To 
make the job easier, I cut 
the cloth into eight slightly 
oversized triangles. Staple 
a triangfe between two ad- 
joining ribs and then trim 
the excess outer edge to 
size. Next, tie-wrap the 
perimeter to the aluminum 
tubing using nylon cord 



with cable-wrapping tech- 
nique. Be sure to wear 
gloves when working with 
the hardware cloth. 

Once all the screen is in 
place, eight flathead screws 
are used to hold it on each 
rib. (The staples are no 
longer needed and can be 
removed.) Since eight 
layers of hardware ctoth 
overlap at the center, they 
must be trimmed and then 
securely fastened beneath 
a seven-inch diameter disc. 

At this stage, all the 
essential parts of the reflec- 
tor are complete. Since my 
dish is going to be mounted 
in an exposed location, I 
decided to strengthen it by 
adding bracing between the 
ribs about midway from the 
center. A framework was 
fastened to the center plate 



so that the whole antenna 
can be bolted to a mast. 

Feedhorn Ideas 

Because of the f/d rati 
of 05, the obvious fee 
choice becomes a horn. The 
theory behind horn design 
is not trivial. To make mat- 
ters worse, there often is a 
vast difference between a 
design on paper and one 
that works The horn shown 
in Fig, 5 has been field- 
proven on the 1296-MH2 
band by K9KFR and others. 
Horns of this type have 
about 8 dB of gain. Other 
types of feeds can be used; 
one good source of infor- 
mation is the RSCB book, 
VHF-UHF Manual, by 
Jessop and Evans. 

Unless you can find a tin 
can that meets the dimen- 
sions shown in Fig. 5, you 
will need to make one. Us- 
ing light-weight aluminum 
stock, I made a cylinder 
from a 18" X 28,25" piece. 
Next, a cap is fashioned to 
fit into one end. Small vee- 
shaped tabs are bent 90** 
and rfveted to the cylinder 
wall. The result is a tube 
with an inside length of 16" 
and a diameter of 9". 

The location of the tuned 
element is critical. A type-N 
connector should be 
mounted 2" from the rear 
wall A 1/4-wave driven ele- 
ment (1.8" of 1/4-inch cop- 
per tubing or 1/8'' welding 



rod) IS adjusted by filing. 
Using approximately one 
Watt of power with an in* 
line wattmeter, file for best 
vswr Caution: The ham is 
emitting microwaves; keep 
hands and eyes away from 
the opening. Be sure to use 
hardline for all connec- 
tions. 

It should come as no sur- 
prise that at this point the 

antenna is almost finished. 
Now the horn is mounted 
on the antenna frame with 
four sections of telescoping 
aluminum tubing. 

The exact distance be- 
tween the dish center and 
the horn must be found 
experimentally. The focal 
point will not be at the 
horn's outside edge, it will 
be inside the cylinder To 
find the exact focus, the 
dish should be aimed at a 
signal source and the horn 
moved up and down until 
the received signal is at a 
maximum. If your 1296 
receiving gear includes a 
low-noise amplifier, then 
one excellent signal source 
is "sun noise.'' Aim the dish 
at the sun. and your re* 
ceiver should give a notice- 
able output. 

The antenna's polarity is 
determined by the position 
of the driven element. 
Rotating the horn 90** 
changes the antenna from 
vertical to horizontal or 
vice versa. When the driven 



£ 1/4 in OH O^tn 



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CENTER 
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OR 



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Fig, 3. Rib detail. 
W 73 Magazine * February, 1982 



Fig, 4, Assembly of the ribs. 




TYPE W CQIVNECTOR 



9 lA 




llfp 



POP RiVCTS 



Fig. 5. Feedhorn design. 



element is horizontal 
relative to the Earth, the 

antenna is horizontalfy 
polarized and is set for 
1296-MHz tropo operation. 
Once the focus and polarity 
are set, bolt everything into 
place and start enjoying 
your new antenna. 

Life on 1 296 

You might be interested 
in the rest of my 1296-MHz 
station. For receiving, I use 
a preamplifier made with 
an MRF901 transistor, fol- 
lowed by a Microwave 
Module that converts the 
signal to 28 MHz where an 
amateur transceiver is used. 
On transmit, a home-brew 



varactor tripler provides 
3/4-Watt output on 1296 
when driven with a ten- 
Watt, 432-MHz signal. This 
may not seem like much 
power, but I make the most 
of it by using hardline be- 
tween the dish and the 
shack, Thanks to my dish 
antenna, the 1 296 effort has 
been a success. The first 
two contacts were with 
K9KFR and WA8|HW. each 
more than 100 miles away. 
This article is being writ- 
ten in the winter, and the 
dish has been stored away, 
safe from ice and other haz- 
ards. When warm weather 
returns, you can be sure 
that W8DI Y will be back on 




Photo D, Building a 1296-MHz dish need not be difficult, 
but it will require sonne home-brewing. 



1296, In the meantime, 
plans are being made for a 
much bigger dish and a 
more powerful transmitter. 
As you can see, build- 
ing a dish need not be 
difficult. This project was 
the result of a lot of help 
and ideas from fellow VHF- 
UHF enthusiasts, including 
WB8EEX, whose garage 
proved invaluable, W8ULC, 
who handled the fancy foot- 



work on the tower, and 
K9KFR, who patiently 
helped get a feed that 
worked. 

About the only thing that 
can't be changed is the ba- 
sic parabolic shape Make 
the most of the materials 
that are available in your 
area; be brave; experiment! 
If you have questions, 
please include an SASE. See 
you on 1296IH 



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Phone {51 31 866-2431 • Tetex: 288-D1 7 



R.L.DRAKE COiWiPANY 




DRAKE 



FEATyfl£S AND PRaC^S SUBJECT TO CHANQ& WrtHQUT MCfTig^ QR OmJQMiOH 



73 Magazine * February, 1982 91 



Richard Christian WA4CVP 
Rl h Sox 209-W 
Creota AL 3652S 

5. f. (Mitch) Mitcheli, Jr. WA40SR 
TO Box 973 

MobihALSSem 



Job's Own LNA 

rolling your own takes patience 



Yes. it is possible to 
home-brew a workable 
LNA (Low Noise Amplifier) 
for your home-brew satel- 
lite TV receiver! But to do 
it, you must have the pa- 
tience of lob and start with 
a full head of hair! 

We'll let you, the reader, 
decide as you read the arti- 
cle just how much patience 
we have. 

In ham radio receiver 
terms, the LNA is the "front 
end" of the satellite receiv- 
er. Commercial units gener- 
ally have about 40 to 50 dB 
of gain at 4 GHz. They usu- 
ally are constructed of one 
or two stages of CaAsFET 



OHAfrTCOMM. UfCs 



transistors and several 
stages of bipolar transistors 
to achieve the amplifica- 
tion desired. The CaAsFET 
transistors are a special 
type of transistor with a 
very low noise figure. They 
get their name from the ma- 
terial used to achieve the 
low-noise figure, gallium 
(Ga) arsenide (As). 

This article describes the 
trials and tribulations that 
we went through in building 
the LNA for our satellite-TV 
receiving system. Although 
we had access to absolutely 
no test equipment for 4 
GHz until after it was 
known to be working, we 



111914 tOpf 



I W f ) h- 



555 



■fflj 



5«ie 



rr 



lit 






were very successful in get- 
ting the complete system 
going. We wish to share our 
hard-earned information 
with 73 readers who are 
considering building their 
own systems. 

First, a tittle history. Our 
initial attempt to build an 
LNA used a commercially- 
available board which, for 
reasons to be discussed, 
will be nameless. The board 
was supposedly designed to 
work with Nippon Electric 
Company (NEC) NE21889 
GaAsFETs. These FETs are 
expensive at $103 25 for 
two, but they have a noise 
figure of 1.2 dB at 4 GHz. 




«1 TAUT 

ADJ. FOR ITV 



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9V 




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TE$T TOlNT 



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Fig. 1. Bias supply schematic. 

73Magaifne • February J 982 



So, being the scroungers 

that we are, we attempted 
to substitute cheaper (high- 
er noise figure) GaAsFETs. 
The result was two blown 
FETs that cost $62,50 and 
two grown men crying. We 
then bit the bullet and 
ordered two of the NEC 
FETs from its US distrib- 
utor, California Eastern 
Labs(CEL). 

With cold, dry weather, 
we were in a real dilemma. 
How do you protect a hun- 
dred bucks worth of minute 
transistors from static elec- 
tricity while you are solder- 
ing them into the circuit? 
We finally decided that we 
needed a work area with a 
good ground and high hu- 
midity. Richard's front 
bathroom was selected to 
be converted to a reduced 
static work area. We turned 
on the hot water in the 
shower to steam things up. 

A piece of copper braid 
wrapped around my wrist 
and grounded to the cold 
water pipes provided the 
ground needed, A large 
piece of copper^covered PC 
board also was grounded to 
the cold water pipe and was 
used as the work surface. 
We let the soldering pencil 



heat up and then un- 
plugged it from the ac line 
and grounded it with a 
jumper to the work surface 
for more static protection, f 
quickly soldered the first 
transistor in before the iron 
could cool. After I stopped 
shaking, we reheated the 
soldering pen and 1 
soldered in the second tran- 
sistor. It's amazing what 
lengths you will go to when 
a hundred dollars worth of 
FETs are at stake. 

The LNA was mounted in 
a box made of double-sided 
PC board, with feedthrough 
capacitors supplying the 
correct operating voltages 
from a very simple resistive 
divider power supply. Next 
we gave the LNA a try. It 
wailed like a banshee! In 
other words, it acted more 
like an oscillator than an 
amplifier. 

How did we tell that it 
was oscillating without us- 
ing test gear? We discov- 
ered that any oscillation 
within the 3J-to-4.2-CHz 
band is immediately ob- 
vious on a TV connected to 
the receiver. If the oscilla- 
tion is strong, there will be 
very prominent black bars 
on the screen regardless of 
where the local oscillator is 
tuned- If the oscillation is 
weak, there will be a very 
weak but still visible black 
bar. Black bars will occur 
twice, 70 MHz apart, within 
the tuning range of the 
local oscillator, if you are 
using a single conversion 
receiver (since you get both 
the signal and its image). 

If the oscillation is out- 
side the tuning range of the 
TV, however, it will not 
show up on the TV screen. 
If you can't see it on the TV 
and if you don't have a 
spectrum analyzer to test 
with, how do you know that 
it is still oscillating? Noise, 
noise, and more noise at the 
70-MHz i-f stage. 

What to do with the oscil- 
lating LNA? Start over! We 
wrote California Eastern 
Labs for their Application 
Note AN80903 that de- 



scribes an LNA using the 
NE21889S. A prompt re- 
sponse from CEL brought it 
to us. In the CEL design, the 
LNA was mounted in a ma- 
chined-brass enclosure. We 
could not immediately lo- 
cate any half-inch-thick 
brass to make the enclos- 
ure, but Richard, scroung- 
ing through his junk pile, 
located a short piece of 
copper bus bar which was 
suitable, A little persuasion 
was applied to a local 
machine shop and presto, 
we had two nice machined- 
copper enclosures. 

Since we thought it 
would be impossible to re- 
move the GaAsFETs from 
the first LNA board without 
destroying them, we or- 
dered two more NE21889s 
from CEL. At $103.25 for 
the pair, this project was 
getting expensive! 

Richard arranged for a 
local print shop to make 
negatives for the printed 
circuit board to within .002 
inch of the dimensions 
specified in the CEL Ap 
Note. We quickly made a 
board and waited for the 
second pair of transistors 
to arrive. 

While waiting for the 
transistors, we did some se- 
rious thinking about a pow- 
er supply for the LNA. As 
previously mentioned, we 
had already zapped two 
''cheap'' FETs. We wanted a 
reliable LNA power-supply 
design that would protect 
the expensive little buggers. 
Many hours of design, 
building, and testing of cir- 
cuits by Richard resulted in 
the LNA power supply 
board described here. We 
call it our "How Not to Gas 
Your FETs Bias Supply 
Board/' It was designed 
specifically for a two-stage 
LNA using the NEC 21889 
FETs. 

Some criteria for the de- 
sign: It should — 

• Supply +3 volts for 
the drain and —3 volts for 
the gates. 

• Power two stages of 
CaAsFETs. 




Fig. 2(al PC-board layout 



+ v 




Fig. 2(b}, Parts placement 



• Require only one pair of 
wires for the LNA so the 
supply voltage, with proper 
blocking, could be carried 
on coax cable. 

• Provide reverse polarity 
and overvoltage protection 
for all gates and drains. 

• Regulate gate bias and 
drain voltage with a main- 
supply voltage falling any- 
where between +15 and 
+ 30 volts. 



• Have most parts avail- 
able from Radio Shack. 

The circuit described in 
Fig. 1 meets all of the de- 
sign criteria. The input volt- 
age, which can be from 
+ 15 to +30 volts, is ap- 
plied to an LM317T adjust- 
able voltage regulator, 
which reduces it to +3,7 
volts. The + 3 J volts is then 
filtered by a 1-uF tantalum 
capacitor and fed through 
33-Ohm current-limiting re- 




01 

2f bHar^^AAMlMS^^Ad**J f I 



^ 



CAPACITORS 



C4 

-4h 



4i — ^i(- 



02 






"Th 



^ 



^ 



k 



C3 

BK 



]OUT 



CG 



'^h?. 



|^]ch3 []'Ch4 



( ^ 



C7 



/f? 



(r 



CASE Sl&E 



TO BIAS BOARP 



62 D^ 

TO BEAS BOARD 



Fig. 3. Typical GaAsFET amplifier schematic. 




I Ip^t 



? 



02 



fig. 4. Typical LNA board layout (not to scale). 

73 Magazine • February, T9S2 93 



HEjff.ll^NK 







::2Toa 



L4 Jllff^ 
SOPiV 



ih 



*I|V 
COMPLETE 



taht 



fig. 5, Receiver power supply schematic. 



sistors to the drains of the 
two CaAsFETs. The test 
points on each side of the 
33-Ohm resistors are used 
to measure the voltage 
drop across the resistors 
and, therefore, the current 
being pulled by each FET. A 
voltage drop across the re- 



sistor of 33 volts equals 10 
milliamperes of current be- 
ing pulled by the FET. A 
3.9-volt zener diode limits 
the maximum drain volt- 
age, and high-frequency 
filtering is provided by the 
,01-yF capacitors. The 
voltage is then fed through 



IN 91 4 diodes for reverse 
voltage protection. This 
completes the drain supply. 
We decided to generate 
the required negative volt- 
age from the positive sup- 
ply instead of going with a 
bipolar supply. Past experi- 
ence has proved that for us, 
the negative-voltage regu- 
lator always fails first. With 
no negative bias, high-drain 
current would probably 
result, zapping the expen- 
sive FET. For the gate sup- 
ply, the +15 to +30 volts 
is applied to a 78L12 regu- 
lator. The regulated +12 
volts is used to supply a 




Fig. 6fa| Receiver power-supp/y PC board layout 




TANT 



Fig. 6(bl Parts placement 



NE555 timer iC configured 
as a free-running multivi- 
brator. The output of the 
555 fs rectified with a volt- 
age doubler and filtered to 
give a negative voltage for 
the gate bias. The negative 
voltage is applied to two 
lOkOhm ten*turn pots. The 
zener overvoltage, diode 
reverse-polarity protection, 
and high-frequency filtering 
are the same as for the 
drain supply. A PC-board 
layout and parts overlay for 
the LNA power supply are 
shown in Fig. 2. 

Everything was now 
ready for the arrival of the 
second pair of FETs. When 
they arrived, Richard 
soldered them in using a 
Radio Shack battery- 
powered, isolated-tip 
soldering pen that we had 
purchased for working with 
the CaAsFETs. By having 
Richard solder these in, we 
discovered that the guy 
who supplies the money for 
the FETs shakes the most 
when soldering. 

After assembly of the 
bias supply board, but be- 
fore connecting it to the 
LNA, apply +15 to +30 
volts. With a voltmeter, ad- 
just pot R1 for + 37 volts at 
the test point IPC (Test 
Point Common). This will 
result in approximately +3 
volts to the drains after the 
.7-volt drop across the re- 
verse-polarity protection di- 
odes. Set the 10k bias pots 
for —3 volts at points G1 
and G2, 

The supply is now ready 
for connection to the LNA, 
using the isolated-tip, bat- 
tery-powered soldering 
iron, with the tip grounded 
to the LNA board Refer to 
the "typical" LNA schemat- 
ic. Fig. 3. Be very careful to 
connect the gate leads, CI 
and C2, before connecting 
the drain leads, D1 and D2. 
With a voltmeter across the 
33-Ohm resistor, + probe 
to TPC, — probe to TP1, ad- 
just G1 bias for a 33-volt 
reading. This indicates that 
10 milliamperes of current 
is being pulled by the 



S4 73 Magazine • February, 1982 



CaAsFET. Move the — 
probe to RP2 and adjust the 
G2 bias pot for a 33-volt 
reading, Now go back and 
check FET #1 . As you adjust 
the bias pots, the current 
should evenly increasel If 
the current jumps or is 
erratic, the LNA is probably 
oscillating. How to stop os- 
cillation is the subject of 
another article! 

Using the above-de- 
scribed LNA power supply 
and tune-up procedure, the 
CEL LNA design came up 
beautifully, with no oscilla- 
tion. Its two stages gave a 
solid, measured 21 DB of 
gain. We were unable to 
measure the noise figure di- 
rectly, but the fellow with 
the test equipment said that 
it appeared to be very low, 
based on his evaluation of 
the ratio of gain to noise 
generated by the test 
equipment 

What type of picture do 
you get with a two-stage, 
21 -dB gain LNA that has an 
unknown noise figure? Very 
poorf After getting the first 
CEL LNA working, Richard 
was able to remove the 
NE21889S successfully 
from the commercial 
board, We built up a sec- 
ond board, using the cell 
design and our LNA power- 
supply board. Again, the 
CEL design came up with 
absolutely no problems. 
Now, by cascading the two 
boards, we were getting 
some results. 

After optimizing the 
boards, which I will cover 
r>ext we have numerous 
transponders on SATCOM I 
above noise. We are locat- 
ed in the 32-33-dB footprint 
and the antenna is a home- 
:>rew 12-foot spherical. We 
lave made comparisons of 
>ur four-stage CEL LNA and 
i 120-degree commercial 
-NA. Our home-brew LNA 
lompares very favorably 
vith the commercial unit. 

rrimming an LNA for Best 
sloise Figure and Best Cain 

After having gone 
hrough the misery of trying 

'See Ltst of Advertts&rs on page 714 



to build an LNA with almost 
no information and abso- 
lutely no test equipment, 
we now can describe some 
of the procedures we had to 
discover the hard way. 

The first step is to pre- 
pare a work area so that 
you minimize the possibili- 
ty of blowing those costly 
CaAsFETs. A piece of print- 
ed circuit board makes an 
ideal work surface. Again, 
you will need a good isolat- 
ed-tip soldering pen. 
Ground the tip of the pen to 
the work surface with a 
jumper. The battery- 
powered pen sold by Radio 
Shack works great. You 
should ground yourself to 
the work surface with a 
piece of copper braid. You 
also will need an X-acto® 
knife, a BB or small ball 
bearing, a plastic tuning 
wand, and a steady hand. 
Clue the BB or small ball 
bearing to the end of the 
plastic tuning wand. 

The LNA, as built should 
produce watchable video in 
most areas of the country. 
With power on and a tran- 
sponder tuned in, make 
sure that the correct cur- 
rent is set for each stage of 
the LNA (10 mA per stage 
for the NE21889). You 
should monitor the current 
of each stage as it is 
trimmed. Place the BB on 
the PC-board trace edge as 
per Fig. 4. Slowly move the 
BB around the outside pe- 
rimeter of the striplines, 
keeping it in contact with 
the stripline. Monitor the 
quality of the received pic- 
ture as you move the BB. 
When a point is found 
where the picture quality 
gets better, you need to add 
copper to the stripline. If 
the picture quality gets 
worse, you need to remove 
some of the stripline by 
making very light cuts. We 
only score the copper with 
the X-acto knife so that it 
can be soldered back to- 
gether if needed. Make sev- 
eral trips around the strip- 
lines and note the effect 




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before doing any adding or 
trimming, Make a log of the 
points where changes occur 
and see if they repeat each 
time you run the BB by 
them. After you are con- 
vinced of the points that 
need changing, then make 
the necessary adjustments. 
Copper can be added by 
salvaging a piece of foil 
from another piece of PC 
board or by using GC Elec- 
tronics Silver Print paint. 

After the adjustments are 
made, make a slight in- 
crease in the current for 
each FET stage while watch- 
ing the picture quality. We 



have run the current up to 
40 milliamperes on a stage 
with no oscillation. The first 
stage will probably have to 
operate at 8 to 1 2 milliamp- 
eres for best noise figure. 
Successive stages can oper- 
ate at higher current levels 
for more gain. 

The basic power-supply 
design (Fig, 5] and PC board 
layout (Fig 6) power the bias 
board and also our com- 
plete satellite TV receiver. 
There is nothing special 
about it except, again, that 
an effort was made to use 
parts available from Radio 
Shack. ■ 



Printed circuit boards are available from IVIartcomni, Inc., 
PO Box 74, Mobile AL 36601, for the power supplies and the 
LNA. The LNA board is $20.00, the LNA bias supply board is 
$t2.00, and the receiver power-supply board Is $10.00. Add 
$1J5 per order for first class postage. 

You may request the CEL LNA Application Note ANa0903 
by writing to Caiifomia Eastern Labs at 3005 Democracy Way, 
Santa Clara CA 95050. A copy of the Note is supplied with 
each LNA board ordered from Martcomm, Inc. 



J 



73Magazine * February, 1982 95 



BifiyL Nlehen W&4APC 
Rte 2, Box ISll 
Raddiff KY 40160 



Microwave Master 

you might not need a mountaintop 



With the growing inter- 
est in satellite televi- 
sion reception, weather pic- 
ture reception, and higher 
frequency utilization, the 
need for a better under- 
standing of microwave prin- 
ciples becomes more im- 
portant than before. 

To better understand mi- 
crowave techniques, we 
must first understand the 
frequency bands and the 
characteristics of the mi- 
crowave spectrum in rela- 
tionship to other lower fre- 
quency radio waves. As we 
know, radio waves travel 
mostly along the ground 
path and are not readily af- 
fected by mild changes in 
the weather or atmosphere. 
When we get into the mi- 
crowave region, the charac- 
teristics are entirely differ- 
ent 

To begin, let us take a 
look at what microwaves 
are. Radio wayes above the 
lOOfrMHz level are called 
microwaves. It is a common 
practice to relate to this 
portion of the frequency 
spectrum in terms of Giga- 
hertz (GHz), With a frequen- 
cy of 1000 MHz being equal 
to one Gigahertz. The basic 
spectrum of microwave fre- 
quencies is made up of 



three very basic bands. 
These bands are: the S-band 
centered at about 3000 
MHz (10 cm), the X band at 
about 10.000 MHz {3cm), 
and the K-band at about 
27,000 MHz ni cm). 

Table 1 shows the rela- 
tionship between the bands 
by wavelength in both cen- 
timeters and inches, and 
Table 2 shows some of the 
services operating there. 
You will notice from the 
table that a full wavelength 
at the microwave frequen- 
cies is not very long. When 
we get into working with 
the construction of micro- 
wave equipment and subas- 
semblies, these measure- 
ments will have a very 
significant meaning. 

The first cavity magne- 
tron was developed in 
Great Britain in 1940, after 
the publication in 1936 of 
two papers on hollow wave- 
guides. These papers are: 
"Hyper-frequency Wave- 
guides—General Consider- 
ations and Experimental 
Results" by G. C. South- 
worth, and "Transmission 
of Electromagnetic Waves 
in Hollow Tubes of Metal" 
by W. L. Barrow. During the 
period of early develop- 



ment around 1940, most of 
the experimental work was 
carried on in the Radiation 
Laboratory at the Massa- 
chusetts Institute of Tech- 
noIogy> During this time, 
almost all experimental 
work in microwaves was di- 
rected towards the design 
and use of microwave radar 
equipment, due to the 
small size of antenna equip- 
ment required in the micro- 
wave region. 

After the second world 
war, more efforts were 
made in other areas to the 
extent that today, almost 
all long-range telephone 
communications are re- 
layed by microwave links 
As scientific advances be- 
gan in outer space, the role 
of microwaves became 
even more important. In 
fact microwave technolo- 
gy has made possible many 
of the products used today 
in our homes, business, and 
in private industry. An ex- 
ample of a modern use of 
microwave technology is 
the microwave oven found 
in many homes and busi- 
nesses. 

Microwaves are also 
used in many of the security 
alarm systems found to 
business use and have been 



used by private industry for 
some time for cleaning of 
parts, removal of broken 
screws and bolts, and for 
controlling signal devices 
at railroad crossings and 
drawbridges Another use 
with which almost every- 
one IS familiar is the radar 
speed control devices used 
by police forces all over the 
country. 

To understand micro- 
wave principles, we must 
first take a look at some of 
the characteristics of mi- 
crowaves in relation to 
other forms of radiation. 
We must also learn what 
variables affect the micro- 
wave signal itself 

To begin, microwaves 
normally travel in one or all 
of four basic paths. These 
four paths are direct wave, 
reflected wave, surface 
wave, and sky wave. In 
most microwave installa- 
tions, the direct wave is the 
desired path, although the 
reflected wave also may be 
of importance in some in- 
stances. 

The direct wave is so 
named because of its direct 
path from one point to an- 
other. With optimum condi* 
tions, the most reliable 
communications can be ob- 



96 73Magaiffte • February, 1382 



Band 


Frequency 
(MHi) 


Wavelength 

cm Inches 


S-band 
X-band 
K-band 


3,000 

10,000 

27,000 


10 4 

3 1.2 

1.1 .44 



Service 



Fi«quency 



Amateur 

WEFAX 

MDSTV 



Table 1. Microwave bands. 



tained through the use of 
the direct wave. 

The sky wave normallY is 
considered to be a wave 
that has been reflected 
from the ionosphere, a re- 
gion that extends from an 
altitude of approximately 
30 miles on out to about 
250 miles. In the area of sat- 
ellite television or weather 
fax, a signal which is trans- 
mitted from a satellite is 
not considered to be sky 
wave but instead, falls un- 
der the classification of a 
direct wave that has been 
retransmitted. 

Surface waves are waves 
that travel along the sur- 
face of ground or water. 
They are mostly predomi- 
nant at the lower frequen- 
cies. At microwave frequen- 
cies this mode of propaga- 
tion is usually insignificant 
and in most cases may be 
disregarded. 

The reflected wave is a 
wave that has been reflect- 
ed from the land or water 
surface of the area between 
the transmitter and receiver 
antenna sites. A factor that 
determines the strength of 
the reflected wave is the 
type of surface that the 
wave is reflected from. 
Land is considered to be a 
poor reflector and will scat- 
ter the wave in many direc- 
tions. Water is a good re- 
flective surface and gener- 
ally will reflect the entire 
wave in one direction. The 
reflected wave is only im- 
portant when the reflected 
signal is picked up at the re- 
ceiving antenna with a 
strength comparable to the 
strength of the direct-wave 
signal. At this particular oc- 
currence, the reflected 
wave may either boost the 
direct-wave signal or cancel 
it almost completely. The 
determining factor at this 

t^See Ust of Advertisers on page 7^4 



time is whether the two sig- 
nals are in phase with each 
other. If the two signals are 
in phase, or nearly in phase, 
or if the two signals are of 
nearly equal strength, the 
combined signal can be 
twice as strong. 

However, if the two sig- 
nals are nearly 180^ out of 
phase with each other, 
there will be a reduction in 
signal strength since the re- 
flected signal will cancel 
some of the strength of the 
direct-wave signal. 

A phase difference be- 
tween the direct wave and 
the reflected wave is usual- 
ly introduced by the dif- 
ference in the distance 
each wave travels. This dif- 
ference may vary from in- 
stallation to installation 
and can be anything from a 
fraction of a wavelength to 
many wavelengths. When 
the path difference is an 
odd number of wave- 
lengths, the two signals 
{direct and reflected) will 
arrive at the receiving 
antenna in-phase. This is 
especially true when the 
wave is reflected at small 
angles of incidence, which 
cause a phase reversal of 
1 80®. In the case of horizon- 
tal polarization, the phase 
reversal is nearly 180*' re- 
gardless of the magnitude 
of the grazing angle^ This is 
also true for almost all in- 
stances of vertical polariza- 
tion in most point-to-point 
communications systems. 

An interesting fact about 
microwave energy is that 
the signal tends to be slight- 
ly curved. This is because 
the signals travel through 
the atmosphere at speeds 
that depend on tempera- 
ture, atmospheric pressure, 
and the amount of water 
vapor present in the 
atmosphere. 



1296 MHz 
1691 MHz 
1900-2600 MHz 

Satel I ltd TV 37004200 M Hz 

Table 2. Some services operating in the micfowave 

frequencies. 



Wivelength 
cm Inchei 

23 ai 

17,8 7 

15.8-12 6.2-4.7 

fr7 3,2-2.8 



The following three con- 
ditions will have an effect 
on the microwave signal; 
The higher the temperature, 
the faster the signal; the 
lower the atmospheric pres- 
sure, the faster the signal; 
and the lower the water 
vapor content, the faster 
the signal. 

With these influences, 
the net result is that the 
signal speed changes with 
altitude. Under normal con- 
ditions, the variation is a 
small and uniform increase 
in speed of the signal with 
an increase in altitude. In 
this manner, it readily can 
be seen that in a way, the 
microwave signal acts very 
much like a light beam. Just 
as a light beam can be re- 
fleeted or bent, so can a mi- 
crowave signal be reflected 
or bent. 

Using the above informa- 
tion, we also can see that 
microwaves can be very re- 
liable for communications 
systems. The most impor- 
tant factor is to ensure as 
direct a line-of-sight path 
from the transmitter anten- 
na to the receive antenna as 
possible. With prior study 
of the potential path, it is 
really not too difficult to 
plan a microwave system. 
The thing to keep in mind is 
that the complete path of 
the microwave signal must 
be free of any obstructions 
such as trees, hills, or tall 
buildings. When transmit^ 
ting over water, the reflect- 
ed wave may play an impor- 
tant role in the received sig- 
nal. When you are design- 
ing over-water point-to- 
point systems, it is very im- 
portant to ensure that this 
reflected signal does not ar- 
rive at the receive antenna 
in an out-of-phase or nearly 
out-of-phase state. 



A simple rule-of-thumb 
method can be used to de- 
termine possible antenna 
heights, especially for over 
water paths. The antenna 
heights chosen must satisfy 
t he f oll owin g relation: 
/2lTi + /2lT,= S, where 
H, and Hi represent the an- 
tenna heights in feet above 
sea level and S represents 
the distance in miles be- 
tween the antennas. 

The next step is to calcu- 
late a correction height 
u sing the formula H = 
n/S/F, where H is in feet, S is 
the distance between the 
antennas in miles, and F is 
the operating frequency in 
MHz. The required antenna 
height for each antenna is 
the sum of the tentative 
height and the correction 
height for each antenna, or, 
more simply stated, H, + H 
and Hi + H. If the values 
obtained are not conve- 
nient, then select new ten- 
tative antenna heights and 
perform a new calculation. 

For example, if we as- 
sume a transmitting anten- 
na height of 1 400 feet and a 
receiving antenna height of 
2000 feet at a distance of 
100 miles, the computati on 
would b e: V 2(1400} + 
V 2(2000) = 100 (miles). The 
square root of the H^ com- 
ponent is 52.92; the H^ 
square root component is 
63.25. This gives us a total 
of 116,17 miles. It is then 
quite evident that one or 
both of the contemplated 
antennas are too high. By 
using the S value of 100 and 
working backwards with 
the formula, using Ht as the 
base antenna and recom- 
puting for Ha height: 100 — 
52.92 = 47.08 squared = 
2216.53 divided by 2 = 
1108.26 feet. Therefore, the 



73 Magazine • February, 1982 97 



STATE-OF-THE-ART 



Quantity discount price structures available upon 
request for dealers. Dealerships, both domestic 
and foreign available in many areas. For further 
information, please contact John Michaels, Sales 
Manager. Telephone hours: Monday thru Thurs- 
day, 10-4. 



ELECTRONIC 



4558 Auburn Blvd., Sacramento, CA 95841 

(916)452-0193 ^ ri 



new height that meets the 
relation is 1108 feet for H^. 
By the same token, we 
could have kept antenna H j 
at the height desired and re- 
computed the height f or H i . 

Using the corrected fig- 
ures for antenna heights of 
1400 feet for H^ and 1108 
feet for H^, v^e now can 
compute the correction 
heights for both antennas at 
a frequency of 1296 M Hz: 
H = 660V 100/1296 = 
183J3333 feet. This gives 
us a final figure of antenna 
height for H| of 1400 + 
183.33 or a total of1583J3 
feet and for Hi 1108 + 
183,33 ora total of 1291.33 
feet. Given the figures 
above, we can now look for 
possible sites to install 
antennas. 

Of course, we may not al- 
ways find the ideal spots for 
our antenna construction. 
In this case, we go back and 
recalculate using different 
antenna heights (plus eleva- 
tion above sea level) to ob- 



tain 3 relative figure equal 
to the desired distance fig- 
ure. Sometimes just one or 
two feet may make the dif- 
ference at the receive end. 
In any attempt at micro- 
wave, if at first you do not 
succeed, try again at anoth- 
er location or change the 
height of one or both of the 
antennas. In selecting a 
good antenna site, a very 
good aid to locate the ideal 
sites is a topographical map 
of the area locality of 
choice. A source of infor- 
mation for obtaining topo- 
graphical maps is at your 
state capital. Try writing a 
letter either to the State De- 
partment of Natural Re- 
sources or the State Forest* 
ry Division. There is a fee re- 
quired for copies of these 
maps, but it is usually very 
small when one considers 
the information that can be 
obtained and the time that 
can be saved. Happy ham- 
ming on the microwave 
bands. 



Hm HELP 



I am in need of the schematic 
and alignment information for a 
Gonset G'77 transmitter and in- 
formation on a TU-8-B plug-in 
unK used with 8C1 91/375 trans- 



mitters, I will copy and return 
your originals, 

Howard Palmer WfflRT 

1125 Basswood Land 

St Louis MO 63132 



I am looking for employment 
in the electronics field, in the 
Knoxville-Chaltanooga, Tennes- 
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cludes 25 years of experience 
with rt circuits, and 1st phone 
license with radar endorsement, 
and an Extra amateur license. 

Herman F. Schnur 

115 Intercept Ave. 

N, Charleston SC 29405 



I am giving away, free, in ex- 
change for postage, a 
R336/GRC26 army receiver and 
6K7, 6J5, 6R7, and 6C6 tubes, 

I am looking for ar> Ameco R5 
receiver and schematic for 
same. Please state condition 
and price, 

Kevin Keal 

Route A, Box 211 A 

FJIppln AR 72634 



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9S 73 Magazine • February, 1982 



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See Usi of Advertisers on fiage 114 



73 Magazine * February, 1982 99 



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Tom weORG Maryann WB6YSS Arcadia, California 91006 



100 73 Magazine • February, 1982 



Two Keys TO Perfect code. . . 





^^ssmmua^m^ 




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73 Magazine • February, 1982 101 




.If s becoming very clear now. . . 
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73Magazme • February, 1982 103 



ieny Dijak W9/D 
215 Tareyton Dfive 
IthacA NY 74B50 



CW Interface 

let your computer do the copying 



It is one thing to obtain 
software to decode 
Morse code with your com- 
puter, but it is quite another 
to process the audio signal 
delivered by your receiver 
in such a way that the com- 
puter can use it. This article 
will describe one approach 
to solving this hardware 
problem and also describe 
the construction and opera- 
tion of an interface circuit 
using these principles. 

I will assume that you al- 
ready have software for de- 
coding Morse and will de- 
scribe the needed hard- 
ware. An example of such a 
program was presented by 
Thomas' in the December, 
1977, issue of 73. For our 
purpose, we will assume 
that your software requires 
a TTL signal that is logic 
low during the key-down in- 
tervals and logic high dur- 
ing the key-up intervals. 

Proper operation of your 
decoding algorithm will re- 
quire the presence of one 
logic level during the key- 
down interval and the op- 
posite logic level for the 
key-up state The computer 
must see only one or the 
other of these states at any 






M 



LIHlTEf^ 



♦-PCILE 

BANDPASS 

FILTEII 



one time, and they must 
change only when the state 
of the desired signal 
changes. State changes 
should not be affected by 
interfering signals or ran- 
dom noise. 

An extremefy simple cir- 
cuit could successfully be 
used to interface a com- 
puter to a ham receiver if 
the audio signal produced 
by the receiver were perfect 
(absolutely noise-free and 
of constant level and fre- 
quency), but the circuit 
must be considerably more 
elaborate if the computer is 
to perform property with 
the imperfect signals typi- 
cal of ham-band operation. 

Typical receiver output 
during CW reception on to- 
day's ham bands presents a 
difficult problem when at- 
tempting to decode the sig- 
nal with a computer. Even if 
the operator is using a se- 
lective receiver (400-Hz 
bandwidth) designed for 
CW reception, several dif- 
ferent signals usually will 
be present in the audio- The 
signal that the operator is 
trying to copy probably will 
be tuned for his preferred 



pitch, while the others will 
be present at other frequen- 
cies- The desired signals 
probably wilt be the strong- 
est, but the others may be 
fairly strong also. 

In addition to these inter- 
fering Morse signals, there 
will be noise. In the signal 
output that is available to 
the computer interface cir- 
cuit we will have, in gener- 
al, voltage due to our one 
desired signal and also con- 
siderable voltage due to all 
the other signals and noise 
being processed by the re- 
ceiver. In order to decode 
the desired signal success- 
fully, we must have a way 
to detect the voltage due to 
our desired signal while ig- 
noring as best we can the 
other signals and noise. 

Desirable Interface 
Qualities 

We can summarize sev- 
eral design objectives for 
our receiver-computer in- 
terface. First of all, it should 
be (as always) small, inex- 
pensive, and easy to con- 
struct and operate. Second, 
it should respond only to 
one very narrow band of au- 
dio frequencies, for maxi- 



OtTECTOB 



FiLl'tff 

I . 



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SUCER 



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^•e TTL UUfPWT 



THBESHOLO 
SELECT 



Fig. 7, interface block diagram, 
104 73 Magazine • February, 1982 



mum immunity to adjacent 
signal interference and 
noise. Third, the output 
should be bistable and TTL- 
compatible for proper inter- 
pretation at the computer 
input port; the output 
should be either logic high 
( + 3,5 to + 5 volts) or low (0 
to +0.6 volts) and never in 
between. Fourth, the deci- 
sion threshold of the detec- 
tor should be adjustable to 
allow the interface to oper- 
ate properly with both high- 
and low-level audio so that 
the operator is not forced to 
operate a certain audio 
gain setting which may not 
always be convenient. And 
fifth, the interface should 
work while the speaker of 
the receiver is operating, so 
that the operator can hear 
the code while it is being 
decoded to allow detection 
of computer errors (decod- 
ing errors can be expected 
under adverse reception 
conditions). 

Theory 

Fig. 1 is a block diagram 
of one approach to doing 
the required processing of 
the receiver audio. The first 
stage is a limiter which pro* 
duces a known signal level 
at the beginning of the cir- 
cuit; this allows the rest of 
the device to be designed 
optimally for this level. The 
limiter is followed by a 
4-pole active bandpass 



AUDIO ^OK 

IfiPUT ° ^ 




CAPACITOR VALUES fN ^F 



o TTL OUTPLiT 



F/g. 2. Interface schematic. 



THRESHOLD 

SELECT 

(TTLt 



filter. The filter is tuned to 
950 Hz and has a design 
bandwidth of 80 Hz. This fil- 
ter works by amplifying the 
signal about 16 times at its 
center frequency and atten- 
uating signals not within its 
passband. This ensures that 
the detector stage only sees 
voltage due to the desired 
signal. The detector itself is 
merely a half-wave rectifier 
(a diode), and it is followed 
by a simple RC tow-pass 
filter so that the output of 
the filter follows the pulse 
shape of the signal as close- 
fy as possible. The output of 
this stage will be maximum 
when the signal is present 
and minimum when there is 
no signal present, 

The slicer stage decides 
whether there is a signal 
present or not. It does this 
by comparing a preset 
threshold voltage to the 
voltage it receives from the 
detector and filter. When- 
ever the received signal ex- 
ceeds the preset threshold, 
the slicer quickly switches 
its output state from -10 V 
to +10 V. 

Under ideal conditions, 
the output voltage at this 
point in the circuit would 
never exceed this preset 
threshold when only noise 
and interfering signals were 
present. If the voltage ex- 
ceeds the threshold only 
when the desired signal is 
indeed present, no errors 
will be generated. If this is 
not the case (and usually it 
IS not), errors will be 
generated whenever the 
combined level of the inter- 
ference and noise exceeds 



the threshold. (The slicer 
will change state.) As soon 
as the voltage subsides, the 
slicer will revert to the cor- 
rect state. For optimum op- 
eration of the overall 
hardware/software system, 
your decoding algorithm 
should be designed to ig- 
nore these spurious but 
unavoidable brief state 
changes due to noise. 

Finally, the output buffer 
converts the signal levels 
produced by the slicer 
(which are incompatible 
with the computer input 
gates) to correct TTL levels. 

The Circuit 

Fig- 2 shows the sche- 
matic of one circuit that 
meets the design objectives 
outlined above. I know that 
not many people build any- 
thing exactly as it is de- 
scribed in a magazine arti- 
cle [neither do I), so I will 
not only describe this cir- 
cuit but will also give a lit- 
tle of the thought behind 
the design choices that I 
made. 

Diodes D1 and D2 form 
the limiter, and these 
should be silicon types to 
give a limited signal of 
about ±0.6-V peak at this 
point. R1 is used to keep the 
input impedance of this in- 
terface high so that it may 
be used across an existing 
high-impedance output of 
your receiver {the anti-VOX 
output on a Drake R-4, for 
instance), in parallel with 
whatever you normally 
connect to that output. So, 
this circuit can simply be 
added to your existing lay- 



out with little effect. Also, 
because the signal level is 
limited to 0.6 V, only about 
al-volt peak of audio signal 
is required at the input to 
this device. On my receiver, 
the anti-VOX output puts 
out more than enough volt- 
age at moderate speaker 
volume levels. Another ad- 
vantage of permanently 
connecting the interface to 
a high-impedance point in 
your receiver is that the 
speaker and headphone 
outputs can be used or dis- 
abled without affecting the 
connection to the interface. 

Components R2 through 
U2 make up the 4-pole ac- 
tive bandpass filter. My first 
prototype used only a sin- 
gle-stage filter (2-po I e), but I 
found that it was allowing 
too much interference from 
adjacent signals. I therefore 
decided to go to a 4-pole 
design, with the resultant 
much steeper skirts to the 
passband. The filter design 
itself was arrived at with the 
help of articles by Stark^ 
and Stewart^ in past issues 
of 73, regarding active filter 
design. Each stage of the 
filter is designed for a Q of 
10. The center frequency of 
stage 1 is 975 Hz and that of 
stage 2 is 930 Hz. This yields 
a 3-d B passband of about 
80 Hz and very steep skirts 
and requires only 2 ICs. 
(Strictly following the cri- 
teria used by Stark would 
have yielded filter stages 
with higher Qs, but also 
would have required a total 
of 4 ICs and several more 
resistors in the design. My 
approach sacrifices some 



skirt steepness but elim- 
inates many components. 
That was my choice,) 

Each filter stage is de- 
signed for a gain of 4.8 so 
that at the overall filter cen- 
ter frequency of 950 Hz the 
complete filter has a gain of 
about 16. With the 0.6-V 
peak input, about 10-volts 
peak output is developed at 
the detector. If you would 
like to try your own hand at 
designing the filters (per- 
haps you'd like to use ca- 
pacitors you have in your 
junk box or a different 
center frequency), use the 
procedures given in either 
of the above two articles 
but be careful to keep the 

first resistor (R2) around 
look or greater so that the 
input is not loaded down. 
R1 and R2 form a voltage 
divider, and smaller values 
of R2 will require more 
drive voltage from your re- 
ceiver for full limiting. 

Diode D3 is the detector, 
and R8, C5, and R9 form the 
simple low-pass filter. The 
filter components were ar- 
rived at by experiment, the 
goal being use of a physi- 
cally small capacitor at C5 
and optimum following of 
the keyed signal pufse 
shape at speeds up to about 
30 wpm. These values meet 
these criteria well. 

U3 is the slicer, and the 
resistor network RIO, R11, 
and R12 with Q1 produce a 
software-controllable vari- 
able threshold. Using the in- 
dicated resistor values, 
when Q1 is not conducting, 
the threshold at pin 2 of U3 
will be about 1.8 volts. 



73 Magazine • FebruaryJ982 105 



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When Q1 is conducting, the 
threshold will be lowered to 
about 1=0 volt. Thus, by ty- 
ing the input to R13 to one 
bit of an output port, you 
can control the slicer 
threshold through software. 
This could have been done 
with a mechanical switch, 
but I wanted to mount this 
circuit deep within the bow- 
els of my computer, con- 
trolled only by my com- 
mands via the keyboard. 
This approach took a while 
to design, but it requires 
very little additional space 
on the circuit board. 

Under normal condi- 
tions, one would use the 
higher threshold for the 
best performance. But 
when you are operating 
with a signal level that is 
not strong enough for full 
limiting and noise condi- 
tions are favorable, you 
can extend your operating 
range by lowering the 
threshold to about 1 volt. 

The output of U3 is either 
about +10 or —10 volts de- 
pending upon the detector 
output to U3. These levels 
could not be applied safely 
to the TTL input port of a 
computer, so the buffer 
stage, Q2, was added to 
provide a signal that always 
remains within the TTL op- 
erating range of 0-5 V. The 




Photo A. Interface prototype. 

output of Q2 can be tied 
directly to one bit of an in- 
put port. 

With this circuit, the idle, 
or no Signal, state of the 
output is logic high ( + 5 V). 
When a signal is present, 
the output drops to V. 

Construction 

Photo A shows the proto- 
type of this circuit in final 
form. My next step will be 
to reassemble it on a plug-in 
vector board for mounting 
directly inside my comput- 
er. As you can see, it re- 
quires a total area of about 
2 by AVi inches on the 
board. None of the compo- 
nents dissipates an appre- 
ciable heat, so it is safe to 
mount them adjacent to 
each other (but be careful 
not to short any leads). The 
wires visible in the upper- 
right portion of the board 
are for my temporary 
power and computer con- 
nections to the circuit. 

All resistors used in the 
circuit need be no larger 
than Va Watt. I used what I 
had in my junk box, so some 
of the resistors in the photo 
are Vi Watt. Capacitors CI 
through C4 should be high- 
quality polystyrene or 
mylar^M (and not disc 
ceramic) as pointed out by 
Stark. Try to get values for 



€l 



R2, R4, R7 as close to those 
listed as possible — al- 
though the final adjust- 
ments of R3 and R6 will 
compensate for any varia- 
tions from the optimum 
values. The values for the 
two trimpots, R3 and R6, 
need be considered only 
approximate, and the final 
adjustment of these two 
can be expected at about 
mid-range if the indicated 
values are used. 

Diodes Dl and D2 must 
be silicon types (small sig- 
nal) and D3 can be either 
silicon or germanium, C5 
can be disc ceramic. Ql 
and Q2 are any general pur- 
pose silicon transistors 
capable of operating with a 
2-mA collector current and 
a beta of at least 100 (type 
2N3566 were used here). 

As you can see from the 
photo, it is not necessary to 
etch a PC board. All three 
tCs are type 741. Power sup- 
ply voltages of +12, —12, 
and +5 volts are required, 
but these should be avail- 
able readily in most com- 
puters. 

Alignment and Check-Out 

The only alignment re- 
quired is that of properly 
tuning each filter stage. For 
this, you will need some 
type of known frequency 



audio input. Apply an input 
to the circuit at 975 Hz, at a 
level of 1 volt or greater, 
and adjust R3 for maximum 
output at pin 6 of U1 . 
Change the input frequency 
to 930 Hz and adjust R6 for 
maximum as measured at 
pin 6 of U2. You then 
should find that the 2-stage 
filter has a center frequen- 
cy of about 950 Hz and an 
80-Hz passband. With an in- 
put signal level sufficient 
for full limiting, about 10 
volts (peak) signal should 
be available at the output 
of U2. Under these same 
conditions, the voltage at 
TP-1 should be about 3 
volts (dc). As a final check, 
you can confirm that the 
output of Q2 is + 5 V with 
no signal applied and V 
when a 950-Hz signal is 
present. 

Operation 

Once the above initial 
alignment is completed, no 
further adjustments need 
be made. When operating 
the interface, all one must 
do is tune the desired CW 
signal properly so that it 
falls within the filter pass- 
band and adjust the re- 
ceiver's audio level to an 
optimum value. These two 
tasks, however, are not 
quite as easy as they sound. 

The easiest way to tune 
your receiver for optimum 
operation of the interface 
requires an oscilloscope. 
While there is another tech- 
nique, it has some severe 
limitations. 1 will first ^oyer 
tuning with an oscilloscope, 
and then the alternative if a 
scope is not available, 

Oscilloscope Method 

For the moment, let us 
assume that you have a 
dual-trace oscilloscope at 
your disposal for operation 

of your receiver-computer 
combination. Connect one 
channel to TP-1 in the cir- 
cuit and the other channel 
to TP-2, Use dc coupling for 
both. Use a vertical sen- 
sitivity of 500 mV per divi- 
sion for both channels and 
a sweep speed of 10 ms per 



106 73 Magazine • February J982 



division. Adjust the base- 
lines of both traces to exact- 
ly the same point near the 
bottom of the graticule. You 
should then obtain a dispfay 
similar to that shown in 
Photo B when a properly 
tuned signal is being re- 
ceived. 

In the example, both 
traces have their zero base- 
lines one division from the 
bottom of the graticule and 
the vertical and horizontal 
settings are as recommend- 
ed above. The trace visible 
about one division above 
the center of the graticule ts 
the TP-2 threshold voltage 
[about 1.8 VI The other 
trace shows the leading 
edge of a CW pulse that is 
being received. This display 
shows just about ideal re- 
ception conditions and is 
what you should strive for 
in your tuning. At the base- 
line of the signal trace, we 
can see that there is almost 
no noticeable noise be- 
tween CW pulses. This 
situation is rare but does 
happen occasionally. (In- 
deed, the photo was taken 
during reception of a very 
Strong off-the-air signal at 
about 25 wpm J 

The first step in tuning is 
to tune the receiver until 
the tone of the desired CW 
signal is centered in the 
filter passband, as evi- 
denced by a maximum sig- 
nal amplitude for the signal 
pulse on the oscilloscope 
display. This will take some 
care, due to the narrowness 
of the filter pass band. After 
this condition has been 
achieved, the next step is to 
optimize the level of the 
receiver audio which is be- 
ing fed to the interface. 
Making this choice op- 
timally will require a little 
experience on your part 
(which will come with time], 
but I can give you a few 
hints. 

Your primary 
maximize the 
noise ratio at 
(which is what the TP-1 sig- 
nal shows). This condition 
will give you the minimum 
error rate out of the slicer 




goal is to 
signal'to- 
the stJcer 



stage, and hence within the 
decoding algorithm in the 
computer. Since you have a 
limiter in the first stage of 
the interface, you will no- 
tice that you can increase 
the level of the desired sig- 
nal only up to a point, be- 
yond which it will no longer 
increase. 

You will notice also, how- 
ever, that if you continue to 
increase the drive level, the 
amplitude of the noise and 
interference evident be- 
tween pulses will increase. 
This is undesirable. There* 
fore, you want a condition 
where the signal gives the 
greatest difference be- 
tween the peak of the signal 
and the peaks of the noise 
and interference as viewed 
on the scope. Next decide 
whether the normal (high) 
threshold voltage is best or 
if the lower threshold 
would be better. Ideally, 
the threshold of the slicer 
should be halfway between 
the signal peak and the 
noise peaks. Then, by moni- 
toring the oscilloscope dis- 
play, you can ensure that 
the signal remains opti- 
mally tuned even if your 
receiver drifts a small 
amount or if the noise and 



Photo S, Osciltoscope display. 



interference conditions 
change. 

When using this type of 
display, it is convenient to 
have the current slicer 
threshold (TP-2) superim- 
posed on the display with 
one channel of the scope, 
but it is not absolutely nec- 
essary. If you have only one 
single-channel scope, just 
remember where you have 
set your threshold, or use an 
external voltmeter to moni- 
tor it while you display the 
TP-1 signal. 

Alternate Tuning Method 

As you probably have 
guessed by now, without an 
oscilloscope it would be 
very difficult to adjust the 
receiver for the optimum 
conditions described 
above. This does not mean 
that you cannot tune it to 
work fairly well most of the 
time, however. A VTVM at- 
tached to TP-1 also will give 
an indication of when you 
have reached maximum sig- 
nal strength, but its fluctua- 
tions with the signal will be 
much more difficult to irv 
terpret. You also will have 
very little ability to judge 
the noise conditions be- 
tween the pulses, but, if you 



are having a problem* you 

can compensate for these 
by doing a little trial and er- 
ror with the detection 
threshold and seeing which 
one works better. You will 
find that you must tune the 
receiver slowly in order to 
find the very narrow pass- 
band of the fitter. 

Summary 

This circuit evolved over 
several months of experi- 
mentation and testing, and 
i think it is a good compro- 
mise between circuit com- 
plexity and satisfactory per- 
formance. I think you will 
find, however, that while 
the computer can do a very 
good job of decoding well- 
sent Morse code under 
good reception conditions, 
the machine is no match for 
the human brain when it 
comes to poorly-sent code 
or very adverse noise or in- 
terference conditions. ■ 

References 

1. Thomas. William L, "Decode 
Morse— With an 8080," 73, De- 
cember, 1977. 

2. Stark, Peter A., "Design An 
Active RTTY Fiiter/' 73, Septem- 
ber, 1977. 

3. Stewart, Dr. John F., "At Last! 
A Use For Your Computer/' 73, 
April. 1978. 



73MagBime • February, 1982 107 



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108 73 Magazine • February, 1982 



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73 Magazine • February, 1982 109 




t^A 



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110 73Mag3Zfne • February J902 



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the worid news and financial happenings from the 
world cepitois on a 24 hour aday basis. This bookgives 
you the frequencies and times of broadcast of such 
news services as AP, UPI, Reuters, TASS, VOA and 
London Press. Also Included is an introduction to 
RTTY with information on equipment, antennas, abbre- 
viations — everything you need to get started in RTTY. 
S5,95*BK1202 



NE^^ 



FOR 
THE 



CONTE 




THE CONTEST COOKBOOK— reveals the secrets of the 
contest winners {domestic, DX, and specialty con lests), 
complete with photos and diagrams of equipment used 
by the top scorers. Find out how to make 1 50 contacts in 
one hour, $5.95." BK7308 



THE NEW WEATHER SATELLITE HANDBOOK- by 
Dr. Ralph E. Taggart WBeOQT Here is the completeiy 
updated and revised edition containing all the informa- 
tlon on the most sophisticated and effective 
spacecraft now In orbit, this book serves botb the ex- 
perienced amateur satellite enthusiast and the new- 
comer, It Is an Introduction to satellite watching, pro- 
viding all the Information required to construct a com- 
plete and highly effective ground station. Solid hard- 
ware designs end all the instructions necessary to op- 
erate the equipment are included. For experimenters 
who are operating stations, the book details all proce- 
dures necessary to modify equipment for the new ser- 
ies of spacecraft. Amateur weather satellite activity 
represents a unique blend of Interests encompassing 
electronics, meteorology and astronautics. Join the 
privileged few in watching the spectacle of earth as 
seen from space on your own monitoring equipment. 
Se.95." aK7363 



INTERFERENCE HANDBOOK— by William R. Nelson, 
WA6EQG— This timely handbook covers every type of 

RFI problem and gives you the solutions based on 

Kractlcail experience. Covers Interference toTV, radio, 
i-fl, telephone, radio amateur, commercial and CB 
equipment Power line interference Is covered in depth 
—how to locate itr cure It, work with the public, safety 
precautions, how to train RF/I investigators. Written by 
an RF] expert with 33 years of eKperlence, this profuse- 
ly illustrated book is packed with practical easy-to- 
understand Information. aKl23l3 $6.95 



IC OP-AMP COOKBOOK— by Walter G, Jung. Covers 
not only the basic theory of the IC op amp In great 
detail, but also Includes over 250 practical circuit ap- 
plications, liberally iiiustrated. 592 pages, SVi xBV?, 
softbound. $14.95." aK102a 



OWNER REPAIR OF RADIO EOUIPMENT-by Frank 
Glass K6RQ Here's a book that will teach you an ap- 
proach to troubleshooting without a sh@ck full of test 
equipment. Written In a narrative, non-mathematical 
style, it will encourage you to successfuily fix your own 
rig problems BO to 90% of the time. Even if you don't 
want to fix, you can learn a lot about how things work 
and fail. Add to your iJbrary and personal expertise. 
$7.95/ SK7310 



HANDBOOKS 

FOR THE 
HAMSHACK 

THE TEN METER FM HANDBOOK- by Bob Hell K9Eia 
This handbook has been pubilshed to help the ten meter 
enthusiast learn mora about the many methods of con- 
versions and iricKs that are used to make existing units 
work better. Join the great "tlnkerers" of the worldon ten 
FM and enioy the fantastic amount of fun in communi- 
cating with amateur stations worldwide on ten meter 
FM. *i.95.* SK1190 

THE PRACTICAL HANDBOOK OF AMATEUR RADIO FM 
REPEATERS- by Bill Pasternak WA6ITF {author of 73 
r^agazines monthly column 'Looking West'') This is the 
bOOK for tiie VHF^UHF FMer, compiled from material 
submitted by over a hundred Individuals, clubs, 
organizations and equipment manufacturers. A "must 
have" for your ham shack shelf. SUBB* BK1 185 



The 7$ 



Test Equipment 
Library 




VOL, I COMPONENT TESTERS— How to build tran- 
sistor testers (8j, diode testers f3)p IC testers [3), 
voltmeters and vTVMs {91, ohmmeters {8 different 
kinds), inductance |3K capacity {9), G measurement, 
crystal checking {6), temperature (2), aural meters for 
the blind (3), and ali sorts of miscellaneous data on 
meters. . .using them, making them mors versatile^ 
making standards. Invaluable book. $4.95.* LB7359 

VOL II AUDfO FREQUENCY TESTERS- Jam-packed 
with ail kinds of audio frequency test equip ment. If 
you're into SSB, RTTY, SSTV, etctnis book is a must for 
you . . .a good book for hi-fi addicts and experimenters, 
tool $4.95,* LB7360 

VOL. Ill RADIO FREQUENCY TESTERS— Radio frequen- 
cy waves, the common denominator of amateur radio. 
Such items as swr, antenna impedance^ tine impedance, 
rf output, and fieid strengtii; detailed Instructions on 
testing these Items Includes sections on signal generat- 
ors, crystal calibrators, grid-dip oscillators, noise gen er 
ators, dummy loads, and much more. $4.^." LB7361 



VOL. IV IC TEST EQUIPMENT-Become a 
troubleshooting wizard! in this fourth volume of the 73 
TEST EQUIPMENT LIBRARY are 42 home construction 
projects for building test equipment to work with your 
fiam station and In servicing digital equipment. In- 
cludes a cumulative Index for all four volumes for the 
73 TEST EQUIPMENT LIBRARY. $4.95/ L873fi2 

RF AND DIGITAL TEST EQUIPMENT YOU CAN 
BU ILO— BK1044— Rf burst, function, square wave gen- 
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counters^ several counters, prescaler^ microwave 
meter, etc. 252 pages. $5.95,' BK1044 



"Use the order card In this magazine or itemi2e your order on a separate piece of paper and mall to: 73 Radio Bookshop • 
Peterborough NH 0345&. Be sure to include cheek or detailed credit card information. No C.O.D. orders accepted. All orders 
add J1.S0 handling first book. $1.00 ^acU additional book, $10.00 per book foreign airmail, Please allow 4 6 weeks for 
de 1 1 very . Q u est i o n s reg ard t n g your order? P lease w ri te to Customer Ser vi c e at t h a above ad d res s. ^ Pr I ces subjecttochange 
on books not published! by 73 Magazine^ 



FOR TOLL FREE ORDERING CALL 1-800-258-5473 



ANTENNA BOOKS 



/' 




THE WELL 
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HAM SHACK 



PRACTTCAL ANTENNAS FOR THE RADIO AMATEII 

^A manual describing how to equip a htm stition with 
a su liable antanna. A wide range of antenna topics, 
systems r ^^^^ ac^cesaorles are pfeaent^d giving the 
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VHF ANTENNA HANOeOOK-The new VHP Antenns 
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lakes }oy in buHcfing, not full of ^rinp^ex formulas for itie 
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73 DIPOLE AND LONQ-WIRE ANTENNAS~bv Edward 
M Nolt W3FOJ. This is the hrst coriaction of virtual ty 
every type of wire antenna used ^ amatwrs. Includes 
dlm«rtslons,conrigyration3,an(f detailed construction 
data foe 73 d Iff a rant antenna types. Appen drees 
describe the consi ruction of noise brl<dgea, fme tuners, 
an<} daia on measuring resonant frequency^ velocity 
factor, and swr, $5,50/ BK10ie 

• ALL ABOUT CUBICAL QUAD ANTENNAS {2n4 edi- 
tion)— BK1 196— The ^'Clftsaic" on Quad deslgji, 
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contains new fe»d and matching systama and r»»w 
data. tSJS/ 

• BEAM ANTENNA HANDBOOK (New &lh •dlllon}— 
BK1 1i7— Vagi beam theory, construction and operation, 
tnfomialion on wife beams. SWR curves and matching 
systems, A "musi^ tor serious DXefs, S5.96" 

• VHF HANDBOOK FOR RADJO AMATEURS— BK 11 96 
— Contairts information on fM theory, operatkm aiKf 
equipment. VHf a ntenns design and construction, satef- 
lita-EME. arxf tn«^ rvewest solid-^tate circuits. V&95* 

• THE RADIO AMATEUR ANTENNA HANDSOOK- 
BK11W— Aii at>out wire antennas, beams, tuners, 
baluns, coax, radial:^. SWR and towers. Clear artd com- 
plete information, $6.9^' 

• SIMPLE, LOW-COST WIRE ANTENNAS FOR RADIO 
AMATEURS— BK 1200— Atl new data and every thing you 
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'Uough" locations. $6.95'' 



COOK BOOKS 



TTL COOKBOOK— by Don Lancaster. Explilne what 
TTL Is, how It works, and how to use it. Discusses prac- 
tical applications, such as a digital counter snd 
display system, evants counter, ^Eectronic stopwatch, 
digital voltmeter and a digital tachometer. 
iSo/ BK1063 



CMOS COOKBOOK— by Don Lancaster Details tt>e 
application of CMOS, the low power logic (amrly 
suitable for most appHcatlons presentiy dominated by 
TTL Required reading for every serious digital ex- 
penmentar! $10.50/ BXlOll 

TVT COOKBOOK— by Don Lancaster. Desorfbes the 
usa of a standard television receiver as a micropro- 
cessor CRT terminal Explains and describes charac- 
ter generation, cursor control and interface Informa- 
tion in typical, easy-to-understand Lancaster style. 
59^5/ BK1064 




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• HOW TO DEFEND YOURSELF AQAINST RADAR— eKl2Dl — by Bfuce F, Bogner and James R Bodner; a lawy^ 
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WOflLD REPEATER ATLAS— Completely updated, ovef 
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THEMAQICOF HAM RADfO- by ctenoid Swank WSHXR 
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in^vemervt in it. Part 2 detilis many of ham radio's 
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A QU1DE TO HAM RADlO-by Larry Kahaner WB2NEL 
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best way to go about getllng an FCC license, A Guide to 
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WORLD RADJO TV HANDaOOK 1ii2, 25TH EDITION 
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tion about broadcasting and TV stations world wide. 
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560 pages of vital aspects of world listening 
liaso. &Klia4 



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1 40 COMPifTER GAMES— BK73B1— Forty D«mes In all 
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HOW TO BUILD A MICROCOMPlTTER—AliD REALLY 
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HOBBY COMPUTERS ARE KEREilf you want to come 

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*Use the order card in this magazine or itemize your ordar on a separate piece of paper and mall to: 73 Radio Bookshop • 
Petert>orough NH 03458. Besuretoir>clud6Check0f detailed credit card information No C.O.D. orders acGSptSd, Ail orders 
add It. 50 harKll^ng first book. Si. 00 each additional book, SlOOO per book foreign airmail, Please allow 44 weeks for 
delivery. Questions regard! rig your order? Please write to Customer Service at th^aDOVe address^ (Prices tyib|ict to change 
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329 ARTochnkal Products. ,,,. .h ...fl3 
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402 AlumaTDwer..... ^36 

Amaieur Electronic Supply 63 

5 AmaTaur-WtKilesafe Electronics. . 25 
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28 Communications Cer>lef, NE 172 

362 Communication Concepts, Inc.. 145 
377 Communioations Electronics. . . 157 
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444 Computer Plus 154 

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70 Cubic Communications, ........ 57 

307 Debco Electronics. 133 

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409 JDR MfCrodevJcas ..,..,,.116, 117 
25 JJT D^stribLiilnQ. .............. ISS 

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31 S National Comm. Group tOO. 139 

412 Nemal Electronics^ , . , . — ... 46 
327 Horciluncl & Asaodaiea. 9S 

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114 73 Magazine • February, 1982 




WHAT WILL YOUR NEW 

RIG BE LIKE? 



Read 73 and Find Out 



The magic of digital electronics is coming to ham gear . . , and you'll be able to read about these 
developments in 73. There probably will be more changes in ham equipment in the next few 
years than ever before in history. You'll see these changes coming in 73, where you'll read about 
the experiments and pioneering. 73 has more articles than any other ham magazine . . , often more 
than all the others combined. 

When sideband got started, it was moved along by the many pioneering articles in 73. In the 60s 
it was solid state, with sevfcfal times as many articles on the subject than in all the other magazines 
combined. When repeaters and FM got going about ten years ago there were over five times as 
many articles on the subject published in 73 as in all other ham magazines combined . . . and you 
can see what changes that brought to hamming. Now we're looking at exciting developments 
such as narrow band sideband for repeaters . . . which might give us six times as many repeaters 
in our present bands. We're looking at automatic identification systems which may make it possi- 
ble for us to read out the call letters of any station tuned in . . . and even the development of self- 
tuning receivers. 

Will stereo double sideband techniques make it possible to have up to 30 times as many stations 
within a given HF band as is now possible? Hams will be experimenting and reporting on these 
developments in 73. 73 is an encyclopedia of hamming. . .present and future. . .and just a bit of 
the past, too. 

Without the endless fillers on station activities and club news, 73 is able to 

publish far more information. . .valuable information. * ,on hamming and r-— ^.,..-.,_ 

ham equipment. | ^|U--. , : '^^ 

You may or may not be a pioneer, but you certainly will want to keep up t^S^^^^m^H 

with what is happening and what the new rigs are going to bg hke. And, frank- |- w^^^ 

ly, your support of 73 is needed to keep this type of information coming. fes -/jfinH^ 



"tf ©©o bill me for 1 year of 73 Magazine at 325.00 

^ 32aB6 



Name. 



Address. 



City . State Zip. 



Canadian S27/1 year only. US funds. Foreign $35/1 year only. US furds 

Please allow 4 to 6 weeks for delivery 
73 Magazine#PO Box 931»Farmingdala NV 11737 



ISMagazine * February, 1982 115 



4116-200ns 



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IMS 40L44-20 
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TERMS: For shipping include $2 00 for UPS ground, S3. 00 
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116 73Magazine • February, 1982 



271 6 EPROMS 450NS (5V) 



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73 Magazine • Fedruary. 1982 117 



REVIEW 



KDK FM-2025 A TWO-METER 
FM TRANSCEIVER 

When you think about two- 
fneter transceivers^ what brand 
names come to rnind first? 
Chances are, you'll name one of 
the big "full line" Imported 
labels- There is nothing wrong 
with this except that you may be 
overlooking some of the other 
guys. What about firms like 
Azden and KDK? Both concen- 
trate on selling a specific but 
high-quality line of radios. Until 
recently, I dismissed firms like 
these as "also-rans." Then I had 
a chance to revievw KDK's new 
FM-2025A two-meter FM trans- 
ceiver. Now Tm a firm believer. 

The FM-2025A is the latest in 
a series of two-meter mobile rigs 
that are manufactured by 
Kyokuto DenshI Company and 
imported into the United States 
under the KDK name. The 2025 
represents a rather substantial 
departure from the earlier 
models, whfch included the 
201 5R, a great rig once you 
modified it. The staff at KDK has 
learned its lesson well; the FM- 
2025A offers many of the 
features that today's ham ex- 
pects yet it remains simple and 
straightforward to operate. 

Diode Matrix Programming 

Like many of its modern day 
counterparts, the 2025A utilizes 
microprocessor control. In what 
seems like a step into the past, 
KDK has chosen to use a binary- 
coded^decimal diode (BCD) ar- 
ray to act as a program for the 
computer. Shades of the 
venerable I com IC-22S. Or is it? 
Twenty-five diodes are used to 
program such functions as the 
loW'frequency band edge, high- 
frequency band edge, transmit 
high-frequency band edge, a 
choice of S-kHz or 12,5'kHz 
steps, the standard repeater off- 
set, and band-scan step size. 
The unit comes factory pro- 
grammed rn a manner that will 
appeal to the vast majority of 
North American users. However, 
if you move overseas or have a 
need to operate outside of the 
US amateur allocation, it's a 
straightforward task to 
reprogram the KDK to meet your 
new needs. 

118 73 Magazine • February, 1982 



If you are like me^ most of 
your two-meter operating is 
done on a few local repeaters 
with occasional forays to other 
machines if you're traveling- 
Perhaps the easiest way to use 
the KDK IS to program your 
favorite machines into the 
memories. There are two sets of 
memoryp five channels each. 
You can use the channels in- 
dependently or in a duplex mode 
where you receive on the "A" 
channel and transmit on the "B'' 
selection. Since I frequent only a 
few repeaters, I find myself us- 
ing the duplex mode. That way, I 
don't have to worry about 
switching the repeater off- 
set selection when 1 change 
frequencies. 

If you use more than five 
channels on a regular basis, 
then yoy may want to make full 
use of the ten memories by 
employing the offset switch for 
everything but the repeaters 
with oddball splits. The FM- 
2025A includes a nicad battery 
that provides internal backup 
for the memory when the radio 
is switched off. The infinitesi- 
mal 57'nano-ampere current 
drain allows the battery to last 
for as long as one year between 
charges. 

Scanning 

The FM-2025A offers two 
modes of scanning. You can 
search the ten memories for an 
open frequency or for a frequen- 
cy In use. When the channel 
changes status, the receiver 



starts scanning again. If you 
want to lock the rig on frequen- 
cy, just flip the scan control to 
the HOLD position. 

The same optfons are avali- 
able in the band-scan mode. The 
scanning starts with the fre- 
quency stored in memory A5 
and proceeds upward to a limit 
determined by the contents of 
B6. But you can't fool the rig; if 
the B5 frequency is lower than 
the A5 selection, there will be no 
scanning. 

The nice thing about the 
KDK's band scanning Is its zero 
detector. This ensures that 
receiver scanning stops only on 
the center of a signal. The only 
difficulty I encountered came 
when I tried to scan near 144.000 
MHz. An internal spur caused a 
false locking there. 

One useful 2025A extra is a 
built-in tone switch. An internal 
switch allows you to select be- 
tween a continuous tone or a 
hatf'Second lone burst. There is 
no need to run out and buy a 
new encoder if your favorite 
machine goes private. There is 
easy access to adjustments for 
the tone generator's frequency 
and output level 

Procedures like this are ex- 
plained well in the instruction 
manual Unlike many manuals 
that accompany new gear, the 
KDK book is written with the 
assumption that the reader has 
some intelligence; it presents 
more than just an idiot's guide 
to installation. You'll even find 
four pages of technical and ad- 
justment Information plus a 
larger-than-usual schematic 
diagram. 

The KDK's construction is 
nothing short of rugged. The 
vast majority of the rig's cir- 





The KDK VHF FM-2025A transceiver. 



cuitry Is on two boards, with the 
digital based control circuitry 
on one and the rf blocks on the 
other. The lack of interconnect- 
ing wiring harnesses and ca- 
bling leads me to tielieve that 
the 2025A will easily withstand a 
harsh mobile environment. 

The back panel includes a 
jack for an external speaker (an d 
once you have tried this you will 
never settle for a built-in speaker 
again), antenna and power con- 
nectors plus an accessory con- 
nector that includes micro- 
phone input, audio output, 
transmit-receive switching, and 
connection to the IS-volt dc 
power supply. 

Moving back inside, I noticed 
that all of the frequency genera- 
tion and most of the audio cir- 
cuitry was centered around in* 
teg rated components. The rf 
section stUI utilizes a fair 
number of discrete semiconduc- 
tors, but the chip-based 
technology is rapidly closing the 
gap. 

Plus and Minus Points 

With a growing trend towards 
higher power for two-meter 
transceivers, the 2025A holds It 
own with a choice of two power 
levels, either one of which can 
be set between 3 and 25 Watts. 
If you need still more power, 
then consider an amplifier; you 
also get the added advantage of 
a receiver preamplifier that way. 
Unlike most of the other new FM 
rigs appearing on the market, 
KDK retains the traditional d'Ar- 
sonval meter movement for the 
power-oot and signal-strength 
measuring chores. I can't knock 
the newfangled LED bar 
displays without trying them, 
but I do know that the old- 
fashioned meter makes the 
radio look more "professional." 

Among the bells and whistles 
that you won't find on the 2025A 
is a priority channel. Nor is there 
a provision for up/down scan- 
ning via switches on the micro- 
phone. For me, the Jack of these 
features had no effect on my 
operating style. 

Perhaps the biggest draw- 
back of this easy-to-use radio is 
the close proximity of the vol- 
ume/squelch, mode, and memo- 
ry-select knobs. They are alf the 
same size and easily confused if 
you don't glance down at the rig. 

On an overall basis, I give the 
FM-2025A high marks. It 
represents a substantial step 
forward In ease of operation. 



While it doesn't resemble the 
mission-control- panel look 
prevalent on a lot of new ngs, it 
Is a sophisticated, fealure-laden 
radio. It should be especially 
popular with amateurs who 
want a radio they can tmker 
with. The 2Q25A certainly proves 
that KDK is more than just the 
'*other guys" when it comes to 
building radios. 

\n (ate t98i. the FM'2025A 
was priced at $299. For more in- 
formation, contact KDK 
Distributing Co., 617 South 
Gaffatin Road, Madison IN 
37115, Reader service number 
476. 

Tim Daniel NBRK 
73 Magazine Staff 



OFD SYSTEMS 

RT-89 RTTY SYSTEM 

The DFD Systems RT'89 
package Is a dfsk-based RTTY 
system for Heath/Zenith H89 
and H8/H19 computer systems. 
It runs under the Heath Disk 
Operating System (HDOS), pro- 
viding unmatched features and 
tiejcibility for the serious RTTY 
enthusiast. The system is 
designed to operate on a single- 
drive, 48K machine with plenty 
of space (eft over for disk 
read/write files and memory buf- 
fer space. All input/output 
operations are buffered and 
interrupt driven, allowing true 
full duplex (send-whlle-receive) 
Operation and real-time disk file 
read/write capablftties without 
loss of data. 

There are 66 commands im- 
plemented to configure the 
system and control program op- 
eration. In addition, a special 
file. "RTTYINIT.TTY", is auto- 
matically read at program start- 
up time to establish the mttial 
system environment. This frte 
can be indrvidually tailored by 
the user to automatically boot 
the system in any desired con- 
figuration. 

RT'89 will operate at speeds 
of 60, 66, 75, and 100 wpm in the 
Baudot mode^ or at any stan- 
dard ASCII baud rate from 110 to 
19,200, Automatic synchronous 
idle (diddle) may be selected at 
any of these speeds in either 
mode^ and an automatic down^ 
shift-on*spaG©(DSOS) feature is 
selectable in the Baudot mode, 
Af[ CW identification Is 
automatic, including an ID at 
nine-minute intervals during any 
single transmission. This 
feature can be disabled with a 
keyboard command if desired. 



In addition, a CW ID shift control 
and transmitter on/off control 
are available from the computer- 

An automatic drsk log is main* 
tained each time the transmitter 
^s keyed, and mar^ual entries 
may also be Inserted on the log 
at any time with the N= com- 
mand. The time of day is 
automatically recorded with 
each log entry, so the system 
log can also be used as the sta- 
tion log if desiredS 

System tine width can be 
varied from 20 to 80 characters 
since the H89/H19 terminaf has 
a full 80x25 line display. The 
screen is split into four func- 
tional areas; a receive window, a 
transmit and command window^ 
a split-screen and statusdis- 
play bar^ and a "times square*' 
moving-marquee format on the 
25th line that displays the 
transmitted data as it is actually 
transmitted. This latter feature 
is useful when the transmit buf* 
fer has been preloaded or a disk 
file is being transmitted, since 
the transmit window displayed 
the buffer contents as the trans* 
mit buffer was loaded, and the 
25th line actually displays the 
buffer data as It is being sent. 
Therefore, the operator always 
'*sees" what is t>eing transmit- 
ted over the air at any given 
time. The sizes of the receive 
and transmitycommand win* 
dows are dynamically variable 
and may be changed at any time 
during system operation, In fact, 
any commands may be issued 
at any time (except during 
transmit), so there is never a 
need to stop the program to re- 
set any parameters as there is 
on some other systems. 

The system may be directed 
to ignore carriage returns in the 
receive window, thus "packing" 
a maximum amount of data on 
the screen. The carriage returns 
are not ignored, however, on the 
printer or disk files, so the actoal 
format of the received data rs 
not lost (you can write on the 
printer, read and write on disk, 
and receive and transmit all at 
once, in real time, due to the 
interrupt-driven I/O structure). 

Any number of tiles can be 
written to or read from disk at 
any time, and the printer may be 
turned on and off at will, in- 
dependently for received and 
transmitted data! 

A variable-length **word- 
correction buffer" is provided to 
allow correcting of keyed Input 
data prior to its release to the 
system. The length of this buffer 



may be set from 1 to 80 charac- 
ters, and facilitates backspac- 
ing over entry errors and correct* 
Ing them before transmission. 
There are actually two cursors 
displayed on the screen: a 
flashing underline cursor which 
indicates where the word cor- 
rection buffer starts, and a 
destructive block cursor in- 
dicating the next location that 
will be occupied by keyed Input. 
In addition, the system can be 
directed to automatically **wrap 
around ' when the end of a line is 
reached and no carriage return 
is keyed. In this event, the 
system will automatically move 
the last word keyed to the next 
line. If it is incomplete, and Issue 
the carriage return itself. 

An unusual and very en- 
joyable feature provides the 
ability to process RTTY pictures. 
The system may be placed in the 
PIX mode, and overlining will be 
allowed on input and output 
files and the printer. In addition, 
three off-line programs are In- 
cluded with the package that 
will allow one to edit PIX files 
with the standard HDOS text 
editor, and automatically com- 
press and expand those FIX 
flies to conserve disk space. PIX 
files received over the air are ac- 
tually compressed before they 
are written to disk, and com- 
pressed PIX files on disk that 
are read for transmission are 
automatically expanded by the 
system at transmit tfme! 

In addition to the unlimited 
disk file capability, there are 
three temporary single-line buf- 
fers that can be loaded and read 
out using the three colored func- 
tion keys on the H89/H19 
keyboard. These are handy for 
holding cails of current stations 
in QSO or repetitive contest in- 
formation. Other function keys 
can be used to rnsert the current 
date and/or time in the transmit 
buffer. (The time of day is also 
always maintained on the split- 
screen bar.) 

In operation, the TX or TXF 
commands will put the system 
in transmit mode, and a 
CONTROLC will terminate the 
transmit mode. Data can be 
entered into the transmit buffer 
while in receive mode, and that 
data will be transmitted the next 
time TX (transmit) mode Is 
entered. TXF (transmit fast), on 
the other hand, will not send the 
data in tl^e transmit buffer, but 
will only send data keyed from 
the keyljoard. TXF, therefore, is 
used to answer a quick question 

73 



or to send a quick message 
without sending the data In the 
transmit buffer. After TXF, more 
data can be entered Into the 
transmit buffer, if desired. 

Disk-based commands in- 
clude opening and cfosing disk 
tiles for either read or write, 
displaying directories^ deleting 
files, exchanging files, and 
swapping disks in drives 1 and 2. 

Performance 

The RT-BS system has per- 
formed very well for more than a 
year of operation on both the HF 
and VHF bands. The system 
was designed to support Navy 
MARS message traffic as well 
as amateur traffic, and has now 
replaced all mechanical 
teletype equipment at Navy 
MARS stations NNN0AFL and 
NNNOZVW. No system prob- 
lems or failures have yet been 
encountered at either station. 

The system includes com- 
plete operational documenta* 
tron and directions for inierfac- 
ing the computer to a terminal 
unit. The system has been suc- 
cessfully interfaced with a HAL 
ST-B, commercial and home- 
brew Flesher TU'170s» and the 
IRbSOO. The iRL-500 interface 
was the easiest to accomplish 
since it already had inputs and 
outputs to directly interface to 
the computer at RS-232 voltage 
levels. 

Each RT-89 system is per- 
sonally generated for each pur- 
chaser to include the station 
callsign. This callsign is per- 
manently displayed on the split- 
screen bar during system opera- 
tion and is used In generating 
the CW identification. Minimum 
hardware requirements are an 
HStwith an H19 terminal) or HS9 
computer, a single disk drive, 
and 48K memory. HDOS is also 
required to operate the system. 
The package consists of the pro- 
grams on a 5V4" diskette and an 
instruction manual. The cost Is 
S39.95, For further information, 

contact DFD Systems, 4W5 N. 

107th Street, Omaha NE 68134. 
Reader Service number 477. 

Dick Jugel K9DG 
8014 Taylor Circle 

Omaha NE 



INTERFERENCE HANDBOOK 

Whether the alphabet-soup 
nomenclature Is TVI, RFI, or 
EMI, interference is a constant 
threat to the radio amateur, lurk- 
ing in the shadows, waiting to 

Magazine • February, 1982 119 



turn docile neighbors into a 
horde of angry enemies. Even 
though tue war against interfer 
ence has just tegun, there is 
hope tor the ham-radio army- 
Radio Publications' new book. 
Interference Handbook, is des- 
tined to become a biUe for the 
tactlcs-mmded foot soldier. The 
author of interference Hand- 
book knows what he is talking 
about; William Nel&on WA6FQG 
is the veteran of sixteen years of 
trench warfare as an RFI in- 
vestigator for Southern Califor- 
nia Edison Company. 

RFi has plagued us ever since 
Marconi made his first transmis- 
sions nearly a century ago. 
While moderfi'day legislators 
and manufacturers grapple over 



a long-term sofutfon, the prob- 
lem gets worse and the poor 
radio amateur is caught in the 
middle. The approach that fn- 
terference Handbook takes is 
best summarized by the quote: 
'The purpose of this handbook 
is to Dutime the many sources of 
Interference; explain how to 
eliminate or reduce them; and 
tell you how to protect yourself 
against RFI. The causes and 
cures of RFI are discussed in 
nontechnical language that Is 
easy to read and understand." 

The topics discussed range 
from interference caused by 
home appliances and the RFI 
emitted by power lines to the 
misunderstood role that hams 
and CBers play in causing and 



solving Interference problems. 
Along the way. the author gives 
case histories based on his 
years as an investigator. 

Tips for locating interference 
with inexpensive gear are ac- 
companied by descriptions of 
commercial and homemade 
cures. The contents will be ot in- 
terest to anyone who deals with 
electronics. This could include 
the members of a radio club In^ 
terference committee or a music 
lover who is plagued with auto- 
mobile ignition noise. The t>ook 
is rounded out with a listing of 
addresses for gaining help from 
manufacturers. 

Interference can work t)cth 
ways as evidenced by recent ex- 
periences at the 73 Magazine 



ham shack; Several months ago, 
a pulsating noise of unknown 
origin kept us bewildered (and 
off the air) for several weeks. 
More recent ly» a neighbor has 
complamed abouX TVI that may 
be the result of our station. In 
both of these cases, a volume 
like the 247-page Interference 
Handbook would have helped to 
reduce the mystery and ag- 
gravation for everyone involved. 
A paperback edition of In- 
terference Handbook is 
available from the publisher^ 
Radio Publications, Box J49, 
Wifton CT 06397, or 73's Radio 
Bookshof}, Peterborough NH 
03455. 

Tim Daniel N8RK 
73 Magazine Staff 



LETTERS 



[ 



QRZ CONTEST? 



The weekend is here, I canl 
wait to get my cup of coffee, go 
downstairs and turn on the rig, 
and relax with some CW. 
Cranked up the old workhorse, 
my TR4'C, switched on the 
keyer. I love CW. my phase of en- 
joying ham radio, and spend 
most of the time on 20 meters 
and a little on 40 meters. 

Here comes the audio, and 
what? Not again! The entire 
band loaded! Another contest? I 
thought they just finished one; 
you know how time flies, t must 
admit I have l^een in only one 
con lest, in the early 60s, and 
cannot rememt>er what it was 
for, but learned it was not for 
me. There are no redeeming fac- 
tors in them that I can see. A 
field day or emergency prepar- 
edness operation so as to be 
able to get a station on the air 
fast in almost any location, por- 
tabie, of course, to assist those 
in need of help, I am all for with- 
out exception, but to sit for 1 2 or 
24 hours at a key or a micro- 
phone cau^ng a traffic jam 
worse than the California free- 
ways ever saw is a gross waste 
of time and energy. 

I enjoy a good rag chew— or 
at least to find out more than a 
QTH and a name that's in the 
Ca//i)0O/r— talking over your ex* 
perienceSt experiments, good or 



bad. is a greater way to enjoy 
one*s on-air time. 

Let's think about it; contest 
weekend as it appears to me 
seems to relate itself to the 
opening of hunting season, the 
night before everyone partici- 
pating making final prepara- 
tions, checking their '*guns" for 
the big day. From cannons to 
peashooters they are all ready. 
The clock is ticking away the 
last few minutes before the ac- 
tion begins. The beams are 
poised at each other, power sup- 
plies humming away, fingers be- 
gin twitching, one ready to 
send, one ready to record the 
contacts, then bang! A solid 
wail of rf rips through the ether 
and for the next day the battle 
for t he climb to the top rages on. 
Stepping on each other, over, 
under, and around. When Ihe 
period of time for the contest is 
over and the electromagnetic 
radiations clear, the battlefiled 
can be seen strewn with broken 
and mangled coffee cups, smok- 
ing ballpoint pens, splinters of 
pencils, and scraps ot paper. 
The casualties are entering the 
''hospitals'' with keyer finger, 
tennis wrist, another fomn of 
keyer finger, and ear-ring: a new 
one, being a depression in a cir- 
cular fashion around both ears, 
manifested by a constant series 
of tone bursts that won't 
subside. 

Why so many contests? 



ArenM there enough awards to 
be gotten on one's own without 
the additional promotion of con- 
test after contest? I wouid like 
someone to reply and let me 
know. 

Mow don't get me wrong. I 
have gotten a few of those 
symptoms myself. What I am 
trying lo say is those who prefer 
contests are good hams, they 
enjoy their phase of ham radio, a 
great hobby filled with very nice 
people. But all 1 ask for us m the 
apparent minority is that on 
those special weekends, those 
who sanction such contests 
tfiink, think of the other hams 
who are not participating and 
leave at least 10 or 15 kHz aside 
for those of us who would like to 
just get on and relax with a good 
QSO, be it CW or SSB. 

Why should the bands be to* 
tally monopolized during these 
periods? A toi of us just do not 
have the time to spend on the 
bands and really look forward to 
our weekend operation. 

Gary L. Jackson N2ACX 

Delron NJ 

N2ACX UR 599 Nh DE WB8BTH 
BK. 



THANK YOU, ERIC 



Zl 



As a subscriber, I feel it is my 

duty to inform you of the good 
job you are doing. I am a new 
subscriber to your magazine 
and I love it I I am 13 years old 
and a General class ham. My fa- 
ther is also a ham and he likes 
your magazine, too. Between my 
father and I we receive GST. 
Ham Radio, CO. 73, and CVRA- 



SERA Journal We enjoy your 
magazine the best. The $25 is 
well worth it. I find many inter- 
estlng articles In your magazine. 
In QST, Ham Radio, and CO f 
rarely find a really good article. 
Many times the advertisements 
are the best things in QST\ I 
can't say QST Is a bad maga- 
zine — it has many important ref- 
erences. The other magazine 
(journal), CVRASERA Journal, 
is a great magazine. I find it and 
73 the most interesting. 

Thank you for your time, I just 
wanted to tell you how great 
your magazine fs. Keep up the 
good workl 

Eric Lasslter KA4KEG 
Danville VA 



WIN SOME. LOSE SOM 



El 



The last of the ham radio 
pubtrshers bit the dust! I never 

thought you would pass us off 
for the quack electronics, but 
my new Decemt>er issue with 
satellite TV, computer scanners, 
and all really opened the oid 
eyes. I think Til go back to model 
trains. I get enough of the elec- 
tronic garbage at work all day. 
NO renewal for me next spring. 

Ed Chenoweth K4HYG 
Zephyrtiills FL 

Sorry to fose you, Ed. but we do 
have to bang news of what is 
happening in electronics to 
those amateurs who are helping 

the hobby to grow, . . who are in- 
terested m things beyond spark 
gaps, t realtze that not all hams 
are going to be inventing and 
pioneering new techniques, bat 



120 73Magaiine • February, t982 



/ had hoped that those who are 
more interested in takmg a free 
ride on the shoulders of those 
who are doing the work would at 
feast be honorable enough to 
read about It and cheer them on 
instead of frying to shoot them 
down.^Wayne, 




Seldom do I write to the editor 
of a magazine, but every once in 
a WfhIJe something will catch my 
eye. Such was the case when 
you asked in the October 73 
Magazine what we could do to 
spur the growth of ham radio. 

Let me state that I am flatly 
opposed to no-code licenses. 
We already have them m the 
form of citizens band commun- 
ications (I use the word "com- 
munications" with some res- 
ervation in this case), and I 
for one don1 want 15-meter 
phone sounding Hke that. J really 
can't imagine that you do efther. 
Now to the basic question: 
What can we do? 

1. We can exert pressure on 
the Federal Commuoicallons 
Commissfon through our elect- 
ed representatives to take the 
tricks out of amateur exams. For 
exampfe, a friend recently took 
(and passed) the Extra class ex^ 
amination in Boston. Part of 
his code proficiency test m- 
volved the apparent word 
"Sprfngfieid," but on the tape 
II was sent '^Cprlngfield," Grant* 
ed, this qufckie will determine 
If the examinee Is paying abso- 
lute attention, but does it 
prove anything else? Is this the 
type of thing one would encoun- 
ter in a normal QSO (which the 
tape is supposed to emulate)? f 
think not. 

Z We can stop regarding our- 
selves as an elitist group. While 
my previous reference to citi- 
zens band could be construed 
as elitist— and perhaps It Is— 
we must recognize that our hob- 
by is no better than that of any^ 
one else. If a CBef wants to be a 
CBer, then so be it. If an audio- 
ph//e gets enjoyment from his 
"things' then (et him. We should 
not continue with the attitude 
that everyone in electronics 
either should ^'progress" inlo 
the ham fraternity or be rele- 
gated to second class. Perhaps 
if we are less pushy more people 
would want to join us. 

3. Along the same lines, we 
should make more of an effort to 
help the newcomer. We spend a 



lot of time and effort getting 
people into ham radio through 
Novice classes, but how many 
Novices have given up on our 
hobby because the Techs, Gen- 
erals, Adva needs, and Extras 
were too busy with their own in^ 
terests to give a hand after the 
newcomer got that much-antici- 
pated ticket? If youVe not really 
sure of what youVe doing and 
there's no one to help, amateur 
radio can be pretty confusing. 
Take the time to help a Novice; 
you may be saving tomorrow's 
Extra class licensee, 

4. Again, along the elitist line, 
we need to have more of those 
'in the know" willing to make 
what they know readily avails 
able. It does not seem consis- 
tent to this writer that an editor 
of a widely-read ham publica^ 
tion could advocate the spread 
of our hobby on the one hand 
and then ask $1,000 or more tor 
a speaking engagement at a 
hamfest on the other. Granted, 
Dayton and Birmingham can 
probably afford this tariff, but 
Windsor (our local hamfest) 
can't, and Windsor is more likely 
to touch a greater number of 
new and prospective hams in 
central Maine than are Dayton 
and Birmingham combined. 
Please don't take this as a per* 
sonal attack, Wayne, but you did 
ask for constructive ideas. 

5. We need more affordable 
equipment designed for begin- 
ning amateurs. Unfortunately, 
our hobby is pricing itself out of 
the reach of many would-be 
joiners because they can't af- 
ford a Kenwood TS-530, an loom 
720A, or an Astro T50. What we 
need are more Ten-Tec Century 
21s thai lei the little guy get his 
feet wet with new (a Novice 
doesn't need the problems 
which often come with used 
gear), reasonably priced, and ef- 
fective equipment. 

6. Finally — for now, at 
least— we need effective repre- 
sentation in the FCC. Some 
government commissions are 
required to reflect in their mem- 
bership the interests of those 
that ihey regulate. Why not a 
ham as a required commission- 
er, and a CBer, too? Who knows 
better what we want than one of 
our own? Certarnfy not some 
politician from the "in" party 
who had the misfortune of los- 
ing in the last election. 



and different fdeas. I wouldn't 
even object if theirs were better. 

BiflCrowtey K1NIT 
Ha Howell ME 

No offense. Biff; the $1,000 goes 
for a special fund for promoting 
amateur radio, not into the gen- 
eral coffers. Without that limita- 
tion rve found that i am getting 
dozens of invitations to taik. 
few of which would be possitle 
for me. Thus, this is a fil- 
ter, . . and also a benefit for am- 
ateur radio. You're right about 
the tricky exams, . . there is no 
excuse for them. There wilt be 
cheaper ham gear for beginners 
when we have enough begin- 
ners to make it profitable to 
make the stuff. Remember that 
plenty of equipment has been 
put on the market in the past, 
but it has not been continued 
due to an almost total lack of 
newcomers. And took what hap^ 
pened to the newcomer maga- 
iine. Ham Horizons]- Wayne 

THE HEATH SNOOZE 



' have just finished the con- 
version of my Heathkit clock as 
stated in the November issue of 
73 h4agazine ("Extra Accuracy 
for Heathkit Clocks," page 124). 
There were no conversion or 
cross-reference fists at any of 
the local Radio Shack stores for 
a switch with part number 275- 
430. f could have used another 
RS switch, but keeping with 
amateur radio practice I quickly 
realized that the Alarm Set 
Switch (SW3) could be used and 
the oid Snooze Alarm Switch 
(SW2) wired in Its place. It Is a (it- 
tie cumbersome to use fn set- 
ting the alarm, but then I don't 
use this function. My clock 
works as stated in the article. 

The wiring is done in the same 
manner as Art N5AEN stated, 
and the new SW3 is wired as 
shown in the clock manual 

Others may be Interested in 
this miser's scheme to beat 
down the rising cost of ham 
radio. 

rve enjoyed 73 hAagazine and 
will continue to do so. 

Jack Gamar KB7HH 
Phoenfx AZ 



cjally interested In the radar 
devices you use and test. My 
mobile friends tell me the de- 
vices are not very good any- 
more. The policeman with the 
gun pops It on and gets a read- 
ing and you are hooked. No 
more carrier to seek out. I don't 
travel much anymore, but I do 
have a new approach to traffic 
tickets. 

I propose a tape-deck player 
and a speciaJfy^prepared deck 
that starts with fifteen seconds 
of sofi music. an<^ men a con- 
vincing commercial announcer 
who breaks in with the news 
that the USA is being attacked 
by USSR missiles and the Presi- 
dent is on his way by helicopter 
to the Virginia underground 
shelter. . .all citizens are to go 
to any nearby shelter. News 
flashes give reports of missiles 
twenty minutes from Chicago, 
Detroit, Washington,,, 

I think by this time the trooper 
IS on his way and you are free to 
go to your destination. 

Just don't get stopped by the 
same guy the second tima 

£d Kirchhuber K4JK 
Elkmont AL 



Fiendish. .J like iff The radar 
gun? I've only run into one once 
in New Hampshire so far, so it 
isn*t much of a problem here, fn 
that case, / got plenty of warn- 
ing before I even got close due 
to the sensitivity of the superhet 
detector and was safely not 
transmitting on two meters 
when I went through the check 
point. Your detector should pick 
it up a half-mile to a mile away 
and give you plenty of warning 
to stop transmitting so you 
won t rack up a speeding ticket 
even when you are moseymg 
atong at 55 per. The officer gen- 
eratfy takes a shot at a car 
ahead of you and you pick up 
that blast. This also gives you a 
chance to check your speed, 
which averages around 70 mph 
on most of our interstates.— 
Wayne, 




Well, Wayne, there you have 
it. I hope this letter will prompt 
others to put on their thinking 
caps and come up with more 




When 1 read QST, j first look at 
the silent keys. With your 73, I 
read the editorial I was espe- 



Those of you who have been 
around ham radio for more than 
a few years undoubtedly remem- 
ber Gus Browning's fabulous 
OXpedittons of the 50s and early 
60s. Welt, W4BPD is back at it 
again and will be sending us 
monthly reports on the progress 
of his current round-the-world 
trip. Welcome aboard 73, Gus! 



73 Magazine • February, 1982 121 



This ifttle episode is being 
written while we are at anchor 
down in Florida awaiting a few 
minor repairs to be completed 
on the boat, but by the time you 
read H we will be somewhere in 
the Caribbean. We have named 
the ship DX since DX is what it's 
all about with us. Our mail ad- 
dress from now until this trip is 
completed is just "DX, 29039. 
USA/' 

A friend of mine talked with 
me up at DXPO 80 last Septem- 
ber and asked mo the question, 
'*Have you ever thought about 
another DXpedition, Gus?'* 

You know what my answer 
was (''I have the time if you have 
the money"), and he said that 
money was no problem! It ended 
up that a boat was purchased 
and the old rat race of getting it 
shipshape for a real DXpedition 
began. The resutt is that here we 
are about to take off for the com- 
/j/e/e Caribbean tour; we'll goto 
every country down there that 
we can get permission to oper- 
ate from. (They tell me that 11- 
censing is no problem at almost 
every one of them.) 

This feller Wayne Green must 
have lots of pull somewhere be- 
cause both on our way from An- 
napolis to Beaufort, South 
Carolina, and then again from 
Beaufort down here, I saw a sign 
on the Inland Waterway on the 
left side each time with the num- 
bers 73 on a green background. 
And this Wayne Green don't fool 
around, neither, because when I 
mentioned writing a series of 
letters for 73 Magazine, he said, 
'^Don't stand there, start 
writing." So here I am doing just 
that. 

This DXpedition should be 
considerably different from the 
others I have been on. This Is 
planned to be an island-hoppmg 
DXpedition with inland excur- 
sions when it's possible and 
worthwhile from a DX viewpoint. 
We will be going by the seat of 
our pants all the way. This DX- 
pedition by boat sure will be a 
lot better than the other ways I 
have used before, and it sure will 
be lots cheaper to charter a ship 
than to spend anywhere from 
$100 on up per day the way I've 
done it many times before. 
Since 99% of our traveling will 
be sailing, using the wind for 
power, it will be very interesting 
to see how our overall expenses 
compare with those of trips 
when other means of transpor- 
tation were used. 

The purpose of the first por- 



tion of this trip will be twofold: 
We will be shaking down the 
boat and we will be trying to see 
how we get along with each 
other being cooped up over long 
periods of time in a small space. 
There are three of us— myself, 
my XYL, Peggy, and Sam, a WA3 
from the Washington DC area 
who purchased the boat. So far 
we are quite compatible, though 
at times a little touchy with 
each other, which we all 
expected before we ever got 
started. 

Our tentative plans are to 
cover the Caribbean, probably 
taking until the next hurricane 
season, which starts next June. 
Then we will sail back to Beau- 
fort to have the boat gone over 
with a fine-tooth comb and to 
visit all the grandchildren, the 
kids, and our friends. We'll 
restock the boat's larder, tight- 
en up all the bolts and nuts, 
and then take off for the Pana- 
ma Canal, the big, wide Pa- 
cific, and all those countries out 
there waiting for us to Dxpedite. 
If things are still "go," then we 
will continue on around the 
world, hitting as many spots as 
we can along our line of travel. 
We won't mind deviating from 
this line of travel a few hundred 
miles when, from a DX view- 
point, it looks like that's what we 
should do. 

The very first thing we all 
agreed upon was that we 
wanted this trip to be a safe one. 
Since we have no set date to be 
anywhere along our route, we 
can always wait for the weather 
to get right before we depart 
from spot A to go to spot B. If all 
three of us like a certain place 
and want to spend a few more 
days or even weeks there, we 
willdojustthat.Thiswill more or 
less be a leisure trip with DXpe- 
ditioning a first priority on our 
list. Right now, we are at the 
creeping stage; we hope to be at 
the walking stage when I write 
the next installment, and at the 
running stage from there on out. 

We have a very good ship, an 
O'Day 37 (measuring 37 feet 
long and 11 feet across). How 
would you like to make some- 
thing like this your complete 
home for up to five years? It will 
be on the rough side, but we will 
be in there trying our best to 
stick it out. Our ship is fully 
equipped with all the very latest 
gear We have a satellite naviga- 
tor that does a better job of pin- 
pointing our position than most 
maps, We have a good radio 



direction finder^ a good VHF 
transceiver, and, of course, a 
sextantp which I have practiced 
on for months. I still need more 
practice to get good on It. We 
have a huge pile of maps and 
charts but will need many more 
when we get to the Pacific and 
other oceans on our way around 
the world. 

We will be taking it easy along 
the way and hamming as much 
as possible. We plan to use both 
CW and SSB on equal terms, go- 
ing by the apparent needs of the 
fellows. We have the full Ten- 
Tec line of gear, their Omni-C, 
Hercules linear, electronic key- 
er, and antenna tuner for the 
long wires we may put up for the 
low bands. I cannot get over the 
Ten-Tec's fast break-in, the no 
tuning when you change bands, 
and the almost silent receiver 
when you disconnect the anten- 
na. As a back-up, we have Ten- 
Tec's Delta. Our antenna is a 
TET and it will get a real test of 
endurance on this trip. As you 
can see, we're delighted with 
the equipment we have. 

QSLs will go out three dif^ 
ferent ways. When we have time 
after the trip, every QSO in the 
logs will go out via bureaus. The 
second way of QSLing will be 
direct to those who send their 
cards to out "DX 29039 USA" 
headquarters and contribute 
$1.00 to help us defray the cost 
of QSLs, postage, and Girl Fri- 
day making them out. The third 
method will be direct from the 
spot where we work you or, if 
necessary, from the next spot 
we operate, to those making a 
$2.00 contribution to help us 
with expenses. (We do not ex- 
pect to come anywhere near 
breaking even on our expenses.) 

I don't think we can help any^ 
one with 300 or more countries, 
but we might be able to help you 
if you have 200 or so. Maybe we 
will help some of you on 40, 80. 
or 160 meters. Later on we may 
use other means and ways of 



communications. We are* of 
course, open to your sugges- 
tions. We may or may not follow 
them, but '1ry us"— hi. 

On CW, look for us 25 kHz 
from the low end, except on 160, 
80, and maybe even 40. On SSB, 
when we are not under FCC 
rules, we will try using more or 
less these frequencies: 28490, 
21190, 14105, 7090, 3790 kHz; 
and on 160— who knows, hi- But 
once we settle down on the ir^ 
quencles we want to use, these 
will be where we will always be 
founds plus or minus QRM. I can 
promise you I wiil never get mad 
at anyone on the entire trip. A 
real nuisance to us may have a 
difficult job getting our OSL for 
his contact— the last laugh will 
be us doing the laughing, hi. 

Up to now, there has been 
very little contributing or donat- 
ing by anyone, so I am under 
obligation to just a few and I 
know who they are. I don't mind 
tail-enders or any other way you 
can come up with to get your 
call in my log, I try to work the 
weak ones first, so if you are 
QRO please go QRP if you want 
to work us first, hi. At times we 
will QSY into the Novice bands 
and will usually be tuning in the 
parts of the band Generals can 
use. But you had better have 
wide shift-split capabilities, or 
you may miss us. Occasionally, 
we will use transceive, but don't 
depend on this mode for many 
contacts with us. I say get your- 
self an outboard vfo and join in 
with the real DXers. 

There will not be any of this 
list type of stuff on this DXpedi- 
tion— if you want to QSO, get in 
there and work me. I don't want 
any of this stuff: "Gus^ so and so 
said you are Q5-S7"; I want to 
hear that report and call myself 
without any assistance from 
helpers on the sidelines. 

That's it for this episode, 
fellows— 73 de Gus 8PD. 

Gus Browning W4BPD 



MM HELP 



I am fn need of technlcaf Infor- 
mation for the RCA AR88D re- 
ceiver. I am also looking for a 
24-hour brass ship's clock. 

Mickey McOaniel W6FGE 

940 Tempie St. 

San Diego CA 92106 



I am searching for informa- 
tion on the use of electric limit 
switches with a Tnasto TX-455 
crank-up tower. 

Don Greenwood KC8GZ 
2687 Timothy Place 

Wooster OH 44691 



122 73Magaifn& • February, 1982 



FUN! 




John Edwards Kf2U 
78-56 Beth Street 
GfendafeNY 11385 



HAMS AND COMPUTERS 

Shh! Keep this quiet! Don't tell anyone, but I think microcom- 
puters are taking over amateur radio. 

Take last Friday, for instance- I'm working this station on 
CW— AF2M, I think the call was— and he's telling me about his rig, 
the weather, and all those other things that make QSOs so in- 
teresting. Then, alJ of a sudden, something must have blown in his 
shack because he just keeps sending "599, 599, 599. . ."After about 
10 minutes of having my signal verif ied^ it dawns on me— AF2M is a 
machine! Egad! This is worse than CB. At ieast on the chicken band 
you pick up animals, not androids. 

it's scary. So scary, in fact, that I decided to write a column about 
ham radio and microcomputers. Hme it Is but don't tell anyone. I 
hate to be an alarmist. Where the heck did 1 put my nightlight? 



ELEMENT 1— CROSSWORD PUZZLE 
(lllustratian 1) 

Across 



1 Letters and numerals 

8 Below high frequency (abbr.) 

9 Direct memory access 
(abbr) 

10 Computer lingo 
13 Package type (abbr.) 
15 Operating position 
18 line 



19 Former big-time computer 
manufacturer {abbr.) 

20 Program that revises (2 
words) 

22 And off 

23 Data processing (abbr.) 
25 Bulletin board (abbr.) 

27 Semiconductor type (abbr.) 
29GOSUB 



























1 




2 


3 




4 




5 




6 




7 




1 


8 


g 






12 




14 




■ 










9 






to 




11 








13 








^H 






17 






21 


1 




15 




16 








^B 


















19 




20 
















1 






g 










1 




1 


22 


29 


23 


24 


1 


25 


f?^^ 


27 






28 


■ 








■ 


B 





















Down 

i Computer use 

2 Scheme 

3 Below VHF (abbr.) 

4 They bought micro for shut- 
tle (abbr.) 

5 Statement of condition 

6 "Only" type of memory 

7 User 



11 Crummy software often runs 
out of this 

12 Golly 

14 Instruction 

16 To follow immediately 

17 Bright diodes (abbr.) 
21 Memory type (abbr.) 
24 Cycles in a second 

26 Smallest computer unit 
28 fj 



ELEMENT 2-MULTIPLE CHOICE 

1) Computers can exchange information by using a code known as 
ASCII. What does this acronym stand for? 

1. American Standard Code for interchanging 

Information 

2. American Standard Code for Information 

Interchange 

3. American Standard Code for Interconnecting 

Information 

4. American Standard Code II 

2) Who was Herman Hollerith? 

1. Father of the punch card 

2. Father of punched paper tape 
3.! Inventor of the floppy disk 

4. Inventor of the CRT 

3) What are "Napier'^ Bones"? 

1. The remains of August Napier, inventor of the 

first analog computer 

2. The first pocket calculator, named for the 

device'3 ivory color 

3. A figment of the imagination 

4 Ivory rods which, when placed next to each 
other, can be used for multiplication 
calciiiations 

4) An "automaton" is: 

1. A mechanism under the constant control of its 

own resident intelligence 

2. A mechanism under the constant control of a 

human or other external inteliigence 

3. A mechanism under the constant control of a 

programming routine previousiy supplied 
by an external inteliigence 

4. A waste of time 

5) How many laws of robotics did Isaac Asimov detail in his book 
I Robots 

1. One 2. Two 3. Three 4. Four 



ELEMENT 3— TRUE-FALSE 



True 



False 



Illustration 1. 



1) HAL, the computer in 2001: A Space 
Odyssey, was built at the Hal Plant in 
Urbana, Illinois, on January 12, 1997. 

2) Speaking of HAL, his name stood for 
Heuristically-pfogrammed ALgorith- 
mic computer, 

3) The word ^' robot" was coined by 
Czechoslovakian author Karel Capek 
in his play R.U.R. 

4) An early electronic computer, ENtAC 
(1946), contained 19,000 vacuum 
tubes. 

5) After ENIAC, there was a computer 
caiied MANIAC. 

6) PASCAL, the computer language, 
was named after Blaise Pascal, a 
17th century French philosopher. 

7) The ' Computerlst's Code" states 
that a computer user should never 
use his equipment to harm anyone. 

73 Magazine 



February, 1982 123 



8) BASIC is a high-level language. 

9) Bubble memory uses microscopic 
magnetic bubbles, 

10) CPU stands for "Control Program- 
ming Unit," 



READER'S CORNER 

Do you have a ham-related puzzle you would like to share with 
FUN'S readers? Then send it in for a chance to see your name in 
print. This month's contribution is by Joe Strolin K1 REC, of Norwalk, 
Connecticut. 



ELEMENT 4— HIDDEN WORDS 
(Illustration 2) 

Hidden in this puzzle are words representing 15 different com- 
puter terms. The words are formed In any direction— horizontally, 
vertically, or diagonally, forwards or backwards. As you find each 
wordj circle it. 



MAGtC SQUARE 
(Illustration 3) 

Circle any number, then cross out all numbers In the same row 
and column. Do this until only one number is left, to get the 
message. 

Send in your answers. We'll print the name and call of everyone 
who solved the puzzle. 



G 


W 


Z M 


A 


T 


R 


L 





A 


D 


E 


P 


T 


1 


A 




A R 


1 


A 


D 


A 


B 


A 


E 


A 





A 


S 


R 


D 


B 


R 


L 


W 


N 


C 


1 


B 


A 


U 


D 


R 


B 


D 


A A 


Y 


A 


X 


1 


H 


N 


U 


C 


E 


L 


E 



A 


1 


Y 


R 





M 


E 


M 


F 


E 


G 


G 


N 


U 


A 


G 


E 


R 


A 


P 


B 


N 


R 


i 


C 


V 


S 


A 


M 


T 


E 


A 


R 


C 


1 


S 


T 


E 


E 


D 


K 


G 


T 


N 


T 


J 





B 








T 


S 


T 


R 


A 


P 


T 


H 


D 


R 


R 


W 


D 


M 


u 


N 


A 


R 


E 


A 


A 


G 


R 


1 


A 


E 


H 


S 


P 


1 


D 


P 


X 


S 


G 


T 


L 


V 


A 


H 


T 


H 


1 


1 


J 


E 


R 


C 


s 


A 


R 


Y 


E 


S 


C 


N 


N 





L 


T 


N 


A 


D 


D 


R 


E 


S 


S 


K 


W 


1 


E 


s 


E 


J 


L 


A 


D 


D 


P 


T 


N 


E 


E 





R 


D 


G 


R 





E 


F 


S 


G 


S 


Y 


D 


O 


N 


L 


P 


W 


R 


E 


H 


Y 


R 


A 


N 




B 


A 


R 


R 


F 



14 


15 


13 


16 


13 


14 


12 


15 


21 


99 


20 


23 


23 


1 

24 


99 


25 



lilustration 3. 



Iliustration 2. 



THE ANSWERS 

Element 1: 
See Illustration 1A. 
Biement 2: 
1)— 2, And you know what great stuff American Standard makes. 
2)— 1. Ever noticed how these cards are only a little larger than a 
dollar bill? That's because HH used the dollar bill of his 
time {1890} as the template for his card. He invented the 
card and its reader for use in the US census. 
3>— 4- Scottish inventor John Napier (1550-1617} developed this 
precursor to the slide rule. 



ALP 


H A 


N U Mi 


ERIC 


pMl 


fH 


aHo 


■ eMo 


rIa^H 


sId 


M aIm 


LAN 


G U 


A GiE 


O^^T 

rHr 


1 P^Ia^HeH 


n1 


S 


L EH 

eIM 


aWe 


^H 


TEX 


tT 


D 1 T 


nIIm 


D P 


SIH 

BB B 

Hi 1 


|m S 

■■It 


■s u 


B R 


OUT 


1 N Ell 



Illustration 1A. 
124 73Maga2ine • February, 1982 



R 
P 



N O 




W R E H (y R A N I 




B 



P 
O 



U 



E 
N 
A 
T 
H 
R 



T I 
A S 



d) R 



L 
U 
M 
N 
D 
1 




T L V A 



E S 



A/t) D R [ E 1 S S) K 



E E 

DON 

1)A R R 



E 
A 

T 

R 
A 
H 
C 
W 
O 



^ 



ilfustration 2A. 



4)— 3. 1 is an android, 2 is a robots and 4 is what noting tiie dif- 
ferences iS. 
S>— 3, And if you break one of the three, you 11 gel a robot fine. 
Element 3: 

1)— True Long way from the ST-5000, Dr. Chandra. 

2)— True Try saying that 10 times, fast. 

3(— True Rossum's Universal Robots, 

4)— False Ha-ha; sHghtly under IS.CXX). 

5)— True Engineers just love snappy acronyms. 



6)"True Blaise Pascal (1623-1662), who, after a day of philoso- 

phi?fngp would tinker with his adding machine. 
7)— False The computerisrs what? 
8)— True Afso the most popular, as if you didn't (tnow. 
9) — True And if you took through a microscope^ yoLt can even 

see them move. 
10}— False Central Processing Unit 
Efement 4: 
See lltustratton 2A. 



SCORING 

Element 1: 

Twenty-five points for the completed puzzle, or Vi point for each 

question correctly answered. 

Eiement 2: 

Five points for each correct answer. 

Element 3: 

Two and 1/2 points for each correct answer. 



Eiement 4: 

Two points for each word found. 

Are you digitally inclined? 

1-20 points— Still mad at the government for outlawing 

spark. 
points — Thinks computers might have a future, 
points— Likes to play with display computers in 

stores. 
points- Owns a nice, sensible computer system, 
points— Home-brews own computer. 



21^-40 
41-60 

61-80 
81-100 + 



/IIVARDS 



Biil Gosn&y KE7C 
Micro-80, Inc. 
2665 North Busby Road 
Oak Harbor WA 98277 

WAT AWARD 

The Cabin Fever Radio Club 
of Tok, Alaska, offers a cer- 
tificate for contacting three 
amateurs in Tok. There are no 
band or mode restrictions. 
However, all contacts must be 
made after December 15, 1980, 
to be considered valid. 

To apply, prepare a list of con- 
tacts in order by callsign. In- 
clude the name of the station 
operator, the date and time 
worked in GMT, and the mode 
and band of operation. OSLs not 
required. Amateurs located in 
Tok include AL70, AL7B0, 
AL7BV. and WL7APG. 



Send your application with 
$2.00 or 10 IRCs to: Cabin Fever 
Radio Cfub. Box 451, Tok AK 
99780. 

WORKED ALL FORGOTTONtA 

Announcing the awards pro- 
gram sponsored by LEARC, the 
Lamoine Emergency Amateur 
Radio Cfub of Macomb, Illinois. 
The Worked Forgotten la award 
is issued amateurs who confirm 
contact with three (3) licensed 
amateurs of Forgottonia. The 
Worked ALL Forgottonia is 
awarded operators confirming 
contact with at least one 
amateur in each of the sixteen 
counties of Forgottonfa. 

What is Forgottonia? It is the 
51st state! It consists of the 
tollowing counties, formerly 



W 



a^mimmA^oK 



'dBS€0' 



wesi central Illinois: Adams, 
Brown, Calhoun, Cass, Fulton, 
Greene, Hancock, Henderson, 
Knox, McDonough, Mercer, 
Morgan, Pike, Schuyler, Scott, 
and Warren counties. 

All contacts must be made 
after June 28, 1980. to be valid. 
From the letter we received from 
the club, the award evidently 
is Issued at no charge since no 
remittance was mentioned- For- 
ward your list of verified 
contacts and a 9" x 12" SASE 
to the attention, of AG9Y, c/o 



LEARC, l224MapleAvenuepMa' 
comb IL 61455. 

JUNIATA VALLEY 

In March, the Juniata Valley 
Amateur Radio Club (JVARC> 
will be celebrating its 25th year 
as a bona fide club. In honor of 
the event, they will be operating 
a special event station. The club 
station Is K3DNA, located in 
Lewistown PA {Mjfflfn county). 
Having started operation fn 
January, %hQ\T heavy operation 
is scheduled for the month of 



^ < 



THiS CiBrffWAfB fS AWARDED tN RfCOGmnON Of SUPfmR DPfBAfm Smi 
Am NQ8LE DiD/CATm TO TmmH£ST PmCfPUS OfAmnUH ffADIO. 

me REcmmr has QEmmiRATm these AimBms by MAms rm wav MDfo 

COmACT WiTH A UCEmEQ AMATim W EACH Of THE SIXT^N COUNTIES Of 

^BGOTTQMA, "^* 



// 



<?^ 



OPE/tATOff 



£^€ 



WAHftiH 



JJAjM 




STATION ^D? X y^L 



^ # n> H i JH i 1 



\ 



fOHGOTTOmA ^ THE Stsr STATE Of T^ iMM&i. matm Y WEST C&fTfmL MmOfS 

tr WAS fomoED m 1373 wheh the naif Mtam ftESiOfNTS Of THE AREA /minm 

rmr wEfiE ommG mAt^i r mFA^ABtE ffOAOS. SEHtom wbr ammm to tmoEfi 

ftmED scMtrng Am sEm monEO or Mi iimois officms emceft rm 

DEPAffTMmtT iff jRfl^iftM, 



73 Magazine • February, 1982 125 



March. The station will operate 
on different bands, CW and 
phone, according to the opera- 
tors' wishes. One contact with 
any club member wiff efititle the 
operator to receive the club cer- 
tlficate. 

VK1 ACHIEVEMENT AWARD 

The A,CT. Divrslorr of the 
Wireless Institute of Australia is 
proud to announce the creation 
of its newest award, the VK1 
Achievement Award. This award 
has the arm of increasing in^ 
terest in the VK1 prefix and in 
promoting Canberra and Austra- 
lia Internationally. 

As there are only 300 VK1 
licensees, the award will not be 
an easy one to achieve, par- 
ticularty on some bands and 
modes. 

The VK1 Award fs available to 
licensed amateurs throughout 
the world. To qualify, stations 
within Australia must work 20 
stations in VKt land on HF and 
on VHF. Stations outside Aus- 
tralia must work a minimum of 
10 VK1 stations for the HF seg* 
ment of the award. 

To apply, submit your list of 
contacts,, includmg the GMT 
time and date worked, the band 



and mode of operation, and any 
reports or ciphers exchanged. 

To be valid, all contacts must 
be made on or after January 1, 
1978- Endorsements may be 
given at the time appltcalion is 
made. Five IRCs or S2.00 fn 
Australian currency covers the 
cost of the award and should be 
sent to the Award Manager, c/o 
WIA. PO Box 46. Canberra A,C.T- 
2600, Australia. 

By the way, the VK1 Award is 
also made available to short- 
wave listening stations on a 
heard basjs. QSL confirmation 
is required* 

SNOWFLAKE MADNESS 

The Michigan Technological 
University Amateur Radio Club 
and the Copper Country Radio 
Amateur Associatbn announce 
a radio celebration of our Winter 
CarnivaJ festivities in the nor- 
thernmost part of Michigan's 
Upper Peninsula. 

Tech's Wrnter Carnival is 
probably the most spectacular 
winter festival in America, with 
fantastic snow sculptures, 
dogsled races, lots of skiing, 
and other festive events. 

In association with the Cop^ 
per Country Chamber of Com- 
merce, they are issuing a cer- 



•«***iMa«am 



iwnp«inn^«<aw>Pt#cooecnnnnnmi«ffWM— 



N** 



M» 



**^ 



.i*S>NSTITOKo,^^ 






A. c.T. Division 
f 



^/. 



4» 



^^/ 



•< ■»■ 



^ 




Thi^K liii:crlir> tllttt 



liiis C4im|i1cli:d lilt: rct|tiiri.iiHn|s 







CIIIITKAII NUMIiH 




k «n|iii. «%%««« wm« «. viL« ih %'^% 4 



PAlt 



1NtKltl.|J«ltHit 



ni«i,iE»Hf 



/^t_, .\ 




%c^n^%^ 




■•*••••« 



oaammmmmm*m 



tificate to all amateurs who 
make contact with any ham in 
the Copper Country between 
OOOOZ January 25 and OOOOZ 
February 1, Only one contact is 
required for the certificate. 

Suggested frequencies are: 
3.975. 7.105, T.2S5. and 21.3B5. 
Listen for CQ WINTER CAR* 
NIVAL 

Send your QSL along with 2 
(twoj 20-cent stamps to: Kevin J. 
Nietzke WDBDQR, 2005D Wood- 
mar Drive, Houghton Ml 49931* 

WORKED BROWARD 
COUNTY CITIES 

The Broward Amateur Radio 
Club, Inc, sponsors the new 
WBCC award available to 
licensed amateurs who submit 
proof of two'way contact as 
fodows: 

A) Residents of Broward, Col- 
liers, Dade, Glades, Hendry, Lee» 
Martin, Monroe, or Palm Beach 
counties must work all 29 of the 
following cities listed below. 

B) All other amateurs must 
work 15 of the 29 cities within 
Broward county. 

To t>e valid, all contacts must 
be verified by at least two fellow 
amateurs and application must 
show all logbook information as 
well as the QTH of the station 
worked. 

To apply, mall your applica- 
tion with $1.00 US funds and 



two first-class stamps (DX sta- 
tions; send 10 IRGs) to: BARC 
Award Manager. WD4RAR 1921 
NW 41st Street. Oakland Park 
FL 33309. 

Qualifying city contacts In- 
clude: Coconut Creek, Cooper 
City. Coral Springs. Danfa, 
Davie, Deerfteld Beach, Fort 
Lauderdale, Hacienda Village, 
Hallandate, Hillsboro Beach, 
Hollywood, Lauderdale-by-the- 
Sea« Lauderdale Lakes. Lauder- 
hill. Lazy Lake, Lighthouse 
Point, Margate, MIramar, North 
Lauderdale, Oakland Park, 
Parkland, Pembroke Park, Pem- 
broke Pines, Plantation, Pom- 
pano Beach, Sea Ranch Lakes, 
Sunrise, Tamarac, and Wilton 
Manors. 

THE SOUTH EAST 

QUEENSLAND TELETYPE 

GROUP AWARD 

This award is open to all 
transmitting and listening 

amateurs who gain award 
points m the following manner 

Australian amateurs must 
score 5 points and overseas 
amateurs must score 3 points. 

(a) To qualify, a station must, 
where possible, copy the official 
station of the South East 
Queensland Teletype Group, 
VK4TTY, during a news broad- 
cast and in the case of a 
transmitting amateur par- 



WBCC 

W4>rk€Ht BnnviircJ Cloumy c:itleii 




1 4 lljlH I Mh- 

I Itr Ht*«^^*iiiL Mil* lit -in Kiiih«* t nui liii 

I t'lllllt '^ lli<l1 

lui*% srtJiiii|(i|t''H t'Vinf ri' < I M lv\i. \\,i\ 

1 I If 1 ft ru If IK ^iiinns Willi f triiH m 



• is M-ifJ. 




l*f«^ii|f-nf 




126 TSMagaime • February. 1982 



tjcipate in the caJlbaok (2 award 
points). A portion of the printoul 
of the news broadcast together 
with the date, time, frequency, 
and broadcast number are to ac^ 
company the request for the 
award. 

(b) Addftionaiiy, a transmit- 
ting amateur must work three 
member stations of the South 
East Queensiand Taietype 
Group on RTTY (1 point each). 
Log extracts and/or printouts 
are to be included with the 
award application, and each 
member station may be counted 
only once towards the award. 

(c) Listening amateurs should, 
in lieu of (b), forward log extracts 
and/or printouts of three con- 
tacts involving different 
member stations of the South 
East Queensland Teletype 
Group point each). 

Applicants for the award 
should forward the above infor- 
mation together with one dollar 
Australian or 5 IPCs to cover 
postage and printing costs to 
' the Secretary. SEQTG, PO Box 
274, Sunnybank; Queensfand 
4109. AustraNa. 

WORKED ALL 
BERMUDA AWARD 

The WAB Award is issued to 
amateurs throughout the world 
by the Radio Society of Ber- 
muda. To qualify, applicants 
must submit proof of having 
worked a minimum of nine (9) 
parishes in Bermuda as listed 
below: 

1. Sandys 

2. Southampton 
a Warwick 

4. Paget 

5. Pembroke 

6. Devonshire 

7. Smith's 

8. Hamilton 

9. St. George^s 

The award is an antique map 
of Bermuda {20" x 23") suitably 



AU ASfiAtt AHMd 



class 



This award is given to ^3 Mcn^a-2.ftng_ f^^ 

establishing two way contacts with radio 
amateur stations in ntentber countries of the 
ASEAN namely; indonesiat Malaysia, Singa^ 
pore, Thailand^ and the Philippines, 



Awarded Man^ js, /*ao by the ORIENTAL 
CLUB, Quezon City, Philippines, 



DX 




inscribed with the recipient's 

name and callsign and Is signed 
by His Exceilency, the Governor 
of Bemiuda. 

The award is not available to 
stations who worked Bermuda 
via mobile including maritime or 
aeronautical mobile. No band or 
mode endorsements are 
available. Only one mobile or 
portable from within Bermuda 
may be used in making clatmed 
contacts on your application. 

QSL cards are required as 
proof of contact and they must 
be sent to the awards manager 
with sufficient postage for their 
safe return. The Bermuda Award 
is issued free of charge! Submit 
your applications to: Award 
Manager, PO Box 275, Hamilton 
5, Bermuda. 

WORKED ALL DU AWARD 

This award is availabFe to all 
licensed amateurs who can 



show proof of having contacted 
at least one station from each of 
the call areas in the Republic of 
the Philippines (DU1 to 0U9, ex- 
cept DU5), 

Contacts may be made on 
any band or mode and special 
endorsements will be issued 
upon request for All-Phone. AH- 
CW. Single-Band, or Five*Band 
accomplishments. 

Contacts for the DU Award 
must be made on or after 
January 1, 1970. To apply, for- 
ward a list of contacts which 
have been verified by two of- 
ficers of a radio organization. 
Your application must show all 
logbook Intormation for each 
contact- Send the list and $4.00 
US funds only {no IRCs pleasel) 
to: Edwin Zambrano DU1EFZ, 
PO Box AC-166, Quezon City 
3001, Philippines. 



WORKED ALL ASEAN AWARD 

The WAAA program requires 
the applicant to work other 

amateurs in the member cpun- 
tries of the Association of 
Southeast Asian Nations: 

Work 5 Philippine contacts, 1 
Malaysian contact. 2 Indone- 
sian contacts^ 1 in Thailand, and 
1 station in Singapore. 

Speciaf endorsements will be 
given for All-Phone, AII-CW, 
Single-Band, and Five-Band 
contacts. 

Have your list of contacts 
verified by at least two radio 
club officials and be sure all 
contacts were made after Jan- 
uary 1, 1970, to be valid. Forward 
appropriate logbook informa- 
tion in your application along 
with $4,00 US funds only (no 
IRCs) to the Award Manager: Ed- 
win Zambrano DU1EFZ, PO Box 
AC-166, Quezon City 3001, 
Philippines, 



KAHANER REPORT 



Larry Kahaner WB2NEL 
PO Box 39103 
Washington 00 20016 

By now you probably know 
that the FCC gave up m its at- 
tempt to rewrite the Amateur 



Radio Service roles. After 
spending thousands of dollars 
and consuming thousands of 
man-hours, the whole Idea was 
thrown in the trash compactor. 
We may never learn exactly 
what led to the shelving of the 



massive revamp nor will we ever ponents caUed the rewrite overly 



realize any t>enefit from all that 
work. However, several FCC em- 
ployees said privately what we 
all know intuitively about 
the project: It was just too big 
and too complicated to be 
completed. 

You must admit the main 
premise was sound. Whenever a 
government agency wants to 
put its roles Into plain English, 
we should all support it. tn this 
case^ it went a little too far. Op- 



simplistic and said that many of 
the fine points of amateur radio 
were lost In the translation. They 
also claimed that the question 
and answer format— which 
worked so well for the rewritten 
CB rules— just didn't work for 
hams. Amateurs, they declared, 
were intelligent and took of- 
fense at the condescending 
stance of Q & A. 

Moreover, the bulk of hams 
who responded to the petition 



73 Magazine • February J982 127 



for rulemakmg took umbrage at 
the very beginning of the rewrite 
proposal which dropped the fa- 
mous reasons for amateurs' ex- 
istence: promoting international 
goodwill, experimentation, and 
50 on. 

FCC otflcials told us that the 
rewrite contained many errors 
and mistakes—not just typos, 
but in substance as welL And ah 
though FCC proposals always 
contain errors, in this case it 
would have been just too much 
work to set things right. Normal- 
ly, the commission works with 
opponents and proponents alike 
until the regulations are honed 
to where everyone can live with 
them. But for the ham rewrite, 
there was too much to do, too 
few staff to do it, and no funds 
available to keep the project 
alive. 

On one hand, the FCC should 
be applauded for realizing that it 
would take resources beyond its 



means to complete the task and 
dropping it now before any more 
lime and money was wasted. On 
the other hand, perhaps the 
commission should be scolded 
for even beginning a course of 
action that came under fire from 
hams at the onset. Even those in 
the commission ej^pressed 
doubts as to whether it was nec- 
essary to rewrite the rules. It's 
certainly apparent that much of 
the impetus for change was po- 
litical (see Kahaner Report, 
September, 1981), Thai should 
never be a reason for a govern- 
ment agency to do anything 
with taxpayers' money. 

So, it seems that hams fought 
the measure and won. But the 
question arises—who lost? 

OUR OWN CHANNEL 9 

Paul Moratto KC5Jig6. from 

Universal City CA, mailed the 
FCC a petition for rulemaking re* 



questing that 11 destgnate a par- 
ticular 2m frequency to be used 
exclusively as an emergency 
and assistance channef. Paul 
also sent us the petition asking 
for our comment. Here goes. 

It's a great idea» Paul, but It's 
not necessary. Hams donl need 
the FCC to set aside a special 
channel for emergency use. 
Hams can do it on their own. 

If hams can set up a national 
simplex channel {.52) and work 
out an entire repeater coordina- 
tion scheme which only tew 
hams don't adhere to. they can 
certainly decide for themselves 
if they want one frequency des* 
ignated for emergency and as- 
sistance useonty. 

In his petHion, Paul noted: 
*'Various law enforcement offl* 
cials have stated that the 
2-meter amateur band is rarely 
monitored due to that fact that 
no Bmergency frequency has 
been officially designated ex^ 



closively for such communica- 
tion/" Frankly. Paul, I doubt that 
police departments would t>e 
willing to shell out bucks for a 
scanner that would pick up 2 
meters or even buy crystals to 
place in scanners they may al- 
ready own- Indeed, cops have 
enough to listen to without 
keeping an ear open on another 
frequency. If and when ham ra- 
dio ranks reach that of CBers, 
maybe theyll listen— but right 
now it's not worth it. 

Besides, even if they heard a 
distress call, they couldn't re- 
spond unless they were li- 
censed hams. Many police are, 
but many aren't. 

Any hams out there want to 
start work on a national emer- 
gency channel? Be my guest. 
Although I can't answer for the 
FCC. I II bet they'll tell Paul ex* 
actly what t just tord you: '1f you 
want to do it, do it. You don*l 
need us." 



COHTESTS 




Robert Baker W82GFE 
15 Windsor Dr. 
AtcoNJ 08004 



RSGB 7-MHZ CONTESTS 

Phone Section 

Starts: 1200 GMT February 6 

Ends; 0900 GMT February 7 

CW Section 

Starts: 1200 GMT February 27 

Ends: 0900 GMT February 28 

Licensed radio amateurs and 
listeners throughout the world 
are invited to take part in this 
year's RSGB contests. Log and 
cover sheets may be obtained 
from RSGB Headquarters, 35 
Doughty Street, London, En- 
gland WC1N 2AE. Please In- 
dude an SAE. 

The general rules for RSGB 
HF contests, published in the 
January, 1982, issue of Radio 



Communication, will apply. 
Please note, however, that urv- 
marked duplicate contacts will 
be penalized at 10 limes the 
number of points claimed, and 
that logs containing in excess of 
5 unmarked duplicate contacts 
will automatically be disquali- 
fied. Duplicate contacts should 
be included in your logs, marked 
BB such, and without any claim 
for points. 

Only RSGB members within 
the British Isles are eligible, 
while anyone else worldwide 
may enter. The only valid 
operating class is single 
operator. 

EXCHANGE: 

RS(T) plus serial number 
starting at 001. 

FBBOUENCtES: 

Phone— 7.04 to 7 A MHz; CW 
—7,00 to 7 04 MHz. 

SCORING: 

Non-European stations with 
British Isles count ^5 points per 
QSO. European stations wtth 
British Isles count 5 points per 
QSO. British Isles stations with 
European stations count 5 
points per QSO, 15 points per 
non-European contact. British 



Isles stations may not work 
each other. 

Multiplier for British Isles sta- 
tions is the number of different 
countries worked— ARRL DXCC 
list applies. In addition, each VE, 
VK. W, ZL, and ZS call area 
counts as a country for this 
purpiose. 

Non-British Isles stations 
count one multiplier for each dif- 
ferent British Isles prefix worked, 



maximum of 42. Please note 
that GB does not count! 

Final score for all is QSO 
points times the total multiplier, 

AWARDS: 

The Thomas (G6QB) Memorial 
Trophy will be awarded to the 
leading British Isles entrant in 
the CW contest. Certificates will 
be sent to the entrants placed 
first, second, and third in the 
British IsleSp European, and non- 



Feb $.7 
Feb 6-7 
Feb S*7 
Feb 13-14 
Feb 1314 
Feb 20-21 
Feb 26 28 
Feb 2728 
Mar 6-7 
Mar 13-14 
Apr 17^18 
Jun 12-13 
4un 26 27 
Jul 10*11 
Aug 7*8 
Aug 14-15 
S«p 11-12 
Sep 11 12 
Nov 6-7 
Nov 13-14 
Nov 20*21 
Dec 4-5 
Dec1M2 



MLENMR 

RSGB 7 MHz Contest— Phone 

South Camftna QSO Party 

Arizona QSO Party 

WAS SSTV Contest 

QCWA QSO Party -CW 

ARRL DX Contest— CW 

CO Worldwide 16{)*Meter Contest— SSB 

RSGB T-MHz Contest— CW 

ARRL DX Contest— Phone 

QCWA QSO Party— Phone 

ARCI QRP Spring QSO Party 

ARRL VHF QSO Party 

ARRL Field Day 

lARU Radiosport 

ARRL UHF Contest 

European DX Contest— CW 

ARRL VHF QSO Party 

European DX Contest— Phone 

ARRL Sweepstakes— CW 

European DX Contest— RTTY 

ARRL Sweepstakes— -Phone 
ARRL IBO-Meter Contest 
ARRL 10 Meter Contest 



12fl 73 Magazine • February, 1982 



European sections of each 
contest. 



ENTRIES: 

Log sheets should be headed; 
date, time (GMT), callsigrr of sta- 
tion worked, RS(T) and number 
sent, RS(T)and number received, 
if muJtipJJer, and QSO points 
claimed. A summary sheet is re- 
quired showing the countries or 
prefixes worked. Each log must 
be accompanied by the follow- 
ing declaration: "I declare that 
my station was operated in ac- 
cordance with the rules of the 
contest and in accordance with 
the terms of my license." The 
declaration must be signed and 
dated. Closing date for receipt 
of logs Is April 3rd for the phone 
section and April 24th for the 
CW section. Address entries to: 
RSGB HF Contests Committee, 
PO Box 73, Lichfield, Stafford- 
shire WS13 6UJ England. In the 
case of any dispute, the ruling of 
the Council of the RSGB shall be 
final. 

RECEIVING SECTION: 

Rules are generally the same, 
as applicable, British Isles en- 
trants should fog only overseas 
stations in contact with British 
Isles stations and must record 
the report and serial number 
given by the overseas station 
and the time in GMT. European 
stations logged count 5 points; 
outside Europe, 15 points. No 
more than 20 QSOs made by any 
one British Isfes station may be 
fogged. 

Overseas listeners should log 
British Isles stations and must 
record the reports and serial 
numbers given and the time in 
GMT. European listeners claim 5 
points per QSO togged; others, 
15. A bonus of 20 points may be 
ciaimed for each British Isles 
numerfcal prefix logged. GB 
prefixes do not count, and not 
more than 20 QSOs made by the 
same British station may be 
fogged. 



ARIZONA QSO PARTY 

Starts: 20C0 GMT February 6 
Ends: OaOO GMT February 7 

Sponsored by the Arizona 
Amateur Radio Club. Each sta- 
tion may be worked only once 
per band. 

EXCHANGE: 

BS(T) and state, province, 
country, or AZ county. 



FREQUENCfES: 

SSB — 1815, 3895, 7230, 
14280, 21365, 28560, CW— 1805, 
3560, 7060, 14060, 21060, 28060. 
Novice — 3725, 7125, 21125, 
28125. 

SCORING: 

Count 1 point per SSB QSO 
and 2 points for each CW or "ex- 
otic" mode QSO. AZ stations 
multiply QSO points by number 
of states, provinces, and coun- 
tries. Others multiply QSO 
points by number of AZ coun- 
ties. The AARC club station 
W7I0 also counts as 1 multiplier 
for non-AZ stations. Anyone 
working all AZ counties and 
W7I0 may double the multiplier. 

AWARDS: 

Certificates for the highest 
scoring station in each state, 
province, country, and AZ 
county. 

ENTRIES: 

Show each station worked, 
RST and exchange, plus time 
and frequency. Include a sum- 
mary sheet of your scoring and 
other information, Include a 
large SASE for results. Mailing 
deadline Is March 6th and 
should be addressed to: AARC, 
c/o Gary Kent KB7VE, 16647 N. 
34th Avenue, Phoenix AZ 85023. 

SOUTH CAROLINA QSO PARTY 

Starts: 1800 GMT February 6 
Ends: 2359 GMT February 7 

The QSO party is again spon- 
sored by the Colleton County 
Contestofs. The same station 
may be worked on each band 
and mode, simplex only. SC 
mobile stations that change 
counties are considered new 
stations* Novice and Technician 
stations please sign IH or U, 

EXCHANGE: 

RS(T) and state, province, 
country, or SC county. 

SCORING: 

Phone contacts are worth 2 
QSO points, CW contacts are 
worth 3 points. The multiplier for 
SC stations is the number of 
states, provinces, and DX coun- 
tries worked. Others multiply 
QSO points by the number of SC 
counties worked (46 maximumj. 

FREQUENCIES: 

Phone~3895, 7230, 14280, 
21365, 28560. CW— 3560, 7060, 
14060, 21060, 28060. Novice— 
3725, 7125,21125,28125. 



REmJS 



RESULTS OF THE 1931 OHIO QSO PARTY 



Ohio 




KA2EPS 


ENY 


5,550 


Stations 


Score 


K9GDF 


Wl 


4,008 


WB8M77 


1,501,640 


W2EZ 


WNY 


3,900 


KB8EI 


820,155 


KA8LPV 


M( 


3,810 


WBSJBM 


666,000 


K8EIO/3 


MD/DC 


3,430 


WDSALG 


448,707 


N04P 


KY 


3,360 


KA8HXX 


428,736 


WB3IET 


WPA 


3,240 


KC8JH 


339,000 


W40VT 


GA 


2,940 


KFBK 


206,550 


WB4ZPF 


VA 


2,875 


N8AKF 


163.674 


NOCLV 


KS 


2,314 


KASIAH 


1 48,830 


N1BDB 


CT 


2,180 


KA8CTL 


104,636 


W4KM3 


VA 


1,692 


KB8AC 


100,940 


WB3FNS 


MD/DC 


1,628 


N8JJ 


47,120 


N4CD 


VA 


1,552 


W8DXT 


45,628 


KG9Z 


IL 


1,482 


WA8WFX 


39,285 


WB9CWE 


IL 


1,364 


WD8MC0 


33,178 


WA3JXW 


E PA 


1,232 


KB8WB 


31,820 


WA3GNW 


EPA 


828 


KA8IGM 


31,620 


WB9NRK 


Wl 


780 


WB8MIP 


28,968 


K2NC 


W NY 


737 


W8HFK 


26,048 


WBIGLH 


MA 


672 


NBDCJ 


23,408 


W4LEP 


TN 


588 


N8BJQ 


12,810 


WA9MRU 


IL 


676 


W80JM 


3,335 


WB7TJI 


ID 


351 


W8VPV (CI I 


lb Station) 


KA1VE 


MA 


340 




183,012 


N5AFV 


OK 


306 






KA2EG0 


N NJ 


208 


Out of 




AK7J 


ID 


165 


State 


Score 


KF2T 


NNJ 


132 


WAeAVU9 


IL 11,086 


KB9Ti 


IL 


90 


W4F0A 


VA 10,480 


K1BV 


CT 


60 


AWARDS: 




made with 


"caotive" 


stations. 



Certfficates to top scoring 
station in eacti SC county, state, 
province, and DX country. Nov- 
ices and Tecfinicians compete 
only with other Novices and 
Technicians, 

ENTRIES: 

Include a summary sf^eet with 
your entry showing scoring and 
other information. Indicate each 
new multiplier in your log as it is 
worked. Novice and Technician 
indicate cJass on your entry. In- 
clude a large SASE for results. 
Mailing deadline is March 5th; 
send to: Colleton County Con- 
testors, c/o Elliott Farrell, Jr. 
WA4YUU, PO Box 994» Walter- 
boro SC 29488. 



QCWA QSO PARTY-CW 

Starts: 0001 GMT February 13 
Ends: 2400 GMT February 14 

This is the 25th annual QCWA 
QSO party with separate week- 
ends for CW and phone. Con- 
tacts with the same station on 
more than one band can be 
scored only once. Contacts 



such as when operating in local 
nets, are not valid. 

EXCHANGE: 

QSO number, operator's 
name, and QCWA chapter iden- 
tification (official number or 
name). Members not affiliated 
with a chapter should use "AL". 

FREQUENCIES: 

Any authorized amateur fre- 
quency is permissible. The fol- 
lowing suggested frequencies 
have been selected to minimize 
rnterference to others: 3530- 
3560, 7030-7060, 14030-14060, 
21040-21070, and 28040-29070, 
These are selected as a starting 
piace. When pileups occur, 
don't be afraid to go either side 
of these frequencies, 

SCORING: 

Each contact made with an- 
other QCWA member win count 
as a single point. This year's 
contest has two multipliers. The 
first is the same as in years past: 
each chapter is a multiplier of 
one. The second is that DX sta- 



73 Magazine * February, 1982 129 




QSL OF THE MONTH 

Call us chauvinists* but the beautffut rendition of the New Hamp- 
shlfe countryside on this attractive card wins WBlGGQ hrs choice 
of any book in T3's Radio Bookshop. 

Is your card a winner? To enter, place your card in an envelope 
along with your book selection and mail to 73 Magazine, Pine Street, 
Peterborough NH 03458. Atlention: QSL ot the Month. To be eligible, 
your entry must be sent in an envelope and must be accompanie<l by 
your book selection. 



tions are a multiplier of two. DX 
stations are defined as Europe, 
Africa. South America, Asia, and 
Oceania— the same as for WAC 
of ARRL. Contacts within your 
own country count oniy as a 
chapter multiplier. Final score is 
then the total QSO points times 
the sum of the number of chap- 
ters and DX stations worked. 

AWARDS: 

Plaques for the top phone and 
top CW scorefs. Certificates wilf 
be given for the 2nd through 5th 
runnerS"Up in both the phone 
and CW Parties. Standings and 
scores will be published In the 
QCWA News, Issue of summer, 
1982. 

ENTRfES: 

Logs should include the fol- 
lowing information: lime (GMT), 
call QSO numbers* name, chap- 
ter number or name, state or 
country. It is the responsibility 
of each contestant to provide a 
legible log, no carbon copies, 
and to list alt claimed contacts. 



The total contacts for each page 
win be recorded at the bottom of 
each page. The total contacts 
for the Party should be recorded 
at the top right of the first page 
of the log. Log sheets will not be 
returned. Make sure you have 
correct postage when you mail 
your logs. Send logs no later 
than March 31st to: Pine Tree 
Chapter 134, Glenn Baxter 
K1MAN, Long Pond Lodge, Bel- 
grade Lakes ME 0491 8. Separate 
logs and scores must be sub- 
mitted for the CW and phone 
parties,. 

Work as many QCWA mem- 
bers as possible and appiy for 
the severai special QCWA certif- 
icates which you have quali- 
fied for in the QCWA Parties: 
Worked 50 States. Worked 60 
Chapters, Worked 100 Mem- 
bers» and Worked 500 Members. 

WAS SSTV CONTEST 

Starts: 0900 EST February 13 
Ends: 2100 EST February 14 

Sponsored by amateur televi- 
sion's A5 Magazine. Use all au- 



NEWSLETTER CONTEST WINNER 

Humor is a key part of this month's newsletter winner. The 
Narional H^mpoon, published by the Cleveland-based South 
East Amateur Radio Club, is chock full of puns, good-natured 
put*downs, and inside jokes. Editor KA8KTR is not above pok- 
ing fun at himself or the 33-year-otd club. Besides being fun to 
read. The National Hampoon provides a deluge of information 
about what individual club members are doing. Don't lei your 
club's members fall into the trap of not reading each newslet* 
terTry adding some life and humor; the readers will anxiously 
await the arrival of the next issue. 



thorized and recognized SSTV 
operating frequencies within 
the HF bands. Attempt to work 
as many SSTV operators from 
other states as possible during 
the 36-hoyr contest period. The 
emphasis is on quality, not just 
quantity. 

SCORING: 

Count 25 points per contact 
with 10 bonus points awarded 
for live exchanges of "mug- 
shots/' color two^way contacts, 
or 256 or 128 (t/2-speed) mode 
transmissions. Add 100 points 
for each new state listed. Alaska 
and Hawaii contacts count a 
bonus factor ot 500 points! 

EXCHANGE: 

Station calls and signal re- 
ports must be exchanged in vid- 
eo format by either camera, key- 
board, or light-pen generators. 

A WARDS: 

First place winnner receives a 
S-year subscription (or renewal) 
to A5 Magazine, a framed Spe- 
cialized Communication Certifi- 
cate, and his photo published on 
the front cover of the magazine. 
Second- and third-place winners 
receive 1-year subscriptions and 
certificates. All contestants will 
receive gold certificates with 
submitted logs. 

ENTRIES: 

Submit actual or copies of 
contest log sheets by no later 
than March 1st to Contest Man- 
ager, A5 Magazine, PQ Box H, 
Lowden lA 52255. Official re- 
sults will be published In the 
May/June issue of AS Magazine. 
Those winners attending the 
Dayton, Ohio. Hamvention will 
be awarded certificates at the 
regular ATV Forum meetings. 

CO WORLDWIDE 160'METER 
CONTEST--SSB 

Starts: 2200 GMT February 28 
Ends: 1600 GMT February 28 

EXCHANGE: 

RS plus a three^iglt contact 

number starting with 001, US 
stations include state and Cana- 
dians include province. 

SCORiNG: 

US and Canadian stations 
count 2 points per QSO with 
other WA/EA^O stations: DX con- 
tacts are 10 points each, 

DX stations count 2 points per 
QSO with stations in the same 
country and 5 points with sta- 
tions in other countries. QSOs 



with W/vevO stations are 10 
points each. 

All stations count one multi- 
plier point for each US state, VE 
province, and OX country. KH6 
and KL7 are considered DX. Fi- 
nal score is total QSO points 
times the sum of multipliers. 

AWARDS: 

Certificates to the top scorers 
in each state, VE province, and 
DX country. Additional awards if 
the scores or returns warrant. 

Two plaques are t>eing award* 
ed by the West Gulf ARC. both 
for single operators, one for the 
highest scoring US station and 
the other for Europe. The World 
Champion in the contest will 
receive the John Doremus 
WilAW Memorial Plaque from 
friends of WHAW. This plaque 
may be won only once by the 
same station in a three-year 
period. 

PENALTfES: 

Three additional contacts will 
t>e deleted from the score for 
each duplicate, false, or unverl- 
fiable contact removed from the 
log. A second multiplier will also 
be removed for each one lost by 
this action* 

Violation of the rules and reg- 
ulations pertaining to amateur 
radio in the country of the con- 
testant, or the rules of the 
contest, or unsportmanship con- 
duct, or taking credit for exces- 
sive duplicate contacts or multl* 
pfiers wiii be deemed sufficient 
cause for disqualification. Dts- 
qualified stations or operators 
may be barred from competing 
in CO contests for a period of up 
to three years, 

ENTRIES: 

Sample log and summary 
sheets may be obtained from 
CQ by sending a large SASE 
with sufficient postage to cover 
your request. It is not necessary 
to use the official form; you can 
use your own. Logs should have 
40 contacts per page and show 
time in GMT. numt)ers sent and 
received, and separate columns 
for QSO points and multipliers. 
Indicate the multiplier only the 
first time It is worked* 

Mailing deadline for SSB en- 
tries is March 31st- Logs can be 
sent directly to the 160 Contest 
Director, Don McClenon N41N, 
3075 Florida Avenue* Melbourne 
FL 32901 USA. Alterr^atively. 
they can be sent to CQ, 160- 
Meter Contest, 76 North Broad- 
way. Hicksville NY 11801 USA, 



130 73Magazme • February J 982 



W2NSD/f 

NEVER SAY DIE 

ecfitor/a/ t>y Watyne Gr&en 



show them around. Have the 450-MH2 band? How about 220 



from page 8 

*'TWi section shalf not appfy to re* 
celvjng, divulging, publishing, or util- 
izing the contents of any radio com- 
munication whJch Is transmitted by 
any station for ihe use ot the general 
public: or which refers lo ships, air- 
craft, vehicles, or persons in distrets; 
or which is monitored pursuant lo 
section 4(fK6) and which is received, 
divulged, or used In any investiga- 
tion or enforcement action by the 
Commission." 

Explanation 

This amendment conforms §605 to 
§4<f) to accommodate proposed lan- 
guage to permit use of volunteef 
monitors. 

Here Is another way that ama^ 

laurs could help the Commis- 
sion cut down on their costs. 
Not that they are spending a lot 
monitoring the ham bands these 
days anyway . . . and who needs 
*em? But with the rules changed 
so that amateurs could set up a 
moniloffng system, we would 
be able to clean up a lot of 
miseries which are now plagu- 
ing our bands. 

We have tens of thousands of 
retired hams and several thou- 
sand more handicapped hams, 
ail with loads of time on their 
hands and an eagerness to be of 
value. WelL here is a service thai 
these hams could provide which 
would be priceless to us. IVe 
talked with the FCC commis- 
sioners about this and they 
seem to be enthusiastic about 
the concept. You see. not only 
could hams be organized to 
monitor the ham bands, but they 
could also assist the FCC moni- 
tors in watching over some of 
the non-amateur bands, too. 

If we once started getting into 
this monitoring idea, it would 
not be long before innovative 
hams would start coming up 
with automatic bamS scanners 
and receivers which would be 
connected to microcomputers 
and would program themselves 
to fisten for unrecognized trans^ 
missions. With digital receivers 
and frequency counters, it is on- 
ly one more step to a system 
which wiil keep track of what 
signals are okay on what fre- 



quencies and spot the anoma* 
lies quickly so they can be 
Identified. 

Not onfy would this be of 
great help for digging out 
emergency signals fast, but it 
would be even better protection 
against illicit transmissions in- 
volved wfth spying and drug traf- 
fic and so on. Coded transmis- 
sions? We have some mighty 
sharp ham cryptographers who 
would love to have challenges 
like that. 

Why should the government 
spend wads of money doing 
something which we not only 
could do but probably could do 
better, and which we would 
enjoy doing? 

YeSj a ham monitoring sys- 
tem would take some organiza- 
tion, but it wouldn't be difficult 
to handle. Much of the work 
could be done over the air, with 
unknown signals spotted and 
triangulated via a ham net. And 
with hams everywhere, even the 
UHF channels could be watched 
over in every part of the country. 
This would raise hell with crooks 
using CB or HTs on commercial 
channels to coordinate crimes. 
There would be no safe frequen- 
cy or place in the country for 
them. Pity. 

FRIENDLY CLUBS 

Several letters from readers 
have made mention of a situa- 
tion which I've noticed in some 
clubs I've visited... a lack of 
friendliness. Oh, it isn*t inten- 
tional ... but it is a drag. I sug- 
gest that club officers take a 
good critical look at the way 
their club is working and start 
doing something about it. 

When someone new comes to 
a club meeting he (or she!) 
should be met by members and 
introduced around. Each person 
shoutd have an identification 
badge so newcomers will know 
to whom they are talking. Mem- 
bers of the club should be aware 
that It is their responsibility 
to go out ot their way to 
be friendly with any new- 
comers. . .to talk with them, .. 



glad hand out 
When the newcomer arrives, 

try to find out about him. . .his 
call, If licensed. . .or if he is not 
yet ficensed and might be inter- 
ested In coming to the club li- 
cense classes. . .what bands he 
works . . . and so on. Then get up 
at the meeting and introduce the 
newcomer and tell about his 
background so the others will 
know him. Make a big deal out of 
the newcomer and he will be 
back. You won't be able to keep 
htm away wfth a stick. 

In case you haven't noticed it, 
darned few hams are outgoing. 
The gregarious ham is unusual. 
Most hams are loners who may 
do just tine on the air, but are 
afraid to talk on a one-to-one ba* 
sis. You should recognize this 
and gear your club meetings to 
overcome this situation. If you 
have a table where they can 
show their new and exciting 
QSL cards. . , that's a conversa- 
tion breaker. Another table 
where they can show something 
they've built is another winner. 
Perhaps a spot to show off new- 
ly-purchased ham gear. , .stuff 
that is just recently on the mar- 
ket. Everyone is always interest- 
ed in new rigs and gadgets. 
Anything you can work up in 
ways to get members showing 
and telling will break the ice and 
help everyone have a good 
time. . .and it is a good time at 
meetings which witi bring *em 
back alive next month. 

This isn't the time to get into 
the details on how to run a ham 
club, but I wifi just touch on 
some of the basics. Remember 
that when you are runnmg a 
ham club you are in show busi* 
ness. You want to keep for the 
board of directors as much of 
the dull business aspect of the 
club as you can, letting the 
meetings be times when you are 
entertaining the members. 

What is entertaining? Well 
demonstrations of unusual 
modes of communications are 
winners. You probably have 
someone in the area who is 
working with slow scan and can 
knock the socks off the mem- 
tjers with color slow scan. Or 
perhaps some members are into 
computerized RTTY communi- 
cations. Anything on 10 GHz? 
Any new antennas popped up 
which can be shown on a black- 
board and explained? Slides of a 
Dxpedition are great fun. 

How much do the members 
know of what is going on in the 

73 



MHz? Anyone working with SSB 
on 2m? How al>out aurora OX- 
ing, meteor-scatter DXing, 
moonbounce? 

Manufacturers will go a long 
way to show their products 
when they have something new. 
Keep your eye on the new prod- 
ucts section of 73 and see 
what you can generate. They 
want to show their products and 
they also want to get feedback 
from your members on possible 
new products. They need both 
the sales and the Input. 

DEREGULATION 

The interest In deregulation 
by the Commission got started 
back in 1974, triggered by the en 
banc hearing at which a group 
of amateurs testified as to the 
need for deregulation. This 
turned out to be a matter of do- 
ing the right thing at the right 
time. , .as the Commission was 
just at that time getting interest- 
ed in the concept. The hearing 
made clear the need for deregu- 
lation of amateur radio, and the 
Commission started with our 
service, intending to use it as an 
example of what could be done. 

The hearing, by the way, was 
In response to the then-new reg- 
ulations on repeaters, which 
were particularly onerous. Lack- 
ing any initiative from the ARRU 
I got representatives together 
from repeater groups all around 
the country to testify before the 
Commissioners. If anyone Is in- 
terested^ I have a tape of this 
historical confrontation. The 
ARRL refused to participate, 
putting the effort down as naive 
and useless. The result was the 
biggest change in our rules ever 
brought about. 

Of considerable significance 
is a recent paper (August, 1981) 
from the FCC. This is a working 
paper on deregulating the per- 
sonal and amateur radio servic- 
es. The paper is quite candid . . . 
surprising in its frankness. 
There are some interesting con- 
cepts. , ."many .. .agree that 
the goals of expanding techni- 
cal skills and manpower and ad* 
vancing the radio art have failen 
on hard times in recent years." It 
goes on, "If there is criticism of 
amateurs for not being tech- 
nically more advanced, it could 
be misdirected. Perhaps one 
should place some of the re- 
sponsibility on the regulations^ 
not the licensees. Substantially 
more regulatory flexibility than 

Magaitne • February. 1982 131 



the service now has would be 
desirable." 

Frankly, that's an understate- 
ment. 

The other day, on my way 
down to Ffofida to give a talk to a 
group of accountants who are 
using TRS-SO systems, 1 stopped 
by Tytts Electronics in Hudson, 
New Hampshire. Chuck recently 
moved from down near Boston 
to tax-free New Hampshire, thus 
saving nearby Massachusetts 
hams a bundle on their pur- 
chases. ThjB new Yaesu FT-208R 
HT had just arrived, so I bought 
one. 

As I punched up the channels 
on the synthesizer, program- 
ming the unit to scan several lo- 
cal repeaters and a simplex 
channet or two, I got to thinking 
about the whole two-meter US 
vs. Japan situation. Having been 
in the 2m ham field for over 40 
years, 1 remember how things 
got started. 

The first FM rigs were con- 
verted commercial systems, 
mostly by Motorola and G.E.— 
monsters, dumped on us when 
the commercial two-way specs 
were changed, rendering tens of 
thousands of taxi and police 
transceivers obsolete. Then 
came a rig from I.C.E. (in Texas) 
which never got to first base. . . 
mostly because it didn't work 
very weJl. The next try was from 
Galaxy (Missouri). Though un- 
stable and much too large, it 
sold reasonably well. The engin- 
eering design was dismal. Ed 
Glegg, who had been building 
VHF equipment for us for years, 
came up with one of the better 
FM rigs of the time, but by then 
some of the Japanese equip- 
ment was starting to arrive. 

loom was designing very nice 
equipment, and it was selling 
welL Unfortunately, the com- 
pany was taken to the cleaners 
by a crooked Arizona importer/ 
distributor. Nothing daunted, 
Mr. Inoue, the president of the 
firm, came to the US and 
shopped around for a new im- 
porter, He also asked a lot of 
questions about what kind of 
new equipment was wanted, . , 
and listened carefully to the 
answers. The result was the 
IC-230, the first synthesized 
ham rig. Before that, the best- 
selling rigs were from Standard 
and featured ever more crystal 
sockets. I got to where I had to 
have hundreds of crystals on 
hand to cope with all of the re- 
peaters going on the air. . .and 
the many different rigs. 



Mr. Inoue said that he would 
some day be able to put a syn- 
thesizer into an HT for us. Well^ 
we knew It would happen, but it 
seemed like a dream. You know, 
there was a small outfit out near 
Buffalo, New York, which came 
up with a synthesizer early in the 
game, but they never really fol- 
lowed up on it. It started out as a 
club project and then changed 
into a business. I think if they'd 
piayed their advertising right 
they could have developed into 
a large busmess by now with 
perhaps $50 million in sales. 

Another firm which had a 
crack at it and dropped the ball 
was Vanguard, down on Long Is- 
land. Andre developed a synthe- 
sizer to plug into the older rigs, 
but didn't take it the next step, 

It isn't really fair to put down 
US firms for losing the baJ! on 



One of the facts of business 
is that the more of the product 
you make, the cheaper it is to 
manufacture, When you double 
the production of a piece of 
equipment, the cost of making it 
goes down 15-25%. So this 
bunch of eager buyers in Japan 
has done two things to the ham 
equipment market. First, their 
enthusiasm has encouraged the 
Japanese firms to keep up a 
continuing deveiopment of new 
equipment. The volume of sales 
has forced American firms out 
of the market because the 
Japanese equipment has been 
both better and cheaper in 
most instances. 

Where the shoe really begins 
to hurt is that we are now seeing 
the results of the over 500,000 
Japanese hams and their enthu- 
siasm. These chaps have now 



WARNING 
Due to numerous compEalnts received from readers who have 
dealt with Electronic Specialties, Inc., of Miami, Florida, we 
have discontinued their advertisements and urge all readers 
to use caution when dealing with this firm. 



FM equipment. . .or any other 
ham gear for that matter. You 
see, the Japanese went right on 
by us in the number of licensed 
hams, so their firms had a great 
advantage. Not only did they 
have more hams, but their hams 
were much more enthusiastic 
and active than we were. Ama- 
teur radio really took hold in Jap- 
an when they got rid of the 
Morse code requirement. Clubs 
sprang up in high schools all 
over the country, and today they 
have double to triple the number 
of active hams that we have. 
Further, their spirit is almost 
unbelievable. 

Have you even thought of go- 
ing on a DXpedition? Well, the 
Japanese have organized DXpe- 
ditions where they have had 
about 400 active hams going 
along and getting on the air! 
When you read the Japanese 
club magazine you find that it is 
packed for dozens of pages a 
month with pictures of club ac- 
tivities and outings. We don't 
appear to have a single club in 
the US which even comes close 
to the enthusiasm which has 
spread through Japan... at 
least rm not familiar with any. 
I've asked several times for pic- 
tures of any outstanding club 
activities for publication in 
73. . .nothing yet 



gone from high school through 
college, on into industry, and 
are wiping out the American 
consumer electronics industry. 
Their rate of graduation of en- 
gineers, technicians, and scien- 
tists has zoomed past ours. 

)n this respect, amateur radio 
has let America down. If you 
stop and think about it, most 
technical career people gel 
started in their teens. By stop- 
ping the growth of amateur 
radio in 1963, with little since 
then, we have managed to kill 
off virtually a whole generation 
of technical people. Unless a 
person gets interested in elec- 
tronics in high school, there is 
little reason for him to go into 
electronics as a career. So now 
we have a bunch of philosophy 
and liberal arts majors wander- 
ing around looking for work, . . 
while our electronics industry is 
getting wiped out by Japan. 

There really Isn't much we 
can do about the situation right 
now. We will be outgunned in 
technicians for some time to 
come. If we are going to get 
back into the driver's seat, we 
are going to have to figure out 
some way to get a whole genera- 
tion of teenagers interested in 
technical careers. That's quite 
a challenge. 

In the meanwhile, as I go fur- 



ther and further into the instruc- 
tion book for the 208, I wonder 
what next in HTs. With the LCD 
display of the frequency, the 208 
should have a substantially 
longer battery life than the 207. 1 
like the scanning system, , .just 
what I've wanted for years, 
wherein it scans, stops on a 
busy channel for a few seconds, 
and then continues scanning. 
You can set it up for a priority 
channel ... for instance, I gener- 
ally monitor 147.540 for simplex 
calls. They've even made the 
battery compartment so that 
you can open it without a coin. 

I picked up a mailing piece at 
Tufts which was rather clev- 
er, . .and sad. The headline on it 
was, "Where have all the ama- 
teur radio stores gone?'' Then 
there are drawings of eleven 
graves with headstones for the 
eleven Greater Boston ham 
stores which have gone out of 
the ham business {or just plain 
out of business) in recent 
months. 

With the recent even further 

drop in new licensees down 

around 35%... ham stores all 
around the country are folding. 
The ones that seem to be failing 
the most are those which had lit- 
tle slogans such as, never un- 
dersold .. .call for low, low 
prices. . .20% off. . .and soor^. 
You know, unless we do some- 
thing about all this, amateur 
radio will soon be little more 
than a retirement playground for 
elderly hams. 

I admit to getting a bit frus- 
trated when I visit some ham 
ciubs and find that many of the 
members . . .old-timers, of 
course. , .are prepared to resist 
any efforts to bring in new hams 
as much as they can. They don't 
want the QRM . . . and they don't 
much enjoy talking to young 
hams... and don*t want them 
trying to join their club. They 
would like to raise the code 
speed to 50 wpm and have every* 
one coming in pass the Extra 
class license exam, . ,and then 
get restricted to the CW bands 
for a few years. They like OST, 
not 73. These chaps are turning 
amateur radio from a friendly 
fraternity into an old farternily. 

Apropos of the mention of the 
1963 debacle, I looked back over 
my editoriais and found that I 
had indeed predicted at thetime 
that one of the resu Its of the pro- 
posed rules change would be 
the demise of a great many deal- 
ers...and manufacturers, 
About 75% of the ham dealers 



132 73Magazine • February, 1982 



went out of the ham business as 
a result . . . and most of the man- 
ufacturers. It's inlerestlng to 
see the old ads for Hammarlundf 
HalUcrafters, National, John- 
ston, Squires-Sanders, Central 
Electronics, Lakeshore, Multl*EI- 
mac» United Tfanstormer, Stan- 
cor. Bud, Gonset, Polytronics, 
and so on. It sure wiped 'em out. 

The 208 is a great rig. . . but \i 
is not a breakthrough Into any- 
thing really new, II we're going 
to get amateur radio pepped up, 
we have to get into the ^s and 
digital communrcatlons tech- 
niques. We really have nothing 
new to be excited about. FM is a 
bore for most of us . . . and heck, 
DX has been around for a Hfe* 
tiffie. What have we that is really 
new and fun? We need some* 
thing to get our |ulces flowing. 

What have you got? 

HAM WATCH REPAIR 

Eventually, those Casio C-60 
and C-90 watches run out of bat* 
tery and need to get a battery re- 
fill The replacement of the bat- 
teries fsn't a really big deaL . . 
you can probably do it. Or, of 
course, you can fire it back to 
Casio for their $tO repair charge. 
Many Jewelers are afraid of dig- 
ital watches and claim they 
can't fix them. Tsk. t 

You can run into a problem 
with the Casio watches fn that \ 
they often do not start when you 
replace the batteries. You have 
to short out the battery cover 
and a nearby metalHc dot 
marked ''AC" with a wire, tweez- 
ers, or even a paper clip to get/ " 
the watch to start again. Jewel- 
ers have gotten instructions on 
this, but often Just don't want to 
be bothered. . .or didn't read 
the instructions. 

The C-80 and C-90 Casio 
watches, which I've written 
about before, are the ones 
which did the most to put both 
Texas Instruments and Commo* 
dore out of the watch business. 
Casio came out with a $50 
watch which knocked the socks 
off everything else on the mar* 
ket More and more of us around 
the magazine are wearing the 
C-90, beeping away every hour 
in unison. 

My thanks to WB90JD for the 
battery information on the 
watch. 

GETTING RICH 

Firms which are publicly held 
have a problem that privately 
owned firms don't have to worry 



about: making ever more money 
to keep the stock prices high. 

This came to mind when I got 
a tetter the other day. . .and not 
the first one, , .saying that the 
reason I want ham growth is so 
that f can make more money 
from 73 Magazine. Let's take a 
good look at that cop-out* 

First point. If I were interested 
in money, spending tfme on try- 
ing to get amateur radio growing 
would be one of the last ways t 
would invest my time. The real 
money today is in microcomput- 
ers, and the maximum return for 
hours spent is obviously In that 
field. Every time I start a new 
computer magazine, I generate 
a couple of million dollars more 
cash flow for us and bring em- 
ployment to a bunch more peo- 
pie. I also help the microcomput- 
er field to grow by virtue of the 
communications I bring atx^ut. 
No, from a business point of 
view, I could care less whether 
amateur radio grows or not. If I 
were to fold up 73 Magazine, 
we'd make more money using 
the people and facilities for the 
much, much more profitable 
computer publications. But Td 
miss a lot of fun. . .and amateur 
radio would lose a lot of artrcfes 
and enthusiasm. 

Point Two. Even if we got Into 
a great growth pattern and 73 
Magazine started to make a 
huge profit, the money would go 
toward my real goals, not to me. 
My goals are to provide educa- 
tion through my publications 
and through any other medra 
available. If I had a million to 
spare right now, I would quickly 
put it Into the development of 
Hawthorne-Green Institute, a 
college to teach electron- 
ics, communications, and 
computing. 

I seriously doubt if many read- 
ers spend much less on them- 
selves than I do. I do have to buy 
clothes so I look well, even If I 
begrudge the expense. That's 
part of being in business. My en- 
tire life revolves around the 
business. I grab breakfast at my 
desk, have a business lunch al- 
most every day. . .or else I eat 
an apple and cheese at my desk. 
Dinners are often with advertis- 
ers, at ham clubs, computer 
shows, or on trips to visit manu- 
facturers. I don't think my wife 
and I get together to eat dinner 
at home ten days a year. She, 
too, is wrapped up in our busi- 
ness, and we shiare a two-room 
apartment in the old house that 
is our headquarters building. 



I'm serious about trying to get 
American technology back into 
the lead and I think I have the 
key to this. If you were in my 
shoes, wouldn't you feel that 
was a worthy goal? Further, 1 
think it is a goal \ can achieve. 

Probably the *^richest" time of 
my life was back in the mid-50s 
when \ was the editor of CQ and 
also the president of a small hi-fi 
manufacturing firm. I made a big 
S15.D00 at that time, which is a 
whole lot more than Vm making 
now in today's dollarettes. I was 
able to support a home, family, a 
seaplane, an Arabian horse, a 
small yacht, and two Porsches. 
One of the things which I 
learned was that toys like those 
own you, not the other way 
around. Tlie horse had to be ex- 
ercised every day... and 
trained. The Porsches needed 
constant service, most of which 
had to be self*provided. The 
damned yacht had to be 
scraped and painted every year 
or so, the engine worked on, and 
so on. The plane? You have no 
idea of misery until you own 
your own plane, it cost more per 
year to own and run than any 
two of the other toys. It was fun 
and Tm glad I did it, but I'm all 
over wanting yachts and planes. 

Money has value only for 
what it can do towards my 
goafs, if I can generate more, I 
can do more. . .and there is far 
more satisfaction In that than 
having a pocketful of hundred- 
dollar bills. . .or a bankfuL 

I have this dream of being 
able to help get amateur radio 
into more countries . . . as a way 
of helping those countries to 
grow. Countries have a desper- 
ate need for electronics and 
communications experts. . . 
technicians, engineers, and sci- 
entists. The best way, by far, for 
getting these needed people is 
via infection of teenagers with 
the virus of electronics... 
and that means amateur radio. 
It works f 

If the United States is going to 
stay on top over the next genera- 
tion or two, we need to invest in 
technical people, Tm working on 
that via my push to get amateur 
radio and computer clubs into 
every high school in the country. 
I'm also working on it via my 
Hawthorne*Green Institute 
concept ... a college which is 
geared to the 1960$ and 
90s... one which will feature 
high-speed concentrated educa* 
tion in both technical matters 
and business. My aim is to pro 



vide the education which will 
bring us tens of thousands of 
entrepreneurs, all with elec- 
tronics and computer back- 
grounds. Let's see any country 
get ahead of us then! 

So, when someone puts me 
down as looking to make mon- 
ey, agree with them... and 
point out that so far I have a 
good record of investing that 
money for the benefit of ama* 
teur radio and computing... 
and, I hope you'll agree... for 
our country. 

My ideas on how a college 
should be are spreading, Vm get- 
ting calls and visits from educat- 
ors who are interested in the 
plan and who see it as a way to 
guJde their schools into sol- 
vency in the next few years. With 
many private colleges failing, 
some radical change is needed. 
My talks on the subject in Brazil 
and South Africa brought great 
intereat, with invites to come 
back and get together with gov* 
ernment officials to further pur- 
sue the idea. 

No, If I was Into a personal for* 
tune, one of the first things I 
would do would be to stop writ* 
ing editorials, which Vm sure 
would immediately increase our 
circulation by about 50%. The 
next would be to stop my cru- 
sades, such as the very costly 
one twenty years ago to self 
sideband to the readers— who 
hated it and fett that AM was the 
only way to go. Or the effort in 
1969 to get amateurs interested 
In a little-known mode: NFM and 
repeaters. While I published 
hundreds upon hundreds of arti- 
cles on repeaters and NFM, or* 
ganlzed FM symposiums, put 
out a repeater bulletin, and doz- 
ens of books. . .the readers re- 
volted, with about 20,000 drop- 
ping the magazine in disgust. 
Oh, most of 'em came back, 
sending me notes saying that, 
golly, rd been right, sorry about 
that. But it was rough going for 
several years. 

Not having a house or **family 
life" to take up my time, and not 
having a yacht, plane, horses, 
and dogs, \ have the time to read 
so that I can keep up on comput- 
er technology, ,, time to keep 
dozens of business projects go- 
ing, .to personally use comput- 
ers, video cameras. . . to go ski- 
ing occasionally, to travel... 
and even get on the air more 
than you might think. I have the 
time to write my editorials and 
even articles for other maga* 



73MagBzme • FebruaryJ082 133 



2ines. I can get to Florida to give 
a talk on computers to an ac- 
counting group (expenses paidh 
to participate in a workshop on 
how to start special interest 
magazines (at the Folio show in 
New York). . . to get to South Af* 
rica and address data pfocess- 
ing professionals on the impact 



of microcomputers. . .and so 
on, I do have to give up some 
things which are important to 
most people in order to do what I 
enjoy. . , pursuing my goal of ed- 
ucatlon for as many people as 
possible. 

It doesn't take money to do 
many of the things \ do— just 



time management, I was able to 
set the 10.5-GHz record for 
states worked with borrowed 
equipment because I was will- 
ing to go up a damned mountain 
at all hours of the day and night 
for skeds. . .freezing my gaiuc- 
CIS off. 

Of course, if I get a lot of stat- 



ic about getting rfch, I can al- 
ways find some sucker to buy 
me out and go for a twenty-year 
sail around the world, charging 
$50 a contact to the Honor Roll 
hams, and live like a king^ An en- 
terprising ham can make 
$50,000 a year or more that way, 
as we have seen in the past. 



RTTY LOOP 



Marc i Leavey, M.D. WA3AJR 
4006 Winlee Road 
RandatlstQwn MO 21133 

One of the fastest growing 
phases of RTTY these days, at 
least as evidenced by the ques- 
tions I receive from readers of 
this column, is "computerized/' 
or at least video, RTTY, More 
and more, the amateur is getting 
away from the old grease- 
monger of mechanical tele- 
printer and turning to one of the 
oew microcomputer systems. 

One of those systems hams 
appear to be turning to is the 
new Radio Shack TRS-30C{R), 
the so-called "Color Computer." 
Based on the powerful Motorola 
6809 central processing unit, 
the TRS-80C appeals to the ham 
on many levels. Until recently, 
however, little was available in 
the way of RTTY software for 
this computer. 

Now, Clay Abrams K6AEP, an 
author whose works are well- 
known to the readers of 73, Is of- 
fering some rather nice software 
for the TRS-80C at reasonable 
prices, Appealing to both the 
RTTY and SSTV enthusiast, 
Clay has put together some 
rather nice packages. 

For the slow-scan television 
(SSTV) operator, Clay has three 
programs of varying degrees of 
capability. SSTV 7.2 converts 
the TRS-80C to an SSTV key- 
board for sending frames of five 
lines each consisting of six 
characters. The next step up is 
SSTV 7.3, which expands the 
previous system to include an 
SSTV keyboard, color keyboard, 
video mixing, and joystick 
graphics. His ultimate system is 
SSTV 7.4, which allows gray- 
level picture transmission and 
reception, color-picture recep- 
tion, tape-save ability, and many 
other features. The cost? SSTV 



7.2 IS only $20, and SSTV 7.3 and 
7.4 are $30 each. 

Not interested In SSTV, huh? 
Well, Clay has a few good RTTY 
programs, too! His bottom-line 
RTTY program, RTTY 7,01, al- 
lows RTTY transmission and re- 
ception in Murray and ASCII at 
all common rates. Three trans- 
mit buffers, an RY buffer, and a 
CW identifier are also provided. 
All this for $20. Clay's top- 
line program, RTTYCW, pro- 
vides RTTY transceive, CW trans- 
ceive, random code groups, 
split-screen display, multiple 
buffers, and tape saving. Requir* 
ing an external demodulator and 
CW interface, the program sells 
for the lofty sum of $30. 

I nterested? Drop Clay a line at 
Clay Abrams Software, 1758 
Comstock Lane, San Jose CA 
95124. Be sure to mention 
that you read about it in RTTY 
Loop, OK? 

Interest in older machines is 
still around. Chuck Euola 
K8YPU, of Redford Township, 
Michigan, is using an Altair 
eaob. This M6800-based com* 
puter was introduced shortly 
after the Altair 8800, the "origi- 
nal" B080 computer. Chuck is in- 
terested in receiving RTTY with 
his 680b, and wonders if some of 
the programs published to run 
with other 6800 systems will 
work. Other than changing the 
1^0 address, the biggest prob- 
lem you may have is with the 
slow speed of the 680b, as the 
clock runs at 500 kHz, roughly 
one half to one quarter of most 
other 6800 systems. However, 
you might try halving the con- 
stant in a delay loop, as calcu- 
lated for a 1-MHz system, and 
then fine tuning as necessary. 
The program published in this 
column back in July, 1978, 



should work reasonably well 
134 73 Magazine • February, 1982 



Not everybody likes a com- 
puter, though. I have a letter 
here from Richard E. Christina, 
in Pahrump NV, who writes, "I 
need a transmitter strictly for 
RTTY. . J would like about 200 
Watts, 100% duty cycle, tubes, 
vfo. . . I do not desire to use a 
computer at this lime." 

Well, Richard, first of all, let's 
get our apples and oranges 
straight. The computer, if you 
use one, replaces the mechani- 
cal teleprinter, not the transmit- 
ter and receiver. No matter what 
method you use to display the 
RTTY signal, from an ancient 
Model 12 to a Whiz-Bang 6880 
Micro^Term, you still need a 
transmitter, receiver (or trans- 
ceiver), and antenna to get on 
the air. 

Now, to the point of your 
question. A look through the 
back issues of 73 or any other 
amateur radio magazine or 
handbook will turn up many cir- 
cuit descriptions for CW trans- 
mitters. Basically, that's all a 
RTTY transmitter is: a CW, I.e., 
continuous wave, transmitter in 
which the frequency determin- 
ing element is modified by the 
digital RBY information. Adding 
that modification to the vfo, for 
example, involves a simple 
diode-capacitor combination, 
called a "shift pot," that we have 
covered in this column several 
times in the past few years. 

As for the teleprinter itself, 
finding information on this ma- 
chine or that can also take some 



ViOL£T 



r 



"^ 



YEllOw 



BLK/QRN 



WHT/tlWf 









JWHT/BLK I Z Ua)" 



WHT/ BLU 



0THSI /YLW 



i::^ 



GREEN 



n£t> 



r:3t> 



5RAT 



WHT /RED 



IZ:::& 



UIVAC 



<D 



L 



<l) 



doing, 1 have another letter here 
from K. D. Hardin KC51I, out in 
Albuquerque NM, who recently 
purchased a Teletype® Model 
3320 and is looking for data on 
hooking It up. The 3320 is the 
"I/O" version of the Model 33, 
and is a very useful machine. 
This machine is designed to 
work in a 20'mA loop, and con- 
nection is via either a nine- 
position terminal strip or a 
twenty-pin plug, located on the 
back of the call control unit. This 
is the right rear corner of the 
machine, as you face it. Fig. 1 is 
a diagram of the nine-pin strip, 
terminal strip 151411, at the rear 
of the machine. 

Unfortunately, not all Model 
33s are alike, and minor differ- 
ences In the call control unit can 
lead to major difficulties in 
hooking the machine up. Manu- 
als are available from several 
sources; see the ads in this mag- 
azine for current availability. 

I have a note here from Jeffrey 
A. Maass K8N0, who relates 
that RTTY DXers will have an op- 
portunity to add Anguilla (VP2E) 
to their DX totals between Feb- 
ruary 23 and March 3, 1982. A 
group of contesters will travel to 
Anguilla to participate in the 
ARRL CW and SSB DX contests 
between February 15 and March 
10J982, and will be taking along 
a complete RTTY station. Ama- 
teurs using the calls VP2EV 
(QSL to K8ND), VP2EJ (QSL to 
WA8C2S), and VP2E0 (QSL to 



TEfiHIHflL STRIP 



PRINTER' 



COMMO*i 



KE^BOARO 



Fig. 1. Modef 33 teletype hookup. 



WB8VPA) will be operating in 
the time slot detailed above. 
Good luck! 

By the way, the number of you 
(merested in BTTY DXing does 
seem to be growing. Not only for 
two-way communications, but 
for looking for those rare press 



and commercial stations, too! 
Lt. Mike Anderson, with the U.S. 
Navy in Europe, is one of those 
folks. So 1 am happy to let you in 
on a little tip. A few months 
back, I mentioned Tom Harring- 
ton's book, Worfd Press Servic- 
es Frequencies, in this column. 
Available from the 73 Radio 



Bookshop at $5.95, this book 
contains iistings of hundreds of 
commercial and governmentai 
RTTY stations. One of the ser- 
vices promised by Tom was to 
keep buyers updated of recent 
"finds" and changes to the 
listing. Well, I have received his 
latest listing, and it is quite a 



gold mine for the individual in- 
terested in RTTY monitoring. 

Well, this month brought 
Groundhog Day! Did the ground- 
hog poke his head out of 
Baudot, see his shadow, and 
ASCII for six more weeks of win- 
ter? Who can say? (Murray can!) 
Find out here, in RTTY Loop! 



A/EIV PRODUCre 



TEN-TEC 2-KW 
ANTENNA TUNER 

Another first for Ten Tec is 
a new 2-kW antenna tuner/swr 
bridge/power meter. The new 
tuner uses a reversible "U' con- 
figuration with a silver-plated 
roller inductor, high-voltage vari- 
able capacitor, and selectable 
fixed capacitors for greater ver- 
satiffty in impedance matching. 
The design automatically pro- 
vides a low Q minimum loss 
path when properly adjusted. 
Power ratfngs are 2 kW PEP and 
1 kW CW. Frequency range is 
1.a^ MHz. Model 229 matches 
conventional 50-Ohm unbal- 
anced outputs of transceivers or 
linear amplifiers to a variety of 
balanced or unbalanced load 
impedances. Antennas such as 
dipolest inverted *'V"s, long ran- 
dom wires, windoms, beams, 
rhombics, mobile whips, Zepps, 
Hertz, and similar types can be 
matched. A built-in balun con- 
verts one antenna to a balanced 
configuration if desired. 

The built-in swr bridge and 
dual-range power meter indi- 
cates swr from 1:1 to 5:1 and 
power from 10 to 2000 Watts. 

Front-panel controls are vari- 
able capacitor with spinner 
knob, roller inductor with spin- 
ner knob, 11-position bypass/hi- 
lo capacitor select switch, 4-po- 
sition antenna selector switch, 
swr sensitivity, forward/reverse 
switch, 2000/200-Watt power 
range switch, and swr/power 
meter switch. 

Bear panel Includes coax in- 
put connector, four coax anten- 
na connectors, three thumb- 
screw-type connectors for 
single wire and balanced line, 
ground connector, and 12-V dc 
input for dial lighting power. 

Styling matches the Ten-Tec 
Omni transceiver and Hercules 
IJnear amplifier with black and 



bronze front panel with blackout 
lightfng, satin-finish wrap- 
around aluminum bezel, black 
textured vinyl-clad aluminum 
clamshell top, and bottom with 
fold-down stalniess steel bail. 
Size:6V2"H x 12V4"Wx ISVa" 
D. Wt.: 9 lbs. 

For full information, write 
Ten-Tec, Highway 411 East, 
Seviervilie TN 37862. 



MFJ-401 AND 
MFJ-405 ECONO KEYER II 

The MFJ-401 and MFJ-405 
Econo Keyer II from MFJ Enter- 
prises is a new full-feature econ^ 
omy keyer using the Curtis 8044 
10 for reliability. The MFJ-401 /405 
Econo Keyer II has a much 
easier to use design and layout 
than the old Econo Keyer line. 
All controls are located on the 
front panel where they are easy 
to find and use. 

The MFJ-401 M05 Econo Keyer 
fi has front-panel controls for 
both speed and volume. The 
on/off switch and auto/semi- 
auto switch is on the front 




The MFJ-401 Econo Keyer U. 




The Ten-Tec 2-kW antenna tuner. 



73 



panel. This switch lets you use 
the Econo Keyer II ]Jke a bug or it 
can be used to make tuning 
more convenient. A red LED indi- 
cates when the MFJ-401 /405 
Econo Keyer II is on. It may be 
used with an internal 9-volt bat- 
tery or any source of 5-9 V dc. 
Circuitry is provided for both 
grid block and direct keying. 
This features lets the keyer work 
well with tube-type and solid- 
state rigs. 

The MFJ-405 Econo Keyer II 
has a built-in clear lucite paddle 
and a jack on the back for an ex- 
ternal iambic paddte. The 
MFJ-401 does not have a built-in 
paddle, but all other features are 

the same. 

For more information, con- 
tact MFJ Enterprises, Inc., 
PO Box 494, Mississippi State 
MS 39762, Reader Service 
number 478. 

LNR DOWNGONVERTER FOR 
SATELLITE COMMUNICATIONS 

The new Model DC4-E1 is a 
high-performance, low-profite rf 
to i-f converter especially de- 
signed for small terminal satel- 
lite Earth stations. Available in 
single thread and redundant 
configurations, this unit offers 
low phase noise ^n^ good fre- 
quency stability for digital and 
voice carriers, such as QPSK 
and FM-SCPC. The DC4-E1 is 
compact, measuring only 1^3/4" 
in heightp and is designed for 
19" rack mounting. Interfaces 
are coax connectors, so that the 
signal may be carried on low* 
cost coaxial cable. FET LNA 
power on the rf input connector 
is available as an option. 

Low translation phase noise 
is ensured by an internal crystal* 
controlled phase-locked oscil- 
lator. Additionally, designed op- 
timization ensures minimal in- 
termodulation distortion. Each 
converter module is self-con- 
tained, including power supply. 
The unit is designed for unat- 
tended operation and has a re- 
motable summary alarm and 
front-panel monitors for key op- 
erating parameters, LNR is a 

Magazine • February, 1982 135 



■i^ 







leading manufacturer of tele- 
communications equipment for 
satellite Earth stations. 

For more Information, please 
contact LNR Communications, 
Inc., Marketing Department, 180 
Marcus Blvd., Hauppauge NY 
11787. Reader Sen/^ce number 
480. 



NEW TOWER TRAILER 

For those special situations 
that require communications 
tower mobility, Aluma Tower Co. 
introduces an all-steel trailer for 
transporting and erectmg any 
Aluma Tower Co. aluminum or 
steel tower, Ideal for Field Day, 
civil defense, remote signal test- 
ing and many other situations, 
the tower/trailer combination is 
easily towed. Once in place, the 
tower is tilted up and cranked in- 
to position. The trailer acts as a 
secure base. 

For more information, con- 
tact Aluma Tower Co., 1639 Old 
Dixie Highway, Box 2806, Vero 
Beach FL 32960. Reader Sen/ice 
number 482. 

PORTABLE RTTY/CW 
TERMINAL 

HAL Communications Corp. 
is pleased to announce the new 
CWR685A Teiereader portable 
RTTY^CW terminal. Featuring 
compact s^ze and 12-V dc opera- 
tion, the CWR685A is just the 
thing for the traveling RTTY am- 
ateor who wants to "take it with 
him.'' A green phosphor 5" dis- 
play Is built into the small 
12-3M" X ir'x 5" main cabi- 
net, as is a RTTY modem for 3 
shifts, both "high" and "low" 
tones. The keyboard is separate 
and connects with a 3-foot cord 
to the main unit. Advanced fea- 
tures such as programmable 
HERE IS messages, type-ahead 
transmit buffer, and automatic 
transmit-receive control are in- 
cluded with the Telereader. The 
CWR685A can easily be slipped 
into a suitcase for a ham outing. 
In the home shack^ the Tele- 

136 73Magazlne * FebruaryJ 




m* 




■i 



^ 



The LNR frequency converter 




The Aluma Tower trailer. 




The HAL portable RTTY/CW termmaL 




reader consumes little space 
and can be connected to an ex- 
ternal monitor and parallel 
ASCII printer for even more ver- 
satility. 

For more information, con- 
tact HAL Communications 
Corp., Box 365, Urbana IL 61801. 
Reader Service numtjer 479. 

982 



SUPERCW 

Frontier Enterprises has In- 
troduced SUPERCW, a comput' 
er-aided instruction program for 
the TRS-80 Model I or Ml micro- 
computer. Sound and graphics 
are combined to teach the user 
International Morse Code. By 
progressively increasing the 



copy speed, SUPERCW brings 
the user to 20 words per minute 
in as little as 72 hours of 
practice. 

The disk-based SUPERCW 
package requires a 32K, 1-disk 
system. Features Include ran- 
dom or plain text practice, sam- 
ple testing, and provision for 
multiple users. For more Infor* 
mation, contact Frontier Enter* 
prises, 3511 Gallows Road, Falls 
Church VA 22047, Reader Ser- 
vice number 483. 

MOBILE HT CHARGER 

Mobile amateurs can operate 
and recharge their hand-held 
radios anytime with the new HT 
Power-ChargerTM from Valor En- 
terprises. They simply insert the 
charger Into the lighter socket 
and attach the mating plug to 
the radio. It will charge hand- 
held radios in less than an hour. 
The HT Power-Charger is not 
just a dropping resistor and 
diode, but a pair of transistors in 
a variable current regulator that 
is self-adjusting depending on 
the batteries' state of charge. 

Mobile amateurs will appreci- 
ate the convenient package— all 
circuitry Is enclosed In the plug 
With no box dangling on the 
cord. The HT Power-Charger 
features a built-in LED to in- 
dicate lighter socket function, 
with a five-foot connecting 
cable and plug to mate with the 
radio. There are six models de- 
signed to fit most popular ama- 
teur hand-held radios. 

For more information, con- 
tact Valor Enterprises, Inc., 185 
W. Hamiiton Street, West Miiton 
OH 45383, Reader Service 
number 481, 




Valor Enterprises' mobile HT 
charger. 



I 

I 

I 

I 



I 



I 



I 

I 
I 

I 






#rMV 



m^i ■ I 1.1 I 




ORBIT is the Official Journal for the 
Radio Amateur Satellite corporation 
(AMSAT), P.O. Box 27, Washington, DC 
20047. Please write for application. 

For a FREE SAMPLE COPY please 
send $1 to cover First Class Postage 
and handling to: Orbit, 221 Long 
Swamp Road, woicott, CT 06716. 




MOVING? 

Lef us knaiv B weeks in advance so that you won't 
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AHach old label where indicated and print new ad- 
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magazine 



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Address p. 
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WATCH FOR OUR NEW PRODUCTS 

COMING SOON 



istts 

ECAST 



HAL 2304 UHi DOV,\ . . ', , £RTERS (f flEO flAKGt 2O0O/25O0 MH^j 
2304 MODEL #1 KIT EASlC UNIT W/PREAMP LESS HOUSING & FITT^GS 
2304 MODEL §2 KIT \m\h presmp) 
2304 MODEL t3 KIT ^irtt H^gn G«m pfumpt 

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BASl C POWER S U P!^¥ , ..__ 119*5 

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TO 600 WH/ FEATURES TWOiNPUrS OPHE FOR LOW FREOUENCV ANO ONE FOR HtGH 
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WITH OPTfONAL TO SEC GATE AVAJLABLE ACGliftACV ±00^% yTiLiZES lO-WH/ 
CRYSTAL 5 PPM COMPLETE KIT 11 39 



HAL'300A ?-^\m COUNTER (SIMILAR TO fiOOA) WITH 



FREQUENCE RANGE OF D 
COMP-LETEKIT SlOO 



HAL^SOA fl-DiGiT COUNTtfl WllM FREQUENCY RANGE OF ZERO TO 50 MHz OR aETTER 

AUTOMATIC DECIMAL POINT ZERO SUPPRESSION UPON DEMAND FEATURES TWO iN 
PUTS ONE FOR LOW FREQUENCY IhJPljT AND ONE ON PANEL FOR USE WITH ANY «NTER' 
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BEET* MADE i SEC AMD 1 SEC TIME GATES ACCURACY ± 001% UTIUZES 10-MH/ 
CRYSTAL 5 PPM COMPLETE KIT $109 

FREE: HAL'79 CLOCK KIT PLUS AN iNLtNE RF PROBE WITH PUflCttASE OF Ai^Y FRt 
OUEMCV COUNTER 



HAL JOO PRE . 
HAL 300 A/PRE 
HAL 600 PRE 
HAL 600 AiPRE. 



PRE'SCALERKITS 

{Pre-dniled G-IOtKjarci ^nd alt cGmponent&j ... tl4.4£ 

.... (Samg as abov« but m\h preampji. .... S24,9S 

(Pre-dnllBd G 10 board arrd all components) $28.95 



tSame as above but «ith pfeamp) 



S39 9& 




HAL-1 GHz PRESCALER, ^Hf & uhf input i out 

PUT DIVIDES B¥ 1000 OPERATES ON A SINGLE 5 VOLT SUPPLY 

PREeurLTt TESTED S7« »5 

TOUCH TONE DECODER KIT 

HIGHLV STABLE OECODEft KIT COMESWlTw^SiOtO PLATED THR^ -'.: SOLOEH FLOWEO 
G 10 PC BOARD 7 567 5 ??iO? ASO ALL iLECTROl^tC COMPOKEHTS ffiJAWJ WlAS 
URES 3 1/2 ■ 5-1/2 INCHES HAS t ? ilHES OUT ONLY 139.95 

NiW— ie LINE DELUXE DECODER %mM 

DELUXE 12BUTT0N TOilCHTONE ENCODER KIT UTiLl2lHlG THE NEW iCW 
;206 CHIP PflOviOES BOTH VISUAL ' »U0ID ^iprCAliOl^S' COMES WITH iTS OWN 
TWO TONE ANOOIZEO ALtiMl*iiUW L«ii *: V-l-SuRES 0«LY 2VA- t 3-3/4" COM 
PLETE WITH TOUCH TONE PAD BOARD CRYSTAL CHtP ANO Ali NECESSARY COMPO 
*||NTST0NNISHTHEKIT PRICED At *2S,95 

r^EW - 1€ LINE DELUXE ENCODER l^d 95 

FOfl THOSE WHO WISH TQ MOUNT iHt ENCODER IN A HAND HELD UNiT ThE PC SOAflO 
MEASURES ONLY 9/lfi*^ v V3V4- THIS PARTIAL KIT WfTH PC PC-R::! CRvSTAi CHIP 
AWD COMPONENTS PfilCEOAT 114.tS 

ACCyKEYER (KIT) this ACCUKEVER IS A ^EViSEO VERSrON OF XHi VERY POPULAR 
WB4VVF ACCUKErtJ^ ORlGiNALLY DESCflrBEO BY JAMES GARRETT m OST MAGA^iNl 
AND THE 1 57^ RADfO AMATEUR S HANDBOOK 116.95 

ACCUKEVER — MEMORr OPTION KIT PROVIDES A SIMPLE LOW COST METHOD 
OF ADDING MEWOflV CAPA&lliTY TQ [HE WB4VVF ACCUK£VER WHILE DESIGNED FOR 
DIRECT ATTACHMENT TO THf. ABOVE ACCUKEYER. IT CAN ALSO BE ATTACHED Tfl ^NY 
STANDARD ACCUKEYER BOARD WITH LiTUE OlFfiCULTY S18.95 

8UYB0TH THE MEMORY AND THE KEYEfl AND SAVE COMBLf^ED PRICE ONLY *32.00 



HAL PA 19 WIDE 

PDtNJSj IS dB GAIN 



PREAMPLIFIER 

BAND PRE-AMPLIFIER. ..'^'Cio MHz BANDW'DTH 1 - MB 
FULLY ASSEMBLED AND TESTED »i.9fi 




CLOCK KIT ^ HAL n FOURDIQIT Sf^ECIAL - VM. 

OPERATES 0^ 12 VOLT AC iNDT SUPPLIED! PROVISIONS FOR DC ft.ND 
AtARM OPERATION 

6-DtGtT CLOCK* 12/24 HOUR 

COIIPLtTE KtT CONS^ST.JiG Of ^ PC G m PRt-DRaLEB PC 60ftfl0S I CiOC« CHIP 6 
FNDCOMM CATh readouts ^ 3 TRANS 3 CAPS 9 RESlSTOHS 5 DIOOES 3 PUSH 
BUTTON SWrTCHES POWER TRANSFORMER AND KNSTmiClKWlS QOftT BE FOOLED BV 
PAl*TiAL«(TS WHERE. YOU HAVE TO SUYEV£flYIH^NG EXTRA PRICED AT 11^.95 

CLOCK CASE AVAILABLE AND WILL Fif AN* ONE Of THE AHJVt CL -' - i .^R 
PRICE Ifi 50 BUT ONLT U SO WHEN SDU&HT WITH CLOCK 

SlXOkClT ALARM CLOCK KIT i OR HOWE CAMPEII KV. OR FlElI)-OAY USE OPfft 
ATESON U-VDlT A£ Off OC AND HAS 'TS OWN 60 H| TiM( BASE ON THE BOARO COM 
PLETE WTTH ALL ELECTRONIC COMPONENTS AND TWO PIECE PflEORlLtED PC BOAf»DS 
BOARD SIZE ■*" k r COMRETE WITH SPEAKER AND SWITCHES IF OPERATED ON DC 

There is nothing more to buy * priced at tie.95 

■IWELVE-VOLT AC LIME CORD FOR ThOSE WhO WiSH TO OPERATE THE CLOCK f«OM 
110- VOLT AC *2.M 

SHIPPING INFORMATION; ORDERS OVER S25 WILL BE SHIPPED POST- 
PAID E>(CEPTON ITEMS WHERE ADDlTtONAL CHARGES ARE REQUEST- 
ED ON ORDERS LESS THAN S25. PLEASE INCLUDE ADDITIONAL $2.00 
FOR HANDUNG and MAILING CHARGES. SEND 204 STAMP FOR FREE 
FLYER. 

DISTRIBUTOR FOR 

Aluma Tow«r • AP Products 

(We have the new Hobby- BIom Syslem) 



.^31 




"HAL" ^^ ^- 
HAROLD C NOWLANO 



W8ZXH 



HalTronix 

P.O. BOX 1101 

SOUTHGATE, MICH. 48195 

PHONE (313) 286-1782 



t 



* 



,^See Usr of A^¥9f timers on ptagB i 14 



73 Magazine • February. t982 137 



■1 



CLOCKS & KITS 

SEE THE WORKS CLOCK 

Our Easiest Clock To Assemble 






nfffrrrr: 






RAodel 850 



Six drglts LED clock. 12 or 24 hour 
formaL Attractive cfear plexigtas 
stand. Kit is complete including pre- 
cut and drilled plexiglas stand and all 
hardware. Size: 6" H x4-1/3" W x 3" 

Model 850 _ , _ . _ S29,9S 

Model 8S0 WT (Factory wired & tested) . . . 

, $39.95 

Now available with GREEN LEDs 

Model GeSO . _ $39.95 

Model G850WT(Factory wired & tested) . , 

(10% off If you buy 3 or more) 



6 DIGIT CLOCK KIT 



12 or 24 hour format. Six large .5" 

digits. 50/60 hz operation. Kit is 

complete with aitractlve plexiglas 

cabinet. 

Model 5314 ....._,,,.._ . $29 J5 



Model 5314 



MOBILE CLOCK KIT 



Mod^l 2001 



6 Digit LED dispfay. 12 or 24 hour 
format. Will operate 12 VDC or 12 VAC 
Accurate crystal time base. LED 
display turns off and on with ignition if 
desired. Kit is complete with cabinet 
and 4 way mounting bracl^et. 

Model 2001 R $29.95 

($27.95 in qtys. of 3 or more) 



60 HZ CRYSTAL TIME BASE 

Enable your digital clocks to run on DC power. 

Model TB-1 ,....,,.,, , $4.95 

Model TB-1 WT (wired & tested) , $9.95 

VEHICLE INTRUSION ALARM 

Easy to assemble and install, this kit offers options not 
normally found in other alarm systems. Hidden switch 
mounts under the dash. Kit has provision of sensors and 
remote control switch. Programmable time delays for exit, 
entry and alarm periods. Basic hook-up utilizes the dome 
light circuit activating when doors are opened. The aJarm 
will drive a siren or pulse horn at a 1 HZ rate. Not prone to 
false alarms due to reliatJle CMOS circurtry. No 
external switch required: Complete kit with easy to fotlow 
instructions and diagrams. 

Model ALR-1 , _ _ ..•*,. **,,,..... , . $14 JS 

Model ALR-1WT (wired & tested) , , $24.95 



(10% Off if you buy 3 or more) 

TERMS: US & Canada add 5% sliipping, handling & msurance. 
Fofeign orders add 10% (20% airmail}. Orders under $20.00 add 
$1.50 extra handling. COD add $2.00, Visa /Mastercard welcome, 
Ohio residents add 4^% sales tax. 



Prices subject to change without prior notice. 



^307 



DEBCO ELECTRONICS 

P. O. BOX 9169 DEPT. K 

CfNClNNATU OHIO 45209 

Phone; (513) 531-4499 



BEEPER 





The Professional Touch 
Comes to Amateur Radiol 

tiie-.- •■ ■■■■ in<MCII* Uf '4»*n. • I(m> DMp IB 
• r%itpLt tfr iOH ^aAe tram dui'ii^ Atit^ 









','aff 



i-n«hwi CMOS tm^amiirt^ tsm 

SP^ for «» w Of* !««' 
• &viLtaMft«ctc0t«nwiton 73iV ■ 



L 



BP-SA: case, c^ble. siatidard 4-piii 
C&rinfrctors $39.9& pfid 
W*-3B; same as a&Ove* without con- 
nectors'.^-. -*-'.****<*'ih36.96 ppd 
BP-3C: circuM tioard only, lor 
custom Installatiaftft S29 95 ppd 

Atl TTHMMt* M* Assamb^sd/tfrfitidi and csny a W day limirsd warrantY Wa 
ship FIRST CLA5S^INSUH£tl and m M^EPAY snapping \r\ |h« US X)«fl/af 
inqufftes iryiiit9C OHnio iiiftsidartt^ pisase ajjd ^^ ^l«t isx C^ack or nioney 

31 48 Oorf Drive, 

INC. 




Dayton, Ohio 45418 



Two-meter HT. Amplifier Kit 



« 






*^ 



1.5watt9 In— 20 out 
COR BNG in— SO 239 out 
smaH size: 1-3/16" x 3' x 4-1^^ 
Class C or ABl 



ask about 
Oiir other 
UHF & VHF 
amplHrer kits 




^459 



QRO ENGINEERING 



1^8 Edwartfs Ave, 

LakewDod, OH 44107 

(216)221 9500 



APARTMENT BLUES? 

Get m the oil NOW) 

with 
HANDBOOK OF APARTMENT OPERATION 

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Every tt^ing you need to know oboui operating from these 

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MONEY BACK GUARANTEE 

only S12,50 + $1.50 p&h Check. MC. VISA (card#^ate) 
to Wessex Publishing Co. Dept, B9 
POS 175 N. Chelmsford. MA. 01863 



UNSCRAMBLE 



SCANNER ACCESSORIES 

FREE LITERATURE 

501-623-6027 

DNE, INC., RT. 7, BX257 ^13 
HOT SPRINGS, ARK. 71901 



POLICE CODE 



138 IBMagaztne • FebruarVp 1962 



MM HELP 



I am in need of a schematic or 
Instfuction manuaf for a MARC 
multiband radio receiver. I wiil 
pay copying and mailing 
expenses. 

Scognamiglio Vincenzo 

Piazza Trieste e Trento^ 17 

80046 S. Giorgio A Cremano 

Naples, Itaiy 

I am In need of information on 
the Gataxy V MK3, conversion 
details for an Aerotron trans- 
ceiver, and information on inter- 
facing a TRS-80 to a Model 15 
printer via an M-80 interface. 

Tom Van Schuyler WA2L0J 

57 Needle Lane 
Levtttown NY 11 756 

I am In need of manuals for a 
Gonset 3136. an Ameco 
5a220^M Hz vfo, and a Seco 520 
antenna tester. 

Orlo Taylor WASHWM 

18412 N. 148tliAve. 

Spring Lake Ml 49456 



I need help interfacing a DEC 
(Digital Equipment Ckirp.) dot 
matrix printer. LA-30 (1972 vin- 
tage), I have no schemattc or 
configuration info, and can't 
seem to shake one ioose any- 
where, I will pay for copFes and 
postage. 

Stephen F. Gent WB2VKL 

Berry Rd 
FredoniaNY 14€G3 

I am in need of a service 
manuai or wiring diagram for a 
Hallicrafters S120A receiver. I 
wNI copy your original and 
return it to you. 

Bill Suffich W4UUC 
55 So. Carien St 
Mobile AL 36606 

I would UkB to phone QSO 
with anyone into weather fax 
recording, 

Dante Ventrier© KA4JRE 

17831 NW 81 Ave. 

Miami FL 33015 



MILITARY SIGNAL GENERATORS 



RECONDITIONED AND LAB CALIBRATED 



TSr51WU RANGE lO MHZ THRU 420 MHZ AM/CW OP PULSE MODULATION. CAU- 
BRATED ATTENUATOR. MILITARY EQUIVALENT TO HPSOaO I ITLm 

TS^inJRMjZ . RANGE 3uB TO 7 GHZ, AM/PULSE MODULATION, CALIBBATEO 
ATTEMUATOR, military EQUIVALENT TO Hf>6iaA 34^,00 

i-fPeCfeA. RANGE 50 KHZ TH RU 50 MHZ AMiCW. G A LfBRATED ATTENtiATOft ASOOT 
HP6T2A , RANGE 450 TM«U tZ30 MHZ. AM/fHJLSE MODULATION. CAUfiRATED 
ATTENUATOR 47&ilO 

HP614 , RANGE 90Q THmj 2t00 MHZ AM'PUL^ MODULAnON, CAUfiRAT^O ATTfN. 
UATOR i4S.OO 

LIRM^ RANGE 10 KHZ THftU 50 MHZ AMiCW, liOOULATlON 400 A \ KHZ, 
CAUBftAtlD OWTPUT. PREOStON 50 OHM STOP ATTENlJATOH jmm 

URM26 . RAP4GE 4 MHZ THRU 40& MHZ AM^CW MODULATION. CAUBRATED 
AITENUATOB iftS-W 

TS497aiRR. RANGE ? MHZ THRU 90 MHZ CALf&RAT^D ATTENUATOR. AM/CW 
MODULATION^ MiyTA^Y VER&pON Qf MEASUREMENTS MOCtELaO ^StSM 

SGtJtfU . AfRCRAFT VORrlLS. RANGE lOB THRU t3S 9 MHZ AND 329 9 TO 335 MHZ 
OUTPUT SIGNALS INCLUDE VOR LOC, GLIDESLOPE AND 1000 CPS SAME AS COL 
UNSiTgrj OPERATES FflOM 2fi VOC AT 3 1 1 AMPS BENCH POWER SUPPLY OR AlP 
CRA F T B ATTER lES I DEAL FO R A IflCRAFT RADIO REPAl R aW-OO 

SGIA/ARN . AEflCRAFT RADIO SlG GEN WITH PP34a/ARN 1 tSVffiO HZ P/S. RANGE B8 
THRU Up MHZ AND 110 1 TO lU 9 MHZ fN fO KHZ STEPS CALIBRATED OUTPUT 
400/1000 HZ. MODULATION INT OR EXT, MILITARV EQUIVALENT TO BOONTON SUA 

345.0O 
SGijMJ, RANGE 20 MHZ THRU ICM MHZ, METERED RF OUTPUT 0-5 V METERED 
DEVIATION 100 KHZ, PERFECT FOR LOW BAND FM RADIO SERVICING OR USE TO 
REPAIR YOUH PRC. GflC, VRC. FM RADIOS 185,00 

ABOVE SIGNAL GENERATORS ARE OF EXCELLENT QUALITY, BUILT TQ MIUSPECS 
0S-1g1/USM-14Q . OSCILLOSCOPE WITH MX307a^USM HO RIZ CHANNEL PLUG-I M AND 
MX-2g30 DUAL TRACE PLUG^IN, 5"CRT. INTERNAL SWEEP, Z4 CALIBRATED RANGES 
WITH SWEEP EXPANSJON, TRIGGER MOOES, CALIBRATOR, DC £2 MHZ. HOUSED IN 
VENTED AIR COOLED CABINET. SIZE 22' L * U'H » iS" W. A BEAUTIFUL MIUTARV 
OSCILLOSCOPE AT A GOOD LOW PRICE 2SS.M 

T S 29/U TEL ET^PEWR ITER T EST SET 4i JM 

HPSOSVHFBi^lDGE KOO 

SIERRA 1268 FREQUENCY SELECTIVE VOL TMETfR " 8S.«> 

HP415B STANDING WAVE INDICATOR 4$J0O 

UPM-gB RADAR TEST SET liS.OO 

URM32tA FREQUENCY METER 13S*< HZ THRU TOCO IIMZ S500 

HP741A AC/DC 01 FEERENTIAL VOLT METER DC ST AI*DARD WSJM 

FOB OTTO N.C.. 30 DAY MONEY BACK GUARANTEE 
WE ACCEPT MC VISA OR CHEC^t P^QNE BILL SLEP (7041 ^^-J^n 




Slop Electronics companif 

p. O. BOX lOO, HWY 441. DEPI. 73 
OnO, NORTH CAROUNA 28763 

Electronic Distributors t^M' 




WORK THE U.H.F. BANDS 

Add a transvertcr or converter to your e?Eisiing lOm, 6m or 2[n equipments. 
Choose from the largest selection of modules available for DX, OSCAR, 
EME, ATV. 
TRANSVERTERS ^^^ 50^144 S234.95 

MMT 144-28 $219.95 
MMT 432-28 (S) S3 19.95 
MMT 439-ATV $379,95 
MMT 1296-144 $399.95 
^^^^ OTH E R MODELS AV AJLABLE 

CONVERTERS 

Choose frofn many models to suit your needs. 
Examples: MMC 412-2g, MMC 426/439— ATV 

MMK 1296-144. MMC l2Sa^ATV 
Write for details and available options. 

nLTERS 

Preveni OSCAR 8 Mode J desense 
Use MMF200-7 $42.95 

Slop receiver tMD birdies 
U-.^ PSF432 S59.95 

ANTENNAS ^ ^ " 

420-450 MHz J -beams 
4a el. 15.7dBdS75.75 
88 eL 18.5 dBd $105,50 

1250^1300 MH/ loop yagi 1296-LY $49,75 

Send 36C stamps for full details of all our VHF/UHF items. 

Prc-selector 11 iters 

Low -pass fillers 

Varactor tri piers 

Pre-ampJificrs 





70/MBM 48 





Transvertcrs 

Converters 

Antennas 

Crystal Fillers 
Spectrum InteraalloiijiL Inr. 
Post Office Bo\ 1084S 
Cuncord. Musis. 01742 I SA 



VfSA_ 



masief Charge 



j^436 



3 



DOLLAR SAVER/SPACE SAVER 

WELZ SP-300 SWR & POWER METER 

1.8 to 500 MHZ/1 W to 1 KW 




Will S^ 



Exclusive cross over frequency" range 

3 Transmitter/ 3 Antenna Connectors, 

One SWR/ Power for the serious amateur who operates all bands, HF 

to 450 MHz 

Serious Dealers Lisiing Available. 



NCG 



*^318 



1275 N. Grove St. 
Anaheim* CaL 92806 

(714)630-4541 

NOTH: Price^ Specifications subject to change without notice and 
oMiualion. 



J 



^See^ UstQf Advertisers ^n page 114 



73 Magazine • February J 982 139 



Hi Pro Mk 




LB'VHF-UHF REPEATERS soon to be fcc type accepted 

NEW SUPERIOR RECEIVER AND TRANSMITTER SPECIFICALLY DESIGNED 
— NEW— FOR REPEATER SERVICE. ADJUSTABLE TRANSMITTER POWER, FROM 1 

to 25 WATTS MINIMUM OUTPUT WITH EXTREMELY COOL OPERATION. 
^-AUTOMATIC BATTERY SACK UP SYSTEM CAPABILITY WITH BATTERY 
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ADVANCED REPEATER SQUELCH SYSTEM NO CHOPPING, POPPING, OR 
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TY LONG LIFE DESIGN. — AMATEUR DISCOUNTS AVAILABLE— 
■ fr« ni-^i-iifi-n ^FVAiLi^»..-i-.-i^n NOW USED IN ALL HI PRO REPEATERS 

Hi Pro RECEIVER and TRANSMITTER also available m kit form 




NEW 




HI PRO TRANSMITTER 

DESIGNED FOR REPEATER 

SEflVfCEWITH EXCELLENT 

AUDIO, STABILITY, 

HAflMONICHEJECTION, 

AND LOW 

SIDEBAND NOISE. 



NEW 



SMALL SIZE 
37/8 X 6-1/8" 



ADJUSTABLE 
POWER 
OUTPUT— 
UP TO 5 WATTS 
FROM THE 
EXCITER BOARD 
COOL OPERATION 

THIS EXCITER ES USED TO DRIVE THE HI PRO 25 WATT 
POWER AMPLIFIER AND (S AVAILABLE KIT OR 
ASSEMBLED, 



HI PRO RECEIVER 

THIS RECEIVER tSTHE 
HEART OF THE REPEATER 
AND BOASTS SUPERIOR 
SQUELCH ACTION NEEDED 
FOR THIS TYPE OF 
SERVICE. EXCELLENT 
SENSITIVITY, STABILITY 
AND SELECTIVITY 



USE THIS RECEIVER 
TO REPLACE THAT 
TROUBLESOME RECEIVER 
IN YOUR PRESENT 
REPEATER. 

WRITE FOR COMPLETE SPECIFICATtONS ON OUR FULL 
LINE OF ACCESSORIES AND LOWER COST 
REPEATERS. 



SMALL SIZE 
3-7/8 X 6-1/8" 




'46 



MAGGIORE ELECTRONIC LAB. 



590 SNYDER AVE 

WEST CHESTER, PA. 19380 



PHONE 215-436^6051 




llnlv«r«Al ComnynlcjirioA* 

A DIVISION OF INNOVATIVE LABS. INC. 

P.O, BOX 339 

ARLINGTON. TEXAS 76004-0339 




SUPERVERTER I $99.95 

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2300 MHZ CONVERTER KIT. ....,.,,. $35.00 

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VARIABLE POWER SUPPLY. ........ $24.95 

Complete kit includes all cofnponents for working unit, 
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DISK YAGI ANTENNA $25.00 

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4-FOOT DISH ANTENNA $54.95 

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^UNIVERSAL COMMUNICATIONS ^ "^°°^^»^ 



140 73Magazlne • FebruaryJ982 





Are yoii on the verge of drowning in the flood of 
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73 Magazine • February J 982 141 




MORSE 

RTTY 
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QUALITY AT AN AFFORDABLE PRICE 




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142 73 Magazine • February, 1982 



Wayne Green Books 







i:trciii0Nacs 

bill Jd your 




■TRS-80 IS a ifademarfc Ot 

fladKj Snack Oivlsion of Tandy Cotp. 



Annotated BASIC— A New Technfque for Neophytes. 

BASIC programming was supposed to be simple— a beginner's programming 
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Annotated BASfC explains the complexities of modern BASIC. It includes com- 
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Annotated BASiC deals with the hows and whys of TRS-SO BASIC programming. 
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AnnatmtKi BAStC V^lami f cofltaifvs Profectino Profiis, Sunwyof. Ttitnts to Do. Tas She^ief. IfHroducfion to 
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System Design, (available February) 8K7385 Si 0.9$ iSSN 0>^00&037^9 

Order Both Volumes and Sawe! BK738402 $18.95 

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A practical course in digital electronics 

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Learning electronics theory without practice isn't easy. And it's no fun to build an 
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ISSN 0^8006027 1 (available December) BK7386 $14.95 

The New Weather Satellite Handbook 

By Dr. Ralph E Taggart WB8DQT 

Here is the completely updated and revised edition of the best-selling Weather 
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siation op«aiions. is8N aaflooMiM available HOW ! BK7383$8.95 



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THE 1382 EDITfON 

GENERAL LICENSE 
STUDY GUIDE 

by Timothy M. Daniel N8RK 

This is the complete guide to the General License. 

Learning ratlier than memorizing is the secret. This 

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144 73Magazine • February, 1982 



Take your favorite H.T. out 
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For $64.95 you get the most efficient, 
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IC 720 ADC $1349 

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I C 290 A $ 549 

IC451A $ 899 



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FT208R 


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FT 707 


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73 Magazine • February, 1982 145 



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9t?:. 9^V?g. 



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IankAmericaro 



7WMC 



master charge 



We Want to DEAL— Carl Us— We'll Do It Your Way. 

WE'RE #1 _ 

NOTE: SEND S1.00 FOR OUR CURRENT CATALOG OF NEW AND RECONDITIONED EQUtPMENT^ 

* ALSO WE PERIODICALLY PUBLISH A LIST OF UNSERVICED EQUIPMENT AT GREAT SAVINGS. 

A BONANZA FOR THE EXPERIENCED OPERATOR, 

TO OBTAIN THE NEXT UNSERVICED BARGAIN LIST SEND A SELF ADDRESSED STAMPED ENVELOPE 



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TAlcoma. WA/UM {20») 7fia!frf| 



140 73 Magazine • February. 1982 



THE AUTEK "QRM ELIMINATOR" 



Model QF-1A 
For SSB & CW 
$73.00 



Corvilfiuously varl- Corttinuousiy varh 

able main selectivity able main frequsiHy. 

(to an IncredJbla 20 (250 to 2500 Hz) 
Hzri 




R^ 



1f 5 VAC Supply butll^ Auxiliary Notcli re- Four main filter 

in. Filter by pa ss&d jectsSO to 11,000 Hz! modes lor any QRM 

when off. Covers signals other situation. 

notches can't touch. 



AUTEK pioneered the ACTIVE AUDIO FILTER back in 
1972. Today, we're still the engineering lesder-Our new QF- 
lA is the latest exarnple. \Vs INFINITELY VARIABLE. Yoy 
v^iy seiecUvity 100;1 and frequency over the entire usable 
audio range This Jeis you feiecl whistles with dual notcJises 
(10 70 dB), or reject SSB hiss ancf splatter with a f jHy ad- 
justable lowpese plus au*. notch. Imagine what the NAR- 
ROWEST CW FILTER MADE will due ro QRM! HP rejects 
Jovtf kequencies. Skirts exceed 80 dB. 1 watt speaker amp. 



Built-in 115 VAC supply. 6V2x5x2Vi. Two-tone grey styling 
Even latest rigs include or\ly a fraction ot ihe QF-1A 
sel-ectivrty Yet il hooks up in minutes to ANY ri^-Yaesu, 
Kenwood, Drake, Swan, Atlas, Tempo, Heath, CoH"ir>s, Ten- 
Tec, etc, Just plug i1 into your phone jack and connect spki. 
Of phones lo the oulpuL Join the thousands &f owners who 
now t>ear stations ihey couldn'l copy without a OF-1A! Il 
really works! 



WORLDS RECORD KEYER. OVER 4000 DX QSO'S IN 2 DAYS! 

Probably the most popular "professional" contest keyer 
In use, yet most owners are casual CW operators or nov- 
ices. After a few minutes, you'll see how memory revolu- 
lionizes your Cvy operation! Just start sendmg and record 
your CQ, name, QTH^ &{c. in seconds. 1024 bits stores 
about 100 characters (Fetters, numbers). Playback at any 
speed. Dot/dash memories, triggered clock, repeat, com- 
bine, 5 to 50 -H WPM, built-in monitor and 115 VAC supply. 
Wofhs with any paddle. Sit back and relax whiieyour MK-1 
calls CQ and handles standard eKchanges! 

Optionat memory expandei' IME-I) expands any MK-1 to 
400 characters. ME-1 factory I r» stalled $35. Owner in- 
stalled, only $25. Add more memory now or iatert 




Model MK1 Keyer $104.50 




NO LONG DELAYS. WE SHIP 95% OF 
ORDERS FROM STOCK 

We sell only factory dtrsct. No dealer markup In our prtce. 
Order with check, M.O., VISA, MC. We pay shipping in 48 
states. Add 4% tax in Fla. Add $3 to Canada, Hi., AW. Add 
$18 eacji et sew here. (Shipped air.) 



Model 173DM 

Dual, independent cfocks/Solld walnut case/ 

Functional and beautiful 
$69.95 (plus $3.00 shipping) 




Model 173B 

Internal backlight/Aluminum 

and Poly case^ Portable 

$34.95 tpJiis $3.00 shippings 




Independent Military Option 

Military time format clocks by Benjamin MichaeL Independent of power 
lines these units are energy efficient, secure, and free to provide 
accurate quartz controlled time in any setting. Used by the Military and 
U.S. government agencies as well as many municipal taw enforcement 
and public safety departments, these units won't quit just because 
commercial power did. 

Exercise your independent military option now. 



**'42Q 



O U INC. 




V 

65 E. Palatine Road 

Prospect Heights, IL 60070 
312-459-5760 




EAST COAST #1 GOES 
NATIONAL 

THE ANTENNA BANK is 
East Coast's #1 supplier of 

ANTENNAS — TOWERS 

ACCESSORIES 



CUSHCRAFT: 

A3 Nevi^ El^rn^nt Tnbiand Beam „.. 5165.00 

A4 New 4 Element Triband Beam....,.,..,,...... $204 00 

AV3 New 3 Band Ver^^dan0-20m ..,. * 4(5.00 

AV4 WeWf4 0aod Vert icaJ 1040m. ... S 81.00 

AV5 New 5 Band Veritcal TD-aOm $ BT.oO 

RS 20-15' tOm Motor tuned Vef tical ,,„.... S20?.0q 

32-19 19 Element 2m BDom-er DX BeaiTi..,.......i, S 74 00 

2MB u Eiern&nt 201 Jr. Soomtr \A4-\AU.. S eO.OO 

Al47'ii tl Element 2fn.,. $ 33.00 

ARX2B2m ■■Rifigo Ranker" H.....„. t 33.00 

-COMPLETE LINE OJSI SALE- 



MlNl QUAD HQ-1 e-10-T5-20m 

HYGAIN: 

V2 He-A 2m V&rlical 

TH3JP 3 Elemeni Tritjand Beam 

TH3MK3 3ElementTflbandBeam 

TH5D)( New 5 EiemenE Tribai^d Bearii 

TH6DXX 6 Element Tritiaod B^am 

vDSBASEtemeni lOfn^'Loi^gJotin' 

1556A5 Element 15m "LDng John" 

20SBA5eiemeftl3iOFn-L-ongJohn- 

t4AVC!4Banfl Vertical 10 40m 

IBAVT 5 Band lO-SOm Trap Vertical 

-COMPLETE LINE ANTENNAS OMLY OM 



$129.00 



. S 33.50 

$1 33 00 

.. .S175.0O 

... ,195.00 

|£3&,00 
...J 95.00 

SMS .00 
.. S235.00 

$ 4f^.tX) 
....$ 7S0O 
SALE- 



ROTORS & CABLES: 

CDE HAM IWCD-lIill . 

Allj^ftce HD73,iU100 

RG^^U Foam 95% Shield 

RG2t3Mii Spec 

Mt-ni-S 



.$165.00/94.00 
593 0*42 00 

24*^i|. 

2a<F^[L 

12tm. 



8 Wire Rotor Cable .,,.16«^IL 

Phjlly Slran GLiy Cat>Fe in sioqK— for price & delivery 
inlormalioi^ caH <7031 569-1200 

#1 ROHN TOWER DISTRIBUTOR 
SALE: 

20G tO'To'ATB/ Sect ion £29.50 

25G 10' Tower Settmn 5 3g'.50 

45G tD'ToweiSactiOn $ fi?.50 

H D B X 4^' Ff fl€ Sra nd i ng Tower tt^20 00 

FP|254» 4B ■ 25G Fo I d-ovet Tovv fic 5695 .00 

iFroiqiT^t prepafcd an Fcldover Towers Pnces iD^-v. highoF 
west ol Roci^y M:oun tains) 

We StocK Rorin Accessories— tor pnoe 4 delivery n>tor- 
n^iahon <is\\ |703) 56.9-1200 

HUSTLER SPECIAL COMPLETE 
LINE: 



4BTV.i"5BTV 4 Or 5 Band Vertical 
MO-liiMO-a HF MQtJilB Mast...,,.. 



.$74.00'92.0O 
. S 1/60 



HF MOB RES. 5TD 4kw 

10 OF I5m $ a.OQ 

2Dm... ......,...:...S11 00 

40m.. ..,,........,.. SI 3.00 

75m J 1.4.00 

SF2 2m5ySWriip... 

HOT ■■■Husileolf" MounL 

BM'T Bumper Moun! with Ball. 



SUPER 2 OKw 



- $14 

- *15 

^ sie 

- »20 



00/ 
00:: 

00 






9.00 
14.00 



.$ 13.00 



AVANTiAPTSl.3G Glass Mount.. S 27.95 



W2AU Saluo ' — "'"S:17.55 Lisl^SaJe £ 13-35 

Traps 10. 15. 20or40flri--— — -S24.95Lisl^Saae S 16.79 

VAN GORDON: 

PD BOlO I0-a0m Ware Dipole S 26.80 

PD40miO-40TnWFfeDipOJe. . S 25.20 

PDe04040-80mW<raDipole ,, S 26 40 

SD40 40triSf»Of1 DipOle S 2160 

SDaoaomShori Dipole S 22.BD 

HiQ Balun IT0.9& List/Salfi $ 7.95 

HjQ Center ..S 5.95 Liat/Sale £ 4.95 



ORDERS ONLY 
(800) 336-8473 



ALL OTHER CALLS (703) 569 T 300 

Shipping cost net included— Prices subject tocliange 

ALLOW 2 WEEKS FOR DELIVERY 

No COD— We ship UPS 

We reserve tlie right to limit quantities 




THE ANTENNA BANK 

6460 General Green Way 

Alexandria, VA 22312 




Tij^im I nai-^s I 



See Ust of Advertissrs on page 114 



TSMagazine • February, 1982 147 



FACTORY-DIRECT INFLATION FIGHTERS! 
PRICES SLASHED DRAMATICALLY! 



MULTTWETEft 

POVHER 

MODEL 




T^l? MM-T 15 High qu^liiy 20Korim/VDC Mummetpr us^tiJe <is 
int S*u?/R3weF Meier ds well Dy comecung The d^^«:tjon^( 

CCujpkrr unat iradudrtl 

DC Vok - 0.3. 1.2. 6. 30, \20. 600V j20»<-ohm/V) t 3% 

AC Volt — 6. 30. IZO. 600V faK-ohm/Vj t 4% 

OCmA 0- 6(XA 3. 300mA i 3% 

OHJVl ....,.,.,. .,,, Rxl RkIO, felK 

dB — 20— +TBO— ♦32dSm 

C 200pF — OSuF 

U ,.,., - 0.1 10. f 00mA 

3.b — ]SOMHZ 

IJ — 3-T 

— 20. ZOO JOOOW i 10% 

, Drrettional coupfer unJt \ftHth felev'itnl; 

conrtectof cable, i^i leads and i:>aiEe*y 

, AW'iWl Jt 6k^"JH} X r\Dl: Multimeter 

*WW\ * 2W'(H) >t 21D|: Coupler 

T.06 IDS \480 gr^rtisj- Multimeter 

75 lbs [340 gramsf: Coupler 



Frepuercy Cavtisgc 

RF ftjywf r Range 
Acceisojy Jnclyded 

DrmefiiicHni , , 

NeE MWighi 




SWR A POWER METER FOR HF/VHF BAND 
MODEL PM-IHV 140. 

High qualJty S'^R/W^n rnetet devigned ai SWfi srwJ power ian 
be meaiurecf independenrf^ at a tune With meter ilJurfidnation 
and "O'hEf'iif-A/r" jndnjitof J^mp. 

SptcHlcatlorif! 

Freqijt-rKy Ct^vefiig* 3 — iSOMHi 

Hf Ftower Range . . — ZO. 2O0_. (. DOQW. 3 rAn^es ■ 10% 

accuracy 
Power Source , , . , 12V AC/DC (for nieter illurnination onfy} 
Accesicny fixfuded .... ?fi. long connector caois with fuse 

for meter iPJurrnndtiOra purpose 

Dhmensiom , . TiW\ k 3"^HJ x 3k>lD| 

Wet Weight , _ . , ...,._ I.S ijm. fO.e kg5i 




SWR « POWER MriER FOR HF/VHf BAND 
MOOtL i»M-4MV . . S30, 

Compatt and' Jr^fn weipfit SVt/H/Walt merer designed For 
rncsiD-iie operation as H^fil as bAse ilacion yie 

Stptcrffcjrtlonts 

Frequerxy Co^/er^ige ..,.;._,.... 3 — 150MH? 

RF Rovv«r ftanije . , — 20. 200. lOQOW, 3 farigei t 10% 

accuracy 

Accessory Included Velrro double Dack adhesive 

rTBuntjng foe rmotnk- irftijtiJJairDn 

Dinwrnnons fi'iwf ^ 2W[Hf x 2Y?"\U} 

Net yyeight 3 ic ^0.44 kgi) 



MigH by? AKIOAHH ELECTRONfCS COl^l'. ■ Exduilw INltHbvtVfi; AkCAW ELECTRONICS. IliC. > P.O. Bo4 «4: C^riilhMl. CA 92^6; l*tt0ME jTf4| 434-107^^ lELEXs 111743 MACAHrC£BJ> 

i^ 56 Prices do no[ wtciude shipping and handling and are su&jecl (o ehflrige wilKui rvHif.* 



r 



CALL NUMBER ONE! 

CARLOAD INVENTORIES • ROCK BOTTOM PRICES 

SUPER-FAST SERVICE 



LINES: AEA 


ALPHA 


CUSHCRAFT 


DENTRON 


KANTRONICS 


MINI-PRBDUCTS 


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TEN TEC T^ 


AVANTI 


BEARCAT 


COLLmS 


HY GAIN 


KLW 


MOB GAIN 


PALO MAR ENG 


UNIVERSAL 


ASTRDN 


BIRD 


COF 


HUSTLER 


KFNWdOD 


MIRAGE 


REGtNCY 


UNARCO HOHN 


ALLIANCE 


BENCHER 


DRAKE 


icaM 


MFCROLOG 


MFJ 


SWAN 


VIBROPLEX 



CALL TOLL FREE 1-800-325-3609 

MID COM ELECTRONICS • 8518 MANCHESTER ROAD • BRENT 



hf%g% IN MISSOURI 

Wif 314-961-9990 

BRENTWOOD, MO 63144 




148 73 Magazine ■ February, 1982 




Introducing 



*'21 



YOUR OWN 
AUTOPATCH FOR 
OPERATION 



Mobile Connection 

ONLY 
$14995 KIT 

Wired and Fully Tested 

$199.95 •Shipping $3.50 
inU.SA -N.Y.S. 
Residents add appropriate 
sales tax 

Hundreds already in operation • Call anyone— anywhere— anytime 

NOVAX interfaces your standard 2 meter; 220; 450; etc. base station and DTMF 
(Touclitone) Telephone, using a high speed scan switching technique so that you 
can direct dial Ironn your automobile or with the HT from the backyard or poolsrde 
—automatically. Easy instaflation. Ringback (reverse autopatch) option available 
for $29.95 kit— $39.95 factory wired. 




• SMALL SIZE- (5" tc 6" x 2") 

• STATE OF THE ART 
CIRCUITRY 12-16 VD.a 

• ADJUSTABLE ACTIVITY TIMER 



EASY INTERFACING with radio audio 
& squelch circuit 

SINGLE DIGIT CONTROL 
(connect and disconnect) 



(clears out if mobile is out of range) • 3 MIN, CALL DURATION TIMER 

TO ORDER— SEND Check— Money Order (MasterCard or Visa accepted) to: 
R.WD. Inc., Oriskany N.Y 13424 or caH 315-736-3087 



CABLE TV 



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SMASHING ALL SALtS RECORDS •• OUR NEW 
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HOT NEW IMPORT! REMOTE CONTROL 
30 CHANNEL CABLE TV CONVERTER! 



95 

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ETCOMKII WIRELESS - 

TNi ULTIMATE CABLE TV CONVERTER< 



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lOO 



VIDCOR 2QO0 CONVERTER ELIMINATES PROBLEMS 
WHEN VIDEOTAPING FROM CABLE TV 



95 



M:aii-i i^mOLH i:hdr:llHl a: II 
fCII. £:kdlil^J .i|1i:iilSi|llJlU! 

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BraniJ nifi* pmcJuctton Surfihii 
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iiTi*ntil vAirM. bu.ld'nfl. -rahti! TV 



MINIATURE FM WIRELESS MiCROPHOfVE 



BRCVID B/4ND 
FOLDB> DIPOLE 



BARKER & 

WILLIAMSON'S 
MODEL 
370-15 




^ 11 



B & W's Broad Band Folded Dipole covers all amateur 
bands including the new 12. 17, and 30 meter bands. 
Also covers CAP frequencies, MARS, Military or any 
frequency from 3.5-30 MHz- Being used ttirougtiout the 
world! Total length only 90 feet long— spreader spacing 
19 inches. SWR— less than 2:1 from 3,5-30 MHz. Rugged 
construction for long life. Can be installed as a flat top- 
inverted "V" or sloper. Also available for 2-22 MHz. 
Power handling capability 2 KW-4 KW PER Supplied 
completely assembled with RG 8 type cable with SO- 
239 connector Terminated with PL-259 connector on 
each end. Patent Pending. 

Price $149.50 

Cable available in the following sizes: 
25 ft. $18.25 
50 ft. $26.00 
75 ft. $33,75 
100 ft. $41.50 

Barker & Wiltiamson, Inc: 

10 Canal Street 

Bristol Pa. 19007 

Phone #215-73a-5581 



BW 




MHtwCCII«d 



Hidn in the palm tjT yw 
hand Bf!;*5]C,i>n (iiian^ Esar 
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QUARTER-MILE WIRELESS MICROPHONE 
& RECEIVER SYSTEM 

hue dhUWiKa'vil liV^I'i' :.Ll-Mllllll'Hi 

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FACTORY SURPLUS VHF / UHF 
TWIN" VARACTOR TUNERS! 



S27 SO 






Bff A^Cl -hJEi^' UiriiH! I in liiiMih"^! 
r,r k4<|ig> I i iv^ i;i|'rlhiiiin.;tHly liiliinl 
TV f^MNl f ';r- ■ ■' iijiiil ([I 
'I'll I irftm ^|.M ^^ ptii fli 

Nst ssdvcaoa 



DUmnnGS NORELCO ENDL£SS LaOPCASS£TTES< 



5f34.g€ 






I mposiiale to Krifl it ahv 
prji^e! 

e iflinutBl - No 354VA6a$. 



Ty5^ 



£SS! 



m STOCK - THE MURA 
CORDLESS TELEPHONE SYSTEM I 

..I I...?.- 1 ^ ■;■■ i:m III '■ 
^^Mt V¥«in I 111', vr.-- 

leu pacAi^'ptMiif 
400 ft rriB*' flA 

niim^ci '<;r,^ii ^.jij- 
'IH iri^lillKi Uut;^Ar:l*- 
■riJi','. i.-'ji-Cf'tvirj-ro- 

Mo. a^VAllA 

SALE Of QUARTZ BATTERY- 
OPERATED CLOCK MOVEMENTS? 

£\ p icr-jiacv :-' f iV.i • .irM ii|i 

r ^ jiiui "f! ' im;II ItriliuiiH"! 'rwn 
Sa.e& '^^JiKi Gfe^ri^-sv Wo 3&aVft 531 ^ 

*•' '' 1"^VA565 Wl&ltchni^ H«Mft ^A^iifU. 



88 



S12*.*i 



311 AMF» REGULATED 12VDC POWER SUPf L V f 



"■ 3g4tfAa95 aa fllj^^<. TS H>"R« 



n tt ,1^ II MiY <• I^LI I ? 5 .41L Ik.ll 

H)#!l %t^:.\t i'a\'iiMe' liiiitl.iTff'ifii" 
rixii I lie :Hli(l. SSB I " i^i J ■ ' 
-4130^ PEP -Br^ixf fte-ir ■ : - 
s^viiipi I r r?'i V AC. Hij 11^4 VA ;-ni'i 



i:ii B 



OUR LATEST ^ PACE 
F ASC IN A TlfttG CATALOG 



■ I- 



\mitAum'4ii I" 



EtCO ELECTRONICS 

NOflTN COUNTfiy 5H0PP<NG CENTER 

fl-ATTSBURGH. N V 12401 



Ch9(* wnti o«ihi. pteaw Vis** IWfliwfcaiu O-K •!;So<iri '"S C Cf * Ana tSi 
for UP3 f^ HandMfni(i:Jie*+rrn1iiiiiiodi Sj.V Sl-ii^ rfliidums iflri ? TB|H^ [hi 
OwaUp Bi iKptjuP inquirmi .ii»ilHi1. Oyi ii.'l*jj|i,unr utik-r ilMt \in<(nt diihij 



r 



copy RTTY, ASCII 

and Morse 
from the palm 
of your hand. 




Have you waited to get into 
code reading until you found 
out what this latest fad was 
about? You can stop waiting, 
because it's no longer a fad. 

Amateurs everywnere 
are tossing the gigantic 
clanking monsters of yester- 
year that once performed 
the job of reading 
radloteletvpe. They are trad- 
ing them in for state-of-the- 
art code^readlng devices 
that are incredibly small, 
noiseless if desired and in- 
finitely more versatile than 
their antique predecessors. 

Kantronics, the leader in 
code-reading development, 
has just introduced the latest 
and most-advanced break- 
through in the copying of 
Morse code, radioteietype 
and ASCII computer langu- 
age. 

The Kantronlcs Mini- 
Reader reads all three types 
of code, displays code speed, 
keeps a 24-hour clock, acts as 
a radioteietype demodulator 
and reads all of its decoded 
information out on a travel- 
ing display of 10 easy'to-read 
characters, it is so compact 
that it fits in a hand*held, 
caicuiator^size enclosure. 

At S289.95, the Mini -Read- 
er outperforms anything 
within another S400 of its 
price range. 

Call or vrslt your Authoriz- 
ed Kantronjcs Oeater now to 
find out what the latest in 
technology has done to 
code-reading. 



I Kantronlcs 

(91 3) 842-7745 

1202 E. 23rcl Street 
Lawrence. Kansas 66044 



1 
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I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 



r 



W^BW^i^BpBp 




IMPROVE YOUR 
NORSE SKILLS 

WITH THE 




MODEL KT-1 
KEYER TRAINER 



FEATURES INCLUDE: 

• PRECISE SPEED CONTROL 

• 24,000 CHARACTER PSEUDO-RANDOM LOOP WITH 
10 STARTING POINTS AND FREE ANSWER BOOK 

• EXCLUSIVE AUTOMATIC SPEED INCREASE 

• RANDOM PRACTICE MODE 

• OPERATES FROM 12VDC 



call or visit 



AEA 



Brings you the 
Breakthrough! 




DERRICK ELECTRONICS 
714 West Kenosha 
Broken Arrow, OK 74012 

TOLL FRFEE (800) 331-3688 












USERS 
IT'S 






^0 



M^ ENGINEERINGS' NEW 

HANDI-CON V 



^''tft 



Are 




HJieiQ wo? IHtl 



•ANY FULLY SYNTHESIZED 2 METER 
H T CAN NOW BE A COMPLETELY 

PORTABLE VHF-hi MONITOR 
•2400 CHANNEL CAPABILITY 
•DOUBLE BAND COVERAGE 

154 -ISSMhz fire,police,sheriff, 

paging & more 
159 - 163 Mhz maritime coastal , 

railroads. N.O^A. 
weather & more 
•MULTI-BAND & MULTI -CHANNELLED 

MONITORING WITH SCANNfNG H T/s 
•SINGLE 3-POSITlON CONTROL 

• "OFF RETURNS TO NORMAL TRANS- 

CEIVER OPERATION 

• LOW LOSS COUPLING TO ANTENNA 

• UP TO 6 MOS OPERATION UNDER AVG. 

USE WITH A SINGLE AAA CELL 

• Bl -LATERAL PROTECTION AGAINST 

ACCrOENTAL TRANSMISSION FOR 
UP TO 5 WATTS 

• size 2 25 5t 1 5 xT4 inches 

• wejght - 4.5 ozs. 



$44.95 



+ S2.50 pstg. &hndl9. 
in Calif, add S% s.tx. 



L 



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contact 



p^n 



M SQUARED ENG. 
1446 Lansing ave, 
San Jose.Cal 95118 

' Of - 

Ph 40d'266 9214 



Pfease write for cfyb discounts 
on quantity orders 



150 73Magaiine • February J982 






look here 



call toll free:njghts 
1-800-231-3057 

6-10 PM CL M.W.F. 
days 1-713 658-0268 

ICOM IC 3AT/IC 4AT 269 00 ea 

IC 25A 309.00 

IC 730 729 00 

IC 2AT 249.00 

IC 22U 269 00 

Santec HT 1200 269.00 

ST 144UP 299.00 

1 0% OH Ust on Stock Items 



Tel rex 
Drake 



» « P -M «■ 



^ * * 



, . 995 00 
. 1 299 00 
,,169 00 
.,11500 



. 1 00 ea 

Call 

24 95 

749 00 

67500 

.699 00 

.159 00 



TR5 . , . . 
R7/DR7 
AEA Morsematic. 
CK1 Contest 

MBA'RO Reader . . . 269.00 

Order KWM380.. $3095 00 

Si 2 Free Frtters 

High Serial Numbers, All Mods 

Ampheno! Silverpfate 

PL259 

Antique rare Tutjes 

TJm«x 24 Hour Wallclock 

Robot 800A ...... 

400 

HalC!2100 

KB2100 

New CWR 685 A Telereader .875 00 

Cubic 103 1195 00 

Bird 43, Slugs Stock 

Drake Theta 7000 995 00 

Belden 9405 Heavy Duty Rotor 

Cable 2#16, 6#18 45C/ft, 

Belden 8214 RG S Foam . . . 36C/ft 

Belden 9258 RGSx Min(-Coax19C fi 

Belden 8267 RG 213 

Non Contam Jacket 43C tl 

AlHance HD73 109 95 

Large Bookstore 

10% OH Curtis, Sherwood: Palomar 

Call Quotes Kenwood TS830S, 

TS530S. TS13DS, New 

We Want Special Orders^ 

Yaesu Specials 
New FTI 

FT 707 . . , 

FT 101ZD Mark 3 
FT 208R 

MASTtRCAftD VISA 
All prices fob Houston «Hc«pr wfiere imjicated Prices 
subjecl lo tf^an^e wiT^oui noifce. all nemsguaranieed 
Some Items sub|9Ct pnqr sa\v Texas res4<^nt5 ddd 6% 
idi Pi«fts# add suHtci^m pf7$ia^, balance cnlfieet 



2395 00 
649 00 
749 00 

289 00 




Electronics Supply 

"« 1508McKinney 
Houston, Texas 77010 



Lacue Likes You . . . 
and you'll like Lacue 

WIRE AND CABLE 

^ G-2 t 3l i r r — ■ ■— ■ ■ ^jTZft/f 1 

RG*U roam 95% stii«l« . — 23 St/*1 

^ G-BX foam 95 % %hmtQ — 1 1«Ht 

RG SaCflJ m,l spec — tleih 

R G Sd mt3 spec ^ ^ ^ Bull 

RG T % — iSWfl 

i 50 ohm Taddcc I me 1 00 »T roil- SIQ 2S 

B-Cortductw Hoior Caoie — — iStrtT 

t<G* Stranded Coppe'iM'f muiiiplesl- Ttlft 

tlGa &o<HdGoppemeidiSOil mufltplcs) 7tlft 

tJGa Solid Cop p«f weld (50 f( ms»llip(#«— — Strft 
SGa SoikdAmminum 15011 muU^plMSi" — ^ — -^ — tttltl 

ANTENNA ACCESSORIES 

Ceramic Insu^aiors - . iii i- 45* ea 

A mp heno I PL- 259 - - ■«im»».i » wi — — — -75* ea 

Van Gorderk" — ._,„,_„_„„,g|,|yn,.. 17 50 

C*rtle^ lr^»U^ ■^-*— -1 — %A 60 

W2AU B3fun i 1 or I 1 ^... $13 25 

B4W Traps 40 Thru tO -'" -■ '—tfi 65 per pair 

8&W Traps 80 thtu IG- -—'■■'-'•"-'■"■■- $25 65 per pair 

ROTORS 

CDE HAM 4 — " .„...,.™.^-_ tlS2 95 

CDE CD 45^-.^-™" -^ —'■ — S B9 55 

CDE AR Z2 " * 48 95 

1962 CALLBOOKS 

us. version .$14.95 

O'X vfifSion — . $14.05 

ALSO AVAILABLE 

Cusftcrad. Hy-Gain f^l^i Bencher Bullernui i%egenc)r 

Mint Prod ucls.tarH»'n SAvy Huflle'r Shure ARHLStrd. 

CaltbQDli Affieco Sams f^j&iicalions FU>nfi Vibf<rpiei 

Ham Key. Vocpm Dnwa arnl manr more 

Pffcea S4jb|ecl lo ch#r*ge *k!hou1 nor»ce 

Hours Mofi — Sal 1 0AM — 6PM Tum% * Pn tiJ 3PM 

Teiephorte rei4iS3fr^500 

mOJE COMMUNICATIONS ELECmOMCS 

fOl Vlkir Sinn ^ 

Jol«towii. PA i^fn 



SMP 2300 MHz 

Now Order Toll Free! 
1-8QO-368-3028 



pfTC nn*'^ 



Ty,S— 44.95. Deluie Tunable PS. Very 
smootti tijniing MIL SPEC pat S-ISV 
Complete, 



UCC-1— 35.00 

2100-2500 MHz 
components 



DownconveHer Kit. 

Quality board and 



SMC-2^50.00. Deluxe downconverler 

kit. Wiiti tiigh gam RF franststor and 
lemperature compensation 



ft FA-1— 44.95 2 stage RF preamp. 
Selective filter 16 db nei gain. 



large SASE brings catalog ot kits and 
parts and the 2300 MHz slory 



Aii prices postpaid m U S. 
VISA and MC accepted 
In Vtrgfnfa. AEaska and Hawaii 
Calf 703-255-2918, 



,^376 



SMP 



U 



Superior Microwave Products, Inc. 

P.O. Box 1241 

Vienna. Virginia 22180 




INTRODUCING THE 

CES 500SA 

SIMPLEX 

AUTOPATCH 

The First Affordable 
Private Phone Patch 



As dtscribed In 73 Magazine. fi/SI. 



Now. for the first time! Every amateur 
operator car) enjoy ttie urjparalletied freedom 
of a private ptione patch m an economicai 
package. 

The dramatic new CES 500SA Autopatch is alt 
the eQUipment you need to patch an FM base 
station to your home or other telephone line, 
without expensive fepeaters. cavities, or other 
equipment Cctfifiections with any standard 
FM base station are rapid and simpte. 

Bypass the congestion and expense of shared 
repeaters — break through lo greater privacy 
and convernence with ttie new CES 500SA 
Autof^ch. 



COHEREI^E IN 
COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY 



CES 



COMMUNICATIOHS ELECTRONICS 
SPECIALTIES, Inc. 

PO, Box 507 

Winter Park, Florida 32790 

Telephone: (305) 645-0474 



^462 



See Lnl Qf Advertisers on page ii4 



73 Magazine • February. 1982 151 



rfb 






MHz MICROWAVE 
DOWNCONVERTERS 



DOWNCONVERTER 

Kit 

Assembled 

2300 MHz PREAMP 

Kjl 

POWER SUPPLY 

Assembled. . . 



¥ T • 



.... $28.50 

$48.50 

. $25.00 

$35.00 



2300 MHz 
ANTENNA 




w w >&■ 



SATELLITE TV EARTH STATION 

• 24 Channel Receiver 

• 10' Antenna 

• Dexcel 120° LNA 
Call for details and price 

Also AvaHable: Connnnercial System with 
Bogner Antenna .............. $169.00 



/ 



WITH BOX 
FOR DOWN- 
CONVERTER 

$27.50 



PB RADIO SERVICE 

1950 E. PARK ROW • ARLINGTON, TX 76010 



t^ 404 



CALL ORDER DEPT. TOLL FREE 

(800)433-5169 




FOR INFORMATION CALL 

(817)460-7071 



RTTY/C\A/ 




A Trajdemark or the Tandy Corp 




R0MH6 

RTTY/CW Operating System 

Detailed brochure available on reQuest 



Featuring: 

1200 BAUD OPERATION. Not limited to 1 10 baud be- 
cause ot timmg loops. 60. 66. 75 & 100 W.P.M. 
Plus 110. 150, 300. 600 & 1200 baud operations 
possible 

FLEXABIUTY OF DPERATIOH. Instantly change: Baud 
Rates: Program Mode (ASCII/baudoi}. Program Status 
SPLIT SCREEN VIDEO. Transmit & receive data dis- 
played separately 

HEAL TIME, Automatic CW/ID without user interven- 
tion. Aylomatically updates \^^^ 
at end ol month or year ^^S CROfdCI 

nicroPiodiicts 



Other features 
include i 

• Two Serial Ports 
Fourteen Buffers 
AuiomaticCWID 
Transmit Control 

• Selective Call Feature 

• Error Corf eclioti 

• Wora Wrapping 

• Easy To Interlace 

• 30 Day Unconditional Guarantee 

• Hardware requirements. TRS-SO 

Model tor 3 16K 
Exif rnal termmat unit. 



606 Slate Slreet. P.O Box 892-R • Marysvdle. WA 98270 • (206) 659-4279 



BASSETT HEUUM 
MOBILE ANTENNAS 



For 

Commercial, Amataiift 
and Government Services 

Rugged, low drag, high efficiency 
mobile antennas engineered to 
maintain resonance at all times. 

Maximum overall height of qnty 
70'. Averaoe weight of only 6 oz. 
They remain vertical ai all ^seeds. 

Hetical inductors sealed in helium 
filled Fi&erglass imperviousloaH 
weaihef. Adjust able i7-7ph whips 
and solid brass hardware chrome 
plated and polished. 

Optimum gain colllnears for VHF 
and UHF. Unrty gain models for HF, 
Amateur band models are mveri- 
toried for "off the sheff delivery. 
Commercials to S|>ec3. 

Write or phone for free brochure 
and prices on Bassett mobiles and 
Helium Trap Antenna Systems. 



REX BASSETT 

ELECTRONICS, INC. 

1633NE14thAve..Btdg. 11 
Fi, Lauderdale. Fla 33305 
Tel: 305/561-1400 




-iho 

ace N, Mitn 
Evans vlllfl J N 47711 

TENTEC 

546 OmnhCXcvr $1050 

580 Delta 750 

525 Argosy ^BQ 

280 Power Supply 150 

255 Power Supply/Speaker 1 70 

243 VFOOrnni 169 

283 VFO Delta 169 

234 Speech Processor 125 



ST-144/;aP 



SANTEC 



call 



AEA MBA Reader 275 

ALLIANCE HD73Rolalor 99 

AZDEN PCS-SOO 2m Hand HeW call 

CUBIC Astro 103 1175 

DAlWACN5lB2,5KWTunef 255 

HAL CT 2 100 call 

HY-GA!NTH7Tn band Ant. call 

1COM25A 2m Mobile 309 

ICOM 251 A 2m All Mode 625 

KANTRONICS miniReader Package 259 

lVlFJ496Kevboard 290 

MFJ 722 Notch/CW/SSS Filter 59 

MIRAGE B3016 2Tn Amplifier 206 

812-422-0231 -*« 

mU-f^l 9AM^6PM • SAT 9ilW-3PM 

jflff'tm tOF (Jut nf * ^ififl uSiPC v 




J 



SYNTHESIZED 

SIGNAL GENERATOR 



MADE IN 
USA 




MODEL 
SG TOdC 



• Cowers 100 !o 179 999 WH/ ifi i kHz steps with 
ihumtt wtteel diaf • Accoiacy 00001% al all fre- 
quencies • iniemai ffCfluBncy mocfulation from to 
over 100 kHz at a 1 ft Hz ra!e • Spurs anif nctse af 
least 60ilB below carrier • RF ourpyt adjustable from 
5 SOOinV across SO ohms • Operates on t2vdc # 
Vt amp In stock tor immecfiaie shippiirg $3?9 95 
plus shipping Overnighi delivery avaH^bts a! extra 
COS! • Range txtender (phase-focked mix&r/divid- 
eri lor above unit Extends Hie range Irom 1 to 580 
MK? Same size as SG-100 Mounts piggyback 
f I e 1299 95 

*^311 

VANGUARD LABS 

imr2^ J»m«cia Av».. Hollit, NY 11423 



CB. TO 1 METER KITS 

AMElfCA*S # f SOUICi FOl 
FM — SSB — AM 



IN STOCK— Kits for rrroM C.B. Modeb 

NiW— 1 0-meter FM DiscriminatoT Board 

—fits most PLL rigs. Kit— Assembled and 

rested. 

NiW AND USID— FM S. SSB converted 

C B.s now In Mock — from SQO, 

LOW COST— Prices range from SlO 

to S50. 

ORDER lY PMONi— f6l7> 771 46B4 

VISA 1 MASTERCARD— accepted 

IREE CAT AlOO— write or call todayf 



AMERICAN ClYSTAl iUrPLV COMPANY 
P.O. iOK 61S 

WEST YARMOUTH, MA. 0267 J 
(«17)77I'4«S4 ^^ 






CB TO TEN METER 
CONVERSION KITS 

KITSforAM— SSB — FM 40 Channel PLL 
chassis conversions 
DETAILED rNSTRUCTIONS for easy In- 
stallation with minimum time and equip- 
ment 

BAND COVERAGE ftexibillty provides 
up to 1 MHz coverage for most PLL 
chassis, 

PHfCES Low cost prices range from 
Sa.OO to $50.tX) 

All kits are in stock including 
several different FM kits, 
FREE CATALOG Write or call today. 

-^TB INDEPENDENT 
CRYSTAL SUPPLY COMPANY 

P.O. Box 183 

Sandwich, Ma. 02563*0183 
(61 7) 888-4302 




THE PROFESSIONAL 

TOUCH TONE 

ENCODER 

' ^^^ ^^ An urtra high qyallty 

encoder for professional 
application. Absolute refi ability and 
function makes the difference. There s a 
Pfpo encoder for every system and 
application. Totally sarviceabte, easy to 
opermXe and Instalf. Ca// or write tor free 
catalog and informatsoni (213) 652-1515 
or P.O. Box 3435. Hollywood. CA 90028, 

PATENTED - A TAT 



^ipocgommunications 

Emptia$t& ts on Ousiity & Rensbtisry *^ 300 



AMP LETTER 



imp LET TERJ f». 
put^Hcacfon devot 
t i an f a R^ opera 1 1 

? . A rrewsl et tsr t 

you IT next ampl 1 f1 

The mp'llllin \l 
Clflin ev^ry three 
It i i orgflfiized I' 

1 Cdf tor's Corn 

il Letters 

1 1 [ J^tn Topics i 

IV Feature ArtU 

t AWP-LETTER |R 



I , An Anateur R»d{<i 

ed tD th? d^itgn, ci>nstruc- 

on nf Amateur jjn jj^ i" f f e r 5 . 

hat can save ^^u mprty tjti 
(jf constrirctlon project. 
rt% and information. 

pubMjhed and mafled Ftrst 
weeks (17 t ilne^/jreir) . 
13 to rive depir imtti'lLS - 






Hive pif Is to se^ 1 7 
Run mil id in the 
*IIP-lftTEft TRIDEft. 
Subvert titr rate \% 
l^t p*^ (word. 



Tfie AKP*LETTEFr believes that hOfttbrewfug 
^n antp can be fvif^i ^ducat 1 dPta 1 * and hdlf 
t% costly as buying i co^fperdal amp^ 

A ore year subscript tQti to the AHP-LETTEfi 
i5 JlB.OO/year (1? issues). Mention "73" 
Napaf7fne and >ou i!ia> subscribe it the spiclat 
one time rate of SlS.DQ/year 

mH*J m\%^ A SINCLC ISSUE OF 



AHP-LITTEIt 
RR? tox I9A 
T**cnnpso"iif ^ Tie 



^ 97 



THE 



a«p-le:up 



Place An 
ad, ICC/norrf 



Send l^.QO For ■ ^inple c 
for « fgH year of t 




or StS.OC 




I 




PILOTS : 



^ ^ 




I 



ThB RST-*42B voice actuated inter- 
com iS59 50i ts tust one of o^er 20 
exctfing avtonics kits from Radio 
Systems Techftology. Test gear too* 

FREE CATALOG 

Caif folf free outside Ca/^/om/a 



e24B97e * 

OTHERWISE ■ 

ate ->. J 

2722203 / 



k 



Radio Systems 
Technology, Inc. 

-~«a£afeG-«flASS VALLEY AVE 
GRASS VALLEV. CA 959i5 



QUAUrr MICROWAVE SYSTEMS 



2100 TO 2600 MHz ANTENNAS 
MINIMUM 34 db GAIN OR GREATER 

Complete Sy&tem ai pictured $149.95 

(6 month warranty) 
Down Converter (Probe Wnld-J 

wsembifrd Ir leiled $59 §5 

Down Convertef (Chassti Itlnd.) 

assembled A lesled %S9^S 

Powef Supply, aiiembled ft teifed $4S.9$ 
Down Converter PC board. 

with pans, unasMmbled A Data $39.95 
Data Information (Plans) 19.95 

Send cash, cheek 
~ or money order to: 

Phillips-Tech 

Bectronics 

Dept SP-73 ,>H.42i 
P.O. Box 33205 
Phoenii, 
Arizona 85067 

for tp^clat qusnttfy 

pricing. CCD/t, 

Mmterct^arg0, 

ana ViSA calt: 

{6021 274-2885 



FINALLY. . . 

A SQUARE DEAL 

ON YOUR 

ELECTRONIC 

SCRAP 



il/rtnv "hrffkftv' pay flat rutv% nn ni'ffip, not 
payment tm fhe value Gfyourmattriat.All 
mai**rml sp^i/ tn uh m mdwifiuftny rvfinvd and 
iimayf'dfor mtixtmum retitrn Takf a. htok at 
urtmi" fypiraf ywifh 



PC Boards 
Connectttr* 
PC Fingrrv 
Gold fHOttd pin^ 



SOC to$7ftt^rfh. 
$l2i**$5npfrlh 



Far further mfttrmalton, ctrvtt itur frader serriae 
nttm hfr or catthtrtrr 



/r^%. 




^^Q 



ELECmomC REC YCLERS 
OFMAmjNC 

263A S. Main Strret. Box € 

Middieion, Mum 01949 

TnU Free fSOO^ 343-8308 

In Mass, (HI 7) 7770455 



WEVE GOME NATIONAL 

Strux Corporation manufactures and 
distributes National Radio, Inc. Com- 
ponents: Chokes, inductors, coils, and 
hardware. We also distribute fixed and 
roller inductors, contactors, mU-spec 
and designer knobs. For all your elec- 
tronic needs, contact Strux Corpora- 
lion. 100 East Montauk Highway, 
Lindenhurst, New York 11757, 



ISTXUXl 

CORPORATION 



100 EAST MONTAUK HIGHWAY 
LINDENHURST. NEW YORK 11757 



S** LfSf of Aitvmrfts^fs on psg^ f f * 



73 Magazine • February, 1982 153 




If s Incredible! 



/ 



OD£.qui!c«c 



Now You Can Master Code * • . 

For your fif si ham license ch yp^rad? m 4 
maftwofdays CODE QUICK 1^ a fi^K>{Ll 

iionary bneAkihrougK cbscowry which dr^s 
ttcalty sifnplrfies the Naming ol Morse Code 
Oort'r torture vourseH wilh an pndWss rmue 
g| diis and dahs With CODE QUICK each 
tetter magHiaUy calb out its own nanw* Your 
amazirYg kit Lon tains S power park^ c*5 
&pttes. visual breakthnxigli carafe, and nrig 
inal manual s^ridSl?^ today to 

WHEELER APPLIED 
RESEARCH LAB 

PO Box -1261 
Cnv of hdustry, CA 91744 

Ask for CODE QUICK ftl03 

(C^lif add 6'm salps T^n.t 

Even if you have failed b*?foTe CODE 

QUICK must work for you or return 

the l<3t for total immedtal^ refund! 



DiREcnon 

FINDBHG? 




New Technology (patent pending) con- 
verts any "^H^ FM receiver into a 
modern Doppler Radio Direction 
Finder. No receiver mods required. See 
June 1981 issue of 73 for technical 
description. Kits available from $245. 
Write for lull details and prices. 

I DOPPLER SYSTEMS 
/^ 5540 E, Charter Oak 
Ly Scott^dale, Arizona 85254 
\ (602) 998-1 151 ^425 



m 



GO MOBILE WITH YOUR H.TJ 









^ 






NOW FOR FT-208R & TR-2500 

*^ unique battttry etirtimitof * 

HANOI-TEK ReQui^tof allows centtani h«n^l>«ld 

operation Uom auto OC or biM supply witi^ no ni- 

ctd drain «r>d WITHOUT RAD»0 MODIFICATION! 

Modvl I— Icom 10-2 AH; K— TR 2400; N~FT-20flR 

Y— FT'207R, T— Simp!* mod ^Of Temp 

124.95 PPO In USA. CA add Si 50. 

*^460 

HANDITEK 

P,0. iOX 2»$, LA PUENTE. CA >ir4i 

Icom—s lidos on bottom of rtd'o 
Vaiflu^hts into t^ativry compartmttn'l 
Kenwood— povtrefed tt^ru batta^y plug 



C:ERTIIIFJ} INTl-RN \rKI\AL 



"rajHULL BE tti_AD ¥ouc»ecped BfiTM MI rim 

QtfHCRMFT AMD mJET^ER fMl hh* n ?fi% of l] . LARSEN, 

FALOMAft. NtE VIKIHG. TlllOifVK, TUAC JAIff L 
•EMCHER. VlBflOTLEJC AlM4£l«OL GOULD ttCiLEN. 
EVIIIEAJ^Y AND 0THERS 



we IFOCK EVBTTKINDOF WiRE TME AMATf UH f«E£IK 
BY 9EIL0EK Q^^Pi 

CRTtTAU F13ESM CUT TO TpOH ORDtR tftCW HJ6 



QSL'i. CUSTOM Hhm, lOE VOtJ 



Ol TO 10 INEftn COIfVF^IOiyS FRCiM the STil.f«pA1IEl STTTEfl 

CERTIFIED COMMUNICATIOIMS 

j^a^l Wf COM ^EflT OVER 1 WliRODELSlil^ ANP U^ 
^^""^ AMD SELL NEW 10 METER flIGSWFTftOOyBLf 
WARRAMTY F RDM Si 76 00 

Al(t fOA 4WCFTE, I:ATALDG, CON trE AilQ«4 flDOKUirr. 
OIL UUPLES 4IMCLUDE 549 BnnJ. OH PNFDAMAr»Of«, 



WE BHfNO OUR STORE TO VOU AT OVER 70 HAMFESTB PER VfAR. 
set VOU IN SOUTH BEMP< AH LIWGTOJ^ H EIGHTS AND WiST ALLIE 



TS WOfffH 1^Di/l? tW^tf TO CALL Oi» Wfl/ Tf 



4141 ii»umf«Trfl, 141*1 aj**5it *liwi»ii>il W( 4MTJ 



fHEHMRiri_ 

MICROWAVE RECEIVER SYSTEM 

24* dfl GAIN * TUiASU Zl TO 36 &Kz RAIIGE 

i nOilll WAMMTT • CPiniTlirEADr TO IM&T All 

PIRTS OF HMR H AVAlUMi SEFAHATaf 



t 


$139S^ACM 


SEND CHECK MONEY 

ORDER 01^ CERTIFIED 

fUNDSTO 

HMR 

POeOX440fi5a* AUt^OflA 

COLORADO aD(H4 

DEPT MB 



fOflTHE LOWEST PHICE ON QUAMTITTOHDEItS. 
COD». MC OR VISA ORDdlS CALL 

^9 QOat 620-0736 



FOR THE DO'lT-YDURSELFEfl 



DOWN CONVERTERS 

PC0 PJIRTSAFUHS W 

PLANS 



POWER SUPPl* 

WITH CI an:^ 

PCa PARTS CiSf 4 PLUNSaq 
tail 



S-LINE OWNERS 

ENHAMCE YOUR INVESTMENT 



with 



TUBESTERS 



TM 



Plug- in. soltd it^e lube rcptscmnenti 

• S'tine perform a tiee—iot id stattt 
* Heat dissipation r^cfiio^ 60% 
• Goodbye Nard-to-f ind tubes 
• Unlitnited equipment life 

TUBESTERS cost Jess than two tubes, 
and are guarantBed for so long ^% you own 
VOurS-IJne, 



1^433 

^■^^^^^ Write or phone for 

Box 535 jpecs and prices. 

Talmage, CA 95481 (707) 462 6S82 



You can pay more — 
But you can't get more! 




RtodeMLiieK 
$839 

Model III 4dK 
I disc 8e RS232C 

$2100 




immrn^ 



Color Computer 4K 

$310 

w/l6KExt Basic 

$459 

BUY DIRECT These are jus! a law d1 our great 
oflers which include Printers, Mudsms. Com- 
puters, Peripherals, Disc Drives, Software and 
more, c^ii toll free 1<OOIM4S^812« 

Wb have the lowest ^ 444 
possible fuHy 
WMTantBDi} prices ^' 
mtf I luH complement ^reecaraloq 
*a Ml **. iTr. t» 245A Gfeai Rood 

Ol Radio Shack Software. Litne^on. MA 01*40 

617 • 466 * 319 J 



comp ^fBT 

te for your WiUS^ 



O 

o 
o 



Q 
O 

S 




YAESU FT-207R OWNERS 

AUTO SCAN MODULE AND BATTERY 
SAVER KIT 

15 minutes to in- 
cA m^^^^^M stall: scan restarts 

when earner drops 
ofL busy switch 
controls automatic 
scan on-olt: in- 
etudes module and 
instructtons. 

Model AS- 1. $25.00 

lt%^ FT-207R BATTERY SAVER KIT 
Ijk^ MODEL BS-1 $14.95 

'No more dead bettefies due to men^ory back- 
up 

'30¥s 1^3 s power drain when squelched 
*SiiTip](3 to Install, step-by-step irvstmctiona 
and parls included 

'd mA memory backup reduced to 500 AA. 
•45 mA receiver drain reduced lo 30 mA 
'Improved audio Tldetiiy artd tcudness 

ENGINEERING CONSULTING 

P.O. BOX 94355 -'^^^o 

RICHMOND. B. C. V6Y2A8. CANADA 






Subscrwtion 
PrdbLSvi? 



73 MagaiifiB does not keep subscrip- 
Iron records on the premrses. Ihere- 
fore calling us only adds (ime and 
doesn't solve the problem. 

Please send a description of the 
problem and your most recenl ad- 
dress label to: 



73 Magazine 
Subscription Dept. 
PO Box 931 
Farmlngdal«, NY 11737 



Thanli you afxj enioy yout ^ytiscnption 



154 73 Magazine • February. 1382 



ETCH BOARDS FAST 




This Power Etching Svstem will 
handle PC boards up to 6" x h'\ 
The pump keeps acid agitattng for 
faster more even etchmg 

Send $34.50 plus $3.50 for 
postage and handling to: 



STEILMAKER ENfERPRISIS 

250PEQUOT TRAIL 

WESTERLY R 1.02891 



^32 






MICROWAVE 
DISH 




24" True Parabolic 
Reflector 

12" Focus 

Made from .050" 
Spun Aluminum 

Approximately 
21 dBi Gain 



$18.95 



■dd 4S t>l*s tax 



INDY AMATEUR SUPPLY 

P.O. Box 421 
Indianapolis, IN 46206 



i^6 





Lsn 


RED HOT SPECf A 




Azden PCS3000 two-metef 


S2SS 


Santec HT 1 2Q0 2 m handheld 


S279 


KDK 2025. MKII, wfTT mrke 


$269 


Janel QSA 5 2*m preamp 


$36.50 


Bearcat 20-20 Scan ner 


$278 


KantronJcs FOII Code Reader 


$360 


All MFJ items 12% off list | 


Ten-Tec Argosy Xcvr 


$469 


Ten^Tec Delta Xcvr 


S738 


Ter^*Tec Omni Xcvr 


SI 040 


A2den PCS'300 2-m handheld 


$280 


2 only Icom 2KL tin ear amps 


S999 


AEAMorsematic 


$167 


icantronics Micro HTTY sender 


S25S 


Sencher black paddles 


$35 


Ben Franklin Electronics 


11572 N Main Hillstxsro KS 67063 


316-947-2269 


1^439 1 



C.B. SPECIAL 

(Repeat Of a sail out) 

CONVERT THESE TO 
10 METER Fil 

Hm* Hy-Gam 40 criinn») pnnltd Ctrcuit 
boards ass«rnt)iy (^^ticrv po! vOlumi 
COf^trot artd Ch«r>r>el swflch HHpr incJudedl 
Boards told as is Ojmensjon S 'X6' 

1-0 pet $7.50 •!, 

10-49 pet $6.50 ei. 

fWhM«guanMttai la»1) 

REMOTE 40 CHANNEL C.8. 

Hemoles tiave a matat !ram« Speahef, 
piaaric case, ai^d control m^c nor inciudtKl. 
Sold as IS $14.95 •« 

C.B BARGAIN 

G.6. boards rrnssmg parts Or damaged, 
Can h^ used tot st^are parts Buv 9evera^' > 

Order mlormal^on Please add 14,00 for 
S/H via UF5 COD s accented tor orders 
Toiahnfl S&OOO or rrora l^londs residents 
add 4°/d sales l»* Minimi^m order $15 00 
Foreign Orders US funds oriiy add ;Q% for 
S/H MASTER CARD ftnd VISA accoc>t*d 

Surplus Ei«ctronlG$ Corp* 

7294 NW 54th St. 

MtamJFL 33166 *^*^ 

P H J 305 887^228 






TRS-80® DISCOUNT 




*^313 



1 ^800-84 1 -0860 i^it nwi 

MICRO MANAGiMINT 
SYSTEMS »NC. 

DEPT. NO, 1 3 

DowniQwri FIqzc Slioppmg Canttf 

115C Second Awe S.W, 

Colro, Georgio 31736 

913'377-7120 Go. Phono No, 

Write For Free Catalog 



RF MODULATORS 





Small SJi« 
1^ X 3 1 1'.^ 



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» CRYSTAL CONTHOLLEO FOR STABJI.ITV 

• IC CtRCUITRV FOR EXCELLENT RELIABILfTY 

• EXTERNALLY SWITCHED FOR CHANNELS Icr 4 

The VM-1000 Rf Modufator is the same type and 
qu&lrty of Ihoae found in todays video tape lecordefs. II 
h as con ^e n ient ph o no j a c k 3 f o r v ideo and a udio 1 npu ts a nd 
has a sisndard "F" lyp^ conn&ttor for RF oulput. Power o 
SLippliE?d by an AC to DC power pacK wnich js included 
Call NOW forrmore inrormatlon and torquantity diacounts, 

JJT DISTRIBUTING ^25 

17210 Yukon Ave., Suite #1 

Torrance, Calif. 90504 

Call COD Orders lo; (213} 515-6800 



this publication 
is Qvoiloble in 

mKlOiOiin 



j_ * *< « ' 






University Microfilms Internsttonal 



300 North Zeeb Road 

Oept. P.R. 

Ann Affcor, Ml 48106 

U.S.A. 



l&BadfordRow 
Dtpt PR. 

London. WC1R4EJ 
England 




16-Pole Equalizing 

RF Processor 

hr«w SrwTHixid £E'2 mllt^itne ipMeh fn oam o r for «nv iranr 
mitiBr or transceiver. An ouu^iMiifi nf tlv SJunmocxl no- 
con^raT^ RHIF jKOcenoo- ContMm bti^li-tri SE-1 mJki 
fiwiMiSKV-mpanK «|u«li»r for maximum Inuliigibilitir, 
Emv TO insttfl. No ii B i i wiie i modfficvtknf nqMlrKl Tws 
speciallv dsa^ned ftfnta crfOMi riiten. plu» tunl. ■«>«« IC 
dipping msotB exc^lvnT taih,|»wvf end linghi tjii i,ii.i^lnii iffl- 
d«v. VVidfr ^ynaniic-nngi IC balancaiJmodulitorfndpraduet 
detecior. Aim£o inpni/cquaSzar cirajitrY wof^ wttii both 
-.- and kiw- imp rt w c f mtem pNin w wntiout ovtrkw) or 
ntswrtian, AdiusTibte dipping 1} to 30 dO or mCMf*. Ec|uMiluiition 
G » 20 dB. VfeTsstility^ quatrtv. pg for n u n c* : for ttw mniur 
iifho ctemands th? b««^ Model SE 2: I4O0.0O. 
Aifai 53 iMppiriQ pv onto^: $ 1 S cpverteas #ir 
CLPnipevisr PlHKoontacilngomipuc, PeBifadk24 49,!>4070, 
Ifl^otosdt, West Germvnv. 

5h6*wood &igfn€€ring Inc 

MS8 South Ogden St. 

Denver, Colo. 80210 

(303) 722-2257 





-™ rt *yift Au torn* lie 
TR-2400 Kind Scinmr 

iat Kenwood TR 2400 ^tops and locks on busy, ur slops^ 
and resumes i*hen c^rrter drops. ConlroKed by Itey 
board, no swilche;. td> add. Irtstalls easily tnsrde rig. six 
SuTipEfl coinnflcTioriiS> no modifrca^lJons. Does nol UiS# 
ipsct provided for PL 
Afls«mbeed— $24 9S Kit— £14.g& 

TR*9000 PiMfiOfV Sc«nn«f 

lor Kenwooo Tft.gOGO scans 5 memory channets Slops 
on busy and resun^es when cafri<er drops U^es «mi sling 
controls, NO 3wii£:r>es la add. InstaHs easily tn«id« rig 
StC product nflviiBiw S«f>t. issue 73 Magaiinm. 
AssflmblAd— S39^ 

tC-280 i*r>d Se«nrMr^S2i.95 

Utinorv Sc«nn*f— (3ft.l£ botTi for K9M 

* S^annefs do nol aftsct ftofmai rig opetration 

* PiQ'laF readouts di9|iC9v scanned FreqtMtncy 

' Alt scannefs are easy tD install using complete ^nd de 
tailad inslallation instructions 

* AH scanners ASSEMRLED £ TESTED (emeepl kin 

* Sa lis tad ion Guaranteed' 

Send crhftcki ot money of der to: 



^SC^VN 



261 ST W Maiy Ann Rd^ Anlkx:ti. IL 60002 

ir>clude It j50 postage £ nafxllirtg 
iljmois res incluid^ 5''^^Ji state tav 



^.^a? 



^See List of AdvefUs^rs on p»ge^ J i* 



73 Magazine • February J 902 155 






Decodes RTTY signals directly from youf re- 
ceiver's loudspeaker. » Ideal tor SWLs, novices & 
seasoned amateurs. * Completely solid state arid 
self-contained. Compact size fits almost anywhere. 
No CRT or demoduiator required . . . Nothing 
extra to buy! # Burtt-ln active mark & space 
filters with tuning LEDs for 170, 425 & 850 H^ 
FSK. * Copies 60, 67, 75, & 100 WPM Baudot & 
100 WPM ASCIL * NOW you can tune in RTTV 
signals from amateurs, news sources & weather 
bulletins. The RTTY READER converts RTTY 
signals Into alphanumeric symbols on an eight-character moving LED readout. Wrjte 
for details or order factory direct. 

RTTY READER KIT, model RRK , , , S/^.fl^ S149.9S 

RTTY READER Wired and tested, model RRF . . , , , . , . %if^.p^ $219,95 

Send check or money order. Use your VISA or MasterCard. Add $5,00 shipping and 
handling for continental U.S. Wisconsin residents add 4% Wisconsin State Sales Tax. 

'-'SO 

Corporation Telephone: (414) 241 8144 

Post OHice Box 51 3G, Thiensville, Wisconsin 53092 



^Hiffwcta^ 






WACOM 




RS 



UJS.ra1flnt Plo,4jEI8aB€1 



CEHIHAI NEW YORK'S MOST COMPLETE HAM DEALER 



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Featuring Kenwood, Yaesu, Icom, Drake, Ten-Tec. Swan, Dentron, Alpha, Robots 
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6ot>^WA2MSH 

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OUR NEW BANDPASS- 
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. . . provides superior performance, 
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Models avaiiatJle for alt cammerctal and nam bands. 
Special prices for amateur repeamr clubs. 

K-79 




fHaiHiBBapi 

:Trr;r;Tn'zrriTTi^i 



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P.O. BOX 7127 • WACO. TEXAS 76710 
817/848-4435 



BILLEf ELICTB«MCS 



r.O.IOM4l)124aE BARUND. TX 75040 214/278^3553 



^^^2 



i 7 Watt Audio Amp Kit $6.95 

5 SMALL, SIN<;LE HVBniD IC AND COMPONENTS FIT ON A r 

5 K 3 1*0 BO AII^D (INCLUBEP) flUNS OM IS^VDC. GREAT FOR 

Si ANV PI^OJECT THAT MEEDS AN INEXPENSIVE AMP. LE&S 

f THAN 3% THD & 5 WATTS COMPATIBLE WITH S€ 01 

\ 

1 



Dooinsilay Alarm Kit $^<9$ 

If you hqve trcujhlp ai-eepsng iancl you wothLd l^ke ihe rest of 
l:^e neighborhood To share yoi-'f misery ihcn Hns lima kil 
will Defor you' There is no way toaccuralelydescFitelhe 
un&arlhly howl.s. *creatn.«5 and 1 fines thai r.omfl out of ITiis 
kEl fcnit separate Enne ofiCiHalorfi nre mixed, cancelled 
and stei5pfirtai ay^rymg rale. lOW&ltsolcraiy^otinds A 
great (on kii or a practicfil burglar afann Corn plolle with 
PC board and all necessary components less speaker For 
6-T? VDC ORDER DA-Q2 



H^' 



3T3t Time Zone Clock Kir 



Mi'croprocfissor/ROM ClocX kit kpfrps lo-caltim'e <I2 hour 
iifji^matl. artcl 2 wOrl<i lime iOneS (24 hour torrrnat): Large 
.6" ORANGE readouts 10 ftiin ID limer for HAMS. Comes 
complete with altratliveisJ^slrctaseandwallpliEgXFMR, 



1 

J Overvoltage Protection Kit $6.9S 



■ H DksiI ihin mm ti^..[ 

• F#|1hArlQuc:h IrnrtI p^ni^l 



• QygrtjfSTj^L TimelMse 
' Qua!l1v collier irififitkfd ^n^ 



1 

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i 

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F^oieci YO\jt ^tpvnttvB i?quipmepl Irom -overvoiiagB 
COiifTitions Ewery compuUsK should hsye Ome' WDrfti wlfh any 
luied DC |3i.Dwvr «Outc» frcmi 10 m 2^1 vollfc up ro 2& HmiH 



Seund Effects Kit 

th« SE-01 SQurvd Ellicli K1tt ha& all ycm 
iKHMl to h II lid a pn>aiamrn3tnn! sound effBcts 
mactiineexcepl a bfaSterv -arvd s-pesker On\y 
Ih* Sf-Ot provides you w»!h adPltionaf 
cif-cuitry Inal frtnliKjfcj n PuIh Geniritof. 
■VKjIt <S)df1«ldr tnd Comparalar !0 n)i)ki> 
mere complex a&untJs ^ srsap lnclLjd«a 
Tlf^iTT tw/sipec&J aaaembly tftsTrutrtiortS 
and progrjimmiris^KJinhptES Y-ou can aasHy 
Cri&ate G-UniKQlt, E]iploB.^cni, Sitam TraJnt, 
Wind ft SuFt ana rnuch fn0f6. 
Complete Kll $1B^D 

W-1h dualilv PC Bosrrt fLesstjUliJery * EpHr 1 
JMTT Chip It PncludHJ 
EHira chtpi 13.19 H. 



ElECTRONIC i^USlC MAKER 



THIS Uf^iaUE KIT COMTAIIsrS A 
MICflOPfiOCESSO!^ Ct*tf WITH ffOM, 
IT HAS BEEN PftOORAMMED TO PLAY 
THE FIRST * ro 10 HOTES OF THE 
TUIWES LISTED BELOW. CONSTitUC- 
TfONtS SmPLE, WORKS W^TH ANY 9 
OR 1A Ot^U ^PKn.lftOT IfiCtUDFDi. 

TflE K3T WILL OPEflATE Of* 

tSVfiC OH 12VAC WITH OPTIONAL 

TflANSFOttMMIJ, (CONVERTS TO 

117 V A O.Alt COtlPOHMttrS 3 BOAfiO 

CempltltKil $16.95 TfanifarmerSl.lS 

TuH^ TnrcudDT ' WllllMit TiHI ■ H^I«t|i^NChonjf '' 

^l-fi $p»ni^t:4 Bnnncr ' YinhM EJo^tdl* "- Amatin 

*m*MiT» • D^irihvhljnn) It^a - W#[3[S(nfl Hjiri:*! ■ 

OmUhimwi & iltijvi^ Jlh 't^tll »flrlli " L* ^i*n t r, fl oa* ' 

Sr<r Wnv Themr ' C^cm^ntln^ '' Augi.itlinc' ' jm^iv 

0*411 ' -Grnd Si«c tht QuMn -^ Cf,if,f,ri Btj^^^f ' 

M HriPillpK^F ' O ^ole Mi« ' ^»m& L ikI* ' T IH £ nil ' Blu* 

iJanubr " Bratrnit |.itllJihr ' Wrt*iwTin™t*r thirfiB " 

Simpiv ChlmE ' C!i«f:intll[M| QnhjtPK ni-imE 




Start the newyeeir rigftt , . the satfing w&yf 



OtA. 



CA3O90 TRA^JS COND AMF 

TLO-SZ DUAL BI-FET AMP 

C D J Sfifi C MOS S^O 'SO CM Tfl 

MC3301 QUAD OP AMP IH?>E »l 

FPT500 PHOTO TRANSISTOR 

TIP \m HPH DARL £A IC 

TEMP CONTROLLED HOTPLATE V 



as 

.A6 

.44 
.44 

rf 1ft 



DUAL PHOTO RESISTOR 3/S 
T' BOHM SPKR, ?5 W 
AV 3-S9-fO SOUND EFFECTS 
fin PAGE MANUAL FOR ABOVE 
JUMBO RED LED ASST STYtES 



Ti.as 

2D>1.BH 



Regulator Card 
Kit $14.9S 



Tnii Hi ihB PegH^'ijiicir Cird frflm ouj Famoys. 
2EIA pQwtr Supply KIL Although we ran oul of 
1l»e tfansiLKmera anJ healslnka, rnany 

£Ll:tilpni-n a hn^t; hc;f!n ^hl^1c.7<iiic:ji4¥'hl'»<ir (iw^ 

vcilliQi r^ulaticn end *iSi 4diiis14tol* foSd 
tdck curreni inriiciTig: Output voHjigeli ilibdii 
lo SOOHV irtjm D lo U Ampi ind idjuililidt 
tiwm 11 Id %^ yollB.. "Designed 1o driMe2 high 
c\*iTEin J N FN .trans lalor-s \2^unx zwasoi or 
equlv.^ Tn^unfl asaammes quIchJy Indudf^d 
are alH tha en bn^rd com^rn^ts lAi^lvd^i^^^ ?i 
di'iv^^ hr9Fi$i.K!&l dn^ O-vcir-E^imp $h<Jl:d^wn 

^uni&cw De!jign0i7tri&cTP*do*TiioaBtaflda-rd 
3"' diamale^ t^mpuler grade Inier tap. the 
quaJlly fjlated PC card la 3-1/?" « ^^*' . 

IHITM INS^TR.'C.IIOMS^ 

niOUiATOn CARO KIT %M,M 

HIQKCURRSNT PARTS 

(2 ' ihlllrf 2 a JSA arW4*| fS.QO 

3 1 .OM HFD OfiO 4DV Camputtr (if Ml* S3. SO 

Roqulrt* TrMKarnnr with 14 - 1tUJC Oyl # Thi 



THE SUPEfl MUSIC MAKER KIT 

REVtSiaN2-SZ4.95 

Nrw vOM Ciu) pl^v l!iir<liE-[fH ul smgs'Rina the 
BuHill Supur Wuilt' MaN Bt Tt* e •:! 1 it liHurM t iIuqIei 
ftcflqrv p«rai}4-atnmHd rnln-DprDCBiNr IC tha; CCtllfS 
wi th 2!:- |:.i £ • |M .-iiir.:i niiiiivLl ¥■ I a ■ UuhES E V at^itinq 
l?re add 111 D i^H I PRflM S I ??(ifl"s I We ^ys lem uan bi: 
fi^prtrHHd l[?pl(ivi up 10 ll)0&i»lBS[rtrPRaPi( TSu; 
w-l i:<i iritis wilh ill ElfElrwilc utniwiinlt |1kSI Iht 
PflQMI. and a [Jr'IfRd. plaietf and LciERnE4l PC 
fionrci which mflasuffii ^" s J-.V t^k 7 i^tll 
intf IJMir ^ECEidr en on ^he Si^me fC board and 
dnvE'i an & ohrn SiPCiikur rnal incluilRdI Smcf 
Ihfl ijnil vtorK*. m 12 VUC or I? PC ■.■i^hitie di 
por 1^1 tk 11 i!?r HM>n It- pQ'^'iihte Whll ild VBu pi fflr 
k24.S&T fMHrythlna IVUl I stwakar. Er3nE.lDfmEr.t1.tt 
SWilchK. ami Pinil. Ai1ditiJi.;i;il :!?0e PflOMS 
allMj'n con! aim Rg, otipular imwiS ^■i&ivilahln In? 
iS.ffi Riich Lists fi! JvijilalilE' PROM aUKifps 3r» 
AVitilabIc mn rAq^iiCAl 

HIP SurlEctiBS l>ri; g pn-s [}w! ^ rxD.!i ?.a)/Sat 
fC^n =lie dJFEnlly $af{lir«j td PC Bri Id acnejs 

tllHR?.! 

Ullry SwitttiBt ywg ^jKi^MiOn ?.$''Sb| 

iFn-r reflinll Wklofl l-Q PC Bd to kc^^s liinftsi 
htUBClJMf Tjh Plastic CilB ft.M 

WHHpJiig TraPBlflrfflir J.DIT 

iFi:i optiatmn OJi n?VAC h&use VDHlaaEl 



ORDERING tN FOR MAT ION: 
C9U or Wffta far Frae^ Cutshg 



TEMP ERE D G L A SS 11 0"F to 1 60'f 1 ■ BB 
3550 < Fa f M ICRO P CH I P Z JQ 

lOtCia SENSITI\/E GATE SCH 3^*B 



i 
i 

f 
f 

f 

w 

¥ 

\ 



SUPER SPECIAL DEALI 
STANDARD C, 60 CASSETTE NEW 
IN PLASTIC CASES rOP QUALITY 
DRIG. USED m-' PJGtTAL' APP 
PREO RE-r-.POf*S.E :iOOH2 - IfiKHZ 
1.3^5*^. 3/3.50 



CO-D MINl*fllJM $JO.OD A ADD SJ.SO FOR COD'S 

- UPS DELivtnv ApORES^ MUST ACCOMPAr^r ALL coo F 

I 



ORDERS 

jl.DD HANDLING QN OROFHS UNDER Sld.H) 

VI$A. MC CAflDS- Ofl CHECK 

ADti ^■•■^ FOR SH1PP1HC 

TEKA^ «E&IOf NTS ADD S^a STATE SA|,|&^ 1 An 

ALL f OqErGN ORDERS ADD 2W-- FOIl SHIPPING 

(CANADA n=..| No FOREIGN COD & 

CALL (214) 37fl-3iSS5 TO Pi Att CRtDIT CARD Qfl COO 

ORDER 



J 



■I 



I 

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futwi tfm^ 



GOTHAM 
ANTENNAS 

(81 3) 584-8489 




SMALL LOT TRAP DIPOLES 



MODEL 
TSL 6040 
TSL 4020 



BANDS 

80,40 

40.20.15 



LGTH 

78' 

40" 



SMALL LOT SHOf^TENED DI POLES 



SL8010 


eO,-30.20. 
15,10 


75' 


S59,95 


SL reo 


1^0 


130' 


S36,95 


SLSO 


80 


63- 


S35.S^5 


SL'40 


40,15 


33- 


$34.95 


FULL SIZE PARALLEL OIPOLES 




FPD8D10 


80.40.20. 
15.10 


130' 


S499& 


FPD4010 


40.20,15.10 


63 


S449S 


^»EW! POflTABLE VERTICALl IDEAL FOR 



APAHTMENTS> CAMPING. TRAllERSJ 

Folds to &' PacVage No RadtaJs, R^qutred 
Fufly Assembled. Full Legal Lirrtil. 11 VSWR 

MODEL BANDS HGHT PRICE 

PVeOlO 8010 13" $5995 

PROVEN DESIGN ■ QOTHAM ALL SAND 
VERTICALS 

V160 

V-flO 

V40 









i6o,ao.40.?d, 


33' 


53^.95 


fS.10.6 






80,40,20 


23 


$3795 


15.10,6 






40.20,15.10.6 


23 


£3S.§S 



FAM0U5G0THAM QUADS 
^ 2 Elem^nis — 3 Bands Complele £1 19.95 

CHAMPIONSHIP GOTHAM BEAMS 
Fyll Size Complete trom t79.95 

CALL OR SEND LARGE SASE FOR CATA- 
LOG Shipping: Dipok«£ & Verl^cals 
52.50 USA;S7.00 Ca nada: S5 00 FPO. APO 
Beams & Quads Shipped UPS or Freight 
Collect. FIs. add 4% Sales Tux 

P.O. Box 776 • Largo, FL 33540 



1^417 

PRICE 
$49.95 

S4/.S5 



150 TSMagazin^ • February, 1982 




on 

Scanners! 

NEW Rebates! 

Communications Electronics™ the 

world's largest distributor of radio scan- 
ners, celebrates 1 982 with big savings on 
Bearcat scanners- Electra Company, the 
manufacturers of Bearcat scanners is 
offering consumer rebates on their great 
line of scanners, when purchased be- 
tween February 1 and March 16, 1982. 

With your scanner, you can monitor the 
exciting two-way radio conversations of 
police and fire departments. Intelligence 
agencies, mobile telephones, energy/oil 
exploration crews, and more. Some scan- 
ners can even monitor aircraft transmis- 
sions! You can actually hearthe news i)efo/'© 
if s news. If you do not own e scanner for 
yourself, now's the time to buy your new 
scanner from Communications Electron- 
ics. Choose the scanner thafs right for you, 
then call our tolHree number to place your 
order with your Visa or Master Card 

We give you excellent service because CE 
distributes more scanners worldwide than 
anyone else. Our warehouse facilities are 
equipped to process thousands of scanner 
orders every week. We also export scanners 
to over 300 countries and military instal- 
lations. Almost all items are in stock for 
quicl( shipment so if you're a person who 
prefers fact to fantasy and who needs to 
know what's really happening around you, 
order your scanner today from CEl 

NEW! Bearcat^350 

The Wf immte SynfhmsixBd Scanner! 

List price $599 95/CE price$399.C»0/£50,00 rftbate 
Your final cost is & low $349-00 
7-Bandf 50 Chmnnei • Alpha-Numoric • If o* 
gtybM sesttner m AM Aircraft mntt Pubiic 
Servicm bands* • Frioriif Channel • AC/ DC 
Bands: 30-50, 11 8-136 AM. 144-174,421-512 MHz. 
The new Bearcat 350 introduces an incredible 
breakthrough in synthes^^ed scanning: Alpha- 
Numeric Display. Push a button— and the Vacuum 
Fluorescent Display switches from "numeric" to 
word descriptions of whaf s being monitored 50 
Channels in 5 banks. Plus, AutoS Manual Search, 
Search Direction, Linttt & Count. Direct Channel 
Access Selective Scan Delay Dual Scan Speeds. 
Automatic Lockout. Automatic Squelch, Non- Volatile 
Memory. Order your Bearcat 350 today! 

Bearcat® 300 

Li5t price $549. 95/CE price S349.OO/$SO.0O rebate 
Your final cost is a tow $2d9,00 
7-Bandf 50 Channel « Service SeBreh * Me- 
Gfystaf scanner * AM Aircraft end Puhlic 
Service tends* • Priority Channel • AC/ DC 
Bands: 32-50, 11S-136AM, 144-174,421-512 MHz, 
The Bearcat 300 is the most advanced automatic 
scanning radio that has ever been ottered to the 
public. The Bearcat 300 uses a bright green fluo- 
rescent digital display, sc it's ideal for mobile 
applications. The Bearcat 300 now has these added 
features: Service Search, Display Intensity Control, 
Hold Search and Resume Search Keys, Separate 
Band keys to permit lock-m/lock-out of any band for 
more efficient service search. 




I4EW! Bearcat® 350 



FREE Bearcat® Rebate Offer 

Get a CQupan good for a £50 rebate when you purctiase a 
Bearcat 350 or 300" $25 rebate on model 250 or 20/20; $1 5 
rebate on modet 210XL $10 rebate on model 160 or 4-6 
Thin Scan. To get your rebate, mait rebate coupon with your 
Original dat^d sales receipt and the Bearca: model number 
from the carton ro Electra, Voull receive your retiate In foLir 
to six sAi'eeks. Offer valid only on purchaser made betwen 
February 1, 1 962 and March 1 5, 1 932 All requests must be 
postmarked by March 31, 1&S2 Umtt of one rebare per 
household. Coupon must accompany all rebate reqwesfa 
and may not be reproduced. Offer good only in the U.S.A. 
Void where taxed or prohibited by law. Resellers, companies, 
clubs and organizations-both profit and non-prottt-are not 
eligible for rebates. Employees of Electra Company, I heir 
advertismg agencies, distributors and retaiiers of SearcaP 
Scanners are also not eligible for rebates. Please be sure to 
send in the correct amount for your scanner. P^y the listed 
CE pri,ce in this ad. Do r^ot deduct the rebate amoimt since 
your rebate will be sent direcUy to you (rom EJe-ctra. Orders 
recei^ved with insufficient payments will not be processed 
an d wri I b e ret u rn ad. Otte r sul^ ject t o c hang e w J t ho ut not ice. 

Bearcat® 250 

List price $429.95/CE price «279-OO/$25.O0 rebate 
Your final cost is a low $254.00 
S-Bandf 50 Channel m Crysiailess e Searches 
Stores « Recoils • Digiiat dock • AC/ DC 
Priority Channel • 3-Band * Count FmatureM 
Frequency range 32-50, 146-174, 420'612 MHz, 
The Se^rcaf 250 performs any scanning function you 
could possibly want. WWh push button ease you can 
program up to 50 ctiannels for auto nna tic monitoring. 
Push another button and search for new frequencies 
There are no crystals to limit what you want to hear A 
special search feature ot the Searca? 250 actually 
stores 64 frequencies and recalls them, oneat atilne^at 
your convenience. 

MEW.' Bearcat® 20/20 

List price S449. 95/CE price S2eQ.0O/$25.O0 rebate 
Your final dOSt is a low $264.00 
7-Band, 40 Chennel • Crymtailmsm • Search e^ 
AM Aircraft and Pubiic Service bands * AC/DC 
Pricriiy Channel • i>ir»ctOhann&l Access • DelsY 
Fr^QuertCYCsnge 32-50. 1i8-T36AM. 144-174. 420-5^2 MHi. 

The Bearcat 20/20 automatic scanrfing radio 
replaces the Bearcat 220 and monitors 40 Jrequen- 
cies from 7 bands, including aircraft. A two-position 
switch, located on the front parrel allows monitohng 
of 20 channels at a time. 

Bearcat® 21 OXL 

List price S349 95/CE price S229.00/$l 5.0O rebate 

Your final cost la a low §21 4. GO 

S'Banvtf iO Channel • Crysfalless • AC/ DC 

Frequency range: 3250, 144 174, 421-512 MHz, 
The Searca/ 21 OXL scanning radio is the second gener- 
ation scanner that replaces the popular Bearcat 210 
and 211. It has alrnost twice the scanning capacity of 
the Sear(?af 210 With 18 channels plus dual scanning 
speeds and a bright green fluorescent display. Auto 
matic search finds new frequencies. Features scan 
delay, single antenna, patented track tuning and more! 

Bearcat® 1 60 

List price $a99.95/CE price S194.0O/S10.0O rebate 
Youf final cost is a low Si S4.0O 
5'Band, 19 Channel • AC only * Pricritw 
Dual Scan Speeds • Direct Chennoi Access 

Frequency range: 32-50, f 44 174. 440-512 MHi. 
The Bearca f 1 60 is the least expensive 0eafcaf crystai- 
less scanner Smooth keyboard. No buttons to punch 
No knobs to turn. Instead, finger-tip pads provide 
control ot ait scanning operations. 

NEW? Bearcat® 100 

riM first no-crYstmiprosremmat>l0 h^ndh^fd scanner. 

At tow 30-120 d^ys for detivery after receipt of 
order due to the high demand for this product. 
List price $449.96/CE price $299. OO 
B*Band, f Channal s Litiuid Crysial Display 
Search * Untit • Moid • Lockout • AC/DC 
Frequency range: 30-50, 138-174, 4Q8-51 2 MH^ 
The world's first no-crystal handheld scanner has 
compressed into a 3^' x 7" x 1 VV case more scanning 
power than is found in many base or mobile scanners. 
The Searcaf 1 00 has a tuli 1 6 channels with frequency 
coverage that includes alf public service bands (Low. 
High, UHF and ' r bands), the 2-Meter and 70 cm. 
Amateur bands, pfus MiHtary and Federal Government 
frequencies. It has chrome-plated keys for functions 
that are user controlled, such as lockout manual and 
automatic scan. Even search is provided, both manual 
and automatic. Wow,,, what a scanner! 

Th e Bearcat ^ 00 produ ces a udi c po we r out pu t of 300 
milliwatts, is track-tuned and has selectivity of better 
than 50 dB down and sensitivity of 0.6 microvolts on 
VHFand 1.0 microvolts on UHF, Power consumption is 
kept esttremety low by using a liquid crystaJ display and 
exclusive low power integrated circuits, 

I nc t u d ed i n ou r low C E pr ice i s a St urdy ca rry i n g case^ 
earphone, battery charger/AC adapter, six AA ni-cad 
batteries and flexible antenna. For earliest delivery 
from CEt reserve your Bearcat 100 today. 

TEST ANY SCANNER 

Test any scanner purchased ifom Communicattons 
Electronics' tor 31 days before you decide to keep it K tor 
any reason you are not completely salisfiet^, return it in 
original condition with all parts in 31 days., for a prompt 
refund (less shipping/handling ctiarges and rebate credits). 



Bearcat® Four-Six ThinScan'" 

List price $189 95/CE prfce $1 24.0O/S1O.00 rebate 
Your ftnal cost is a low $1 1 4. 00 
Frequency range: 33-47, 152)64, 450-503 MHz. 
The incredible. Bearcat Four-Six Thin Scan" is like 
having an information center in your pocket. This four 
band. 6 channel crystal con trolled scanner has patented 
Track Tuning on UHF Scan Delay and Channel Lockout. 
Measures 2^ X 6 V* « V I ncludesfuhher ducky antenna. 
Order crystal certificate tor each channel. Made in Japan. 

Fanon Slimline 6-HLIJ 

List price $169 9S/CE price $109.00 
tow cost S-channelt 3- band scannerf 

The Fanof^ Slimline S-HLU gives you six channels of 
crystal Controlled excitement. Unique Automatic Peak 
Tu n ing C i rcui t adj usts t h e rec e i ve r front e nd I or max i^tn u m 
sensitivity across the entire UHF band. Individual chan- 
f>el I oci<out switches. Frequency range 30"50r 146-1 75 
and 450-51? MHt Si^e 2^A xS^/* x 1' Includes rubber 
ducky anlen na. If you don't need the UHF band, get the 
Fanon model 6-HL forSSg.OO each, and save money. 
Same high performanceandfeaJures as themodel HLU 
without the UHF band. Order crystal certificates for 
each channel. Made in Japan, 

OTHER SCAHHERS £ ACCESSORmS 

HEWl Regency' t 0810 Scanner $319,00 

mew? Rgency' D300 Scanner $219.00 

JiEW/ Regency' DItMD Scanner $169.00 

«eWf Regency' H604 Scan rier $129 00 

Regency" M400 Scanner $259 00 

Regency' Ml OO Scanner $199 OO 

Regency ^ R1 040 Scanner , , $149,00 

SC M A'6 Fa no n Mo bi le Acta pter/ Battery Qh^ rger ... $49 00 

CHB-6 Faron AC Adapief/Batlery Charger $1 S.0O 

CAT-6. Fanon carrying case wjth b(?lt cNp . , $15.00 

AUC-3Fancinayto1ighleradapter/BaitervCharger $15 OO 
PSK-6 Base Power Supply/ Bracket for SCMA'6 . . $;J0 00 

SPSO &QsrC0t AC Actapter S9 00 

SP51 Bedrest Sartery Charger . $9 00 

SPSS B&arcat 4-6 ThinScan" carrying case Sf 2 00 

MA&Q6 fl^gertgyf carrying case foe H604 . . . $t S 00 

FB-E Frequency Directory for Eastern USA St 2.00 

FB'W FrequfSncy Directory lor Western Lf, SA $1 2.00 

FFD Federai Freqiienc/ Dhrectory for LI.S.A. . $12 00 

TSG TopSeerer Regrstryof US, Government Freq. . .510.00 
ASD Frequency Directory for Aircraft Bartd . . . . $10.00 

B-4 1 .2 V AAA Ni Cad batteries [Set of four) $9 00 

A-1 3&CC Crystal cerliticate - $3.O0 

Add $3 .00 shipping for aM accessories ordered alt he same time. 

INCREASED PERFORMAHCE AMTEMNAS 

If you want the utmost in pertorrr^ance from your 
scanner, i^t isessentiallt^atyouuseanexternalantenna. 
We have six ba^e and fTl!obi^e antennas speci'fically 
designed tor receiving all bands Or^der #A60 is a 
magnet mount mobile antenna Order #A61 is a gutter 
clip mobiie antenna Order #Ae2 is a trunk-lip mobile 
antenna. Order #A63 is a ^* inch hoie mount Order 
#A64 is a % inch snap-in mount, and # A70 isan ail band 
base station antenna. All antennas are $35.00 and 
$3 00 for UPS shipping in the continental United Slates. 

BUY WITH CONFIDENCE 

Togo! the test est detivery from CE ot any scanner, i^end 
or phone your order directly to our Scanner Disintaution 
Cenrer' Be sure !o calculate your pnce usmg the CE prices 
in this ad. Michigan residents ptease add 4% sales tax. 
Written purchase orders are accepted from approved gov- 
ernment agencies and most weli rated firms at a HO* 
surcharge for net 10 billing. AH sales are subiect toavaila- 
brjity. acceptance and verffication. All sal^aon accessories 
are fma! Prices, terms and specifications are subiect io 
change wilhoal notice. Out ot stock items w^ll be placed on 
backorder aulomatfcalty unless CE is instructed diff^renlly. 
Most products Jhat we self have g manufacturers warranty, 
Free copies Of is/arranties on these products are avaiiable 
prior to purchase bv writing to CE. lnternati;onal orders are 
invited with, a $20 00 surcharge tor special handHr^g in 
addition to shipptiig chfsrges. A^f shrpmenis are RO B. Ann 
Arbor Michigan No COIN'S please Non-certi^fiedandforei^gn 
checks require ban-k clearance. Winirr^urn order S35.O0 

Mail orders to: Communications Electronicsr 
Box 1002, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48106 USA. Add 
$7.00 per scanner or phone product for U.P.S. 
ground shipping and handfing, or $ 1 4.00 for faster 
U.P.S. air shipping lo some locations. If you have a 
Visa or Master Card, you may call anytime and 
place a credit card order. Order toll free in the 
U.S-A. Dial 800-521-4414. If you are outside the 
U.S. or in Michigan, diat 313-994-4444. Dealer 
inquiries invited. Orber without obligation todayl 

Scanner Distrfbution Center' and CE logos are trade- 
marks of Communications Electronics* 
f Bearcat is a federalty registered trademark of Electra 
Company, a Division ot Masco Corporation of Indiana, 
trtegencj^ is a federally registered trademark of Reg^ency 
Efectrontcs Inc AD # i 1 2 1 0S 1 

Copyright -1982 Communications Electronics'" 






fV 



^377 



COMMUNICATIONS 
ELECTRONICS" 

a54 phoflnii n BoJi ^007 D Ann ArtKvr. WHthigan 4fl106 U S A. 
Cal I TOLL^ F n E E {AOO] 52 1 44 1 4 or wi*i4* U . S. A ( 1> S| 904^4444 



^"■^ electromc;^ 



Introducing 



(602) 242-3037 
(602)242-8916 

2111 W. CAMELBACK ROAD 
PHOENIX, ARIZONA 85015 



TVRO CIRCUIT BOARDS 

Satellite Receiver Boards— Now in Stock 



DUAL CONVERSION BOARD .$25.00 

This board provides conversion from the 3,7-4.2 band first to 
900 MHz where gain and bandpass filtering are provided and, 
second, to 70 Mliz. The board contains both local osciilators, 
one fixed and the other variable, and the second mixer. Con- 
struction is greatly simplified by the use of Hybrid IG amplifiers 
for the gain stages. 

SIX 47pF CHIP CAPACITORS 

For use with dual conversion board ..-...,, ,$6.00 



70 MHz IF BOARD $25,00 

This circuit provides about 43d8 gain with 50 ohm tnput and 
output impedance. It is designed to drive the HOWARD/ 
COLEMAN TVRO Demodulator. The on-tKDard bandpass filter 
can be tuned for bandwidths between 20 and 35 MHz with a 
passband ripple of less than Vt dB, Hybrid IC's are used for 
the gain stages. 

SEVEN .01 pF CHIP CAPACITORS 

Foruse with the70 MHz IF board. , . , . .$7,00 



DEMODULATOR BOARD ,$40.00 

This circuit takes the 70 MHz center frequency satellite TV sig- 
nals in the 10 to 200 millivolt range, detects them using a phase 
locked ioop, de-emphasizes and filters the result and ampli- 
fies the result to produce standard NTSC video. Other outputs 
include the audio subcarrter, a DC voltage proportional to the 
strength of the 70 MHz signal, and AFC voltage centered at 
about 2 volts DC. 

SINGLE AUDIO. .... .$15.00 

This circuit recovers the audio signals from the 6.8 MHz fre- 
quency. The Miller 9051 coils are tuned to pass the 6,8 MHz 
subcanier and the Miller 9052 coil tunes for recovery of 
the audio. 

DUAL AUDIO , .$25-00 

Duplicate of the single audio but also covers the 6.2 range. 

DC CONTROL. $15.00 

SPECIAL SET OF FIVE BOARDS $100.00 

INCLUDING DUAL AUDIO (2 single audio boards) 



1900 to 2500 MHz MICROWAVE DOWNCONVERTER 

MICROWAVE RECEIVER This receiver is tunable over a range of 1900 to 2500 MHz approximately, and 
is intended for amateur use, The local oscillator is voltage controlled, making the I.F. range approximate- 
ly 54 to 88 MHz for standard TV set channels 2 thru 7. 

P.O. BOARD with DATA 1to5 $15.00 6to11 $13.00 12to26 $11.00 27-up $9.00 

P.O. Board with all parts for assembly $49.99 P.O. Board with all chip caps soldered on. . . $30.00 

P.C. Board with all parts for assembly P.O. Board assembled & tested $69.99 

plus 2N6603. $69.99 P.C. Board assembled & tested with 2N6603$79.99 

HMR 11 DOWNCONVERTER with Power Supply, Antenna (Dish) & all Cables for installation. 180 Day Warranty. 

1to5 $150.00 6 to 11 $140.00 12- up $125.00 

YAGI DOWNCONVERTER with Power Supply. Antenna (Yagi) & all Cables for installation. 90 Day Waranty. 

1to5 $150.00 6 to 11 $140.00 12 -up $125.00 

YAGI DOWNCONVERTER as above but Kit. (NO CABLES) With Box. 

1to5 $125.00 6to11 $115.00 12-up $100.00 

HMR II DOWNCONVERTER as above but Kit. (NO GABLES) With PVC. 

1to5 $125.00 6 to 11 $115.00 12- up 



.00 



«#^¥*»»**if*»»#*»*#«»^" 



f *=**^*^ 



SPECIAL NEW STOCK OF CARBIDE DRILL BITS— YOUR 



1.25mm 
1.45mm 
3.2mm 
3.3mm 

1/8 

3/16 
5/32 

7/32 



13/64 
19 
20 
24 

Zd 

29 
30 

31 



36 
37 
38 
39 
40 
44 
45 
46 



47 
48 
49 

50 
51 
52 

53 
54 



CHOICE $1.99 


■**■■ urn 


55 


63 


56 


64 


57 


65 


58 


67 


59 


68 


60 


69 


61 




62 





■ 



1$0 73 Magazine • February, 1982 



"DOWN CONVERTERS" 

1900 to 2500 MHZ Microwave Downconverters 

In Regards to your request for information concerning our microwave receiver. This 
receiver is tunable over a range of 1900 to 2500 MHZ approximately, and is intended 
for amateur use. The local oscillator is voltage controlled (i.e.) making the I.F. 
range approximately 54 to 88 MHZ For Your Standard TV Set Channels 2 thru 7. 

P. C. Board with Data 



1 to 5 



$15.00 



6 to 11 



$13.00 



12 to 26 



$11.00 



27 



P. C. Board with all chip caps solder on. 

P,C. Board with all parts for assembly. 

P. C. Board with all parts for assembly plus 2N6603 

P. C. Board assembled and Tested. 

P. C. Board assembled and Tested with 2N6603. 

HMR II Downconverter with power supply — antenna (Dish) 

180 Day Warranty . 



1 to 5 



$150.00 



6 to 11 



$140.00 12 to up 



$125.00 



Yagi Downconverter with Power Supply , Antenna (Yagi) and all cables for 
Instalation. 90 Day Warranty. 



up 



1 to 5 



$150.00 



6 to 11 



$140.00 12 



up 



$125.00 



Yagi Downconverter as above but Kit. {NO CABLES) With Box. 



1 to 5 



$125.00 



6 to 11 



$115.00 12 



up 



$100.00 



HMR II Downconverter as above but Kit, {NO CABLES) With PVC. 



1 to 5 



$125.00 



6 to 11 



$115.00 12 



up 



$100.00 



$9.00 
$30.00 
$49.99 
$69.99 

$69.99 
$79.99 



Special Ne w Stock Of Carbide Drill Bits . 



1.25rnn 


20 


40 


53 


63 


1.45mm 


24 


44 


54 


64 


3.2inn 


26 


45 


55 


65 


3.3i[in 


29 


46 


56 


67 


1/8 


30 


47 


57 


68 


3/16 


31 


48 


58 


69 


5/32 


36 


49 


59 




im 


37 


50 


60 


Yo 


13/64 


38 


51 


61 




19 


39 


52 


62 





Your Choice $1.99 



Tod Free Number 
800-528-01 80 

(For orders only) 



Q^^^§\x elect roi|ics 



*^159 



See List of Adv&fUsers on page T 14 



73Magazine • February, 1982 159 



"FILTERS 



99 



Con ins Mechanical Filter #526-9724-010 Model F455Z32F 
455KHZ at 3.2KHz Wide. 



$15. 00 



AtUs Crystal Filters 



5.52-2.7/8 

5.595-2.7/8/U 

5.595-. 500/4/CW 

5.595-2.7/LSB 

5.595-2.7/USB 

5.645-2.7/8 

9.0SB/CW 



5.52MHZ/2.7KH2 wide 8 pole 
5.595HHZ/2.7KHZ wide 8 pole upper sideband 
5. 595MHz/. 500KHZ wide 4 pole CW 
5-595MHz/2.7KHz wide B pole lower sideband 
5.595MHZ/2.7KHZ wide 8 pole upper sideband 
5. 645MHz/ 2. 7 KHz wide 8 pole 
9.0MHz/ 8 pole sideband and CW 



Your Choice 
$12.99 



Kokusai Electric Co. Mechanical Filter #MF-455-ZL-21H 

455KHZ at Center Frequency of 453. 5Kc Carrier Frequency of 455Kc 2.36Kc Bandwidth 



$15.00 



Crystal Filters 
Nikko FX-07800C 
TEW FEC-103-2 
Tyco/CD 001019880 



Motorola 


4884863B01 


PTI 


535QC 


PTI 


5426C 


CD 


A10300 


Ceramic Fi 


Iters 


Murata 


BFB455B 




CFM455E 




CFM455D 




CFR455E 




CFU455E 




CFU455G 




CFW455D 




CFU455R 




SFB455D 




SFE10.7 




SFG10.7MA 


Clevite 


TO-OIA 




T0-02A 


Nippon 


LF-B4/CFU455I 




LF-B6/CFU455H 




LF-C18 


Tokin 


CF455A/BFU455K 


Mat sushi ra 


EFC-L455K 



7.8MHz 

10.6935 

10. 7MHz 2 pole 15KHz Bw. Motorola #48D84396K01 

Thru #48D84396K05 

11.7MHz 2 pole 15KHz Bandwidth 

12MHz 2 pole 15KHz Bandwidth 

21.4MHz 2 pole 15KHz Bandwidth 

45r^Hz 2 pole 15KHZ Bandwidth (For Motorola 

Comnuni cations equipment) 



10.00 

10.00 

4.00 
5.00 
5.00 
5.00 

5.00 



455KHZ 




455KHZ +- 


5.5KHZ 


455KHZ +- 


7KHz 


455KHZ +- 


5.5KHZ 


455KHZ +- 


1 . 5KHz 


455KHZ +- 


IKHZ 


455KHZ +- 


IKHZ 


455KHZ +- 


3KH2 


455KHZ 




10.7MHz 




10.7MHz 




455KHZ 




455KHZ 




455KHZ +- 


IKHz 


455KHZ +- 


iKHz 


455KHZ 




455KH2 +- 


2KKZ 


455KHZ 





$ 2.40 
6.65 
6.65 
8.00 
2.90 
2.90 
2.90 
4.35 
2.40 
2.67 
10.00 
5.00 
5.00 
5.80 
5.80 
10.00 
4.80 
7.00 



RQTRON MUFFIN FANS Model Mark 4/MU2A1 

These fans are new factory boxed 115vac at 14watts 5O/60cps 

CFM is 38 at 50cps and 105 at 60c ps. 



Impedance Protected- F 



$ 7.99 



SPECTRA PHYSICS INC . Model 088 HeNe Laser Tubes. 

Power output l,5niw. Beam Dia. .75niii. Beam Dir. 2.7mr. 8Kv starting voltage 

68f( ohm Iwatt ballast lOOOvdc +-100vdc 3.7ma. TUBES ARE NEW $59.99 



lao 73MagaTine • February, 1982 



"AMPLIFIERS" 



AVANTEK LOW NOISE AMPLIFIERS 



Model s 

Frequency Range 

Noise Figure 

Voltage 

Gain 

Power Output 

Price 



UTC2-102M 

30 to 200MC 

1.5d8 

+15vdc 

29dB 

IdB Gain +7dBm 

$49.99 



/\p_20-T 

200 to 4aOMC 

6.5dB 

+24vdc 

30dB 

IdB Gain +20dBm 

$49.99 



AL-45-0- 1 

450 to 800MC 

7dB 

-6vdc (a +12vdc 

30dB 

IdB Gain -5dBm 

$49.99 



AK-IOOOH 

500 to lOOOMC 

2.5dB 

+12vdc -12vdc 

25dB 

IdB Gain +8dBm 

$69.99 



Mini Circuits Double Balanced Mixers 



Model RAY- 3 



Very High Level (+23dBm LO) 70KHz to 200MH2 LO,RF,DC to 200MHz IF 

Conversion Loss,dB One Octave From Band Edge 6Typ./7.5Max. Total Range 6.5Typ./8Max. 

Isolation, dB Lower Band Edge To One Decade Higher (LO-RF/LO-IF) 55Typ./45Min. Mid. Range 

(LO-RF/LO-IF) 40Typ./30Min. Upper Band Edge To One Octave Lower (LO-RF/LO-IF) 30Typ./ 

25Min. 

Price $^4.99 

Model TSM-3 

Standard Level (+7d8m LO) .IMHz to 400MHz LO,RF,DC to 400MHz IF 

Conversion Loss.dB One Octave From Band Edge 5.3Typ./7.5Max. Total Range 6.5Typ./8.5Max. 

Isolation, dB Lower Band Edge To One Decade Higher (LO-RF/LO-IF) 60Typ./50Min. Mid. Range 

(LO-RF/LO-IF) 50Typ./35Min. Upper Band Edge To One Octave Lower (LO-RF/LO-IF) 35TYP./ 

25Min. 

Price $11.99 



i^^^^^"^^^ 



Hewlett Packard Linear Power Microwave RF Transistor HXTR5401/35831E 



Collector Base Brakedown Voltage at lc=100ua 
Collector Emitter Brakedown Voltage at Ic=500ua 
Collector Cutoff Current at Vcb=15v 
Forward Current Transfer Ratio at Vce=15v,Ic=15ma 
Transducer Power Gain at Vce=18v»Ice^60ma,F=2GHz. 
Maximum Available Gain at Vce^l8v,Ic^60ma,F=^lGHz/F-2GHz 
Price $29.99 



Motorola RF Power Amplifier Modules 



35volts min* 
SOvolts min, 
lOOua max* 
15min,40typ,125max 
3dBmin,4dBtyp 
14dB typ»8dB typ 



Model 


MHW612A 


MHW613A 

150 to 174MH2 


MHW710 


MHW72a 


Frequency Range 


146 to 147MHz 


400 to 512MHz 


400 to 470MHz 


Voltage 


12.5vdc 


12.5vdc 


12.5vdc 


12.5vdc 


Output Power 


20watts 


30watts 


13watts 


20watts 


Minimum Gain 


20dB 


20dB 


19.4dB 


21dB 


Ha nnon i cs 


-30dB 


-30dB 


40dB 


40dB 


RF Input Power 


400nfiw 


500mw 


250nM 


250mw 


Price 


$57.50 


$59.80 


$57.50 


$69.00 



Toll Free Number 
800-528-01 aO 
(For orders only) 



Q^^i\T elect roi|ics 



See Lt^f of Aa^erttsers on pjtge tJ4 



73Magsime • February, 1982 161 



fifi 



TRANSISTORS" 



WATKINS JOHNSON WJ-M62 3.7 to 4.2GHz Communication Band Double Balanced Mixer 



$100.00 



SSB Conversion Loss 4.9dB Typ. 6dB Max. fR 3.7 to 4.2GH2 

5.5dB Typ. 6.5dB Max. fl DC to 1125MH2 fL fR 

fl 880MHz fL fR 
fR 3.7 to 4.2GHz 
4.9dB Typ. 6dB Max. fl'aO to il25MHz fL fR 



SSB Noise Fiqure 



Isolation 

fl at R 
fL at I 



5.5dB Typ. 6.5dB Max. fl 880MHz fL fR 



30dB Hin. 40dB Typ. 

25dB Min. BOdB Typ. 

20dB Min. 30dB Typ. 

15dB Min. 25dB Typ. 
Conversion Compression IdB Max. 



fL 2,8 to 5.35GHz 
fL 4.5 to 5.35GHz 
fL 3.6 to 4.56Hz 
fL 2.8 to 3.6GHz 



fR Level +2dBm 

Flatness .2dB Peak to Peak Over any 40MHz Segment of fR=3.7 to 4.2GHz 

Third Order Input Intercept +ndBm fRl=4GHz fR2=4.01GHz Both at -5dBm fL=4.5GHz 
Group Time Delay .5ns Typ. .75ns Max. fR3.7 to 4.2GHz fL 3480MHz @ +13dBin 



VSWR 


L-Port 


1.25: 


:1 Typ. 2.0:1 


fL 


2.8 to 5.35GHz 




R-Port 


1.25: 


:1 Typ. 2,0:1 


fR 


3.7 to 4.2GHz fL fR 






1.4 : 


:1 Typ. 2.0:1 


fR 


3.7 to 4.2GHz fL fR 




I-Port 


1.5 : 


:1 Typ. 2.0:1 


fl-- 


=100MHz 






1.3 : 


:1 Typ. 2.0:1 


fl = 


=500MHz 






1.8 : 


:1 Typ. 2.5:1 


fl = 


^1125MHz 


SGS/ATES RF Transistors 








Motorola RF Transistor 


Type. 


BFQ85 




BFW92 




HRF901 2N6603 


Collector Base V 


20v 




25v 




25v 25v 


Collector Emitter 


V 15v 




15v 




15v 15v 


Emitter Base V 


3v 




2.5v 




3v 3v 


Collector Current 


40ma 




25ma 




30ma 30ma 


Power Dissipation 


ZOOwM 




190mw 




375mw 400niw 


HFE 


40mi n . 


200max. 


20min. 150max. 




SOmin. 200max. 30min. 200max. 


FT 


4GHZ min. 5GHz 


max. 1.6GHz Typ. 




4.5GHz typ. 2GHz min. 


Noise Fiqure 


iGHz 3dB Max. 


500MHz 4dB Typ 


^ 


IGHz 2dB Typ. 2GHz 2,9dB Typ. 


Price 


$1.50 




$1.50 




$2.00 $10.00 


National Semiconductor Vari 


able Vo 


Itage Regulator Sal 


e !!!!!!!!! 


LM317K 


LM350K 




LM7236/L 




LM7805/06/08/12/15/18/24 


1.2 to 37vdc 


1,2 to 


33vdc 


2 to 37vdc 




5. 6, 8.12.15,18,24vdc 


1 . 5Amps 


SAmps 




150nia. 




lAmp 


TO- 3 


TO- 3 




TO-lOO/TO-116 




TO-220/T0-3 


$4.50 


$5.75 




$1.00 $1.25 




$1.17 $2.00 



P & B Solid State Relays Type ECT1DB72 



*May Be Other Brand Equivalent 

Toll Free Number 

800-528-0180 
(For orders only) 



5VDC Turn On 120VAC Contact 7 Amps 

20Amps on 10"xl0"x.062" Alum.Heatsink with 
Silicon Grease $5,00 



(fVI^jz electroi|ics 



182 73 Magazine • February, 1 982 



iC 



MIXERS" 




WATKINS JOHNSON WJ-M6 Double Balanced Mixer 



LO and RF 0.2 to 300MH2 
Conversion Loss (SSB) 

Noise Figure (SSB) 

Conversion Compression 



IF DC to 300MH2 
6.5dB Max. 1 to 50MHz 
B.5dB Max. .2 to 300MH2 
same as above 
8.5dB Max. 50 to 300MH2 
.3dB Typ. 



$21.00 



WITH DATA SHEET 



NEC (NIPPON ELECTRIC CO. LTD. NE57835/2SC2150 Microwave Transistor 



NF Min F=2GHz 
F=3GHz 
F=4GHz 



dB 2.4 Typ. 
dS 3.4 Typ. 
dB 4.3 Typ. 



MAG F=2GH2 

F=3GHz 
F=4GHz 



dB 12 Typ, 

dB 9 Typ. 
d8 6.5 Typ 



$5.30 



Ft Gain Bandwidth Product at Vce=8v, Ic^lftna. GHz 4 Min. 6 Typ. 
Vcbo 25v Vceo llv Vebo 3v Ic 50ma. Pt. 250niiw 

UNELCO RF Power and Linear Amplifier Capacitors 

These are the famous capacitors used by all the RF Power and Linear Amplifier manufacutures 
and described in the Motorola RF Data Book. 



lOpf 



14pf 
20pf 



22pf 

25pf 
27pf 
27.5pf 



30pf 

32pf 
33pf 
34pf 



40pf 
43pf 

62pf 
SOpf 



lOOpf 
120pf 
180pf 
200pf 



250pf 1 to lOpcs. .604 each 

820pf 11 to 50pcs. .504 each 

51 to lOOpcs, .404 each 



NIPPON ELECTRIC COMPANY TUNNEL DIODES 



Peak Pt. Current ma. 
Valley Pt. Current ma. 
Peak Pt. Voltage mv. 
Projected Peak Pt. Voltage 
Series Res. Ohms 
Terminal Cap. pf. 
Valley Pt. Voltage mv. 



mv 



Ip 
Iv 

Vp 

Vpp 

rS 

Ct 

vv 



Vf=Ip 



MODEL 1S2199 
9min. lOTyp. Umax. 
1.2Typ. 1.5max. 
95Typ. 120max. 
480m1n. 550Typ. 630max 
2.5Typ. 4max. 
1.7Typ. 2max. 
370Typ. 



1S2200 ^^'^^ 
9min. lOTyp. Umax. 
1.2Typ. l.Smax. 
75Typ. 90max. 
440m1n. 520Typ. 600max 
2Typ. 3niax. 
5Typ. 8max. 
350Typ. 



FAIRCHILD / DUMONT Oscilloscope Probes Model 4290B 

Input Impedance 10 meg.. Input Capacity 6.5 to 12pf . , Division Ration (Volts/DIv Factor) 

10:1, Cable Length 4Ft. , Frequency Range Over lOOMHz. 

These Probes will work on all Tektronix, Hewlett Packard, and other Oscilloscopes. 

PRICE $45.00 



MOTOROLA RF DATA BOOK 



List all Motorola RF Transistors / RF Power Amplifiers, Varactor Diodes and much much 
more. 



PRICE $7.50 



Ton Free Number 
800-528-0180 

(For orders only) 



^/i*^x electroi|ic$ 



i 



t^See Ust of Aavernsms on fiOffe f t4 



73 Magazine • February J 982 163 



"SOCKETS AND CHIMNEYS" 



EIMAC TUBE SOCKETS AND CHIMNEYS 



SKUO 


Socket 


SK406 


Chimney 


SK416 


Chimney 


SK500 


Socket 


SK506 


Chimney 


SK6Q0 


Socket 


SK602 


Socket 


SK606 


Chimney 


SK607 


Socket 


SK610 


Socket 


SK620 


Socket 


SK620A 


Socket 


JOHNSON 


TUBE SOCKETS 



$ POR 
35.00 
22.00 
330.00 
47 . 00 
39.50 
56,00 
8.80 
43.00 
44.00 
45.00 
50.50 



SK626 


Chimney 


SK630 


Socket 


SK636B 


Chimney 


SK640 


Socket 


SK646 


Chimney 


SK711A 


Socket 


SK740 


Socket 


SK770 


Socket 


SK800A 


Socket 


SK806 


Chimney 


SK900 


Socket 


SK906 


Chimney 



$ 



7.70 

45.00 



26 
27 
55 

192 
66 
66 

150 
30 

253 
44 



40 
50 
00 
50 
00 
00 
00 
80 
00 
00 



124-115-2/SK620A Socket 
124-116/SK630A Socket 



$ 30.00 
40.00 



124-113 Bypass Cap. 
122-0275-001 Socket 
(For 4-250A,4-400A,3-400Z, 
3-500Z) 



$ 10.00 

10.00 

2/$15.00 



CHIP CAPACITORS 

.8pf 

ipf 

l.lpf 

1.4pf 

1.5pf 

l.Spf 

2.2pf 

2.7pf 

3.3pf 

3.6pf 

3.9pf 

4.7pf 

5.6pf 

6.8pf 

8.2pf 



PRICES 



I to 10 - 

II to 50 ■ 
51 to 100 



lOpf 
12pf 
15pf 
18pf 
20pf 
22pf 
24pf 
27pf 
33pf 
39pf 
47pf 
51pf 
56pf 
68pf 
82pf 

.99* 
.90* 
.80* 



lOOpf* 


430pf 


llOpf 


470pf 


120pf 


510pf 


130pf 


560pf 


150pf 


520pf 


leopf 


680pf 


180pf 


820pf 


200pf 


lOOOpf/.OOluf* 


220pf* 


lB00pf/.0018uf 


240pf 


2700pf/.0027uf 


270pf 


io,oaopf/.oiuf 


300pf 


12,000pf/.012uf 


330pf 


15,000pf/.015ijf 


360pf 


18,000pf/.018uf 


390pf 





101 to 1000 .60* 
1001 & UP .35* 



* IS A SPECIAL PRICE 



10 for $7.50 
100 for $65.00 
1000 for $350.00 



MATKINS JOHNSON WJ-V907 : Voltage Controlled Microwave Oscillator $110.00 

Frequency range 3.6 to 4.2GHz, Power ouput, Min. lOdBm typical, 8dBm Guaranteed. 
Spurious output suppression Harmonic (nfo), min. 20dB typical, In-Band Non-Harmonic, min. 
60dB typical. Residual FM, pk to pk. Max. 5KHz, pushing factor. Max. 8KHz/V, Pulling figure 
(1.5:1 VSWR), Max. 60MHz, Tuning voltage range +1 to +15voUs, Tuning current. Max. -O.lmA, 
modulation sensitivity range. Max. 120 to 30MHz/V, Input capacitance. Max. lOOpf. Oscillator 
Bias +15 +-0.05 volts @ 55mA, Max. 



Toll Free Number 
800-528-0180 
(For orders only) 



(fVI^l^ elect roi|ic$ 



164 Z3 Magazine • February » 1982 



ti 



TUBES" 



TUBES 

2E26 

2K28 

3B28 

3-500Z 

3-1000Z/8164 

3CX1000A/8283 

3X25Q0A3 

4-65A/8165 

4-125A/4D21 

4-250A/5022 

4-400A/8438 

4.400C/6775 

4-1000A/8166 

4CS250R 

4X150A/7034 

4X150D/7035 

4X1 5QG 

4X250B 

4CX250B/7203 

4CX250F/7204 

4CX250FG/8621 

4CX250K/8245 

4CX250R/7580W 

4CX300A 

4CX350A/8321 

4CX350FJ/8904 

4X500A 

4CX600J 

4CX1000A/816a 

4CX150QB/8660 

4CX3000A/8159 

4CX5000A/8170 

4CX 100000/8171 

4CX15000A/8281 

4E27/A/5-123A/B 

4PR60A 

4PR60B/8252 

KT88 

0X362 

DX415 

572B/T160L 

811 

81 lA 

81 2A 

813 

4624 

4665 

5551A 

5563A 

5675 



PRICE 



TUBES 



$ 4.69 


5721 


100.00 


5768 


5.00 


5836 


102.00 


5837 


300.00 


5861/EC55 


200.00 


587 5A 


200.00 


5881/6L6 


45.00 


5894/A 


58 . 00 


5894B 


68.00 


6080 


71.00 


6083/AX9909 


80.00 


6098/6AK6 


300.00 


5115/A 


69.00 


6146 


30.00 


6146A 


40.00 


6146B/8298A 


50.00 


6146W 


30.00 


6159 


45.00 


6161 


45.00 


6291 


55.00 


6293 


100.00 


6360 


69.00 


6524 


99.00 


6550 


100.00 


6562/6794A 


100.00 


6693 


100.00 


6815 


300.00 


6832 


300.00 


6883/8032A/8552 


300.00 


6884 


300.00 


6897 


400.00 


6900 


500.00 


6907 


700.00 


6939 


40.00 


7094 


100.00 


7117 


175.00 


7211 


15.00 


7289/3CX100A5 


35.00 


7360 


35.00 


7377 


44.00 


7486 


10.00 


7650 


13.00 


7843 


15.00 


7868 


38.00 


7984 


100.00 


8072 


350.00 


8121 


100.00 


8122 


77.00 


8236 


15.00 


8295/PL172 



PRICE 



$200 
85 

100 

100 

110 
15 
5 
45 
55 
10 
89 
14 

100 
6 
6 
7 

14 
11 
70 

125 

20 

4 

53 

7 

25 

110 

58 

22 

7 

46 

110 
35 
55 
15 
75 
17 
60 
34 
11 
67 
75 

250 
58 
4 
12 
55 
50 
85 
30 

300 



NOTICE ALL PRICES ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE !!!•! 



TUBES 

8462 

8505A 

8533W 

8560A 

8560AS 

8608 

8624 

8637 

8647 

8737/5894B 

8807 

8873 

8874 

8875 

8877 

8908 

8916 

8930/X651Z 

8950 



6BK4C 

6DQ5 

6FW5 

6GE5 

6GJ5 

6HS5 

6JB5/6HE5 

6JB6A 

6JM6 

6JN6 

6JS6B 

6JT6A 

6KD6 

6K66/EL505 

6KM6 
6KN6 
6LF6 
6LQ6 
6LU8 
6LX6 
6ME6 
12JB6A 



PRICE 

$100.00 

73.50 

92.00 

55.00 

57.00 

34.00 

67.20 

38.00 

123.00 

55.10 

1000.00 

260.00 

260.00 

260.00 

533.00 

12.00 

1500.00 

45.00 

10.00 



00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
50 
50 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 



1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 I 1 1 1 1 1 1 H 1 1 1 1 1 n 1 1 1 ! 1 1 



5.00 
4,00 
5.00 
5. 00 
5.00 
5.00 
5.00 
5.00 
5.00 
5.00 
5.00 
5.00 
5.00 
5.50 
5.00 
5.00 
6.00 
6.00 
5.00 
5.00 
5.00 
6.00 



"WE ARE ALSO 
TUBES NEW/ US 



LOOKING FOR 
ED ECT." 



WE BUY SELL OR TRADE 



Toll Free Number 
800-526-0180 

(For orders only) 



^^^L? electroi|ic$ 



^See List of Adverttsers on page t ^4 



73 Magazine • February J 982 165 



"MICROWAVE COMPONENTS" 







MIPfllJAVl COWGHEVIS 


All 


7tM 


HeiK SHmt 


ML 


7010 


Mcive S«iffxt ,2 t« ?,«Olz 


JUL 


QTO^ 


ikiit« Source 


$11 


orosi 


itolH S«yi1^ 7. OS 16 ]DGH£ 


Ml 


07091 


ik>4K^ ^6yr?€ |?.4 to IB^t 


MM 


CUSZQK 


VaridbW Atirny^tor 


MM 


24)6-Z0 


VtnaBle AttcnwiaEar Q-ZOdB .5 to l&il lObf 


jum 


I6H-60I 


Var tattle AtteniMtAr D-60cfB 1 to mii lOw 


AftW 


46S4-Z0C 


Vartat>1e Attcny^ator (}-limK I to 4GHr IDk 


AHU 


»e4^20F 


Veni&le AttemittDr O-ZIMB 7 to il£i^f 


Aifre* 


im 


SMpler Aticfiuitor 1 to Z&H to SOd€ 


AHrtd 


U$2 


SMfi1*r Attftiuitor 2 ta 4QU ti to SOdBi 


Alfred 


U51 


SMvtkr AtC^mMtor 4 to SS^E to 50dB 


jtomcofi 


aODD-6754 


Adapter X to SMK S.Z to l2.4eKz 


JlKrican 


202D-fieOO 


Olrectioml Coupler .5 to IGKz edH 


Bow ton 


4i'4a 


PiM^r Dittctor 


CmxHiI Dyn«ii1ci 


30?:j 


Directional Powr Detector 60wfwJ/l^wrff^/2?5-40Cknc 


Coaxlil Dynmlci 


302S 


DlrectlOJiil Power Qe tec tar eQwfwd/i&wrev/ni-l'ianE 


FXR/Mlcrolab 


erw-A2i 


Coupler 


F)tB/>1tcfolab 


XP-AJ^ 


Crystal Detector 


FXft/Microlib 


SI 64 A 


ViriabU' Attenyatar 0~&DdB 2.^ to :].tSail 


FJtR/Hicrglib 


N414A 


Frei^ucn cy Wet#r 3.ff5 to llCHz 


FJtR/MiCfOlib 


G01A07 


Adaptigr 


FWHlCrtfllb 


G£OLe 


Adactf- 


Gentril MkroMfVt 


N40EA-3 


Power Detector 


General Mlcrcwave 


Nno-20 


Directional Coupler 2 to 46Kz 2QdD 
li}D:l k>^vldtr ik tc Z5DW 


Serve rj J MIcrowivf 


4276-2 


Heirlett PicUfd 


BZBIA 


Adapter d to « 5. 95 to 5.85Gc 


Htwyett PicUrd 


H^IA 


Ai^aprer h to i« 7. OS to lOGc 


Hnlett PAck«rd 


XZ91A 


Miptrr I to N fi.f to 12,46c 


Heir1«tl. Ptclttrd 


Hl292e 


kUoif'f IQ to t^Gc 


Hfiilecit PicMnJ 


NK292A 


Wapt«r IS to 22Gt 


Htkf1«tt PtcUnl 


»Si 


Motw Source If 3U/60HC 


H«if1ett P«cUnl 


fi347A 


Moue Source 3. »S to l.SSl&L 


H«Hl«tt Ptchjnj 


H347A 


MHt l4^rcc 7. OS to 10^ 


KChIeU PtChird 


5347* 


KD-lie Source ?.t to l^^SGc 


HtM]ett PKfcAfd 


tWM 


Moite Source S,? to lZ.4£c 


KNwIetl P«t*nJ 


MU 


itoit* SADTCt tOOlc ta 4Cc 


Htw^tU fictind 


3S5t 


Virt*b)e Attnuator . Sh DC to Ific 


HivlEte Picking 


MOD 


im Pn% FHter 4100^: 


Hptlett T>K4urd 


G3aZA 


VartAbU AtttAMtor to 5IW 3.95 to %.^%c 


HMltCt ficfcird 


JJKA 


rariabte itiemiator o to sOdS 5.6S to &.2&c 


Umlrtt P*curd 


fsezA 


far»*6l* Attenuator to SQiB 12.4 to laSt 


NwtfU Hcllt^ 


1»SA 


fertal^le Atte^LMtiir to 50tf 8.2 to 12.4GC 


^icwTett PiCUrd 


41lA-^U> 


i rer for 411A 


Hsilttt PlckJird 


M«21A 


Crntal 5et«tor 7. OS to IDGc 


ftcwlett Piciard 


MI21A 


CrytUl Detector 7. OS to 10^ Kitched Pair 


HchIfU HcUf4 


iM^a 


Crrvtal Dttcctot 7.05 to lOSc llitcrie^ Pair 


H&m\tt* Packird 


tT» 


therBHtor feunt For 430 SErrei IIM: to )06c 


Hi«f!flt Pitkir^ 


MftiA 


Mrritur Munt 1.9% ta ^.fiSSc 


ftWltftt P^KkAPd 


^ias» 


OcUctor Hnmt S.es to B.2Gc 


H^litt fackant 


JUGA 


TlWVlitor Houht S.SS to a.2&c 


Hewlett ^ftclbtrd 


nmt 


Th«f^ttor Hount 7. OS lo lOSc 


Hftflett f>iek4rd 


K«7C 


TI*ei^1itof "teufit It to 2Me 


HeifVvtl PicMrd 


PM7B 


TftiTplstor Hownt 12.4 to 185c 


Hewlett P*ck»(^ 


X4&7A 


Thiffllitor tount &,2 to l?.4Sc 


Hewlett pAckird 


I487B 


ThcrmHtor Hount S.2 to l2.4Gc 


H«ylBtt P«ckAr4 


G&32A 


Freqi,»ene;y Heter 3.9^ t? S.flSGc 


Hnlett PicUrd 


H53ZA 


Frequertcjr Heter ?.a5 to 106c 


HMl«tt PftcUrd 


JS3ZA 


Freqijency Meter 5.3 to a.2Cc 


HpHlttt pAckird 


nS^M 


Frequency Meter 10 to 15Gc 


Hatlttt Packard 


P53ZA 


FrA^ucncy Meter 12.4 to iSGc 


Kevlett P«qlcarEl 


X532A 


Frequency Meter B.2 to l2.4Gc 


Hewlett Packarij 


536A 


Frequency Meter ,94 to 4.ZGc 


Htift#tc PAClcinJ 


G752D 


D^rectloriil Coupler 20da 3,95 to S.flSGc 


Kiwl#U Packard 


Xr52A 


Dlfectlotial Coupler 3<ja 8.2 to l2.4Gc 


Hewlfrtt Packard 


J(752C 


Dli'ectlonil Coupler 1MB B.2 to L2.HiC 


Hewlett Packard 


17 KD 


Street lonal Coi^pler 2QdB S^S. to t2.4gc 


HnUtt PdCUrd 


7i£0 


Ouil Olrectionil Coupler .94 to K97SSc 20iiB 


HcHlett Packard 


767Q 


Dual Dlrectlotial Coupler 1.9 to 4(ic ZOdB 


Hewlett Packard 


7870 


mF«tton«t detector 1,9 to 4.1Cc 


Hevlett P«ck4r4 


G91QB 


Tafirttittlon 3,95 to S.BSGc 


HewUtC Packard 


J1914B 


Moving Load 8.2 to I2.4Gc 


HevlttC P§QkMri 


ZS30A 


Senter O-^Elllitor 


McHlftt Pich«P4 


35(13 


Nkrowavc imiUh SOQii: to I2.4& SPSf 


Hvlett Packard 


843 lA 


Sandjiati Filter 2 to 4Gc 


HCMlett FKkird 


8416A 


Aandpast Filter B to l2.4Gc 


Healvtt Ptckird 


«7lA 


RF Detector 


Mpileti Packaif4 


$4TZA 


Crrsut Detector .Oi to 18&: 


Hotflett Packard 


SfWk 


Pin Hodiilatior l.S to 4.S6c SOa 


Hotlett Packard 


«}J3A 


pin Nadwlat^ 3.7 to &.!&: 3SA 


Mariett PacUN 


lOlOOB 


l«r*tfMtlQft no otai 


Hewlett PkUp^ 


IDSS5A 


Pr«a^p. / to inoic 


HHlctt ficure 


Il6bDA 


Trtcklfif G#neratiir SNmt 


fl«ifl«tt'^acUP4 


IJfcgiA 


Lf»Her 


H«lEtt Packard 


DiKI 


frantHtof Tett Jig 


>*HUtt ^atkard 


33Rnc 


Hh Absorptive Nodylator 


PalBtt Fatfcard 


93110* 


mcfwive Switct) iOGnc ctp iemt 


Mskleit PacLtard 


PS-IWl?* 


■HcrOH^ve Saltch DC to iBGc SPQ^ 


HfwUtt Pacur^ 


3909eA 


HtcrCM4«e Swittft 


Uf 


KJ-Qi'437n 


t4 lOldfi variable Attenuator DC to I&C 


Uy 


woai 


Itolili Source 


El/ 


7921A 


Noise Swirce 10 U MWc 


Kiy 


7921A1 


iolsc Soiree 10 to tOOQMc 


Lectronk 


K53A 


Tube Ht^.Mttenuator And 2ft2S 


ML 


WLU^e^l 


t Band Lu-d 


PCCA 


7H-1S? 


Directional Coupler 4 to 6&c 20dO (flarda ^Q44ft20) 


mrrimtHi 


AU-2fiA/ 


SO 1162 iTirlablc Att«iuator 


Hicrotech 


fl49?Z 


Mkfowave Switch 


HlUUry 


AT-ea/ijPH 


Horn Aflienna ft. 5 to 9,66e 


Hllltarjr 


U[S-52a/U 


MB Attenuator 


Minla 


703 


Variable Atte^udtor to 40da 


NinSi 


79ZFH 


Variable Attenuator 2 to 2.5Sc to l7dB nU. 
£.5 to 12.4GC to 20dB nln. 


Mtrdi 


2301-20 


Directional Cojipler 2 tQ 4Gc: ZCMB 


lUr^* 


2301-30 


Directlofiil Coupler 2 lo 4Gc 3{MB 


Mtrdi 


2366 


Var1al}1e Directional Coupler 1.2 to r.4Gc 7 to 12 


Ntrdi 


2EG3 




Htnda 


28« 




NirdA 


2979 


BlOlrectlonal Coupler 4 to SSc 20dfi 


Ninii 


3002-10 


Directional Coupler .95 to ESc lOdB 


Narda 


VKl?'2d 


Direct locitl Coupler .S5 to 2Gc ZOdfl 


Hanja 


30G3-1D 


Directional Coupler 2 to 4&; lOdB 


Hir4i 


3003-30 


OlrtctlOMl Coupler 2 to 40c JOdB 


iti^i 


30W-KJ 


(Hri<t1o^«l Coupler 4 to lOGc IWfi 



1100.00 

100.00 

100-00 

ISA.OO 

200.00 

IDO.OO 

50.00 

50.00 

75.00 

75.00 

200. oe 

ZOO.OQ 

JM-QCi 

7S.0O 

75. OO 

?5.0O 

5Q.0O 

50,00 

3^.00 

35,00 

450.00 

450.00 

35.00 

35.00 

lOO.OO 

75.^W 

35.00 

50. OQ 

15. DO 

3S.O0 

75.00 

7^.00 

200. QO 

^50. 00 

250.00 

3E5.00 

Z50.00 

300,00 

tfO.OO 

so. 00 

^00. 00 

soo.oo 

350.00 

3ZS.00 

J5.00 

50.00 

200.00 

400^00 

75.00 

85.00 

ISO. 00 

50.00 

IJS.?^ 

155/00 

65.00 

SS.OO 

100. DO 

500.00 

4O0.D0 

500.00 

400. OD 

3SO.O0 

600.00 

200, 

200. 

200. OC 

200.00 

50.00 

50,00 

200.00 

?5.Da 

100.00 

50.00 

IDO.OO 

200.00 

2DO.00 

7S.0O 

1D0.00 

400.00 

350.00 

2S.00 

eoD.oo 

SD.OO 
3flO,00 
150.00 
lOC.OO 
100.00 

75.00 
100,00 
100.00 
250.00 
200. «} 
250 00 

50.00 

sa.oo 

100,00 
75.00 
50.00 
25.00 
35,00 

100.00 

250.00 

100. OQ 

100.00 

40,00 



too. 00 

100.00 
100. QO 
100. M 
100. OO 
100.00 



.00 

oa 






166 73Mag3zinB * February, 1962 



cc 



TEST EQUIPMENT 



JJ 



loon ton 

OK 

Alfrgd 

SyEtron Ogmrter 
S Infer 

Po1«r«4 
tHilinmO 



rtcvltit Pi£Urd 
NiMltte PlCkAi^ 
flMTttt fiekird 
Haiti vie PAir44r4 



Z3fM 



Hi«ll'l«tt 

WW leu 

HtvUtt 

wt^lett 
Hewlett 

Hmtett 
HmUu 
Heyl ett 

Hewlett 
Hewlett 
tt*wletE 



Ptci.4r^ 

Ptcfcftrd 

Packird 
Pdckird 
PackdriJ 

Packard 
Pdckard 
Pdckarij 



Hewlett Piduird 

Hewlett PAckord; 



Hch-Utt 

Meviett 
Hffilett 
«e*il*U 
K«ilitt 
hfiilett 
Hewlett 
He«Tett 
i^ewlett 
Hewlett 

Hewlett 



Ptck^rd 

Ptc kirt 
Ptcurd 

fKktft 

PtClcjrd 
Pickjnd 
PicUf^ 



Hewlett ^i^UH 
Te^tronii 
Hicro Tel 
TekironlA 



T£5I tOmPtgifT 

Z02J AN FM Si anil ^neritur 195 ccr 77Mli CIO^OO 
2a7J/Z07H AM FM Slgnil ^^neritar jnd Un^verter 

lOOKHi CO 55HC Ai^d 19S to 270Mc 600.00 

?3i Het«i*odyiiB Cchn verier 200 ta UOOrtc £00.00 

HCH5 NOfiUOr 750.00 

eOOD/7D&L Swe«p Nctworlt Analyzer lOOKNf to 40Ge AOO.OO 

KSG'ZZS^A Stindird Signal Generator F^r ZS ?^O.Q0 

FW3 Frwiuency Meter 20 to lOOOMc 150,00 
1037/ U9 1 A Frw^u«ncy Met^r to SOHc wUh Plug ir^ td SOOHc 500.00 
SPA3/?5A Spectfutii Arfl.lyzer IKc td ^5Kc And e Q-£ CainpianiOn 

Sweep Senerttar ta ISMc ^ni PS- 19 Powr Supply 1500. OD 

6SB StaiKlird Sigttil Gefierator ?5Hf to 351^ 250.00 

140 SUndifd Oevfatior; NEter IS to lOoOnc 200.00 

KSa-Z Si|na] gcnerttor £l^ to «&00f1c 5A0.00 

S?4 Hfcroweve Swept Oscil liter fl to l2,4Gc ?5a.OO 

U(3^ T|»e Intersil Hug In fd.OO 
TS^lOll/ Wm* Spectrins tnalyi^r iWc to lOSc irilh 

Alien Filler FJ35/F33fi/F3aT/f33e/F3*l/liac♦^ 
Aticfivatipr Cllin/C]t4WOI409 «mJ lEech Adapter 

UGl?3W0GI24O/UG124iyifitZ4Z ISOQ.DO 

StAAdind Signal CamrMtot IfiCc t» §IMc 300.00 

Peiw Ai^iHner 10 U MSMt i.5ii«tts 400.00 

PtMCT A^Hfier 10 tc SOOfc i.iwtUf iOO.OQ 

24IMI Smccp Qeneritor 4.5 to llOPto 4110.00 

4iX vmi £0 70Gm7 400.00 

4I5D sun Heur Z 50.00 

41 tS PMcr Pleter lOMc to 40Gc ISO. 00 

60«A 5tgnil Generator SOKHf ta frSHc TOO OO 

£OeO SljAll Gen»rdt{}<^ 10 tD 42Qfle «O0,0O 

6Q8C Si«^l Generator ID to laOHc SOQ>PO 

60af S{9<v4^ Generator ID to 4a<Mc l$O0,OO 

bOSF Sfgml Generator ID to 4S5Mt 1^00,00 

6I2A Signil Generator 450 to l?J0Mc 500,00 

ei4A Stgnd! Generator 90D to 210DMc BOO. 00 

&16A Signal Generator Lfi to 4.2(iC 400.00 

gl^B Signal Generator i.a to A.iQt: BOO. 00 

file A Signal Gen ere tor 2.B to 7.6Gc 400. 00 

^ISB Signal Generator 3.8 to 7.6Cc bOO.OO 

&ZOA Signal Generator 7 to U4k ^QD.OO 

62 ja Tett Sat 5925 to 775QH£ 5*>0,00 

fi26A S4gnil Generator 10 to ISGc 2000.00 

£2aA Signal Generatm- 15 to 2l<k^ 2500,00 

94m Freqti^cy Ooubler Z6.5 to 40Gc 1000.00 

J5»m Portable Teit Set lOOO.OO 

5249. frmxitftdf Cdintter ce 50llt 1000,00 

525^ ^l(#g In For Above 20 to lOlK 100. OO 

5252A Plvg Ift Fflf «e)Oif& lOO tu J5<3Wt ?00,00 

52536 Plug In F«r itwv« 50 to 5O0Hc 150.00 

52S4t PI 119 I fi For above 20QMc to 34c 750.O0 

S2fiQA frti^tm^f Otvider to I2.4fic Tor atmre 1000.00 

S^saA Hif9 Iff For above Tim Inteofl 100.00 

53Z7B INM ifkd Freqyencj Pteter t& S5<ilc 150(>.OQ 

01f5«3« H UAd Scwntor/Teat Set 7.t Cn 8.5Gc 1000. 00 

491 !&o#ctn0) Afidl/ter Solid St4te lime tn 40Gc. 70QQ.G0 

MSmOl HlcrD^ve J^ceiwer to 40ee DIgiUl RhAoiA 90O0.QO 

l%fi ^tatiil fieneracor JSOttHj to SOHc 150.00 



Telontc ?001 Sweep/Sl^riift^ Uei^erator ^^$t 

J 305 5 to ISOOHc AuUlpleI.?/3^^5 1 to 20QdHc Varidble Hart(er,}34D AF /Output 

AttCfiuttor 50 atiu,i3^iLi J^ DeteLtor,J3€OA Rite ModiJlatiofv.JJ^OOUplay Prcoesslng. lOOO.OO 

TeloBlc 2003 Sweep/Slqtiat Generator Sj^tttn'S 

3303 5 to SDOWt B weep. 3323 1 to 2000Mt VirJable Har1<er,3343 RF/Output 50 ohms. 3 340 

flf Output/Attenuator 50 ohms ,3350 SF Oetettor.3360A Rate K)ElulitiQn«33?D Display 

Praces&ing. 750. 00 



(^^ 



Karda 
Hir^ 
Nirdi 
Njirdi 

liarda 
Harda 
Harda 
H«rd« 
Nirda 
Hftfda 
Harda 
ftarda 
Mtrda 
iirdi 

Nirda 
Kardla 
Harda 
Kirdt 
iirda 

i«rii« 

Pffi 

rao 
mo 

PftO 
pao 
Pro 

Quantdtron 

Hadar Design 

Sage 

Safe 

Sage 

Slwrry Hicroline 

StDddart 

Systron Danner 

Tefetronu 

Tcttroniii 
Tektranlt 
Telonfc 
Tekscam 
Trans to 
MaveTiFie 
Havel ine 
iitvetei 
MvlntcMl tt^. 

Kaiiitfictiir^ 
^ftO 

Hewlett Pact*rti 
Hfvfett Pacta rd 
Hewlett Packard 



Hewlett Paqkard 



3004-20 

3032 

3033 

3039- ?0 

3040-20 

3043-20 

3044^20 

3544S2n 

3045C30 

4035 

22006/ 

22007/ 

£2011/ 

eaoii/ 

ZZVT 
22SW 

22539/ 

22574 
2M§9 

22«76/ 

l«0ft4.10 
ClOE 
17101 
20M 

sesA 

C3414 

sau 

116001 
Xfi2e4 
SlOO 
A-?filOC 

[Jl*3« 

752-3 

2503 

7?53-S 

l^Q] 

9D515 

[)&U19A 

51 

52 

550 

lUOA 



DTrectional 



Coupler 125 to 75Qftc ?0(JB 

Coupler 240 to 5DOi4c 20dB 
Coupler 2 to 4Gc 20d& 
Coupler 4 to SGc 20dB 
Coupler 3.7 to B.JGc 2'OdB 
Coupler 7 to lZ,4Gt 30dB 



Coupler 4 to lOGc 20dB 
Hybrid .95 to 2Gc 3de 
Hybrid 2 to 4Sc 3ija 
Directional 
Directional 
Di^ett■i^^n4l 
Oi recti anal 
Directional 
Directional 
Hybrid 3dB 

3043-20 Directional Coupler 1.7 to 4Gc 20dB 
3D43-30 Oirectlona) Coupler 1.7 to 4Gc 30da 
3003-10 Directional Coupler ? 
3003-30 Directional Coupler 2 
Alllptei^ K to n B,2 to 12.4&C 
4014-10 Directional Coupler 3 
4015C1D OlnBctiona^ Coupler 7 
4013C10 Direct iontl Coupler 2 to 4€f: lOcQ 
IHrcctiOtfiAl Coupler 2 to *Gc lOOB 
»ir^£iofii1 Coupler 1%.S t« 17.1&: 
4014C« Directional Cwftler l.ftS to dEf fitfl 
4015C30 OlrecticMiel CoipTer 7 143 l2.4Sc 30i« 
Olr^tional Coepltr t to IKc 300 
ViFiable Atte4t4#iter S.S^ to B.2fic to iOdl 
VAriablp AtteAu>atO^ 12.4 to ia& t4 fiOdO 
Slotted Lire wUh Probe 4 to lOGc 
Frequenci' Meter B,2 to lOGc 
90^ Twist l& to 2£.5Gc 



to 4fic IDdB 
to 4Gc 30dB 

£5 to s&c \om 

A to inc lOtt 



,00 
00 

00 

00 



t^vovter 7 to l0.6Cc 

Crystal Switch 

Tnermistor Mount 3*2 to 12,4Gc 

fiodustub Tuner 

Variable Attenuator 

Directionftt Coupler 

Coup^ er 

Mixer 

Directional Coupler 4 t.D SGc 3dB 

Frequency Meter 5,614 to fl.2Gc 

IDdB AttenuatOf 

Tunable Detector IB to 2£.5Gc 

Saaip^lng Nead 

Saapling Head 

Pulse Gef>eraCor Held 

170 oiie V4H««te Attenuator 
TI!f4]7-34-SCDZ Bandpass Filter 
5YF2S0-50O-1AA Ti#i«bl« Bandpats Filter 250 to SOOfc 

*m70ioo sp&r swi tch 

£01 Mapter I to TIC i.2 to 12.4«C 

9009-10 ftirec:t3«»I CQUp\mr 4 to lOGc lOffl 

5070 to 7«A Variable Attenuitur 

2fr« *X to mm Viirit^le Attemiatar 



^^»/33o^/ 

33oa/U0fiA 

0OM 

eo5c 
eo9e with 



IQO.OC 
ISO. 00 
150. CH] 

150,00 

125,00 

100. 00 

IDO.OO 

150.00 

125,00 

150.00 

100. DO 

100. DO 

100.00 

100. DO 

35.00 

?5.00 

B5.00 

75.00 

100^00 

125.00 

100.00 

too. 

7S. 

ISO- 

100. 
too. 00 

125,00 
50,00 
75. CO 
50.00 

125.00 
M.OO 
50.00 
75.00 
fS.QO 
25.00 
50. ao 

200. DO 
35. Tin 

JOOiiJi' 

Can 

Can 

M^DO 
15.00 

250.00 
25,00 
3S,00 

101.00 
?5.00 
50.00 

Frice 



1250. «} 
JOO.OO 
400. 00 



809E btith 



Detcriptloii 

20 to ioamu 

Standing Mave Pe tec tor And Hatched Le^d 

Slotted tine SOOWii to 4Bij 

Slotted line SOOitii to 46Hz 

W6& Slotted lirre 3 to L2GH2/Ciei0e Slotted 

Line 3,95 to S.aSOMi/JaiDB Slotted Line 

5. as to e.2aHr/)(aiOfl slotted Line 8.2 to 

\2AGHz/P&im ^latteil Line 12.4 to JBGHJ/ 

tZEiP, £ H2KtA Adapt«r/H)(?926 Tapered 

Trans it1on7444A Prote 2,6 to laCHi/and d 

447B Probe/HttlOB Slotted Line 7.05 to 10.5 

BO£B Shotted Lirte 3 to l2GHz/Hai{)G 

Slotted J-ine 7,0& to id.sghz/xsidb slotted 

Line a.2 to l^.4G#1ir/HK?92@ Tapered Tranjition 

H to X/H2ai* i K2&lA/^Wlth Probe. H^^l^ 5S0.0Q 



900.00 



Toll Free Number 

800-528-0180 

(For orders only) 



electrof|ic$ 

(602) 242-8916 

2111W. Camelback 
Phoenix, Arizona 85015 



t^4^ 



t^See Ltit of Advertisers on page U4 



73 Magazine • February, 1982 167 




FULL LINE ALL PARTS & COMPUTER PRODUCTS 



P.O. Box 4430M 
Santa Clara, CA 95054 

Will calls: 2322 Walsh Ave. 

(4QB) 988-1640 

Samt div itilpmirt. Rrst Wrm pans only Factory t^td ClvajiJite«d 
mcni;v bach Quality IC's and o\im componefm at factary pdc^ 



ELECTRONICS 



tNTfGRATED CIRCUITS 



Phone orders only (800) 588-8198 










■JK 
I.M»IAN<AH 



LH3CibH 
LM11IH-N 



JJ 
»4 



CtMOUl 

cmooft 

CMOID- 



4 116 ZDOns Dvntmic RAM B $15,40 



ELICTHOMIC SYSTEMS KITS 

A|lple Ptrlphtral Kiti 

SERIAL I/O INTERFACE to 30.000 tjauri. 
D T B . Input & DiilpuJ from rnonlt&r or basic, or 
usEAppla as IntuHtQfiiil Teimjnal, td orly (P:N 2^ 
SH.S5, Kit (P/N 2A) 151,25, Assembled [P/N 

PHOTOT^PrNG BOARD (P/N 79€7^ 121. H. 
PARALLEL TRIAC OUTPUT BOARD 8 inacs, 
each can swIEcti 11 QV ^ lo^dS. Bd only (P/t^ 
2 'Oi S19 20. KMP N 21DA) $119.53. 
OPTO'ISOLATED INPUT BOARD 8 inpuls. can 
be driven from TTL logic, Bd only |PN 1201 
$15,65. Kit IP N120Ali».»&. 
lAtf rtaci Hm 

SERIAL PARALLEL INTERFACE Bidireetionai. 
Baud rates from ttO 10 19 2K. sw sateti^ 
polarity oi tnput and outpui strobe. 5 to Q di^ 
bits, 1 CH 2 flQp bits . parity odd or t vtn or none, 
all ctianctOT conlun a si^t bit. ^5 4 -12V 
required Bd only (P.N 101} %^^M. U {?H 
tQ1Ai S4Z.tl. 

RS'232.ni IMTERFACE BM<rtclional. n- 
qufres rl2V. «it (Pm 23ZAJ tl.K. 
RS-23^'20l1lA INTERFACE BritifRt«ntL 2 
Dassii« otfo-^oiilMl cktutts, m (PM T%m 
S1I.9S. 

PROM Eraser 

t\- ii.. 25 PROMs «n 15 (Wfiufes U*l?3vlolit, 
iSlcfTitiifrd 25 PROM capacity WM iwdh 
liRKi UB.^' 6 PfiOM cipKiy OSHkUL vef- 
lion S7t.SI) I wrth timer liOi.U) 

NICad Battery Fixer Charger Kit 
Opans snorbBd cms tm won i ttoiid a ciiarpe ana 
j tiivi charges ft>ern up, afl in one hit w-lufl parts 
snd instructHHif . tS.ftS 



Z80 Microcomputer 

16 bit 1/0, 2 MH? clock, 2K RAM. ROM Bread- 
board space. Excellent for control HarR Board 
S2B.S0. full Kir 199.00. Monitor SZfi.OO. Power 
Supply Kit £35.00, Tiny Basic Ufl.U. 

Modem Kit $60,00 

State of the an, ori^., answer Ha tuning neces- 
^ry. 103 compalible 3Q0 baud inexpensive 
acDusrio coupler plans included. Bd only 
S17.0C Article in June Radio E/ecfnon^cs. 

60 Hz Crystal Time Base Kit $4.40 

Conwrts Hiqnai clocks from A€ Ime frsqiaency to 
crystal time base. QjtstandinQ accuracy. 

Video Modulator Kit $9.95 

Convert TV s^t into a high quaJity fnonltor w.o 
atfectm^ usa^e. Gomp. hit wf ul^ mstruc 

Mult}-volt Computer Power Supply 

Sv 5 arnp. =18^ .5 amp, 5v 1 i anvp. by 
Samp. 12v .5 amp, -1?y option itSv. rllv 
aftf^^ilated BasicKit^S 95. Kitwitfi^ssis. 
antallhanhiarf SS1.99LAiMS5.0Qsh{p|iir)Q Kit 
of hard^re HLOe, Woot^grain ose $10.01. 
Si. 50 shqjping 

iype-M4al1c by Votrax 

1^ to speech synthesoif mth unlatiltad vocabu- 
lary, hmh-^ t&t to spMdialootiQvn. 70 10 100 
Ms pe^ secoml sp«edi qraOMa^iBrp RS232C 
tmeil9ce (319.00. 

1602 18K Dynamic RAM KH $143.00 

£xpsnddbli Sq b^ Hdoen refresn M.tJob^ up v:- 
4Wtw^tii^S^s.AdEl. 1»<RAMS25Q0 
S-100 4-^ ecpansiOD $ 9 95 

S4i|)er MofFhor Vt .1 Sou rce Ltitlao £ 1 5 00 




RCA Cosmac 1802 
Super Ell Computer 5196,95 ' 

The Soper Ell IS a smj^ single boari} GOrnputw i:har 
(toes many big ihirigs Ms an «ceiiflt computer 
lor tnming vtf fc^ ^anwig proTanrniig wih is 
machine fsngmoe m ^ its eis^ ea^nM 
wWt tillllonil nwnwry. Ftll Batlc. ASCII 
Ktfbovill^ 1M» ctiarader generatJOii, elC, 

ROM fTunHoF; SMb imd Aitodft diSfA^S', SviQic 
step^ Opbonid adt tr ess dtspbys; PtPMf Supply* 
Audio MtfMie' and Spfiton My si^Bbil tir ^ 
s. rui oocufiwfxXNin. 

"^ &iar ar ndydes i HOH monitor tarpni- 

g^r^koading, """t) rt rnnfttm Tritr WfTia F 
STff ^ pragnm dttHnlii wticfi Is not «- 
dhJded n oltiers at the sane price^ Wrtti SINGLE 
STEP you cm lee ihe m i c fop foce s sor cihp oper- 
SBiQ Mth tfifl niqije Ouetf address vd dan tus 
disffai^ Mwt. 4imeg ifid Mv ^secutpig inr 
striKtons Abo, CPU fTVde and instruciioft t^de 
are decDdec a^ dkspHyed on a LB) ridicators. 

An fCA la&t vk^ grapftio atp Hows you to 
DQtinK] m your o«vn TV Mtti an netpRns^ve video 
mniuMOr to do ira|ihic$ ^nd gams There e& 3 
tpaiier iiiluii mduded (ik writing your onm 
m^tsic Of using many muse prpgram^ already 
wtitiert ttwsp&ker jimpiifi«rfliiyatobeiisedtd 
6ttm ma^ lor control purposes 

A 24 key HE^ ktytuard ^ndudt^s 1& t€X ksys piLS 
loatf, rts«t, nA, waH, ti^, memory poj/tad, 
monitor seiad ^nd itngle slftp Unje, on board 

dispii^V^ piovide ouipul and optional littgh md low 
■lUrwii. lhe\t is a 44 p^n ^ndaid cannector siot 

Super Expansion Board with Cas 

This Is truly an asioundioQ ^lue' Tttis t^rd fias 

been designecl to allow you to decide ficw you 
want d optioned The Supef Expansioit Boanf 
comat wHh 4K or low power RAM lully address- 
able anywhsfe in 64K wrth buiH-ln memory pro- 
t^ and R cHSsafli lirieriaes. Provisions have 
been made for aij other optiois on Ihe same board 
and H fits neatly inta the iiardwood cabinet 
alongside the Super Elf Tfie board includes slcts 
Tor up to 6K of IPfiOM (2706, 2758, 2716 or It 
?7l6] ^nd i$ lully sockeied. EPROM can b« u^ed 
for Hie monilor and Tiny Basic or other purposes^ 

A IK Super ROM Monilor SIS. 95 is available as an 
on hoard option in 2706 EPRGM which has been 
pFBpnsgnmmad with a prograni ioadfir/edilor and 

error checking mult I fita cassette read /write 
soltware, {reiocjLjOie cassette lilel another exclu- 
sive from Quest It Includes register save and 
Foadout, block mowe capability and video graphics 
drtwf with blinking cursor Sreak points can be 
used with the register save feature lo isolale pro- 



Que$l Super Basic V5.0 

A new enhanced ver^tan oJ Supet Bai^e now 
avHilible. Quest wa^ the first corn par^y worldwide 
to shjp a M size Basic for ia02 Sysiems. A 
complete tonctton Super Sesic by Hon €enker 
including floating point capability wilti scienEific 
mitation t number range ± 17E*|. 32 bii inte^et 
±2 billion: myib dim arrays, string arrays. Sitrlng 
manpilation; cassette LD. save and Icid, basic, 
data and m^hrne langitage programs and owr 
75 statements, functions and operations 
H^tf improved taster vermin- ncludirig (t* 
nuntticF ^nd ess^nttalj^ unlimited firiihii . 
Also an exdusive user expanoad^e commind 
Liiifaiv 
Senaf and Paralt^t i o routines induded 

Sii|ier flasic od (^ss«tte £55 00. 



for PC CXI& anj a 50 pn csnwiQr slot Iqr the 
Quest Super Expansan Boird. Pomr supply and 
sudets for aO Cs 317 induded plus a dcniM 
127 pg. msmxim imnat whiii now iidjdes 
over 40 pgs of sottMarv li^. {ndufiOQ a S8is o( 
lessons Ui hdp get you sorted wd i muse pro- 
03n and gtapiks target ifsnt Itoiy schools 
and urvwfstKs are usmg the Sit^ @l ts a 
course of study 0B4 s use i tar trailing and 
Fl£D. 

REfinndec other QonpitasDrty oObt Super B 
fabiEsdadifiian^Oosf ornottf il Conwan 
bribi« rou btiy, S^v El Kit $106.9$. ligi 
aMmu option SB.SS, U^r addnen o^ion 
SiJL teton> €^iK^ wtth dniKi wd taumn 
pie»s^tes foam p^Dij $2Aw£l Al metf &«armi 
CatNTiet piiiBd and sl( soeened. with foom lor 
5S-1D0 boards and po«er supply 157.00. WCail 
OMenr Memoff Ssver Kii Sfi 95. All k3te and 
options liso Dompletely ass9n(M and fested. 

duesjda^, a sottwai piiiUion lor ^802 oom- 
piigf users is avaiitile by subs^ipdon tor $12^00 
per ^^ issuer, Srqie fasws Si 50. testes M2 
bound SIB 50 

MocM^ Videg Gr^i^ics S3.50, Sanes and Musio 
S3.0II Dup S liiW^^ SS.SO. Siarship 4K cas^ 
setlE WM. 

Free 14 page brochure 

ol complete Super Elf system, 
sette Interface $89.95 

Qrarti bugs ^ms^. tf>en follow wtth single step. H 
you have the Super Expansion Boanl and ^per 
Monitor the monitor is up and running at the push 

01 a button. 

Other or* Doarti options indudf Penllel Inpul and 
Output Paris witli hill handshabie They aNow ea^y 
connection of an ASCII keyboard to the jnpul port, 
fIS 232 and 20 ma Current Lopp for teletype or 
other device are on boaid and If you need more 
mfifDory there are Iwo S-100 slots for static RAM 
or video hoards. Also a I K Super Monitor ^rsion 

2 with video driver for lull capabilfty disp|:ay with 
Tiny Basic and a video interfeoe bqard PBrallol 
I/O Por^s $BM, RS 23? $4.50. TTT 20 ma l/F 
S1.95, S-IDQ S4.5a. A 50 pin conneclof set with 
ribbon cable is available at $13,95 fo^ easy con- 
nection between the Super Bf and the Sufwr 
Expansion Board. 

Power Supply Kit for the Domplets syslem (see 
Mufti -volt f^jwer Supply below) 



Reckweil AIM 65 Oomfiuter 

6bii£' od:ieu Sim\t mam wnn tuLi ASCII keytioard 
arirt 20 Golymn rnermal pnmer 20 char aFjihanu' 
me IK display FiOM monfor Mly eaipandaUe 
I419.IW. 4K vgfiion $449,00 4K Assemtsier 
laSJOO BK Base Inferprdff SI&OO 

Specyi nm^n power supply 5V 2A 24V .5A 
assem m trame ISV.DO, Molded pi ash c 
enclosure to fe boin aim fiS and power supply 
55?. 90. MM 65 IK m caOt%1 wittt power supply 
swidi. luse. cord ^sem S55§ 00 4^ S579 OQ 
A^ ^SOOO AIM ^40 « 16t( HAM aitf mcfiilor 
$121500. flAM Boy- - ■ ^^^ ItlS^ iA 
IlISi VDWWdw S113.MJ. A&T 

imM Comtme AIM 65 m Dftn bndc^e mm 
po«per sop9ily fSll.flO SpioaiPadcageFtice 4K 

Ai¥. m Sue. poiKf ^m^ cabin:' unm 

AIM 6S^iM,S¥M^upit Bf iM fy : - '" 

Ell II Adaptfif Kit IZAM 

P!u^ into EW II pmvid ir^ Supef EH 44 and 50 ptfi 
plus S-100 bus expansion (With Super Ex- 
pmsKMi) Huh and low address dispiay^. sta^ 
ifvJ mute L£Ds d^ioniJ S18.00. 




Super Color S-10t) Video Kit $129 J5 

BtparuS^sle to 2SG i 19^ higl] lesotutioo cofor 
gupfiics. 6047 wih il abpby modes oKnpviter 
ajftroied Memoiy nuppsf. IK RAM uiviS- 
aUeto6K B-100 biis 180? 800(1 SD85 Z80 
etc Oulofs: Send iDf iiatl«ni pricifi§ margin 
pmgran. 



TERMS: $5.00 min onfer US, Funds. Ctlii resldems add G%1ai, 

$10 JO min, VISA and MasterC^rtt ac&epted. S1.0Q insurance opffiRiL 
Shipping: Add 5%; orders under S2S.00— 10%. 



FREE: Send for your copy af our MEW 1981 
QUEST CATALOG . Include 88c Stamp. 



168 73Magazme • February, 1982 



lansa^j the first name in Counters ! 



9 DIGITS 600 MHz $129 




CT W Kit W da) pun t * 1^ 

HiiliTTlnir 1Li9 

cnr I. taMto-ttrmt thm 



The CT-9Q is the ma^r versitile, feature ptckti^dl cuiihter ivaLtable for leis 
ihvi $300,001 Advanced dcifti|n feituFes include; ihrec sekcuibk stat times, 
nine di|iu, gate indicAtor tnd ■ unique displiy hok) functign which huldi (he 
displsyed couni alter the input ijjnAl is removetf A\&<x m. lOmHzTCXOlJme 
bue is used which enibln euy zero hut ciJibritkiti checks tgiiiut WWV. 
OptiofiiJty; in ini«nuU nic&d b«ii«ry |i*ckctteiiL«l ttent b&te input MRd Mtcro^ 
power high stxbiliiy cryiul avta time bue are ivaiEabit The CT-90, 
peffdi'inance ym can count ool 



SPECIFICATIONS: 



WIRED 



Rjuifc 
Seniitivity; 

Reiolulionc 



Diipliy! 
Time bue 



20 Hi to 600 MHz 

Less ihan 10 MV lo 150 MHz 

Less ih^n SO MV l£) 500 MHz 

O.J Hi (10 MHz range) 

LO Hz (60 MHt range) 

10 Hz {600 MHz nnge) 

9 difjn 4' LED 

SiMiKlarES- 10 000 mHi, LO ppm 20-4<rC 

0|iaoiuil Micfo power ovei>0.! ppm 20-40'C 

S-I5 VAC « 750 mA 



7 DIGITS 525 MHz $99 



SPECIFirATTONS: 



Ftimie: 
Seiuitivity: 

Iljeiolutioix 



Dtipliyt 
Tune bti 
P^*ec 



20 Hz to 515 MHi 
Uas thanSO MV lo 150 MHk 
Lc« than 1 50 MV to 500 MHz 
JO Hf {5 MHz rfingc) 

IOO.OBmSOO MHi range) 
T(tiffm0 4" LED 
LO ppi!BTCXO20-40=C 
12 VAC « 250 ma 



WIRED 



The CT-70 breaks the price barrier an lab quaJtty frequency count«n. 
Deluxe fealurei such as three frequency ranges -each wil h pre- BLmpliric it ion, 
duaJ Kleclible gatetimes^ and gate activity indication make measufeinents a 
loap. The wide ^nequency range enables you to accurately measure signaJi 

from audio thru UHF with 1 ppm accuracy - thal't .0001%! The CT-TO it 
the answer lo all tout meuurvmeni ne«(js^ in the fteld. l$h or hatn shaclL 




PRICES; 

CT 70 wired, I yearwarranEy 

CT-70 Kit 90 day parts *ar 

ranty 

AC- 1 AC adapter 

BP>] Ntcad pack + AC 

adapter/ chargei 



S99.95 




7 DIGITS 500 MHz 



MJNIIOO wired, 1 year 

wafTiJity %19.95 

AC' Z Ac adapter for MINl^ 

100 13S 

BP-Z Niead pack BAd AC 

adapter,!' chjugcr 12,95 



$7995 

WIRED 



Hef«'t a handy, generiJ purpof^e counter thai provides mo«t couniir 
funcLioni at aii unbelievabJc priceL The MINMOO doesii't have the fulL 
frequency rinie or Lnpui impedance qjiaJjtie& found in liigher price imiu, but 
for basic RF signal itieaiuremenu^, it can't be bead Accurate measuremenli 
can be made frnm I MHz all the way upfoSOQ MHz with excellent sensiuvity 
ttuoogliout tJw range, and the two gate timet let you seiect the moliuion 
defined Acki the nJcad pack af?uon and the MIN I- 1 00 makes an ideal addilioA 
to yoyf tool boi for 'in-ihe-fiel^' frequency checki and rcpain. 



SPECIFICATIONS; 



Range; 

Seniitjvity: 

ttesolutioEE: 

Dupliy: 

Tunc base 



I MHz toJOO MHz 
LeiU than 25 MV 
100 Hi{%ki^u'^} 
LO KHi(fiwi gate) 
7 digjti. 4 LED 
2.0 ppm 20^40 C 
5 VDC 4 200 QU 



8 DIGITS 600 MHz $159 






WIRED 



gPECIFICATIQNSi 



Range: 
Sens 111 vityr 

ResotutXHT 

Diiplay: 
Tane base 
Pcrwen 



20 Hz to 600 MHz 

Leas than 25 mv to J 50 MHz 



The CT'SO \% i verutile tab bench counter that wflJ meuure up to600 MHz 
with 8 digit preciiion. And, one of its brit features ii the Receive Fr&quency 
Less iha* 1 50 flsv 10 600 MHz Adap«r. which tunu the CT-50 into a digiul readout fof any receiver. The 
I Hi (60 MHj ringe) ji ^r a ^ JL v. 

TOO H iliOO MH I adapter ti easily proframmed lor any receiver and a simple connectMm !o the 

B diam 4" LED receiver's VF O is alJ thai is required fof use Adding the recei ver adapiet in no 

2.0 ppm 20-40 ~C ^'T Etm^ the operation of the CT-50, the adapier can \x convenjaitl>' 

1 10 VAC or 1 2 VDC twitched on or ofC The CT-50> a counter thai ctn ^mk doubJe- duty! 




FRJCESr 

CT'50 wired I yearwuraniy 

CT-50 Kii, ^ day pajfti 

warramy 

RA- i , ivGciver adapier kit 

RA'J wuiedandpfe-profrajn- 

med fsend copy of receiver 

schema tic ji 



SI 59.95 

T 19,95 
14.95 




DIGITAL MULTIMETER $99^ 



WIRED 



PRICES: 




DM^TOO wiml t year wtiiflfi^ 


S99,95 


DM^700 Kit, 90 day paiu 




warranfty 


79.95 


AC-1, AC adaptor 


393 


aP-3. Nicad p«ck ^-AC 




idapte? charger 


19,95 


MP-L Probe kit 


2.95 



The DM'70C ol^feri prDfessional qualltv pterfornuince ar a Kc^hhytst pricr^ 
Features include; 26 different ranfpi and ^ Functiona, nil arranged in a 
convenieni, eauv to use format- Mruurements are diaplaved on 1 lar^ 3^ 
difit, ^ tneh LED rndout with jutomafK decimal placrfnrni. •uicTmaiic 
polarirv. ovrrrantfr (ndtcaOMOft and over load procccrion up 10 1 250 vc^ejon aJ| 
raitRA. makmg it vmualtv ffoof^fvoolf The DM-700 Looka ^etri. a kandsosne, 
fci Hadt. rifffped AftS caa* wnli coftvemenc fewaoafeJ* nk hail makes tt an 
ideal addition (o k\\ slia|i. 



SPECIFICATIONS; 

DC/ AC voha: lOOuV to 1 KV. 3 range* 

DQAC 

cufTcnt 0.1 uA to 2.0 Am|»&, 5 ranges 

Rc535iance D. 1 ohms to 20 Metohnm ^ ranges 

impedance IQ Megohins. DO AC vohi 
Accurwry: 0, J % basic DC volu 

Power 4 C ceHa 



AUDIO SCALER 

For high resotuiio^ audiO measuremenuiH, niulUphej 
UP in frequency,. 

• Great for PL tonei 

• Multiplies by 10 or 100 

• 01 Hz resojuiionf 

$29.95 Kit 539,95 Wired 



ACCESSORIES 



Telescopic whip aAietuia- BKC plug. .«..«..* 

High impedance pmbe, light toading 

Low pas3 probe, for audio measure mentdi. .*^r 
Direct probe, general ^urpoie usage . . , , ^ , . . , 

Tilt bail for CT 70, 90, MINMOO 

Cojor bui^t c;alib'rBtioii uniti calibratea counter 
against color TV signal 



V 4' t V * a 4 I 



S 7.9J 
15.93 
15.95 
12.95 



COUNTER PRE AMP 

Fof measuring rxtremelv weak signals from 10 to LOOO 
MHs. Small *tie, fHiwercd hv plug ETnrLsiormer- Included, 

• Flat 25 db gain 
4 BNC Conneclort 

• Great fo'' snifTing RF Hrjth p4ck-up Ux^ 

S34 95 Kit S44.95 Wired 



remsey etectranic's, inc. 

2575 Baird Rd. Penfield. NY 14526 



S^ 



PHONE ORDERS 
CALL 716^586-3950 



-%wran*r *« D Aia^-fliMM ftl 1 1 0-»-**« »dW I % COO a4*l 



^5*tf List ot Advsrftsefs o/> if9g& tj4 



73 Magazine • February, 1982 169 



2822 North 32ncl Street »1 • Phoenix Anzona 8bUUB • PhGne602-9S6-9423 









CHOKES 

AND 

INDUCTORS 



4/1.00 

.3uH 
.56 uH 
1.8 uH 

2uH 
3.1 uH 
6.6 uH 

52 uH 

55 uH 

2/1,00 
Z4mH 
22 mH 

MHIer 9055 
50-120 uH 

Summlta 20K359 
455 kc discrfmination 
Miller #8e06/34H-650 



TUBES 



6KD6 

6LQe/eJE6 

6MJ6/6LQ6/6JE6C 

6LF6/6MH6 

12BY7A 

2E26 

4X1 50A 

4CX250B 

4CX250R 

4CX300A 



MINIMUM ORDER $10.00 NOT 

4CX350A/8321 

4CX350FM/8904 

4CX1500B;8e60 

811A 

6360 

6939 

6146 

6146A 

6146B/d29B 

6146W 

6550A 

^06 

8950 

4-400A 

4400C 

572B/T160L 

7289 

3-1000Z 

3*500Z 



82uH 

91 uH 
1B0uH 
220 uH 
270 uH 
410 uH 
450 uH 



68 mH 



$2.50 



$2.50 




* 5.00 

6.00 

10.00 

6.60 

4.00 

4.69 

29.99 

45.00 

69.00 

109.99 



INCLUDING 

100-00 

100.00 

300.00 

20.00 

4.69 

30.00 

7.95 

9.00 

12.95 

10.00 

14.00 

13.00 

145-00 

145.00 

44.00 

39.99 

229.00 

141.00 



SHIPPING 

500 pes. 
1000 pes, 

LED Diaptay 
FND 357, 362 red 
C.C. 

TIL312 LED Display 
Red 

Assortecf Heat Sinks— 3 each. 
For TO-3, TO-220, T(>66 & 105. 




CAPACITORS 



DIPPED SILVER MICA CAPACITORS 


5pF $.40 


120pF 


$.25 


10pF .25 


150pF 


.25 


12pF .30 


210pF 


.40 


15pF .30 


250pF 


.40 


20pF ,25 


330pF 


.40 


22pF .25 


470pF 


.40 


24pF .25 


SOOpF 


.40 


33pF ,25 


560pF 


.40 


50pF .25 


620pF 


.40 


75pF .25 


82DpF 


.50 


82pF .25 


SSOOpF 


1.00 


100pF .25 







Quantity pricing also. 



ASSORTMENTS 

Electrolytic Caps. 

All types (new), 

50 pes. S6.99 



GapacHors, Resistors & Diodes 

Assortment 

(All New) (Not Junk) 
100 pes. 4.00 

250 pes. 7.00 



12.00 

20.00 



2/100 



2/1.29 



12/1.99 



Assorted Potentiometers 

*rAII new" not junk. Some with switch, 

some with 1/4*' shaft. 

#3.5.283 30 for 4.00 

#S.S.284 100 for 10.00 

New Miniature Toggle & Rocker 
Swltcti— 25mix. $6.99 

New Assorted Toroid Cores 

10 big & small 4.00 

TO-3 and TO-66 Used Power Transistors 
High voltage switching in CRTs. 
30 pes. Good/Bad? $ 2,00 

100 pes. 10.00 

Hardware Assortment 

1 pound mixed screws, standoffs, 

washers, feet, Insulator 5.00 

IC Assortment 

50 New IC's. Not Junk. 

7400/S/LS Linear, DTURTL etc. $10.00 

House numbered AYS 2376 
Keyboard encoder chip— 88 (keys) 
same as OR 2376 6.99 each 

5 Way DC Voltage Adapter 
Selective voltage: 6, 9, and I2VDC. 
input voltage— 11 5VAC $9.99 
WALL TYPE TRANSFORMERS 

115 VAC input 

6 VAC @ 10 MA 2.99 

12 V @ 700 MA _.. 4,99 

15 V@ 300 MA. _,a99 

115 VAC & 220 VAC input 
15 V @ 300 MA. , , . . . . .3.99 

DL-1416 

4-Dig»t 16 Segment Alphanumeric 
Intelligent Display with Memory, 
Recorder, Driver $14.95 each 

Fuse Holders 

HKP type for 3AG J9 each 

UHF Varactor Tuners— Sony 

19.99 each 

TeledyneSerendip 

Solid State Dip Relay 

Part#A641-1 2.49 each 

RCA TRANSISTORS 
80684 

40235 

AM PER EX/MOTOROLA 

RF TRANSISTOR 

BFR91 J5 

MRF901 2.00 



170 TSMagMzine • February J 982 



RF Transistors 



MRF203 

MRF216 

MRF221 

MRF22e 

MRF227 

MRF23e 

MRF240 

MRF245 

MRF247 

MRF262 

MRF314 

MflF406 

MRF412 

MRF421 

MflF422A 

MRF422 

MRF42d 

MRF428A 

MRF42e 

MRF426A 

MRF449 

MRF44gA 

MRF450 

MRF450A 

MRF452 

MRF453/GE185 

MRF454 

MRF454A 

MRF455 

MRF455A 

MRF468 

MRF472 

MRF474 

MRF475 

MRF476/C1306 

MRF477 

MRF4dS 

MRF492 

MRF502 

MRF604 

MRF629 

MRF648 

MRF901 

MRF902 

MRF904 

MRF911 

MRF5176 

MRF8004 

BFR90 

BFR91 

BFR96 

BFW92A 



P.OR. 

31,00 

10-90 

12.65 

3.45 

12.65 

15.50 

34,00 

34.00 

9.20 

20.70 

13.80 

25.30 

36.80 

41.40 

41.40 

46-00 

46,00 

15.50 

15 50 

12.65 

12.65 

13.90 

13.80 

15.00 

17>25 

19.90 

21.83 

16.00 

16.00 

19.90 

1.00 

3.00 

2.90 

2.90 

11.50 

3.00 

23.00 

1.04 

2.07 

3.45 

33.35 

2.15 

8.00 

3,00 

3.00 

3.00 

2.10 

1.30 

1.65 

2.20 

1.15 



eFW92 

MMCMSid 

MMCM2222 

MMCM2369 

MMCM2484 

MMCM3d60A 

MWA110 

MWA120 

MWA130 

MWA210 

MWA220 

MWA230 

MWA310 

MWA320 



1,00 
14,X 
15.65 
15,00 

15.25 
24.30 
10,00 
10,00 

laoo 

10.00 

10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10,00 



Transistors 



2N2e57 

2^2857 J AN 

2N2949 

2N2947 

2N2950 

2N3375 

2N3553 

2N3818 

2N3866 

2N3866JAN 

2N3866JANT)( 

2N3925 

2N394a 

2N3950 

2N3959 

2N3960JANTX 

2N4072 

2N4427 

2N4429 

2N4877 

2N4959 

2N4976 

2N5Q70 

2N5071 

2N5108 

2N5109 

2N5179 

2N5583 

2N5589 

2N5590 

2N5591 

2N5635 

2N5636 

2N5637 

2N5641 

2N5643 

2N5645 

2N5S42 



155 

3.60 

15.00 
4.60 
8,00 
1.57 
5.00 
1.30 
2,50 
4.00 

10.00 
2.00 

25.00 
385 

10.00 

1 ao 

1.30 

7,00 

1.00 

2.30 

15.00 

18.40 

20 JO 

4.00 

1,70 

1.00 

4.00 

6.65 

10,35 

1360 

10,35 

12,00 

15.50 

9.20 

15.50 

13,80 

8.00 



2N5849 20.00 

2N5942 40,00 

2N5d46 19.00 

2^5862 57.50 

2N6080 9.20 

2N60ei 10.35 

2N6082 11.50 

2N6083 13.25 

2N60e4 15.00 

2N6095 12.00 

2N6096 15.50 

2N6097 1 7.25 

2N6166 40.25 

2N6368 28.75 

A210/MRF517 ZOO 

BLY38 5.00 

40280/2N4427 1,30 

40281/2N3920 7.00 

402e2/2N3927 17,25 

MMT74 1.04 

IC SALE 

400CJ 36 

2805HC/1405A 1.00 

74LS27 25 
P3101/82525/74S289 1.0O 

SCL4013A/BE .25 

MC14001BCP .25 

MC14017BCP .75 

MC14012BCP ,19 

MC14023BCP .20 

MCI 4027 BCP .39 

MC14069BCP .39 

MC14093BCP .60 

MC3420P 1.00 

MCM10152L 5,00 

MC7408P .19 

74LS05PC .20 

AD580 1.00 

8T01B .60 

CH164A .25 

CG388V .25 

74LS20F .20 

748SN .39 

DS0026CH 1 .00 

CD 4013BCN .30 

CD 4028AE .49 

CD 4040 BCN ,80 

CD 4069CN/74C74 .30 

MM74C74N .40 

CD4015CN .75 

DS/DM 8839N .60 

DM75L51N .75 

TL0-61CP .30 



m 



SN7420N .25 

ZBOCPU 4.99 

2708-6 1.00 

2516/2716 2.50 

2732-6 10.00 

2102 .50 

21 1 4-2 & 3 8/16.00 

4104 a/16.00 

D21 16/4116 8/18.00 

D8257 3.00 

MC6845 10.00 

2S0CTC 4.00 

280SIO/Oor/I 8.00 

ZBOPIO 4.00 

74LS273 .80 

74LS373 .80 

74LS374 .80 

74LS245 1.40 

74LS367 .40 

74LS14 .60 

7aM06 .39 

78L05 .30 

78L15 .30 

78L08 .30 

79L12 .49 

LM317T ,1.99 

MC7808T/LM340T-8 .49 

7805/LM340T-5 .89 

7812/LM340T^12 .89 

7ei5/LM340TO5 M 

7824/LM340T-24 .89 

06202 20.00 

D8212 1.00 

D8214 2.00 

8251 3.00 

TMS1000NL 2.00 

MC1306P .75 

MC1414L .29 

LM/SN 1458V .40 

LM565V .30 

LM309K/7805CK 1.00 

MG6852P 3.00 

RC74LS51N .15 

SN74LS74N .20 

PT 14826 2.00 

EC1422B 2,00 

LA 4220 Sanyo 1 .00 

SN75427N .30 

N8T28N/MC6889 1.00 

D3232/MC3232 1,00 



ORDERING INSTRUCTIONS 

Check, money order, or credit cards welcame. (Master Cliarge and VISA only,) No personal checks or certified personal checks 
for foreign countries accepted. Money order or cashiers check in U.S. funds onfy. Letters of credit are not acceptable. C.O.D.— 
$2.25^-52 35 shipping. 

Minimum shipping by UPS is $2.35 + .35 per $100.00 for insuranea Please allow extra shipping charges for heavy or long items. 

All parts returned due to customer error or decision will be subject to a 15% restock charge. If we are out of an item ordered, we 
will try to replace it with an equal or better part unless you specrfy not to, or we will back order the item, or refund your money. 

PRICES ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE. Prices supersede all previously published. Some items offered are 
limited to small quantities and are subject to prior sale. 

We now have a toll free number, but we ask that it be used for charge orders only. If you have any questions, please use our other 
number. We are open from 8;00 am-5:C)0 p.m. Monday thru Saturday. 

Our toll free nymt>er for charge orders only is 800-528-361 1. 

MINIMUM ORDER S10.00 NOT INCLUDING SHIPPING 



»^64 




2822 North 32nd Street. »1 • Phoenix. Arizona 85008 • Phone602-956-9423 



p'See List of Aifvefttsen art page f N 



73Magaz(ne • February, 1982 t71 



CALL TOLL FREE 









3: 
c 
m 

-I 



o 

IL 




IS BACK! 



Dentron Clipperton V 



o 

< 

z 

0* 



2 

S 



m 







Big power on 2 meters! 
Self-contained A.C. power supply 
500 watts from 4-CX-250 B final 
CALL FOR SUPER SPECIAL! 



Dentron RT-3000 



Panasonic RF-3100 




111 

Hi 



a 

e 

X 

a 



NAV369 95 



AC/battery FM/MW/SW radio 
3 1 band operation 
All quartz synthesized tuning 
5 digit frequency readout 
Linnjted 2 year warranty 



CALL NOW! 



$299.95 



< 





III 

Q 



III 

< 
C£ 
O 



O 

u 



• 3Kw capability 

• Roller inductor 

• Power/VSWR meter 

• Bypass capability 

CALL FOR SPECIAL DISCOUNT! 



$ 



%-r^ 







DM81 Dip Meter 



Frequency range 700 kHz- 
250 MHZ (7 band) 
Function — inductive coupling 
capacttive coupling 
Compact size 

CALL NOW FOR PRICE! 



i 



CD 

m 

z 
o 

X 
m 
3] 






"Our Most Popular Scanner 
the JIL SX-100" 






o 

o 
o 

z 

UJ 




rNAV $399.00 



16 Channels, 30 54 MHz; 140OB0 
MH;; 410-514 MHz Digital Ciock 
Date Display 110 V AC or 12- 
16 V DC 

Seeh Rale Fast ^Och/sec 
Stow ScH/sec 
Bfight Green 9 Digii Ffequeocy Dis- 
play Ext Antenna Jack Exi 
Speaker Jack Large Top Mounung 
Bracket Scan Rale Fasi Sch.sec 

Slow 4ch/&ec 
Scan Delay Time Variable 0-4 sec 

UNBELIEVABLY PRtCED 
ATA LOW $199 95 



^KEIMWOOD HC-1 

Digital Clock 




Attractive, functional layout, with switch buttons on 
slanted panel. Cabinet is trigonal pnsm shaped for 
stability. With a pleasing color cx>mbinatton and 
modern styling, the HC-lO will enhance the appear- 
ance of any ham shack. 

CALL NOW FOR PRICE I 



p 

p 



> 



31 
O 

z 



5 

> 



Computer 



Call for Discount Prices. 

Amateur Radio 



AMDtK 
APPLE 

ATARI 

BASE? 

CENTRONICS 

COMMODOflE 

DC NAVES 

NAZELIINE 

LEED€M 



MACRO T RON ICS 

MAXELL 

MCflOSOFT 

MOUNTAIN HAROWAHE 

NEC 

NOflTHSTAR 

pamasonh: 

SANYO 
5VNCOM 



AVANTI 
SASH BOOKS 
eCAHCAT 
BENCH£R 
CALL BOOK 
CUShC«AFT 
OAIWA 
DENTRON 



DRAKE 

ETO 

huSTlER 

HV-GAIN 

ICOM 

KENIVOOD 



MIRAGE 

PANASONIC 

ShURE 

TEMPO 

TEt£X 

fRAC 

tA£SU 



aw 




o 

fll 



5 



ANTE£NNAS 



PRICES SUBJECT TO CHANGE AND AVAILABILITY 



OPIR . . 



WE TRADE 



WE EXPORT 





C€NTifl 



Nationally Advefiise<l Value 



1840 "O" Street Lincoln, Nebraska 68508 
In Nebraska Call (402) 476-7331 - a 




V/SA 




172 73 Magazine • February, 1982 



LINKS •REPEATERS • THANSMIHERS 
RECEIVERS • PHEAMP8 • CONVERTERS 
TRANSCEIVERS • POWER SUPPLIES • PA'S 



TRANSMimSs QUALITY VHF/UHF KITS 



AT AFFORDABLE PRICES 




FM-5 PC Board Kit ^ ONLY $159.95 
complete with controls, heatsink, etc. 



SAVE A BUNDLE ON 
VHF FIW TRANSCEIVERSf 

1 watts, 5 Channels, for6M, 2M, or 220 



4 



<9 



9 



^ 



O 



^^V^>% 



\0' 









V 






,e 












^«" 



h^Z.y^' 



\v 



r' ■¥ 




HIGH QUALITY FM MODULES FOR 
REPEATERS, LINKS, TELEMETRY, ETC. 




• R75 VHF FM RECEIVER for 10M. 6M. 
2M, 220, or commerdal bands. 4 fantastic 
SB[ectivity options. Kits from S84,95 to $ 1 1 9-95 

• R45OUHFFMRECEJVERfor3e0-520MHz 
bands. Kits in selectivity options from $94.95 

• R1 1 VHF AM RECEIVER Kit for vhf aircraft 
band or ham bands. Only S84.95. 



COfl KITS With audio mijcer and speaker 
amplifier. Only $29.95. 

CWID KITS 159 bits, field programmabre, 
clean audio. Only S59.95. 

A1 6 RF TIG HT BOX Deep drawn alum, case 
wfth tight cover and no seams. 7x0x2 inches. 
Only $18.00. 

SCANNER CONVERTERS Copy 72-76. 
135-144. 240-270, 400-420, or 806-8 9 4 MHz 
bands on any scanner. WifectAested On^ $79.95. 




TS1 VHF FM EXCtTER for lOM, 6M, 2M, 
220 MHz or adjacent bands. 2 Watts contiiv 
uoys. Kits onfy S54,95. 

T451 UHF FM EXCITER for 450 ham band 
Of adjacent Kits only $64,95. 

VHF & UHF LI NEAR AMPLIFIERS. Use on 
either FM or SSB, Power levels from 1 to 45 
Watts to go with exciters & xmlg converters. 
Kits from S69.95. 






VHF & UHF RECEIVER 
PRE AM PS. Low noise. 



VHF & UHF TRANSMITTING CONVERTERS VHF & UHF RECEIVING CONVERTERS 



For SSB. CW. ATV, FM, ela Avaflable for 6M. 2M, 
220,440 with many IF input ranges. Converter board 
kit only at $79.95 (VHF) or $99.95 (UHF) or kits 
complete with PA and cabinet as shown. 



20 Models cover every practical rf and if rarvge to 
Nsten !o SSB. FM, ATV. etc. on 6M. 2M. 220, 440, and 
1 1 aircraft band. Even convert weather down to 2M! 
Kits from $39.95 and wired units. 



VHF Kits from 27 to 300 MHz. UHF 
Kits from 3O0 to 650 M Hz. Broadband 
Kits: 20-650 MHz. Prices start at 
SI 4.95 (VHF) and SI 6.95 (UHF). All 
preamps and converters have noise 
figure 2dB or less. 



Call or Write for FREE CATALOG 

(Send $2.00 or 5 IRC's for overseas MAILING) 
Order by phone or mail • Add $2 S & H per order 
(Electronic answering service evenings & weekends) 
Use VISA, MASTERCARD, Check, or UPS COD. 



mironics, inc. 

65Q MOUL RD, • HILTON NY 14468 

Phone: 716-392-9430 ^3a 



Hamtronics" la s reglstarod trademark 



RAMSEY 

ELECTRONiC'S 
•^62 Inc. 



PARTS WAREHOUSE 



We now have available a bunch of goodies too 
good lo hypass items are Jimiied so order today 



2575 Baird Rd. 
Penfietd, NY 1452< 

716-586 3950 



MINI KITS - YOU HAVE SEEN THESE BEFORE NOW 

HERE ARE OLD FAVORITE AND NEW ONES TOO. 

GREAT FOR THAT AFTERNOON HOBBY. 



FM 

MINI 

MIKE 




A »upflf high p&rtDrmance FM wjre- 
tes$ rnlkt kit! Tranfimits a stable 
signal up lO 300 yar<f} with except 
TiOf^tl fiu(^«0 quality t>y means 4I tt;^ 
by^lt 411 decirei mike Kit mcJiudes 
case mikff o*i-off swrtlch int*nf>a 
bftttfffy irHJiupef tnifrucrions TfKiS 
IS me finest unit avatiainv 

FM 3 Kit $14,95 

FM 3 Wired ana Teklftd 19.»S 



Cotor Orgafi 

$e« music come 
alive' 3 d^ifferent 
tights llick^F 'Mvith 
musiC- On^ l^Qht 
eactt for, high, 
mid-range and 
lows Each indi- 
vidually adjust' 
ab^e and drives up 
!o 3O0 W runs on 

Complete hit. 
ML-l 
$i.95 



•ifw4*n Uv^ulmittT Kit 
StaMa luiUAit S ^^n» on S>- 



Led BHnkf K\l 
A greai aitorntion get- 
ter which alternately 
flashes 2 Jumbo LEDs. 
Use lof name badges. 
buttons, warning 
pAMt lights ^iriythingi' 
Runs on 3 to 15 vO^tS 
Comp*ei« kti Bt-t 
%3M 




Super Sleuth 

A (ly per sensihv* ampl I - 
ti(?r which wiH pjck up a 
CMn {irop at 1 5 teei' Greai 
tor monitonnig baby's 
room ct &% general pur- 
posfl ampiifi&f Full 2 W 
rma output . runs on 6 to 
15 wo' 15 u^es fl-45 ohm 

speaker 
OomfMtB kit Bi^9 



CPO-1 

Runs on 3- 15^ VdC 1 wall 
Atamn. Audio Oscillator 



cnit 1 KHZ qood tot CPO 
Complete kit tS-tS 




Call Your Phonp Order in Today 
TERMSi Saiislaction gLaianitt?ed or monnj 
letunded COO add $2 00 Wllnfmum ofde 
S6.00 Orders iinUm $10 00 add it 1 SO Add b' 
lor pot»tayt;, insurance, hartdling Over-jt'd 
add 15*= N V re^idenis ddd /' la* 



CLOCK KITS 

Vchjf 0^ fSToritM are here tg^ln. Over T,OtlO Sold to Dele 
Wm orte at ifie Qan>g and ortler youn lodayt 

Try your hand at buildcng the finest tookmg c^ock on the 
market >ts satm fifKsh anodlzed aluminum case looks great 
anywhere, whife six 4" LED digits provide a highly readable 
display This is a complete kit, no extras needed, and it only 
takes 1-2 hours to assemble Your choice of case colors: 
silver, gold, black (specify). 

Cfock lilt. 12/24 hour. DC-S $24M 

Clock with 10 mtn 10 timer 12>24 hour. DC-IO S29.95 

Alarm cJock. 12 hoyf only. DC-8 129.95 

12V DC car ctock, DC-7 S29.95 

For wired and tested clocks add $10 00 to kii price 

SPECIFY 12 OR 24 HOUR FORMAT 




f M Wlreteta Mik* Kil 

Trannmits up to 300' to 

any FM bioadcaM ra^ 

iiio. uses any lype of 

TYiike Runs on 3 to 9V 

has added sensthve mtke preamp 

stage 

FM^I kit 13.95 FM-£ltit $*%5 



Type FM-2 



Unhfcrul Timer tttl 

Provides the t»a$ic pani and PC 
|>oard f'^Qyired 10 providfr a source 

at praciSiODi irmmg af<d pu^^ 
generation Use$ 5S5 timer IC and 
includes a range ol paria for moBi 
timing needs 

UT-S Kit SS.tS 



Whisper LiQhl Kit 

An interesting kit, small mike 
picks up sourids and converts 
them to light The louder the 
sound, the brighter the lighl 
includes mike controls up to 
300 W. runs on PO VAC 
Complete kM WL-t 
S6^S 



Mad Blaster Kit 

Produces LOUD ear snattenng and 
atterFttoo getting siren like sound 
Can supply up lo 15 watts of 

ObfKSKioys ayflro Runs on S-IS VDC 



Me-t Kit 



S4^£ 




Tone Decoder 
A complete lone deco- 
def on a tmgle PC 
board Features 400- 
5000 Hz adiuslable 
range via ?0 turn pot. voltagi? rr.j:, 
iation 567 IC Useful for toucfi- 
tone buj'st deiection FSK eic 
Can at^o be used as a stable tone 
encoder Runs on 5 to 1? volts 
Complete kit T{>1 $595 



Car Clock 

TTie UN- KIT. only 5 i»t^r eofineeltona 



Sirefi Kit 
Produces upward^ a:nd downward 
wail characteristic of a |>oiice 
Siren 5 W peak nudto ouiput. runs 
on 3-15 volts, uses 3-45 ohm 
speaker 
Corrplete kit, SM-3 S2.95 



00 Hj TlmnF QtM 

Rii<n3 on §-M yE3C Law cufrBni |l)ini»i < 
iflin wortlfi JccuFKr TB-^ Wit U W 



HeicB ft tupor laQkinq rugged Jind accurnEe kuio croch wh^cri \'i n tnmp to build aird 
ir^stnil Cloch movsnienT n cflmplelely aiiemhlitd - yot* oniif iOild*i+ 3 wnfe-$ and 3 
^witchi04 lAhM Eboij-l 15 mmLitiDi' Display la bnighr f^teen with lutomntic bfighrnest 
coriirQit E^inoiaceM — asfyief vclji ol 1 higfily Ftidftbtr display div ^^ itt^ht Co^e$ ^'^l 
Ht^n trmifi iAodi^^ii ^iMtni^MiTV CAt^ AtKcti can b* ftllacfted 5 diHirvnl wa^ysi>itg? t^ilvO 
iaf» Cnonet or s^pr ei«ich o' ^>d casa (icMcifvi 

OC-3*<1 1?hQUftorfnai t21 •» 

DC 3 «ifK] vvd tP5t«d 



Cutcmdar Atarifi Ctock 
The Clock mat s tot it ait B- 5 LEDs 
i2?4hour loooie ?4 r^ou^' alarm J 
year caliendar itansiTy tjachup bdei 
JOIS mor« The super 7Q0i chip is 
UE&d Size 5K4K2 inchpF Complete 
kii less case [not ^^^a^iAbtei 
DCS 134.95 



Under Oa«h C^f Clock 

1:3 I^mMfcaK^t^AKaaypii^ -#«tu««i 

a tu'^VOHil} LEDS luBtiKt- I., -1- "^1 attt 

3 4M4 hdCNkiip. d<«pNlf b««n*.» *«Cn ^imttofi •mr 

T„rtivf ii^iriicl^i>fl OpIiO'^Ai i^im-mHT aluomil^riilii 
•CJjMi'li ili^^ljir 10 At1^&)f ni 1-^)14 l««ll 
t>p. 1 1 eioeli wiil\ tfit{j bi^Llt'i^ fir n k,il 

1>S/A 1 «)iiTim4r muAptVT HM 

Add $1000 4«»v KhH T«tt. 



PARTS PARADE 



VIdffO Tfrmlnii 

• ' • ' r 1*1 f c CHitsmpi"] irgrtft nhfun- atc^fio rr^rm 
■ r-. i^* icemp^STi- tr'ffi.MiaiLiflii feai-j^es *■ 
-d IWlWOf temp J3U!»* i»''D prf&fi- 

^-0tf and ^vfivrtf E i . : ^ aS^N p*ui fsaradg ^ 

»- 1 -- *^fi| Bfift c o mi rtt f ifn(tiii«><U4j<> 

-MA«i etfffl kit itdd Me de hat 

«»* 

'■' ■ ■ ■Ft'?' trf 



ffpUMif *SC<fh#rfrO*Ti3»"«:|TV 

V^LrPE". rmritMkrd h-nc ai^d B«uil 

_. The aii4<«fl«ttiJ> i>T ^fl><'<H win 

HIM 
114 fS 

I'M 



IC SPECIALS 



LINEAR 



38D 

56€ 
5#? 
T41 

3it4 
«3i 



4» 



t 3S 

11 SO 

II. ill 

$ 49 

tt» 
11 M 
(1 90 
in 2% 

t so 
s se 

I7 9S 

%2K 



4011 
4013 
404« 
4049 
4059 
4511 
451a 



CMOS 



Ifffi 



.50 
.50 
$1.65 
.50 
$9.00 
S2.0O 
51.35 
$1.75 



READOLFTS 

fNp»rrsio5CA %m 

MAN 7?.HPrT» irC A 1» 

Ni^fMi *rcA i.« 



TRANSISTORS 

jNim* »#M c* F 1 i^i da 

7^4403 mp C^F IVII H 

7nu,]oi#«iC*r 11.11011 

JMBQtC*' 4«Mt 

ztoTTi D^ii 5ACOA ti at 
HPN HKM trfw ^*f* fam.m 

PHP 3»0i T^pf T>ft |«/»,M 
?N:Wfi I.H 

3iN»4e u^r l/4a.ee 



TTL 



74SCK) 

7447 

74n 

7490 

?4196 



$ 40 

$ .6S 
t.50 

1,50 
t1 as 



SPECIAL 



72oe 

72C7A 

72ieD 

710TC 

5314 

a375AB/G 

7001 



115,00 
S 1^ 
$1?,S0 
$ 5.50 
S2TD0 
$12.50 
3 2.95 
$ 2,95 
S 6 SO 



FERRITE BEADS 






'111 W 



Soektli 

14 Pin 10/S2 OO 

16 Pm 10/Sa 00 

?4 Prn 4/S2.00 

?8 Pin 4/S2.00 

40 Pin 3/$^.Q0 



ficftislQr Aii'l 
AssorimenT of Popular values - % 
watt Cut lead tor PC rn hunting. ^^■' 
center ^o" leads, big ot 300 or 

more. 

$1.50 



Switches 
Mini ic^gie SPDT 
Red Pushbuttons N '^ 



3 



{too 

it 00 



r ivAdB 



iafphones 

ft of^m goQ0 tt)f vnm* ton* 
«tarmcic»cU Mc 



f ofiifi 5p««itef 
ADpiQi « 1 di^m Hound 

3 lor ia 00 



Cvyitala 

3&79&45 4UIHZ 11. SO 

10 00000 MHZ tSOO 

5 24BeaO MHZ SI.OO 



AC Ad«p^l*n 

cKv^ftfi.BK 110 VAC plug 

Dllff «fKl 

i5tlK#.20mA ft 00 

16 VK # l€iOmA ft,M 
t2 TK # 2»^A tJ 09 



i4«4 9I»I* Butxtn 
vmti buizer 4S0 hj M cfB lound 
DJalpul on &<17 vdc Ml 10^30 mA TTi 
epmpaiifelt |1,iO 



Stug Tuntd Colti 
Small 3/16'^ H^x Stugs lurngd cqii 
aiurns, 10 for $1.00 



AC Outlel 

Panal Mounl with Leads 

4/11.00 



CAPAClTOftS 

TAHTAlum 

15tiF25V3/$1.00 
1.8ijF25V3/ST.OO 
22 uF 2SV 3/S1.00 



ALUHINUH 

>ClQO uF 1^ nadi^a^ t «a 
UO wf »V A>.Bf I M 

lie w# irv Ajui Ml eo 



DESK CEIIAMIC 
91 1&V divk Ifrtt M 
< iSV 11 f 1 M 

001 tiv n If ae 
Ocr«r 



Plodat 

5 t V ^enef M/H 00 

lN914Type 50/5 too 

tKV2Afnp ilVOO 

tOOV lAmp IS^SI.OO 



25 AMP 

100V Bridge 
$1.50 each 

Mini-Bridge 50V 

1 AMP 

2 tor $r. 00 



PC-PC Cvnmtm Cer«mic IF FiltBfl 

^5 flic ifKHrt pnya -9 vUc # 30ina Mini ceramic filt«ra t IcMz 

'9r<ScerOiJuC«-lSwtfCi1S 3Sma 11.15 Q i^ 455 h;H2 S1 50 «>a 



^SK 30 Turn Tc<m Pod |1 00 
TK 20 Turti Tnm Poi 1 .SO 



4E 



Tnr»irn*r C*^ 
Spri^iui! - 9-40 pl 

Siibl« Poiypropyltn* 



Audio 
Preicalar 

Maka high resolution audio 
rrieasurments. greai for musical 
instrumenl lunmg, PL tones, etc 
MulttplJes 9udm UP in frequency, 
selectable xlO or a 100. gives 01 
HZ resolution with t sec gate 
hme' High sensitivity ot 25 mv, 1 
meg input i and built-in Mlermg 
gives great per^OTmance Runs 
on tv battery all CMOS 
PS-2 kit $39.tS 

PS'2 wire^ t^.9S 




600 MHf 
PRESCALER 



Extend the range of your 
counter (o 600 MHz Works 
with all counters Less than 
150 mv sensitivity specily - 
10 Of -100 

Wired, tested. PS-IB $59,95 
Kil, PS-IB S44.95 



30 Watt 2 mtr PWR AMP 

Simple Ctass C power amp features 8 times power gam. 1 Wirt 
for 8 out , 2 W in for 15 ouU 4 W in for 30 out. Ma n, output of 35 W, 
incredible value, complete with all parts, less case and T-R relay. 
PA-1 , 30 W pwr amp kH S22.9S 

TR-1 RF sensed T-R relay ki! 6.9S 



MRF-2MI 1fins43lor u uaed m PAO 
a-lOdb^tm T50fflh£ I11JS 



RF actuated relay senses RF 

(1W) and closes DPPT relay 

For RF sensed T-R relay 
TR'1 KFt $6.flS 



Ponvtr Supiily KII {, 

Compi«ie triple re^uUfed oowm 
supply jpfOw«d^ vsriiibi« fi ID t i vti-Kf «1 
200m«vitl-*^an Acnp £;i Calient I04ld 
rt^UilitiQn good Mt^fing nm) smaHl 
ti£t tewtrsmtoriner^ r«!quir«5S3V 
/# 1 A and 24 VCT 
Complete kit PS-3LT U^% 



Cry Mil lllcrophont 
Small }" diameter 'a" Ihack 
c^y^EAl mike cartndge $,T5 



Cfi«)t Cofm*ct«r 

Chassis mount 
BNClype Sl.N 



Mini RG-174 Coa* 
10 It lor $1.00 



Nice QuAiiry ti'&% s tw ft oa 

%~ ^jMMf QiWl«in«is lOiortTM 



A«l 0tC«VW» *e|C £4H IflM f-H4WiX 
■in e«« I m pcT Vvm q Ug l}» {K^ ttJ» 



Conn*c10f1 
^11 type go>ta£Dn1i»Cl» tor 

pric4 7S «« 



L»4i - your cht^ee ti>««se' specify 

Mini Rftd Jumbo Red Hugh intensity fltd Tlfgimlriator Fted i/fl 

Mini VeltOMv, Jumbo Yellow Jumba Green %/$i 



V*i«cton 
Molorcta MV Z20d 30 PF Noinindl cip 20-90 Pf - Turiible ringi < 

JO Hc*i Of 1/11 00 



OP-AMP Sp*d«l 
Bt"FETLf 13741 - Off ect pin for pin 741 compatible but 500,000 MEG 
Jnpul 2. super law SO pa input curr«nit io* power dram 
50 tot onty Si.Oa 1Q lor SI QO 



7«MQ 
71MG 

7?3 

7*05 



11,25 

isa 

t* 15 
Si DO 



Rvguliitd-rt 



7S12 
7815 
TvOft 

7912 



SI. 00 
t1 OD 
tl.25 
S1.25 
S1.15 



ftlwirtli Tubtfug Hubm 

shnnh IQ' ■*" Gr^a! lor =p' -••', SO.'Sl.OO 



iUn4 TO-42 HtH SInkt 
T^tttninQy 8r|i^d $ for t1 W 



Tr, 



?M HMf Sinfci 



3 iw %im 



Opto Isolators - 4N2B type 

Opto Reflectors - Photo diode * LED 




S.SO t«. 
SI. 00 M, 



Mol«it Pini 

WqIbm iJrBHjy preciit m i^rHjih cvf ? l^trfKl 



cos lhNeloc«4li 
naitiiinc* vcnei wiin iigriT £5D ohmt ia 
ov«r 3 m*g 3 Ivr It.Ott 



174 73 Magazine • February. 1982 



i 



i 



i 



"TOP QUALITY PARTS FOR LESS 



It never fails: Someui-e calls you on the telupr.orit; .itnj yuu heeci to cliti-.w,u 

' phones to get some infofmation. You put the phone down, go to another 

phone and give them the information, then hang up. Oops! You forgot to hang 

up the phone you first answered! No more phone calls for you until you discover 

your mistake!! Or, the phone rings right in the middle of a serious talk with your 

children, spouse, girl friend, efc. You have to lay the phone down, go to another room 

to finish your conversation, leaving your caller in silence. Or how many times has one 

of you r not-so-good friends asked you and your spouse to go out Friday night and you are 

fl^^ sitting there making all these weird gestures and rollmg your eyes. etc. Your spouse does 

^■l^ not know whether to pour cold water on you or run screaming into the street. Well NO MORE 

^^^ Digital Research is proud to announce the M.O.H-0,. the first patented, electronic hold control 

for your home telephone Return to the same phone or any phone in your home and your party is 

still there. All the time your party is on hold, they may listen to A.M.. F.M.. casette. T.V,, or any other device 

you wish to hook up to M.O.H.O. No need to butcher your phone either. Only two wires to connect to your 

existing phones. One wire to tip and the other wire to ring. For those not too telephonefCBlly inclined — one 

to the red wire and one to the green wire. The M.CH.O, reisdes in an attractive box approximately 6" x 4" x 

2", which may be placed anywhere. Now comes the fun part. You have just received M.O.H-0. (kit form takes 

about 1 Vz hours to complete}. There are only two things to do: hook the red and green wiretothe telephone 

and plugM,O.H,0, into A. C. outlet. Remember M,O.H,0. is completely legal, patented and FCC. approved, 

(We provide you with a Registration Sticker too.) . -,. ihOft f%C 

Kit i^du.uO Complete 

(For rotary dial add S1 50 per phone) 



Assembled and Tested $37.50 



POWER SUPPLY 
TRIPLE OUTPUT 
25 Volts @ ISA 

5 Volts @ .8A 

15 Volts @ 1.25A 

Isolated independent 
outputs 

Positive or negative 
operation 

Constant Voftage Regu- 
lation 

25 Volt line adjustable 
with 10 turn pot from 
23,5 V to 28 Volts. 120 
Volt - 60 Hz input Fused ■ 
H-3^^" W=5V' D=4'' 



Fixed Inductors 

.39uh-6/1<**> 12.5 uh -8/1°° 
500 uh- Hash Filter 

(S 2 Amps ^ 4/1 °° 




Molded Choke 

l3uh-8/r^50mh^6/1^^ 
1.2 mh 8/1"*** 



Precision Hybrid 
Oscillator Module 

Has both 1 MHZ and 2 MHZ 
TTL - outputs —Hermeti- 
cally sealed —Ultra high 
stability over wide temp, 
range —originally cost over 
$40,00 each — we made a 
super purchase from a 
major computer manufac- 
turer — 5 Volt operation - 
fits standard 24 pin socket - 
Manufactured by Motorola 
oscillator division. 

MC6871A 



1 a %f*m 



iM. 




3/20 



w/data 



Variable 
Inductors 

30-40 uh 
.9uh- 1.2 uh 
11uhto20uh / 
,25 uh- .35 uh 
,85 uh - .95 uh 




NEO 2137 by NEC 

• Microwave R F. trans- 
istor (N.P,N,) 

• Micromold Package 
#37 

• Dual Emitter leads 

• FT to 4.5 GHZ 

• VCEO 10V-CC 20 
MA. HFE 40-20Q 

• Gain 10V'20MA' 
1GHZ - 14DB Typical 

• Very low noise - High 
gain 1.5 DB @500 
MHZ 

• Cleared for high reli- 
ability space appli- 
cations 

COWPARE 1 ^'^ 



El AJ #18398 

NEC #4981 -7E 
Microwave - Schottky 

barrier diode 

HP-Hot Carrier diodes 

5082-2835 



• It 



*^ or 6/5°° 



REGULATORS 

LM309K *S V. 1.5 amp TO-3 1-00 

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$895 



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AU I |^4;f|fe if* pif h^inff (hiti% vtii^t IS i44 7S hioJiPf 1^4 

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73 Magazine • February, 19S2 175 



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176 TBMagaime * February, 1982 




SS££^Ut» Clock Modules 

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13SS SHOREWAY ROAD. BELMONT, CA 94002 

PRICES SUBJECT TO CHANGE 



.^30 



Tna JEEIO ASCII Kayboard Kit can ba Inia'faoad tnio 

rrvaii any cdmpUiar tyttam. Th* kit roiTiif Eomplata 
lyvitN an indutirlal D'lda kayhaard iw^tfih aiaamblv 
(fi2-K«v*L Id. IOC kali, cannactar, alactronlo compo- 
nanti Bod a dDublalldad DfifiTeiJ ui/lrlrijj bDtFct The 
kavbo-ard aiaat^rtjlv raquirt* ♦^V ^5* l&OmiA and — ISV 
9 TO rr^A tar oparrlilon. Faatur«: SO kavt ^hai^ttt liha 
l^e ehafactan. upp*r amJ \tmW eaw ASCpJ lal FuHv 
Oulfi-rwd. TvMD uaaF'dalina kava prpvidad Tar custDm 
apDl teat jQ n«. Capa lacN for up0ar-caaa-4 1^ iv alpha Sftnc- 
T»T» ytiJiiai a 23 76 laO cinh «ncoc*w^ rai#d-DnP¥ ii lift»fV 
<chi6. QuiDuu diracTlv eafTipwl3)la witti TTLJOTL or 
MOS Tf^sK affava Eatv ImlarfacJoi Mlth a 19 pin diD or 

JEglO/DTE-AK ifiSJ^'^SSSi .. $124.&5 

iccin I/*:* « ««¥ Kaytoard.Pcaoa^a. * tq qjt 
JEiDIUnlL .4 CQniiP^nanEf |oo casai . . . .^ /3*93 

K62 &2-Kay Kayaoai'd (KaybDAtO an>y> . ^ -S 34.95 

DTE-AK (cat* only - laii"MiclI"Wietai'*ojS 49.95 



JE600 
Hexadecimal Encoder Kit 



FULL f^lT 
LATCHED OUTPUT 
19 KEY KEYBOARD 




trm JE€00 Enco4«r KavbO^fd KttprDwidai t#D 
hmMmawcimai dlfJta p'Oducad from taquannal KtY arnr^a^i 
ia a1{f3n/v difact prbfiramfnlnB for S bri rn tcrppf qc a iap f 
or B'bfl ma^'^Hirv ci'CMlIt- Thr*a addaionaP h«vi ara pra- 
vtdad for ijatr oparaltani wltti ona lucv^ng a biilabla 
OulpuT vvalPabla- T^^a ouTpuTt ara laTcrvao anU manitorsd 
with fl LEO I'aadOuti. Alio intPui^ltdivaiKay amry itreba. 
Fva^Mfiiiii: puPl fl-bit Patch^ output fgr mlcroproceiiar 
Uia. TNraa uiar-dlt4na kav> WhTfi on* b-llri(r OJfTabia 
Qpfli'ltlnin. Dabaunca cIrcuJt prOvldad (or all 19 kayi. 
i LEO rpacl<»uti to varltv antrJan. Eaiv Intarfaalnp iwlih 
iTand«fct Ifi pJfi IC coorwclPr, Dihlv *BVDC rv^yirad 
t^T {>ppr«tion Stra a^-l'H p 8W"VV ji Sii'O 

JESQO/DTE^HK ji p<cui?td a&&»a) $99.95 

Jt^QO Ktt PC eo«r4 «• Cmoritli. [fio caM) - $99 'TD 
K19 l^tivf KarDOard (Kay^Haarfl oniyl , . , SI 4,95 

OTE-HK icHtontf 3i7''Hsd>»'-iw^i*"D3 S44.95j 



TRS-80 
16K Conversion Kit 

Expand your 4K TR& BO Syitepi to 16K. 
Kkt CPITii( comptata wilh ; 

* B aa. IViMe200 (UPD4l6/41ie! 10K Dyn. Ram (*NSl 

♦ DoeumtntJitlon ivt Copivarakin 

TRS-16K2 M&ONS ............... S29.95 

TWS'16K3 *20t)NS ........,,,*,.. $24.95 

TRS-16K4 *250NS _,..,,..,. Sl9 9b 



f,/VAM^ JE2I3 - Naoativa 12VDC Adaptar Boird Kct 
ZNEWI? fof JE610 ASCII KEVBOARO KIT 

Tv^vJ^^ Pro,wlaiJ-iSVDCtrOrTTiFlCOm|iirjS.VOC $9.95 



'Se# jL^sf □/ Aiivefftsets on p^ge J t4 



JSMagazme • FebruaryJ982 177 



q)Em£R 

DIRECTORY 



Phoenix AZ 

Uvua nxnpAnv stocxing Ke^nufiDd, from, 
\me%u. MR. B^W, Attno, Limn, Ctohcnli. 

u-nt- vuu! FcTHirrConimiinicatHiHCorp., 1640 



Culver City CA 

\iaC\ EJkctjvmua, l^^l^ Sepuli^edA BK^^I, . Culver 
iiiy CA INIZ30. 3(K)-«0Q3. TrAckA4(ia-liiHaSHn 
|}ke|{Lt, CvJI us loi a law quotes. 



Somer^t NJ 

axid Yi^ESC djsiribi^biri LK^invTntDf% of ilrv> 
nod ttmd Tppriah Man mftjov bnmdb in liack 
C^J^lple(e wilier and UdlUiet. lt*dio» 
I ntimitad, ITfid EkIixi Awnov, F.O. Ben 34?, 
SonxEvt SI 06S73. 4@£M5g9. 

Amsterdam NY 
UPSTATE NEW YORK 

KniUTKicL IC:OVi, DtmIu, plus tfijiny mtlyt't 
]j|w» Annttnjr Dea3CT-foro^"er35\T*f> A'djrtin- 
d*tk HkIki Suppiv, Inc. , 1S5 iVei Mijji !!itrwt, 
Amthfrdam NY 1^10. 842-5350. 



Fontana CA 

Com|ilclt' \\n&, rCOM. I>enTraii, Twi-Tap, 
Mirnftji^ Cubic, Lutmr, ovt-r 400U rkvEroriiL- 
|irofliKi^ Inr h«hb\is^ tech nici tin, i^xpcri- 
iMt'iitcr. ALmi IJli mdJo, landrTidiLliv Ffiritjirui 
Ekw-HruiiJca, !^28 Sierrii Ave.^ FtintitLii (^A 



Central NY 



AfllAletif nidlo hurd^LcxKit dLsplavK tnttdc td youi- 
iifK?i.'lfit.'utn)as— cjilbigni, plq^iiies, Jiward^c or 
^|MvLul i>rdeii. High fjUftlUy, l9S\ a'r^'kti, Iww 
urtct^ A.&M. WfjodcfftH. HUN, M*fU%(fn Si., 
F.Q. Boa H3. Ri»mc NY 13440, iJ7-3<^. 



San Dtego CA 



Wr bu^ J 11.! vr*ll Sural iii Amiy Ni^-\ E\m.-- 
<rrink>, uLsiii K-Miiiruited Stateriai Whjit d<;ry'ni 
>^jiiT III yA\f VViite (lkt catjJtijfLiir. ESictnink- 
lovm. Inc.. 440-7 th A*oiue. PO Boi 304ft. Saw 



San Jose CA 
BAN FEANCISCO BAY AAEA 

HoRielmwd' haiiEn; tons ol ne* •ml Ufsd 
Mwiii'G»a|]ift« RAT mud I'lirntpnfientii. 5«f>1iif 
YiMim utmt I95S. We fpeculuK in tCOM, 
KLM. Mirijr. ComptTOOu Wc ship wfidd- 
lAidc- Tclje~QHn £3cctfOfiki^ lS46v Vvkm 
A^mur. S«n J^at CA a&ia4. :n7-4478. 



Syracuse-Rome- Utica NY 

Pefiturtiif(,; Kenwood, Ya«u, JCOM^ DrAkr. 
Tun-Tec, Swan, Dt^nTmn, Alpha, RiiIujL MFJ, 
Tempo, j\s.rron.f KL^i, Hv Giiiu, MiHli'v, 
t^rit'f). Ca-^tcfuft, HLkstlrr. Mini Pmtiibcta Vmi 
w*>i}'i Ik* dujippoinled with eqtiipTntTit; wri'ice- 
RlAjtk) WnrkL, Onrid* Qmntv Airport'Trrmi' 
ml biuMkig, Ondusy >iY L3424. 337^1203. 

Colunibii^OH 

The bj|^l Jtnd best Ham Stmv m \he mtdv^rai 
rnfurfng qualit> Kenwood pTuduct^ wjlh 
I'tiififnil d^pLav^. We wJJ nniy tjir beiJ. 
Aulluirii^ Kenwood Service -^ ifniw^fll 
Anuleiir Khdkt Inc.. 1230 Akk Dr., Re^iMUb^ 
huri rc:dimibi»i OH 43068, §66-4367. 



San Jose CA 

Ray #rt«'% ni-Hr«s1 Amateur Radki ihire N<^' ^ 
iLwl AiTFiBtrjr lladiD5alQ^&: wrvrice. VVefealuie 
KiTn-ifiiTd. ICt>M, Azxk?], Y'aefii. TctvTcc» 
Siifiittx it mam'TiKiie. Shai'ef Hadki, Inc., 1371 
So. B^woin AiiT.,5*n JoseCASSISS. 9^1 ttQ. 



Bend on 

Satetlilp TV Kjkxwti bfaEal^. CiU todm\ Uv 
mm iniDTTTiatHxi aiKf iiv|ujre nbnut <nur dulct 
piFicrwn WESFEHCOM. P.O. Bm 7238. 
Beiid QB 977%. 3Sg4imi6. 



hiiami FL 

Ainalrur Aadki Center, inc. "EverMhlniif I mi 
Oh- ApiHittiir SJnDe lEJflO, fiSOS N.I. 2nd 
Av^ntK. Miami FL 33137. i^TJ-^SiS, TW'X 
ri2203». 



Sctmnton PA 

laJM Bird. CushCriUl, Beckmui. V^^Ar 
lentil, lliutler. Antennai SpodJilislSi, Ajitiun. 
A%anti, Belden. W2AU W2Vii. CDE, AKA. 
Vlbropiat Hstm-Km^ CES. Ampheinal. Suiu'. 
FiirMin/CrmhtT. HJkW, Amertt, Sbunv T.aRttf 
Ekdttmlci, U12 Cimnd%iew St.. Scramon FA 
18500,343-2124. 



Smyrna CA 

Fnr yimi Kwm'<itKl, Vaesu^ ICOM, Drulci- und 
(HhiT linturi'Kf Hf^xl-i, aume tu fteu tw. DrtttS 
TwtvWav hadio. 2506 N. Atlanta Hd., !iinyma 
tf A 30086, 422rfi(m. 



Preston ID 

BiKt WBTFI^'7. has the Largest Stuck s)l Ama= 
tnif Ck^aj^ in tk' EnteTmountain Wot aixl el'H.' 
Bcml Pricia (IWI me for all your ham ticvtb 
lbs Piitnhiiting. 7S So. SCale. Fnatcm ID 



Houston TX 

K.xiiiTlmenter\ [MrttclL^iiil lileclrnnir uiid mi^. 
L'lMink'al compont-nlji fur rnrnpuler [w^hpli', 
MudH^ lT*«u3e, hams. rtAwt Imikler^. tXpcrl- 
fUfiili'iTt Open !ti£ davs ■) vn-k {^nlrwav Fllcc^ 
lfani«a Inc., 8833 Clarkcrest, Elinutun T\ 
770n. ll7N'ti57S. 



Teire Haute IN 

Ymr ham headauarten kcjited in llv twart td 
the midwes] HoasieT Eks etaMw ct. Inc.. #i 
Ht«fci|i|i. CvaleF. P.O. Bat 3300« Twrr lUut^ 
IN 4l90ftl, £18-1456. 



San Antonio TX 

Compiler 2 way Mjrk-ice tjBJjji. Cull Pw, 
WiSFbP ^hn^ Anteima Spediiibtt, A^anlL 
.A/dfn„ Bird* Hy-gain. Standajd. VLhmpIra, 
Midland. Ilenrv. CuihCraf!. Dielectfic 
lliotkr, [COM, XiFI* Nve, Shurr. Ciibk 
Timyu , Ten- Tec and odlen. AppLianctf ^ 
EniAHoent Co., Inc., 331? Vaiwr Jaciuon 
RrfHdl San AntmiD TX 7S213. 734*7793. 



Littleldfi MA 

Thr ham iMire iif \.E vou cmn n^v ott Kefi- 
vbitfii. ICOM, Uiboiv totsii. Dentron, KLM 
ai^ipi. HAcW' ki&itchs & wattmetoi^ Wtiiitier 
Twdmt {kicfriurL, Bearcati. Hegeon^ antftifi«» by 
Ijirwn, Wilion, Hustler. GAM- TEl^COM 
Inc. C4)fnmijiiicatian& & Ebdronki. 673 Graal 
Hd.. Ri. I L9, Utt^ton MA DI4«0. 48^3040^ 



Vienna V'A 

The Wa^Lnpcton mrtrDpoiitan ana'i loiKlin^ 
wpplieT oi the liAeit m Amateur Kadwo imd Ttsit 
E^uiptsem, On ymjt ifext bip ici thi- \it}t»n'i 
Capit ri. ItOp b^ and see usu Ucetrcmk: tiVjuip- 
moA BaiA^W,. S16 MiU SI. N.E., Vienna \ A 
93110, flSft-aSSO. 



Ann Arbor MJ 

Str m fm pnxlLiicU Ukt Ten-T« . B L Drain?. 
l>t!ntri.in aiid man) mort Optn Mundny 
tlir<ni|ih S^aturdav, 0830 to 1730, W-^VCR. 
Vt'BKllXO. W-Dh'OKN and V\'fiRF t>rhind the- 
aHJhtiT. Purcliaw Radio Supply, 327 E- IliHiver 
Aw.. Ann Arhor Ml 4Eim. G^-Wm. 



Hudson NH 

Nru I-]|||j;luiid'^ Distributur and Authorizud ^j- 
virt' < !(MkUT h»r uJl Mujur Amateur UneSi Tufto 
|{m4ii> l^kclnmics, [ixr., &1 LoweU Aowii Hud- 
Hin Mi 03051. SS3-S005. 



DEALERS 

Your company name attd message 
can voniain up to 25 worth for as Ht- 
tle as $I$Q ymritf (prcpaia). or $15 
prr month (prepaid qtiartfrhi). No 
mefiHon oj maii-order business or 
area code permitted. Direct onj text 
and paymeixt must reach ns 60 dor/s 
trj autmnce of publication. For vx- 
ampfe, advertising for iite April ^82 
isstte must be in our Stands by 
Fehnmry ht. Mail to 73 Magazine, 
PeierhorQugh NH 03458. ATTN: 
Nancy Ciampa. 



17fl 73Magazme • February; 1982 



PROPAGATION 



J, R Nelson 
4 Pfy mouth Dr. 
Whiting NJ 08759 



EASTERN UNITED STATES TO: 



GMT: 



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MEXtCO 



PHILIPPINES 



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A = Mext higher frequency may aiso be useful 
B = Difficult circuit this period F = Fair G = Good 
P = Poor * = Chance of solar flares; # = of aurora 



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=T-2 



FT-208R - 2 Meters 
FT-708R - 70 CM 



cmsnu. 

The LCD frequency readotit provides high read* 
ability night and day, alcing with ¥«iy low airrent 
drain. 



mnjom 



SWfCH 



All operating frequencies are entered from the 
front panel keyboard. Unusual repeater spirts^ 
scanning, and memory programming are all 
controlled via the keyboard, 

UP/DOWN HAHIIAL tCAN 

The FT-208R scans in either 5 kHz or 10 kHz steps, 
while the FT-708R steps are 25 kHz and 50 kHz. 
Automatic hattrng on a bu^ or clear channel is 
provided, with automatic pause and r^tart 
feature. Scan either the band or the memories. 

UMTCD BAND SCAN 

You can program upper and lower frequency 
limits, then command the transceiver to scan that 
segment or exclude that segment. 

TBI MEMOHY CHAHNELft 

The memories may be used for either simplex or 
repeater operation. No ne^ to throw a "5 UP" 
switch for those 15 kHz channels, either! 

UDN04JFE MEMORY BAOCIIP 

A Lithium cell provides the memory backup func- 
tion. Now you won't dump memoiy when switch- 
ing tiattery packs, 

L0Mf CURRENT OIUUN 

Typical standby current drain is 20 mA, for long 
battery life, 

480 IHAH BATTBIY PACK 

Witti more capacity than competing pacte, the 
FNB-2 battery pack gives you those precious extra 
minutes of operating time that might prove critical 
in an emergency I 




In the high power position, the Fr'208R packs a 
walk}p at 2.5 watts output, while the Ft-706R 
output is 1 watt. Switch to low power for 1 watt 
output on the F-208R. 200 mW on the FT-708R. 
for even greater battery life. 



A priority channel may be programmed from the 
keyboard, allowing you to check a lavorite channel 
while operating on another. 



Automatic scanning of the band or memories (or a 
segment of the band) with pause and restart 
feature. 

It BUTTON IITMF PAD 

For autopatch operation, a 16 button dual tone pad 
is built into every FT'208R and R-708R. 

PROQRAMMAMJE SPUTS 

The popular ±600 kHz shift is standard (±5 MHz 
on the FT-708R) on the FT-208R. Odd splits of up 
to 4 MHz may easily be programmed from the 
keyboard. Additionally, a split memory/dial mode 
provides a third method of operating on unusual 
splits. 

OPnONAL 32 TONE crest 

Easy interface is provided to the synthesized 
SSY-32 CTCSS Encoder, providing all 32 common 
subaudible tones for repeater operation. 

IjOCK SWITCH 

The keyboard lock switch allows you to disable 
entry from the keyboard, thus preventing inadver- 
tent frequency change. 

FULL LME OF ACCESSORCS 

A Yaesu tradition, a full line of accessories is avail- 
able to maximize your enioyment of the FT-208R 
and FT-708R. 



i 



For more than a quarter of a century, Yaesu has produced reliable, high-performance 
communications equipment for the Amateur and Land Mobile services. Contact us today for full 
information on our cost-effective line ofHF, VHFand UHF transceivers — at Yaesu we want you 
to get your message across! 



Pnce And Specifications Subject To 
Change Wtttiout Notice Or Obligation 




w 



The radlOm 



MW 



282 



YAESU ELECTRONICS CORP. 6851 Walthall Way, Paramount, CA 90723 • (213) 633-4007 
Eastern Service Ctr. 9812 Princeton-Glendale Rcf., Cincinnati, OH 45246 • (513) 874-3100 



i*^fv 



MCH 







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1** r 


MR 


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POWER /VOL 



SQUCiCM 






S*iF 










SCAN 


MOLD J 


^^^^HH^ 


• 


• 

HI 




^^^^^^^r 


lOk 


LOW 


UIM 



Photo shown is TR'V a 16-kev 

_ -I- 

aulopatch UP/ DOWN microphone version. 



Miniaturized, 5 memories, memory/band scan 






The TR-77M la an incredibly compacts 
reasonably priced, 25-waU, 2-mcter FM 
mobile IranBceiver with fl^e memories, 
memory scan, automatic band scan, and 
other convenient operating features. The 
TR*7730 Is available In two variations: 
a 16'key autopatch UP/DOWN microphone 
(MC-46) version* and a basic UP/DOWN 
microphone version* 

TB-7730 FEATURES: 

* SmftUcat ever Kenwood mobile 

Measures only 5-3/4 inches wide, 
2 Inches high, and 7-3/4 Inches deep, and 
weighs only 3.3 pounds- Mounts even in 
the smallest subcompact car, and Is an 
ideas combination with the equally com- 
pact TR-840O s>Titheslzcd 70-cm FM 
mobile transceiver. 

■ 25 watts RF output power 

HL/LOW power switch selects 25-W or 
5-W output. 



• Five memories 

May be operated In sfniplex mode or 
i^peater mode with the transmit fre- 
quency^ oftset ±600 kHz, The fifth 
memory stores both receive and transmit 
frequcricy tndependenUy. lo allow opera- 
tion on repeaters with nonstandard splits. 
Memory backup terminal on rear panel. 

• Memory scan 

Automatically locks on busy memory 
channel and resumes when signal 
disappears or when SCAN switch Is 
pushed. Scan HOLD or microphone PTT 
suntch cancels scan, 

• Automatic band scan 

Scans enUre band in 5-kHz or 10-kHz 
steps and locks on busy channel. Scan 
resumes when signal disappears or when 
SCAN switch is pushed. Scan HOLD or 
microphone PTT switch cancels scan. 

• Extended frequency coverage 
Covers 143.900448.995 MHz in 

si\itchable 5-kHz or 10-kHz steps. 

• UP/DOWN frequency control from 
microphone 

Manual UP/DOWN scan of entire band In 



Synthesized 70-cm FM mobile rig 



I \ 



TR-84aO 

« Synthesized coverage of 440-450 MHz 
Covers upper 10 MHz of 70-cm band in 
25-kH^ steps, with two VFOs. 

■ Offset switch 

For ±5 MHz transmit oflfset on both VFOs 
and four of live memories, as well as 
simplex operation. Fifth memor%^ allows 
any oilier offset by memorizing receive 
and transmit frequencies independently, 

• DTMF autopatch terminal 

On rear panel, for connecting DTMF 
(dual-tone multifrequency) touch pad (for 



accessing auiopatches) or other tone- 
signaling device, 

* BI/LOW RF output power switch 

Selects 10 walls or 1 watt output. 

* Virtually same size as TR-77dO 
Perfect companion forTR-7730 Ln 
a compact mobile arrangement. 

* Other features similar to TR-7730 
Five memories* memory scan, automatic 
band scan (in 25-kHz steps), UP/DOWN 
manual scan, four- digit LED receive 
frequency display (also shows transmit 
frequency in memory 5L S/RF bar meter 
and LED indicators, lone switch, and 
same optional accessories. 



5 kHz or 10 kHz steps is possible when 
using either autopatch or basic UP/DOWN 
microphone versions. 

' Offset switch 
Allows VTQ and four of five memory 
frequencies to be offset ±600 kHz for 
repeater access or simplex, 

* Four- digit LED frequency display 

Indicates receive and transmit frequency. 

• 8/RF bar meter and LED Indieatofs 

Bar meter of multicolor LEDs shows S/RF 
levels. Other LEDs indicate BUSY. ON 
AIR. and REPEATER ofiset 

« Tone switch 

Optional accessories; 

MC-46 16-key autopatch UP/DOWN 

microphone 

SP-40 compact mobile speaker 

KPS-7 Qxcd-siatlon power supply 

More informauon on the TR-7730 and 
TH'8400 is available from all authorized 
dealers of Trio-Kenwood Communications 
nil West Walnut Street 
Complon. California 90220 

®KENv\/qaD 

TT , , .patesetter in amateur radio 




Specificaiiona and prices are subject to 
change without tioiice or obligation.