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June 1982 $2,95 



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TVRO Receiver 




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How You 
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INFO 



Manuscripts 

scripts iMiih <tr3wifici.s and^r phofo- 
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film Edition — UnlwersEty MicfOfMm. 
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1982 





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wide QSL bureaus, and more. The U,5. 
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4 73 Magazine • June, 1982 



r 



Build This Digital Vfo 

— a microprocessor makes it simple 

WA5VQK 



F 4 f- T I I I- 



12 



Surviving the Unthinkable 

—part 1 1: some practical ideas. AK(?Q 



30 




/ane 82 

MAGAZINE 




'Lite Receiver IV 

— the second half 

WA4CVP, WA40SR 

TVRO Transducer 

—wavegu ide-to-coax transition 

WA4CVP,WA40SR 

The MTV Music Box 

— Satell ite Central, part V 1 1 

Gibson 




52 



58 



60 



Vol. XXII No. 9 




A Split Personality 
for the KDK FM2015R 



Building for Beginners 

—happiness is a hot soldering iron 



N1II 



Coping with PC Boards 

— it's not easy to be virtuous KC7M 



40 



42 



48 



Tune In the World's Tinderbox 

— SWUng from Cairo to Kuwait 



4 * I I ■ I I- I 



Are You Ready for 900 MHz? 

WB4LNM 

Crime-Stoppers' Textbook 

— rules of thumb for would-be gumshoes 

..-,.. Diefenbach 



66 



74 



84 



Never Say Die— 6, Ham Help — 64, 92, 94, 95, 108, 118, Corrections — 64, 96, Social Events — B8, Satenites — 97, 
Fun -98, DX-99, Letters- 101, Contests- 104, Awards- 106, Reader Service- 114, Review-115, New 
Products — 119, Dealer Directory— 162, Propagation— 162 



T3 Magazine • June, 1982 5 



W2NSD/1 

NEVER SAY DIE 

editonatl t>y Wayne Green 




HOOKED 

You know, after over forty 
years of hamming I still don'l 
know exactly what it is that 
grabs the interest of a teenager 
and turns him from a normal rot- 
ten kid into a raving electronic 
maniac, I'm told by the dodder- 
ing grey-bearded otd-limers who 
have taken over most of the ham 
clubs in the country that young- 
sters are exposed to the whole 
world on television and thus find 
little exciting about talking to 
weird places. 

Hmmm. I'm not convinced. 
No, amateur radio didn*t gradu- 
ally die off. It was killed with one 
blow back in 1963. Before that it 
had been growing at 11% per 
year for 17 years, right on up 
through the evolution of televi- 
sion. TV never even stowed it 
down. 



My first exposure to amateur 
radio must have made a strong 
impression, because after 50 
years I still remember it. Yep, 
sonny, I was a shaver of ten and 
while visiting the best friends of 
my grandparents In Bethlehem, 
New Hampshire, I met Harry 
Stevenson WiCUN. His mother, 
along with Johnny Macauley, 
ran the Valley Vrew Inn. That 
was back in the heyday of hotels 
in Bethlehem. . .30 hotels and 
100 rooming houses, the bill- 
board at the entry to town said, 

Harry was sitting there laconi- 
cally talking on a 75m rig. . .a 
breadboard construction with a 
big copper tube final coil He 
didn't pay a lot of attention to 
the visiting kid. It didn't occur to 
me, at ten, that I might ever be 
able to understand the wizardry 
of Ihat mass of wires and tubes. 



HOME-BREW CONTEST WINNERS 

• 1st place, $250 prize: '*Smart Squelch for SingleSideband 
Receivers" by Frank Reid W9MKV and David Link W9YAN, 
both of Bloomington IN. 

• 2nd place, $100 priie: '*SjX'Meler Double-Sideband QRP 
Transmitter" by Larry Jack KL7GLK of Annapolis MD. 

• Honofable mention, S50 each: "MB-1 Function Circuit" by 
Mike Strange WA2BHe. Pine Hill NJ. "Splattomeler" by 
Penn Glower W1BG. Andover MA, and ^Weather Converter 
for Your Two-Meter Rig" by Paul Danzer N1II, Norwalk CT. 
We're sure you have heard it said that "hams are not build- 
ing anymore; they're |ust appliance operators." Well, 73's 
Home-brew Contest proves that rumor to be baloney. We were 
literally buried with entries. The winning projects show that 
hams are not only building, but that they are still innovatmg, 
too. 

Our editorial staff burned the midnight oil in early April, 
choosing five finalists from more than 100 entries. The win- 
ners were then picked by three of 75's veteran home-brewers: 
AG9V, K1XR. and W1Xa 

The Home brew Contest winners will be published in future 
issues of 73. In the meantime, keep your soldering iron 
hot — 73 is having another contest. This time there will be a 
$50 limit for the projecfs parts. 



Like a time bomb ticking 
away, that experience fay hid- 
den, waiting for the spark of pu- 
berty to set it off. By 14, 1 was a!* 
ready familiar with the excite- 
ment of the police calls at the 
top of the broadcast radio dial. 
Then all it took was an exposure 



to a fantastic radio my grand- 
father in Littleton. Hew Hamp- 
shire had. . .with a shortwave 
band on It! Wow! There were all 
those foreign broadcast sta- 
tions. . .and a myriad of hams. I 
was a roly-poly kid. but the fami- 
ly still had trouble tearing me 
away from the twenty-meter 
ham band to eat. 

It was at just this juncture 
that some fiend dumped a box 
of radio parts in my lap one Sun- 
day at church. Most of the parts 
were brand new and in their orig- 
inal cartons, so 1 couldn't just 
throw them away. Oh, f tried to 
sell them to the local radio re* 
pairman (now gone the way of 
the ice man}, but he sneered at 
the parts as antiques. Popular 
Mechanics had a radio con- 
struction project each month, 
many of them using parts |ust 
like those in my collection, so 1 
put together a radio in an old ci* 
gar box. . .and unfortunately It 
worked. I was hooked. 



%l HOME-BREW II CONTEST SS 

Between now and October 1, well be looking for articles de- 
scribing the best home-brew projects in the land for under 
$50. All useful projects will be published In 73, and the cream 
of the crop will share $5€0 in cash prizes. Top prize in the con- 
test is S250. wilh SI 00 going to the second place project and 
S50 to each of three honorable mentions. These prizes are 
over and above the payment that all authors receive for hav- 
ing their articles published in 73, 

Contest Rules 

1. All entries must be received by October 1, 1982. To enter, 
write an article descrrbing your t>est home-brew construction 
proiect, and submit the article to 73 Magazine. Any construc- 
tion article received before the October 1 deadline is automat- 
ically entered in the contest. Any entries for the first Home- 
brew Contest which meet the S50 requirement for Home-brew 
II will be automatically entered. If you haven't written for 73 
before, please send an SASE for a copy of our author's guide. 

2. The total cost of the project must not exceed $50, even If all 
parts are purchased new. Be sure to include a detailed parts 
lisL with prices. 

3. All parts used in the project must be available to the aver^ 
age radio amateur or electronics experimenter; To be on the 
safe side, include sources for any unusual components. 

4. Projects will be judged by the 73 technical staff on the ba- 
sis of usefulness, reproducibility, economy of design, and 
clarity of presentation. The decision of the judges is final 

5. Ail projects must t>e original, i.e., not previously published 
etsewhere, 

6. All rights to articles purchased for publication become the 
properly of 73 Magaztne, 

Send your entries to: 

Home-Brew II Contest 

73 Magazine 

80 Pine Street 

Peterborough NH 03458 

Winners will t>e announced in the December, 1982, issue of 
73. Hme fun! 



6 73 Magazine • JuneJ982 




®KEI\l\A/aOD 

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lam Rad^Q Dvttftt 

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lam Radio Ouli«t* 

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lam Radio Outlat 
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lenry Radio, Inc. 
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lenry Radto ^ Electronics 
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COLORADO 

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Amatttur Radio Canter 

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mAHO 

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i. ^52-0630 

ILLINOtS 

Erickson Communications 

Chicago. IL 6G630 

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INOSAWA 

Graham Electronics 

fndianapolis, llsr 46204 

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Hopaler Efectronlca 

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(812) 238 1456 

Krydar Electronics 

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KAIISAS 

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MARn AND 
Electronic Int'i Servic* 
Wheaton. MD 20903 
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Tha Comm. Center 
Laurel, M:D 20B10 
(301* 792- 0600 

MICHIGAN 
Rad^Q Supply & 
Engtnaafing 
Deifoit. V; - . 
(3T3J 435-5660 

MINNESOTA 
Midwest Amateur 
Radio Supply^ incr 
Mmneapolis. MM 55142 
(612) 521 4662 

MISSOURI 
Kam Radio Center 
Si Louis, UO 63132 
(314) 993-6060 
Hanry Radro Company 
Butler, MO 64730 
(816) 679^3127 
MldCom Electronic a 
Si. Laijis, MO 63144 
(314) 961-9990 

MiMourl Radio Center' 

Kansas City. MQ d4150 

(816) 741 811 a 

MONTANA 

Conlay Radio Supply 

Billings. MT 591 OT 

(406> 259-9554 

Communtcelions Center 
LmcoTn, NB 68506 
(403 476-7331 



NEVADA 

Amateuf Electronic 

Syppty* 

Las Vegas. NV 89106 
(702) 647-3114 

NEW HAMPSHIRE 
Tuffi ftadio ft 
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Hudson. NH 03051 
(6031 BB3-5005 

NEW IIEXiCO 
Eiactronfc Modula 



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(505) 3^ 

NEW YORK 

Adirondack Radi|»S|ippjy 

Amsiertlani. Hi 12010 
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Narrifron Radio Corp< 
Long JslanaNY 11735 
f5T6) 293-7990 

Radio World 

Ofiskany. NY 13424 
(315) 736-0184 

OHIO 

Amateur ElectronJc 

Supply 

Wicklille, OH 44092 
(216) 585-7388 
Srepco Electronic 8 
Dayton, OH 4 54 04 

(513) 234^0B7T 

Universal Amat«i^r 
Radio. Inc. 

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(614) 8&6-4267 

.= ."-. ■ -I ' : f .fc . -^ 

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Broken OK 74012 

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RadEo, Inc. 

Tulsa, OK 74119 
(918) 587-9123 

OREGON 

Portland Radio Supply 

Portland. OR 97205 
i503j 2288647 

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(215) 357-14D0 
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York, PA 17404 
(717) 854-8624 

SOUTH CAROLINA 

G.I.S.M.O. 

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(803) 386-7157 

SOUTH DAKOTA 
Burghardt Amatvur 
Cwitar 

Watertown, SO 57201 
(605) 866-7314 

TENNESSEE 
Amateur Radio Supply 
of Na»Hvlll0 

Maaison.TN 37115 
(615) 868^4956 
Memphis Amateur 
Electronic* 
Wempms.TN 38108 
(901) 683-9125 



TEXAS 

Douglas Etecfronics 

Corpus Cnu^ili, TX 78404 
(512) 883-5103 
Electronics Canter 
Dallas, TX 75201 
(214) 526-2023 

Hardin EI»Glronte« 

Fr Worth. TX 761T2 
(fl?7) 429-9761 
Madison EtectronJcm 
Houston, TX r/010 

Kennedy Aasociatea 

San Anlomo. TX 78222 
(512) 333-6110 

WASH1II6TON 

A^-^ Communtcatfons 

Seattle, WA 98^55 
(206> 364 8300 
Amateur Radio 
Supply Co, 

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(206) 767-3222 
C-COMM- 

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(206) 764-7337 

WISCONSIN 
Amateur Elaetronic 
Supply 

Milwaukee. Wl 53216 
(414) 442-4200 



"interim Dealers 



♦ 







lis KENWOOD BONUS BUCKS coupon, ^Hen presented to any factory ijuthorized deader 

TRIO KEN WOOO CGMMUNiCAnONS products, may be usedas partial payment in the 

lounl of S30 00 toward the purchase of any new KENWOOD model R-iOOO, TR'8400. or 

1-7730 wilh MC-46 or basic UP'DOWN fr^'CfOphone. Of may be used as paftiai payment 

the amount of S15 00 low as a of ar^y new KENWOOD ff*odel TS-130S. 

' 3DSE. or T5-S30S amateur ; nrodui^t The pixrchiiso mu£l be made during the 

d March V Ihrough June 15. I§a2. The customer must present a sefjarate coupon 

i^nly) for oAch of the i models tieing purchased AdUihona) coupons are awailatsle 

— lythofi^ed dea>-„-r^ iftlO-KENWOODassu^ " ^ ■^■"rionstpiiity for themaD*iity 

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<ne Offer ^ 'r^e'JSA v tajted or p led by law 

ife n e to pa^^hcipat© ti Thts coupon is e part of TRIO- 

ENWOOO COMMUNiCATlONS 'BONUS SUCKS" sates program It has no value tif^ess 

hjnitted m compliance with the rules oi that program pnot to June tS, 1982, 

KE N\A/a O D 





/ /1 982 


Model Purchased 


Date Purchased 



Deafer Name 

Customer 
Neme: 



, Cat! S*f|n 




Address 
City: 



Slat 



Customer Signature: 



TRIO-KENWOOD COMMUNICATIONS 

1111 West Walnut. Compton, California 90220 



Good Mar. 1 through Jiin. 15, 1982 



^^^^^^^^^■^ 



m 



STAFF 



Al 15, ! was busify boolleg- 
ging on 40-meter CW with my 
Hailicrafters SX-19 receiver and 
a homemade 6L6 rig. \ was pret* 
ty good al the code, but every 



The ham DXing originafly got 
me interested, but I didn't get in- 
lo that aspect of it until years la- 
ter, 1 was mostly active in my 
early days on 160m and 2 Vim. 



don't know. . .and that mtght be 
some of the reason for our low 
level of newcomers. Still, with 
the entry mto amateur radio now 
al five words per minute and the 



f 



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I 



'Jk 



Meet the new ICOM 220 MHz IC- 
/. Providing full coverage of the 220 MHz 
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etiSilife completely compatible bet^^een the tw^o 



I 



The IC-3flKnciudes a 16 button 
Touchtone® Pad and covers 220 to 224.99MHz 
both simplex and duplex operation. The 
IC-3AT system comes complete w^th IC-BP3 
NiCd battery pacJc^C wall charger^ belt clip, 
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no extra cost. 'il 




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Imagine lO-ZZS^performance and 

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Monitor repeater inputs at the flip 

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Convenient hookup points for sub* 

audible tone encoder or continuous 



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• 5 KHz step (800 T/R channels 
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ICOM Performance* 

• 5 helical resonators for outstanding 
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• Excellent receiver sensitivity 



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• 8 pin mic connector 

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All itfltcd iiH^Eiincaiiani axv appn^ximaie and '^uKjcfut tu cKiirLMv* wiiKout nf»ti«r iir obll|$A[lcin, All ICOM rfldia* ilKnincantlv r?tce«d FCC rf*|tu1«tli3ni LlmltlryR apui-ioui emUdiutiA. 






Ttm Ahrem WA5VQK 
MiCFocomponvnt Applications 

Ingmeer, Moforoia 
3501 Ed Bfuestein 8hd 
Austin rx 7B72t 



Build This Digital Vfo 

a microprocessor makes it simple 



Ed. Note: The MC6S05T2L2 microprocessor IC used in this |Mio|^t mtxsl to ordered directly from Motorola. Send a mofwy order only (no 
checks) for $1 1.50, payable to Motorola, to: Ttm Ahfens, Motorola, 3501 Ed Bluesteln Blvd., Aystin TX 78721, Attention: MalL Stop L 2787. 



This article describes a 
microprocessor-con- 
trolled vfo which may be 
used as a remote vfo for ex- 
isting stations or incorpo- 
rated into new radio-system 
designs. The vfo features 
ten battery-backed'Up 
memories, keypad entry of 
frequency, up/down scan- 
ning, a real-time clock, plus 
a liquid crystal display- 
As a remote, the vfo 
tunes from 5 to 6 MHz in 



100-Hz increments and is di- 
rectly compatible with ra- 
dios which use a 5-to-5.5- 
MHz internal vfo (e.g., 
FT'107. FT-707. etc.}. If us^ 
ing one of these radios, only 
small modifications within 
the radio are required to al- 
low the remote vfo to 
change bands at the touch 
of a finger! 

Microprocessor Selection 

The vfo is designed a- 



round Motorola's MC6805T2 
microprocessor. Within this 
multi-function chip (now 
called a microcomputing 
unit — MCU — because of 
all the integrated functions 
on board), I/O plays a very 
important part. This is the 
portion of the MCU which 
does the actual com muni* 
eating with switches, LEDs, 
bells, and whistles. The 
MC6805T2 MCU used in 
this project (we will refer to 




it as the ''JD has a small 
amount of RAM, ROM (2.5 
K bytes), a timer, parallel 
I/O lines, and one other fea- 
ture that makes it idea! in 
the radio environment— a 
built-in frequency synthe- 
sizer A block diagram of 
the synthesizer is shown in 
Fig.l(a); Fig.l(b) is a block 
diagram of the entire vfo. 

The vco signal which is 
fed back into the T2 may 
have an amplitude as low 
as one-half volt and be as 
fast as 16 MHz. With exter- 
nal pre sea I ing, the vco fre- 
quency may be consider- 
ably higher. However, any 
external prescaling will 
multiply the step size by 
the prescaling factor- 
In addition to its on-chip 
synthesizer, the T2 contains 
enough ROM to hold all the 
software needed for the vfo 
control program. In fact, 
the T2 with the vfo program 
in ROM is available from 
any Motorola distributor. 

An alternative to the T2 is 
the MC68705P3 MPU. The 
P3 is very similar to the T2 
except that it requires an 
external synthesizer and it 
contains on-board EPROM 
instead of ROM. The 
EPROM on the P3 is user- 
programmable, so you 
should use the P3 if you 
need a control program 
other than the one avail- 



12 73 Magazine • June, 1982 



able in ROM on the T2. See 
the box for further informa- 
tion on programming and 
use of the P3. 

The circuit-board layouts 
given in this article can be 
jumpered for use with ei- 
ther MPU. The figures and 
text explain where differ- 
ences occur For those who 
prefer not to etch their own 
boardSp a source for boards 
as well as components is 
given in the small box. 

Using the Vfo 

Upon power-up, the 
MCU reads the last-entered 
frequency from the RAM 
on board a battery-backed- 
up MC146818 clock chip. 
enters it into the synthesiz- 
er, and displays it. If power- 
ing up from a "dead'' sys- 
tem (no battery backup), 
garbage will be both dis- 
played and entered into the 
PLL system 

After the powerup se- 
quence is completed, num- 
bers for a different frequen- 
cy may be entered via the 
keyboard When the dis- 
play shows the frequency 
desired, depress ''enter" 
and the PLL system wit! be 
set up. By entering the fre- 
quency in this manner, it is 
also stored in RAM so that 
if a power failure should oc- 
cur, the correct frequency 
will be read from the bat- 
tery-backed-up system and 
the PLL restored- 

If the displayed frequen- 
cy is to be stored into mem- 
ory for later recall, press 
"memory" followed by a 
digit, 0-9. To retrieve a pre- 
viously stored frequency, 
press "recall" followed by 
the desired digit All of 
these memories have bat- 
tery backup. 

If you want to move up in 
frequency, press and hold 
the ''up" button. If you 
want to go up fast, press 
and hold the "fast" button 
at the same time. The fre- 
quency will go up until it 
reaches XX,999.9, at which 
time it will roll over to 
XX 000.0. To make the sys- 
tem go down in frequency, 
the same procedure may be 



SYSTEW CLOCK 



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Fig. l(al Block diagram of synthesizer on MC6805T2 MCU chip. 



followed using the "down" 
key. 

To set the time, press 
''recall" followed by 
^'memory/' At this time, the 
display wilt show EEEEEE, 
signifying that the time may 
now be entered. Enter the 
time in 2'4-hour format and 
when satisfied with the dis- 
play, press "enter." At this 
time, the data will be 
placed into the clock chip's 
registers and time-keeping 
will commence. When ''en- 
ter" is depressed, the fre- 
quency that was on the dis- 
play before setting the 
clock will be restored to the 
display. The actual PLL sys- 
tems are not disturbed by 
entering into either this 
mode or the time-display 
mode. 

To display the time with 
an update every second, 
press "recall" followed by 
"enter/' You may exit this 
mode by pressing any key, 
which will return the dis- 
play to the previous fre- 
quency. 

As you can see, the com- 
bination of the MC6805T2 
MCU and the MCI 4681 8 
clock chip provides the ra- 
dio designer with capabili- 
ties that far surpass the pre- 
viously acceptable meth- 
ods of frequency control. 
The 6818 may be omitted, 
but the clock feature, 
stored frequencies, and the 
battery backup of them will 
also be deleted. 

Vfo Circujf Design 

The rf circuitry I used is 



CVXO FEED8ACK] 



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Fig. 1(bl Block diagram of entire mfcroprocessor-controlled 
vfo. 



given in Fig. 2, while the 
MCU and its peripherals are 
shown in Fig. 3, 

As the MCU's minimum 
step is 1 kHz, some method 
of refinement must be in- 
corporated because 1 kHz 
is not adequate resolution 
in the HE bands. By using 
four of the I/O lines from 
the MCU for a voltage-sum- 



ming network, 100-Hz step- 
ping increments may be re- 
alized. The output of the 
sunnming network is used as 
an ''offset'' voltage to shift 
the frequency of the vfo. 
Because the frequency will 
be locked (basically to it- 
self), changing the main vco 
frequency would achieve 
nothing. There are, how- 
ever, two methods of 



PARTS AVAILABILITY 

The varactor diodes {02 and D3) and most of the integrated 
circuits used m this project are Motorola devices and are 
available from Motorola distributors. In many parts of the 
country » Hamrlton-Avnet Electronics is a source for these 
parts. Excludrng the LCD unit, a set of ICs for this project 
should cost between $45 and S70, depending on which micro- 
processor you select for your version. 

The f^Dl08 double-balanced mixer is available for $12 post- 
pafd from ANZAC, 180 Cambridge St., Burlington MA 01803. A 
good selection of coils and forms can be found at RADIOKIT, 
Box 411 S, Greenville NH 03048. 

Parts, as well as circuit boards, are also available from Con- 
version Dynamics, 2218 Old Middlefieid Way, Suite N, Moun- 
tain View CA 94043. Their version uses a double-sided PC 
board and an LED rather than LCD frequency display. Write to 
them tor more details. 



73Magazine • June, 1982 13 



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changing the frequency 
which would not affect the 
PLL system itself Shift the 
reference frequency, or use 
an auxiliary variable crystal 
oscillator [vxo) and then 
mix the two frequencies to- 
gether. 

The first method was 
tried initially, but due to the 
low frequency of the crys- 
tal, I could not pull the os- 
ctilator far enough off fre- 
quency to provide the 
100-Hz shift and still have 
provisions for RIT. So the 
second method, of an auxil- 
iary vxov was tried. The 
main vco tunes from 1236 
to 13.36 MHz and is then 
mixed with 18 36 MHz from 
the vxo to provide the nec- 
essary 5-to-6-MHz signal 
This method of shifting 
through 100-Hz steps may 
seem a bit crude, but sever- 

14 73Magazine • June, 1982 



Fig. 2. Rf circuitry of vfo. 



al commercial transceivers 

use this method. In fact. 
I corn's IC-730 uses this 
method to generate 10-Hz 
steps! Fig. 4, a spectrum an- 
alyzer photo, shows the ac- 
tual vfo output. 

The 18 360-MHz vxo 
crystal (Y4) was chosen be- 
cause t had one; it is a 
146.8B-MHz transmit crys- 
tal for an HT-144 Either of 
two crystals may be used in 
the oscillator. An 18360- 
MHz or an 18.860-MHz 
crystal may be selected by 
a jumper and a pultup/pull- 
down resistor on pin 27 of 
I CI (see Fig 3). The vco 
must be adjusted for the 
crystal you choose. 

If a different frequency 
range is to be covered by 
the vfo, the frequency of 
the vxo crystal must be 
changed, and appropriate 



modifications in the filters 
should be made From this, 
it may be seen that almost 
any frequency may be gen- 
erated from the vfo by sim- 
ply changing the vxo crys- 
tal. 

The MCU and Clock Circuit 

A version of the MC6805T2 

is available from Motorola 
which already contains in 
ROM the program neces- 
sary to function as a vfo, 
This part is called an 
MC6805T2L2. The L2 signi- 
fies a specific program 
within a ceramic part in 
this case, the vfo software 
The MCU is used to gather 
data from the keyboard and 
execute any function which 
is "called up." The tines 
used for I/O are represented 
by PA0-PA7. PB0'PB7, and 
PCO-PCl. Port A is used for 



both the keyboard and rrv 
lerf ace to the MCI 4681 8 
clock chip. In this applica- 
tion, the clock chip is bat- 
tery-backed-up, and when 
powered down draws only 
300-400 microamperes 
from a four'and-one-half- 
voft source. 

The B port is used to con- 
trol the four bits of the voit- 
age-summing network plus 
the read/write and control 
lines of the clock. The C 
port is used to control the 
clock and data lines of the 
liquid crystal display (LCD). 
Only two crystals are re- 
quired in this part of the 
vfo — a 4 096 MHz for the 
MCU, and a 4.194 MHz for 
the clock chip. These fre- 
quencies are divided down 
by their respective hosts for 
internal timing. 

All of the peripherals 
with the exception of the 
6818 are serial devices. This 
means that the digital data 
which goes to each part re- 
quires only two lines, a data 
line and a clock line In the 
MCU environment, I/O 
lines are at a premium; that 
is why data lines are com* 
mon to all parts and only 
the clock or enable lines are 
separated from the rest. 

The Display 

The display portion of 
the system uses the 
MCI 45000 multiplexed 
LCD driver and an 8-digit 
LCD, although only six 
digits are used. 

The MCI 45000 requires a 
total of four lines — power, 
ground, clock, and data. 
This means that the display 
may be located away from 
the main PC board. This 
makes for a lot easier con- 
struction of the total proj- 
ect! Since this is digital data 
on two of the lines, use no 
more than about a foot of 
cable. Current consump- 
tion is quite low with this 
CMOS device— about 75 
microamperes. As data is 
shifted into the 145000, 
every 8 bits will shift over 
one character from left to 
right. Even if only the right- 
hand-most digit is to be 




The antenna specialists co. introduces the DURA-FLEX 
shock nriount. It does everything a steel spring will do — whDe 
solving two special problenns. 

1 . It completely eflminates spring-generated RF noise 
in duplex radio systema 

2. It improves radiation patterns and prevents antenna 
damage in rough environments by drastically dampening whip 
vibration. 

DURA-FLEXJ" You have to flex it to believe it 



t:he antenna specie 




ign solution& 



the antenna speciatists co. 

a member of The Allen Group Inc 

12435 Euclid Ave.. Cleveland. OH 44106 

Canada: A. C. Simmonds & Sons, Ltd. 



^63 



y^S^e List of Advertisers on page J 14 



73 Magazine • June, 1982 15 



J 






♦sv 



i*CO 



■ i 






PCi — 



10 



PCS 



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ENAULC 



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£54 - 
10- *0' 



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DATfi 



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THESE JUMPER COMNEttfONS 
AT THE MCL4!ll55 SOCKET 



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F/^. >*. Using the MC745155 CMOS synthesizer 



Using the P3 

Although designed tor me MC6805T2. the vfo software was 
given the capability of using the MC68705P3 as a host MCU. 
This MCU is identical to the T2 with the following exceptions: 
• The P3 does not contain a PLL • The P3 is an EPROM type 
part which programs itself. 

In the early stages of the design, a T2 was not available and 
a '*simulation" was made by usmg a P3 and an MC145155 
CMOS synihesizer. If changes to the program are desired, yoti 
may use a P3 plus an MC145155 CMOS synthesizer to sirrru- 
late the T2, as shown in Figs. A and B. This allows you to use 
the same basic core of the program and add enhancements 
that might be useful. 

The actuat software listing for the system is available from 
me on receipt of a targe SASE plus $3.00 to cover copying 



Fig. &. 6805 T2 vs. P3 diff&rences^ 



costs. It may be entered into an MCM2716 2K by 8 EPROM for 
programming ot the MC68705P3, Fig. C Is a schematic for the 
programmer. 

The MC68705P3 MCU has the capability of programming it* 
self. By adding only one additional part (MC14040B), the P3 
can read data from a 2K by 8 EPROM and program itself from 
it. Two LEDs are used, which signify that the device has been 
1 -programmed, and 2-vefified. 

Because the hardware required to program the P3 ts so 
small, even the casual amateur/hobbyist may build a pro- 
grammer to take advantage of the MCU's capabitittes. 

Either the T2 or the P3 with the MCI 451 55 can be used with 
the circuit board presented in this article. If the T2 is used^ the 
MG145155 is not needed and two jumper connections should 
be made at the MC1 45155 socket- See Fig. A. 



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fig. C Programmer for the P3. 



10 73M^gB^ine • June, 1982 



fleadei- Service tor tacmg page *^31^ 



Is this new KDK FM2030 

the best 2 meter FM radio in the world? 




U CM M Fn 



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esY 



KDK VHP 



FM aoaa 




OPN 



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That's a pretty strong claim considering the 
;ompetitfon, 

^et's look at some of the features . , , 

• KDK continues the tradition of bciog the ultimate in VHF FM mobile 
operations. We make maximum use of multiple function, multiple shaft 
;on trots and onlv three sets of knobs are located on the front panet. 
>till many new features have been added, such as digital RIT. reverse 
lutton, memory channel readout number and morel 

•The new KDK 4 bit microprocessor chip is an in-house developed 
ioftware which makes all these new features possible. Plug in modules 
ire used for CTCSS tone and diode matrix duplexing. 

•We gave it a very heavy textured paint finish on the case and mounting 
iracket that is highly resistant to scratch in gt No more micro-thin paint 
'inishesl 

• Modem styled front panel with dials intelligently arranged so you can 
Dest utilize the multi-function, easy to handle controls. 

• Good audio with the famous KDK audio output capability of 1.5 

mm . . . you can't blow out our audio \Ci 

• RF power is a good, clean no spurious signal of 25 watts on high and 
S watts (adjustable) on low, 

• Frequency coverage 143.005 - 148.995 mhz, S/N better than 35 db 
it 1 uv input. Better than .2 uv at 12 db SI NAD. Squelch sensitivity 
letter than .15 uv. Bandwidth at -6db: +6khz, at --BOdb: +16kh2. 
Image ratio better than 70db. Double superhetrodyne. Transmitter uses 
/ariable reactance frequency modulation with maximum deviation set 
3t ±5khz. 

•Nicads for memory retention built in, nothing extra to buy. Disconnect 
the FM2030 from the power source and the memories remain I 



^y y 



INTRODUCTORY PRICE! 

Includes Tone Pad Microphone 

and all accessories. Shipping: $5.00 eastern U.S.A. S7.50 western U.S.A. 



$309 



• Easy to use mobile mount with instant disconnect knobs for fast, 
simple removal. DC Cable and mounting hardware^ spare fuse, external 
speaker plug and complete simplified instruction book includes circuit 
diagrams and even complete alignment instructions! No extras to purchase! 

• Control functions: Select memories, show memory channel number, 
or select memories and show frequency of channel, or dial frequencies 
with two speed selectable control. Instant choice of either 5 or 100 hz 
tuning steps. Band scan or frequency scan selectable. 

• Frequency shown in 5 bright LED digits. tED indicator shows when 
signal is received (unsquelched), LED indicator shows transmit. 

• Modern LED bar meter shows signal strength of received signal and 
on transmit shows relative output power. 

• Microphone includes tone pad, and up and down buttons to change 
dial frequency or memory channels. 

•A standard microphone with up-down buttons only Es available 
separately. 

• The FM 2030 is basically as easy to use as a crystal receiver with 
rotary switch frequency selection for full "eyes-on-the-road" mobile 
operation. 

• And, in case we forgot to mention it, we retained our good point-to- 
point wiring and printed circuit boards and eliminated troublesome 
relays and those pesky internal plugs that can give trouble. 

• Smaller case size: 55mm (2 3/1B") high, 162mm (6 3/8") wide, 



182mm ( 7 3/1 B") deep. 
NOW YOU HAVE JUST SOME OF THE FEATURES , . • IT'S UP TO YOU TO DECIDEl 



Write for brochure - Deafer Inquiries iffvftiill 

Warranty inforTnation available from your dealer or direct* 

Company reserves the right to chaoge spectf scat ions 

without notice. 

Exdifsive USA, Central and South American Distributor 



NOW DIRECT 
CALL TOLL FREE 



ORDER DIRECT or at your deater! 

DISTRIBUTED BY: 



800-251-4141 



Tbi miirdHf l^r anOERS ONI Vt 




Miil Qatar - COD - ivtb Cii4i 




KDK DISTRIBUTING COJNC. 

617 SOUTH GALLATIN nOAO - MADISON, TN 37115 - PHONE (615) 86S-7949 - TELEX 80-8327 



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changed, all 6 digits must 
be present to the 1 45000 (48 
bits worth). Fig. 5 is a chart 
which relates bits to digit 
segrnents. 



Fig. 3. MCU and peripherals. 

The Real-Time Clock 

The MO 4681 8 is a new 
device which not only has a 
real-time clock in it, but 




Fig. 4. Vfo output displayed on spectrum analyzer. 
te TSMagazinG • Junej982 



also contains 50 bytes of 
CMOS RAM. This makes 
the device an excellent 
choice, since data in the 
RAM may easily be saved in 
a power-down condition. 

The 6818 has a clock gen- 
eration circuit on chip 
which requires only a crys- 
tal, resistor, and two small 
capacitors to generate not 
only the time clock source, 
but also a clock signal for 
the rest of the system if de- 
sired. If the crystal mode is 
not chosen, the 6818 may 
be driven with an external 
frequency of 4*195 MHz, 
r048 MHz, or 32.768 kHz 
An interna] register tells the 
6818 which frequency it is 
on. I have found that the 
6818 draws less power 
when operating at the low- 
est frequency— 32.768 kHz. 




R 



Displayed 




1 
2 
3 

4 

5 
6 

7 

9 
A 

b 

C 

d 

E 

F 

P 

Y 

H 

U 

L 

blank 

— (dash) 

^ (equal) 

n 

r 
"(degrees) 



DIspliiy Format 
Hex Code 
D7 
06 
E3 
A7 
36 
B5 
F5 
07 
F7 
B7 
77 
F4 
D1 
E6 
F1 
71 
73 
B6 
76 
06 
IDO 
00 
20 
AO 
64 
60 
33 



Note: A decimal point can be 
added to all but the right^most 
display digit by setting b3 [seg- 
ment (3)] to a 1, 

Fig. 5. Display codes of LCD 
readout 



In fact, by using an 
MCI 4069 inverter as a crys- 
tal oscillator at 32.768 kHz, 
less power is used than by 

using a 4.194-MHz crystal 
on the 6818! As with most 
parts of this type, the faster 
the clock, the more current 
required. 

The MCI 4681 8 may be 
set up in a 12/24'hour type 
mode, plus alarms which 
may be set to interrupt at 
any time, including every 
hour, minute, or second. As 
shown in Fig, 6, there are 14 
registers required to set up 
this data, and the entire 
memory map looks like 64 
RAM locations. 

Although the MCI 4681 8 







Electronics Supply 



c 



IT-ONi\ 




LIST $2995,00 

three selectivrty posftfons 
for CW (two for FSK!) usmg 
optional filters. 
73 MHz first fF 
0.3 uV sensitivity 
full break m 

Curtis 8044 keyer available 
as option 

front panel keyboard 
ten VFO'i 
• one year factory warranty 



> 



««*J»J DRAKE 



ANNOUNCING THE NEW 




^KENV\/OCX} TS930S Call for Quote 



160-10 Meters, with 150kHz 
* 30 MHz General Coverage 
Receiver, quadruple 
conversion, digital PLL 
synthesized circuit 
All Solid Slate. 
Power input rated at 250W 
PEP on SSB, 250W DC on 
CW, 140W DC on FSK, and 
eOW DC on AM 



Autonnatic Antenna Tuner^ 

Buth-ln. 

CW Full Break-In, 

Dual Digital VFO's 

Eight Memory Channels. 

Dual Mode Norse Blanker 

r'Pulse" or 

"Wood pe ck er* ') * 

S5B IF Slope Tuning. 

One Year Warranty. 




lus Coverage 
Reception— no gaps— no 
range crystals required 
Amateur Band transmission^ 
including capability for 
JVI A RS, Embassy, 

Government, and future 
band expansions 

1 695.00 



Mmsim 



IC-720A 



Madison's 
LIST Price 

$1498 w/AC $1298 w/AC 

ICOM'S top of the line - 
9 band HF transceiver, 
general coverage 
receiver - 0.1 MHz to 30 
MHz, 12 VDC operation 
(compatible with PS15 
power supply). 2 VFO's 
built in* 




DONS CORNER 

My spy at ihe Japanese factories. Tang In Stead, h back on my good 
side. If you have fo Hewed his doings < you will recall thai he leaked the 
info on the new Kenwood TS-840s three months ago. Well take ihoie 
three monihi^ which is 90 days, add that to the number fi40, and 
presto> the Kenwood TS930s. He was RIGHT! Just premature. . ,but 
isn't that what spies are for? Tang has started rumblings about the new 
Icom HF rig that is about to debute More on that next month. 

Antennas, those things that you stick up on the roof or tower and 
then forget about, are evolving into new shapes. If you haven't 
checked yours recently, get up there and inspect the connectors, 
traps, guys, and joints. That next OX pile-up is the wrong time tc 
discover the creeping crud. What with I he new verticals and compaa 
beams, there is no reason to use wire as your primary radiator. Call us 
and ask what the best alternative is for your set-up. 

\f you and the cJan are going on a vacailoRp don't negfect the 
equipment you are taking alortg. Consider an amplifier, extra 
batteries, appropriate mobile antennas, power cords, scanning or 
DTMF mikes, mobile chargers, and so on. Thtnk about how the rigs 
wfll be used and be prepared. ^ _ . 

See you next monthl 




fcOLLINS KWM 380 

I LIST $3849.00 

I Madison's 

V Price $2795.00 



BELDGN Ks> 



ftGl.'u 
Obi Shivlil 




nGi,'u 




^ 9883 

esc/ft. 

Ho. of Cond - 8 

AWG (in mm) — 

8214 6 22 (7 N 30) 

P 3* c/h, 2-18 {16x30) f1 19) 



^- t^ ft44S 



\- 




RGi;u 




8237 
32«/fl. No. of Cond — 8 

AWG {in mm} 




— » , 9405 
-'-^ ' *6 C/#t. 



fVi213 

Mon-cpnlArmnalinfj 2-18 (20 X 30) 

8267 S*1 6 (1 C X 30i. (1 1 7) 
*3 0/ft. 

Belden Mini RG-S (9256)-19c/ft. 




ANTENNAS 





BUTTERNUT 
New HF6V 
100.00 



HYCAIN 
18AVT/WB 
100.00 



HUSTLER 
5BTV 

100.00 



TH7DXX 
HYCAIN 

349.00 





cushcroft 

A3-1 69.00 
A4-209.00 



( 



C 



713-658-0268 



• CALL FOR QUOTES 



1508 McKINNEY -« 

HOUSTON. TFXAS 7701Q 



^S&e List of Adv€ttfS&fS on page 114 



73MBgaz'me • June, 1982 19 




Main circuit board, using the MC6805T2L2 MPU If the al- 
ternate "py MPU is used, then the socket with jumpers at 
lower center would be replaced with an MC145155P syn- 
thesizer chip. The empty socket at left is for the plug-in ca- 
ble to the keypad At upper right is a metal can containing 
the double-balanced mixer. 



clock chip is not designed 
to have any I/O pins, there 
is one way in which a single 
output bit may be "con- 
structed," The SQW pin is a 
software-programmable 
clock output pin whose'f re- 
quency is a derivative of 
the 681 8's clock. The inter- 
nal register which controls 
the frequency of the SQW 
pin can not only change the 
frequency of the pin, but it 
may also turn it off. By set- 
ting the frequency of the 
SQW to some relatively 
high frequency (it is not 
really that important) and 
providing some external fil- 
tering, when the clock is on, 
the output of the filter 
represents a "one" condi- 
tion, and when off, rep re* 
sents a "zero" condition! 
This provides an extra I/O 
pin. 

Power Supply 

To supply the MCI 4681 8 
with voltage both when the 
main system is off and on, 
there need to be a few smarts 
involved. See Fig. 7, The 
trick required is to use D6 to 
initially raise the 5 volts 
from IC7 one diode drop 
higher (.7 VJ, then drop the 
supply voltage (Vcc) to 
both MCU and 6818 by sefh 
arate diodes {D4 and D7}. 
This ensures that both parts 

20 73Magazine • June. 1982 



are operating at basically 
the same voltage. For 

battery-backup operation, 
D5 is inserted from the plus 
lead of the battery to pin 20 
of the 6818. This isolates 
the batteries from the rest 
of the system and doesn't 
allow any current to flow 
back into them when the 
main Vcc is on. If you are 
using nicads, a resistor of 
appropriate value could 
replace the diode to allow 
charging during on time. 
The value of this resistor is 
of little consequence to the 
6818 when the main power 
is off because the current 
consumption of the 6818 is 
so low. 

In addition to the voltage 
differential, there is another 
consideration regarding the 
chip enable (CE) line of the 
6818. When the system is 
powered down (main pow- 
er), the CE line of the 6818 
should be brought high to 
ensure that the part is dese- 
lected. This is easily accom- 
plished by using a transistor 
(Q5 in Fig. 3) in the classical 
inverter style. The base is 
tied to the MCU Vcc 
(through an appropriate re- 
sistor), and the collector re- 
sistor is tied to the 6818 
Vcc. When the system is on, 
the collector is low, en- 
abling the 6818, but it goes 








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SECO*iDS 


01 

OZ 

03 

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OS 

06 

07 

OS 

09 , 

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OB 

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REGISTER A, 




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13 


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Fig. 6. Registers oi the MCI 4681 8 clock chip. 



•itv 




*I2V TO M,L 
POINTS 



*flV TO VCO, 
f VXO 



f Hurrcn 



♦ SV TO Itl. Wi J 
4 MCU 



""T^ ' MCirB05 ^T T — ^^~T 

I r * ^ J^ 

pfcc4i T :±ic*z 1 ^c48 

/h I^'^''^ ^ 9V TO IC3, 

11^ ^ 1 SfliB CLOCK 

CHtP 



^IPI«I4 



43V 



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Tl 



fig. 7. Power supply. The r^ulated 72 Vdc which drives this 
supply can often be derived from your transceiver. Other- 
wise, a simple 12-V-dc, 1-A source should be constructed. 



high when the system gets 
turned off. 

The Keyboard 

Because I/O lines are so 
valuable, each one com- 
monly is given more than 
one function. Of course, 
every effort has been made 
to keep the number of lines 
required to a minimum (by 
using serial-type devices), 
but there are instances 
where large numbers of I/O 
pins are required. For in- 
stance, the 4X4 keypad re- 
quires eight lines just to de- 
code the proper key. Yes, a 
two-to-four decoder could 
have been placed external 
to the MCU which would 
free up two additional tines, 
but it also would have re- 
quired an external device to 
perform that function. The 
system designer must make 
the decision here. In this 



DATA 



RCSE 






*9V 

In 



EMiBLE 



1 



LSD 



11 



0-4 



II 



14 



- J 



MSD 0-4 



/h 



IC9 

DUAL aCD COUNTEft 




ALL ttlPUTS ARC RISllWS 
EDGE THIGCEBEO 



fig. S. MHz-counter option. 

case, I chose to "multiplex" 
the data lines for the clock 
on the same I/O tines as 
those required for the 
keyboard. 

The way the software 
works, immediately after a 
key ts released, eg, the 
"enter" key, the data direc- 



DOUBLE BAZOOKA 
COAXIAL ANTENNA 

' Injection Motded Plastic Fittings for Strength, 
Durability and Weather-proofing, 

* Broad Banded Low VSWR 

* No Tuner or Balun Required 

* Feed With Any Length 50 Ohm Coax 

* Power Handling Capacity - Two Kw 

' Not A Kit - Ready For Use - Made in USA 
' Steel Eyeletts For Installation and SO-239 
Fitting Are Molded Into Antenna 

20, 15, Of 10 Meter... ..„...,„. „44 .95 ea 

[loWGP gain sysi ems 




D Payment e^c Insects _ 
D VISA QMC 

Card nq-, Bnp. 

Signature 

Name 



00X0. 




1007 Cypress ^95 

Wist Monroe. La. 71291 



VHUti 



Addreas^ 

crry 



.State. 



!fp_ 



HAVE RTTY—WILL TRAVEL 



TIJLES14 



I* y 



-^ 



•»«*.* 



Yes, now you can take it with youl The new HAL 
CWR-6850 Telereader is the smallest RTTY and CW 
terminal available, complete with CRT display screen. 
Stay active with your RTTY and CW friends even 
while traveling. Some of the outstanding features of 
the CWR-6850 are: 

• Send and receive ASCII, Baudot, and Morse code 

• RTTY and Morse demodulators are built-in 

• RTTY speeds of 45. 50, 57, 74, 110, and aOO baud 

• High or Low RTTY tones 

• Send and receive CW at 3 to 40 wpm 

• Built-in 5 inch green CRT display 

• Four page video screen display 

• Six programmable HERE IS messages 

• Pretype up to 15 lines of text 

• External keyboard included 

• Runs on +12 VDC @ 1.7 Amperes 

• Small size (12. 75" x 5" x 1L5") 

Write or call for more details. See the CWR-6850 at 
your favorite HAL dealer. 

HAL COMMUNICATIONS CORP. 



BOX 365 

URBANA, ILLINOIS 61801 



217-367.7373 



.-345 



Hl-Q BALUN 



• For f3i0€Hes yagis. ^nveftetJ 

• Replaces cemef iisiiiaiof 

• Puis powffif m amenna 

• B'oadDandHl 3-40 mhz 

• Smau hgiitMeigril and 

• I 1 ifnpeoaince ratio 

• For Ml legal p Oitf O and mete 

• Heipis eliniinai* rvi 

• Wiin SO 239 cortnectof 




I 



only $12.95 



Hl-Q ANTENNA 

INSULATOR 



Small rugged ugni^L'ighf 
weal he rpr oof 

Replaces cenier msulatgr 

Kancfles full legal power 
tin a more 

wm SO 239 connycfor 



^'^ 

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$6.95 

Hl-Q ANTENNA 
ENO INSULATORS 

Rugged Ug^ilwe^ghi. iAjec- 
tion molded ot top quality 
maierial. with hijjh didiec^ 
trie qualiUBs and excel la^nl 
weather abihty End insula- 
tors afB constructed in a 
spiral unending fashion to 
pemiit wirK^irig of foadir^} 
coils o* iiarltai winding fof 
tuned traps. 
May Dc iriva ic 

• Guv ***t^ ^fa«n inS4^y|fO*S 

• t no ot c<?nic?t uTr^uLafffS 'ck 
anii'nnas 

• Construction Qi iintcfina toa<J- 
ing coii^ w rmjltiband traps 







M.95 




MODEL a^NOS LENGT>1 

Oipolai 

DSO 80J5 

D-40 40,15 

D-20 20 

D'16 15 

D^tO 10 

SDBO S0.75 

SD-40 40 

PD-BOtO 80,40.20,10, 1& 

PD-4010 40^,10,15 

P0fi040 60.40,15 

PCMOaO 40.20.1S 

S-80 
S-40 



PBiei WITH 
H1-0 BALliN 



WITH HI Q 

CIMTCA 

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130 
66 
33 
22 
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90 
45 



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|T1.95pr 
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All anteitnasafa complete vnith a Hl-Q Baiunw Ht-0 
Antefina Center in^^lator. No. 14 antenna ««fire, cef- 
amic insulators. 100 nylon antenna Support rope rSD 
models only 50} rated fof (ull legal power. Anrennas 
may be used as an mverted V and may also be wsed 
by MARS or SWLs. 

Anieitna accessories — avail abie with anfenna orders 

Nylon guy f Ope 45(># test 100 feet $4.49 

Cefamic (Dogbon^ Type) antenna InsuEatom $1.50 pr 
SO 239 coax connectors .SS 

All prices are postpaid USA 4fl 
Available at yaur favorite dealer or order direct from 



^/sflft Dealer Inquiries incited 

Gorden 
Engineering 

BOX 2130S B. SOUTH EUCLID, OHIO 44121 



'Se^ LfStGf A(iverttsers on page tT4 



73 Ma^zlns • June, 1982 21 



HC4#S» 



T<tS*70 



2 

4 
» 



2 



1 



If 




90 
40 



10 



ie 



IT 



ly 




42 



•2L 



SELAT 



• MP^O *tV 



•ev 



TrPic*t 



3.fiK xa 



O-GO 



v: #oi( 




loa 



10 D 




* loe flfLAv 



•toe REIW 



HFUP 



ADDRESS 


DATA 


$03 


$80 


$07 


$40 


$10 


$20 


$U 


$10 


$18 


$08 


$21 


$04 


$24 


$02 


$26 


$01 


$29 


$03 



Fig. 9(a). This circuit provides automatic bandswitchirig for 
the FT-707. Alternative connections rriaybe required for the 
FT'107 or other radios. Be sure to place the f 7-707 band- 
switch in the unused position when this hardware is con- 
nected. 



complete, While in the 
time-display mode, once 
every second an interrupt is 
generated. As soon as the 
MCU recognizes this inter- 
rupt, the MCU reads the 
time from the 6818 and dis- 
plays it. As soon as that 
data is read, the MCU is re- 
configured for a keyboard 
entry. The rest of the one- 
second period, the MCU is 
waiting for a button to be 
pushed, The amount of 
time required to read the 
time [< 50 ys) is the only 
time that depressing a key 
could possibly disturb the 
actual data read But since 
any key depression would 
be greater than 20 ms, the 
incorrect frequency would 
be displayed, then immedi- 
ately jump out of the time- 
display mode and redisplay 
the last frequency. 

Band and Mode Switching 

For the vfo to be used 
conveniently with a multi- 



Ail other locations are $00* 
$ denotes hexadecimal notation. 

Fig 9(bl This program must 
be burned into the 74LS470 
PROM of bandswitching cir- 
cuit 

tion registers in the MCU 
are set up to talk to the 
6818 Data is then trans- 
ferred to the 681 8's RAM. 
As soon as the data transfer 
Is complete, the MCU is re- 
configured for inputs from 
the keyboard. The actual 
transfer time is so short 
(<300 IAS] that no matter 
how hard the operator tries, 
he cannot hit another key 
before the data transfer is 

22 T3 Magazine * June J 982 









LO 


9HHJ 


I l-F 








VFO 












1 


. 










,j 










1 


' 










_^^ 


epF 


^^ ™ 


Ji*nis 




k 
















-^ 


apf 


L -an LiTBa 






f ZQ WTna 










HWA no 






aoM 


\/ 


Jp 


-^ 


LI»F 






■ 


1 ' 










i 


b M 


^ i 






M«A no 






inn 


-^^ 


LPF 


1 




N 


AMP 












u^ 









Fig. 10. Block diagram oi a complete single-conversion 
transceiver controlled by the microprocessor vfo. 



IMK>E 5W1TCH IM TI4AMSC£lVtfl 






/ 



*5V 



u 



x — r; 



m 



SET FOfi 

APPROPRIATE 
FflEOUENCT SHIFT 



i 



,01 



wcfiftd^Tj 



lOOK 



rr 
I 



MVI04 



JE 



1 nCFLACES C34 
I m FIG 3 



Fig. n. Mode switching for rigs which display actual 

operating frequency (not carrier frequencyl 



Ha 
*I2V 



t 



CLOSE FQR,——^ — 
RJT * 

— r^* — L« 




5 



• 5V 
4 



R43 

FINE TUJ^E 



R18 

I 9K 



/ff 



ON PANEX 



|OiM« 



brii CIRCUIT 



mMOj 



SET BIT tktm FiNf TUNE FM MiD PO^ClON 

TURN OH fliT Am TUNC FOR HlAT NOTE 
TUflN Orr AND A&JUST R40 FOR SAME PITCH 

USE AS REQLPinED 



Fig. 12, Adding R IT and fine tuning to the vfo. Most of these 
components mount on the main circuit board. 



band transceiver, some 
method must be provided 
to tell the external PLL sys- 



tem which MHz segment it 
IS on. This function is imple- 
mented as follows. 



Whenever the frequency 
is sent to the on-board syn- 
thesizer, the two most sig- 
nificant digits (MHz) are 
sent serially to the data pin 
(PCO), If operating on 5 
MHz, the sequence of 
events is: (1) set up the 
5-6-MHz synthesizer, (2) 
pulse the SQW pin of the 
6818 (resets the external 
counter), (3) set the clock 
enable pin (allows clock 
tine to increment counter), 
(4) send out five pulses (for 
5 MHz), (5) clear the clock 
enable pin, and [b) continue 
with program. 

The circuit for a simple 
decoding scheme using the 
MC1451fi dual BCD count- 
er is shown m Fig 8. One 
use for the outputs from the 
counter is to provide auto- 
matic bandswitching. 

References were made 
earlier to bandswitching on 

an FT407 or FT-707. Fig 9[a) 
shows how it may be ac- 
complished By taking the 
outputs of the binary de- 
coder of Fig, 8 and running 
them into a 74LS470 Pro- 
grammable Read Only 
Memory (PROM), certain 
combinations of frequen- 
cies may be turned into 
levels which may drive cir- 
cuitry to change bands. The 
PROM must be pro- 
grammed as per Fig. 9(b). 
Unlike older transceivers, 
the FT-107 and 707 do not 
use a bandswitch which 
runs the entire depth of the 
rig. The actual switch is on- 
ly a double-pole type which 
switches relays within the 
radio By placing this switch 
in an unused position and 
adding appropriate drivers, 
the remote vfo can switch 
bands, too! 

I originally used this vfo 
with a simple home-brew 
transceiver that operates 
on both 80 and 20 meters, 
with no external hetero- 
dyne oscillator This single- 
conversion radio provides 
an excellent "simple" radio, 
with the T2 controlling 
everything, including the 
bandswitching of the filters. 



Fig, TO shows a block dia- 
gram of this radio. 

The vfo provides the ac- 
tual frequency selection, 
with the display presenting 
the operator with the car- 
rier frequency. If you are 
upgrading a standard radio 
such as Heath or Collins 
where there was an analog 
method of readout there 
will be no problem in con- 
version. But it you are 
already using a digital 
readout that displays not 
the carrier frequency, but 
the actual "talk frequen- 
cy/' then an additional 
modification must be made 
to the system. This mod will 
shift the reference oscilla- 
tor by 1.5 kHz, either up or 



MODE 


DISPLAY 


VFO 


PURPOSE 


(PC2J,0) 




FREQUENCY 




000 


3.0000 


5.0000 


INVERTED 80-20M 




3.9999 


5.9999 


AUTO REV ON 20 




14.0000 


5.9999 


MHZ NOT SENT 




14.9999 


5.0000 


PC2 1 ^ 80 
= 20 


001 


XX.OOOO 


5.5000 


FT107 MODE 




XX.5000 


5.0000 


MHZ SENT 


010 


XX.OOOO 


5.9999 


INVERTED 




XX,9999 


5.0000 


MHZ SENT 


101 


XX.OOOO 


5.0000 


NORMAL 




XX.9999 


5.9999 


MHZ SENT 


110 


aoooo 


5.9999 


80-20M 




3.9999 


5.0000 


AUTO REV ON 20 




14.0000 


5.0000 


MHZ NOT SENT 




14.9999 


5.9999 


PC2 1 = 80 

= 20 



Table t. Vfo options. MCU I/O pins PCO, PCI. and PC2 are 
strapped to 1 (-^5 V) or (groundl depending on the vfo 
mode you select 





Parts List 




Y4 


18.36 Of 18.86 MHz 




Component 


Valye (Q) 


Quantity 


RYl 


Relay (RIT) 


1 


R1,8,14 


47 


3 


01,27.10.11,13,43. 


IhF 


17 


R2.35 


22k 


2 


44,14.15;16.18.2€ 


> 
K 




R 11, 16,29 


100k 


3 


27.45.46,49 






R4 


5.6K 


1 


C3,C4 


300 pF 


2 


R6 


910 


1 


G5 


200 pF 


1 


R7.15 


680 


2 


06 


.47fjF 


1 


R9 


270 


1 


OS 


65 pF 


1 


R10 


50k pot (small) 


1 


09 


91 pF 


1 


R 12, 13, 15,26, 


15k 


7 


012,20.24,28.30 


1000 pF 


5 


27,28,30 






017,19 


82 pF 


2 


R17,R33 


Ik 


2 


021 


10 pF 


1 


R18 


750 


1 


022 


20 pF 


1 


R19 


68 


1 


023 


12 pF 


1 


R20 


56 


1 


025,31 


150 pF 


2 


R21 


a2k 


1 


029,32 


470 pF 


2 


R22 


39k 


1 


033.47,48 


Uf 


3 


R23 


20k 


1 


034,36 


10-40 var 


2 


R24,31,39, 


10k 


12 


035 


50 pF 




44-51,3 






037 


39 pF 




R32 


4.7k 


1 


038 


.47 ^F 




R34 


200k 


1 


039 


M0-40pF 




R36 


56k 


1 


040 


•39 pF 




R37 


3.6k 


1 


041,42 


2hF 


2 


R3e 


1.8k 


1 


C50 


10 ^F 




R40.41,42 


5k pot 


3 


01 


2N5484 






(2 panel, 1 PCS) 




02.3,5,6 


2N22?? 


4 


R5 


27k 


1 


04 


2N3906 




R43 


10 meg 


1 


D1A5.6 


1N914 




R53 


300 


1 


02 


MV104 




R58 


?.?k 


1 


D3 


MVB30 




LI 


150 ^H 


1 


D7,9 


irMX)2 


2 


L2 


1-2 |iH 


1 


tcio 


LM358 






(13 turns #28 Vt ' 




fCI 


•M068(^T2or 






fonn) 






68705P3 




L3,4 


6*8 fiH 


2 


fC2 


MC146B18P 




L5,e 


1.8 mH 


2 


iC3 


M0145000P 




B1 


MD108 


1 


104 


GE Display 






double-balanc^ 




105 


MC14518P 






mixer 




106 


•MC145155P 




Y1 


4.096 MHz 


1 


107 


MC7805 




Y2 


4.194 MHz 


1 


ice,9 


MC78L05 


2 1 


Y3 


•2,048 MHz 


1 


•denotes MC88705P3 option. 





73 Magazine • June, 1982 23 




Fig. 73, Main vfo PC board (foil side). 



down, depending on which 
sideband you are on By 
tapping off the mode 

switch in the rig, the fre* 
quency may be shifted au- 

tomatically 

Fig. 11 gives an example 
of how this may be ac- 
complished. In this dia- 
gram, a voltage divider is 
switched, depending on 
what mode the radio is in. 



Of course, an additional 
position on the switch may 
be used for CW, AM, etc. 
This mod must be made if 
using the vfo as a compan- 
ion for another digital rig 
which uses a 5-to-6-MHz 
vfo. 

RIT 

In almost every rig that 
I've owned, receiver in- 



cremental tuning (RIT) was 
a must for operating con- 
venience. This vfo provides 
the user with not only a RIT 
control but also a fine- 
tuning adjustment for sta- 
tions between the 100-Hz 
resolution of the vfo The 
foil pattern for all RIT com- 
ponents with the exception 
of the panel controls is on 
the PC board, including the 




Fig. 14. Display PC hoard {foil side). 



relay used to switch it in 
and out Fig. 12 illustrates 
how the RIT is imple- 
mented, (Thanks to Yaesu 
for their design.) 

Construction and 
Alignment 

I recommend that the 
vco be built first, This is the 
most difficult portion of the 
vfo, and the rest comes 
easily once this is com- 
pleted. After the vco is 
built, check its frequency 
range by turning the slug in 
coil L2. It should encom- 
pass the 1 2 J6-1 3.36-MHz 
range required. After this 
has been built, build the 
rest of the rf section 
(IB-MHz VXD and filters). 
Only after you have 5 to 6 
MHz coming out of the fil- 
ter stage should you pro- 
ceed with the digital sec- 
tion. Depending on which 
parts you are using (T2 or 
P3). select the appropriate 
jumpers and install the rest 
of the parts The 6818 fre- 



24 73Magazme • June, 1982 




— SOCKET TO 

DISPLAY 

AND 

KEYBOARD 



BATTERY 



BCD 

OUTPUTS 



R45 THRU RSI 



NC - NO 

DOTTED LINES- JUMPERED FOR MC6805T2 



Fig. 15. Component placement main board 



qtligficy may be adjusted by 
placing a counter on pin 21 . 
Trinnmer C36 should be ad- 
justed to read 4.194306 
MHz If you cannot bring it 
exactly on frequency, some 
adjustment of fixed capaci- 
tor C37 may be required. 

If you are using the P3, 
the frequency of the 
MC145155 may be ob- 
served on pin 15 of the part, 
Adjust C39 for 2,048 MHz. 
If using the T2, use a low- 
capacitance probe on pin 5 
of the MCU and adjust C34 
for 4.096 MHz. If, upon 
power-up, the unit appears 
dead, it is time to borrow an 
oscilloscope to do some 
checking. First, check the 
jumpers and power sup- 
plies. Next check to see 
that the oscillators are 
functioning properly. 

If the unit seems to 
operate properly but the 

vco will not track, be sure 
that the loop filter is prop- 



erly built and that there is a 
feedback frequency back 
to the PLL. Also, check for 
the obvious solder short. 
Figs. 13 and 1 5 are the PC 



layouts for the vfo and 
display, respectively. Figs. 
14 and 16 show component 
placement. 
Table 1 lists the available 



modes of the vfo system. 
The modes are selected by 
strapping I/O pins PCO. PCI, 
and PC2 to either -F5 V or 
ground through 15k resis- 




"- TO KEYPAD 




Fig. 16. Component placement, display board. Driver chip fits under display unit, on the 

same side of the board Display unit is elevated above the board by segments of high- 
profile IC sockets [see photos). 

73 Magazine • June, 1902 25 






f 



M 





Display board. The liquid crystal display (LCD) un/t pkfgs 
into a home-brew socket composed of pieces of two 40-pin 
IC sockets. 





Display board. This view shows how the display driver /C 
mounts beneath the LCD unit 



tors. In the first column of 
the table, a indicates the 
pin is connected to ground, 
while a 1 means the pin is 
connected to +5 V, The 
table shows the available 
modes vs. the frequencies 
produced. Also included 
are the purposes behind 
each mode. The mode is 
read at reset time on PCO, 
PCI, and PC2. 

Take it from Malnerd . . . 



Getting the Parts 

Approximate costs of the 
high-value items of the proj- 
ect are; 

• MC6805T2L2 -$1 2.00- 
15.00 

• MC68705P3-$50.00 [not 
needed if the T2 ts used) 

• MC1451 55-57 J2 {not 
needed if the T2 is used) 

• MCI 4681 8— J1 00 



• MCI 45000 -SI 2.49 

• 8'digitLCD-$26.40 
The MC6805T2 contairv 

ing the program used for 
this project is an evaluation 
part under the number 
MC6805T2L2 (ceramic case) 
and is available from any 
Motorola distributor, as is 
the MC68705P3, the alter- 
native MPU. 

The liquid crystal display 



(GE part LXD69D7R09) is 
available from any GE dis- 
tributor (Hamilton Avnet, 
etc.). 

My heartiest thanks go to 

Helge Cranberg and Mike 
Pendley, who provided me 
with some necessary rf 
savvy, and U I rich Rohde, 
who gave me some insights 
into PLL system design ■ 



TM 



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best matclied pair 
intownr' 

Matching your antenna and trajiamltter 
requires the aGcuraqy of our 1000-A Iff 
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ensures yuuTl get majdmum power out and minimum 
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You can depend on Dielectric, 
TUB MAINS SOUBCB for 

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Call us for more information and the name of 
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We're b Courage Center 
HANOI HAM sypportsr. 




^ ^ Hew Hx^lud Integrity and craftsnuooiJiip 

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26 73 Magazine * June, 1982 



O^J^GiTLC O^TTy 



m 



^ t 



•** 



*** 



***H 



*■•-• 



*^»^^, 



By popular acclaim - the leader and king of radio teleprinter communieations - the HAL 
DS3100ASR and ST6000. When combined with the MSO3100 Message Storage Option and a 
hard-copy printer, you have the premier RTTY station • Discriminating operators the world- 
over choose the DS3100 and ST6000 for their stations over any other equipment. The DS3100 
and ST6000 have set new standards of comparison for commercial and amateur RTTY data 
communications; they are representative of the high standards of quality and performance for 
which HAL is known throughout the world. Put your best RTTY signal forward with the 
DS3100 and ST6000! 

• Send and receive ASCII, Baudot and Morse code 
^ Full length 72 character tines and 24 line screen 

• True "ASR" operation — pretj^je while receiving 

• 50 Line pretype, on-screen transmit buffer 

• 150 Line receive display buffer 

• MSO3100 adds 450 lines of MAILBOX message storage 

• P31 green, 12 inch display Bcreen is built-in 

• Control functions are clearly marked on keytops 

• On-screen status indicators with real time 

• Upper-lower case ASCII with ALL control codes 

• 45. 50, 57, 74, 100 baud Baudot 

• 110, 150, 300, 600, 1200, 1800, 2400, 4800, and 9600 baud 
ASCII - full or half duplex 

• 1 to 175 wpm send and receive Morse code 

• Current loop or RS232 I/O interface 

• ST6000 has tuning oscilloscope and loop supply 

• Three BTTY shifts: 170, 425, or 850 Hz 

• Multiple active RTTY filters and detector stages 

• Crystal controlled RTTY transmit tones 

• Printers available for hard-copy of all 3 codes 

Writeor call formore details. See the DS3100, MSO3100, ST6000, andprinters at your favorite 
HAL dealer. 



I 



HAL COMMUNICATIONS CORP. 

BOX 365 

URBANA, ILLINOIS 61801 217-367-7373 



.^345 



J 



\si iHS^n 



4 k 



The IjSBGi and EBG\ 

offer performance and versatility 
for tliose wiio demand the uitimate! 



TR7A Transceiver 



• CONTINUOUS FBEQUENCY COVERAGE - 1.5 to 30 MHz full 
receive coverage. TTie optional AUX7 provides to l.S MHz 
receive plus transmit coverage of 1 .8 to 30 MHz. for future 
Amateur bands. MARS, Embassy » Govemmefit or Commercial 
frequencies (proper authorization required). 

• Full Passband Tuning (PBT) enhances use of high rejedjon 
S-pole crystal filters. 

New! Both 2.3 kHz ssb and 500 Hi cw crystal Afters, and 9 

kHz a-m selectivity are standard, plus provisions for tv^o 
additional filters. These 8-pote crystal filters in conjunction 
with careful mechanical /electrical design result In realizable 
ultimate rejectbn in excess of 100 dB. 

Newl The very effective NB7 Noise Blanker Is now standard* 

Newl Built tn lightning protection avoids damage to solid-state 
components from lightning induced transients, 

Newl Mic audio available on rear panel to facilitate phone patch 
connection. 

• State-of-tlie-art design combining solid-state PA. 
up-converslon. high-level double balanced 1st mixer and 
frequency synthesis provided a no tune-up. broadband, high 
clynamic range transceiver. 



R7A Receiver 

• CONTINUOUS NO COMPROMISE to 30 MHz 
frequency coverage, 

• Full passband tuning (PBT). 

Ne ' ' NS7A Noise Blanker supplied as standard. 

• State-of-the-Art features of the TR7A. plus added 
flexibility with a low noise 10 dQ rf amplifier 

Newf Standard ultimate selectivity choices Include the 
supplied 2.3 kHz ssb and 500 Hz cw crystal filters, and 
9 kHz a-m selectivity. Capability for three accessory 
crystal filters plus the two supplied, including 300 Hz* 
1.B kHz, 4 kHz. and 6 kHz. The 4 kHz filter, when used 
with the R7A's Synchro-Phase a-m detector, provides 
a-m reception with greater frequency response within a 
narrower bandwidth than conventional a-m detection, 
and sideband selection to minimize interference potential* 

• Front panel pushbutton control of rf preamp* a-m /ssb 
detector, speaker ON /OFF switch, i-f notch filter 
reference-derived calibrator signal, three age release 
times {pius AGC OFF), integral ISO MHz frequency 
counter /digital readout for external use. and Receiver 
Incremental Tuning (RIT). 



The ^Twrns" S 



FREQUENCY FLEXIBILrTY. The TR7A/R7A combination 
offers the operator, particularly the DX'er or Contested fre- 
quency control agility not available tn any other system. The 
'Twins" offer the only system capable of no-compromise 
DSR (Dual Simultaneous Receive). Most transceivers allow 
some external receiver control but the "Twins" provide 
instant transfer of transmit frequency control to the R7A 
VFO. The operator can listen to either or both receiver's 
audio, and instantly determine his transmitting frequency by 



appropriate use of the TR7A"s RCT control (Receiver 
Controlled Transmit). DSR is implemented by mixing the two 
audio signals in the R7A 

• ALTERNATE ANTENNA CAPABIUTY. The R7A's Antenna 
Power Splitter enhances the DSR feature by allowing the use 
of an additional antenna (ALTERNATE) besides the MAIN 
antenna connected to the TR7A (the transmitting antenna). 
All possible splits between the two antennas and the two 
system receivers are possible. 




DRAKE 



SpecHlcatiafis. avafiaUltty aM puces subject to cl^aftge wtttiflut notice or oUiflStiQA. 

your Drake dealer or write 

for additional Inforrnation. 




COMING S n; * New RV75 Synthesized VFO 
Compatible with TR5 and 7-Llne Xcvrs/Rcvre 

• FriquiRcy Syntheliea tor crystal control led 
stability • VRTO (Vuiablt Rati Tuning OsdlLator') 
adijus^ ty fling rate as function of t*jnmg speed 

• B«solutloi! to to Hi • Three programmable fixed 
f r«i|tjencies for MARS. etc. • Split or Transceivt 
operation witl) mairi transceiver PTO or RV7S 



R. L. DRAKE COMPANY • 540 Richard street;. Miamisburg, OhlD45342 • Plione 151 3) S6 6-2421 • Telex2BS-017 



Patent pending 




i 





far above average ! 



rf 



With the new TR5 



COMtNG SOON 

RV75 Synthesized VFO 

featuring the Drake "VRTO" 

- Frequer^cy SyRtJiesJiied for cr^stai-eon trolled 
statJilfty * VBTO (Variable Rate Tuning Oscillator* ) 
IJusts tuning rati as fynction of tuning speed, 
ResQ^utlon to 10 Hz • Three programmable fixed 
frequencies for MARS, etc ' Split nr TranKti ve 
operation with main transceiver FTO or RV7S 



J 



* Patent pending 



versatility and value are spelled D-R-A-K-E . . . 



lYIUAMIC 

RANGE 



The dynamic range of the TR5 is unexcelled by any transceiver in its class. The TRS's 
greater than dBnn third order intercept point (85 dB two-tone dynamic range) at 20 
kHz spacing can be achieved only by the use of a passive diode-ring double balanced 
nriixer. Drake was the first to bring this technology to the Amateur market with a 
high-level mixer in the TR7. 



When you purchase a TR5. or any Drake product, you acquire a product of the latest 
production techniques, which provide reliable performance. 

Yet with a product as sophisticated as one of today's transceivers, after-sales 
sen/ice is a must. Ask any Drake owner. Our Customer Service Department has a 
reputation second to none. 



ELIABLE 

SERVICE 



/Accessories 



Kilowatt 
"^ amplifier 



Drake is the only Amateur Radio manufacturer who offers a full complement of 
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assures compatible interfacing and styling instead of a desk full of equipment with 
a variety of styling and poor operation as a system. 

Everyone wants to be heard! The accessory L75 and its 3-500Z (1200 watts PEP 
input) and a decent antenna will do the trick* This rugged self-contained amplifier/ 
power supply will put the TR5 on an even footing with the best of them. 



Engiimeering 



The TR5 and all Drake Transceivers, are backed by the best in engineering. The TR5 
Is the result of an extensive engineering effort, combining proven past techniques 
and Ideas with new state of the art concepts. 

As a result, the TRS will not be superceded by a new model every six months. It 
represents a true radio communications value that will provide many years of 
operating enjoyment. 



See your Orake dealer 
or write for 
additional information. 



w^m 



Peatur?5, ava(Edbil% and pnces subject to cftangG witjiout nottce or ot^tifatiof). 



R. L. DRAKE COMPANY 




DRAKE 



Hff 



540 Richard St., Miamis&urg, 0hiD4534E, USA 
Phpne; t5l 31 eB6-&42l • TeleK: 2SS-01 7 



Keith Cremer AK0Q 
421 N. P/easanf HitI Bhd 
Des ^foJ^es tA S0S17 



Surviving the 
Unthinkable 

part II: some practical ideas 



In part I, I talked about 
the idea of emergency 
communications after a 
nuclear attack and the 
benefits the Amateur Ser 
vice might provide. In this 
part, we'll talk about 
specific steps that each of 
us can take First, though, 
let's set the stage: 

Imagine this situation for 
a moment: The most incom- 
petent of operators walked 
into your shack and for a 



fraction of an instant con- 
nected your receiver's an- 
tenna terminals to a high- 
voltage distribution line. 
The result was a 40-kV, 
1,000-Amp shock to the in- 
put of your receiver. There 
wouldn't be very much left 
of your sensitive input cir- 
cuits, to say the least 

This sounds like an im- 
possible situation. I only 
wish that it were truly im- 
possible. But in today's cri- 



ANT|I4«^4 FESO CABLE 



403 LVN WASHER 



PIER 



GROUND 




EARTH 

AMDREWS GROyfiDiH^ KIT 



Fig. 1. Recommended ground connections at tower base. 
30 73 Magazine • June, 1982 



sis-oriented world, the situ- 
ation is indeed within the 
realm of possibility. The 
40-kV shock is what civil-de- 
fense experts say would be 
the result of a nuclear blast 
in the vicinity of most any 
piece of unshielded wire, in- 
cluding telephone wires, 
power lines, antennas, and 
feedlines. The phenomenon 
is commonly referred to as 
a nuclear electromagnetic 
pulse (EMP or NEMP). 

This kind of pulse is so ex- 
treme in amplitude that 
many normal lightning pro- 
tectors are useless. For ex- 
ample, a typical lightning 
pulse has about a lOOmi- 
crosecond duration, with a 
5-microsecond rise to its 
peak. A high-altitude EMP 
pulse can be expected to 
have a 1 -microsecond dura- 
tion and a 10-nanosecond 
rise to its peak, That's not 
enough time for many com- 
mon lightning arrestors to 
work. 

In the following pages 
we'll talk about some of the 
EMP protective measures 
which should be taken on 
your equipment Without 
protection, sensitive semi- 
conductors would be most 
likely to fail and put you 
out of business when your 
services may be needed 
most. 



But, first, why should we 
even be concerned about 
protection? After all, any 
nuclear exchange seems to 
be so outrageously incom- 
petent on the part of world 
leaders that it seems that it 
never could happen. Unfor- 
tunately, however, we've 
seen in the last few years 
that many improbable 
things such as revolutions, 
hostage taking, etc., have 
actually occurred. 

Even though we all hope 
and pray that a nuclear ex- 
change does not occur, let 
us not underestimate the 
devastating and paralyzing 
effects of such an ex- 
change. Simply imagine, for 
a moment, a world with 
hundreds of mitlions of US 
and Russian citizens killed 
and tens of mi! lions more 
severely and untreatably 
burned, near death, and 
starving. Major cities, with 
their sophisticated hospi- 
tals, police, telephone com- 
munication systems, radio 
and television stations, 
transportation, food dis- 
tribution networks, finan- 
cial centers, and manufac- 
turing centers all eliminat- 
ed—gone—not much us- 
able left, and most likely 
too radioactive to ap- 
proach for many years to 



come. The situation might 
be reminiscent of the Cam- 
bodian experience of re- 
cent years, where a ruthless 
and irresponsible leader- 
ship evacuated the cities 
and forced an entire coun- 
try into an unnecessary di* 
saster. Imagine that situa- 
tion in your community, 
among your friends — per- 
haps worldwide! 

However, even in the 
worst of disasters, there will 
be some survivors. If not us, 
then our friends or rela- 
tives. Perhaps our children 
or grandchildren will be 
among those fortunate sur- 
vivors- There also will be 
some amateur radio opera- 
tors. Perhaps the best thing 
that w.^ can do for these 
people faced with a com- 
pletely unknown and hos- 
tile environment is to en- 
sure that they have every 
possible assistance avail- 
able to help them through 
the crisis. 

In communications, that 
assistance means that in a 
world where the estab- 
lished public system is no 
longer available, the 
technical preparations of 
amateur radio operators 
may make the difference 
between life and death for 
countless hundreds of thou- 
sands. It could be the final 
foothold in their struggle 
for survival. After all, assis- 
tance during disasters is 
one of our key elements, 
and a justification for an 
Amateur Radio Service. On- 
ly amateur radio operators 
can supply an organized 
communication system 
from almost every commu- 
nity in this country. Only 
amateur radio operators 
can supply this system with 
a substantial portion of the 
surviving equipment easily 
made operational after the 
shock of a nuclear explo- 
sion. Citizens Band equip- 
ment for the most part 
would be rendered totally 
useless by its unprotected 
reliance on semiconduc- 
tors and its tendency for 



ANTENNA 



ANTEMNA 



SPARK GAP 




SPARK GAP 



L--C.P. CLARE CO, \JBU-Z-2tffO 
[ REACTION TIME GAS GAPS 
(OR EQUIUALEMT) 



COAXUL CAPLE SHIELD 



HEAVy WALL FERROUS CONDUFT 
3 INCH JVllNlMUiyl OLAMETEff 



COUMTERPOISE 



EARTH 



fig. Z Suggested use of gas gaps in an antenna balun. Note that this approach uses a thick- 
wall conduit around the coax. 



total disorganization even 
io times when there is no 
crisis. 

The job of amateur radio 
equipment protection is 
easy once we realize that it 
does not need to be diffi- 
cult or complex. Most any 
technical or non-technical 
operator can accomplish 
some EMP protection on 
short notice, with a very 
small outlay of money. The 
objective is to safely bypass 
your equipment and any in- 
coming connections when 
they are presented with an 
EMP signal composed of 40 
to 50 kV and current in the 
order of 1,000 Amperes. 

(t is interesting to note 
that much of the EMP pro- 
tective equipment avail- 
able today has been de- 
signed since our country 
stopped testing nuclear 
weapons. As a result, none 
of it has received the only 
true test of reliability 
— on-the-job testing — al- 
though EMP simulators are 
used. 

Because of the lack of 
widespread testing capa- 
bilities, the only really prov- 
en method of protection is 
also the simplest Under 
this approach, all equip- 
ment to be protected 
should be disconnected 
from all external wires and 



AT RECEIVER 



TO 
ANTENNA* 




PANEL PEN£TRATIC>N 



ymmnji , 



&W\li^^(!i 



CONVENIENCE BOX 



DIODE BRIDGE SERIES 
450 FCC PROTECTOR^ 
OR EQUIVALENT 



\ 



RF GASKET AfiO BOLTEO 
COVER 



SHIELDED ENCLOSURE 



fig. 3. Coaxial tee protectors used in a receiver circuit 



AT TRANSMITTER OUTPUT OR AT AMTEIVNA 



TO ANTENNA 






^ 



TEE 



r 




SOLID PANEL 
PENETRATION 



FISCHER CUSTOM 
COM*^UNlCATiONS 
(FCC) GAS GAP 
SERIES 250 OR 
^50 PROTECTOR 
OH EQUIVALENT 

-SHIELOEQ 
ENCLOSURE 



fig. 4. Coaxial tee protectors shown in a transmitter circuit 



stored in a thoroughly 
sealed and shielded box. 
The box should have no 
holes where any kind of 
energy can get in and 
should have a skin made of 
18- to 26-gauge metal to 
provide magnetic shielding 
for the equipment inside. 

Since the civil-defense 
planners expect to have 
Americans moved to a safe 



location 30 to 200 miles 
from their community, de- 
pending on the nature of 
threat to that community, 
the equipment should like- 
wise be moved to a location 
30 to 200 miles from the 
community. 

Keep in mind when stor- 
ing your equipment that 
power supplies also should 
be shielded and stored with 

73 Magazine * June, 1982 31 



3-4 IN CONDUIT MISERS 

A 



r 



jy^* 'tf 



SOLID ^ANEL SeCTiOM 




ADD tMP GROLiStG 
4/0 C^U. COM-D MIN 
ON TPP DF SHELTER 



.4 IN V. UP 



IVEHT AND ORim 
* SYSTEM 



ABdV£ »0OF 
leuRlED) 



Fig. 5, Suggested layout for communications room with 
remote operation of equipment 



NOTE 4 



SPLJT 

SL£E¥E 
CLAIiPS 



tNCOW^G 

FEED£H 

CABLE 



NOTE I 









NOTE 7 



■■ JIJ^JJL— J 






SOtDEff dft tJSE $*»L1T 
SLEEVE CLAMP 



QftUQE COPPER SHEETING 



F'&«fOD PROTECTOR HOUSmG 
NOTE & 



LEAD SMEATH 
TEniilNATtNG 
CftdLE 



NOTE 6 



F/g, 6. 7h/s IS one recommended method of protecting a 
telephone cable system against EMP transients. Note the 
heavy emphasis on shielding. The numbered notes refer to 
detailed construction specifications. 



your equipment because 

they are lust as susceptible 
to an EMP transient signal 
as is your sensitive trans- 
mitting and receiving 
equipment, A publicly-re- 
leased 1970 Department of 
Defense publication sug- 
gests that if equipment 
must be used during a 
threat of nuclear attack, at 

32 73 Magazine • June, 1982 



least one set of equipment 

(and likely more) should be 
held in reserve in the event 
of any equipment failure. In 
the ideal case, ham opera- 
tors should have a reserve 
available due to equipment 
failure caused by every suc- 
ceeding attack. 

Good grounds are very 
important to EjMP protec- 



t 



-Wrtr 



^\ 



"-*t— r 






m - m J 



r 



« 



ir 



^ 



METAL OKiOE V4«tST01l 



Fig. 7. This is a typical vartstor installation applied to a 
fluorescent tighting circuit 



JUNCTION eox 



QROONO WIRE 




WOTOH 



mCTAL OKlOE 
VARlSTOFtS on 

EOUIVALENT 



Fig. 8. This is a suggested circuit for EMP protection of a 
J-phase, 4-wire motor using metal-OKide varistors (MOVs) 
connected between each hot wire and ground. 



juMcttON mojt 



GROUHD lA^lRf 



T- 

^flexeblE conouit 




NEUTRAL 



MOTOR 



IIETAL OXIDE 
VARESTOR& IM* 

EOUIVALENT 



Fig, 9. Single-phase motor protection using MOVs between 
hot wires and ground. 



tion, and antennas should 
be well grounded. But a 
smart operator would keep 
a longwire and tuner stored 
as if to be used for Field 
Day for, in any emergency, 
the antennas can be expect- 
ed to take the brunt of the 
effects and may need to be 
replaced in the fastest time 
possible. 

The Department of De- 
fense publication EMP Pro- 
tective Systems suggests 
several approaches which 
should be used if you're go- 
ing to shut down for a while 



in anticipation of an attack. 
First you should open the 
master power switch at your 
service entrance. Second, 
all circuit breakers should 
be opened and all critical 
equipment should be turned 
off or disconnected. 

When the equipment and 
power are to be restored, all 
circuits should be checked 
for arc-overs or damage be- 
fore power is restored Be 
sure to disconnect tele* 
phone and cable television 
connections, because the 
advice indicates that there 







The response to our S100 
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Converters and Model 800 
Super Terminals was truly 
impressive. More Robot SSTV 
Scan Converters and Robot 
terminals were purchased 
than in any like period 
in our history. 

To encourage the continued 

growth of SSTV on the 

General Class Phone 

Bands, Robot is extending 

our $100 Cash Rebate 

offer on our Model 4Q0s 

and 800s another 60 days 

to July 31, 1982. 

Now is definitely the 

time to consider SSTV 

for your station. Prices 

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there's never been 

more SSTV stations 

I to work, and there 

i have never been 

1 more frequencies 

available for SSTV. 

The picture 

telephone of the 

future is here 

now for the 

amateur radio 

operator. See it 

at your Robot 

dealer today. 



ItRf*^' 



SS-^^ 



^*^ 



ep**?^ 



|T*^^ 



f#rti*' 




'"^**»* 



i»rs 



repfO 



5loW 



Scoi* 






ad as 



it apP 



eare 



d if^ 



M3f 



ma^a^ 



jneS- 



6^^ 



lion 



of or*9^ 




p^54 



ROBOT RESEARCH INC. 
7591 Convoy Ct., San Diego, CA 92111 

(714) 279-9430 



World Leaders in Slow Scan TV, Phone Line TV and Image Processing Systems. 



could be a problem with 
any wire coming into your 
home. Since the EMP 
energy in long overhead 
wires can be extremely 
hazardous, be sure people 
stay away from these wires 
during a time of possible at- 
tack. 

If you must have some 
radio equipment operating, 
dig out your old tube-type 
equipment and use it. 
Tubes are much less sensi- 
tive to high-voltage shocks 
and are more likely to re- 
cover It is felt that less 
protective shielding is nec- 
essary for broadcast receiv- 
ers with loopstick antennas 
or receivers with short an- 
tennas, including two-meter 
equipment. Again, how- 
ever, because there are so 
many unknowns, a wise op- 
erator would most likely 
consider any equipment in 
full use to be vulnerable. 

More advanced EMP pro- 
tective measures which 
allow more operating versa- 
tility also have been pub- 
lished under the name of 
the Defense Civil Prepared- 
ness Agency and may be 
obtained from the Federal 
Emergency Management 
Agency in Washington, DC 
(ask for publication TR-61- 
B). These approaches to the 
problem center around the 
use of gas-gap arrestors, 
metal -oxide varistors 
(MOVs), coaxial tee pro- 
tectors for antenna cables, 
and improved grounding. 
Some of their suggestions 
are described here, so you 
can start on your protection 
right away. The approach 
requires some expense and 
would be used if you would 
anticipate operating during 
a nuclear threat. 

Improved grounding of a 
tower is extremely impor- 
tant for supplying a low- 
impedance path to ground 
for EMP current. The sug- 
gested way to accomplish 
this is shown in Fig, 1. The 
tower should be connected 
to the ground rods using 4/0 
wire, 

An alternative is to install 
20 radials about 12 to 18 

34 73 Magazine • June, 1982 



U] 



m 





1 *^^ 


--* 1 


( 1 
















1 1 f-i n F-. 1 


L U A U 




U\ 



tbi 




AC 





tet 



it 



e- 



FIRING' CrRCUlT 

z 



SCR 



LOAD 



Fig. 10. Various EMP protective circuits for several typical circuits. 



inches below the surface, 
using Vi-inch copper tub- 
ing. The approach could get 
very expensive at today's 
copper prices but would 
provide an undisputably 
super ground for your ver- 
tical. Be sure to connect the 
outside of your antenna 
feed cable shields to the 
ground. Any control cables 
going up the tower should 
be shielded in threaded 
conduit so there is a perfect 
conductive shield all along 
the. .line. 

A particularly sensitive 
part of an antenna circuit is 



a balun at the antenna feed- 
point. The best way to pro- 
tect a balun is to provide 
"zero reaction time'' gas- 
gap arresters in parallel 
with all balun capacitors 
and inductors. Be sure to 
have the breakdown volt- 
age of the gas gap higher 
than that which you would 
expect under normal opera- 
tions, even under unusually 
high swr conditions. Gaps 
can have breakdown volt- 
ages ranging from 220 volts 
to 30 kV and have current 
ratings ranging from 3,000 
Amps on up. 



The amount of time that 
any one gap arcs over is a 
factor to be considered 
when selecting the gap. 
Almost any gap can sustain 
a large number of low-cur- 
rent arc-overs, but only a 
few very-large-current arc- 
overs during its life. The 
specifications for each gap 
should be consulted if it is 
also to handle lightning-ar- 
resting chores in addition to 
EMP protection. Also, most 
gaps capable of EMP pro- 
tection are labeled as such. 

The characteristic ca- 
pacitance of each gap is of 



MOV S 10 JOULt 




REMOTE LOm 



MOV £ 10 JOULE 



CUSTRI&UTlOhl 
PANEL 



fl •I20VAC flELAV 

LA 'LIGHTNING ARRESTOR , POLE TVPE 

E - ELECTRIC OPERATOR 



v.^ 



i>^^ 



j"^ 




c^ 



^ 



MOV S 40 

JOULE 






Fig, 11. Full-blown EMP protection for supplying power to commur)ications equipment 



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73 Magazine • June, 1982 35 



^•m 



umi 



^ 



£{hJrPll£lffT 
CASE 



t r 



:J 



r 



m 



C^RCUIT 



f/g, TZ Sw/tch/ng diodes may be used to protect very short 
wires. Use 1N3653S and a 0.1-piF, 500-volt capacitor. 



considerable importance in 
rf circuits since the inter- 
electrode capacitance be- 
tween gap electrodes can 
cause additional capaci- 
tance to be put into the cir- 
cuit along with the gas gap. 
This capacitance can be on 
the order of 2 to 15 pF or 
more, depending on the 
type of gap. The capaci- 
tance can be reduced by 
connecting two gaps in 
series. If you use that ap- 
proach, be sure to put a 
1 -megohm or higher resistor 
(about 1 Watt) across each 
gap to equalize the voltage 
between gaps Keep in 
mind, too, that connecting 
two gaps in series roughly 
doubles their breakdown 
voltage An example of the 
use of gas gaps in an anten- 
na balun is shown in Fig. 2. 

At the transmitter or re- 
ceiver you may use a gas 
gap or tee protector as 
shown in Fig. 3. The diode 
shown here is a silicon type. 
While this diode has a fast 
reaction time, it may not be 
able to sustain the needed 
current, and should be pre- 
ceded by a gas gap at a 
point closer to the antenna. 
Fig 4 shows a gas gap con- 
nected in a transmitter cir- 
cuit 

If you want to go first 
class and prepare the entire 
shack (Fig, 5X you could be 
in for a very expensive proj- 
ect, which may not be nec- 
essary if you can shut down 
your equipment as dis- 
cussed above However, if 
you wish to take that step, 
the FEMA recommends 
that the shack should be 
completelY encased in 18- to 
2Crgauge galvanized sheet 
metal! To provide com- 
plete protection, the treat- 
ment includes the door and 
ventilation facilities. The 

36 73 Magazine • JuneJ982 



sheet metal should be fold- 
ed at the seams and sol- 
dered, with a strip of tinned- 
metal tape covering the 
seam. 

Telephone landlines 
should be brought into the 
shack via 50 to 300 feet of 
conductive conduit which 
is welded to the enclosure 
at the point of entry. The 
lines should be terminated 
in gas gaps, metal-oxide 
varistors, or both. Fig. 6 
shows an example. Even 
your lighting system should 
have MOV protection as 
shown in Fig. 7\ 

Ac power supply lines 
should have MOVs at all 
critical points, FEMA 
recommends that MOV rat- 
ings should exceed the 
stored inductive energy of 
the preceding transformer 
and also should exceed the 
no-load transformer cur- 
rent. Typical varistors have 
ratings of 40 joules (some 
are in the range of 10 to 200 
joules] and should be in- 
stalled at 40 joules per 
phase of the ac line. Four 
lO-joule varistors connect* 
ed in parallel will provide 
the needed 40-jou!e protec- 
tion. Electrical distribution 
boxes and control boxes, of 
course, should be thorough- 
ly shielded FEMA recom- 
mends that doors and open- 
ings should be fitted with rf- 
shielding gaskets and con- 
ductive epoxy. 

Don't forget the ventila- 
tion system, where all 
motor wires and switches 
should be thoroughly 
shielded and protected 
with MOVs, Some additiorv 
al circuit protection ap- 
proaches may be seen in 
Figs 8 through 12. 

Of particular importance 
is the emergency generator 
to be used, All important 



EMF Prpt^ction Equipment Sources 

Some EMP protective devices are not easily obtained. 1 
have found that even a local distributor cannot always obtain 
information about them. Following is an updated list of 
sources. Those with asterisks (*) have expressed their inter- 
est in selling the equipment by sending me information when I 
specjfically requested information about EMP protection. 



*C. P. Clare Co. 
3101 West Pratt Avenue 
Chicago I L 60645 

Dale Electronics, Inc, 
Box 609 
Columbus NE 68601 

* Emerson and Cuming, Inc, 
869 Washington Street 
Canton MA 02021 

' Fischer Custom 
Communications 
Box 581 
Manhattan Beach CA 90266 

General Electric Company 
Electronic Comp. Sales 
Operation 
1 River Road 
Schenectady NY 12306 

General Semiconductor 

Industries 

2001 W. Tenth Place 

Tempe AZ 85281 

•Joslyn Electronics Systems 
6868 Cortona Drive 
Goleta CA 93017 

Lectro Magnetics 
6056 W. Jefferson Blvd. 
Los Angeles CA 90016 

E. A. Lindgren and 

Associates 

4515 N. Ravenswood Avenue 

Chicago I L 60640 

Ray Proof Corporation 
Keeler Avenue 
NorwalkCT 06856 

•Shielding Technology, Inc. 
(Division of Chomerics) 
970 New Durham Road 
Edfson NJ 08816 

Technical Wire Products 
129 Dermody Street 
Gran ford NJ 07016 

*Technit {EMI Shielding 
Division) 

320 North Nopal Street 
Santa Barbara CA 931 03 

Topatron, Inc. 

Box 967 

Costa Mesa CA 92827 

Tf anstector Systems 
532 Monterey Pass Road 
Monterey Park CA 91754 



Gas gaps and other 
transient protectors 

Gas gaps and other 
transient protectors 

Conductive adhesives 
Rf gaskets 
Rf shielding 

Coaxial tee protectors 



Metal-oxide vadstors 
(MOVs) 



Gas gaps and other 
transient protectors 



Gas gaps and other 
transient suppressors 

Rf shields 



Rf shields 



Rf shields 



Conductive adhesives 



Rf gaskets and shielding 



Rf gaskets and shielding 



Rf gaskets and shielding 



Transient suppressors 



wiring should have MOV 
protection Shielded con* 
ductors should be used for 
best results and the shields 
should be grounded, ■ 



Acknowledgement 
The basis for Figs. 1 through 6 
and 8 through 11 Is EMP Pro* 
tective Measures, Defense Civil 
Preparedness Agency, 1976. 



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.See usi =r Ad^^rose,, pn pag^ ) ,4 73 Magazine • June. 1 982 37 



i 



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9 

A Split Personality 
fortheKDKFM2015R 



A simple modification to 
your KDK FM2015R 
will give you the capability 
to receive on one frequency 
Stored in memory and 
transmit on another This 
modification gives you the 
newer FM2016'5 capability 
to operate with nonstan- 
dard offsets without an 
additional crystal. It re- 
quires two diodes, a piece 
of wire, no holes, and less 
than half an hour. The rig 
may easily be returned to 
original configuration 
whenever desired. 

A different form of this 
mod was described in some 
Amateur^Wholesale Elec- 
tronics notes concerning 



MARS-CAP modification, 
so I can't take credit for the 
original idea. Til first de- 
scribe how the modifica- 
tion functions, then go 
through a step-by-step mod- 
ification procedure. 

The resulting frontpanel 
performance is as follows; 
Select Mode A. With the 
memory-select switch at 
OFF, you have simplex op- 
eration on the dialed-in and 
displayed frequency. Se- 
lecting memory position 2 
will allow you to receive on 
the frequency stored there, 
which is displayed as usual. 
When you transmit, how- 
ever, the memory internally 
shifts to the frequency 



stored in channel 1 . This fre- 
quency is displayed while 
transmitting, and the dis- 
play shifts back to your 
channel 2 receive frequen- 
cy when the mic button is 
released. 

Channels 3 and 4 work 
the same, with channel 4 
functioning as the receive 
channel, switching auto- 
matically to the frequency 
stored in channel 3 on 
transmit. If either channel 1 
or 3 is selected, simplex op- 
eration on those channels is 
the result- All that for only 
two diodes! 

Here's how it works: On 
transmit in the unmodified 
rig, a transmit oscillator is 



diode-switched on by +9 
volts from the front panel 
MODE switch. We locate 
the wire which runs to the 
"A" oscillator position 
(which has no crystal in- 
stalled) and run switching 
diodes from there to two 
places. 

The first diode goes to 
the simplex crystal position, 
activating it on transmit 
The second diode goes to 
one of the two memory- 
select lines (A(3 and A1) 
which select the memory 
channel. In an unmodified 
rig, the same memory fre- 
quency is used on both re- 
ceive and transmit- If you 
trace out the schematic, 





Photo A. 
40 73 Magazine * June, 1982 



Photo S, 



you will see that in the 
original configuration when 
memory position 2 is front- 
panel selected, -h9 volts is 
routed through this mem- 
ory switch to memory- 
select line A1 . Or, if memory 
position 3 is selected, A0 
is taken high. Memory posi- 
tion 1 requires both AQ 
and A1 to be high, and posi- 
tion 4 requires neither to 
be high. If we modify things 
to make A(/l high on trans- 
mit only, then memory po- 
sition 4 on receive becomes 
3 on transmit, and 2 be- 
comes 1 on transmit This 
switching is done with 
diodes to avoid interfering 
with other functions. 

To perform this mod, 
remove both top and bot- 
tom covers from the rig. 
With the rig right side up, 
locate the three crystals on 
the transmitter board. (See 
Photo A and ignore the 
fourth crystal which I in- 
stalled for another offsetj 
A terminal post corre- 



sponds to each crystal posi- 
tion. A yellow wire is con- 
nected to the first unused 
crystal position, which is 
the fourth one in from the 
outside edge of the board. 
The pencil in the photo is 
touching this terminal. 

Note that this wire is con- 
nected to the "A" MODE 
switch position and is 

switched to +9 volts on 
transmit. Remove the wire 
from this terminal post. You 
will run two diodes from 
this yellow wire, and you 
will need to mechanically 
secure this junction some- 
how. I slipped a piece of 
spaghetti over the terminal 
and tied the wire/diodes to 
it. However you do it, the 
first diode is soldered from 
the yellow wire to the first 
crystal position's terminal 
(the one with the brown 
wire), The diode points at 
the brown wire (cathode to 
brown wire) and will acti- 
vate the simplex oscillator 
on transmit 



The second diode's 
anode is also soldered to 
the yellow wire. At this 
point, the yellow wire 
should form a "flying tie 
point" with the two diode 
anodes. Attach the cathode 
(point) of the second diode 
to a length of hookup wire. 
Route the free end of the 
wire toward the front of the 
radio to the control board 
and connect it to the A(J 
pad. This control board is 
accessible from the bottom 
of the radio and is located 
near the front panel. See 
Photo B The pencil points 
to pad AO. The wire at- 
tached to the pad is the one 
I added for this mod. 

The AQ and A1 pads are 
designated as such on the 
component side of the 
board and have white/ 
brown (A0) and white/ 
black (A1) wires attached to 
them on the component 
side- This completes the 
modification. 



Verify that the rig wt 
operate now as described 
earlier. This mod is totally 
"safe" in that the rig can't 
be harmed by incorrect 
front-panel switch settings. 
MODE switch positions B 
and C are still available for 
nonstandard offset crystals 
if desired The rig's opera- 
tion in all other respects is 
unaffected. 

The only problem I en- 
countered was that the 
simplex transmit oscillator 
didn't function until the 
yellow wire and diodes 
were isolated from the 
fourth oscillator terminal as 
1 have described. If you feel 
like experimenting, leave 
the yellow wire connected 
and solder the diodes di- 
rectly to the terminal If it 
works (if the transmitter 
puts out power), then you 
win. If not, then isolate the 
wire/diodes as 1 described. 
Please send an 5ASE if you 
have any questions. ■ 



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See Ltst oi Attv^ftt^ers on fjage f td 



73 Magazine • June, 1 982 41 



Building for Beginners 

happiness is a hot soldering iron 



PauiM. Danza^Nlii 
2 Dawn Road 
Norwsfk €106851 

(have authored several 
short construction ar- 
ticles in the past year or two 
and each time their publica- 
tion was followed by a 
flurry of letters asking for 
help in selecting parts and 
building the circuit This 
mail suggests that a number 
of hams without very much 
electronic construction ex- 
perience would still like to 
home-brew their own. 

For this reason, I have 
put together a set of sugges- 
tions and hints which an- 



«200fl 




9Q20n 



4-10%] 



swer the most commonly 
asked questions. The next 
time you see a circuit or 
gadget described in 73 or 
elsewhere, don't be shy — 
go ahead and build it! 
You'll be delighted with 
the results. 

Where Can I Get the Parts? 

The most critical part of 
building anything these 
days is obtaining the parts. 
Years ago, the corner radio 
store carried almost any- 
thing you wanted, and if 
you lived in a metropolitan 
area you could always go 
down to "radio row" where 
there was a cluster of such 



sioan 



iO^aooa ^^— 









95ooa 
9^50 a 




IO,OOOJi 




to. 5000 




M^QODA 



i2.oooa 



Fig. 1. Standard resistor values. Those in boxes are standard 
commercially-available resistors. 

42 73Magazme • J one J 982 



stores. Today, your best bet 
is either the mail<jrder ads 
in the back of this magazine 
or the Radio Shack chain of 
stores. Radio Shack carries 
a line of the most common- 
ly used parts and has 
stores scattered throughout 
the country. 

The mail-order advertis- 
ers in the back of this maga- 
zine usually list common 
parts and prices for immedi- 
ate order- Most of them of- 
fer catalogs, either free or 
for the postage, and are 
geared up to ship your 
order within a day or two 
after receipt. They have 
been advertising for many 




PtNl 



IttOTCH 



mut 




LARSE 
NOTCH 



t^m i 




9MALt 

HOTCrt 



Fig. 2, IC pin iocations. 



years, and the acceptance 

of their ads by 73 on a 
continuing basis shows 
that they deal fairly with 
their customers. 

Try to take advantage of 
the "two-for" offers. Even if 
you have no immediate use 
for the extra parts, keep 
them around and you will 
probably find a use for 
them in some future con- 
struction project 

Resistors and Capacitors 

Unless the magazine arti- 
cle states otherwise, use 
half-Watt resistors. They 
are most commonly avail- 
able, and if a higher watt- 
age is needed, the arti- 
cle will say so. If you are 
squeezed for space, quar- 
ter-Watt units can be 
used — again, as long as 
the article says nothing to 
the contrary. 

Don't worry about the 
seemingly oddball values 
specified. Resistors general- 
ly come with 20%, 10%, 
and 5% tolerances. Using 
10k Ohms as an example, 
Fig. 1 shows the relation- 
ship between the standard 
values and these toleranc- 
es. Today, most people use 
10% values primarily be- 
cause they are the most 
commonly available, [f the 




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73 Magazine * June, 1982 43 



article does not say any- 
thing else, you might stick to 
10%. You can always use a 
resistor with a better 
tolerance (10% instead of 
20%, or 5% instead of 
10%) If you need 5% and 
can find only 10%. buy a 
handful of 10% resistors 
and check them with an 
ohm meter to select one that 
falls within ±5% of the 
value required. 

Capacitors have both a 

value and a voltage rating. 
You can always use a cap 
that has a voltage rating 
higher than the amount 
needed. For most capaci- 
tors, you must stick to the 
value needed but you can 
always use the farger-than* 
specified electrolytic cap 
when it is used for bypass- 
ing or filtering a power sup- 
ply voltage. Just be careful 
to wire it in with the polari- 
ty shown in the schematic. 

Transistors and FETs 

Generally, you will have 
to stick to the type 
specified in the article. Sub- 
stitutes can be used and 
you can pick a substitute by 
looking at the substitution 
guide printed by a number 
of suppliers and distribu- 
tors. Radio Shack, GE, and 
Motorola all have hobby 



Piiii 




lines of transistors and sub- 
stitution guides where you 
can look up the device you 
want; the guide will give 
you their substitute num- 
ber When you do substi- 
tute, be careful of the con- 
nections. Often a substitute 
will be very close to the 
ofigmal part electrically 
but will have a different 
mechanical package and/or 
lead arrangement. 

Integrated Circuits 

Let's assume that the cir- 
cuit you are building uses a 
very common amplifier 
known as the 741 There are 
perhaps twenty versions of 
this amplifier, with twenty 
different part numbers, 
Each of the part numbers 
includes the digits 741 , with 
the rest of the digits telling 
you the temperature range 
and mechanical package. 
For most uses we don't have 
to be concerned about the 
temperature range, but the 
pin numbers for connecting 
to the amplifier are very 
much of interest Compare 
the pin numbers of the 
amplifier as shown in the 
schematic with the pin 
numbers of the actual part 
you buy. 

Occasionally, the article 
will specify an amplifier 
such as the 741 and show it 
as a single amplifier in an 
8-pin package. You might 
be able to obtain only a 
dual 741 or two 741 amplifi- 
ers in a 14-pin package. This 
is perfectly OK; just ignore 
the second amplifier. 

Integrated circuits are 
available most commonly 



pi» t 




PltlNrED CIRCUIT BDANO 



^COPPER LAND 



fig, 3, Pin 1 transposition. 

44 73 Magazine • June, 1982 



in "in-line" packages having 
8, 14, or 16 pins. A round 
dot usually marks pin 1. 
Sometimes a notch tells 
you where pin 1 is, and oc- 
casionally you have to cope 
with a dot and two notches. 
As Fig 2 shows, the dot 
takes precedence over the 
notch, and if there is a 
notch at both ends of the 
package, the larger notch 
tells you where pin 1 is. 

Unlike tubes or transis- 
tors, the manufacturer's 
data sheets usually picture 
integrated circuits from the 
top. Therefore, when you 
are wiring them from the 
underside, remember that 
pin 1 is now on the other 
side of the package as seen 
from the bottom of the cir- 
cuit board (Fig. 3). 

Diodes 

Power-supply-type di- 
odes have both a current 
rating and a voltage rating. 
You can substitute any di- 
ode which has a rating 
equal to or greater than the 
original numbers. Small sig- 
nal diodes used as switches 
usually can be substituted 
for at will. Most ham cir- 
cuits use a maximum of 12 
volts (sometimes labeled 
13.6 volts if the equipment 
is for mobile use). There- 
fore, if the circuit calls for a 
small signal silicon diode, 
almost any other silicon 
diode will do. Fig. 4 shows 
the most common markings 
of the diode package. 



*4 

f 



•«. 



CI 



^^ 







Zener diodes, used in 
voltage regulators, have 
both a voltage rating and a 
power rating. You must use 
the voltage rating called 
for, but you can always use 
a higher-power-rated diode. 

Power Supply Connections 

Fig. 5 shows a simple 

2-transistor amplifier. With 
today's solid-state circuits, 
usually only one power-sup- 
ply voltage is used and, as 
shown in the figure, you 
simply tie the identically- 
marked points together and 
connect them to the volt- 
age required. If the sche- 
matic does not show differ- 
ently, the power-supply 
return lead (in this case 
the minus 9-volt lead) is 
tied back to all of the 
ground terminals. 

}acks 

Here you can substitute 
at will. ]ust remember that 
the most commonly used 
jacks have one side ex- 
posed and will connect to 
the chassis (ground) if they 
are not insulated by wash- 



w 



SCHEMATIC 
SYMBOL 



BAND. 






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TTPICAL 
COMMEHCmU-T 
MARKED 
DIQO£S 



Fig. 4. Typical diode mark- 
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m 



THESE TWO CmCUJTS ARE IDENTICAL 



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73 Magazine • Junej982 45 



WIRE GAUQE 


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Fig. 6. Wire sizes. 

ers. If you need a two-con- 
ductor jack, and one lead is 
not supposed to be ground- 
ed, vo*J will either have to 
mechanicarty insulate the 
outside of the jack from 
ground or get a three-con* 
ductor jack where you use 
the two inner conductors 
and ignore the third 
(grounded) lead. 

Cable 

If the circuit you are 
building is not used at VHF 
and a piece of coax is called 
for with a length of 12 inch* 
es or less, the coax is being 
used mainly for its shielding 
capability. You can safely 
fgnore the impedance and 
pick a piece of coax on the 
basis of being able to fit it 
into your box mechanically. 

Wire 

Unless used for high-cur- 
rent leads, most solid-state 
circuits use just a few milli- 
amperes per stage. There- 
fore, there is no reason to 



fig, Z Use of perf board 



use wire sizes larger than 
number 22 or 24. As shown 
in Fig. 6, the lower the num- 
ber the larger the wire diam- 
eter. Pick wire which is me- 
chanically convenient Soft 
plastic insulation strips very 
easily and conveniently, 
but if you have to solder a 
number of them in close 
proximity, the plastic 
tends to melt and burn, 
generally making a rather 
unsightJy mess. 

Printed Circuit Boards and 
Breadboards 

Some construction arti- 
cles provide either a PC- 
board layout or a commer- 
cial source for purchasing 
the board. If a layout is 
given, you can use the PC- 
board kits sold by several 
suppliers to make your 
own. However, if no board 
is suggested, you always 
can use a breadboard-type 
construction to build the 
circuit. Most hams have 
one or more breadboard 



CONNECT TO POSITIVE VOLTAGE SUPPLV 




5) 



r 

03 



I IWTEGftATEU 



GZE3 



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CEZEH 



i CIRCUIT J 

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CEZ4) 

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3 



CatMECT TO tjAOtmp 



Fig. 8. CommerciallY^^vBilable PC board for breadboarding. 
46 73 Magazine • June, 1982 



circuits, neatly enclosed in 
a box. which have been op- 
erating in their breadboard 
form for many years. Even 
if your construction does 
not come out very neat, the 
flaws will be hidden by the 
enclosure you put the 
circuit in. 

One of the simplest con- 
struction techniques uses 
perforated board such as 
that sold by Radio Shack, 
Vector, and others. The cir- 
cuit is laid out just as it ap- 
pears on the schematic, and 
every time a connection 
must be made, a small met- 
al terminal or clip is insert- 
ed in a hole and the leads 
soldered onto the terminal 
(Fig. 7.). 

Alternatively, general- 
purpose PC boards also are 
commercially available. 
They are arranged in a fixed 
pattern and, as shown by 
the dotted rectangle, inte- 
grated circuits plug in adja* 
cent rows of holes (Fig. 8). A 
bus-bar system of feeding 
ground and voltage is used, 
where one bus is connected 



to the supply voltage and 
iumpered to the IC pin 
where required. Transistors 
and other parts can be 
mounted where conve- 
nient. A second bus is used 
for ground. 

Also commonly avail- 
able are small carrier 
boards which will allow you 
to wire up one or two inte- 
grated circuits (Fig, 9). 
Other parts are jumpered 
from one terminal to wher- 
ever required. 

Generally speaking. 
sockets or molex* pins are 
a good idea for mounting 
integrated circuits. If you 
do have a problem, you can 
now unplug the IC and test 
or substitute without a mas- 
sive and messy unsoldering 
job. 

Plan It Out and Then Build 

Take a careful look at 

what parts are required and 
make sure you can obtain 
them. Plan the layout of 
parts and decide what you 
are going to enclose the cir- 
cuit in and where the jacks, 
connectors, and controls 
will be located. Don't hesi- 
tate to call for help. Often 
an experienced ham in the 
area can offer an immedi- 
ate solution to your unique 
problem. But if this does 
not solve the problem, you 
can drop the author of the 
article a note. Enclose an 
SASE, and help will proba- 
bly be on its way quite 
quickly. ■ 




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73Magazme * June, 1982 47 



Ctenn Jacobs KC7M 
Poverty ftat AZ 35925 



Coping with PC Boards 

it's not easy to be virtuous 



"A dmit it You'd really 
/m rather build it. Any 
idiot can plunk down a 
charge card." 

"Well, yeah. /' 

''Glenn, If you build it it 
will give you pride and ex- 
perience, and you1l know 
how to service it yourself." 

"Yeah, but /' 

''And it wouldn't cost 
nearly as much, and no- 
body would have one just 
exactly like yours/' 

So, Tm building. And my 
inner voice was right about 
everything it said. But there 
are a few things it didn^t tell 
me. I found out the hard 
way, and I'm telling you so 
you don't have to "re-invent 
the wheel/' like I had to. 

Vm building. But so help 
me, when 1 see those full- 
page, full-coior ads and a 
toll-free number and the 
sign of the yellow and 
orange overlapping circles, 
it's hard to keep at it. I 
could have any equipment I 
want for fust a phone call 
and twenty "easy" pay- 
ments. The path of virtue is 
harder 

Designing it 

In the first place, I don't 
know much about vacuum- 
tube circuits and even less 
about solid state. For- 

48 73 Magazine • June, 1982 



tunately, I don't have to. 
The League^ publishes So//of 
State Design for the Radio 
Amateur It's a "cookbook." 
It shows three varieties of 
any circuit you could 
want — all pre-engineered 
and tested. 

Redesigning It 

Now, even with a 
cookbook, I can make mis- 
takes. In fact, its about 
even odds that I will make a 
mistake in a one-device 
gadget. It is far beyond me 
to put forty '^stages" on a 
board as big as a 73 cover 
and have them all work. I 
decided to put each stage 
on a separate board and 
plug 'em all into edge con- 
nectors, That way if (when!) 
I make a mistake, I won't 
have to tear everything up. 

I mailed off^ for some PC 
board. It took three weeks 
to get here. They didn't 
send it until my check 
cleared. 

Whittling It 

PCB is funny stuff. I 
couldn't trace anything on 
It. I couldn't find any kind 
of carbon paper that would 
make a mark. Finally I 
rubbed yellow crayon on 
the copper and was able to 
trace faint lines. I cut on the 



lines and peeled up the un- 
wanted foil in little-bitty 
strips with a point of a 
knife, it took half a day. But 
it worked, I got a nice little 
40m CW receiver for my 
trouble. 

Buying It 

For my next project, I just 
sent off for ready-made 
custom boards.^ They were 
nice, neat correct, beauti- 
ful, and even had the parts 
placement marked. They 
worked perfectly. I made a 
mate for the last project 
But I wanted to do these 
boards myself. 

1 sent off for ferric 
chloride."* This time I called 
up and told 'em my card 
number and they had the 
stuff delivered to my door 
in about three days. 

Mixing It 

The ferric chloride is a 
black, gritty powder. I 
mixed it with hot water in a 
plastic jug. The water got 
hotter. The powder that got 
on my hands turned into a 
brown goo all by itseff and 
began to sting. I went and 
washed it off. When I came 
back, the grit I had spilt on 
the floor had turned into a 
nasty glop. That stuff ab- 
sorbs water right out of the 



air! I wiped it up. The floor 
is now permanently stained 
several shades of brown, 
black, green, and gray. 

Etching It 

Anyvvay, now I was ready 
to begin. Or was I? 1 cut out 
a little piece of the high- 
priced board and drew a cir- 
cuit on it in ink. I laid it in a 
plastic dish and poured 
some of the smelly brown 
juice over it. An hour later it 
looked gritty. Two hours 
later it was covered with a 
fine black sediment. I 
rinsed it in the sink and 
every bit of copper was 
gone. The thing might still 
make a banjo pick, but it 
would not make a circuit. 

Resisting It 

I cut out another piece. 
This time I drew my design 
with a felt marker. I bap- 
tized it for two hours in the 
ferric chloride soup and, 
beholdl — a printed circuit. 
The remaining foil was 
rough and gritty — about 
half eaten up. But it would 
do. Now I knew for sure 
what to do Very carefully I 
designed the first board. I 
felt-marked it and laid it 
away in the tobacco juice. 
In the morning there wasn't 
enough copper left on the 



board to tell what it was 
supposed to have been. 

Next t tried crayon. I sirp- 
pose if crayon were the on- 
ly resist in the world, we 
might make a go of it, but 
we wouldn't like it. It 
turned out rough and ugly. 
By now I wasn't trying to 
make any particular kind of 
board, I just wanted to see 
what would get me decent 
resu I ts. 

Cursing it 

Oh! I found a lump of 
etchant I had missed be- 
fore. I stepped on it bare- 
foot and stained my sole 
brown. I said some words 
that stained my soul deep 
purple. After i cleaned up 
the mess, 1 went to bed, 
disgusted. 

Dreaming It 

Suddenly I sat up. I had 
dozed off and dreamed I 
was painting a pattern with 
a tiny brush. That mimeo- 
graph correction fluid! I 
had a whole case of it! 
Mimeograph correction 
fluid corrects by drying into 
a plastic film. And it comes 
with a handy little brush 
built right into the bottle 
lid, 1 put on my pants and 
waddled out into the dark 
to my store.'" There it was, 
cartons and cartons of it I 
brought one in and annoint- 
ed a little rectangle of cop- 
per with abstract designs 
and flooded it with the stop 
from the jug. 

In the morning I rinsed 
It off and scrubbed it clean 
at the kitchen sink Beauti- 
ful My design was perfect- 
ly preserved in glittering 
copper. 

Sharing It 

Finally I have found The 
Way to do it. And I will 
share it with you. lust send 
a dollar and a double- 
stamped SASE to Glenn's 
Trading Post at Poverty 
Flat, Arizona 85925. I will 
send you a bottle of gen-u- 
ine Army surplus correction 
fluid complete with a nice 
little applicator brush built 
right mto the lid Guaran- 



teed to delight you. Correct 
your stencils. Paint your 
nails purple Make your 
own PC boards, (Who 
knows, it may even remove 
warts J This is the best stuff 
since snake oiL You can 
even see your pencil fines 
on the foil through the 
fluid. 

Drilling It 

By 'n by I had the first 

board ready for parts. Near- 
ly ready for parts. Gotta 
drill it. All my drills are too 
big. I went to a dozen hard- 
ware stores within a hun- 
dred miles. The smallest or- 
dinary drill bit is a sixteenth 
of an inch. It's positively 
teensy. But the components 
just fell out of the holes. 
Even after 1 soldered them. 
The best I could do was 
bend the leads over hard 
after poking them through 
the holes. Then they would 
stay in place long enough to 
be soldered, But the holes 
were so large it left a quar- 
ter-moon gap around each 
lead It didn't look neat. It 
didn't look professional If I 
had wanted a ventilated 
board, I would have made a 
pattern of round holes on 
purpose, 

"I need a smaller drill." 

"No. You need smaller 
holes. Or, you need to be 
less picky/' 

"All I want is a drill half 
that size," 

"There ain't any in 
eastern Arizona. You need 
something else/^ 

"tf it drills holes, ain't it a 
drill bit?" 

"Not necessarily/' 

My wife broke a sewing- 
machine needle as I argued 
with the inner voice. 

"Honey, get this broken 
needle out for me, will you, 
please?" 

Grinding It 

I did. A broken-off 
sewing-machine needle 
looks a lot like a little-bitty 
drill bit. I ground a bevel on 
the notched side of it with a 
whetstone and it looked a 
lot more like one. I chucked 



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the shank into my hand drill 
and found it would go 
l:hrough PCB like a hot knife 
through butter. It made a 
neat round hole with the 
foil pushed up around the 
edge like the rim of a moon 
crater. And, the hole was 
too little for a resistor lead. 
But sewing-machine nee- 
dles come in different sties 
and for a buck at the friend- 
ly local notions counter. 1 
had an assortment of drill 
blanks just the right sizes 
for component leads. 

Concluding It 

You can roll your own 
printed circuit boards with- 
out spending a fortune on 
special supplies and equip- 
ment 

You can draw your pat- 
tern right on the copper 
with an ordinary pencil and 
erase it until you get it right. 
You can paint directly on 
the board with mimeograph 
correction fluid. You can 
see your pencil lines right 
through the purple film. 



You can remove it with a 
fingernail. When you are 
satisfied with your pattern, 
a mixture of ferric chloride 
and water wilt etch it for 
you. Plain water will clean 
it up, with a little scrubbing. 
If you can't get the size 
of drills you need, ready- 
made, you can make your 
own out of sewing-machine 
needlesJi 

Footnoting ft 

U American Radio Relay 
League, Newington, Connecti- 
cut 06111. 

2. There are a fot of places. J got 
mine from Fair Radio Sales. Box 
1 105» Lima, Ohio 45802, 

3. Again, there are several 
sources. Try Circuit Board 
Specialists. Box 969, Pueblo, 
Colorado 81 002- 

4. Meshna, Box 62, East Lynn, 
Massachusetts 01904. They 
may be out. 

5. Glenn's Trading Post. Poverty 
Flat, Artzona 85925. 

73 Magazine • June. 1982 49 




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50 73 Magazine • June, 1982 



EARTH STATION OWNERS & DEALERS: 




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T3 Magazine « Jiine/1982 SI 



'Lite Receiver IV 

the second half 



i. Richard Chfistian WA4CVP 
6(X) Norion Drive 

S. f. {Mltchj Mitcheii }r WA40SR 
PO Box 973 
Mobile AL 36601 

This is the second part of 
a two-part article on the 
'Lite Receiver IV^^ * ]n the 
first installment [May, 1982, 
731 we described our philos- 
ophy for designing a home- 
brew receiver that can be 
easily duplicated. The Lite 
Receiver IV is the culmina- 
tion of that design phitoso- 



k 1 



Lite Receiver IV is a trademark 
of Martcomm, Inc. 



phy. The receiver completes 
the home-brew system 
which started with our low 
noise amplifier (February, 
1982, 73] and easy-to-build 
downconverter (March, 
1982, 731 

The fir^t Xit*^ R^Qeiver IV 
insta!fment covered the 
70~MHz bandpass filter/i-f 
amplifier board and the vid- 
eo demodulator board, Afso 
included was an intercon- 
nection diagram showing 
how all of the boards were 
connected together. In this 
installment, we describe the 
audio, automatic frec|uency 
control, and metering cir- 
cuits. For ease of building, 
printed circuit board layouts 



and parts lists are provided. 
A source is provided for 
etched and drilled pfjnted 
circuit boards for those not 
wishing to "roll their own/' 

Dual Audio Board 

The audio circuit pro- 
vides for switch selection of 
either 6.8-MHz or 6.2-MHz 
audio subcarriers from the 
satellites. The circuit shown 
in Fig. 1 is designed around 
Motorola MCI 3S8 audio de- 
coder ICs; however, RCA 
CA3065 or National LM3065 
iCs can be used as direct re- 
placements The board can 
drive a small speaker and 
has a front-panel audio-level 
control if the speaker is used 



or the audio level from the 
MC135tis is sufficient to 
drive most rf modulators. 
Complete component cost, 
exclusive of the printed cir- 
cuit board, should be 
around $15.00, 

Construction 

The printed circuit board 
and parts overlay, Fig. 2, 
make construction simple. 
We did not use sockets for 
the ICs; however there is no 
reason not to use them with 
the relatively low rf frequen- 
cies involved. The coils are 
about $1.00 each from RCA 
distributors. 

When building, you must 
decide on the options that 




«^-' 



Front panel of the Zite Receiver fV, 
52 73 Magazine • June, 1982 



**>- 




Top view of the lite Receiver's dual audio board. 



you want. If you do not 
plan to use a speaker but 
need audro only to drive 
your rf modulator, then the 
LM386 and its associated 
components can be elimi- 
nated. In that case, the 
front-panel level control 
will not be needed, but be 
sure to install the two 
SOk-Ohm printed circuit 
board pots since they con- 
trol the amount of audio 
available from the MCI 358s. 
If the LM386 is not in 
stalled, the center pole of 
SI is connected to a rear- 
panel jack for connection 
to your rf modulator If the 
LM386 is installed, then the 
output of the LM38fa is con- 
nected to the rear-panel 
jack for connection to a 
speaker or to your rf modu- 
lator. We use the convplete 
circuit as shown so that a 
small speaker can be used 
when we carry the receiver 
out to the antenna to make 
adjustments. 

If you decide that you 
want the speaker drive capa- 
bility, replace the two 
50k-Ohm PC board pots 
with lOk-Ohm, quarter-Watt 
resistors ThelOkOhm resis- 
tors provide fixed attenua- 
tion of the audio level from 
the MCI 358s. The front-pan- 
el control is then used for 
audio level for both the 
LM38b and your rf modula- 
tor 

Note that picofarad-size 
capacitors are silver mica, 
with all other capacitors ce- 
ramic or electrolytic. 

Tune-Up Procedure 

For tune-up, it is neces- 
sary to have a signal genera- 
tor or use a signal off the air. 
If your signal generator has 
modulation capability, en- 
able the modulation and 
tune the output of the gen- 
erator for 6.2 MHz Tune LI 
for maximum audio level 
and L2 for best audio (which 
probably won't be very 
good because most signal- 
generator modulation is 
AM). If the signal generator 
is CW only, then tune both 
LI and L2 for maximum 
quieting. If the LM386 was 



omitted, adjust the 50k- 
Ohm pot for correct modu- 
lation level for your rf 
modulator. 

To tune the b.frMHz cir* 
cuit, simply repeat the 
above procedure with the 
signal generator set for 6.8 
MHz and tune L3 and L4 as 
described. 

Off-the-air tune-up can be 
performed using the sanr>e 
procedure as above. How- 
ever video will have to be 
detected by the video de- 
modulator board since the 
audio is a subcarrler riding 
on the video signal. If the 
signal^generator tune-up 
method is used, it still will 
be necessary to fine-tune 
once you have a signal off 
the air. Simply adjust for 
best audio quality. 

If the LM386 and a speak- 
er are used all the time, be 
sure to heat-sink the voltage 
regulator and the LM386, 
This completes the audio 
section of the receiver. 

Afc/Metering Board 

The afc/metering board 
gives afc control for the mix- 



PRINTED CiRCUlT BOARDS 
Printed circuit tx^ards are available from Martcomm, fnc, PO 
Box 74, Mobile AL 36601. The dual audio bomd \s $12.00 and 
the afc/metering board is $15.00. Add SI. 75 per order for first 
crass postage. 



DUAL AUDIO BOARD 

Parts List 
2 IVTC1358 ICs. See text. 
1 LM386 IC 

1 7812 voltage regulator 

2 50k-Ohm PC board mount pots. See text- 
1 lOk-Ohm pot, paneJ mount. See text. 

1 10-Ohm, v^-Watt 

2 220 Ohm, V4 Watt 

2 10k Ohm, V^-Watt. See text. 
2 4-pF silver mica 
2 l2'pF silver mica 
2 2?-pF silver mica 

2 33-pF sliver mica 

7 .01 -uF djsc ceramic 

4 ,047- or .05-uF disc cefamic 

1 .05 uF disc ceramic 

3 1-uF electrolytic 

1 10'UF electrolytic 
1 100-uF electrolytic 

1 SPOT switch, panel mount 

2 coils. LI and L3, transformer'Sound/if, stock number 
130120, from RCA PM200 sound board. 

2 coils. L2 and L4, coil-discriminator, stock number 130121, 
from RCA PM200 sound board 

1 printed circuit board, single-sided, G-IO, available from 
Martcomm. Inc., PO Box 74, Mobile AL 36601. 



' 



--Cji 




«, «HH} 



"S 



«£MHl 



SI 

FRONT PAMEL 



t 



TO flF 

MO0UL4TOff IF 
LM3e$ NOT USE&. 

SEE TE)(T 



'I2V ^ 



4=33pf y\ 



l2pF 





lOd.f 4ycm3 OUT TO 

-\\ -• l*-itfll on 

TO ftf 
W0DUL4T0R 



1 



a 



FROM VIDCO 

DEMKXlgLATOR 

BOAAtt 



L 




/ft 



T' 



'^livoc 

FROM 
PO*£R 
StJPPLT 
BCMRty 



J 



fig. 1. Dual frequency audio demodulator arrd amplifier schematic. *See text All pF capaci- 
tors are silver mica. All others are disc ceramic or etectrolytic. 

73 Magazine • JuneJ982 53 




ft 






.05 



ton 



T 



LM386 






.01 

-II- 



7a 1 5 






I^F 



01 

01 ^ ,01 




Ifif 



^^ 



047 




SOK 



.01 •" .0 

XiJ. 



T 



r 



12 PF 

-H- 



L2 



c 







} 


33pF 


1358 








4}— 



L3 



Z7fif 
^^ 047 
£20n 4pF 



aaon 



4pF 



Dx 



33pF 



fig. 2, PC board and parts tayout for the dual audio board. 



AFC/METERlNG BOARD 
Parts List 
1 LM324 IC 

1 IK'Ohm PC board pel 

2 5k-Ohm PC board pots 

1 5k-0hm panel mount pot 

1 10k 'Ohm PC board pot 

2 Ik'Ohm. V*-Watt 

2 2.2k Ohm. V4'Watr 
6 lOk-Ohm V4-Watt 

1 1 megohm, Vi-Walt 

3 -Ol-uFdisc ceramic 

1 ,022-yF disc ceramic 
2 1-uF electrolytic 

1 47-uF electrolytic 

2 1N270 germanium diodes 

1 0-1-mA meter 

2 SPOT switches 

1 printed circuit board, single-sided^ G-10, available from 
Martcomm, Inc, PO Box 74, Mobile AL 36601. 



er local oscillator (vto) and 
provides drive for a relative 

signal-strength meter. 

The signal-strength meter 
is not a necessity for the re- 
ceiver, StilL meters seem to 
impress people and we are 
no exception It does serve a 
very useful purpose, how- 
ever The meter comes in 
handy for adjusting your 
LNA and antenna, and it 
gives a relative indication of 
signal to noise for your com* 
plete system. 

As can be seen from the 
schematic in Fig- 3, there are 
four op amps used on the 
board, We needed three for 



■7fi4LiNCt 



/fr 



P4 

roK 



*7uf 



JT^n 






lOK 












5h* FftOtif iPJiti£l 

TuftC 




TO V70 ON 
BOARD 







01 



ftOH VIDEO 
0CPD[WLAT13ft eOA]«D 







TUMI^Mfi 

MFTEH 

0-lrtiJ& 



Fig. J. Afc/metering hoard schematic. 
54 73 Magazine • June. 1982 



the afc circuitry, so one was 
left over We decided to put 

it to use to drive the meter. 
The 70'MHz output from 
the i-f filter amp is picked 
off through a coaxial tee 
coupled with a .01 -uF capac- 
itor. The rf is then fed to a 
voltage doubler composed 
of two 1 N270 germanium di- 
odes. The dc from the volt- 
age doubler goes to an op 
amp connected as a non-in- 
verting buffer. The op amp 
drives a 0-1-mA relative sig- 
nal-strength meter. 

Afc Circuit 

The automatic frequency 
control (afci like the meter- 
ing circuit, is not an absolute 
necessity. But it sure is nice 
to have it lock the vtoonto a 
transponder, as the vto does 
drift in frequency due to am- 
bient temperature fluctua- 
tions. 

It was decided to provide* 
for afc with normal or in* 
verted video. There is not 
much inverted video on the 
satellites, but occasionally 
you do run across an "up- 
side-down" transponder 
Also, on a single-conversion 
system such as ours, it is 
possible to tune in the image 
of a transponder But if the 
video switch is in the 
'NORM' video position. the 
afc will "push"" the image 
signal away instead of lock- 
ing onto it. 

Refer to the schematic in 
Fig. 3. At the afc sample 




The 'Lite Receiver's afc/metering board 



point AFC-2, we are not de- 
tecting a peak or a null, but 
instead a dc level which is 
compared to a reference sig* 
nal at pin 3 of the LM324 
quad op amp. The first op 
amp in the chain is wired as 
a non-inverting voltage com- 
parator. Its output is 
summed with the transpon- 
der tuning pot voltage to 
supply the tuning voltage 
for the vto in the downcon- 
verter (mixer), A span pot, 
R2, and a zero pot, R3, are 
provided to calibrate the 
transponder tuning pot, 
since vtos have different 
voltage-to-frequency ratios. 

The third op amp is used 
as Br\ inverting buffer for in- 
verted video. As can be seen 
on the schematic, the video 
normal/reverse switch is a 
double-pole, double-throw 
switch. This switch reverses 
the afc action when you 
switch from normal to in- 
verted video. Also, provision 
was made to turn the afc off 
but not change the tran- 
sponder tuning pot calibra- 
tion. R4 sets the afc refer- 
ence level the same as the 
afc voltage of a properly 
tuned transponder when 
the afc is switched off. 

Construction 

A printed circuit board 
layout and parts overlay are 
shown in Fig. 4. There is 
nothing critical about the 
construction of this board. 
lust use good soldering 
technique and keep com- 
ponents flat against the 
printed circuit board. Use an 



IC socket for the LM324 
since tune-up of the board is 
done before the LM324 is in- 
stalled. Do not connect the 
tuning pot wiper to point 
"W" on the PC board yet. 

Tune-Up 

Connect the tuning-pot 
wiper to the vto at this time. 
Connect the AFC-I and 
AFC-2 points to the video 
demodulator board Con- 
nect to the +15 volts regu- 
lated and dc ground return 
on the video demodulator 




Bottom v/ew of the dual audio board. 



board. Set the video switch 
to "NORM" and the afc 
switch to "ON." 

With the LM324 un- 
plugged, test for +15 volts 
at pin 4 of the LM324 socket. 
Tune in a transponder and 
measure the voltage at pin 2 
of the LM324 socket Move 
the meter probe to pin 3 on 
the socket. Then, using R1, 
set the pin 3 voltage to 
equal the pin 2 voltage. Now 



switch the afc switch to the 
''OFF" position With the afc 
switched "OFF/' set the pin 
2 voltage with R4 to the 

same voltage as with the afc 
switch "ON." Now, remove 
power and plug or solder in 
the LM324. Connect the 
tuning-pot wiper to point 
"W" on the afc board, and 
connect the afc board out- 
put (marked vto) to the vto. 
Be sure to use coax or well- 




Tosr 



0£>jF 




'^»* T* 



+ ISV 

FROM VIDEO 

DEMOD BOARD 





FROM AFC SWITCH 

TO 
' METER 



l^f^ j:,Ol 



FROM 
TOMKi AMP 



TO VTO 



TO S2-A 
REV 



FHOW 
AFC#| 



Fig. 4. PC board and parts layout for the afc/metering board. 

73 Magazine • June, 1982 55 



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shielded cable to connect 
the output of the afc board 
to the vto. (Usually, the vto 
will be remotely mounted m 
the downcoriverter, located 
at antenna ) The afc board 
output is controlling the 
voltage-controlled oscilla- 
tor in the mixer, so any stray 
signal or noise spikes picked 
up by the cable will result in 
the vto being "modulated'' 
and will cause it to change 
frequency with very undesir* 
able effects on the picture. 
With the afc switch "ON" 
and the video switch set to 
"NORM/' the tuning pot will 
act like a channel switch. As 
the tuning pot is rotated, the 
afc will try to hang onto a 
transponder as long as possi- 
ble; then, it will "jump" to 
the next transponder. Be- 
cause of the ''jump/' the ef- 
fect is to ''switch" transpon- 
ders! Frnallv. adjust the zero 
pot, R3, to set transponder 
#1 close to full counter- 
clockwise position of the 
tuning pot Adjust the span 
pot, R2, to set transponder 



#24 close to the full clock- 
wise position of the tuning 
pot- 
Now, with a 01 -m A meter 
connected to the meter out- 
put, tune in a transponder 
and impress people. 

Rf Modulator 

We have not described 
the rf modulators that we 
have tried since we just 
haven't found a circuit that 
we are happy with. At pres- 
ent, we are using the rf mod* 
u la tor in our RCA video tape 
players The rf modulator 
therefore costs only four 
times what the complete 
'Lite Receiver IV costs! 

Correspondence 

Because of the com pi ex h 
ty of the 'Lite Receiver IV, 
we may not have answered 
all your questions. We'll be 
glad to try to answer any 
questions that you might 
have if you include a self-ad- 
dressed stamped envelope 
and are patient in awaiting a 
reply. ■ 




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73 Magazine • June. 1982 57 



/, Richard Christian WA4CVP 
600 Nonon Drive 
S3t§um3 AL i6572 

S. f fMitch) Mhchett Ir. WA40SR 
PO Box 973 
Mobile AL 36601 



TVRO Transducer 

waveguide-to-coax transition 



Trans-duc-er (trans-doo'- 
sar) n. Any device 
through which the energy 
of one power system may 

be transmitted to another 



system, whether of the 
same or a different type. 

Now that you know the 

dictionary definition of a 



transducer, let's look at the 
satelhte TV definition: the 
gizmo that hooks the anten- 
na horn to your LNA 

Simply stated, the trans- 




Sf£ffS 4f^G SACK 

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MAKE \ EACH FROM ^/S*^ THICK 
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r 



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i£ND 90' QH m^OnHH LIHES. 5 PLACES 
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At LOCATION SHOWN 



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If 



WAitE I EACH 040 BRASS OR COPPER 

MAKE TAO TO F|T AfdO SOLDER TO 
CENTER CONDUCTOR OF TVPE "N" 
CON(«ECT0ft 



Fig. 1. Parts dimensions and bending instructions. 
58 73 Magazine • June. 1982 



ducer is a section of wave- 
guide 3/4 of a wavelength 
deep with the back closed. 
The waveguide is a trans- 
mission line and has a ve- 
locity factor different from 
that of free space. A signal- 
pickup probe is installed 1/4 
wavelength from the back 
(closed end) and 1/4 wave- 
length from one side of the 
box. The 1/4-wavelength 
spacing ensures that any 
4 GHz energy that gets past 
the probe and is reflected 
from the back of the box to 
the back side of the probe 
will be in phase with the sig- 
nal arriving 'head on/' 
since 1/4 wavelength from 
the probe to the back of the 
box plus 1/4 wavelength 
from the back of the box 
back to the probe equals 
1/2 wavelength. The 1/2- 
wavelength spacing mini- 
mizes phase distortion and 
signal cancellation 

Two Methods 

Our transducer can be 
built in one of two ways. If 
you are lucky and can find 
some 4-CHz copper wave- 
guide, most of the work is 
already done for you. lust 
cut off a 2S' section of the 
waveguide. Take a scrap 
piece of waveguide and cut 
a piece to fit the back of the 
2.5" piece. Solder the two 
pieces to form a box with 
one end open. Make sure 



that no solder gets inside 
the box Using the instruc- 
tions below, prepare and in- 
stall the T'^square piece, 
the probe, and the coax 
connector. This waveguide 
method was used to build 
the transducer in the photo. 

If yo^ ^^^ ^*^t lucky 
enough to have a friend 
with a source of waveguide, 
you will have to ''bend" 
your own. The material 
needed is .040'' brass shim 
stock or sheet flashing cop- 
per. Most large sheet-metal 
shops have small scraps of 
such material thai^ can be 
purchased at a very reason- 
able price. 

Cut the 7.3''X115" 
piece of material and bend 
it to a U shape as shown in 
Fig 1. Cut two pieces 2.8* 
X2.8''- [You probably can 
get the sheet-metal shop to 
cut the material with their 
shear for good clean edges.) 
Bend the edges of the two 
pieces 90 degrees as shown 
in Fig. 1. 

Drill one 2.8" X2. 8* 
piece as shown. This piece 
will be the bottom of the 

box, so that looking into the 
front of the box, the probe 
hole will be in the bottom 
on the right-hand side. The 
photo shows how the probe 
is offset. 

Thoroughly clean all 



3 3/4* 



2 1* 



pieces in preparation for 

soldering Assemble the 
three pieces to form the 
box, and clamp or wire 
them together If necessary, 

slightly bend the U-shaped 
piece outward to ensure a 
tight fit when the top and 
bottom pieces are installed. 
With a large soldering iron 
or small propane torch, sol- 
der all seams Be sure that 
no solder gets inside the 
box. If any solder gets in- 
side, clean it out; you want 
a very smooth surface in- 
side the box to minimize in- 
terference with the signal 
energy. 

Installing the Probe 

The 1*-square connector 
spacer (see drawing) must 
be made from 1/8" brass or 
copper Drill a 1/2-inch hole 

in the center of the 1* 
piece. Then, using the type 
N chassis-connector mount- 
ing holes as a guide, drill 
and tap the piece for 4-40 
screws. Sweat-solder the 
1''-square plate centered 
over the 5/16" hole in the 
bottom of the box (now, 
transducer!). Cut the pickup 
probe from .040" brass or 
copper scrap to the dimen- 
sions shown in the drawing- 
Solder the probe to the 
center connector of the 
type N connector. The dis- 
tance from the connector 
flange to the end of the 
probe is 13/16" 



1 



? 3/4 



I ts" 



Fig. 2. WR-229 waveguide flange dimensions. Flanges may 
be purchased or made fmrn sheet brass or copper 1/16'* 
thick or heavier. White not absolutely necessary, some 
method must be used to mate the transducer to the horn. 
Solder the flange flush with the transducer. 




End view of a transducer made from copper waveguide. 
Note the clean, smooth interior. 



Now install the connec- 
tor to the waveguide, using 
4-40 screws, making sure 
that the flat side of the 

probe is toward the front of 
the waveguide. 

Connecting to the Horn 

After constructing your 
transducer by the easy or 
hard method, you still have 
to mechanically connect it 
to your antenna horn. This 
is where a WR'229 wave- 
guide flange comes m real 
handy. If you don't have ac- 
cess to a WR-229, you can 
make one from 1 /8" brass or 
copper. Mild steel also 
could be used, but is more 
difficult to solder Refer to 
Fig. 2 for the dimensions if 
you have to make your own. 

Solder the flange flush to 
the front of the transducer. 



Sand or file off any excess 
solder for a smooth transi- 
tion from the flange to the 
transducer Drill mating 
holes in the flange to mate 
with the flange on your 
horn. We use .141" hardline 
coax from the transducer to 
the LNA. This small coax 
can be bent easily so that 
the LNA can be installed di- 
rectly behind the transduc- 
er- 
Final Comment 

We have heard of several 
people building horns and 
transducers from double- 
sided printed circuit board. 
We have gone the PC-board 
route, but with very poor re- 
sults Stick with the sheet 
copper or brass and you 
should get good results 
with a minimum of trouble- 
Good transducingtB 




Fig. 3, Tbree-D drawing of the transducer. 

73 Magazine • June, 1982 59 



Stephen Gibson 
PO Bon 1S5S6 

Hoffywfxxi CA 90038 



The MTV Music Box 

Satellite Central, part VII 



Part of the fun of TVRO 
experimenting is search- 
ing for new signals. While 
Video is an easy mark, the 
real gold is sometimes hard- 
er to find, especiaily since 
new services keep popping 
up. The 'video records" are 
a good example. Slide by 
transponder 11 on Satcom 3 
(131 degrees west), and 
you'll find Music Television 
(MTV), a cable service from 
Warner Amex 

You may wonder why you 
are seeing rock groups blast- 
ing their brains out in near si- 
lence. It's because the audio 
portion of MTV is not on 
your typical TVRO receiver 
outputs of 6 8 or 6.2 MHz 
Instead, different subcarrier 
frequencies were picked. Se- 
curity? Perhaps, 

Rock and roll music may 
not be your cup of tea, but 
the MTV delivery technique 
may become popular and 
worthy of more investiga- 
tion since it is sent in stereo. 
And more important, you 
can experiment with a neat 

60 73 Magazine • June, 1982 



trick that mighty Warner 
never thought of! 

Stereo Trickery 

just having two sound de- 
tectors to get stereo isn't 
enough You need a decod- 
er, too. Don't bother with a 
stereo FM-decoder setup 
because it won't work. MTV 
combines both channels, 
L + R, on one subcarrier and 
sends the difference be- 
tween the channels, L — R, 



on the other subcarrier. 

You can hear the sum 
channel on a 6.62-MHz sub- 
carrier and the difference on 
5.B MHz. Alt you need to do 
is a little addition and sub- 
traction with the electron- 
ics, and voila. they sepa- 
rate into left and right! [f 
you add the L + R signal to 
the L — R signal, the + R and 
the ^R cancel, leaving* just 
L, or 2L, if you want to be 
technical about it. 




Photo A. Front view of the Music Box. 



Likewise, if you subtract 
L + R from L~R, you get 
just 2R. The secret to ail the 
addition and subtraction is a 
"matrix/' which is a short 
and fancy way of saying two 
op amps from Radio Shack. 

Before you rip the top off 
your receiver and start 
tweaking, you should con- 
sider an option. Why not 
build two more sound sec- 
tions plus whatever else is 
necessary in a separate box, 
sparing your receiver? Don't 
worry if you are a Novice or 
your last project was an old 
tube-type Selecto-Jet. I've 
found an easy way for you 
to build this gadget 

Simple Circuit Details 

The unit connects to your 
TVRO receiver at the same 
place your internal sound 
subcarrier-detector circuits 
tap off. Referring to Fig. 1, 
the detected composite vid- 
eo with audio subcarriers is 
coupled to two separate 
subcarrier sound detectors. 
One detector is tuned to 



6.62 MHz and will give you 
an L+R output. The other 
detector is tuned to 5.8 MHz 
and delivers an L ^ R output. 
Each detector output feeds 
two op amps. I used a TL084 
because it is cheap (avail- 
able at Radio Shack) and 
works rather well. You get 
four amplifiers in a single 
chip. That sure beats the 
6SN7 that some of you may 
remember. 

A portion of the L + R de- 
tector output feeds the in- 
verting input of the top op 
amp in the diagram. The 
L — R detector output feeds 
the non-inverting input As 
in typical op amp fashion, 
its output is just the differ- 
ence between the two in- 
puts. So much for the sut 
traction part of the matrix. 
Addition is performed in the 
bottom op amp by summing 
the L + R and L - R detector 
outputs into the inverting in- 
put, isolation is superb in 
this configuration because 
the inverting input is driven 
towards ground. 

An Evening Pioject 

The subcarrier-decoder 
circuits in May's edition of 
"Satellite Central" will work 

very well. You can make a 
PC board for two detectors 
or use perf-type vector- 
board and hand-wire the cir- 
cuit in record time. Or you 
can even buy some dual- 
sound-section subcarrier PC 
boards from one of the 73 
advertisers and just stuff 'n 
solder. 

But if you are in a rush 
{and who isn't nowadays) or 
if you are just learning 
about electronics, I suggest 
you take the lazy way and 
simply buy two RCA XL-100 
sound-section modules like 
those described last month. 
Servicemen call them 
PM-200S. These little mod- 
ules are complete TV-set 
sound sections and simply 
plug into the popular 
XL-100. Of course, they are 
tuned to 4.5 MHz (TV 
sound), but we can tweak 
them to the frequencies we 
want. In fact, we can modify 
them so that we get pretty 



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EE^EN-rCRt 



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l-F tR4NS 



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VAC 



Ih 



lA 
Bt^lDGE; 



^ 





Fig. 1. Two PM-200 subcarrier detectors and a TL0B4 op amp are all you need to hear MTVsat- 
eltite stereo. 



hi-fi, too. Get two RCA 
MAAOOIAs from a local 
RCA distributor. They run 
about 15 bucks each. You 
may be socked with a $3.00 
dud charge. 

Modification of the PM- 
200/MAA001A modules is 
very easy We simply reduce 
the values of two capacitors 
so that we can tune higher 
than 4,5 MHz and then add 
two more capacitors to get 
better sound. Referring to 
Fig. 2, remove the T299 can 
and change C290 (82 pF) to 
50 pF Replace the can, Then 
change C295 (68 pF) to 25 
pF. Now the unit tune^ from 
53 to nearly fi MHz, 

Next, solder a .01 /jF ca- 
pacitor from pin 13 on the 
CA'^065 IC to a ground 
trace. This sets the de-em- 
phasis to 75 ^sec using a re* 
sistor inside the chip Then 
solder a 5-^F (or so) 
capacitor from pin B on the 
C A 1065 to a spare trace. If 
you don't see a spare trace, 
then cut the trace from pin B 
on the CA3065 leading out 
to the edge of the board and 
solder the rap acros** this 
trace cut. Just be sure the 
cap IS polarized (end with + 
on it) towards the chip, Now 
you have a dc-blocked out- 
put to your amp. We don't 
use the preamp inside the 
chip because a quick look at 



the distortion specs would 
drive any audiophile back to 
AM radio! 

Last solder a 50k PC-type 

mini-pot from pin 6 on the 
chip to a ground trace This 
is a volume control that we 
use in the mixing process. 
You can use larger shaft- 
type pots and mount them 
on the front panel, but they 
are likely to get bumped lat- 



er on and will only reduce 
stereo separation. So why 
bother? 

Depending on your TVRO 
receiver, you may need an 
input bandpass filter to cut 
noise from the video and ad- 
jacent audio subcarrier. The 
input coil [T299) works pret- 
ty welL but a cheap 
10 7-MHz FM if transformer 
padded down to the proper 






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Fig, 2. The RCA PM-200 uses a CA J065 quadrature FM-detec- 
tor IC for 43'Mliz audio. The few mods discussed in the text 
will make it perform very well as a stereo sound decoder. 

73 Magazine * June, 1982 61 



' 




Photo 6, Clean out that junk box with this project since noth- 
ing is critical. For example, two 72-T8-vo/t transformers can 
be used instead of a single 24-36 volt. Even another op amp 
likely will work. 



frequency knocks out what 
little noise is left Not all 
transformers are the same, 
so a gdo or an rf generator 
will separate the winners 
from the losers. The second- 



ary usually has a center tap. 

Junk Boi Jubilee 

I decided to take a strictly 
plain-vanilla approach since 
I knew my iittle Music Box 



WHY QUAD? 

Back in the dark ages of stereo« David Haf ler of Dynaco was 
experimenting with techniques to eliminate the so-called 
**hole in the middle" between left and right channel speakers 
—see Tig. 3(a), From that effort came a center-channel speak^ 
Bf which was simply the ^eft and right channeEs combined 
(L + R) and played 6 dB softer. Then he went one better and 
suggested a single speaker behind the listener to add am- 
bience. Logically, this ambience channel would consist of the 
difference between the channels, or L-R, Remember, we 
started with only two channels from tape or disk* This was 
revolutionary to audiophiles, but old hat to motion-picture 
people who'd been doing it for years with Cinemascope and 
3D. (Funny how simple technology doesn't cfoss-poHinate 
now and then.) 

Anyway, Michael Gerzon in England improved on the idea 
with the typical left* and right-front setup by feeding the dif- 
ference (L — R) to separate speakers tocated at "left-rear" and 
"right-rear" and out of phase— see Fig, 3(b). It sounded so 
good that record people started recording ambience with a 
reverse matrix setup. Then Ihey tried discrete channels, and 
you had technology go mad with the consumer wondering 
which system (o choose. So much for history- Most stereo 
recordings have some ambience imbedded in them, so this 
technique Is worth the extra effort to track down an old ampli^ 
fler and two smafi speakers to fiddle with quadraphonlcs. 

A 5th Channel? 

ff the front speakers are widely separated, you can connect 
a 5th channel to go between them. This will indeed reduce 
separation but tends to fNi lhe**hole in themiddre'* effect. Cin* 
ema sound processors use this technique with an age to re- 
store apparent separation. Since a signal that would appear 
to be located at a point m space between the speakers wouid 
have to t>e coming from both the left and right channels, we 
must assume that it is the sum of the channels, or L -^ R— see 
Fig. 3jc). So feed another amp with the L+ R output of the 
Music Box and place the speaker between left and right 
speakers. 



would soon be lost in the 
never-ending wire jumble 
behind my preamp I used a 
utility box and mounted 
RCA jacks for all the outputs 
to my stereo system (See 
Photo A) The rf input was a 
lowly phone jack since I be- 
lieve in using everything in 
the junk box. Use mini-coax 
if you have some. The input 
transformers can be sol- 
dered to the bottom of the 
PM-200S, The op amp was 
mounted on an experiment- 
er's breadboard. All boards 
were mounted on standoffs. 
The PM-200 already has a 
hole in it for 6-32 hardware. 
Be sure to use voltage 
regulators to smooth the rip- 
ple. The op amps won't see 
ripple when running from a 
bipolar supply, but the little 
PM-200S want pure dc. 

For the most part, con- 
struction is not critical other 
than the suggestion that you 
use coax to feed the 
PM-200S. Also, you should 
use 5%, V4-Watt resistors in 
the op amp matrix [all 100k). 
While the pots on the detec- 
tors can be used to compen- 
sate for tolerances, we do 
want the tune-up process to 
be easy. 

Next, you should modify 
your receiver. Find the loca- 
tion where the 6.2- and 
6.8-MHz detectors connect 
This is usually an emitter fol- 
lower after video detection. 
Tap in with a dc-blocking ca- 
pacitor. Then run more mini- 
coax to a BNC. type F. or 
RCA jack that you mount on 
the rear of the receiver. Take 
your choice. Use what you 
have. The signal is then 
patched to the Music Box 
with stilt more coax. 

Tune-Up Hints 

There are two ways to 
make the Music Box play. 
Yoy can simply set both 50k 
pots for minimum resistance 
(that's maximum volume) 
and tweak the input trans- 
formers, the T299 coils, and 
L299 coils for sound. But 
knowing which subcarrier 
you are on may be a trick. 
Add to that the possibility 



that you may have both de- 
tectors tuned to the same 
carrier, and you're sure to 
see there must be a better 
way. 

Use a signal generator set 
to 6,62 MHz. Feed it into the 
unit. Put a scope on pin 9 of 
the IC on the 6,62-MH2 
board (L + R) and tune the 
coils for maximum. Back the 
generator down below limit- 
ing and peak again. Do the 
same procedure for the 
other module (L— R), but set 
the generator to 5.8 MHz. 

If the generator can be 
frequency-modulated by an 
internal oscillator, set it to 
±75-KHz deviation and ad- 
just the L299 coils on each 
module for the cleanest 
waveform. Depending on 
the particular run of 
PM-200S, you may need a re- 
sistor across L299 to lower 
its Q a small amount. A THD 
analyzer is a better eyeball 
if you have one. Without an 
analyzer, you are stuck with 
having to use your ear to 
fine-tune L299 for minimum 
noise and distortion. 

While we're on the sub- 
ject, don't expect the Music 
Box to play very well if your 
system has any spark lies. 
And narrowing the receiver 
i-f bandpass doesn't count, 
despite the picture improve 
ment you'll likely see. It's 
what you'll hear that really 
counts. The first time a 
solid-color field is displayed 
(wider carrier deviation), 
you'll see and hear what 
many call frizzies, the bane 
of all "near threshold" sys* 
terns. Even with music, noth- 
ing beats a good LNA and a 
large dish. Nothing. 

At this point vou should 
be able to connect every- 
thing and hear pretty good 
stereo.' Use headphones to 
verify. Some of the music is 
in mono, so don't worry if 
your first blast of sound is in 
the middle of your head. If 
you used 5% or better 
resistors on the op amps, 
you may be finished. Other- 
wise, the two 50k pots may 
need adjustment for maxi- 
mum separation. Tweak 
either pot for best aural 



62 73 Magazine • June, 1982 




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f /g. 3. Evolution of four- and 
five-channel sound, (a) Ste- 
reo, (b) quad, and (c) five 
channel system. 



separation or connect the 
Music Box outputs to the 
horizontal and vertical in- 
puts of an oscilloscope. 
Without sweep, you can ad* 
fust the detector pots for a 
45-degree angle trace on the 
CRT when nnono is being 
transmitted. You'll see a 
"ball of yarn'' display when 
stereo is being sent. Of 
course, you can always ad- 
just for the most sym- 
metrical jumble. What else 
would one do for rock and 
roll? 

Next, connect the speak- 
ers. Watch phase because it 
is everything in a quad set- 
up. If you are unsure, then 
first place a 1,5-volt cell mo- 
mentarily across the voice 
coil of each speaker and 
note in which direction the 
cone moves. Mark the 
speaker lead with a + when 
the cell polarity causes the 
cone to move outward. All 
this is arbitrary, of course, 
but serves to give you a ref- 
erence from which you can 
work. 



AMP 



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LEFT 
REAR 




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Fig, 4. Hookup for quadra- 
phonic sound. 

Music Bo9c Bonus! 

Sending the sound tracks 
in stereo was a pretty good 
idea. But what the Warner 
people didn't option was 

quadraphonic sound (at 
least until they read this]! 
And the little Music Box can 
do it. Quad sound? Yeah. . . 
and does it sound neat! And 
if four channels don't grab 
you, then how about five 
channels? It's just sitting up 
there on the bird waiting for 
you to snatch it! 

For a quick trip into the 
history behind four- and 
five-channel sound, see the 
box. To get quad, just take 
the Music Box's L — R out- 
put, run it through a power 
amplifier, and connect two 



speakers as shown in Fig. 4 
Note that the speakers on 
the amplifier's output are 
connected in parallel but 
out of phase. The L — R goes 
on the left rear as you face 
the main speakers, The R — L 
goes on the right rear. Since 
the rear speakers will be ra- 
diating only ambience, you 
don't need to use the best 
that money can buy. Small 
bookshelf units work fine. 

Setting fevels for quad is a 
matter of taste, The ambi- 
ence effect is very pro- 
nounced if the rear levels 
are high. But the stereo ef- 
fect is reduced somewhat 
depending on the room. This 
is also true of the center 
channel. Too much level 
and separation goes away. 
As a rule, start your ad- 
justments with the center 
and rear channels about 6 
dB softer than the main left 
and right. And. . .oh 
yes. . .remember the thresh- 
old of pain is stiti + 120 dB. 
But it may be less with rock 
and rollfi 



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CORRECTIONS 



The British VHF converter 
project presented in the April, 
1982, issue of 73 uses a doubie- 
slded printed board. The foil pat- 
tern for the board's top (compo- 
nent) side was inadvertently 

64 73 Magazine • JuneJ982 



omitted. I! is reproduced here as 

Fig. 1. Also, the crystal XI, R9. 

and L4 junction should not be 

connected to ground. 

Tim Daniel N8RK 
73 MaQszinw Staff 




Fig. 1. Fotf pattern for top side of the VHF converter PCB. 




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Tune In the World's Tinderbox 

SWLing from Cairo to Kuwait 



The assassination of An- 
war Sadat, President of 
Egypt was simpiv the latest, 
at that time, of a whole 
series of "incidents" in this 
conflict-torn area. The war- 
fare between Israel and 
Egypt a few years ago, the 
fighting between Iraq and 
Iran, the invasion of Afghan- 
istan by the USSR, and the 
ever-threatened stability of 
Saudi Arabia, Kuwait, and 
other Arab oil-producing 
states are all part of the tur- 
bulent Middle East scene 
For a clear-cut, direct, day- 
by-day picture of this ex- 
plosive part of the world, 
listen to your shortwave 
radio. All the countries men- 
tioned above, plus others, 
have daily programs in 
English that can usually be 



heard welt in North Amer- 
ica. And you will find it in- 
teresting to compare the dif- 
ferent viewpoints of these 
nations, 

Radio Cairo from Egypt 
usually has a pretty good 
signal into North America, 
Its English programs can be 
heard at 2215-2345 CMT on 
9805 kH^ and at 02000330 
CMT on 12.000 and 9.465 
kHz, A 250-kW and a 100- 
kW transmitter are all the 
station has. Its programs al* 
ways open with the sound of 
chimes (sounding suspi- 
ciously like Big Ben in Lon- 
don) and the words from a 
woman announcer: "This is 
Cairo, this is Cairo." Fol- 
lowing this is a ten-minute 
news program. Then comes 
a regular pattern of music 



followed by a discussion of 
some timely topic, usually 
related to the Middle East 
The music is Middle Eastern, 
reminiscent of Egyptian bel- 
ly-dancing scenes in old 
movies. The music goes on 
for about ten minutes and 
then for 15 minutes you hear 
talk. Then back to the mu- 
sic, and so on This is the reg- 
ular daily program format. 
However, like the good 
broadcasters they are, Radio 
Catro is not afraid to break 
out of the mold if the occa- 
sion calls for it. 

If you had been listening 
to Radio Cairo on the eve- 
ning that Sadat was killed, as 
I was, you would have been 
in for a most interesting ex- 
perience. As soon as the off 1- 
cial announcement of 



Sadat's death had been 
made. Radio Cairo discard- 
ed its regular format and put 
on a fascinating program 
about the late president. 
They covered his rise to 
fame and his accomplish- 
ments while president, and 
then switched to a report on 
the background of his suc- 
cessor, Hosni Mubarak. 

To me, this was short* 
wave radio at its best. Such 
experiences give the listener 
the opportunity to go to the 
sources of major stories, 
wherever in the world they 
take place, and to get on- 
the-spot coverage that is 
usually way ahead of your 
local radio or TV news 
report. 

Perhaps the most exten- 
sive broadcasting job in the 



ALGERIA 



USSR. 




66 73 Magazine • June, 1982 



Middle East is done by Isra- 
el. Kol Israel, the vo!ce of 
Israel's External Service, 
bearns some six hours of 

English-fanguage programs 
into North America, many 
of them very popular with 
regular listeners. 

Broadcasting in Israel 
goes back to the days when 
the British ruled Palestine 
under a League of Nations 
mandate. They formed the 
Palestine Broadcasting Ser- 
vice (PBS) back in 1936 and 
put out programs in English, 
Hebrew, and Arabic The 
present Kol Israel took its 
bow on the first day of Isra- 
el's independence, carrying 
Prime Minister David Ben- 
Curion's original Declara- 
tion of Indeperidence 
speech live on May 14, 1948, 
from the Tel Aviv Municipal 
Museum The Hebrew 
broadcasting staff of the 
PBS joined up with those 
who had been broadcast- 
ing for the Jewish under- 
ground to form a nucleus for 
the original Kol Israel 
organization. 

In 1965, a Broadcasting 
Authority Law was enacted 
that gave Kol Israel the 
same status that is enjoyed 
in Great Britain by the BBC. 
That is, it is administered by 
a Board of Governors acting 
as an independent body out- 
side of direct government 
control The executive head 
is the Director-General who 
is appointed by the govern- 
ment for a five-year term 

About two-thirds of the Is- 
rael Broadcasting Authori- 
ty's budget is revenue from 
license fees of domestic lis- 
teners and TV viewers The 
remainder comes from fees 
charged advertisers for com- 
mercials on domestic radio 
and TV. The External Ser- 
vice also gets direct grants 
from the government 

Kol Israel has a strong sig- 
nal into North America with 
four 300 kW transmitters 
atmed at our shores. Broad- 
casts in English can be heard 
in the mornings, afternoons, 
and evenings. The last is the 
best time for reception, al- 



though afternoons generally 
also are good. Mornings at 
1200-1230 GMT are usually 
not the best for reception 

In the evenings, listen 
from 0000 to 0030 GMT, 
0100 to 01 30 GMT, and 0200 
to 0225 GMT on one of the 
following frequencies; 
15.583 kHz. 11 640 kHz, or 
9.815 kHz. Also listen from 
0500 GMT to 051 5 GMT on 
15105, 11.960, 11.638, or 
9.815 kHz. 

In the mornings at 1200, 
try for Kol Israel programs 
on 21 J60, 21 495. or 17.612 
kHz Sometimes the recef> 
tion at this hour is unusually 
good, but it is problemati- 
cal, unlike the other times of 
broadcast 

From 2000 to 2030 GMT 
on 12.025. 11,960, 9 815, 
and 11.638 kHz, reception 
IS usually strong. So, too, is 
it from 2230 to 2300 GMT 
on 1 1 .960, 1 1 ,638, and 9 81 5 
kHz. 

All Kol Israel programs 
begin with a five-minute 
news summary and then go 
into their regular program- 
ming, which is different 
each day. 

Sundays. "Calling All Lis- 
teners" is Radio Israel's pop- 
ular DX program which 
gives up-to-date information 
on frequency changes for 
Stations in the Middle East 
and also Kol Israel program 
details for the week This 
program extends into Mon- 
day GMT times (0100. 0200, 
etc.) 

Mondays . "Program 
Parade" gives forthcoming 
program details, and then 
comes "This Land/' which is 
particularly aimed at people 
interested in touring Is- 
rael Following this is ''Spec- 
trum/' which reviews Israeli 
scientific developments, 

Tuesday. "Israel Mosaic" 
gives the listener interest- 
ing facts about life in that 
country. "Pop Sound" of- 
fers music, and then comes 
^'Personally Speaking/' a 
program with guest 
commentators. 

Wec/nesda ys. "Israel 
Forum" is the big program 



Want Q5L Cards or Station Prof rams? 
Here are the addresses of Middle East broadcasters: 



Radio Afghanistan 
PO Box 544 
Kabul 
Afghanistan 

Voice of Islamic Republic 
Box 41-3641 
Tehran, Iran 



Radio Cairo 
PO Box 1186 
Cairo, Egypt 



Radio Baghdad 
[raqi Broadcasting 
Saftbiya 



Israel Broadcasting Authority 


Baghdad. Iraq 
Kuwait Broadcasting 


PO Box 1082 


PO Box 397 


Jerusalem. Israel 


Kuwait 


Broadcasting Service of the 


UAE Radio 


Kingdom of Saudi Arabia 


Dubai 


Ministry of Information 


PO Box 637 


Riyadh 


Abu DhabF 


Klrtgdom of Saudf Arabia 


United Arab Emirates 



of the day and offers the 
listener some lively discus- 
sions about people and 
politics. 

Thursdays. 'Time Out" 
offers interesting feature 
stories about life in Israel, 

Fridays. "Music from 
Israel/' 

SaturdaY$. "Israel This 
Week" is a review of current 
events of the past six days 

Compared to Israel, the 
other Middle East broad- 
casters are, for the most 
part, inferior While some 
have good signals, they are 
not on the air very much and 
their programming is, by 
comparison to Kol Israel, 
somewhat crude. However, 
if you are not listening just 
for enjoyment, as you might 
with the BBC or other West- 
ern stations, but to get infor- 
mation and various view- 
points, these other Middle 
East stations do give 
you that 

Radio Kuwait is an in- 
teresting station to listen to. 
This little country— about 
the size of Israel but with 
only half as many 
people — has some 15% of 
the world's oil reserves. Oil 
pays for (ust about 
everything there — free 
medical care, education, 
and social security. Best of 
all there are no taxes! 



Kuwait, as might be ex- 
pected, has modern 

Western technology work- 
ing for it, and this includes 
shortwave transmitters in 
which there are four 250-kW 
and two 500-kw units. They 
have a pretty good signal in- 
to the US from 1 800 to 2100 
GMT every day They use 
only one frequency— 11 675 
kHz — but the equipment is 
good enough to make this 
almost always a good one 
for receivers here in this 
country. 

A typical program from 
Kuwait goes like this: 
—1800 GMT -Station Iden- 
tification; music (Arab 
style); 

--1830 CMT-1 5 minute 
talk on some current event 
in the Middle East by young 
lady; 
—1845 CMT — More music; 

— 1900 GMT — Western- 
style music; 

—1930 GMT — Review of 
the week; 

— 2000 CMT -Music [Ara- 
bic); and 

— 2030 CMT — Discussion 
of economics by a man. 

Listening to Radio Kuwait 
is similar to sticking with 
Radio Cairo. It's not easy to 
stay glued to the receiver on 
stations like these unless 
somethmg special is hap- 
pening in the area. This, of 
course, is very likely these 

73 Magazine • June. 1982 67 



ii 






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dav5, with the Middle East 
set to have an explosion of 
some kind at any time Thus, 
it makes sense to know 
where to find stations like 
Radio Kuwait on your dial 
and to check into them from 
time to time. 

A real disappointment is 
Saudi Arabia. Here is one of 
the largest Middle East 
countries, with a population 
of 9,290.000 and geograph- 
ic a Uy a quarter the size of 
the US. Lfke Kuwait, it is oil- 
rich Unlike Kuwait, which 
has a literacy rate of over 
60%, Saudi Arabia has a 
rate of only 15%, 

The Saudis have three 
shortwave transmitters— a 
SO-, a 10O-, and a 350-kW 
They should spend a couple 
of bucks and buy more or 
better ones Reception is not 
very good here in the US 
They broadcast from 
1800-2100 CMT on 11 856 or 
7 210 kHz, 

When you do tune them 
in, the program starts with a 

68 73MagazmB • June, 1982 



man saying, "This is Radio 
leddah, the broadcasting 
service of the Kingdom of 
Saudi Arabia." The program 
that follows is a mixture of 
Middle Eastern music and 
talk, the latter primarily ex- 
plaining positions on oil 
prices, purchases of modern 
arms from the US, etc. 
Again, while not the most 
entertaining station to listen 
to, it could be of great in- 
terest should some event 
take place in that part of 
the world. 

A much more intriguing 
station to listen to is UAE 
Radio in Dubai, in the 
United Arab Emirates. Here 
is a little country that I had 
never heard of before be^ 
coming a shortwave radio 
listener. It has a population 
of less than a million people 
and is roughly the size of 
Maine. However, oil rev- 
enues give the UAE one of 
the highest per capita gross 
national products m the 
world This little country 
was a British protectorate 



until 1971— another reason 
for its obscurity. 

From a broadcasting 
standpoint, UAE Radio is a 
pleasant surprise. It has 
three 30OkW transmitters 
which seem to reach us here 
in North America extremely 
well Its English programs 
can be heard twice daily, at 
0330^3357 CMT on 17775 
and 9.590 kHz, and from 
1610-1650 CMT on 21 695 
and 17 710 kHz. 

After station identifica- 
tion by a young lady who 
sounds as though she has 
been educated in London, 
England, UAE Radio offers 
not the news, as is the usual 
shortwave broadcasting 
technique, but a feature 
story Recently/for example, 
it had an interesting 
1 5-minute talk on the history 
of the trade of that geo- 
graphical area with China 
during the time of the Cru- 
sades. Following this came 
ten minutes of music— not 
Arabic music, but the kind 
we hear on US FM "beauti- 
ful music" stations. After 
this came the news. 

News is done in BBC 
style. That is. first they give 
you the headlines, then the 

detailed stories, and then a 
repeat of the headlines. You 
can see the British influence 
in their broadcasting With 
the exception of Israel, UAE 
Radio appears to be the 
most westernized of alt the 
Middle East stations. 

Another pleasant surprise 
in Middle East stations is 
Radio Baghdad from Iraq. 
This station also has very 
good programs, and even 
though it is reported to have 
only a single 250-kW trans- 
mitter, it comes in with a 
pretty strong signal to North 
America. A typical program 
starts with 15 minutes of 
news followed by about five 
minutes of music (Arab 
style) Next comes a five- 
minute editorial (perhaps on 
the war with Iran and why 
thev are fighting), followed 
by more music. Then 
another talk and more 
music. 



While it may sound rather 
boring, the fact of the mat* 
tf r is that the talks are well 

thought out and very welt 
delivered. It is good listen- 
ing if you are at all interest- 
ed in what is going on in the 
Middle East 

Iraq is not a large country 
(a little bigger than Califor- 
r>ia in size and with a popu- 
lation of 12,000,0001 but it 
is one of the key nations in 
the area and. unlike some, 
has a pretty good record for 
stability In other words, its 
attitudes and thinking wilt 
be important in future 
developments in the Middle 
East You can hear Radio 
Baghdad every day at 
2130-2225 GMT on 9.745 
kHz and at 03000335 on 
21.585 kHz. 

The other countries in the 
area are an "iffy" proposi- 
tion as far as reception is 
concerned Iran, three times 
the size of Iraq in both pop- 
ulation and area, can often 
be heard at 1930-2030 CMT 
on 9,022 kHz. Programs are 
not exactly award winners, 
but you do get the Iranian 
point of view. 

Afghanistan can usually 
be heard at 1900-1930 GMT 
on 15.077 — but not very 
well. Algeria can sometimes 
be heard at 2100-2130 GMT 
on 25 700 or 15 215 kHz 
Some listeners have heard 
Lebanon on 11 790 or n 860 
kHz at 0230-0300 GMT. DX- 
ers have caught additional 
Middle East countries, but 
not with programs in 
English 

However, for those of you 
who want to keep up with 
what IS going on in that part 
of the world, you have a 
pretty wide choice of sta- 
tions with good signals and 
fairly good programs — 
Israel, Egypt, UAE Radio, 
Kuwait, and Iraq, This 
assortment gives you a good 
balance of opinions. After a 
few months of listening to 
this array of programs, youll 
be the best-informed guy or 
girl on the block about the 
Middle East.B 



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^Se* Ust of Advertts^ts on page ft4 



73 Magazine • June J 982 71 



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72 73 Magazine • June, 1982 



Confidential 
Frequency List 



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New 5th edition by Perry Ferreii 



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2608 Vantage Cove 
Annapolis MD 21401 



Are You Ready for 900 MHz? 



This article is based on a paper given at the 27th Annual VHF Conference, Western Michigan University, Oct. 17, 1981, Kalamazoo Ml, 



Since the proposal and 
decision to allocate the 
902-928-MHz segment of 
the UHF spectrum to the 
Amateur Servicei^ VHF/ 
UHF enthusiasts and experi- 
menters have wondered 
how best to utilize this new 
resource and what equip- 
ment would be needed to 
communicate efficiently on 
it. This article will address 
those topics and will pro- 
pose a band plan for the 
amateur community based 
on experience with other 
VHF/UHF bands and prov- 
en radio-frequency design 
techniques. 

History 

Recent use of the fre- 
quency spectrum from 
902-928 MHz in the United 
States has been for radio- 
frequency heating, i.e., the 
Industrial, Scientific and 
Medical (ISM) service. Early 
commercial and consumer 
microwave ovens used this 
wavelength, although most 
now have changed to 2450 
MHz for improved perfor- 
mance at this higher fre- 
quency,^ Most ISM heating 
devices (typically magne- 
trons] are tuned to a center 
frequency of 915 MHz and, 
with their pulsed power op- 
eration, generate consider- 
able amounts of energy in 
the form of sidebands. 
Thus, guard bands of plus 
and minus 13 megahertz 
about the center frequency 
were adopted to minimize 
interference with services 
in immediately adjacent al- 
locations. 

74 73 Magazine • June, 1982 



Warning: The 915-MHz 
frequency was origina^lly 
chosen for its heating ef- 
fects on substances with 
high water content such as 
food and, unfortunately, 
human flesh! 

The ISM service will 
share the new amateur allo- 
cation on a secondary, non- 
interference basis as the 
proposals now stand. Both 
services will share the band 
with Government Radiolo- 
cation (radar), which will 
have primary status (this is 
the case in many UHF/mi- 
crowave amateur bands). In 
addition, other restrictions 
provide that the new band 
will not be available to the 
Amateur Satellite Service 
and that it may be suscepti- 
ble to interference by Auto- 
matic Vehicle Monitoring 
(AVM) systems pending 
consideration by the Feder- 
al Communications Com- 
mission.^ 



Propagation 

The new UHF allocation 
has shown in commercial 
land mobile tests that it be- 
haves much as expected — 
attenuation by natural ob- 



jects such as trees and earth 
will be greater than on 450 
MHz, necessitating in- 
creased effective radiated 
power. However, in urban 
areas, because of the much 
shorter wavelength, its 
specular reflection allows 
much better coverage in 
areas forested by tall build- 
ings and tunnel structures, '* 

Much research has al- 
ready been accomplished 
by the commercial commu- 
nity in its quest to prolifer- 
ate the cellular mobile ra- 
diotelephone services into 
the 825-to-890-MHz area. 
Several excellent articles 
have appeared document- 
ing extensive tests that have 
been performed in a variety 
of areas (mostly metropoli- 
tan) around the United 
States.^'®'^ The operational 
characteristics of amateur 
mobile FM voice should 
parallel these results quite 
closely, 

One area of concern in 
using the new 33-centime- 
ter band for mobile com- 
munication is the rate of 
signal cancellation and ad- 
dition (mobile flutter]. At 
two meters, the same phe- 
nomenon that causes lost 



902X MHz 

90Z6MHZ 

906.0 MHz 
912.0 MHz 
918,0 MHz 
924.0 MHz 



CW/SSB 

FM voice/RPT 

(mobile receive, RPT transmit) 

ATV Channel A 

ATV Channel B 

ATV Channel C 

FMvoicelRPT 

(mobile transmit, RPT receive) 



927.4 MHz, 

928.0 MHz -Control Links, Packet Transmissions 

The band plan proposed by WB4iNM in October, 1981, for 
902-928 MHz. 



words during transmissions 
will, at 900 MHz, add a low- 
frequency buzz to demodu- 
lated audio. At speeds of 30 
to 60 miles per hour, the fre- 
quency of this tone will be 
approximately 80 to 160 Hz 
for a transmission frequen- 
cy of 915 MHz. Although 
this is not a problem for 
voice intelligibility (it can 
be filtered out by appropri- 
ate audio high-pass filter- 
ing), it does cause the pres- 
ent continuous tone sub- 
audible squelch (CTSS), 
known more popularly by 
its trade name, Private 
Line,* to malfunction by un- 
squelctiing a receiver when 
there is actually no trans- 
mitted CTSS tone. Thus, dif- 
ferent selective-signaling 
methods, perhaps tone 
burst or digital squelch 
composed of a short dura- 
tion serial-bit stream at the 
beginning of each transmis- 
sion, would be required for 
reliable operation, 

Hardware 

Equipment for commu- 
nicating at 900 MHz is an- 
other area where the com- 
mercial communications 
services are helping almost 
as much as when they 
dumped thousands of old 
VHF high-band transceiv- 
ers on the amateur market 
in the late 1960s. Although 
it will be many years be- 
fore the new cellular radios 
will be available as surplus, 
the components and tech- 
nology used in these trans- 
ceivers will be produced in 
mass quaint it ies for the 
many tens of thousands of 





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73 Magazine • June, 1982 75 



mobile radiotelephone 
users that are expected to 
populate the adjacent 
commercial band in the 
next few years. Several 
semiconductor manufac- 
turers already are produc- 
ing comporreots that will 
WQfk well in amateur trans- 
ceivers.^-^ ^^^ 

For those who don't want 
to build down to the basics, 
there are also hybrid power- 
amplifier modules that re- 
quire little more than appli- 
cation of proper drive sig- 
nals, power-supply volt- 
ages, and heat sinkingJ^ 
These would be suitable for 
FM, PM, or CW operations, 
and require only 250 milli- 
watts of input energy for 7.5 
GT 20 Watts output. 

Receiver designs will be 
of the same general super- 
heterodyne style we are ac- 
customed to, but with sig- 
nificant differences in the 
construction of the rf am- 
plifier and first mixer 
stages. To enhance selectiv- 
ity, small cavity resonators 
or helical resonators will be 
used for their low-loss char- 
acteristics and their physi- 
cal size^ which will reach 
manageable proportions at 
this wavelength. Gallium 
arsenide fieid-ef feet transis- 
tors, once expensive de- 
vices for commercial and 
military systems, will be 
employed to minimize 
noise figures when used 
ahead of Schottky diode 
double-balanced mixers 
known for their inherent ex- 
cellent wide dynamic 
range. The cost of these 
mixers Continues to de- 
crease as they are used in 
more and more communi- 
cation systems. Several 
manufacturers already of- 
fer, in small quantities, pre- 
assembled mixer modules 
that work to 1 GHz for un- 
der ten dollars. 

Building at 900 MHz will 
introduce the newcomer to 
a different attitude toward 
the components he uses. 
The rules here are, ''the on- 
ly good leads are no leads/' 
and, ''rt may look like a ca- 
pacitor to you but what 

76 73 Magazine • June J 982 



does it look like to the cir- 
cuit?" At this frequency, a 
one-eighth-inch lead of #22 
AWG wire on a 270-picofar- 
ad disc capacitor exhibits 
an inductive reactance 
larger than the capacitive 
reactance of the capacitor. 
Thus, the capacitor at this 
frequency is actually acting 
as an inductor. 

Chip capacitors, capaci- 
tors with no leads at all, are 
frequently used where this 
effect becomes a problem. 
Although they are reason- 
ably expensive, their price 
can be expected to de- 
crease since the production 
process for manufacturirig 
them is automated and they 
are now being used in the 
computer industry to help 
digital devices comply with 
stringent new radio fre- 
quency interference regula- 
tions. 

One of the toughest 
problems to tackle will be 
that of frequency stability, 
especially in mobile and 
portable equipment. Con- 
sider a typical transmitter 
crystal of frequency 
33.4074 MHz (902 MHz di- 
vided by 27X with a toler- 
ance of 001 % over the ex- 
tremes of temperature, 
shock, and voltage. This 
crystal could exhibit a drift 
of 9 kHz at 902 MHz and 
still be within specification. 
if the new amateur band 
were to follow the normal 
25-kHz channel spacing 
and 13-kHz occupied band- 
width used on 450 MHz, if is 
obvious that the communi- 
cations system would suffer 
great degradation in both 
adjacent channel selectivi- 
ty and demodulation distor- 
tion if this crystal were 
used. 

Several ingenious ideas 
have been proposed to alle- 
viate this stability problem, 
or at least to transfer the 
problem to a station capa- 
ble of maintaining an accu- 
rate frequency standard. ^^ 
If the mobile transmitters 
were designed to operate in 
full duplex mode, the signal 
received from the repeater 
(assumed to be stable and 



accurate) could be used as 
a reference to which the 
mobile transmitter could be 
frequency-locked. Since 
the vast majority of vehicu- 
lar operation on this band 
will most certainly be tied 
to repeater systems, this 
method represents a very 
Cost-effective solution. The 
band plan suggested later 
in this article was devel- 
oped with this concept in 
mind. 

Another positive aspect 
of a full duplex system is 
that it will allow the opera- 
tor to gain immediate 
knowledge of how well he 
is communicating with the 
retransmission site, be- 
cause he will be able to lis- 
ten to his own signal as it is 
retransmitted [perhaps at 
reduced volume in the re- 
ceiver to prevent audio 
feedback). 

Antennas for the 33-cm 
band will be small enough 
to be built easily with sim- 
ple hand tools and mount- 
ed on masts no larger than 
small television antennas. A 
fourteeo-element parasitic 
yagi-uda array, which mag- 
nifies a transmitter's power 
16 times, occupies a space 
of only 6.5 by 28.5 inches. 
Corner reflectors, which 
have never been widely 
used by amateurs at lower 
frequencies, are Easily con- 
structed and offer a decent 
amount of gain and fairly 
wide bandwidth. Of course, 
for those who can afford 
the price [and have no 
neighbors), a four-meter di- 
ameter parabolic dish gives 
about 27 dB gain and can 
be used on the higher mi- 
crowave bands as wel 



Using If 

Many different ideas, 
amateur conventions, and 
technological factors were 
considered when attempt- 
ing to formulate a band 
plan that would serve all 
the needs of the amateur 
fraternity. The following 
plan is the distillate of 
those components. 

One aspect of the hobby 
that appears to be in a 



growth mode is that of fast- 
scan television and com- 
puter-generated video. On 
the 70-centimeter band, the 
wide, buzzing video car- 
riers are not well received 
(more accurately, not wel- 
come) near the weak-signal 
satellite downlink subband 
from 435-438 MHz. This has 
prompted ATV, in several 
metropolitan areas of the 
country, to move to 23 cm 
in search of usable spec- 
trum. However, the expect- 
ed allocation of 1260-1270 
MHz to the amateur satel- 
lite service/ coupled with 
the recent removal of ama- 
teur operating privileges 
from 1215 to 1240 MHz for 
military navigational sate!- 
lite systems (NAVSTAR, 
GPSS),* as well as the diffi- 
culty of generating healthy 
amounts of power at 23 cm, 
makes this band less than 
desirable for fast-scan tele- 
vision. 

! am proposing, there- 
fore, that three 6-MHz-wide 
standard video channels 
(with multiplexed FM voice 
if desired) be centered in 
the proposed band plan. 
Since these three channels 
would be broadcast stan- 
dard video format and fre- 
quency spacing, only one 
local oscillator per down- 
converter would be needed 
to mix alt three down to 
contiguous VHF or UHF 
broadcast channels for dis- 
play on a standard unmodi- 
fied television receiver. 

For the FM crowd, the 
band plan proposes 128 
new FM channel pairs 
spaced at 25 kHz, with the 
transmission and reception 
frequency difference [split) 
at 21.4 MHz, This would al- 
low use of relatively inex- 
pensive monolithic crystal 
filters at an intermediate 
frequency of 21 .4 MHz and 
the frequency-locking of 
transmitters to received pi- 
lot carriers from repeaters. 
Although this is an extreme- 
ly low first i-f for a radio of 
this type, a judicious mix of 
image-cancelling mixer 
technology and low-loss 



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73 Magazine * June, 1982 77 



front-end filtering will pro- 
vide good image rejection 

and sensitivitV' 

The portable equipment 
receive band is placed at 
the low end of the new 
spectrum, causing the im- 
age frequencies to be 
thrown into the avionics 
(DME. TACAN) band in* 
stead of the new cellular ra- 
diotelephone band Since 
the smaller mobile trans- 
ceivers have less room for 
cavity filters, that can be 
implemented more easily in 
fixed-retransmission sites. 
The ATV repeater-output 
spectrum is also located at 
the same end of the band as 
the FM voice repeater so 
that the two types of re- 
peaters can be easily co-lo- 
cated. Point-to-point ser- 
vice for low-band repeater 
linking, packet-transmis- 
sion techniques, and radio- 
command systems would 
be placed at the high end of 
the band. 

Space has been reserved 
at the lower end of the band 



for weak-signal modes, SSB, 
and CW, as is common on 
the lower VHF and UHF 
bands. This 600-kHz swath 
allows for many 3-kHz side- 
band voice channels for tro- 
pospheric-scatter. moon- 
bounce, and meteor-scatter 
experiments. Initial experi- 
ments may be carried out 
with little more than a re- 
turned 451-451.30-MHz 
commercial FM transceiver 
driving a varactor doubier 
for CW transmission. From 
past experience with both 
listening and operating on 
the other bands above 30 
MHz, this will provide plen- 
ty of weak-signal spectrum 
space for the foreseeable 
future. 

Conclusion 

Techniques and equip- 
ment for the new amateur 
band from 902-928 MHz 
have been discussed, A 
band plan which tries to 
serve all users in the ama- 
teur community has been 
proposed. Particular em- 



phasis has been placed on 
the need for fast-scan tele- 
vision transmission spec- 
trum since it appears that 
ATV mode has been 
nudged out of other re- 
gions of the amateur spec- 
trum. It is hoped that the 
discussion of the new UHF 
band will entice you to 
buitd or buy equipment 
and operate this frequency 
range no matter what your 
special interest is. With 26 
MHz of spectrum, there is 
room for everybody! ■ 

References 

1. Proceedings of the 1979 
World Administrative Radio 
Conference. 

2. "Microwave Ovens -Revolu- 
tion In Cooking;^ O. R McCcn- 
nell, Eiectronics Worid, August, 
1970. 

3. "Happenings'* column* W. D. 
CHft, OST. September, 1981. 

4. Microwave MobifB Communi- 
cations, W. C. Jakes, Jr., Wiley- 
Interscience, 1974. ISeN 
0*471 -4372CM. 

5. "What Happens When 900 
MH2 Takes to the Hills," F. A. 



Barton, G. A. Wagner, Communh 
cations Magazine, March- April, 
1974. 

6. ''Some Characteristics of Mo* 
Dile Radio Propagation at 836 
MHz in the Philadelphia Area," 
D. M. Black, D. O, Redudink, 
IEEE Transactions on Vehicuiar 
Technoiogy, May, 1972. 

7. "Examination of the Feasibil- 
ity of Conventional Land Mobile 
Operation at 950 MHz/ FCC Re- 
search Division Report R'7120, 

8. Private Line: registered trade- 
mark of Moloroia Communica- 
tions Products, Inc., Schaum- 
burg, Illinois. 

9* "Rf Selector Guide and Cross 
Reference/' Motorola Semicon- 
ductor Products, Inc., Phoenix, 
Arizona, 

10. *'Rf Communications Prod- 
ucts," TRW RF Semiconduc- 
tors, Lawndale, California, 

11. Data Sheets, Communica* 
tions Transistor Corporation, 
inc., San Carlos, California, 

12. Data Sheets MHW82Q, 
MHW80a, Motorola Semtcon- 
ductor Products, Inc., Phoenix, 
Arizona. 

13. " 'Logical' Design Relaxes 
Tough Crystal Standards/' S. J. 
Lipoff, Microwaves Magazine, 
August, 1977. 



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-&uii( tfi ThJt f«tuit& m i kowftf lOtM Efiti 

■ Fafitaiilc Moran rie«ptlan, Si> iiaqi iciivt fillir 
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W Butit in>, iteariit, fnuRl-tttit, lAtlv* flluf RTTV mn^ tStS 

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TO ORDER (209) 634<8B88 or 667-2888 

Wfl are experlandng; islephpne ditficultiea. ^ Please keep iryung 

•TRS-80 is a Regisi&rod Trademark of TarnJy Corp. 
Appffl IS e Registered Trademark ot Apple Computer inc 
1 yr, Parts & Labor - LimFl«J Wflrfanty 



tThe communications terminal that does it alii 



79 73 Magazine • June J 962 



BEEPER III 



^4T 



MFJ RF NOISE BRIDGE 



^rf^^li^- 



*lf^*>* 



"THE PROFESSIONAL TOUCH 
COMES TO AMATEUR RADIO!'' 



" BP-S aubcijnatusily provides ift {anUe ht^h fre- 
quency beep a,l ihs beginning of nch. Lran^mlB- 
sjon &rtct ft loir beep &t Uie and Vlftuolly elnai 
jMbm "lilk-ijver"! Qperai«e for up to one year 
on A ilii^le 9-T baa«7 tnoi auppliadt Can be 
duvcUy mterfHsed to May tf«fiso»ver which i£ 
AsytA by grounding the PTT Una fthe FITllne 
voltags ifiufii be posism, not groatar than 34 
VD(X fffiT thtt cuimnt gFmmt th&a 100 eQ4^ i 
WorJtB with ftrtuolly all nuMtem ga&r. Ymi^ve 
tifliLrd It, tiow jrmi can li&v* Itr^ 



Lets you adjust your antenna quickly for maxi- 
mum performance. Measure resonant frequency, 
radiation resistance and reactance. Excfusive range 
extender and ex panded capacitance range gives 
you much extended measuring range. 

• Exclusive range extender • Ex panded 
capacitance range • Series Bridge 



a 



ADD THE BEEP! 



ff 



HP 3A GompiecewiLi. l:^^^^. OOtilfi. 
Sttmdard 4-pm oonnwAora 
BP3B As above exwpt without 

uuniiectoi-a. Add yoLU" own 
BP-aC CtTGuit-board vsraksn for 
cnjfiitOJTi installation 
All iinii£ aas&iTkblied^'iegtad 
add e% Saim T^y. ' 



9vpVD yy 
3$.BB pp 

as .98 pp 

OH residents 



F^es 



II 





3146 Dorf Pnvfl* Dvyiort Qrw 4S<4ie 



*»**•♦#♦***#* ********^ 



TM 




This MFJ-202 RF Noise Bi^ge lets you qmckfy 
adjust your single or muitttjaml dipole. inverted 
Vee. Deam, veriical, mot)ife whip w random 
system for maximum pertofmance. 

Tetis r^sofiant frequency and whethef to shorten 
or lengthen your antenna tor mmimuFn SWR over 
any portion oi a band 

MFJ's exclusive range extender, expanded ca- 
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use, Comprehensive computer proven manual. 

Works with arty receiver or transceiver. SO 239 
conoectors. 2x3x4 inches 9 volt battery. 

Other uses: tune transmatctt; adjust tuned cfr 
cuits; measure inductance. RF impedance of ampli 
tiers. ba!un5. transfomiers: electrical lerigth. velo- 
city tactor, fmpedar^ce of coax; synthesi?e RF im* 
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Ortfer from WFJ and try rt — no obligallon. Tf 
not delighted, return tt within 30 days tor a refund 
(less shipping). This brkloe is uncondttionaH v 
guaranteed for or^e year, 

To order, simply call us ton free 900-6 47^1 600 
and charge it on your VISA or MaslerCharge or 
mail us a check or money order for $59,95 plus 
£4.00 for shipqinq and handling for MFJ 202. 

Put this MFJ Noise Bridge to work improvirt^ 
your antenna. Order from hifFJ or see dealer 



CALL TOLL FREE ... 800-647-1800 



Call 601 323 5669 tor technical inlormatlon, or- 
der/repair status. Also call &01-323-586B outskJe 
continental USA and in Mississippi". 

ENTERPRISES, 

INCORPORATED 

Box 494, Mississippi State. MS 39762 / 




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Converter P,C- Board 
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Power Supply 
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MRF 901 .»„...2,00 

2835 Diodes 95 

.001 Chip 

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35 



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Mo C.0.0. 0rd«ri 
To Of^«r Ctll t-317'255 7776— for information ctU 317-Z91 7262 

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INDIANAPOLIS. IN 46268 



ELECTROniC 

RmnBOUi 



t^S&e List of Advertisers Of^ page 1 N 



73 Magazine • June, 1982 79 



look here 



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ITEX, RES. Call Collect 7-10 PM CT 
M.W.F, 1-713-721-7920) 

days 1-713-658-0268 



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FT101ZD/Mafk3 749.00 
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MASTERCARD VISA 
All prices fob Hcusion except wtieie indicated Prices 
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Some itmns subject prior sale Texas rasi^ents add 6% 
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Houston, Texas 77010 



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on orders over 

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10 am "11(6 pm 

Thurs & Friday 'til 9 pm 




Mich. res. add 4% 



^KENWOOD 

R. L. DRAKE 




nisir 



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AND »^ORtl 
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2 locations 
1207 W. 14 Mile Road, Clawson Ml 46017 

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$219.95 • Shipping $3,50 
m USA. • N.Y.S. 

Residents add appropriate 
sales tax 

Hundreds already in operatJon * Call anyone'-anywhefe^anytiirie 

NOVAX interfaces ycwjr standard 2 rr^ter: 220; 450; etc. base statjon arxl DTMF 
(Toucmone) Telephone, using a high speed scan switching technique so that you 
can direct dial from your aulorr>obile or with the HT from the backyard or poolside 
—automatically Easy inslallation Rtngback ireverse autopatch) option available 
tor S29 95 kJt-S39.95 lactory wired. 



• SMALLSIZE-(5"x6"x21 

• STATE OF THE ART 
CIRCUITRY 12-16 V DC 

• ADJUSTABLE ACTIVITY TIMER 
(clears out if mobite ts out ot range) 



• EASY INTERFACING with radio audio 
& squek^h circuit 

• SINGLE DIGIT CONTROL 
(connect and disconnect) 

• 3 MIN CALL DURATION TIMER 



TO ORDER— SEND Check— Money Order (MasterCard or Visa accepted) to: 
R.W.D. Inc.. Ortskarty, N.Y. 13424 or call (315)-829-2785 ^ j. 



80 JSMagazine • June, 1982 



GOTHAM 
ANTENNAS 

(305) 294-2033 

SMALI.L0TTRARDIPOLES 




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$36 95 
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FULL S«2E PARAiLEt DfPOLES 
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N£W^ PORTABLE VERTICAL' lOEAL FOR 



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PROVEN DESIGN 
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CALL OR SEND LARGE SASE FOR CATA 
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S«3ms & Quads Shipped UPS or Freight 
Cottrcl Fia iddt^ §»t#^Tai 

1415 First St. • Key West, FL 33040 



MFJ-1200 GENERAL PURPOSE 

CW Computer Interface 

Connects computer to transceiver. Converts received audio 
to TTURS-232. Allows computer to key transmitter. For 
use with your computer and CW Keyboard/Reader program. 




At tows your rig to 

"talk Cl¥" to your 

computer anti vice versa. 




A personal computer with an appropfiate 
program can give you a complete and very ver- 
satile CW Keyboard/Reader. But you still need 
interlace electronics to provide compatible signals 
between your transceiver and computer 

Ttie MFJ-1ZQQ CW Computer Interface pro 
cesses (noise fjmits. tillers, delects, posi fiffers, 
stia|}es, level smtts} trie received CW audio from 
your transceiver to provide a clean cofBputer 
COfftoatible TTL or RS 232 level 

it also takes the keyt^oard generated CW 
(TTL Of RS-232 output (evei^) Irom your ctrniputm 
and dri^res tii^h vollage keying eircuits to key 
your tutie or so^id state transmitter (-300 V, 
10 mA max: -I- 300 V. 100 mA maK). 

Has tuning, transmit, and "OH" LEDs. Reverse- 
normaf switch inverts output level to computer. 
ON/OFF switch. 6x1 f'4x3 m Black, eggshell wrule 



aluminum cabinet. Requires 6-9 VAC or 110 VAC 
with npflonaf AC adapter. MFJ13GgAC. $9Sf^ 

Order Irom MFJ and try it - no ottligatlon. If 
nol delighted, return it within 30 days lor relund 
(less shipping). One year ur^conditional guarantee. 

Order today. Call toll free 800 647 1800. Charge 
VISA. MC or mail ct>eck. money o:def lor $69 9 'j 
lor MfJ 1200 ^lus S4,00 shipping and handling 

Use this lAFJ'IZOO to enjoy your computer a^3 
a CW Keyboard/Reader CaN MF J^of see dealer 



CALL TOLL FRS . . . 800-647-1800 



Cati 601 323 5869 tor technol inlofTnalion of 
der/repair siaius. Also call 601 323 586*3 mii^ 
contmentai USA and in Mississippi ^az 

ME. I ENTERPRISES, 

IWirW INCORPORATED 

Box 494. Mississippi State. US 39762 




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THIS EXCITER IS USED TO DRtVE THE HI PRO 25 WATT 
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THIS RECEIVER IS THE 
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Sen? Lnt of Aoveftihefs on aagB 1 14 



73 Magazine • June. 1982 81 




RAC 




TRAC*ONE + DELUXE 
CMOS KEYER 

$119.95 



Features: 



Model IE 464 



' True CW signal reproduc r ion— Single stgnaJ recep- 
lion 

' Removes aEl QRW and QRN 

"DJQS out CW signal, decodes it with Phased Lock 

Loop Tone Decoder then reproduces it with full 

operatof control over Gain, Freq. Tone. Delay. 
'All controls on front panel 
'Ffeq controi variable 300 Hz to 2500 Hi will match 

any rig. 

'LEtD flashes during decoder operation 
"Operates In line with rig audio — leave In line on 

OFF/BYPASS 
'Buill m speaHer 
'Headphones jack rear panel 
'Bauery or AC adaptor. 9VDC operation 

PLUS: 

" Deluxe CMOS Keyer— Static I' ttie-art" CMOS cir- 
cuitry 

'Self-compJeting dots and dashes 
*Both dot and dash memory 
Mambic keying with any squeeze paddle 
*5-50 w.p.m. 

'Speed, Volume, Tone, Tune and Weight controls 
"Stdetone and speaker 
* Semi -auto swdch foi bug or straight key 
"Deluxe quarter-inch jacks lot keying and output 
" Keys grid block or solid stale rigs 




# ##..# 



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PROCESSOR 



$89.95 



Features: 



Model TE 424 



'True CW signaj reproduclitn— Single signal recep- 
tton 
^Removes all QRM and QRN 

"Digs out CW stgnal^ decodes it with Phased Lock 
Loop Tone Decoder then reproduces It with luii op 
eraior conirol over Gain, Freq, Tone, Deiay. 

*AI! controls on front panel 

■ Freq control variable 300 Hi' to 2500 Hi wUI n^atch 
any rig 

•LED flashes dunng decoder opera h on 

^Operates In line with rag audio — leave in hne on 
OFF/BYPASS 

*BiiiitHn Speaker 

* Headphones Jack rear panel 

" Battery or AC-adaptor. 9 VDC operation ^ ^6 

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1106 RAND BLDG. 
BUFFALO. NY 14203 

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£50 










H 

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1 


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130 








w 
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to 




• 


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V-J PRODUCTS, INC. bob East Shaw, Pasadena, Texas 77506 

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82 73Magazine • June, 1982 



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73 Magazine • June, 1982 83 



Crime-Stoppers' Textbook 

rules of thumb for would-be gumshoes 



Robert C Diefenbach 
2402 Uuderdaie Driye, HE 
Aftanta CA J034S 

NO one seemed to 
notice the tan car that 
stopped at the quiet corner 
only long enough to drop 
off a tall, casually dressed 
young man. As the car 
drove unhurriedly away, 
the young man began walk- 
ing past the neatly trimmed 
yards looking — carefully 
looking— at each house as 



he passed. No one seemed 
to notice. 

But the driver of the car 
with amateur radio tags did 
notice, and a few minutes 
later also noticed the same 
tan car stopped in the 
shade of a clump of low 
pine trees in a nearby 
church parking lot. The 
car's hood was raised. Its 
driver, standing in front 
with one foot resting on the 
bumper, was making some 
unseen adjustment to the 





B.M, Gray II. 

84 73 Magazine • June, 1982 



idling engine. He appeared 
impatient as he glanced at 
his wristwatch 

Driving past the parking 
lot, the ham noted the 
dented left front fender on 
the tan car and the driver's 
blonde hair and blue foot- 
ball-style jersey. And more, 
By the time he pulled his 
car to an easy stop midway 
down the next block and 
reached for the micro- 
phone clipped to the dash- 
board, he knew exactly 
what he would say to the 
police dispatcher. 

It took only moments to 
place the call through the 
repeater phone patch. 

The dispatcher's voice 
was crisp. "Police emer- 
gency," 

"I want to report a suspi- 
cious car and persons on 
Thomason Drive, I suspect 
they are planning a bur- 
glary/' 

"Stand by/' 

There was nothing re- 
markable about this series 
of transmissions or others 
like it, heard infrequently 
on the amateur and busi- 
ness radio bands, except 
that they are heard very in- 
frequently in proportion to 
the potential criminal activ- 
ities witnessed by drivers of 
radio-equipped vehicles. 
Law-enforcement agencies 
wish fervently that there 
were more civilian radio 
exchanges tike this one. 
They need alt the help they 
can get. 

There are only 2.1 full- 
time law-enforcement offi- 
cers per 1000 US citizens, 
according to the latest 



figures released by the Fed* 
eral Bureau of Investiga- 
tion. These men and wom- 
en do their best in the 
face of an alarming in- 
crease in serious crime, 
but they are, as a group, 
vastly overworked. Since 
1971, property crimes [bur- 
glary, larceny-theft, and 
motor-vehicle theft) have 
shot up 54 percent nation- 
ally. Violent crimes (mur- 
der, forcible rape, and ag- 
gravated assault) have risen 
60 percent. In just one year, 
from 1979 to 1980, burglar- 
ies and robberies rose 14 
and 18 percent, respec- 
tively. 

As federal, state, and lo- 
cal governments tighten 
their belts in the current 
wave of budget and tax re- 
visions, there is not likely to 
be much — if any — increase 
in the number of profes- 
sional crime fighters in 
most jurisdictions. There is 
a clear and growing need 
for appropriately- con- 
trolled civilian involve- 
ment. 

Special Agent Edward J. 
Tully of the FBI points out 
that "there has been a ten- 
dency for civilians to forget 
their responsibility for ef- 
fective law enforcement. 
Clearly, police departments 
cannot do the job alone/' 
Tully is acting academic 
dean of the FBI Institute in 
Quantico. Virginia, where 
police officers from cities 
of all sizes are trained 
alongside federal and state 
agents and policemen and 
-women. "Citizens with ac- 
cess to mobile two-way 



radios, or ham radio oper- 
tors, can be of significant 
assistance/' he said. 

San ford H- Smith, a lead- 
ing national figure in public- 
safety communications, 
agrees wholeheartedly. 
"The present trend in our 
country is towards self- 
help. Increased citizen in- 
volvement in law enforce- 
ment is a natural part of 
that trend" Mr. Smith is 
Director of Communica- 
tions for the city of Greens- 
boro, North Carolina, presi- 
dent of the Land Mobile 
Communications Council, 
and immediate past-presi- 
dent of the Associated Pub- 
lic Safety Communications 
Officers, Inc. ''When we 
feel we have done some- 
thing for our community 
and our fellow men, there is 
a huge personal reward," 
he adds. 

When the FBI and any 
other law-enforcement 
agency solicit civilian help, 
they are definitely not sug- 
gesting that the civilians 
"play policeman/' That is 
the very last thing authori- 
ties want and is probably 
the best way a civilian 
could pick to become a 
part of the problem instead 
of the sotutionl What is 
wanted and needed is re- 
sponsible, reliable observa- 
tion and reporting of poten- 
tial or actual criminal activ- 
ities, and NOT vigilantism 
or other unauthorized di= 
rect involvement 

Professionals in law-en* 
f ore em en t communica- 
tions — "sworn'' officers 
and civilians alike— agree 
that radio-equipped volur^ 
teer observers' reports are 
valuable. They stress that 
these reports are more valu- 
able when the observers 
have been trained, even 
minimally, by their local 
police departments. 

The concept is endorsed 
by The Crime Prevention 
Coalition, a group of almost 
50 prestigious national or- 
ganizations whose com- 
bined efforts are behind the 
multimillion dollar 'Take a 



Bite Out of Crime'' ad vertis* 
ing campaign. B.M. Cray II, 
Director of Crime Preven- 
tion, says, "Surveillance by 
drivers of two-way radio- 
equipped vehicles could be 
one of the most useful citi- 
zen involvements in pre* 
venting crimes, particularly 
street crimes, from occur- 
ring. Drivers whose radios 
give them the ability to no- 
tify and communicate with 
the police without leaving 
their vehicles — whether 
amateur radio hobbyists or 
commercial drivers — can 
be a definite asset." 

Why the need for train- 
ing? It sounds simple 
enough: If you see some- 
thing unusual or suspicious, 
call the police That's the 
basic idea, all right. But 
when is something unusual 
Of suspicious? What should 
be reported. How should it 
be reported? Police-direct- 
ed training is the most reli- 
able source for answers spe- 
cific to each community's 
needs and resources 

Most police departments 
are anxious to work with 
local citizens who express 
interest in helping them. A 
letter to the office of the 
Chief of Police, volunteer- 
ing to help and asking to be 
trained, is a good way to 
start. You might attach a 
copy of this article as a way 
of introducing the subject. 

The amount of training 
police departments can 
provide — from informal ad- 
vice through classroom 
presentations — varies wide- 
ly, depending upon the re- 
sources available. Under- 
standably, most depart- 
ments will devote more at- 
tention to training requests 
that represent bigger poten- 
tial payoffs — larger num- 
bers of reliable radio- 
equipped observers on the 
streets. Several ham radio 
clubs or repeater groups, or 
the owners of several small- 
er firms which operate 
radio-equipped vehicles, 
can effectively combine 
their initial contacts with 
the police. 



tii._-' 



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K^^J^ .^^^^^^^P^ 


^^^^ ~ 1 'w^^^^^^l 






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.' »J 



San ford R Smith. 



What Is Unusual or 

Suspicious? 

Deciding what is unusual 
or suspicious enough to re- 
port to the police calls for 
subjective, case-by-case 
judgment- It is easy to err in 
either direction: reporting 
inconsequential observa- 
tions or failing to report 
meaningful ones. Detective 
jerry Jaquenta KA4NIA of 
the Boca Raton, Florida, 
Police Department bur- 
glary squad, voices the 
opinion of most law-en- 
forcement professionals 
"We would far rather get a 
dozen or more false 
alarms — calls reporting 
what turn out to be entirely 
innocent events— than risk 
missing the one call that 
does involve crime. If there 
is reasonable doubt call!'' 

Detective Jaquenta lists 
these examples among ob- 
servations he thinks should 
be reported: persons — such 



as obviously truant stu- 
dents—who are obviously 
out of place where they are 
observed, perhaps with a 
screwdriver or gloves stick- 
ing out of a pocket, some- 
one knocking at the front 
door and moving to the rear 
of a house when there is no 
answer, and occupied cars 
or trucks parked in conceal- 
ment. 

"But don't be guided o^^ 
ly by a person's appear- 
ance/' cautions Sanford 
Smith. "It is a subject's ac- 
tions that will usually tip off 
a good observer/' Persons 
who seem to be hiding, or 
showing nervousness while 
loitering, are high on 
Smith's list of significant 
observations. 

"Any sort of violence 
should be reported 
quickly;" adds David N. 
Wise N8CNY, veteran chief 
of the Michigan State Po- 
lice Department's twenty- 
TSMsgazine • June, 1982 8S 




David N. Wise NSC NY. 



seven communications dis- 
patching locations- "Whetiv 
er it is as obviously criminal 
as a robbery or only poten- 
tially so — as in a street- 
corner shoving match that 
looks as if it could become 
a fistfight — let the police 
know. But/' he emphasizes, 
"do it from a safe 
distance!" Exposing your- 
self to danger or violating 
the law yourself — for exam- 
ple, following a speeding 
car— isn't just foolhardy. It 
is dumb I 

Police dispatchers, par- 
ticularly in smaller jurisdic- 
tions, soon learn whether 
regular callers are reliable 
observers or merely busy- 
bodies If you remember 
the old tale about crying 
wolf, you will agree that it is 
best not to get the latter 
reputation. 

What Should Be Reporledl 

Public-safety communi- 
cations expert Sanford 

86 73Mags2ine • JuneJ962 



Smith lists these four com- 
ponents of an observation 
report, in the order in which 
they should be given to a 
police dispatcher, 

• What is being reported? 
Tell the dispatcher immedi- 
ately. A robbery in pro- 
gress? A suspicious person 
or vehicle? An accident? A 
fire? A potential suicide? 
Knowing what the basic 
problem is, the dispatcher 
can decide what public- 
safety resources may be 
needed. Radio operators 
should know that most 
police departments would 
rather get several radio re- 
ports of a serious traffic ac- 
cident than not receive any 
because each passing radio- 
equipped observer as- 
sumed someone else had 
reported iL 

• Where is it happen /ng? 
Give as accurate a location 
as possible. Include street 
names, nearby intersec- 
tions, building numbers, 



and easily- recognized 

landmarks. 

• Who arid where are you ? 
The radio or tetephone 
tink between you and the 
police could somehow be 
broken. Give the police dis- 
patcher your name, exact 
location, and a way that he 
or she can get back in touch 
with you if you are discon- 
nected This is especially 
important in bigger cities 
where several dispatchers 
are on duty at a time. Call- 
ing back after disconnect- 
ing, you may get another 
dispatcher and have to start 
your report all over again. 

Ham radio operators, 
and others who can talk to 
the police directly through 
repeater phone-patch facil- 
ities, are not so easily re- 
contacted if the patch 
times out or the connection 
breaks some other way. 
Hams should ask for help 
from another amateur mon- 
itoring the frequency from 
a location with a tetephone, 
and that telephone number 
should be given to the 
police dispatcher. If no one 
else is on frequency, think 
of some other way the com- 
munications link might be 
re-established if it breaks. 
Be sure that you and the 
police department both 
understand how the re- 
contact will be made. 

If the report is being 
made through a taxi, de- 
livery service, or other busi- 
ness radio dispatcher, that 
business dispatcher's phone 
number should be given to 
the police dispatcher 

Some law-enforcement 
agencies will insist on re- 
cording your identity — as 
much to discourage anony* 
mous nuisance calls as to 
add to their record. Others 
will ask your name, but 
treat your report with equal 
seriousness whether you 
give it or not While some 
radio operators may shrink 
from getting involved in an 
incident they observe by 
identifying themselves, 
they should realize that by 
giving their names they are 



assuring the police that 
they believe in the accur- 
acy of their report. 

• What are the details? 
Your eyes may fool you. 
Simply being able to see all 
of the details that occur 
during an exciting, stressful 
event can be difficult. 
Under these circumstances 
we are all subject to a phys- 
ical phenomenon called 
tunnel vision. As we con- 
centrate intently on what is 
going on in the center of 
our visual field, we actually 
lose a great percentage of 
our peripheral — or side- 
vision Being aware that this 
may happen to you will 
help you prepare to over- 
come tunnel vision by mak- 
ing a conscious effort to 
look around the central ac- 
tion for important details. 

When describing per- 
sons, follow this standard 
sequence. Leave out any 
item you do not know. 

1. Name 

2. Sex 

3. Race 

4. Age 

5. Height 

6. Weight 

7. Hair 

8. Eyes 

9. Complexion 

10. Physical characteristics: 
marks, scars, limp, etc* 

11. Clothing, from head to 
foot: hat, shirt, coat, 
trousers, socks, shoes. 

When describing vehi- 
cles, start with the color or 
colors, then give the make, 
model, and as many give 
away m arkings — accessor- 
ies, damage, etc. — as you 
can The license number or 
any part of the number can 
be very helpful to the 
police. But stolen tags are 
commonly used by crimi- 
nals, so an accurate descrip- 
tion of the vehicle itself is 
just as important 

How Should U Be 
Reported? 

To be usefuL reports 
must be made calmly, 
clearly, and objectively. 
That may not seem too dif- 
ficult when you are describ- 



Lsgal Issuos In Ctvllian Surveillance 

Does a radio operator step onto danQerous legal ground by 
making reports to the police? Can he or she be sued for 
slander? For false arrest? Not if the reports are accurate, ac- 
cording to Lewis J. Paper, former Associate Counsel of the 
Federal Communications Commission, now In private prac- 
tice In Washington, DC, "It woufd be difffcult/' he says, ''to 
conceive a situation where simply reporting— accura^e/y re- 
porting—what is observed could expose the observer to any 
llabllllty." 

Attorney Paper recommends that as soon as possible after 
making any direct or indirect verbal report to the police, radio- 
equipped observers should make a personal written record of 
everything seen and said concerning the event, and then save 
the record. If made whUe memory is still fresh, this document 
can be very helpful later tf you are ever called as a witness in 
any court action that ensues. You can be subpoenaed by 
either the prosecution or defense. Your record itself will prob- 
ably never be caifed into evidence- But if there is— and there 
frequently Is— a Jong delay between the event and a trial, it 
will protect you against a lessening or loss of memory that 
could occur before you are asked to testify. 

"Although most states' slander laws vary in detail," says 
Mr. Paper, "generally a charge of slander must be based on re- 
porting information which the reporter knows or should have 
known was false. A written record— by Its very exis- 
tence-will help minimize any risk that you will be accused of 
intentionally lying.'* 

Provided you have accurately reported your observations, 
according to Mr. Paper, you have no liability If the police are 
charged with false arrest after detaining someone as a result 
of your report. "In making the arrest the law-enforcement 
agency assumes the responsibility and any Hability for that 
arrest/" he says. 

Like every other authority contacted In connection with this 
article, Mr Paper quickly and firmly points out that volunteers 
must remember that they can expose themselves to liability 
for violations like trespass and assault by acting as if they 
have powers which, without specific fBg^f authority, they 
don't have!! 



ing a minor auto accident 
on the freeway. But it i$ dif- 
ficult when actual crime or 
violence is concerned. Even 
police officers have had dif* 
ficuity making proper radio 
transmissions under emo- 
tionally stressful circum- 
stances. Here are some tips 
from the experts: 

• Think about what you 
are going to say before you 
transmit. Even if it means a 
short delay, compose your 
message mentally to be 
sure it is accurate, concise, 
and in the sequence that 
will be the most helpful to 
the police dispatcher 

• Keep your transmissions 
short. Break frequently to 
allow the person on the 
other end to interrupt. 

• Control your voice. 
When excited or upset, 
many people tend to speak 



faster and to raise the vol- 
ume and pitch of their 
voices. The combination 
makes for hard-to-copy 
radio transmissions. Listen 
to yourself Keep your 
voice as close to normal 
as possible. 

• Avoid subjective words. 
Be specific in describing 
what you see. The dispatch- 
er doesn't know what you 
think "a bad fight" is or 
what "a whole bunch" of in- 
jured motorists means. 

• Speak plain English! 
Leave the "ten-this" and 
"ten-that" and other sup^ 
posed-to-be police jargon 
to the TV heros. The few 
seconds you think you 
might save by using jargon 
is not worth the risk of 
being misunderstood. 

• Stay at your radio. Ex- 
cept to render whatever aid 




Detective Jerry }aquenta KA4NIA 



you can to an injured per- 
son, you can be more help- 
ful by being keeping a com- 
munications line open be- 
tween the police and what- 
ever action you are observ- 
ing, 



Don^t forget the impor- 
tant don'ts; Dor^'t expose 
yourself to danger! Don't 
play cop! In the process of 
trying to assist the police, 
don't violate any laws 
yourself." 



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7$ Magazine • June, 1982 87 




SOCML EVENTS 



UMtitfgs in this column am provide 
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The fofiowmg information shouid be tn- 
Ciuti9d in every snnouncemBnt: sponsor, 
&\tefi(, dfl/^, time, p/acrft, City, 5 fa I*, at^mis- 
sfon charge (it arty^, features, talk- in fre- 
quefjcies, and fhe name of whom lo con- 
tact for further information. Announce- 
ments must be received at ?Z MagaiJnei?K 
tfiQ first of the manth, two mQnth$ prior to 
the month in which the event takes place. 

SEASIDE OR 

Ihn North Qoasl Ft&peat«r Assoctaiiof^ 
%n4 the Oregon Tualatin Vail^ Amaleur 
Radio Club will HoriJ thfitr Orsgon Stale 
Ham COfiv^ntton oft iuri« 4^, 1962. at the 
SeaiJdi Convent mn Center. Seaside OR. 
Hours are TZrOO noort to 5:00 pm on Friday, 
&!CIO am to 9:30 pm or> Saiurday, and S:DO 
am to 2:00 pm on Sunday- Registration is 
$5.00 per single, S7 00 per couple, and 
$1 00 for children. SerriLn^F$ will include 
receiver design, conatrgctlon, satellite 
sarlii stations, contests, and rnany 
Others. The banquet speaker will be a 
NASA Space Shuttle astronaut and mas- 
ter of ceremonies will be Mel Ellis K7A0Z. 
Vice Director ARRL Northwesi Oivigion. 
The banquet cost is St 2 50 per person^ 
Talk-m on 146 62 and t*6,*5 (-600)^ For 
more infomialion, write Doc McLendon 
WTGWC. PO aoK 920. Seaside OR 97132. 

SAN OlEGO CA 
JUN 4-« 

The San D+ego Coanly Amaleyr Radio 
CouncH and tt>e San Diego Computef Soc^ 
ety wUi ho\d Hamcomp 82 on June 4-€, 
1982. at the Town & Ckxjntiy Convention 
Center, San Diego CA. Reg r stmt ion Is S7.00 
and I tie Saturday evening banquet featur- 
ing speaker Roy Neal K6DUE Is $15.00. 
There will be technical sessions all day Sat- 
urday, ham and computer £]ooths, many 
priies and awards (including a main prize of 
an Osborne 1 computer), an ARRL fonjm, a 
ladies' lunqheofi, Sunday morning break- 
fasts, and ham and computer sessions 
evary hour. Ifm final event on Sur^day at 
lifiO pm wtll be a T-hunt on 1 46.70 MHz. 
T«lti-in on .D4rB4. .TSflS, arKJ 222.94/224.54. 
Fof registration forms, write Kamcomp 82. 
PO Box 8)^7. San Diego CA 921 3& 

iOVEUlNO CO 

The Northern Colorado Amateur Radio 
Club w^ij hold its annual Superfest on 
June 5, 1982, from 0:00 am to 4:30 pm in 
tne McMUlen Bultdtng at the Larimer 
County FairgroLinds, Love land CO. Admia- 
Bion Js S3.0D and will Include a swap table. 
There will be exhibits, technical laiks, a 
code contest with prizes, an auction, a 
swap feat, and drawings for many prizes, 
Including a synthesized 2 -meter hand- 
held Special activities are planned for 
non hams, especially the kida. For further 
Inlormalion, contact Gene Bellamy 
WD9DRM. 3124 West 6th Street. Greeley 
GO 8063 L 

51 PAUL MN 
JUNS 

The Hottn Area Repeater Association 
will hold a swapfest and exposition for ra- 
dio amaieurs and computer hobbyists on 
June 5^ 19Q2, at the Mrnnesota State Fair- 
grounds, St. Paul MN. Admission is 13.00 
and free overnight parking tor selfcon- 



tainod campers will be available &n June 
4lh, There wlK be es^hlbits. booths. «m> 
prizes. Talk-tn on .25^ 85 and MiJB- For 
more information or reservations, write 
Amateur Fair, PO Box 30054, St. Paul MN 
55175. 

GRAND RAPIDS Ml 
JUN 6 

The Independent Repeater Association 
wiM hq^d Its annual Grand Rapids Festival 
Swap 1 Shop on Saturday. Jurre 5, 1962, 
frorT> 0:00 am to 3:00 pm at the Kentwood 
Fieid HOUM, |U5t south of 60th Strwi Qr% 
Kalamazoo Avenue Admts^on i% f3.0C^ 
eight- Joot iat}ie9 a^re $7.00 or (4 OQ for half- 
size. TlMf^ will l>e prizes and rflfreshments. 
Fof more mfofmatlon at Oeaier reserva- 
lions, wnte IRA Swap, 5G2 92nd Street SE, 
Byton Center Ml 49315, or call 
(616H55^2926. 

GUELPHONTCAN 
JUNS 

The Guelph Amateur Radio Club 
(VE3ZM) wlil hold the 7th annual Central 
Ontario Amateur Radio Flea Market on 
Saturday, June 5, 1982, from 8:00 em to 
4:00 pm at 'Regal Hall, ' 340 Woodlawn 
Road Wastn corner of Woodlawn and l-lan^ 
Ion Parkway (Hwy. tf6], Guelph ONT Ad- 
misflion Is 12.00 and chitdren 12 yearj old 
and under wtti be admitted free. Vendors^' 
admission is an adt^itH^nal S300 and a 
Quantity of 3' x 0' tables are available at 
S5 00 each. Vendors will he admitted from 
0:00 am on. There will t^e commercia! dis- 
plays, surplus dealers, computer software 
andhard<ware. and indoor and outdoor 01 a^ 
plays. The refreshment concession will 
open at 12:00 noon. For further mforma- 
lion, coritacl Bob Lacombe VEB1YE at 
(519J-843 4618 or Rocco Furfaro VE3HG2 
at (5191624-1167. 

FAIRBANKS AK 
JUN 5 

The Arctic Radio Club of Fairbanks AK 
will hold a hamfeet on June S. 19B2. at the 
Kiwanis AG Hall at the Tanana Vallqy Fair- 
grounds. Tttft doofs will open at 0:00 am 
and there will be a SS^OO fee for all sellers. 
Features will incCude door prizes, a rattle, 
a left footed key for a code contest, and 
an oleMlashioned pot luck dinner. The 
Alaska OSL bureau will be tfiere as well as 
an ARRt representative. Fof further infor- 
mation, contact He*tJ Walls KL7JLF. PO 
Boi 1625. Fairbanks AK 99707. 

CHELSEA Ml 
JUN 6 

The Chelsea Swap and Shop will be 
held on Sunday, June 6, 19B2, at the Chel- 
sea Fairgrounds, Chelsea Ml. Gates will 
□pert lor sel lers ai 5:00 am and for the pub- 
lic from 8:00 am until 2:00 pm, Donation Is 
S2.00 in advance or S2.50 at the gate. GNI- 
dren under t2 and non-ham spouses will 
be admitted free. Tafk-in on 146.520 slm^ 
plex an4 147.055 (Chelsea repeater}. For 
more into, write to Witltam Altent>errHJt 
WB0HSN. 3ta2 Timberiine. Jackson Ml 
4^0t. 

MANASSAS VA 
1UN6 

The Ole Virginia Hams Amateur Radio 
Ciubi Inc-^ will hold the eighth annuai Ma- 
nassas Hamlest on Sunday, June 0, 1902, 
at the Prince William County Fairgrounds, 
Route 234, Manassas VA. Admission is 
$4.00 per person; children under 12 will be 



admitteiJ free Gates will open at 0:00 am. 
In addition to the admission fee, there will 
be a S3.00 fee lor Ultgatmg and the flea 
market spaces Gates wiii open at 7:00 am 
for tal^gating setup Features will ir^clu^ 
ladies' programs, children's enieriairv 
ment. CW proficiency awards, OSL bur« 
otus. food ai>d refreshments, and many 
prizes. Taik^ln on 146.37/140,97 {WlCHO» 
and 14652. For additional Information, 
write Jim Lascans WA2QEJ. 11063 Cam- 
field OU Manassas VA 221 iO 

MILTON PA 
JUN 6 

The 11fh annual Milton Amateur Radio 
Club hamf est will be held on June 6, 1982, 
from 6:00 am to 5:00 pm, rain or shine, at 
the Ailenwood Fireman's Fairgrounds lo^ 
cated on US T5, 4 mites north of Interstate 
BO- Advance registration is S2.50; at the 
gate, S3 00. XYLs and chilttrefv will t>B ad* 
milted free, Tfwre wHl be a flea marftet, an 
auction, contests, cas^ door prizes. an4t ■ 
ffee portables and mobile FM clinic. An In- 
door area will t>e available as well as food 
and beverages. TalMn on .37^^97, 
.Q25/.625^ and .52, For further details, con^ 
tact Jerry Williamson WA3SXQ. 10 O^d 
Farm Lane, Milton PA 17047, or call 
(7 17^7 42- 3027, 

ROME NY 
JUNe 

The Rome Radio Club, Inc., will hold the 
30th annual flome Ham Family Day on Sun- 
day, June 6. 1902, at Beck's Grove. Oswego 
Road, Rome NV. Features will include door 
pri^es^ an early brunch, a buffet-sly le dirv 
rter, a Ilea n^arttet, educational ar>d acien^ 
tifk: presefitations, arx) ovemigtit parking 
for oampets, as well as fty-4n capaljilities^ 
Tatlt^ft on .2B/.eS and 140^6. 

HUMiOLPTTN 

JUN0 

The Hymt>o1dt Amateur Rad»o Club will 
hold its annual hamfest on Sunday^ Jurie 
6i 1982, at a new location: Bailey Park. 
North 22nd Avenue, Humboidt TN. Tickets 
are 12.00 each, with no additional charge 
for the flea market, There will be prizes, 
light lunches, end ladles' and children's 
activities, Talk In on 146.37/.97, For more 
Information, contact Ed Holmes W4IGW. 
501 North 18th Avenue, Humboldt TN 
38343. 

D€AL NJ 

JUN 6 

The Fort Monmouth AftC and KaveHm 
will hold the Jersey Shore Hamtest and 
Electronics Flea Mairket on June 0, 1982. 
from 9:00 am to 4r00 pm at ttre Jewish 
Community Center, tOD Grand Avenue. 
Deal NJ. Admission is $3.00 per person; 
XYLs and children under 12 will be admit- 
ted free. Outdoor tailgating is S2.00 per 
space and indoor space is $5.00 per 0'foot 
table. Door prizes and refreshments will 
be available. Talk-In on 147. 045 + .6, 
146.775^.6, and 146,52 

MAYVILLE ND 
JUN 6 

The Goose River Amateur Radio Club 
will hold Its annual hamfest on Sunday, 
June 6, 1982, at the City park, Mayvllle ND. 
In case of inclement weather^ the tesUvl- 
ti^ will tM held in the Mayville Armory. 
Reglsuatiion begins at noon and the 
charge is Si .00. All registrants will E>e eli- 
gible for the many door prizes. The grand 
prize (S a Heat hk it SA2OS0 Super Tuner. 
Camping taciHties will t>e available for 
those who desire lo beat the rush. Talk-in 
on .31^91. For further information, please 
contact Mary Carlson, RB 2. Box 47, nat- 
ion ND 58240. 



MIDLAND III 
JUN 12 

The Central Michigan Amateur Repeat- 
er Association witt hold Us eighth annuat 
hamfest on June 12. 1962, from 8:00 am to 
4:00 pm in ttie "Great Hall" of the Valley 
Raza Complex, |USt oft US Rt«. 10 In Mid- 
land Ml. Tickets are S3 00, Children under 
12 will t>e admitted free. Tatk^n on 
146.67/.07and 14652 For additional infor- 
mation, contact Carol Hall W 08 DOG, 4051 
Cardinal Drive, Ml. Pleasant Ml 4d650> or 
call (5171-772-0363. 

STATEN ISLAND NY 
JUN 12 

The Staten Island Amateur Radio 
Association will hold its flea market on 
June 12, 1982, from 9:00 am to 3:00 pm, at 
All Saints Episcopal Church. Staten Island 
NY. To get to the church, lake interstate 278 
to the Victory Boul«vafd e^lL proceed east 
on Victory Boulevard for \^ mile to Oyatal 
Avenue^ arHJ turn left on Crystal Avenue, 
There will be no admission charge lor 
buyers, a S3.00 per space charge for selleis 
(bring your own tables), and a $1.00 charge 
for eiecttiCity. Refreshments will be avail- 
able. A raffle will be held et 1:00 pm and ttve 
winner will have a choice of an Jcom IC4AT 
or a Bearcat 20^ Talk-in on 146.52 and 
146.28/80. For additional Information, send 
an SASE to George Rice, Jr. WA2AWIJ, 430 
Jeweit Avenue, Stater island NY 10302. 

TORRINQTQNCT 
JUN 12 

The CQ Amateur Radio Club of Torring- 
tofl CT will hold a ham radio flea markei on 
June 12, 1902, from 9:00 am to 5:00 pm at 
Itw Drop-In Centet, East Albert Street, Tor- 
rington CT, TTke admission tee of $2.00 in* 
cliMles a chance for a c^oor pfi^e. A seller's 
indoor table is S5.00 e»ch and tailgating 
space IS S2-00 each Th«re wlit be a raffle 
featurirvg a personal mtcrocomputer kit as 
lirst pnze. a portable radio cassette record- 
er as second prize, and an MFJ clock as 
third prize. Vou need not be present to win. 
Talkfn on 140 25^.85, 147 84^,24, and 146.52. 
For tickets, table reservations {before June 
0, 1962), or more Information, contact Sb- 
bastlano Aibanl KAIFVM, 76 Pythian Ave- 
nue, Torrlngton CT, or call (203)-489-2945; 
Ron Brook KAlAFN, 213 East Pearl Street, 
Torrlngton CT, or call (2a3H82'2764; or the 
CO Club, PO 0OJI 602, Toffington CT 06790. 

GRANITE Cmr IL 
JUN 13 

The 53fd y^r annivofaaiv cerebration 
and annual hamfest of the Egyptian Radio 
Pub. Inc. (WSAIUI, wtll be held on Sunday, 
June 13, 19B2. a! their club grounds near 
Granite City lt_ 

QUEENS NY 

JUN 13 

The Hall of Science Amateur Radio Club 
will hold Its annual Indoor/outdoor, raln-or- 
ahine hamfest on Sunday, June 13, 1962, 
from 9:00 am to 4:00 pm, at the municipal 
parking lot, 80-25 t26th Street (t blook from 
Queens Boulevard)<. Kew Gardens. Queens 
NY, Seilem' donations are S3.00, buyers' 
donations are S2.00. and XYLs and children 
will be admitted free. Talk-in on 145.520, For 
additional information, coniact Thomas 
Doyle KA2DTB, 135-14 l2Sth Street, South 
Ozorie Park, Queens NY 1U20, or phone 
(21Z)-73&0887. 

WILLOW SPI^INQSIL 
JUN 13 

TfwSix Meter Ctubof Chicago, Inc., will 
hold its 25th annual ARRL-affilialed ham- 
feet on Sunday, June 13, 1982, at Santa Fe 
Park, 91st and Wolf Road, WMJow Springs 
IL (southwest of downtown Chicago). Ad- 



60 73 Magazine • June, 1982 



SUMMER VACATION SPECIALS 

You Can Bank on Us for More Than Just Low Prices. 



If YAEBU 



SAVE 518600 
on FT902 DM 



i« 



_ 4*^' 



HF TRANSCEIVERS 

RONE 9 Band Hcvr W/FP107, */0 FM *ZB95.0Q 

Ff-107M/OMS 9 Sand ncvf, digHal Si 034.00 

FT 101 2D MKIII 9 Band xcvr, digital I7&9-00 

FV-101DM Synih . scanning VFO S323.00 

FT-i02DM 9 Band xcvr digital S1 349.00 

VO 90tP Monitor scope w' pan adapter 146t.O0 

fV-MlOW Remole VFO wwemqr^ *373.O0 

WTTOf a Band Mobtie scvr i72».00 

FP 707 Power SufhpJv 1145,00 

FTV*707 Trarysverler Wro Mpdyle 1116 00 

2M Module only S13S.O0 

@M Module only l9fi.O0 

TIJCM Module orify S220.OO 

VHFUHF TRANSCEIVERS 

rresOR eM SSe^FMCW^AM xcvr S4e6.00 

Ft 480R 2W SS&FM^CW icvr S476 00 

FT7dOF1 70CM AlF Modfi «cvr S6&9 OO 

VHFUHF HAND HELDS 



FT-20fiR 2.5W 2M FM HT wrTTF 5323.00 

FT-70SR 1W 440 FM HT v^fTTP S323.00 



VHF PORTABLES 

FT.690R 6M FM'SSe kcv* S339.00 

R aSOR 2M FMrSSe KCvr S3S9 00 

FULL UN£ AVAILABLE ON SALE 

AH sccessoftes iQ^t oft ^r* Radto fufcnsse 



The 

Antenna (703) 569-1200 

R^nk ^^60^ General Green Way 
■^^'"'^ Alexandria, VA 22312 



HUSTLER 

4BTV40 10 Mtf. Vertical , . .. . , *79.00 

&BTV BO 10 Mtr. VerHcaJ $100.00 

M01/M02 HF Mobile Mast .>. . vSia.OO 

HF Mobile Resonators, Std. 400W .SUPEI^ 2KW 

lOdrlSm. $9.00 SX^JOQ 

2ChTi tii-oo tfaoo 

40in fl3.00 $1«.00 

75 w Mm SUJOa 52^00 

BW 1 Bumpcf mt wilh S S Strap .Si 3,00 

SSMa Ckxnfnefcial SB Ball S14.0O 

SF-2 5/8 Wave, 2 Meter Antenrta $9.00 

HOT HustloffMt.wpth Swivel ball $14.00 

GMt^B 2M Golinear, Mxed Slalion, 6db $71.00 

G7444 2M Cottnear, fixed SlatJ^n. 7<Sh $103.00 

ROHN 

200 10 ft Stacking Secilon , $32,00 

2SQ 10 ft Stacking Secilon S39.S0 

4SO 10 fl Stacking Saciion $^7.50 

25AG 2.3 or 4 Top Section $52 50 

MDBX 4a 4e ft Free Sianding Tower $320,00 

HiX&e 56 ft Free Standing Tower . $340,00 

FK2S46 43 ft, 2SG Foldover Tower ._. $725 00* 

Tfl3 Thrysi Bearing . f4a.O0 

SBZSG snort Base for 25G Sir 50 

BPH25G Hinged Base Plate .,^. $59 75 

AStBQ Accessory Sn«lJ i«.50 

HB25AG T4 House Braciief $14.50 

BPC2SG Cement Base Ffate $32 00 

8AS25G Short t<^ siM:nofi Wf/acc shelf.. $36.00 

M200 16 gauge 10 ft 2^ •.D, Mast $19.50 

M200H IB waft. 10 ft 2' Mas« ... $36 00 

fretgM prepaid on F^t^owm towers. Prices 
W% higher ^est at ftpcky Mts 

Phllly Stran Guy Cabli In ctock - for price and 
dsllvery call (703^ 569-1200 



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HF TRANSCEIVERS 

IC-720A DigltaJ HF xcvf, General Coverage Hcvf. 

Aii 9 HF Bands, 2VFOs Sl19fl.O0 

IC'730 Solid Stalen Digitai %cvr^ 8 Bands 2 VFOs, 

1 Wemorv per band . . $729,00 

PS-1 5 Power Supply $135,00 

PS^20 Power Supply . . $199.00 

Phone Patcit Specify 730 or 720 A S1 75 QQ 

AT- too tOOW auto antenna tunef . $314.00 

AT-500 500W aut<} antenna tuner S3t9.00 

VHF UHF TRANSCEIVERS 



IC-290A All Mode 2M xovr, 2 VFQ^ 5 A^emonea, 



UtD Walt^. scan SP ECl AL . ... 

IC 2SA Compact, 2'l^ xcvr, 2 VFQs, 

Scan. lr2SW 
tC'ZSI A 2 M A 1 1 Mo<J e SUPER SP ECJ AL 
10-451 A UHF All Mode Base Station. 
fC-55i eM All Mode Base Station , 
rC-4S0A Aff-Mode 430 MHz Mobile 

HAND-HELD w/o tjp 



$459 00 
MernOftes 
$314.00 
S599j00 
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$57^.00 

wffTP 



IC 2A;2AT 2M, Haf>d heid $216,00 

iC 3A/3AT 320. Hand he(d, $242 00 

IC 4A/4AT 440, Hand heid $242 OO 

FliLL LINE AVAILABLE ON SALE 
Afi accessories T0% aft */ Badto Purchase 



$242.00 
$269.00 
$269.00 



THIS MONTH'S SPECIAL 
LimiiBd to EEB stock. 



VAESU 404A 
YA€SU 404 B ^^TTP" 



Speclat $179,00 

. . reg $369,00 

$199.00 

ren $399,00 



^ORDERS ONLY 

800-336-8473 

*Shippin.g charges not included 

• Prices subject to change without notice 
•Some items iimited lo atocK only 

• Limited quantMies 
•No COD s 



HY-GA]N 

TH3JRS Jr Thur^dertJifd. 750W P£P $150.00 

HQ-ZS Hy Quad, 2 Element $235.00 

TH5DXS Tfiundefbtrd. & Element $215.00 

TH 3MK3S Ttiuncteftoifd, 3 Element $195.00 

TH2MK3S Ttiundemifd, 2 Element $126.00 

TH7DX Tnundefbird. 7 Element. S33eJX) 

392S TH60XX Conv^Tiion KH lO TH70X $15500 

105BAS 5 Element lOm ' Long-Jotin" $t 14.00 

155BAS 5 Element tSm "Longgohn $i6i 00 

SfiSBAS 6 Element aOm "Lorvg-John" $269,00 

I4AVQ/WBS tO^Om Vertical . $49,95 

18AVTWBS tO^Om Vertical , . , $^7,50 

V'2S Cofinea/ Gain VerlicaJ 138-174 MH^ $33,75 

BNfl« Ferrite 9alun, tcm) meters $t3,00 

HDR300 Deluxe Rotor, DtgFlal Readout $378,00 

. SUPER HY-GAfN PACKAGE ^ 

^^ SAVE $355.15 Pigs FREE DELIVERV* ^ 

SALE $136 JO 

HG53SS 52 ft Self -Supporting Crankup 

Tower . , , $900.00 Value 

HG^OA 3 each Coax ann for Tower Legs 

..-,......._.... $39,00 V*ia# 

THSDXS Thunderbird, 5 Eteffiefit Triband 

$319.95 Value 

HAM IV Rotor ..... $237,95 Vilue 

HG 10 10 ti- mast 2 O-D 120 WaN 

Steel .« $56,00 Value 

BN^ FeiTtte Bahin ... S1t.95 Value 

free deitvery offered for sftipfit^g pomts wtthm 

48 Srafes ADDEO BONUS iftdude M O or 

Cemfi^ Ck with order snd receive a 

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NO SUBSTiTUTiONS PLEASE. SALE ENDS 4(301^ 



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on FRG 7700 






SWL DX HEADQUARTERS 

Yaeau FRa7700 150 KH^ao MHz Digttai rcvr $479.00 



Yi«su WU7700 12 Ch IVIemory Unil 
Vaesu FRG7 b-2%2 MHz rcvr 
Kenwood fl 1O00 15 30 WH? 
Kenwood R 600 15 3C MHz 
Panasonic RF 3100 t 30 MH,j & FM 
Panasor*ic RF 2200 MB SW FM 
Sony ICF ?00i Digital Compaci 
Sony ICF-6SO0 tNewi Oigitai 
Paiomsr Loop Amp J Ant. . 
Into Tech M200F ar-vcw Vtdeo Out 
McKay Dymeli DA-100D Active 4nt 
Kantronie Mini RsA<lflr 
World R»dio TV HarnSbooN 1962 



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A743 7 * 10 MHZ Add On tor A3 

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AV4 4 Band Vertical ttMOm. 

AVS 5 Band Vertical H>«)m 

R3 14.21.26 MH^ Ringo 

32-19 Boomer 19 Element 2m 

21 4B Jr. Boomer 14 Element 2m 

A147-11 2m 11 Elemeni Antenna 

Al47'4 2M 4 Element Antenna ., 

ARX 2B 134 t&4 MHz Rmgo Banger n 

At44 tOT 145 MHz ID Element 

A432 20T 432 MH^ 20 Element 

A14TMB Twist Mounting Boom & Bracket, $21,00 

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$167.00 
$204.00 
$55.00 
S55 0O 
$41.00 
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$75.00 
$61.00 
$34.00 
$2^.00 
$34.00 
$41,00 
$41 ,00 



Ml NhPRO DUCTS 

HQ'I hfl in hOuad 6/1 0^f15/2OfI1 Antenna $12995 

6-24 2 Elemeni HP Mjm-Beam &iOJl5^20m $9900 
flK-3 3rd E3em«n} Add-on for B-24, 

Improves t0^20m . . $67,00 

C-4 Mint- Vertical 6't0^l5.'2Qm $59,00 



ROTORS & CABLES 

CDE HAM IV Rotor 
CDE T2X Rotor 
CD€ 45 RolQT 
Alli«nc« HC^73 Botor 

Allianca UlOO Botor 

flG*U Foam Coas 95% Shield 

RG-213 Coax, Mil Spec 

Mlrtl-8 Coax 95% Shiefd 

Rotor Wire 8 Conductor — 
4 Conductor- . . 



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1 



73Magazine • June. 1982 89 



vance regis I rat ion Js £2.00: at the gale. 
S3 .00. Thera will Iw a large swapper's row. 
displays, an AFMARS meeting, rgfr ash- 
men is, plenty of parking space, picnic 
g,roiin{|s, af>d! prices, inf:lui3tng afw^t ptii^ 
Dt a color TV. Talk-in on 146.52 or .37/97 
K90NA/R. For advance tickets, contact 
V£il HelJwig K9ZWV, 3420 South 6Dlh 
Court, Qce^o a 60650. 

SAHIA MARIA CA 
JUN 13 

The Satelllle Amateur Radio C4ub will 
hold its annual bar-b-q/swapfesl on June 
13, I9sa2. at the Union Oil picnic grounds, 
|u$t south of Santa Maria CA. Adrnia$ion 
ts Iree for the swapfest; dinner tickets aie 
S7.S0 for adults and $3 50 for children 6 to 
12 years of ag^; pfize tickets are $i 00 
each. Swap tables are$2 50fof each area, 
Tfiere will be prt£e«, contests, anej a 
Santa-Maria-style baf-b-q. Talk-m on 
146. 34/. 04. For lockets or more informa> 
tion, write Santa Maria Swapfesl, PO Boat 
2616, OrcuttCA 93455. 

BELLEFOUNTAINE OH 
JUN 13 

The Champaign Logan Amateur Radio 
Club, Inc^ anrtual ham f est and flea mar- 
ket will be held on Sunday, June 13. IS&Z, 
a) the Logan County Fairgirounds, BeUe- 
fountaine OH. Tickets are $1.50 m ad^ 
vance and $2.00 at the door. Tables are 
S3 00 in advance. Gates will open at 7:00 
am and priie drawingis will be held every 
hour starling at 9:00 am. The major prizes 
of $200, $100, and $50 will be drawn at 3:00 
pm. you need not ba present to win. Talk- 
in on 147,60/00 W&EBG/R. For more Infor 
mation, tickels, or tables, contact M. A. 
(Bud) Criswold W6J>CM. PO Box 301 , Urba^ 
na OH 43078 

HUNTINGTON WV 
JUN 13 

The Tri-State Amaleiir Radio Assoc ia- 
lion will hoNl its 201 h annual Huntington 
Ham f est on Sunday, June 13, 1962* Irom 
9;IX) am to 3:00 pm at Camden Park, off 
Route 60 West, Huntington WV. Reg 1st ra^ 
tlon Is $3.00 per person and children under 
12 will be admllted tree^ Spacer are S3.O0 
each fof the fiea market and 6- foot com- 
mercial dealers' tables are £5.00 each. 
Setup time is 6:00 am to 0:00 am. Over- 
night space will be available for setf-con- 
tained RVs, Talk-In on 146.04/.&4 and 
146 52/.S2. For further mforfnatton. aend 
art SASE toTARA, Inc.. PO Bos 4100, Hun^ 
tingtofi WV 25729 

SAGINAW Mi 
JUfi 13 

The Saginaw VaNey Amateur Radio As- 
socialjon v^li! hold its new Electronic Hob- 
by Expo on Sunday, June 13, 1082, at 
Bridgeport High School off 175, exit 144 
wesL Doors will Open at B:O0 am. Adults' 
tickets are $1.00; kids will be admit led free. 
Trunk sa^es are $2.00 and all tables are 
S5.0O Features will include displays and 
demonsiraiions tor the who^ family.^ majof 
pfjizes totaling S400.0D« w4 hourly ilraw^ 
Ings. Talk-ih on 147.24 and 146.52 |K8DAQ. 
For more intormatiorF, tab-ie neservations. or 
tickets, send an 5ASE to SVARATEHE^, 50 
Durarkd Court. Saginaw Ml 4^602, 

MOMROE Ml 
JUN 13 

The annual Monroe County fladio Com- 
municaticns Hamfe$| witl be held on June 
13, 1362, from 8:00 am to 3:00 pm at the 
Monroe Community College. Raismvilie 
Road. Monroe Ml Tickets are S2,00 at I he 
gate, $1.50 in advance, and XYLs and Chit- 
fireri will be admitted bee. Renty of table 
space and: fr^ parliiing will be avaiiabie. 
Feature<i wHI be contests, auctions, and 



tJi splays Talk-in on 146 J 3/73 and 52. For 
aOditional in format ion, contact Fred Lux 
WOeiTZ. PO Bolt ^62. Monroe Ml 46161, or 
(^lC3l3}-243-l€iea 

AKRON OH 

JUN n 

The 15th annual Ooodyear ARC Hamfest 
wit! be held oo Sunday. June 13, 1962, from: 
10:00 am 1o 6:00 pm at Goodyear Wingfoot 
Lake Park, near SR224 and 43, east o1 Akron 
OH. Family admission is $2.50 in advance 
and $3.00 at the gate. Flea market spaces 
outside are $ t .00 and dealer s^ tablee inside 
ttve shelter are $500 ^advance reservaiions 
are sugo«s(ed). Ttiefe wilt be picn»c tables^ 
a concession sian>d, a^id tree parking avail- 
able Prize drawings will be held thf oughoul 
the day with grand pnzs drawings at 4:00 
pm. Talk-in orv 146,04/.64. For furthaf infor- 
mal ion, advance sales lickets, and sheUef 
house reservations, send an SASE to Don 
Rogers WA8SXJ, 161 S. Hawkins Avenue, 
Akron OH 44313, 

PHILADELPHIA PA 
JUN 14 

The Phy-Mont Mobile Radio Club wilt 
host the amaletir radio segment of the In- 
ternatiortal Conference on Communica- 
tions on Monday. June 14, 1962. from 7iX) 
pm lo lOiX) pm, at the Franklin Pfa^a Ko- 
teL I7lh and Race Streets. Philadelphia 
PA. The session is free and all radio ama- 
teurs are tnvtted to attend, Fof additional 
Informal ion, contact Jacob S. Kovalchek, 
Jr AK2t, 1228 Heartwood Drive. Cherry 
Hill NJ 08003, Of phone (603^28-5924. 

DUNEUEN NJ 
JUN 10 

The Raritan Valley Radio Club will hold 
its 11th annual tiamtest and Ilea market on 
June 19, 1982. I^om 8:30 am to 4;00 pm at 
Cotumbia ParK. Dunetlen NJ TTsefe will be 
doo^ prizes ar»d a snack bar. Admission is 
SaOO lor seliers and $2.00 for lookers TaJk- 
in on 148625/025 tWaOW) and 146 52 di^ 
rect- For further intormatton, call Bob 
KS2EF at f20l^369-703a 

PAVETTE ID 
JUN 19-20 

The Voice of Idaho Amateur Rad^o Club 
and the Treasure Valley Radio Associa- 
tion will hold tne fifth annual Treasure Val- 
ley Hamfest on June 19-20. 1982, from 9:00 
am Saturday to 3:00 pm Sunday at the 
Mini-dome, Payette tO. Registration in- 
cludes break! a SL dinner^ and prize tick- 
ets, and is $15.00 in advance and $20.00 at 
the door. Features will include swap ta- 
bles, dealers, transmitter hunts, special 
activities tor ladies and children, games, 
contests, prices, a cocktail party on Sun- 
day, a picnic and banquet on Saturday, 
and a breakfasi on Sunday. Talk-in on 
147.84f.24 (WB7NSE/RJ, 147,72/. 12 
(K70JI/R), and ^46 5Z For more informa* 
tion, contact Samuel K. Sower N7D0V, 
1909 Grant Street. Caldwell ID S3606, or 
phone (20a)-4&*^i:K- 

MOORHEADMN 
JUN 19-20 

The ACE Radio Club will hold its first 
radio and computer ftea market on Jurve 
19^20. 1982, beginning at 8:00 am at the 
Moorhead Cenienntai Arena, Moorhead 
MN Talk- in on 146.970. For complete de- 
tailed Information, send an SASE to AGE. 
PO Box 452, Moorhead MN 56560. 

LANCASTER OH 

JUN 20 

The Lancaster and Fairfield County Anv 
aieur Radio Club will hold its annual Lan- 
i^tster Hamfesi on June 20, 1962: from 
9:00 am to 5.O0 pm at the Fairlield County 



fairgrounds, Lancaster OH. Ttckets aie 
S2.0O in advance or $3, 00 al the door. Flea- 
miftrfcel tables will be available or bring 
your own. There will be hourty drawings, 
refreshments, and plenty of tree paftting. 
Talk-in on 147.03/63 Of 146,52, For addi- 
tional Informal ion or advarvce tickets, 
write Box X Lancaster OH 43l3£f, 

CROWN POINT IN 
JUN 20 

The Lake County Amateur Radio Ciub 
will hold its 1 0th annual Dad's Day Ham- 
fest ort June 20, 13S2. at the Industf^ai Arts 
Building at the Lake County Fairgrounds, 
Crown Point IN. Prizes will be featured 
and ati evenis will be held indoors. Tickets 
are $2.50. TaSk-in on 147.84/24 or .5Z For 
advance tJckets, mail check to LakeCourv 
ly ARC, c/o Walley Kojol KA9FDC, 624 U. 
Rensselaer Streel, Gnrtith IN 463191 

MILWAUKEE W1 

JUL 8 11 

The VL International SJngie Sideband- 
er s (YLISSBi 1982 Coni/ention will be held 
on July 8-11, 1962. an Milwaukee Wl. Activi- 
ties will Include the DX Roundup, the Sys^ 
terns Awards Banquet on Saturday nighty 
and a major door prize of an Icom IC-2AT. 
Jean Chittenden WA2BGE will tell atxjut 
her recent Chma trip. Pre-convenlion ac- 
tivities wm beqin July 5. 1982. with goM- 
Ing, hshtng, and side trips planned. De- 
tailed information may t>e obtained by 
sending an BASE (business size) to Sus 
Musachi Ka9DC. PO Box 18123, Milwau- 
kee Wl 53216. 

STATE COLLEGE PA 
JULIO 

The NIttany Amateur Radio Ctub Ham 
Festival will tie held on July 10, 1962, from 
8:00 am lo 4:00 pm, at the HRfi-Singer pic- 
nic grounds, Scinance Park Road {between 
US 322 West artd Rte 26 East), State Qo^ 
lege PA, Talk-in on 146.16/76, 146.25^.85, 
and 146,52, Features will include a flea 
market, technical sessior^s, numerous 
prtzes and contests, and refreshments. 
Tickets are $3,00i iBilgatlng and tables are 
S5,00. for more inforrriaiion, contact 
Richard L Sine K&3WN l6O0 E. Branch 
Road, State College PA 16601. 

OAK CREEK Wl 
JULY 10 

Th« South Milwaukee Amateur Radio 
Club will hold ris annual swapfest on SaCur- 
day. July 10, 1962, Irom 7.-00 am to 5:Q0 pm 
at the Amencan Legion Post 434, 9327 
South Shepard Avenue. Oak Creek Wl. Ad- 
mission is $2.00 and includes a hai^py hour 
with free beverages. Prizes include a SiOO 
first prize and a $50 second prize plus a 
variety of other prizes to be awarded during 
the day. Parking, a picnic area, hot and cold 
wndwiches. liquid refreshments, and over- 
night campirhg will be available Talk4n on 
f46.M More details, including a map. may 
be obtained from the South Milwaukee Am- 
ateur Radio Club, PO Box iCffi, South 
Milwaukee Wl 53172. 

m^TON ONT CAN 
JULIO 

The Burlinglon Amateur Ftadio Club will 
hold the 8th annual Ontario Hamfest on 
Saturday, July 10, 1982, at Iha Milton Fair- 
grounds. Milton, Ontarto Admission Is 
$3-00 per person or $2^00 for pre-registra- 
tion, There wili be a flea market, displays, 
an auction, contests, and prizes. Camping 
will be available and grounds will open 
Friday njlght for early campers. For pre^ 
registration, contact Mike Cobb 
VE3MWR, PO Box 836. Buriington L7R 
3V7, Canada. 



eOlSSEVAIN MAN CAN 
JUL 10*11 

The 19th annual international Hamresi 
will be held on July 10-11, 1962. on the Ca- 
nadian side of the International Peace 
Gardens between Dunseith ND and Bote* 
sevain MAN in the Canadian Pavilion. Ac- 
tivities will include transmitter humsn mo- 
bile judging, CW sod QLF contests, semi- 
nars for OMs and YLs. fiea markets, a ham 
auction, a Saturday night dance, a Sunday 
morning breakfast, and lots of great 
prizes. For more information, contact Ber- 
nle Arcand WD9MD. PC Bok &3. Epping 
ND 58843, or William M Shryock, Jr. 
WD9GRC, 322 East 4ih Street, WlUi^ton 
NO 56801. 

RAPID CITY SD 
JUL mil 

Ttie Black Hills Af%C will hold the annu- 
al South Dakota Hamfest on July 10-11, 
1932, at the Surbeck Center. SD School of 
Mines and Technology, Rapid City SD, 
Pre-registratiDn is $7.00: registration at 
the door is $6.00. There will be a prize 
drawing for pre- registrants, forums, con- 
tests, a picnic, and prizes. Tables are free 
for the flea market. Talk-in on .34^.94 
(WOBUQ. Fflir further information, write 
Black Hills ARC. do Rudy WBAPWA. A&22 
Capitol, Rapid City SD 57701. 

MAPLE RIDGE BC CAN 
JUL 10^11 

The Maple Ridge ARC will hold its Ham- 
fest '82 on July 10-11, 19B2, al the Maple 
Hidge Fairgrounds, located 30 miles east 
of Vancouver, Maple Ridge BC. Reg 1st ra- 
uon for hams is $5.00; lor nor^ hams over 
12 years old, $200. There will be food, 
prizes, a swap & shop, displays, a bunny 
hunt, ladies' and children's programs, and 
a main prize drawing fOf a Kenwood 
TR 2500. Camper spaces will be available 
(some with electrical hookups). Talk-m on 
146.20/80. For mo*e intormatton and rag- 
istratmn. contact Maple Ridge ABC, Box 
2^2. Maple Ridge BC V2X 7G2, 

INDIANAPOLIS IN 
JULY 11 

The Indiana State Amateur Radio CofV 
vent ion, in coniunction with the India naph 
olis Hamfest and Computer Show, will be 
held on Sunday. July 11, 1982, at the Mari- 
on County Fairorournls at ttie southeast- 
ern intefsection of 1-74 and 1-465, Gate 
tickets are $4.00 and entitle you to all ac- 
trvilies, including the ma|or prize drawing 
and hourly prizes. There will t» inside and 
outside flea markets, a separate compute 
er show and flea market, a commercial 
vendors' display area, technical forums, 
club activities, and ladles' programs. 
There will be setups after 12^00 noon on 
Saturday, July iDlh. Security will be pro- 
vided Saturday night and Sunday, and 
camper hookup facilities will beavaiiabte 
on the grounds. For further information, 
contact Indianapolis Hamfest, Box t1066» 
Indianapolis IN 46201. 

ALEXANDER NY 
JUL 11 

The Genesee Radio Amateurs, Inc., will 
hold the second annual ARRL-approved 
Batavia Hamlest on Sunday, July 1 1 , 1 962, 
Irom 7:00 am to 5:00 pm at Alexander Fire- 
men's Grounds, Rte. 98 (nine miles south 
ot Balavla^. AliKander NY. Registration is 
$200 in advance. $300 at the gate, and 
$1.00 for the Ilea market. There will be 
many prizes, a large exhibit area, OM and 
YL programs, contests, plenty of tood* 
overnight camping, and a boat anchor 
auction at 3:00 pm Talk-in on 4.71/5.31 
{W2RCXJOI .52. for advance lickets. make 



73 Magazine • June, 1982 



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73Magazine • June, 1982 91 



checks payable \o BatavM HamFasi, Cfo 
Gram, Inc.. Box 572, Qaia^ta NY 1405<3 

HARBOR SPRINGS m 
JUL 17 

The Sirails Area Amateur Radio Club wiH 
tidld lis annual hamfest on July 17> 1382. 
Irom 9:00 am to 4ifX) pm ai rhe Harbor 
Springs Hbgh School, Harbor Springs Ml 
Donatior^s are S2.00 ai the door and table 
space is S2.50 Ooof a will be Op«n a1 &;00 
am for setuf^s. Lunch will ba sarved ttom 
11.00 am to T:00 pm and reHreshmams will 
be available durmg ttie day. There will be 
one mam door pttie and s^naltef pfizes will 
be awarded hourly The ^hool pafhing lot 
ts tree for seir-containad RVa to use tor an 
ov^mighi stay and many places of rnierest 
to VLs a/e available nearby, Talk^m on 
52:<52 and 146 07^6? For more details, 
contact Mr. Bernie Sloinlch KBOAE, GOO 
Anr> Street. Hartx>r Springs M\ 49?40. or call 
16161-526-561* 

EUOEN£ OR 
JUL 17-1S 

Ttie Lane County Ham fair wift be heid 
on July 17-1B, 1902, at the Oregon NatiOiv 
al Guard Armory. 2515 Qentann^ai. Eu- 
gene OR Tickets are MOO «ach and anU- 
Ue ttie holdef to one extra drawing ticltdt 
Tree if purchased b«fote July 1st Doors 
will open ai 6:00 am Saturday and Sunctay 
Featiures will include a swap arid stiop at 
SSOO a table, a 2-meier t>unnv hunt, wom- 
en's activities, a ctilldren's corner, com^ 
pyter derrtos. techntcal seminarsK OCWA. 
and a grand onie of an I com 730 lowDariKl 
mobile rig. There wJU b« an all-^ay snack 
bar, tree parking tot RVs {no hooKupS), 
and a Salgrday pol luck supper ai 6:00 pm. 
Talk-in on 52/,52. \m,2^M. 147 66/26. 
and 3.910 HF. For advance llckels, send 
an BASE to Eunbce Qrown WA7M0K, 2456 
Corral CoufL Springtield OH 97477, Or 
phone |S03h747-793fl. 

WASHINGTON MO 
JULia 

The Zero Beaters Amateur Radio Club 
wHl hold Its hamfesi on Sunday, Judy 16, 
19&2, at the Washfngiori Fairgrounds, 
Washington MO. Talk in on 147,64/24 For 
more Jnfornnaiioa. contact Rich Noelkfj 
WA0NUI, Rte. 3, 10 Hicriard Drive, 
Washing Ion MO 63090. 

SOWLIKG GREEN 
JUL 16 

The 17th annual Wood County Ham-A- 
ftama will be held on Sunday, July 18. 
1962, at the Wood Couniy Fairgrounds, 
Bowling Greer^ OH. Gates will oper^ at TO 
arn with free admtssion and parking. 
There will be drawtrtgs for prtj^esi tickets 
are $t. 50 in advance and $2.00 ai ihe gate. 
Trunk sales space and food wih be avail- 
able. Advance table rentals are $3.0Q lo 
dealers only Saturday setup available un^ 
III 8:00 pm KBTIH talk in on 52. Fof more 
info or dealer remaps, sand an SASE to 
Wood County ARC. c/o S. Irons. PO Box 
73, LuOkey OH 4344^ 

CANTON OH 

jyLi« 

The Tusco Radio C»ub {WSZXt and the 
Canton Amateur ffadto Club (WSAU will 
hold the 81 h annual Hall of Fame Hamfest 
or) July 18, 1962. at the NimishiUen 
Grartge. 5461 Easton Street Louisville 
OH Admission is S2 50 m advance, 13.00 
at Ihe gale. ar>d children under t6 will be 
admitted free The flea market witl open it 
9:00 am and activthes wilt include awards, 
forums, dealers, and XYL programs Tal*t- 
inon I46.1&r 70.146.52/^. and 147 72/12 
For reservations and/Of intormation. con- 

92 73Magazme • June* 1982 



tact Butch Lebold WASSHP, 10677 Hazel- 
view Avenue. Alliance OH 44601, or phone 
(216h82l 6794, 

GRAND RAPIDS MN 
JUL IS 

The Range Wide Hamfest will be herd 
on July 1 8, 1902. from 10:00 am to 4:00 pm 
al Qunn Par^, HighwaySS, 6 mites north of 
Qvand Rapids MN. Admission and ta(>les 
are tree. Bring the family lor a ptcntc. 
games, prizes, and tun. Parking and camp- 
grounds wiU be availabte TalK-m on 
146.28/86 an<| .52- For more tnformaiion^ 
write Bob WD4AAF. 736 Crystat Springs 
Road, Grand Rapids MN 55744, pr call 
(216^326-2268 (evenings}. 

POUGHKEEPSte NY 
JUL 24 

Th€ Mt Beacon Amateur Radio Club 
will hold lis annual hamfesi on July 24, 
1182. I>eginning at 8:00 am, at the Art*ng^ 
ton Senior High School, Poughkeepsie 
H y Adm IS? I on is S2 ,00 (X Y Ls and chi tdr en 
admitted tree), tatlgatmg space is S3. 00 
^includes i free admission^ and a table 
space IS MOO (includes i free table and 
admission}. Thare will be ttie tree ilea mar- 
ket tables indoors, parting door prizes, an 
auction starting at 2:00 pm. and ho! food 
and beverages. Talk- in on 146.37/.97 and 
146.52 For additional infom^aiion, ad- 
vance tfckets. or registration, send an 
SASE to WaJt Obiter WA2ZGN, Norlh Hilt 
side Lake Road. Wappingers Falls NY 
12590, or phone i9t 41-226-6636. 

WEST FRtENOSHIP MD 
JUL 25 

The Baltimore Radio Amateur Televi^ 
sion Society (6 RATS | will hold its annual 
BRATS Maryland Hamfes! on Sunday, Ju* 
ly 25, 1982, at the Howard Courrty Fair- 
grounds, Route MA ai Route 32, adjacent 
to Interstate 70, aboui 15 m^les west of 
Baltimore, in West Friendship MD. Indoor 
tables with ac power are Si 5.00 each; 
without ac power, SI 0.00 each. Indoor tait 
gating Is S5.00 per space; outdoor tailgal 
ing Is S3.00 per space. Overnight RV hook- 
ups will be av3iiat>le. For more Intorma- 
lion and reservations, write to BRATS, PO 
Bom 5915. Baltimore MD 2i;^QB, 

CENTREV1LLEMI 
JUL 25 

the Amateur Radio Putsiiic Service As- 
sociation of Si Joseph County Ml will 
hold Its 4th annual swap and shop on July 
25, 1982. at the St Joseph County Fair- 
grounds. Centre ville Mt Doors open at 8:00 
am. Tickets are $2.00 in advance and S3.Q0 
at the gate, indoor tables ar^SaoO Trunk 
sales are free Cannptng ts available Satur- 
day ntgh! only for S6.00. Talk^n on 146.52 
For more information, contact Dennis 
CtJilef NSDOU. 3051 2 Avenue, Vickesburg 
Ml 49097 

WHEELING WV 
JUL 25 

The Triple States Radio Amateur Ctut? 
will hold its 4tli annual tiamfest on Sun- 
day, Juty 25, 19&2, from 9:00 am to 4:00 pm 
at Wheeling Park, Wheeling WV. Arlmis- 
sion IS S2-00 fSO^SO); children under t2 will 
be admitted fpes. T^e^e will t>e major 
prizes plus door prizes every 15 minutas; a 
l5-minute auction every txiur on ttK hour 
free parking for 1,D{|0 carsi refreshments; 
ARRLrSWOT/TSRAC boottis; indoor deal- 
er displays: and a flea market. There will 
be satups the night before or at 7:GQ am 
Sunday morning. Tatk-in on 146.i1/-9"t and 
14^34!, For advance dealer regiistraticn. 
elecincal outlet and table requests. sut>- 
missjon ot free ads for the club's tiamfest. 



Issue, and more Intormation, contact 
TSRAC, Box 240. flO 2. Adena OH 43901. 

prnsaunGH pa 

AUQ1 

The 45lh annual South Hills Brass 
Pounders and Modulators Hamfesi will be 
t>eld on August 1, T962. trom 10:00 am to 
4:00 pm, at South Campus. Community 
CoimgB ot Allegheny County. Pittshurgh 
PA Admission is S200 or 3 lor $500. 
There will be compgler. OSCAR, and AT^ 
demon si rations, as well as a Ilea market. 
Talk in on 140 13/73 and t46.52 For tor- 
Iher information, contact Andrew L Pato 
WA3PBD, 1433 Scnautt^r Drive. West 
Homestead PA 15120. 

ANGOLA IN 
AUG t 

TheSteutien County Radio Amateurs will 
hold the 24m annual FM Picnjq and Ham 
fest on SitTHfay, August 1 t9ft2. al CrooKed 
Lalte, Angola IN Admission is S2 50. Tlt^e 
wriE be prizes, picmc-siyie BBQ chiehen. in- 
side ladles tor exhibitors and vendors, and 
overnight camptng {A fee wf 1 1 be charged 
tiy county pmfk^ Talk-in on 14§.52 arid 
I47,8tf2t 

SAUK RAPIOSMN 
AUGB 

The St Ciotjd Radio Diub will hold its 
annual hamfest on Sunday. August 8, 
1962. Irom 8 30 am to 4:00 pm, at Ihe Sauk 
Rapids Municipal Park. Sauk Rapids MN. 
Talk'in on 14& 34/ 94 Fot more inlorma^ 
lion, contact Mike Lynch. 2ii6-iai Street, 
St Cloud MNSeSOt. oread (612| 251 2297 

TACOMA WA 
AUG 14-1S 

The f^adlo Ctub ot Tacoma witl hold 
Hamfair 82 on August 14-15, 1982, at the 
PacMIc Lutheran University campus, Ta- 
coma WA, Registration Is $5.00 and dinner 
Is $7,50, Acilvities will include technical 
seminars, a flea market commercial 
booths, an ARRL mealing, a repealer to- 
rum, a VHF tweak and tune clinic, prizes, 
rallies, and a loggers' breakfast. Talk in 
on 147.flB,i'.28. For more inlormailon, con- 
tact Grace Teitzel AD7S. 701 So. 120th, Ta- 
coma WA 9S444. or phone [206)-S64'8347. 

TIOGA COUNTY PA 
AUQ21 

The Tfeoga County PA ARC flth Annual 
Amateur Radio Hamfest will beheld on Sat 
urday, August 2t. 1982. tromOBOO to 1600 at 
a new location at Island ParK. jusi otf US 
Rte 15, Biosstiufg PA There wiH be a Ilea 
market, lood. tree camping, an auction, an 
H/T door pnze, etc Talk-in on ISI/.TO and 
52. For more information or advance tick- 
ets, write TiOQa Co ARC. PO Box 56, Mans- 
field PA ie933. or contact Paul Sando 
KG2AZ 606 Reynolds Street. Elmira NY 
14904 on .19^ 79 or 9& 36 



MARYSVtLLE OH 
AUG 21-22 

The Union County Amateur i^adio Club 
will hold the Marysvlile Hamfest ortSatur' 
day afternoon and aH day Sunday. August 
21 22. 1982. at the fairground mMarysvi lie 
inear Colun^bus^ OH Admission ts $2.00 
in advance or S3.00 at the gate Flea mar^ 
ket space is St.OO. Food, beverages, and 
freeoverncght camping, movies, and pop' 
corn will be avaitabie. Featured on Satur 
day night will l>ea free square dance (with 
a live band} followed by a tjig country 
breakfast avaiiabFe aji nigni Door gnzes, 
iar^ies^ programs. ar*d ARRL FCC, and 
MARS meetings will tw featured on Sun< 
dajr. Talk-in on 146.52 and 147 99/39 For 
additional inform a! ton. write UCARC. 
13613 US 36. MarysvJtIe OH 43040, or call 
IS13>6444346S. 

AUGUSTA ME 
SEP 10-12 

Thie Augusta Emergency Amateur Ra^ 
dio Unit will hold the ARRL-approved 
Northeast Area Hamfest on September 
10-12; 1982. at Wmdsor Fairgrounds, lo- 
cate just off Route 17, !0 miles east of 
Augusia ME. Facil^jties for campers will be 
available. Activities will include a flea 
market and regularty scheduled speakers 
and cSemonstrations, as well< as the usual 
events. Tajk<in on 146.22/.&2 and 3940. 

ADRfAN Ml 
SEP 26 

The Adrian Amateur Raifio Club will 
hold its toth annual tiamfest on Sunday. 
Septemt>er26. 19B2. al the Lenawee Coun* 
ty Fairgrounds, Adrian Ml. Talk in on 
146.31/.91 (WSTQEK For tickets, tables, 
and more information, contaci the Adrian 
Amateur Radio Club, Inc.. PO Box 26. Adri- 
an Ml 49221. 

NEW LONDON NH 
SEP 26 

The 61 h annual Connecticut Valley FM 
Association Hamtest/Ftea Market will 1>b 
held on Sunday. September 36, 19Q2, from 
9:00 am to bW pm, al King Ridgo Ski Area, 
New London (MH, Adull admissions are 
S2.00, a flea- market setup is $5.00, and 
children under 16 wHI be admitled froo. 
King Ridge will have the food concession, 
For more in formation, contact Francis 
Callahan KAlBWE, Bok 173. East Wamng- 
fo,fd VT 05742. 

CHICAGO IL 
OCT 17 

The Chicago Citizens Rad^o League will 
hold its first annual hamfest on October 1 7. 
1983. at the North Shore American Legion 
Post. 6040 H. Clark, Chtcago IL from 7 00 
am to 4 00 pm. Due to limited table space, 
table reservations must be made in writing 
lo Fred Marlette KA9FUO tS5l W. Chase. 
Chicago I L 60626 



HAM HELP 



I would appreciaie hearing 
from anyone who has made any 
rrtodificatlon to the Kenwood 
TR-7500 2-meter FM transceiver. 

R. L Rabensteln WB3JJG 

2904 W. Pine Avenue 

Altoona PA 16601 



I am looking for m for mat ion 
regarding the serial numbers on 
Vibroplex units and the year of 
their manufacture. 

Richard Randall K6ARE 

1263 Lakehyrsi Rd. 

Livermore CA 945S0 



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HAM HELP 



A while back, Poly Paks was 
selling a surplus keyboard^ mi- 
nus the keytops, made by C- P. 
Ctare and Co. for Burroughs 
Ck>rp. If anyone has one of these 
boards or extra keyswitches, I 
would like to buy them. 

Ralph Alexander WB50RH 

Box 236 
Ufors TX 79054 

I recently purchased a Ham- 
martund Model SP-600 and a 
Hammarlund HC-10 converter 
(less hookup adapter). I will pay 
for manuals or any information^ 
copies, postage^ etc.« regarding 
these two units and their com- 
patibility. { am also in need of an 
adapter for the HC*10. 

C.L Gant2| Jr 

SI 5 E. Fulton St 

Lancaster PA 17602 

(7l7)-393-ia62 

i am in need of a tube-spectfi- 
cation manual which covers re- 
ceiving and transmitting types. 

Ljrrv Schad 

Box 332 

Afton lA 50830 

I am in need of some donated 
QSL cards. 

Garv Mitchell KHSAC 

PO Drawer 909 

Pago Pago, American Samoa 

96799 



I am in need of schemahcs 
and parts lists for the power 
supply and tape reader of an 
NCR Model 400-600 Teletype* 
(power supply schematic no. 
095-0009500 and tape reader 
Model GE 4APTR61G002, serial 
no. 5523). Have copier or please 
advise. 

Also needed is a dial plate {or 
copy) for the Phiico AM/SW 
Model 41^250 radio. Code 121. 

H. W. Wallmaier 

TOO W, 7 

Washington MO 63090 

Does anyone have informa- 
tion on the whereabouts of 
VP6LX (April, 1963} or 
W2PCJ/KJ6 (August, 1963)? 

George Osier KHEDA 

524 eth St. 

Wwt Des Moines lA 50265 

1 need a schematic and manu< 
al for a Gonset G151 FM Com- 
mynicaior. 

Marlt Rethtmeyer 

1531 Belmont 

Kansas City MO 64126 

I need a schematic, and ser* 
vice and upgrade information 
for the Sommerkamp FTdx-150 
transceiver. 

Charles Wendlar K2B0Z 

58 South Airmont Rd. 

Suffern NY 10901 



I would like to correspond 
with hams who have operated 
with or are operating with a Hal- 
licrafters FPM300. 1 am interest- 
ed in troubleshooting an exists 
\ng problem and in learning 
about any modifications which 
can t>e done on this rig, 

Neiir. HaegerWD6CVA 
14402 Cartefa Dr. 

La MIrada OA 90638 

I am looking for a model DD- 
1C Spectronics frequency read- 
out for my Collins 753-3 receiver. 

R. E Follz W7JQ0 

PO Box 2126 

Sodona AZ 66336 

[ need the service manual for 
the Clegg **99*er" 6-meler trans- 
ceiver along with any informa* 
tion on home*brewing a suitable 
vfo and FMIng the unrt. I wiil pay 
for postage and copying. 

Kevin Van ZullenKA9GWB 
205 Lehman St. 
Berne IN 46711 

I am looking for a schematic 
for an SBE VHF power amplifier, 
model SB-1 PA. 

Lennox Bodman K1NBG 
29 Mt Vernon St 

Gardiner ME 04346 

I need a service manual and 
schematic for a Phillips Tele- 
communications receiver type 
BX 925A/09 N R BC 8380/30502, 

Mark A. D'Ornellas 8RtY 

110 Barrack Si 

Kingston, Georgetown 

Guyana 



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I need schematics, technical 
manuals, and crystal informa* 
lion for an ANA/RC-52 radio set 
(T-891/VRC.52 and R-1146/ 
VRC-52). I will pay any reason- 
abJe chargas for copying and 
postage, or will copy and return^ 

John Wilson KC1P 

15 Kennedy Rd. 

Cambridge MA 0213d 

I would like to hear from hams 
who use the Exidy Sorcerer lor 
ham applications of any nature* 

John Stover N9AMC 

1521 Medora St, 

South Bend IN 46628 

I would like to convert a model 
1-636 Royce SSB/AM 23-channel 
CB radio for use on the lO-meter 
band. Any information on how to 
do ttits would be helpful 

Lyle G. Plum WB7PX0 

3807 East Emile Zola 

Phoenix AZ 85032 



schematic and 
Hammarlund HQ 
All costs will be 



t need a 
manual for a 
100 receiver. 
gladly paid. 

Fatrlcit J. Chlvfngton WSJ IB 

1478 Grace Ave. 
Lakewood OH 44107 

I need a schematic and any 
technical advice for keyboard 
assembly 055-1 3-02- 70REV by 
Incoterm Corp.. particularly for 
RTTY. All reasonable expenses 
refunded- 

W. G. Mott G4KLP 

2 London Bridge 

London, SEI 9RB 

England 



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94 ?3 Magazine • June, 1982 



MM HELP 



[ am booking for active Radio 
Shack TRS^ao and Sinclair ZX-81 
computer user*s nets, I am inter- 
ested in when these nets meet 
and the frequencies they meet 
on. I am also interested in the 
locations of the following air- 
craft and marine beacons (all 
frequencies In kHz}: A 320, 
eNO-396. BNU-396, COR-206. 
EBY-391, FR355, GWF-282, 
HMM*410, INE'521. LYI-416» 
MF-371, NO-351, 01376, 
PNA'392. QQ'401. RD-410, 
SL'288. TA-390, UNB 388, Vl-220, 
XSCK278, and ZP-368. 

Qary Payne KE6CZ 

1347 E. Dakota 

Fresno CA 93704 

I need a manual for the 
Beckman-Berkley model 7751 
frequency counter and a 
1000-kHz, 11frV ac crystal oven 
for same, I am also looking for 
the manual for the 312B4 Collins 
speaker console, i will purchase 
outright or copy and return. 

Bill Mellsen WB4APC 

Ri 2, Bom 253E 

RadcllffKY 40180 

I would like to obtain a motor* 
divider PC board number 1 A2 for 
a GXC5 military FAX unit. A 
schematic and/or manual for 
this would be handy, 

Al Clkas KA9QPL 

2112 Stonehenge 

Springfield I L 62702 

I need schematics or any in* 
formation for the Hammarlund 
HQ110, Hammarlund HQ180, 
and Hammarlund HX500 trans- 
mitter. I also need information 
on the Teletype® 28RO teietype 
machine and the Gonset G-50 
6-meter Communicator; and in- 
structions on how to convert the 
Communicator to FM* 

Tom Blessing 

294 Helen Ave. 

Xeoia OH 45385 

(513^372 9341 

1 would like to use my TBS^ 
Model I for SSTV work and 
would like to get in contact with 
anyone who has information on 
how to do this. 

Dale Clarlc N9APX 

40194 N.GIendale 

Zion IL 60099 



I am looking for 

• the instruction booklet for us- 
ing the Johnson transceiver 
tester 

• information on how to convert 
the Heathkit SB310 receiver for 
10- and 15-meter band coverage 

• information on how to modify 
the Heathkit SB102 for more so- 
phisticated operation 

I will copy and return or for- 
ward payment for the above, 

Robert Ross VE3LPJ 

4 Meadowlane Or. 

Brampton, ONT L6W 2R4 

Canada 

Is there a reader of 73 who can 
write an articte about the Japa- 
nese radJO*intercept training 
program that took place at the 
Eastern Signal Corps Training 
Center in Ft. Monmouth NJ In 
1944? 

Gordon E. Hopper 

75 Kendall Ave. 

Framlngham MA 01701 

I am interested In the 1750- 
meter band and wouJd enjoy 
hearing from someone who is/ 
was using this frequency. I am 
interested in learning about re- 
ceiver conversion and transmit- 
ter design, as well as activity on 
this band. 

Rex FauEkner N4EYE 
3413 Covington Dr. 
Augusta GA 30909 

An amateur in the ivory Coast 
la looking for a RTTY program 
and interface to use with the 
Atari 800 computer. Can anyone 
help me to help him? 

FredTrick, Sr KB9UB 

Zetlred Company 

PO Box 265 

North Manchester IN 46962 

Wanted: Robot Model 70 
SSTV monitor, regardless of 

condition. 

Dante Venlnere KA4JRE 
17831 NW 61 Ave. 
Hialeah FL 33015 

Wanted: amateur radio QSL 
cards prior to 1930 for old-time 
display. 

Oave Noon VE3tAE 

19 Honeysuckle Cr 

London, Ontario 

Canada N5Y 4P3 



I am looking for a schematic, 
service manual, and connec- 
tions for a Motorola Twin V 
Trans-type CC 3006 6/12-voit ra- 
diophone, model W43GGD'2. I 
am also looking lor information 
on the BC733F radio receiver. I 
will pay all costs for postage 
and handling. 

William Pence 

600 Old Stage Rd. 

Cave Junction OR 97523 

t need a schematic or any 
other information on the model 
300/600 digital counter sold by 
Crescent Wire and Cable Com- 
pany, circa 1976. 

Harold May 

428 Phinippa 

Hinsdale IL 60521 

I need a schematic and 
operating manual for a Knight 
KG-2100 dc oscUioscope. 

Joe Bische KA4HAG 

341 2 29th St. W* 

Bradenton FL 33505 

Our club Is fn dire need of a 
service manual for a Johnson 
Thunderbolt linear amplifier, 
catalog # 240-353. 

Ronald Daly WBAZN1 

Hot Springs 

Amateur Radio Club 

Box 365 

Hot Springs SD 57747 

I need schematics for the 
2^meter Edgecomm mobile 
radios 25A and 3000A, I will pay 
copy costs and postage. 

Rudolph Fallang KA7DTA 

717BSE6th 
College Place WA 99324 

I am looking for a DG-5 digital 
display and a DS-1A dc-dc con- 
verter for a Kenwood TS-520S. 
Please state condition and 
pricep including shipping. 

John R lorlo W04MWH 
622S Longvlew Dr, 
Port Rlchey FL 33552 



I am looking for a Vocallne 
AT-30 420-MHz transceiver. 
These units are very old, but I am 
sure that one can be found. 

AUen Harris 

3M7 Worden St. 

Muskegon Ml 49441 

t am In need of a source for 
stainless spring rod in pieces 
that are five feet long and no 
more than 1/8" in diameter* 
Tapered replacement CB whips 
are not quite long enough. 

Stan Hockman KA4DSK 

636 Flager Blvd. 

take Park FL 33403 



1 need a schematic diagram 
for a Collins 651 S general-cov- 
erage receiver. I w\\\ pay for the 
copies and postage. 

Tom Kormanik 

14114 St, Marys Ln. 

Houston TX 77079 

\ am looking for a Hallicraft' 
ers SX-73 or SX'73A receiver. I 
would like to use the receiver for 
DXing the 540-1 800-kH2 broad- 
cast band. 

John Crequa 
1121 Berdan Av«^ 
Toledo OH 43612 

i am looking for a schemaUc 
and service manuai fcjr the mod- 
el 33 Sideband Engineers trans- 
ceiver. I would also like some in- 
formation on how to convert this 
rig for CW use. 

Ka Kanana 

lS6SW0akiynSt 

Palm Bay FL 32905 

I am returning home from Ger- 
many to the Rome/Cartersvilie, 

Georgia, area. Any job informa- 
tion for a First Class Ra 
dioteiephone and amateur Extra 
class licensee commencing in 
August would be most ap* 
preciated, 

B. G. Echols, Jr. 

WA2NYR/0A2EJ 

University of Maryland 

Jaeger Kas., Bldg, 26 

APO New York NY 09162 

I would like to get a Novice 
license. Are there any nearby 
hams that could help me on my 
days off? An hour every other 
weekend would be a great help. 

Robert Good 

Box 86 

O verb rook KS 66524 

(91 3)^665' 7463 

t need a service manual and 
schematic diagram for a 
Motorola T4rGGV series "Twin 
V" transceiver. 1 will pay 
reasonable copying costs or 
copy and return* 

Jeffrey Miller WD4SM A 
2112 Natahoa Court 

Falls Church V A 22043 

I am looking for manuals and 
specification sheets for 
Hallicrafters SX101 and SX42 
receivers, I will buy your 
originals or pay for copying. 

Bob Allie 

736 Pine St 

Central Falls Rl 02863 

73 Magazine • June, 1982 95 



CORRECTIONS 



The TVRO fifter/amplifler and 
demodulator circuit boards 
shown in ** *Lite Receiver IV," 
May, 1982, are double^sided. The 
foil patterns for the component 



(top) srdes of these boards are 
given here as Figs. 2 and 3. 

J. Richard ChHstlan WA4CVP 

Mobite AL 



Please note the following In- 
formation: 

• The coaxial collinear de- 
scribed In '*Omni-Gain;' an ar- 
ticle in the May issue of 73, is 
incorrectty shown in Fig. 3. 
The V-i'Wave stub should be 
shorted at both ends, as de- 
scribed in the text. 

• A complete kit of parts for the 
"Fun-Amp" featured in the 
May, 1982, issue is available 
from Radiokit. Box 4115» 
Greenviiie NH 03048 for 
$37.95. 

Tim Oaniet NSRK 
73 Magazine Staff 

The printed circuit board lay- 
out for 'Home-8rew a TVRO 
Downconverter," March, 1982, 
should have included both 
sides. The lop and bottom of the 
board should be etched as 
shown here in Figs. 4 and 5. 

Also, the three coupling ca- 
pacitors shown in the parts 
placement diagram should tie 
50-pF disc ceramics, not the 
.01-uF ones shown. 

S. F. Mitchell WA40SR 

Mobile AL 





Fig. 3. Foit layout for top side of the demodufator board^ 




Fig. 4. Top Side of doubie-sided circuit board* 



Fig. 2. Foit layout for top side of 
the fiiter/amplifier board. 

96 73hAagazme • June, 1982 




Fig. 5. Bottom side of downconverter circuit board. 



SATE LUTES 



BEYOND PHASE IIIB 

Wfth the Phase 1I)B launch stillset for early July, there are now in- 
creasingfy bright prospects for geosynchronous launch opportuni- 
ties for amateur satellites. It appears that there may be two such 
possibilities by the end of 1985, The first of these is a test flight of 3 
vehicle designed for launching a new US defense satellite. The sec- 
ond is a test launch of a new European Space Agency (ESA) vehicle 
called Ariane4. 

Irk both cases, the available pay load is enormous by amateur sat- 
ellite standards: 1200 pounds for the US launch and 4400 pounds for 
the ESA flight. Needless to say, AMSAT officials on both sides of the 
Atlantic are pursuing these unique opportunities. It has been sug- 
gested that the time may be at hand for AMSAT to coordfnate Its ac- 
tivities with other amateur space groups, in order to make full use of 
the large payloads. It may well be a case of "use H or lose it**' 

SPACEWEEK: JULY 16-24 

The week of July t6-24 marks the 13th anniversary of the Apollo It 
flight, during which man first set foot upon the moon. "Spaceweek" 
Is a national celebration to commemorate this historic event and to 
demonstrate public support for space exploration. Activities include 
exhibits, lectures, and a petition drive to show our leaders in Wash- 
ington DC that Americans really do favor an active role in space for 
the United States. 

Spaceweek activities in each local area are organEzed by volun- 
teer groups. The Spacewe&k Handbook, which teJIs how to conduct 
a local Spaceweek, is available from the group's headquarters for a 
$10 donation. Write to Spaceweek National Headquarters^ PO Box 
581 72, Houston TX 77258. 

The above informaton is courtesy of A MSA T SareUite Report, PO 
Box 27, Washington DC 20044. 



oaCJUt ■ Orbits Iflf«EKAtiofli for J sine 



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Wheo ordeNog, please specify mode( It you 5Cl tsetore 


July -4 TCJH2 receive | 




a SlO discouni on ihe Tl-10: S5 disciHinr on the Tl tOK 








COMSTAR RESEARCH 


•^140 






P.O. BOX 771 


Madison Heights, Ml 48071 \ 





COMMUNICATIONS DIVISION 



/ / / // • / / 

(We SpeakVbur 
Language.) 

Backed by over 54 years of experience^ Harvey 
continues to offer the broadest selection and finest 
service available for the amateur radio comnnunity. 
This experience has taught us that the ham needs 
special treatment and that rs why Harvey has estab- 
lished a special division dedicated to the needs of 
the U.S. and foreign ham alike. 

One thfng is for certain. A ham will never get the 
run around from Harvey. If we dont have something 
in stock, we say so and will order it for you— or— tell 
you where to get rt. However we are sincerely dedi- 
cated to the ham community and, as a result, our 

expansive in- 
ventory means 
that, more than 
likety we will 
have what you 
are looking for 
in stock. 




AGA 

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Signals 

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VoCom 

W.Sh Engtneering 

Yaesu 



CALLTOLLFREE: 

1-800-223-2642 

Ask for Dou "Joe" Chin - KB2MU 




I 



'S0Hf Ust ot Adver1ist!'r$ Off page t T4 



73 Magazine • June, 1982 97 



IBB 



FUN! 



Johrt Edwards Kt2U 

78-56 86th Street 
GiendaieNY 11385 

LOGIC PUZZLES 

Recently, on a day when 15 meters was dead and I had nothing 
else to do, 1 pulled out my Dover Books catalogue and began thumb- 
Ifig through its pages. For Ihose of you not acquainted with this firm, 
Dover is a company specializing in all types of quality paperback re- 
prtnls priced from about one to five bucks. Wilhin the pages of their 
catalogue, you cao find books on subjects ranging from dying cloth 
with crushed insects, to the complete engravings of Albrecht Durer. 
They also have a selection of old-fashioned postcards that can be 
made into fantastic QSLs. 

At any rate, I'm plowmg my way through this catalog and what 
should I see listed but a book by Hiram Percy Maxim. Yes, the Hiram 
Percy Maxim. As I mentioned m a column back in 1980, among 
HPM*s many accomplishments was an autobiography entitled A Ge- 
nius in the Famtfy (later made into the 1946 movie So Goes My Love, 
starring Don Ameche and Myrna Loy>. Well, W seems that Dover has 
dusted off this mighty tome and is offering it to an anxious public for 
the tantalizing sum of $150. 

If you're interested in ordering a copy (and should any real ham be 
without one?), you'll find H on page 52 of the 1981-82 catalogue listed 
between The Handbook of Pictoraf Symtols and ObedteacB Train- 
ing For Your Dog. To order, write to Dover Publications. 180 Varick 
Street (slightly south of the FCC), New York NY 100 1 4, and ask for 
tKMDk 2094&'2. Be sure to add 70c for handimg. I can hardly watt to 
see the faces on the people at Dover when they suddenly get a few 
hundred requests for a book by Hiram Percy Maxim. 

Last January's logic puzzle in the Reader's Corner seems to have 
struck a responsive chord, in fact, since the puzzle appeared, Tve re- 
ceived over two dozen tetters askir\g for more problems devoted to 
logic and reasoning. Since FUNl always aims to please its readers, 
this month we're dedicating the entire column to logic games. These 
puzzles are by far some of the most complex riddles ever published 
in FUN!, so be sure to keep a glass of ice water or some other suit- 
able refreshment nearby. We don't want to burn out any brains. 



f iect to hearing an altercation followed by a shot. AHer a lengthy trial, 
the murderer was convicted, sentenced to death, and hanged. 

• Nat knew both the victim and the murderer. 

• !n court, the judge asked Wall to give his account of the shooting. 

• Harvey was the iast of the six to see Jimmy alive. 

• The policemaf^ testified that he picked up John near the pface 
where the body was found. 

• Bob and Harvey never met. 

What role did each ham play m this tragic story? 



ELEMENT 3— DXCC COUPLES 

Many husbands and wives are avid DXers. One afternoon, Stan, 
Frank, and Joe, along with their wives, whose names in random or- 
der are: Susan, Wilma, ar\d Diane, got together to compare their 
DXCC totals. 

• Diane. Witma, Susan, and Frank have 206, 202, 200, and 194 coun- 
tries respeciiveiy. 

• Stan and Joe have 198 and 196 countries, but for some time they 
couldn't tell who had made which since they both had tiad memories 
and lost their copy of OS 7. 

• When the fellows finally found the QST, it turned out that two of 
the couples had the same total 

• Frank's vyife has more countries than Stan's wife. 

What is the name of each man 's wife, and how many countries do 
Stan and Joe have confirmed? 



ELEMENT 4— CENSORED MULT! PLICATION 

The following example of multiplication has been attacked by the 
"Malh Censor." He's taken most of the digits in this problem and re- 
placed them with x's, it s up to you to restore the problem to its cor- 
rect form. (Note: The 4s, 5s, and 6s remaining are not necessarily the 
only digits of those values in the example.) 

€> X X 
XXX 



XXX 
X XXH 

X 6x 5 
X X 5x4 X 



Uncensor those digits. 



ELEMENT 1— THE REPEATER COUNCIL 

The Northern South Dakota Repeater Council has a highly in- 
volved system of repeater group representation. According lo the 
rules of the council, each repeater is represented by four members, 
but because of overtappmg repeater ciub memberships the follow- 
ing complications exist: 

• Each person on the council is simultaneously the representative 
of two different repeater groups. 

• Every pair of repeater clubs has one representative In common. 

In this maze of conflicting allegiances, the NSDRC accomplishes 
little In the way of frequency coordination, which isn't unusual for a 
group of this sort. Nevertheless, the councirs ofganizetion presents 
an Interesting puzzfe^ which is; How many repeater clubs &re repre- 
sented on the NSDRC and what are the total number of representa- 
tives? 



ELEMENT S— THE ORGANIZATION 

Six hams: John. Mary. CarL Stan, Harry, and Dick, are the only 
people interested in running for the offices of president, first vice 
president, and general manager of a certain national organization. 

• John won't be an officer unless Harry is presidenL 

• Mary won't serve if she outranks Carl. 

• Mary won't serve with Dick under any conditions. 

• Carl won1 serve with both Harry and Dick. 

• Carl won't serve if Dick Is president or Mary is general manager. 

• Stan won't serve with Carl or Harry unless he outranks them. 

• Harry won't be first vice president. 

• Harry won't be general manager if Stan is an officer. 

• Harry won't serve with John unless Dick serves too. 

• Dick won't serve unless either he or Carl is president. 

How can the three offices be fitted? 



ELEMENT 2-THE JAMMER 

A recent murder case involved the homicide of an alleged repeater 
jammer. In one order or another, six hams. Wait. Jimmy. John, Bob. 
Nat, and Harvey, were the victim, the murderer, the witness, the po- 
liceman, the judge, and the hangman. Here are the facts of the case: 
The victim had died instantly from the effect of a close-range gun- 
shot wound. The witness did not see the crime committed, but testl- 

96 JSMagazine • June, 1982 



THE ANSWERS 

Element 1: 

There are ten persons representing five repeater groups. 

Element 2: 

Walt was the policeman, Jimmy the murderer, John the witness, Bob 

the victim, Nat the judge, and Harvey the hangman. 



Element 3: 

Slan is married to Diane, Frank is marffed to Wilma, and Joe is wed 

to Susan. Stan has 198 countrtes and Joe 196. 

EtBment 4: 

645 
721 

6 4 5 
1290 
451 5 

4 6 5 4 5 
Efemenf 5: 

Carl is the president. Mary the first vice president, and Harry the gen- 
eral manager. 



Element 1: 
Twenty points. 

Element 2: 
Twenty points. 



SCORING 



Efement 3: 

Twenty points. 

Efement 4: 
Twenty points. 
Element 5: 
Twenty pomts. 

Let's get logical. 



1-20 points 

21-40 points- 

41-60 points- 

61-80 points 

81-100 points- 



Scatterbfain. 
Utterly confused. 
Room tempefature IQ. 
Computer like. 
Mr. Spock. 



The following amateurs were mtsslng from last month^s fist of 
those solving January's Reader's Corner. Found 1 solution: 
Ed Larose KS5V, John Hufschmid KI9J, Bob Kendall VE4ZH, and 
Marien Kendall XYL-VE4ZH, 




Chod Hams VP2ML 

Box 4881 

Santa Rosa CA 95402 



COMBATTING THE SUMMER 
DOLDRUMS 

Doldrums. A state of inactivi- 
ty. stagnation, or slump; a spell 
of listlessness. What the bands 
do in the summer The pits. 
What do the enthusiasts of the 
vaTious bands do during the 
summer doldrums? 

The high level of atmospheric 
noise (QRN) ruins the lower fre- 
quencies for most DX. The 
I60*meter specialist discon- 
nects the rig and spends the 
summer nights sleeping, dream^ 
ing of living on a mountain of 
copper plate. His days are filled 
designing the perfect ground 
and wondering it his neighbors 



will notice those copper wires in 
their swimming pools. 

The SO meter enthusiast 
splits hfs time between repair^ 
ing winter^damaged wire anten- 
nas and checking the noisy sun- 
rise and sunset openings for 
some other masochistic DXer, 
The pickings on the band are 
poor. There are too many leaves 
on the trees to shoot the arrow 
through the branches and haul 
the antenna up anyway. Maybe 
there's a baseball game on the 
tube. 

The 40^meter DXer paces off 
his imaginary Selement monch 
bander in the back yard for the 
fifteenth time. No matter where 



s^ 




he places the tower, the ele- 
ments will hang over his neigh- 
bor's yard. That neighbor, of 
course. . .is the one who has 
never been vety friendly since 
that incident with the TV set. It 
looks like another season with 
the inverted vee. Maybe a reflec- 
tor element hung between that 
fight post and the fence. , . 

Twenty meters stays open, af- 
ter a fashion, all summer. The 
high absorption and occasional- 



ly high noise level combine with 
amateurs pushed down from the 
higher bands so conditions are 
hectic. But it is possible to make 
contacts outside your conti- 
nent. Antenna work can wait un* 
til the winter proves that the 
beam really is too big and blows 
it oven 

Fifteen meters flashes with 
occasional excitement; it's 
probably the best band to watch 
carefully during the month. The 




The Catholic church overlooking Mam Street, Easter Island. Anfen- Father Dave Reddy, O.F.M,, CE0AE. The Chtfean flag has flown over 
nas mark CEQAE, Father Dave for years, 

TSMagazine • June, 1982 99 



J 




CEQAE as most of the amateur popufatton sees (hears?) him. Father 
Dave's 5BWAS sits above the fist of couniries needed, the fatter 
always at hand. 



band opeos toward the sun in 
the morning, often very rapidly. 
The most distant stations fade 
rapidly as the MUF climbs^ but 
the shorter path DX stays stfong 
for hours. The sunrise and sun- 
set hours at the OX location re* 
main the best bets. 

Ten meters suffers badly from 
the summer doldrums, But the 
changeable ionosphere does 
give the band a little pizzazz 
once in a whtle. 15 meters pro* 
vides a good predictor of 
IOmeter band openings. As IS 
meters shortens up (the more 
distant stations lose signal 
strength, the closer stations im- 
prove), 10 might be opening in 
that direction. A rapid shorten- 
ing of 15 suggests tuning to 10 
and trying a few CQs. The first 
few stations on the newly open- 
ing band get the best DX. 

Six-meter fans are finding F2 
propagation scarce, but the af^ 
ways-exciting E^skip keeps the 
summer interesting. Solar flares 
liven the band a couple of limes 
during the summer, but the real 
excitement awaits the return ot 
shorter days. 

DX activity and the overall lev- 
el of effectiveness of the bands 
do indeed drop during the mid- 
dle of the summer. The increase 
in solar radiation during tfte 
tonger days increases the at)- 
sorptive properties of the iono- 
sphere much more than the re- 
fractive ones. The signals aren't 
escaping into space as they do 
when the maximum usable fre^ 
qoency is low. Our radio waves 
are t>eing absorbed by the same 
ionosphere which permits long- 
distance communications in the 
first place. 

But a few bright spots shine 
through the murky bands. The 
dectining sunspot cycle flashes 

100 73 Magazine • June, 1 932 



wfth a fickleness which stnkes 
terror in many a propagation 
forecaster. A sudden solar flare 
can produce the most incredible 
long-path openings one night, 
and drive the absorption so high 
the next day that you can't work 
across the block. But favorabte 
conditions as the flare just 
starts make up for the crummy 
conditions the next day or two. 

Take advantage of these tran- 
sient gifts to the dedicated DXer 
by checking the bands at least 
twice a day. f^onitor WWV on a 
cotiple of different frequencies, 
if possible, until you can tell 
when conditions are a little 
strange, a little wilder than nor- 
mal. Try some of those long- 
path directions and times. Most 
superb band conditions pass 
unexploited because '^everyone 
knows the band isn't open 
then I " 

Another encouraging aspect 
of the summer doldrums is the 
occasional cool breeze of good 
conditfons. The level of absorp- 
tion varies daily and frequently 
drops low enough to permit 
some good DXing. Again, daily 
or twice daily monitoring and 
occasional transmitting ensure 
catching these openings. 

But during these months of 
perfect weather, between the 
occasional flashes of real ex- 
citement on the bands, this writ- 
er's attention begins to wander. 
I start to think how some of the 
South American amateurs are 
contending with the winter 
storms, amateurs such as our 73 
profile: CEOAE. 

When a visitor walks slowfy 
up the wide, dusty main street, 
he looks toward the church 
square, drawing attention from 
the crumbling walls and rust- 



stained roof of the church itself, 
But what Is that sticking up 
above the root of the church? It 
looks Uke. . Jt is! A multlband 
vertical, with radials strung out 
just over the roof line. An RG'58 
feed line runs off the back of the 
church and crosses over a long* 
neglected garden to a tiny 
house, overrun with vines and 
cats. A garden gate hangs from 
a strap of rubber tire under a col- 
lapsing grape arbor. The person 
who lives here has interests 
other than gardening. 

Indeed, a telltale crackle from 
the window on your right hints 
at the avocation of the long-time 
resident: That snnooth CW radi- 
ates from the fist of Father Dave 
CEQAE, on Easter Island, in the 
Pacific. 

Father Oave Reddy, O.F.M,, 
landed on this remote rock, 
thousands of miles from any 
other inhabited land, on the rec- 
ommendation of Father Sebas* 
tian, the former Catholic priest 
of Easter Island. Father Sebas- 
tian, widely recognized as the 
father of modern archeology on 
Easter Island, as well as father 
of his flock, interviewed Father 
Dave in the United States short- 
ly before the former's death. 
Soon thereafter, Father Dave 
embarked on the fulfilfment of a 
longtime dream; operating ham 
radio from the South Pacific. He 
left the seminary In Buffalo, 
New York, where he had been 
teaching, for Santiago, Chile, to 
learn Spanish* 

His arrival fn Chile (the coun- 
try which controls Easter Island) 
was untimely. Leftist leader Al- 
llende rode to power on the back 
of anti'American slogans, and 
Father Dave could not get the 
necessary permission to as- 
sume his role as the spiritual 
leader of Easter Island. 

AUhoygh the journey was nei- 
ther short nor straight, Father 
Dave did finally arrive on Easter 
Island, with built-in status as 
one of the leaders of the tiny is- 
land. His predecessors in the 
rofe of Pastor of Isia de Pasqua 
helped forge a nucleus of 
"Who's Who'^ on Easter Island 
along with the Governor, Mayor, 
and heads of the small military 
units on the island. Father Dave 
rapidly forged another reputa- 
tion as an active and congenial 
amateur radio operator, CEJ9AE, 

Today. Father Dave wel- 
comes visitors with the same 
friendly cheer so well known to 
his on-theair contacts. His 



hearty laugh and ever-present 
smile and good humor provide a 
welcome touch of the States in 
this remote corner of the world. 
His Long Island twang, which 
strongly colors his Spanish, be- 
trays his New York heritage. The 
visitor suspects he welcomes 
the chance to speak English 
other than "59 100/' 

It ^s hard to say which of the 
Items I brought from the United 
States Father Dave most appre- 
ciated: the spark plugs and re- 
placement gearshift knob for his 
jeep, the diodes to repair a sel- 
dom-used Collins 30L1 ampli- 
fier, or the two big jars of chunky 
peanut butter. I suspect the last. 
The food on Easter Island is 
monotonous and expensive, 
and the passing of the plate at 
the Sunday service permits few 
luxuries. 

The presence of amateur ra- 
dio visitors promised another 
bright spot In the slow tifa on 
Easter Island. Father Dave wel- 
comed the assistance of the vis- 
iting amateurs in improving his 
antenna farm, heavily damaged 
by the storms which sweep in 
from the northwest. Spare parts 
and tower-climbing ability are 
scarce in Easter Island, but the 
generosity of his amateur visi- 
tors and a little help from some 
passersby left CEOAE with a 
credible set of skyhooks. 

Father Dave divides his time 
on the Isia de Pasqua between 
his church, DXing, and his Boy 
Scout troop, one of two on Eas- 
ter Island. On Chile's Constitu- 
tion Day, he organized the 
Scouts into the parade, then 
raced to join the other island au- 
thorities in the viewing stand. 
The Scouts themselves quickly 
joined the viewers at the side of 
the parade route as soon as they 
passed the viewing stand There 
simply aren't enough people on 
the entire island to both have a 
parade and have people watch- 
ing It, Everyone serves double 
duty. 

A good time to work CEOAE is 
during a contest. He lets few 
pass without at least a few con* 
tacts. He claims a faissez faire 
attitude toward amateur radio 
contests, but his actions sug- 
gest a more positive attitude to- 
ward their periodic madness. 
When his 10-meter signal ap- 
peared to be interfering with the 
public address system in his 
neighboring church. Father 
Dave would hear none of any 
suggestion that the visiting am- 
ateur curtail operations during 



the Synday servfce. ^'Nonsense! 
You go right ahead and operate. 
111 turn off the church mike and 
talk louder/' And he did! 

While Father Dave often can 
be found in contests, he adn^its 
he prefers DXing to contesting. 
Easter Island Jies south of the 
tropics, and the band coridilions 
are not as uniformly superb as In 
the West Indies or other more 
northerly islands in the Pacific. 
So band opentngs to the heavy 
amateur concentrations In the 
Northern Hemisphere are short- 
er and not as strong as those en- 
joyed by his competition in the 
tropics. And the absolute lack of 
any local contacts makes seri- 
oys contesting difficult. Easter 
Island is no place to go to win an 
amateur radio contest, despite 
the extra 20 dB the CEO callsign 
Imparts. 

"Besides/" Father Dave re- 
minds his visitors, "Sunday is 
my busiest day." 

Father Dave shows some of 
the signs of the hard-core DXer: 
His greatest fear Is that he won't 
get on the Honor Roll before 
Easter Island Foses its status as 
a separate country, 

Easter tsland no longer a sep- 
arate country for DXCC? Father 
Dave explains, "Continental 
drift is sweeping Easter Island 
toward mainland CMe at Ihe 
rate of 2 inches per year. We'll 



be withfn 22S miles of Chile and 
lose our status as a separate 
country inonly 70 million years, I 
hope I can work the last 47 coun- 
tries I need before then/' 

How can you increase your 
chances of working Father Dave 
next time he shows up on 15 me- 
ters? Maybe you should review 
the phonetics for your callstgn. 

CHOOSING YOUR PHONETICS 

(This part of the column Is for 
phone operators only; we'll get 
to the CW crowd in another col- 
umn.) Proper choice of phonet- 
ics can speil the difference be^ 
tween success and failure in OX 
pileups. How do you choose the 
most effective phonetics for 
your calisign? 

Think about why you use pho- 
netics: The purpose is to reduce 
ambiguity. So many letters 
sound the same in the English 
language: b, d, e, t, p, g, c, v, z* 
Even under perfect conditions, 
most OX stations confuse state- 
side calls. In the confusion of a 
typical phone plleup, these let- 
ters are impossible to tell apart. 
So you turn to phonetics. 

You want the DX station to 
recognize (and come back to) 
your calisign, and hopefully be- 
fore he comes back to someone 
else's. So your phonetic callsign 
should be unique, it should re^ 
duce confusion, and it should be 



easy to copy through the pileup. 
Does your phonetic call meet 
these objectives? 

THE CHOICES 

The first place to look for pho- 
netics is the standard list found 
in any amateur radio handbook 
or training manual This stan- 
dard list is remarkably good, but 
it does have a few problems for 
DXers. One example: After mak- 
ing thousands of contacts as 
WAISQB1 1 would like to person- 
ally throttle the idiot who picked 
^^sierra*^ for S. Sierra is C. 1 still 
hear sierra and write C. "Sugar" 
gets through as well as sierra, 
without Che ambiguity. 

Short phonetics punch 
through pileups faster than long 
ones. The amateur who uses 
short, punchy phonetics can get 
his call in twice as often as the 
ham who uses longer ones. 
Guess who works more DX? 
"Fox'' is vastly preferable to 
"Florida.'' And the DX station 
can fall asleep or, worse, work 
someone else, while I struggle 
with "^Washington American 
One Santiago Quebec Bolfvia 
Portable Victoria Portugal 

Which brings us to another 
possible soy fee of phonetics- 
place names. Place names 
make long phonetics, usually 



too long for pileup sHuations. 
But they can be used to good ad- 
vantage in poorer conditions or 
to confirm a oallsiga AU place 
names share a common disad- 
vantage as phonetics, however. 
Upon occasion they cause more 
confusion than they eliminatef 
Witness my callsign above, and 
the DX station answers, 'The 
station in Bolivia, stand by. The 
Portuguese station, go aheadT' 

One well known contester 
turned this problem Into an ad- 
vantage. WA1KID would often 
break through pileups with 
^'WAIKlDeJaware." Ethical DX- 
ers frown on such use of decep- 
tive phonetics, however, and 
you will quickly find this prac- 
tice leads to more harm than 
good. 

A final hunting ground for 
possible phonetics: *'cute" or 
catchy phonetics. Such as 
Black White Yellow, or Whiskey 
One No Good. Or the famous 
Cute Enema Seashore. Topical 
phonetics fait into this same 
category. When the race horse 
Seattle Slew won the Triple 
Crown of racing, K7SS tried Se- 
at lie Slew for phonetics. 

How do you choose the best 
phonetic from this assortment? 
We'll examine how you "fine- 
tune" your mdividual phonetic 
for your voice and station next 
month. 



LETTERS 




THE t^ST TRAGEDY 



J 



Shortly after the article *'The 
Father of FM" (February, 1982) 
appeared, I thought Td look-see 
for myself. Perhaps a few pic- 
tures would be In order. Sure 
would be nice to add to the club 
history (the Major Armstrong 
Memorial Radio Club, Alpine, 
NJ, on the site of the tower de- 
scribed In his later experiments). 
Several passes were made to 
find the location, and at last t 
found it hiding ingloriously be- 
hind a huge apartment, the num- 
ber, 1032, hidden under many 
coats of paint and hard to distirv 
guish. 

There above me on the hill to 
the east she stood, empty, 
burned, and blackened, over- 
grown with weeds and unattend- 
ed flora, alone, abandoned, ut- 



terly destroyed. Though win- 
dows below were boarded, the 
door swung freely in the winter 
wind; a foreboding feeling crept 
over me as I entered. 

Local youths, it appeared, 
had added thefr mark to the al- 
ready sickening sight» Fear- 
fully I entered, as one would an 
unknown tomb, feeling the evil 
of such a deed. Slowly, I climbed 
to the room where it all began, 
up the main stairs which, under 
the paint removed by the heat, 
showed a lovely balustrade— 
the kind so many are now restor- 
ing back to the way they used to 
be. 

If only It had had a chance, It 
too could have been restored as 
have been the homes of many of 
America's lesser heros, but the 
shame of the Bronx has reached 
a few miles north into Yonkers. 



There before me was the 
room — the one with the three 
windows— where it began. The 
sounds of those words rang in 
my head and lifted up into the 
sky above. Open into the 



universe. Another tragedy In the 
tale of Major Armstrong unfold- 
ed before me and you. 

And so the last tragedy in the 
life of Major E. H. Armstrong 
passed one cold December 16, 




1032 Warburton Ave., Yonkers, at preserrt. For "then,** see p. 51 of 
the February, t9B2, issue. 

73MagazmB • June, 1 982 tOI 



1981, shortly after 8:00 am, car- 
ried by the heal and smohe into 
eternity. 

God bless his memory. 

Art Bonto W2ZYC 
New Ml I ford NJ 




The Metropolitan Communi- 
cations Network Radio Club of 
the greater Washington (DC) 
area operated a repeater on six 
meters (52.2M MHe in; 53.250 
MHz out). We would like to have 
repeater clubs operating six 
meters anywhere along the 
eastern seaboard contact us to 
establish some linkage and ex- 
change experiences. The six- 
meter FM net meets Saturday at 
1900 hours local time. We also 
have a six-meter AM net which 
meets Sundays at 0900 hours lo- 
cal time on 50.4 MH£. Sunday at 
1900 hours local time we have a 
six-meter sideband net which 
meets on 50.125 MHz. 

Robert Spom WA3GG0 
Corresponding Secretary 

9927 Cottrell Ten^ace 
Silver Spring MD 20903 



U 



WRITE FOR RIGHT HAMS 



As a regular reader of your ex< 

cellent publioallon, I enjoy read- 
ing your often-controversial edi- 
torial comments and the letters 
page, but t have now been 
forced to write on behalf of the 
large number of amateurs out- 
side the US without whom there 
would be no DX. it seems that all 
your comments do not take any 
account of the very important in- 
ternational-contact part of our 
great hobby. Please bear in 
mind that you are no more a rep- 
resentative of the radio ama- 
teurs than IS the editor of the 
Washington Post or the London 
Times of their respective reader* 
ships, and please take us DX op* 
erators into account, 

I would also like to comment 
on some aspects raised In your 
Issue of March, 1982. Concern- 
ing your promotion of a no- 
Morse license. I am definitely 
against this, especially as we In 
Britain have had a no-Morse 
VHF license for some years. As I 
operate both in the US and at 
home on both the VHF and HP 
bands^ f have noted that despite 
the much larger number of US 
amateurs, yog have a much 
smaller proportion of lids. Have 
you ever listened to the London 

102 73 Magazine • June, 1982 



repealers? Also, the operating 
standards of US amateurs to me 
are much higher than the aver- 
age, especially on CW. I am sure 
that this difference ts a result of 
youf Novice system, that i woutd 
like to see copied in the UK. 

This brings me to my next 
subject of emergency communi- 
cations, although nobody can 
fault your suggestion for a na- 
tional data network (internation- 
al?) for traffic handling- 1 believe 
that once main power supplies 
have gone^ as they certamly will 
in a conflict, we will be back to 
CW. I believe that we should 
propagate some return to basic, 
but modern, technology in 
amateur radio coupled with GW 
operating so that In the final 
emergency we amateurs can 
salvage some communications 
from the remains. 

Andy Hewitt G3SVP/W4 
Thatcham, Berkshire, England 

t can see you've never tried our 
repeaters in New York or Los An- 
geles. I monitor the London re* 
pesters when I'm there. , .no 
comparison to the antics we are 
abfe to generate. Andy, where 
are we gotng to get aii those CW 
rigs? Most of the SSB and fM 
ham gear these days can oper- 
ate from a car bBttery as we// as 
the mains. A farge part of the 
emergency gear is mobile and 
hand-heid equrpment anyway, / 
can just see us aii sitting there 
with a hand key sending mes- 
sages via our handie-tatkies. 
Perhaps some forward-tooklng 
firm wiii come out with a hand- 
key kit to provide keys which wiii 
screw on to our NTs in case of 
emergency need. We could even 
have the code printed on it for 
those of use who have forgotten 
the code, — Wayne. 



A RtGHI HAM WRITES 



: 



1 think that you ought to write 
a couple of things about Nov- 
ices. I'm 12 years old and Tm a 
Novice, I see a lot of articles on 
things pertaining to General 
class hams but nothing about 
us Novices. Thanks for your 
time, I think your magazine Is 
great* 

Eric Farwell EF2XJI 
Miami FL 

Eric F., you are atsofuteiy righit 
Let's see some more articles to 
help our Novices understand 
more of what is going on. We 
need to get them interested in 
simpie antennas and how they 



work, introductions to some of 
our more eKciting activities 
such as traffic handling, BSTV, 
ATV, R7TK certificate hunting, 
contests, and so on. — Wayne. 



NO MORSE A HO KO 



] 



I am writing in disagreement 
with your feelings about CW. Ev- 
idently you don I operate CW* I 
operate CW and enjoy It. I am 14 
and was first introduced to ham 
radio when I was 11.1 was at- 
tracted to ham radio because of 
CW; it seemed interesting. I was 
not scared off by CW when I was 
a newcomer, I work lots of CW. I 
do also work SSB and enjoy it, 
too. CW is oof (for most) just 
"the usual garbage of name, lo- 
cation, signal strength. . .** etc., 
as you stated in an answer to a 
letter in the April, 1982, issue. 
Tm a ragchewer and do mostly 
that, though I do some DXing 
and contesting, t don't just give 
my name, QTH, etc. I taik about 
my family, the day, school, my 
future, eiectronics, etc. CVV is 
fun and rewarding. CW is the 
root of ham radio, CW is what 
makes ham radio special. I am 
compieteiy against "no-code" ^ 
itcenses; the last thing I want to 
hear is ham radio sounding like 
the Chicken Band (CB>. So my 
conclusion is that CW is fun and 
thoughts are expressed on CW, 

Eric lasslter KA4KEQ 

Danville VA 



Hey, Eric /_., i*m giad you We 
found some chaps on CW who 
wiii give you more than the usuai 
duii routine. That's great! Not 
that / can in any way single out 
CW for that crime. it*s ati too 
prevatent on our repeaters, and 
certaiafy not unknown on ourDX 
bands. And t don't know of any- 
one who wants to have our ham 
bands sounding even more like 
CB than they do, so stop fretting 
about that. Perhaps f put more 
trust in the intettlgence it takes 
to understand radio theory than 
f do in the skiii it takes to copy 
code, t do know that you would 
be hard put to point out any of 
the more serious offenders on 
our bands as being good techni- 
cians^ I tend to gravitate more 
toward hams with technicat 
backgrounds, and to find them 
the most sincere and fascinat- 
ing of ail hams^ — Wayne. 



[ 



HO CODE A YES YES 



Sir, I sincerely applaud you for 
your editorial tn the March, 1982, 



73 Magazine. I find your logic in 
a no-code ham ticket as being 
beyond reproach and agree 
whole-heartedly with your comK 
ments. Do not give up on this, as 
you will prevail* 

One of the most frustrating 
experiences I have had has been 
wanting to get a ham license 
and to do experimentation m 
communications. As a result of 
this frustration, I turned to CB 
radio. Most everyone knows 
there is a problem on 11 meters, 
but fads have a way of fading 
away, leaving only those that 
are sincere. The only drawbacks 
in my getting into ham were two 
items, one a myth and the other 
what now should be a legend^ to 
wit: you had to spend a lot of 
money on equipment, and code. 
As has been evidenced, you can 
get on the air In a respectabfe 
manner without having to sell 
the wife and kids. 

The other item, code, is rhet- 
oric used by the elitists to keep 
it all to themselves* 

Selfish and unconcerned as 
to the future of ham radio: '1 had 
to do it, so shouJd you," atth 
tudes. tf we were to use the logic 
many hams profess, we'd still 
t>e in knickers until manhood, 
women would not t>e able to 
vote (hmmm), and we would 
have legal slaves. Trying to keep 
code as a requirement is analo- 
gous to keeping a person on a 
respirator who has suffered 
"brain death/' 

I cannot for the life of me find 
any logic in the license require- 
ments for code. 5 wpm, Novice, 
CW only; Technician. CW and 
phone on some VHF; 13 wpm for 
General and Advanced for, . . 
phone privileges? Like putting 
the cart before the horse, bass 
ackwards. In any case, code 
should be like blacksmithing, an 
art of an outdated requirement. 
Those who want it, do it; those 
who don't, won't. Code, like sav> 
ing string, serves no useful pur- 
pose but you keep hanging on to it. 

We need technical innova- 
tions afid experimentaljon by 
those who sincerely want it 
while, on Ihe other hand^ provid- 
ing a hobby to many. I am trying 
to get our local Community Col* 
lege to carry a non*credit course 
In the aspects of ham technol- 
ogy. So far no luck, but I will con* 
tinue to try. I feel that we as 
Americans need to recapture 
the reputation for being leaders 
in technological advancements 
rather than aiso^fans. To do this, 



we must take down our selMm- 
posed barriers and "motivate, 
not frustrate" (a good anti-code 
slogan) new blood Into tiam. 

I'll learn the code in order to 
upgrade, but I will then drop It 
like a bad habft. i guess that 
means some people will label 
me as a lid or other terms they 
put on those who want to move 
forward, not stay In the past. If 
people would sit down and un- 
©motionaliy analyze the no-code 
proposals, using reality, and not 
negatrvely speculate on what 
would happen, only positive 
things could come about. For 
those who cannot follow the 
rules and regulations as set 
down, what we need Is stronger 
enforcement of the roles, not 
outdated requirements such as 
code. 

FCC has its heart and hands 
full in light of the budget cuts, 
etc. It needs help in enforce- 
ment of the rules. This could be 
accomplished by the use of 
hams themselves. Testing could 
be done on a local level by a 
group or club of hams. In my 
case, I would have to go to Long 
Beach, California, to upgrade. 
This would cause me to miss 
two days of work. Or, glory be. I 
could wait to sea If the field of- 
fice will have enough money to 
make a trip maybe 2-3 times a 
year to come to where I live* 

Using local hams to upgrade 
future hams would also Instill 
pride. It wouldn't take long to 
find out which groups are up- 
grading really qualified hams, 
as the proof is in the pudding. 
Nothing wrong in taking pride in 
knowing that your pupils have 
been properly supervised, 
instructed, and motivated in the 
correct methods and Nnowl- 
edge. However, the clout is In 
the hands of the diehards who 
Insist on being outdated In put* 
ting politjcal pressures on those 
who can change the code re- 
quirement. Until these "chosen" 
pass away to that great shack in 
the sky, I am afraid that the code 
will remam, regrettably. 

There are so many positive 
aspects to dropping the code; if 
only those who wish to hold on 
to the past would take a positive 
view. Let*s move a^lead and be- 
come the leaders of advance- 
ments, not the sleeping giants 
that we are. 

Frank J. Ward KA7LXT 
Tempe AZ 

Tfoubfemaker — Wa yne. 



HANG HI OV YAQI 



Even I can remember the time 
when one needed a yagi or a 
quad to work DX, the thrill of 
breaking a pileup, the sophisti- 
cation of dual vfo*s, talKending, 
and all the rest of that good 
stuff. To the new breed of ham, 
this sounds like weird talk in* 
deed, The new DXer thinks 
you're out of the band when he 
hears about stacking flve*over^ 
five on a 180-foot tower Who 
needs ft? And he's right! These 
tales of working DX with yagis 
and amplifiers sound like 
echoes of the past, like the 
mumblings of bearded Honor 
Rollers about the gud or days. 
The new DXer knows where it's 
af, , ,you won't find him staying 
up half the night in the hope of 
catching a rare one while the 
rest of the world sleeps. He^s 
not going to spend hours calling 
CQDX in the hope of finding a 
rare bird, Hefl no, he'll tune in to 
a DX net, of which there are now 
more than thirty. He*ll get in line 
and work the rare ones without 
any fuss. **Llke a telephone 
call/' says one list-taker. "No 
cuss'n and scream 'n/' 

We old goats have been taken 
In by the manufacturers, i.e., we 
were told It was necessary to 
have a beam and an amplifier if 
one wanted to be a successful 
DXer. Well, it took me five years 
to discover that all one needs to- 
day is a worry-free dipoie and a 
barefoot transceiver and you 
can work the world, 

Like an archaeological relic, a 
dinosaur crying out for a mate, I 
called CQDX today for twenty 
minutes on 15 meters and noth- 
ing came back. There I was with 
a fortune tied up in amplifiers 
and towers, yagis at 150 feet, 
and two-Inch heiiax. Nothing 
came back, so I spun up the 
band and there they were, 
twelve of them, all 5 and 9, and 
all semi-rare: D68, ZD7, EAS, 
EA9, 707, 3V8, JW, and more, all 
sitting tike clay ducks in a 
shooting gallery. One after 
another they came back to the 
squeaky off-frequency signals 
with 4 and 3 reports. (The 
callsigns were handed out by 
Ihe control station to the DX sta- 
tion. Reason; speed and effi- 
ciency, of course, of course!) 
And what's more, everybody 
was happy. The gud or list 
takers stood by for the indoor 
dipoles and verticals. Only one 
guy failed to get his report, and 



he was using a mag-mounted 
Hustler whip on his rig in the 
basement. . .he said he would 
wait for propagation. (Gud 
man!) 

We with the mite-liigh yagis 
and maximum-limit amplifiers 
are anachronisms, incongrui- 
ties at this point of time. Down 
will come those relics of the 
past and up will go the trouble- 
free dipote Of verticalt and out 
Witt go the amplifier. That stuff 
belongs with chrome- laden, 
6-litrd guzzler automobiles and 
25-cent-a-gallon gas. Get with It, 
DXers, you're showing your agel 
Plleups are on their way out, the 
way individuality is out and or- 
ganization is in* CU on the lists. 

Don Ntwlandv VE3HQN 
Cotborne, Ontario, Canadi 

You ^oft*t have to be an ofd* 
timer to remembBr the days 
when men were men and the en- 
dorsement sticker belonged to 
the strong and the quick. But 
now the demand for DX is way 
ahead of supply. A DL can raise 
a huge lO-meter piieup on a 
weekday afternoon. Rare ones 
who prefer to avoid the meiee 
turn to iists^ What to do? Try 
contesting, where the big sta- 
tion is worth the trouble. There's 
still a place for your 8877s, 
Don.— WBBBTH. 



IT DOESN'T COMPUTE 



] 



The basic reason for not re- 
newing my subscription to 73 
Magazine Is because I feel that 
Wayne Green Is using It to fur- 
ther the use of computers and 
associated software for commu- 
nications between hams. This, I 
feel, reduces the human touch 
involved tn everyday hamming. 
Taking away the personality of 
the ham and replacing It with 
machinery will Indeed make 
everyone bored with the hobby. 
This leads to reduced growth, 
which Is the opposite of that 
which Wayne Is trying to 
achieve. 

Wa do fiMd growth tn our 
hamming hobby. This will not be 
denied. But to substitute com- 
puters for the personal touch is 
not going to hack it. Contesters, 
DX hunters, county hunters, and 
rag-chewers thrive on the per- 
sonal satisfaction that comas 
from doing it themselves. From 
learning a new langauge — 
Morse code^to building their 
own pro|ects, no matter how 
simple or complex, each and 



every ham has his goal within 
sight and obtainable. It oniy de- 
pends on his ability and determi* 
nation to do so, 

Wayne professes that Involve- 
ment with computers will revolu- 
tionize the hobby. He is abso- 
lutely correct, it will do what he 
wants. It will have hams all over 
the world making contests no 
more complicated than picking 
up the phone and dtaling across 
the states. If that's what hams 
want, then why are they spend- 
ing their money on better anten- 
nas, higher towers, new radios, 
or any other gadget that they 
think will make their contacts 
better or stronger than anyone 
else's? Why don't they spend It 
on computers and software and 
take all the grief out of ham- 
ming? 

Computer hamming will elimi- 
nate personal satisfaction, 
which Witt in turn eliminate the 
desire to be an amateur radio 
operator 

Jim Ory WD9ATJ 

Plalnfleld IL 

By goffy, Jfm, you are probably 
right! We Just may be able to 
make It so amateur radio can te 
enioyed by people who haven't 
the kllobucks to put up monster 
beams and run 10,000 Watts, as 
you seem to prefer We might 
even be able to cut back on 
those fun plleups which have 
chased most of the DX opera- 
tors off the air from rare coun- 
tries. But just maybe the nuts 
who think a new country 1$ 
worth getting kilted for can be si- 
phoned off Into ever more com- 
plex automatic country working, 
thus leaving the bands more 
open for getting to realty know 
some of the DX operators. You 
know, the FCC was opposed to 
letting computers into amateur 
radio, too. It apparently never 
occurred to them that^ like a 
typewriter or a Teletype^ ma- 
chine, there has to be an opera- 
tor. . .a live person, , Mehind 
each computer; The computer Is 
just another means of conymunl- 
cating, little different from CW, 
RTTY, and so on, it turned out 
that the FCC chaps had virtually 
no understanding of the situa- 
tion and were acting normally 
. . JIghting any efforts by hams 
to experiment and perhaps pro- 
vide the world with some prog- 
ress. Obviously t Jim, you've 
managed to arrive at your con- 
mictions without taking the time 
to ask anyone involved with 

73 Magazine * JuneJ9d2 103 



computers about the reaf skin* 
ny. Find out what you are talking 
about first. . Jhen think it 
over . .then, and onty then, go 
on record. Remember^ Jim, that 
when t write something t know / 
will be faced with about 200,000 
skeptics, each one more inter- 
ested in biowing a hole in my 
reasoning than in agreeing with 
me, ♦ .so thaye to be darned sure 
t have the background to know 
what t am writing about. Jim, I'm 
ready to stand up in front of any 
assemblage of hams and dis- 
cuss Morse code, its pros and 
cons. /Ve been at that for some 
thirty years now, . ,and, as t've 
said, it has been quite a few 
years since t've heard anything 
new. Jim, you havenl the slight- 
est idea of what computers may 
do to hamming since you 
haven't tried them, , .and ap- 
parently don t know anyone who 
has.^Wayne, 



THE GREAT GRATER 

So Wayne the Grate (just a 
smaH pun) has again taken up 
the Holy Grail, this time in the 



form of abolishing the code re* 
quirements for han^ licenses. 

I admire you for the coy rage 
of your convictions, Wayne, but 
there are more than a few of us 
out here who have strong objac* 
tJons to a no-code license, my- 
self included. 

I am a newer ham (since 1977), 
an electronics engineering tech* 
nician, own my own personal 
computer, and am an active 
member of the Tucson Amateur 
Packet Radio Club. 1 only say 
this in order to dispel any idea 
that 1 am of the "fraternity" that 
dislikes the introduction of new 
technology into ham radro. 

When I recetved my ham li- 
cense in the mail. I felt some- 
thing that Tm sure no CBer has 
feit when his permit arrived. 
That feeling is a sense of ac- 
complishment, I earned this II- 
cense^ and it is that feeling that 
binds me together aiong with 
the majority of other hams. A 
"cut above,*' if you will. The day 
that bond is gone is the day thai 
the Amateur Radio Service 
ceases to exist. Att remaining 
motivating factors will be seff- 



centered, and no longer will 
hams work for the "good of am- 
ateur radio," 

But that is not why I write this 
letter. I enjoy your magazine 
very much, Wayne, but a couple 
of things disturb me. First of all, 
your "Holy Graif editorials tend 
a bit toward ranting and raving. 
That can't be good for the blood 
pressure or the digestion, I also 
have noticed that your replies to 
the letters protesting your edito- 
rial views are usually longer 
than the letters themselves. My 
psychologist friend has some in- 
teresting things to say atiout 
that. In short, take it easy. 
Wayne, This would be a pretty 
dull hobby sometimes tf it were 
not for cage-rattlers like you, so 
try to rattle softer, so that you 
may rattle longer. 

Dsve Bamhart WB70BG 
Glendale AZ 

Dave. / enioyed your tetter But 
you should understand that no 
matter how much the cages rat- 
tle, I'm sitting here grinning. My 
blood pressure is fine. - J give 
heart attacks, I don*t get *em. t*m 
happy that / give the impression 



that Vm real serious about ati 
this. Oh, i do think that it is high 
lime to dump the code as a 
means of keeping enthusiasts 
out of the hobby. . .and to sup- 
piant It with a technical exam 
which can't to totafly thwarted 
by the Bashes and other cheat- 
ing systems, if you read the li- 
cense study manuals t put out, 
you'll see what t think is best. . . 
simple theory explanations 
which anyone can understand. 
Fortunately, / have reason and 
psychoiogy on my side. . .and 
fust an interest in getting things 
improved, not an overwhelming 
zeal Zealots are not open to aV- 
ternative ideas and get aft emo- 
tionally involved in what they 
are doing. On, t don't expect 
Morse code to get dumped 
quickly. . .perhaps some expert* 
ments with this on 220 MHz, as t 
proposed to the FCC about thir- 
teen years ago, to see if we can 
make the change from a filter of 
a very slight skill (code) to a not- 
much-more-difficult technical 
test. . .without the universal 
cheating via Bash. My letter an- 
swers are long, at times, so I can 
clarify misconceptions.— Wayrie. 



comm 



Robert Baker WB2GFE 
15 Windsor Dr. 
Atco NJ 08004 

JEFFERSON OAViS DAY 

QSO PARTY 

Contest Period: 

1500 to 2400 GMT June 5 

The Pennyroyal Amateur Ra* 
dio Society is offering attractive 
certificates for contacts made 
during this year's ar\nual event. 
Suggested frequencies are 
3730, 3940, 7260. 14310, 21410, 
and 28610. Requests for certifi- 
cates or more information 
should be addressed to Penny- 
royal Amateur Radio Society, 
PO Box 1077, Hopkinsville KY 
42240. 

WORLDWIDE SOUTH 

AMERICA CW CONTEST 

Starts: 1500 GMT June 12 

Ends: 1500 GMT June 13 

Sponsored by Eiectronica 
Popular magazine of Rio de Ja- 
neiro, Brazil, this contest will be 
held annually on the second 

104 73Magazine * June, 1982 



weekend of June. Use all bands 
from 80 through 10 meters on 
CW only; crossband contacts 
are not valid. Only contacts be- 
tween South American stations 
and stations on other conti- 
nents are considered tor scor- 
ing. A station may be worked on- 
ly once on each band. Entry 
classes include single operator/ 
single band or all bands, and 
multi-operator/single transmit- 
ter (multiband only). 

EXCHANGE: 

RST and consecutive QSO 
number starting with 001. 

SCORING* 

Each QSO counts 2 points. 
Contacts between South Ameri- 
can stations count only as muf- 
tipliers, not as QSO points. For 
South American stations, the 
multiplier is the number of dff- 
ferent countries worked on each 
band. For others, the multiplier 
is the number of different South 
American prefixes worked on 



each band. The final score is the 

sum of QSO points multiplied by 
the sum of multipliers. 

AWARDS & BNTRIBS: 

Certificates will be awarded 
to the three top-scoring stations 



fn each class and to the top 
scorer in each country. A sepa- 
rate log for each worked band 
must be sent no later than July 
31st to WWSA Manager. PO Box 
18003, 20772 Riode Janeiro, RJ. 
Brazil, 



JUHS 


LENMR 

JnHwiqn Bmt\s QSO F^irl? 


JUN 12^13 


AftRL VHP OSO Party 


JUN 12-13 


Worldwide Scutti Art«6rfc« CW ContHt 


JUN 19-20 


Summflsr SMIRK Rally 


JUN 2&zr 


ARPL Field Day 


JUL! 


CARF Canada Day Contaaf 


JUL 10^11 


lAflU fied^ospofl 


JUL l7'Tft 


Intemntlonal QRP Contest 


JUL iin 


'AS M9ga£ine Worldwlda SSTV DX Contest 


JUL 24*2$ 


CW County HunterQ Contaal 


AUG r-8 


AFIRL UHF C^ntesl 


AUG t4rtS 


European DX Contesl— CW 


AUG 21-22 


SARTQ Worldwide RTTY Conlttt 


AUG 21-22 


M5 M9Q»iine FSTV UHF Conleft 


SEP 11 12 


ARRL VHF OSO Party 


SEP11'12 


EuTOpean DX Contest— Phone 


SEP ia-20 


Wavhlngtoo State OSO Party 


OCT 2-3 


CsllJ&mla QSO Party 


OCT IfrtF 


ARCJ ORP CW QSO Party 


OCT 16-17 


Pennsytvania QSO Party 


NOV6>7 


ARRL Swsepslakcrs— CW 


NOV 13-14 


EuiT>p«an OX Cocrtest— RTFY 


NOV 2(V21 


ARRL S waapglalt as — Pfwm 


DEC4-S 


ARRL 160-Mfltef Con!a»t 


OEC 11-12 


ARRL 10-Meier Conieat 


DEC 19 


CARF Canada Contact 


* Nate 4«la chinge^ 







RESULT 

72 MAGAZfNE 


s 


1 




40MtTER SSB CONTEST 






—Claimed Scones— 








(Callsign. QTH, QSOs, Toia« Content Scorn) 






W/VE Single Operator 






VF-iDX 


Sask. 


972 


113.240 


W9Re 


IN 


851 


105,148 


N3AMK 


PA 


771 


99,160 


KK9A 


IL 


856 


87.440 


KA1XM 


WA 

OX Single Operatof 


761 


63,358 


YUSANE 


Venezuela 


359 


65.880 


CN8G0 


Morocco 


361 


61,008 


H44SH 


Solomon Is. 


291 


37,765 


LA5YF 


Norway 


221 


32.319 


JA2BAy 


W/VE Mulli-Op«ralor 


205 


28,470 


N9IMB 


IN 


1098 


112.965 


KD4TQ 


KY 


972 


96,432 


VE22P 


Que. 


704 


86.355 


KJ9D 


IN 


6ei 


77^868 


N4BAA 


FL 

DX Multi Operator 


645 


66,392 


I4YNO 


Italv 


672 


128^800 


I5MPK 


Italy 


590 


107.334 




KJMETER SSB CONTEST 






—Claimed Scoros- 








Wn/E Single Operator 






KQ2M 


NY 


510 


60,606 


; N7DF 


UT 


700 


57,642 


KiCS 


MO 


552 


51,435 


WB2DHY 


NY 


34^ 


42,510 


VE5XK 


Sask. 

DX Single Operator 


672 


42,222 


CN8C0 


Morocco 


441 


67,032 


C6ADV 


Batiamas 


296 


21,488 


H18GBG 


Dom. Rep. 


149 


17.052 


0K1MSM 


Ciech. 


165 


16,640 


HIBGB 


Dom. Rep. 

W/VE MyltlOpefator 


145 


14,484 


N9NC 


IN 


793 


57,652 


VF?ZP 


Que. 


567 


42,387 


N4BAA 


EL 


421 


36,480 


W4CN 


KY 


564 


35,441 


KF2X 


NY 

DX Multl Dfserator 


413 


25,488 


I5MPK 


Italy 


191 


22,184 




mm-fAETBn COMBINED CONTEST 






—Claimed Scoftts— 








WA/E Single Operator 






N7DF 


UT 


1166 


180,040 


KC40V 


TN 


931 


147.686 


KSAKY 


Ml 


sao 


141.685 


W8ATR 


OH 


788 


104,967 


KC3JH 


OH 

DX Single Operator 


735 


100,250 


CNBCO 


Morocco 


802 


256,908 


H44SH 


Solomon Is. 


aeo 


71,082 


JAIELY 


Japan 


196 


26,642 


VK5BW 


AuBtralJa 


170 


17,384 


DL8UI 


W. Germany 

WnAE Multi Operator 


92 


8,544 


N48AA 


FL 


1066 


205,076 


KF2X 


NY 

DX MuHI'Operator 


976 


161.604 


VF7ZP 


Que. 


1271 


249,996 1 


l5\flPK 


Italy 


781 


234J36 




QSL OF THE MONTH: W8VFT 

Sometimes, the design of a QSL card can capital ize on the unusu- 
al aspects of your station. It worl^ed for W8VFT and his wind-pow- 
ered setup. In fact, as the back of the card explains, WSVFT's entire 
homestead is powered by the wind generator shown on the card! 

If you would I ike to enter our contest, put your QSL card in an en- 
velope and mail it along with your choice of a book from 73's Radio 
Bookshop to 73 Magazine, Pine Street, Peterborough NH 03458. At* 
tention: QSL of the IMonth. Entries which do not use an envelope (the 
Postal Service does occasionally damage cards) and do not specify 
a book win not be considered. 



SUMMER SMIRK PARTY 

CONTEST 

Starts: 0000 GMT June 19 

Ends: 2400 GMT June 20 

Sponsored by the Six-Meter 
Internationaf Radio Klub 
(SMIRK). No crossband con- 
tacts, multi operators, or partial 
contacts. Check logs or dupe 
sheets are not needed. 

EXCHANGE: 

SMIRK number and ARRL 
section, foreign state^ province, 
prefecture, or country. Count 
ARRL sections in the 48 US 
states only; KH6 and KL7 count 
as countries. Washington DC 
counts as a section as well. 



SCORING: 

Count 2 points for each 
SMIRK contact, 1 point for non- 
SMIRK QSOs. Add QSO points 
and multiply by number of ARRL 
sections^ foreign states, prov- 
inces, and countries worked for 
final score, 

AWARDS: 

Trophies for high-score 
SMIRK in two divisions: US/Can- 
ada and foreign. Certificates for 
high score In each ARRL section 
and foreign state, province, pre- 
fecture, or country. 

ENTRiES: 

Entries must be submitted on 
TSMagazine * June, 1982 105 





RESULTS 

1981 CALIFORNIA QSO PARTY 


1 






Sponsored by the Northern CalHomia 


Contest Qlub 






{Call, CW Qb, SSB Q&, Mulllpler 


, Score) 




- 




California Single Ops 








M6TR 


310 


2063 




m 


293,248 


N6BT 


325 


1998 




57 


283.347 


Neev 


282 


1488 




58 


221,676 


AI6V 





1855 




m 


215.180 


K6HNZ 





1659 




S7 


189,126 


KI60 


330 


972 




57 


167,238 


N6PE 


363 


882 




se 


159,600 


N60W 


270 


933 




m 


155,208 


AA6G 


41 


1227 




m 


146,889 


AA6RX 


@9 


1085 
CalHomla MultlOps 




%7 


138,909 


AJ€0{M-Kl) 


15t 


1908 




57 


243,333 


N6AHA (MS) 


105 


1298 




57 


165,927 


KSAA (M-S) 


274 


455 




U 


93,528 


K6VA fM-M) 


259 


400 




a3 


83,581 


KS6H (MS) 


300 


34t 
Out of Slata 




60 


79,100 


WDOEWD 


168 


501 




54 


81,324 


WAOAVL 


171 


497 




52 


78,364 


N4BAA 


141 


312 




49 


51,303 


WA5DJK 


154 


249 




4S 


46,080 


WB5YXK 


176 


149 




45 


37,440 


W1GNR 


189 


in- 




44 


34,892 


K7GM 


156 


187 




41 


34,522 


W3HDH 


152 


166 




42 


33,096 


WA1FCN 


131 


149 




47 


32,477 


KD4XR 


P 


342 
DK Top Five 




4? 


32,148 


SM3DXG 


41 


1 




33 


4,125 


JA10P 


46 







23 


3,174 


JR7TJP 





53 




26 


2,756 


PY1NEZ 


g 


61 




20 


2,440 


LU6EF 


19 


24 




ai 


2,205 



the fall, 1981, edition of the offi- 
cial SMIRK log, Singfe copies 
are available for an SASE and 
photocopies may be used. Send 



log requests, and entries post- 
marked by July 11th, to Spencer 
F. Ritchie KA2MHT/5, 5122 Sag- 
annore, San Antonio TX 78242. 




NEWSLETTER CONTEST WINNER 

After a three-month hiatus, I was called upon again to 
choose a winner for 73's monthly newsletter contest. As 
usual, I put the task off until the last minute. This time, I was 
lucky; a 'winner" jumped out at me. If you have an opportu- 
nity to read this month's choice. The Log, published by the 
Northern Ohio Amateur Radio Society, you'll see why. 

The NOARS newsletter is not a one-man show. A rather im- 
pressive-looking masthead lists 25 names of officers, editors, 
and committee chairmen. The theory that many hands, work- 
ing together, make for a light load applies here. The Log's first 
page is rounded out by 'Inside This Issue,'' a series of vi- 
gnettes that make you want to turn the page and start 
reading. 

NOARS editors KA8JRI and N8DN A make sure that there is 
something for everyone. They include reports for award 
chasers, the contest crowd, DX hounds, traffic handlerSj and 
Novices. An historical series, "In the Beginning," will appeal 
to all the readers. A more somber Log feature is the '^Silent 
Key" section, which incorporates the QSL cards of deceased 
members as part of a brief memoriaL 

In addition to their monthly newsletter, NOARS members 
receive an annual membership roster and a calendar that has 
the dates for club activities and operating events clearly 
marked. All this helps to convey the image of a lively, enthu- 
siastic club.— N8RK. 



AWARDS 




Bill Gosney KE7C 
Mfcro-80, Inc. 
2665 North Busby Road 
Oak Harbor WA 93277 

CERTIFICATE HUNTERS CLUB 

All awards are issued to both 
licensed amateurs and SWLs 
on a heard basis. 

Requests for band, mode, 
and power endorsements must 
be made at the time of your 
originai application and must 
be correctly indicated on your 
log extract. 

A verified log should be sent 
in lieu of QSLs. Have your log 

106 73 Magazine • June, 1982 



certified by a local radio club 
official, two licensed ama- 
teurSt or a notary public. 
Copies of your cards will be ac- 
cepted in lieu of certification. 

• WTP— Work The Pacific. The 
basic award is issued for con- 
firmed contact with at least 30 
countries in the Pacific area as 
set forth by the WTP country 
list, Gold seal: A gold seal is 
applied when 50 or more confir- 
mations are achieved- Award 
application fee is $3.50 or 12 
IRCs; overseas, add $1.00 or 3 
IRCs; gold seal after original 
application, $1.00 or 3 IRCs. 



• WTO—Work The Caribbean. 
The basic award is issued for 
confirmed contact with at least 
20 countries In the Caribbean 
area as set forth by the WTC 
country Ijst. Gold seal: A gold 
seal is applied when 30 or more 
confirmations are achieved. 
Award application fee is $3.50 
or 12 IRCs; overseas, add $1.00 
or 3 IRCs; gold seal after 
original application is $1.00 or 
3 IRCs. 

• Gold Seal Plaques. If 
desired, plaques are available 
for the WTP and WTC award 
series. When requested at the 
time of original application, 
yoof award is mounted on a 
walnut-grain 13" x 16" plaque, 
for $25.00, (Overseas, add $7,50 
postage/insurance.) When re- 
quested after your original ap- 
plicatton, an engraved 4x6 



solid walnut plaque denoting 
your accomplishment is avail- 
able for $20.00. {Overseas, add 
$3.00 postage/insurance.) 

• A-1 — Operator*s Certificate 
of Merit. Issued free of cost by 
the lARS/Certificate Hunters 
Club to amateurs observed dis- 
playing a high level of achieve- 
ment in various areas of ama- 
teur radio. The award is also 
issued upon receipt of three 
nominations from three dif- 
ferent amateurs in three differ- 
ent geographical locations. So, 
if you feel that an amateur 
should receive this honor, get 
out your pen and give us the 
details in writing. You do not 
have to be a member of the 
club or a holder of the award to 
nominate. 

• County Awards. Issued in 
multiple classes for the differ- 



ent numbers of count ies con- 
firmed, m 14 states. GCR apply; 
fee is $3.50. Tlie awards mea- 
sure 8V2 " X 11 " and are printed 
on a fine parchtone bond. Other 
county awards will be made 
available as demand requires. 

• 10 K and 20 K Awards. Issued 
for confirmed contact with 1 or 
20 ditferent locations outside 
the United States operating wrth 
a W, K, or N prefix. Award fee is 
$2.00 and band and mode en- 
dorsements are available, 

• Work A- 1s, Requires appli- 
cant to work A'1 operator certifi- 
cate holders of any radio organi- 
zations issued for WAG, WAZ, 
WAS, WPX and DX(CC), All rules 
are the same as they are for the 
regular award. Award fee is 
$2.00 and band and mode en- 
dorsements are aval fable. 

For applications and addi- 
tional information, send an 
SASE to the CHC Manager, 
Scott Douglas KB7SB, PO Box 
46032, Los Angeles CA 90046. 



WORKED ALL VE 

Sponsored by the Nortown 
Amateur Radio Club of Willow- 
dale, Ontario, the WVE Award 
requires the applicant to work 
two different stations on two dif- 
ferent bands in the eight sec- 
tions, VE1 through VE6. Aft con- 
tacts must have been made 
from an area within a radius of 
150 miles of one point on and af- 
ter January 1, 1939. 

A sworn affidavit and certifi- 
cation by a local radio club offi- 
cial must accompany your applr- 
cation. Also, be sure to send all 
sixteen QSL cards, two from 
each section, along with $1.00 
and sufficient return postage for 
the return of your cards. Ad- 
dress your application to the 
Nortown Amateur Radio Club, 
Box 146, Station A, Wlllowdale, 
Ontario, Canada M2N 5S8. 

The Nortown organization 
also sponsors the WACAN 
(Worked All Canada) Award, 
Here the applicant must work 
two different stations on two dif- 
ferent bands in each of the fol- 
lowing twelve areas: VE1 (PEI), 
VE1 (NS), VE2, VE3, VE4, VE5, 
VE6, VE7, VY1 or VE8, V01, and 
V02- 

All contacts must have been 
made on or after January 1, 
1949f and a 150-mile rule ap- 
plies, as mentioned for the WVE 
Award. 

Send your list of contacts and 
QSL cards, with $1,00 and suffi- 
cient funds for the return of your 



confirmatron cards, to the Nor- 
town ARC, 

TRANS CANADA AWARD 

The Canadian DX Association 
writes to tell us about their very 
beautiful award. To qualify, you 
must work each of the eight VE 
call areas, with five contacts In 
each area. In addition to that, 
another five stations must be 
worked in V01 and/or V02; one 
VEO maritime mobile station 
must be contacted. One of the 
five VE8 contacts required must 
be from the Yukon Territory and 
one must be from one of the off- 
shore islands of the Northwest 
Territories. In short, a total of 46 
contacts must be made to meet 
the minimum requirements. 

WAG 2-80 AWARD 

Sponsored by the Metro Ama- 
teur Radio Club of Downsview, 
Ontario, the Worked All Canada 
2-BO Award was originated in 
November, 1972. All contacts 
and confirming cards must be 
dated on or after that date. 

To qualify, xhe applicant must 
submit QSL cards to verify two- 
way contact with one station 
possessing 3 two-letter call In 
each of the twelve Canadian 
sections. Are you wondering 
what the 2-80 stands for? Well, it 
means all contacts must be 
made with stations onfy with 
two-letter calls, and these con- 
tacts must be made only on 80 
meters. Required sections in- 
clude V01, V02, VE1 (PEI), VE1 
(NB), VE1 (MS), VE2, VE3, VE4, 
VE5, VE6. VE7, and VE8. There 
are no mode restrictions, but en- 
dorsements will be granted at 
the time of applications if all 
contacts were made on a specif- 
ic mode of operation. 

Contacts must be made using 
your own equipment from one 
location or from within 150 miles 
of it and within the same sec- 
tion. 

To apply for this award, en- 
close $2.00 and sufficient post- 
age for the return of your award 
and the required confirmation 
cards. Address all your corre- 
spondence to the Metro ARC, 
PO Box 352, Downsview, Ontar- 
io, Canada M3M 3A6. 

ALL NOVA SCOT*A COUNTIES 

The Nova Scotia Amateur Ra- 
dio Association is proud to an- 
nounce the WANS Award, which 
requires the applicant to work 
fifteen of the eighteen counties 
in Nova Scotia, Canada, or four- 
teen of the eighteen counties 



plus a contact with Sable Island. 
There is no charge for this 
award, but applicants are asked 
to send QSL cards and log data 
along with sufficient postage 
for their safe return. Address 
your application to Mrs. Chris- 
tine Weeks VE1 AKO, PO Box 47, 
Rural Route 1, Cleveland, Nova 
Scotia, Canada BOE 1J0. 

The Halifax Amateur Radio 
Club also sponsors a Worked All 
Nova Scotia Counties Award 
which states that maritime prov- 
inces must contact seventeen 
of the eighteen counties in the 
province, while at the same time 
they must contact ten counties 
on a second band or series of 
bands. In all cases, Sable Island 
can be used as a substitute. 

To qualify, all contacts must 
have been made on or after Jan- 
uary 1 , 1 977, and the application 
should be sent directly to the 
Halifax ARC, PO Box 663, Hali- 
fax, Nova Scotia, Canada B3J 
2T3. There is no charge for this 
award, but the appffcant must 
supply sufficient postage for 
the safe return of confirmation 
cards. 

DIPLOMA OF THE 
FRENCH AMERICAS 

From Quebec City, Canada, 
comes word about the French 
Americas Award which requires 
stations in Europe, Africa, 
North, and South America to 
work at least two FP8 stations, 
two FY7 stations, and either an 
FS7 or FM7 station. Applicants 
in Asia or Oceania must work 
only a single contact from the 
areas of'FP8, FY7, and FS7 or 
FM7. 

There appear to be no date re- 
strictions, and applicants may 
have their list of contacts verl* 
tied by a locaj radio club official 
and sent, along with an awards 
fee of $1.00 or seven (RCs, to 
Alex Desmeules VE2AFC, PO 
Box 382, Quebec City 4, Canada, 

QUEBEC CITY AWARD 

Speaking of Quebec City, 
Quebec, the local amateur radio 
fraternity sponsors the Quebec 
City Award for American and 
Canadian stations which make 
a minimum of five station con- 
tacts in Quebec City. 

You may address ail corre- 
spondence to the Radio Club of 
Quebec, PO Box 332, Upper 
Town, Quebec City, Quebec, 
Canada. The award fee is $1.00 
or seven IRCs, 



WORKED ALL 
SASKATCHEWAN PROVINCE 

The Regina Amateur Radio 
Association is pleased to an- 
nounce the WASP Award which 
requires the applicant to accu- 
mulate a total of 100 points to 
qualify. Members of the Regina 
organization count 10 points 
each to a maximum of five con- 
tacts made with members of the 
group* Contacts with other Regi- 
na amateurs score five points, 
while contacts with other Sas- 
katchewan amateurs count two 
points. There must be a mini- 
mum of ten QSOs made. Send 
your list of contacts along with 
your confirmed QSLs and $1.00 
to RARA Club VE5NN, 2827 Ab- 
bott Road, Regina, Saskatche- 
wan, Canada S4N 2J9. 

STONEHENGE USA 

The Tri-City Amateur Radio 
Club wil [ operate a special event 
station Saturday, June 12, 1982, 
from the replica of Stonehenge 
located near Maryhiil, Washing- 
ton. W7VPA will operate from 
1600 to 0100 UTC on or near the 
frequencies of 3.900, 14.290, 
21 .390, 28.690, and 1 46.52. An at- 
tractive certificate will be 
awarded. Send QSL info and 
$1.00 to W7VPA Special Event, 
PO Box 73. Richland WA 99352. 

HOMEWORK NET 

Are you a teenager? Or still 
think you are? Then the Home- 
work Net is for you, operating on 
7.250 phone every Saturday 
from 2100 to 2200Z. It is de- 
signed for, but not limited to, 
teenagers. This net is looking 
for young amateurs who wish to 
make new contacts with people 
who have similar interests. So 
take a break from your home- 
work and join us on our informal 
Homework Net— Diane WD9DNQ 
and Scott KCONF. 

WATERLOO DAYS 

The N. E. Iowa Radio Amateur 
Association will operate special 
event station WQJMG in conjunc- 
tion with activities celebrating 
My Waterloo Days, on June 
12-13. Activity will take place 
froni Waterloo, Iowa, and will be 
on 7.240, 14.290, ar^d 21-370. 
Special informative commemo- 
ratfve QSL card for SASE to: 
NEIRAA, PO Box 92, Waterloo I A 
50704. 

DUNGEONS AND DRAGONS 

New! A 10-meter Dungeons 
and Dragons Net at 28.720 

73MagazfnB • June, 1982 107 



±QRM. Saturdays promptly al 
1500 GMT. To save us time and 
grief, please be ready with your 
charactef, rank. dice, and all of 
the necessary info. Net control 
is KA9J0X. If you donl hear any* 
on© at 28.720, check 28.820. If 
stilt nothing is heard, the net has 
been canceled because of poor 
turnout or other reasons and will 
resume the next week at the 
same time and place. If you wish 
to participate regularly, please 
write me so you can gel a 
chance to be a DM or net con- 
trol Address: Michael Frost 
KA9JOX, Box 1008, Riverside IL 
60546. 



FORT DELAWARE 

Fort Delaware, on Pea Patch 
Island, Delaware, will be the site 
of a mini-expedition by Wilming- 
ton area hams on the weekend 
of June 5 and 6, 1982. 

This will be the first HF ama- 
teur operation from the fod in 
the middle of the Delaware River 
where, during the Civil War, 
many thousands of Confederate 
prisoners of war were held. The 
fort is now a state park. 

Equipment will t>e limited to 
one transceiver fed by a small 
generator carried to the istand 

by a small boat. Operations wid 
be in the General segments of 



the HF bands, daylight hours 
only, with each operator using 
his own call and the Fort Dela- 
ware identifier. Members of the 
Independent Amateur Radio 
Group of Delaware wilt be Rick 
KB3PD, Allen KB3HZ. DwfQht 
N3ARU, Ned N3ARV. and Doug 
N3ACU. Commemofatrve QSL 
cards will be issued to contacts 
supplying SASEs. 

For more information, con- 
tact the Independent Amateur 
Radio Group of Delaware, 400 
Fifth Ave.* Miflcreek, Wilming* 
ton DE 19808, 

NOARS AND USS COD 

Once again, signals will be ra- 
diating from the submarine USS 
Cod. Members of the Northern 
Ohio Amateur Radio Society will 
be operating from this proud 
WWK warship during the 
months of June, Juty, and Au- 
gust, using the call K8KRG. 
The USS Cod is on permanent 
display in Cleveland, Ohio. Oper* 
ations win begin on Memorial 
Day and run every weekend 
(with the exception of Field Day 
weekend) until Labor Day. 

An attractive certificate will 
be awarded for two-way con* 
tacts from the ship upon receipt 
of QSL card and S.50 for post- 
age. Look for operations in the 



lower part of the General bands. 
10 through 80 meters, on the 
weekends of June 5-6. July 
17-18, and August 7-8; we will be 
operating 40'meter Novice band 
at ?. 1 25. Send QSLs to Donald L 
Winner WD8RZG. 8927 Torrance 
Ave.. Brooklyn OH 44144. 

NORFOLK TRICENTENNIAL 

The city of Norfolk, Virginia, 
will be celebrating its tricenlen- 
nial this year. As part of the 
**Harborfest" celebration on 
June 11-14, the Tidewater area 
amateur clubs will join together 
to operate a Harborfest-Tricen- 
tennial special event station. 
The amateur call W4NV wiil be 
used, and special QSL cerfifi- 
cates will be sent to all contacts 
made who send a large (8"x 
10 ") SASE. The station will oper* 
ate 24 hours each day in the 80- 
through 2'meter bands and will 
work CW and SSB. 

For further information, 
please contact Bill Verebely 
KC4YX, 3101 Petre Road. Chesa- 
peake VA 23325. 

LARGEST TRAIN ROBBERY 

The Lit>ertyville and Munde- 
lein Amateur Radio Society 
(LAMARS) will operate W9HOG 
from Rondout, Illinois, near the 
site of the largest train robbery 



in United States history. Approx^ 
Imately three million dollars in 
negotiable instruments and jew- 
elry were confiscated during a 
brief stopover and all partici- 
pants were apprehended within 
six months. Frequencies; 
phone— 7.260. 14.290. 21.375; 
CW— 7J25, 21.150. Time: from 
OOODZ 12 June until 00002 13 
June. Certificate for a large 
SASE to: KB9BR or **Big Rob- 
bery." Box 656, Liberty vjlle IL 
60048. 

STAR-SPANGLED BANNER 
SPECIAL EVENT STATION 

WB3KUH will operate a spe- 
cial event station from Fort Mc- 
Henry, Baltimore, fylaryland— 
the birthplace of The Star-Span- 
gled Banner — on June 12 and 
13, 1982. Operation will conv 
mence at 1600 GMT. Operation 
will be within the first 25 kHz of 
(he General and Advanced 
bands. Both SSB and CW will be 
used. Novice operation is also 
expected. Operation will be on 
20, 15, 40. 2, and 6 meters. 

Stations desiring a speciat 
certificate from the event sta- 
tion can obtain one by sending 
an SASE and their QSO number 
to Donald Oakjones WB3KUH, 
1806 Willann Road, Rosedale 
MD 21237. 



MM HELP 



We are happy to provide Ham 
Help Ustings free, on a space- 

avaifabh basis. We are not hap- 
py when we /rave to take time 
away from other duties to deci- 
pher cryptic notes s craw fed il* 
iegibly on dog-eared post cards 
and odd-sized scraps of paper. 
Pfease type or print (neattyJ), 
doubie spaced, your request on 
an$Vf**xt} "sheet of paper and 
use upper- and lowercase fetters 
where appropriate^ Afso, please 
make a "I" fook tike a "t" not 
an % '* which couid be an "et'* or 
an "eye, ** and so on. Hard as it 
may be to belteve, we are not fa- 
miliar with every piece of equip- 
ment manufactured on Earth tor 
the last 50 years! Thanks for 
your cooperation. 

I am interested in correspond- 
ing with hams who have or had 
any late-model Hallicrafters 

108 73 Magazine • June, 1382 



equipment, specifically the 
SR2000 Hurricane transceiver. 
HA20 v1o. and P2000 power sup- 
ply/speaker, \ am interested in 
operational notes, modifica- 
tions reviews, and comparisons. 

I would also like to obtain in* 

formation on the history of Halli* 
crafters eQuipment, particularly 
post" 1956. (I already have a copy 
of the Ham Radio article, ''The 
HalNcraftersStory",) 

And does anyone have manu- 
als and schematics for a Heath- 
kit fG-72 audio generator and 
AT^I transmitter, Hallicrafters 
S38E receiver, and Eico's 1078 
ac power supply, 239 TVM, and 
Model 315 signal generator? 
Write before sending* 

Robert Gagne 

143 Millvltte St. 

Safem NH 03079 



I would like to hear from any- 
one who served at the Navat Ra- 
dio Station NSS, Annapolis hAD, 
from 1942 to 1946. 

Laurence E. Hoepfer N7BJT 

Box 334 
Columbia Falls MT 59912 

I need a schematic for a Hick- 
ok Model t9XD signal generator. 

Sherman Banks N4CXF 

Rt 1 Youngs Mill Rd 

Kingston GA 30145 

Has anyone interfaced an 
Atari 400/SOO to a rig for sending 
and receiving CW? Is software 
available? 

John S. Lee KA4EPR 

12341 Dickinson Or, W303 

Coral Gables FL 33146 

I am in need of information 
about the WWII Navy Model 
MBM radio- 
Tony Grogan WA4MRR 
5 Rolllngwood Dr. 
Taylors SC 29687 

I would like to contact anyone 
who is using the Texas Instru- 



ments T1-99/4 home computer to 
send and receive RTTY, CW, and 
SSTV. 

Miguel BlnstokLUIDia 
PC Box 012592 

Miami FL 33101 

I would like to hear from own- 
ers of the code reader made by 
Mlcrocraft. I need data on how 
well it works. QRM, etc, 

Berand G. KIrschner WBiYCQ 

1440 Grand Ave. #11 

St. Paul MN 55105 

I would like to *'marry" my 
Johnson Jnvader 200/2000 with a 
receiver that has a 5.0-5.5-MHz 
vfo sothat I get transceiver-type 
information. Can anyone help? 

Arthur Ford W2HAE 

552 Hillside Ct. 

Melbourne FL 32935 

I need a copy of the sche- 
matic for a Hallicrafters S407 
Mark II receiver, built approxi- 
mately 1961. 

Sheldon Daitch WA4MZ2 

Box 8091 
Greenville NC 27834 



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Kantronics, the Innovator in code readers and rtty 
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Your personal computer becomes a complete Cw and 
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The interface™ receives any shift of rtty. ASCII, or 
cw and transmits all the necessary AFSK tones for rtty, 
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software example for the Apple ii Plus, featuring split 
screen display, buffered keyboard, status display, and 
much more. Software is also available on diskette for 
Apple and cartridge for Atari. 

Follow the leader, Kantronics, into the computer age 
of amateur radio, see The interf ace^'" at your authoriz- 
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73 Magazine • June. 1982 109 





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A Stradivarius is more than a body, neck, and strings. The name alone says it is an instrument of out- 
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EDITIONS OF OUR 

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STUDY GUIDE AND 
NOVICE STUDY TAPES 



• NOVICE STUDY GUIDE— by Tfmot^ty M. Daniel NSFSK. Hme Is the most up to date novice gylde 
available. It Is conn pjete with Information about learning Morse Code, tias the latest FCC amateur reguta- 

tJons and the current FCC application forms. This guide is rtof aquestlon/answef memorisation course 
but father it emphasizes tlie pfactical side of getting a ham license and puttfng a station on the ain It 
* reflects what the FCC expects a Novice lo l^now without page after page of duH theory. The most current: 
information stiJI av^il^bie at last year's pdce. SG7357 $4.95." 

• NOVICE STUDY TAPES— If you aw Just getting started in ham radio, you'll find these tapes Indispen- 
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covered, and you'll be amazed at how fast you Jearn using these tapes! 

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GENERAL LICENSE STUDY GUIDE^by Timothy M. 

Daniel N8R K. Th is is the complete g uide to the General 
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• ADVANCED CLASS LICENSE STUDY GUIDE— Ready 
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* QSL CAR DS— 75 tiirns out a fantastic series of QSL 
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Style Y— QYOSOO—for $13.95,* Allow 6-12 wKs. for 
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• LIBRARY SHELF BOXES— These sturdy white, cor- 
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Radio EtectroniGS, interface Age, and Byte. Order 1 — 
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MAGAZINE 





Style W 



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• Preserve and protect your coifection for a hfetimet 
Order these handsome red binders wHh gold lettering. 
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Bi riders, P.O. Box 5120, Philadelpftia, PA 10141. 

*NOTE^— AboTC addr««« for Binders cmjy. 



7S 



CODE TAPES 

ANY FOUR TAPES 
FOR $15.95! 
$4.95 EACH 



"GENESIS" 

S WPM— CT7305— This is the beginning tape for people 
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the 26 letters, 10 numbers and necessary punctuation, 
complete with practice every step of the way using the 
newest blitz teaching techniques. It is almost mirac- 
uiousl in one hour many people— inci:uding kidsof ten- 
are able to master the code. The ease of Fearning gives 
confidence to beginners who might otherwise drop out. 



"THE STICKLER" 

6+ WPM— CT7306— This is the practfce tape for the 
Novice and Technrcian licenses, it is made up of one 
solid hour of code, sent at the official FCC standard (no 
other tape we've heard uses these standards, so many 
people flunk the code when they are suddenly— under 
pressure- faced with characters sent at 13 wpm and 
spaced for 5 wpm). This tape is not memorizabie, unlike 
the ^any 5 wpm tape, since the code groups are entirely 
random characters sertt in groups of five. 



"BACK BREAKER'^ 

13+ WPM— CT7313— Code groups again, at a brisk 14 
per so you win be at ease when you sil down in front of Ihe 
steely-eyed government inspector and he starts sending 
you plain language at only 13 per. You need this extra 
margin to overcorne the panic which is universal in the 
test situations. When you've spent your money and time 
lo lake the tesi, you'll thank lieaven you had this back- 
breaking tape. 



"COURAGEOUS" 

20 + WPM— CT7320— Code is what gets you when you 
go for the Extra class hcense. It Is so embarrassing lo 
panic out just because you didn't prepare yourself with 
this tape. Thouph this is only one word faster, the code 
groups are so difficult that you'll almost faH asleep copy- 
ing the FCC stuff by comparison. Users report that they 
can't believe how easy 20 per really is with this fantastic 
one hour tape. 



"OUTnAGEOUS'* 
25+ WPM— CT7325— This is the tape for thai small 
g ro u p of over ach i e v i ng h a m s w ho wou Idn't be conten t to 

simply satisfy the code requlremems of the Extra Class 
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BACK ISSUES 

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733006 73 BACK ISSUE— BEFORE JULY 1980 

% 3.00 

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Shipping: Please add $1.00 per magazine. Orders of 
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73350 

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BINDERS 



* Use the order card in this magazine or itemize your order on a separate piece of paper and mai i to: 73 Radio Bookshop • 

Peterborough NH 03456. Be sure to Include check ordetaiied credit card lAfofrnation. NoCO.D. orders accepted. All orders 
add SI. 50 handfing first book, $1.00 each additional book, $10.00 per book foreign airmail. Please allow 4-6 weeks for 
delivery. Questions regarding your order? Please write to Customer Service at the above address, (Prices subject to change 

on books io: Dutj' ^hed by 73 Magazine,) 



FOR TOLL FREE ORDERING CALL 1-800-258-5473 



I 



1 



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WW''^ 



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!«• nrv^'b t M '— u^ tmri* **nj ^ Kk 



THE © 
TECHNICAL 

LIBRARY 




BEHIND THE DJAL— by Bob Grove. Get mow fun out oJ 
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receivers, antennas, frequencies* and inteFference. 
BK?307 34.95/ 



THE CHALLENGE OF 160— Is the nev^esl book Jn the 73 
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On tt>is unique band. The a H- Important antenna and 
ground systems are described in del ail. The inhroduclion 
contains interesting photos o( Slew Perry's (I he King oH 
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perienced "Top Band" operators, BK7309$4.95/ 



SSB...THE MISUNDERSTOOD MOOE-by Jamei^ B. MEW 
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wmo 

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PROPAGATION WIZARDS HANDBOOK— by J. H. 
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byist. It has numerous pictures and descriptions of the 
safe and correct ways to use basic and specialized tools 
for electronic projects, as weil as specialized metal- 
working tools and the chemical aids which are used in 
repair shops. BK734e$4.95,* 




S^,9S 



COffr^TT 
COOKBOm 



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FOR 
THE 



CONTESTERl 



fciii 'wji. 'prij'i^ -lipaiyib- J ■ 




THE COhiTEST COOKBOOK— reveals the secrets ot the 
contest winners fdomesTic, DX, and specialty coniests), 
complete with photos and diagrams of e<^uipment used 
by the top scorers. Find out how to make ISO contacts in 
Of^e Jiour. HK7308 S5 95.* 



THE NEW WEATHEPt SATELLITE HANDBOOK-by Dr. 

Ralph E. faggart WBeOQT. Here is ti^e completety up- 
dated and revised edition containing all the informa- 
tion on the most sophisticated and effective space 
craft now in orbit. This book serves both the experi- 
enced amateur satellite enthusiast and the newcomer, 
it is an introduction to sateiiite watching, providing all 
the information required to conslruct a complete and 
highly effective ground station. SoMd hardware 
designs and all the Instructions necessary to operate 
it>e equipment are included. For experimenters who 
are operating stations, the book details all procedures 
necessary to modify equipment for the new series ol 
spacecraft. Amateur weather satellite activity repre- 
sents a unique tJiend of interests encompassing elec- 
tronics, meteorology and astronautics. Join the privi- 
leged few in watching the spectacle of earth as seen 
from space on your own monitoring equipment. 
QK73B3$a.35.* 



INTERFERENCE HANDBOOK— by William R, Nelson, 
WASEQG — This tirnely handbook covers every type of 
Hf\ problem and gives you the solutions based on 
practical experience. Covers Interference to TV, radio, 
hl^fi, telephone, radio amateur, commerciat and CB 
equipment. Power fine Interference is covered in deptti 
— how to locate it, cure it, work with the public, safety 
precautions, how to train RF/I investigators. Written by 
an RFI expert with 33 yearsof experience, this profuse- 
ly illustrated book is packed with practical easy-to- 
understand information, BK1230 Se.95 * 



IC OP AMP COOKBOOK— by Walter G. Jung Covers 
not only the basic theory of the IC op amp in great 
detail, but also includes over 250 practical circuit ap- 
plications, liberally illustrated. 592 pages. SVixeVs, 
softbound. BK1028 $14.95.* 



OWNER REPAIR OF f^ADIO EQUIPMENT— by Frank 
Glass K6RQ. Here's a book that will leach you an ap- 
proach to troubleshooting without a shack full of teat 
equipment. Written in a narrative, non- mathematical 
style, it will encourage you to successfully fix your own 
rig problems SO to 90% of the time. Even if you don't 
want to fix. you can learn a lot about how things work 
and fail. Add to your library and personal expertise. 
BKr3lOS7.95.' 



HANDBOOKS 
FOR THE 
HAMSHACK 

NEW 

THE COMPLETE SHORTWAVE LISTEJ*4ER'S HAND- 
BOOK, 2nd EDITIOW by Hank Bennett and Harry L. 
Heims. This comprehensive volume contains Eoads of 
new information from all over the world on the latest 
developments in SWL technology clubs, associations, 
pract Ices and stations. A ttiorough guilds to stations of 
the world by general continental area and frequency is 
included. BK1241 $9.95 

THE TEN METER FM HANDBOOK~by Bob Hell K9E1D. 
This handbook has been published to help the ten meter 
enthusiast learn more about the many methods of con- 
versions and tricks ttiat are used to make existing units 
work better. Join the great "Tinkerers" of the world on ten 
FM and enjoy the fantastic amount of fun in communi- 
cating with amateur stations worldwide on ten meter 
FM. BK1190$4.95,' 

THE PRACTICAL HANDBOOK OF AMATEUR RADIO FM 
REPEATERS— by Bili Pasternak WA6ITF (author of 73 

Magazines monthly column "Looking West") This is the 
book for ihe VHF/UHF FMer, compiled from material 
submitted by over a hundred individuals, clubs, 
organizations artd equipment manufacturers. A "must 
have' for your ham shack shelf. BKl 185 $12.95/ 



The IS 



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with all kinds of audio frequency test equipment It 
you're Into SSB, RTTY, SSTV, etc, this book is a must for 
you , . ,a good book for hi-fi addicts and experimenters, 
tool LB7360$4.95.* 

VOL. Ill RADIO FREQUEWCY TESTERS— Radio frequen- 
cy waves, the common denominator of amateur radio. 

Such items as SWR, antenna impedance, line imped- 
ance, RF oulpull, and field strength; detaiied instructions 
on testing these items includes sections on signal gen- 
erators^ crystal calibrators, grid dip oscillators^ noise 
generators, dummy loads, and much more. 
LB7361 $4.95.* 

VOL. IV IC TEST EQUIPMENT— Become a trouble- 
shooting wizard! In this fourth volume of the 73 TEST 
EQUIPMENT LIBRARY are 42 home construction proj- 
ects for building test equipment to work with your ham 
station and in servicing digital equipment. Plus a 
cumulative Index for all tour volumes for the 73 TEST 
EQUlPI^ElstT LIBRARY. LQ7362 S4.95,* 

RF AND DIGITAL TEST EQUIPMENT YOU CAN 
BUILD— BK1044— Rf burst, function, square wave gen- 
erators, variable fength pulse generators — 100 kHz 
marker, if and rf sweep generators, audio osCi af^rf sig- 
nal Injector, 146 MHz synthesizer, digital readouts for 
counters several counters, prescaler, microwave 
meter, etc. 252 pages. BK1044 35,95.* 



"Use the order card m this magastne or Itemrze your order on a separate piece ol paper and mail to: 73 Radio Bookshop • 
Peterborough NH 03458. Be sureto include check or detailed credii card information. NoC.O.D. orders accepted. All orders 
add Si. 50 handling first book. $1.00 each additional book, $10.00 per book foreign airmail. Please allow 4-6 weeks for 
delivery. Questions regarding your order? Please write loCusiomer Service at theabove address. (.Prices subiect to change 
on books not published by 73 Magazine.) 



FOR TOLL FREE ORDERING CALL 1-800-258-5473 



ANTENNA 

BOOKS 



PRACTICAL ANTENNAS FOR THE RADIO AMATEUR 
—A manuaJ describing how \o equip a ham station with 
a suitable antenna. A wide range of antenna topics, 
systems, and accessories are presented giving the 
reader some food for ihought and practical I data for con- 
struct tori. Designed to aid the eKperienced ham and 
novice as weJI. Onl^ BK101_5:$9,95.' 

VHF ANTENNA HANDBOOK— The new VHF Antenna 
HandtooH deiaiis the theory, design, and constructton 
of hundreds- of dlHerent VHF and UHF antennas. , .a 
practical book written tor the average arnaleur who 
takes joy fn t^uiiding, no! i\j\\ of compiex formuJas for the 
design engineer Packed with fabjiOLis antenna projects 
you can build. BK7368 S5.95." 

73 OIPOLE AND LONGWmE ANTENNAS ^by Edward 
M. Noli W3F0J. Thts is the first coDectton of v^^tualiy 
every type o^ wireanienna used by ar^ateurs. includes 
dimensiions.conhgy rations, and detailed construction 
data For 73 differenl antenna types. Appendices 
describe the construction of noise bridges, line tuners, 
and data on measuring resonanl frequency, velocity 
factor, and swr BKIOie ^5,50.* 

• ALL ABOUT CUBICAL QUAD ANTENNAS (Znd ectJ- 
tion)— BK1196 — The -Classic" on Qusd design, 
theory, conslructton, and operation. New 2nd edition 
contains new feed and matching systems and new 
data. S5-95.' 

• BEAM ANTENNA HANDBOOK (New Stti edition)- 

BK1 1197— Yagt beam theory, construction andoperalion 
information on wire beams. SWR cur.ves and matching 
systems A -must" for senous DXers S5.ft5" 

• VHF HANDBOOK FOR RADIO AIWATEURS-BK 11 9B 

— Contairts informattcin on FM theory, operation and 
fBguipment, VHF antenna design and construction, satei- 
Iil.e-EJVIE. and ! he newest so hd -state circuiis, S.6.95' 

• THE RADIO AMATEUR ANTENNA HANDBOOK- 

BKn99— All aboui Mite aniennas. beams, lurters/ 
baiiuns. coax, radiats, SWR and towers. Clear and com- 
-plete infornnarion £6.95" 

• SIMPLE, LOW COST WIRE ANTENNAS FOR RADIO 
AMATEURS— BK 1 200— All nevtf data and everything you 
want to know about low-cost, riiuili-band antennas, inex 
pensive beams, "tnvisib^e" antennas toi hams in 
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TTL COOKBOOK — by Don Lancaster Explains whai 
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pJay system, events counter, eiectronfc stopwatch, 
djgital voU meter and a digital: tachomeier. 
B KlOfJ3 .$9.&0. * 

CMOS COOKBOOK — by Don Lancaster Details the 

apptioaikm of CMOS, the low power logic family 
suitable for most applicalions presently dommated by 
TTL. Required reading for every serious digitaf ex- 
perimenter! BK1011 $10,50,' 

TVT COOKBOOK— by Don Lancaster Describes the 

use of a standard television receiver as a rnicropro- 
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BKt064 59.95.* 




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• HOW TO DEFEND YOURSELF AGAINST RADAR— BKt 201 — by Bruce F Bogner and James R. Bodnar. a lavvyer 
and radar expert. This book g^ves you the ammunition to challenge the radar -■evidence" that usually leads to a 
speeding convi:ction, The major part of the book details the inner workings of radar — you'll become more of an e5<- 
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WORLD REPEATER ATLAS-Compieteiy updated, over 
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THE MAGIC OF HAM RADIO— by Jerroid Swank W8NXR 
beg(ns with a brief history of amateur radio and of Jerry's 
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heroic moments Hamdom's ctose ties witti the contis- 
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A GUIDE TO HAM RADfO— by Larry Kahaner WBzr^EL 
What's Amateur f^adio all about? Vou can team the 
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WORLD RADIO TV HANDBOOK 1982, 25TH EDITION 

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ANNOTATED BASIC— A NEW TECHNIQUE FOR NEO- 
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Each program is annotated to explain In step-by-step 
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programming, along with a couple of TVT construction 
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recommendations as a teaching aid. |i4,95, ' BK7322 

'Use the order card in this magazine or itemize your order on a separate piece of paper and mail to: 73 Radio Bookshop • 
Peterborough MH 03458, Be sure to include check or detailed credit card inlormation, NoC.O.D, orders accepted. All orders 
add SI. 50 handling first book, $1.00 each additional book, SlO.OO per book foreign airmail. Please allow 4-6 weeks for 
del I very. Questions regarding your order? Please write to Customer Service at the above add;fe:SS.i Prices subject lo change 
on books no! published by 73 Magazine.) 



FOR TOLL FREE ORDERING CALL 1-800-258-5473 



Improve 73 and our other publi- 
cations. With our mountains to 

climb, he coufd easily take off 
about fifty to seventy-five 
pounds and get into f igh ting 
trim to help amateuf radio get 
back into a growth mode. What 
say there. Harry? i know he's al- 
ways been a very big fan of 
mine, so let's see what happens. 

WHATS THAT CLOUD? 

Is that a nuclear blast cloud 
rising over New Hampshire? No, 
the work on our nuclear power 
generator seems to have been 
halted. A clipping sent in from a 
North Carolina paper (where 
they put much stock in these 
things) gives us a hint. It seems 
thai there are more cigarettes 
per person sold in New Hamp 
shire than in any other state. 
Atx>ut 254.4 packs for every per- 
son. - . includmg the kids- 

Now before you get the idea 
that my own efforts to stem the 
tide of smoking by not hiring 
smokers is totally ineffective. I 
should point out that New 
Hampshire has a lower tax on 
cigarettes than other states. 
The result is that Massachu- 
setts (called taxachusetts) peo- 
ple come up here in swarms to 
buy cigarettes and liquor, both 
of which are a bargam in New 
Hampshire. 

The gas stations along the 
border do a iand-office business 
In cancerettes^ helping substan- 
tially to stamp out life in the 
great commonwealth Just south 
of us. Liquor is sold in state li- 
quor stores, thus giving us a cut 
of the action towards lowering 
taxes. Indeed, we are the lowest 
taxes state, with no sales tax 
and no personal income lax. 

The only serious problem we 
have Is the air pollution along 
the Massachusetts border from 
all those cigarettes. 

NO NEWS VS. GOOD NEWS 

The recent purchase of The 
Daily N&ws in New York brought 
back memories of my first visit 
to The News, back in 1938. 
When I visited The News along 
with my high school class (we 
often went on field trips to see 
businesses), little could I have 
imagined that jn ten years i 
would be working for WPIX, The 
News' television station. Heck, 
In those days television was a 
new invention which was being 
shown at the New York World's 
Fair. The sets for receiving the 
few broadcasts were pmhEbi- 

124 73 Magazine • June/1982 



tively priced. In 1938, I was jUSt 
barely getting going in amateur 
radio, having been involved for 
about a year. 

The Qaiiy News plant was 
modern then, with new high* 
speed presses and row upon 
row of Linotype machines. The 
Linotype operators delighted 
my classmates by making up 
our names in type slugs and 
tossing them to us, burning our 
hands with the hot lead while 
they laughed. 

Hitler was raising hell in 
Europe and war was brewing. 
Despite the barrage of propa- 
ganda, war was not real to us 
and rl never even occurred to me 
that before long I might be going 
to war on a submarine in charge 
of maintaining and operating all 
of the complex electronic equip- 
ment. 

After the war. . . and after col- 
lege. . .having avoided entrap- 
ment by large corporations (a 
fate suffered by most college 
graduates which dooms them to 
mediocrity of income for life)i I 
found myself in broadcasting. 
First I tried radio engineering 
and announcing. Then, when a 
spot opened at WPIX for an en- 
gineer. I made contact through 
an old friend Bob Sullivan, who 
worked as a feature writer for 
The Sunday News. 

Bob, a friend of the family, 
had quite an influence on my 
life. It was he who introduced 
me to classical music when I 
was about seven. He also was a 
Gilbert and Sullivan nut, which I 
became, too. I maybe got even 
by exposing him to country and 
western, which took with him. 

Before we could pot WPIX 
(channel tljon the air. we had to 
get some experience. In 1948, 
there were no unemployed tele- 
vision cameramen to hire. The 
News rented studio space a few 
blocks from their 42nd street 
skyscraper at Reeves Sound 
Studios. Buzz Reeves Is reason- 
ably weJl known today for his in- 
credible contest station. I think 
they use the call N2AA. Buzz 
was one of the wealthy hams I 
talked with when 1 was looking 
to start 73 Magazine ^ Wisely, he 
was not interested. 

When the studios were fin- 
ished in The News building, we 
moved to there and finished get- 
ting ready to go on the air. We 
learned to use the cameras, to 
fix them while operating, to han- 
dle the mike booms, and to cope 
with the various unions which 
have a vice-like control of New 



York, The inaugural ceremonies 
were in the lobby of the building, 

with me as the cameraman. 

It didn't take long before I was 
nosing around the top floor of 
the skyscraper, looking for a 
place for a small ham station. 
I found an unused room and 
soon had permission to use It 
and put an antenna on the roof 
of the buUding. I brought up my 
SCR-522, which was state-of- 
the-art in those days. Imagine, 
crystal control! Twenty Watts! 
Then I put one of the Bill Hois- 
ington (W2SV) 16-elemenl 
beams up and found myself with 
a whale of a signal. I could work 
anything from central Connecti- 
cut on down almost to Phila- 
delphia, including all of Long 
Island. I made thousands of con- 
tacts. Hams are still bringing my 
old News building QSL cards to 
hamfests to flash at me. 

Being young and fooHsh (as 
differentiated from old and fool- 
ish), I wanted to put my beam in 
the best possible location on 
the roof of the building. I wanted 
it out in the open so that 1 would 
have a good signal in all direc- 
tions. Wetl« the onfy really good 
place for It was mounted on top 
of a parapet I have to admit that 
I was a bit shaky about climbing 
out on it to set up the rotator and 
beam. 1 had to skinny out about 
fifty feet, with a 25'Story drop on 
one side and about six stories 
on the other. Just to help mat- 
ters, it was windy. It Is always 
windy on top of a 37-floor build- 
ing. 

My stint atop The News build- 
ing had lasting repercussions. It 
was while operating from this 
aerie that I began wondering 
what those strange beedie- 
beedie signals were on the high 
end of the band. I started asking 
around and was led to John Wil- 
liams W2BFD out in Woodside, 
Queens. John was playing 
around with radio Teletype*'. Be- 
ing an unrepentant experiment* 
er, I was quickly hooked on 
RTTY. 

John was the father of ham 
RTTY, Me got a lot of us hooked 
on it in the late 40s. My downfall, 
if you like to think of it as that, 
came whan I went to work for 
WXEI-^ a television statiofi in 
Cleveland. 1 was hired on as a 
television producer and director. 
They had a mimeo machine, 
which was a fairly rare item In 
those days. Within a few days. I 
managed to get the first issue of 



a H77T Buitetin out for the few 
hundred RTTY experimenters. I 
almost ruined the mimeo ma- 
chine in the process, but I was 
started. The BuUeiin grew into 
Amateur Radio Frontiers and 
kept going on almost a monthly 
basis until I became editor of CO 
in January, 1955, 

The News has changed re- 
markabfy tittle in the last thirty 
years, which probably is why It 
was recently put up for sale- The 
graduat closing of one New York 
paper after another, often in the 
wake of strikes, has kept the 
papers from making much 
money. That and union opposi- 
tion kept The News from mod- 
ernizing their equipment. 1 
wouldn't t>e surprised if they still 
had some of those old Linotype 
machines being used to set hot 
slugs of type. I should get back 
for a visit and see if any of the 
old television crew are still 
there. 

Bill Holslngton's fire tower 
eventuaiiy blew down in a storm 
and he found himself fired from 
the firm he had worked with for 
years. The main reason for let- 
ting him go seemed to be that he 
was getting too close to retire* 
men! pension age. He went into 
business writing a long series of 
simple VHF and UHF construc- 
tion projects for 73. He moved to 
Peterborough (as K1CLL) to 
make this simpler- Following a 
divorce and some serious ill 
health, Bill moved to the Phltip* 
pines and got remarried. He 
seems to be living happily ever 
after there, still working on sim* 
pie i^ome VHF projects. 

You know, one of the odd 
things atiout operating from the 
top of a skyscraper or a mourH 
tain is that when the two-meter 
band begins to open, it is the 
stations on the ground which 
hear the skip signals firsL I 
would hear New York stations 
working down into Virginia and 
North Carolina for an hour or 
more without being able to hear 
a whisper of the southern 
chaps. Then, when the DX was 
starting to work on up into Con- 
necticuti I would start hearing 
them and be able to make con- 
tact. My elevation had little 
benefits for that type of contact. 
There are drawbacks to sky- 
scrapers and mountains. 

Well, I hope that the new 
owners of The News will mod' 
ernize it and keep it going. I en- 
joyed my working there and will 
never forget the excitement of 
DXing from that spot. 



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Cns^l Parifc, Chickn^ha, uyahonm ^3018 



^333 



' ?\ms€ jiJIow extra time for precision, I HF sLnd ?^pt*cial frequencies. 




Introducing 
A Whole New 
World Of 
Capability For 
Your Repeater • 



The RC- 850 
Repeater 

Controller! 



QCC 



CO«Tipi/ler 
controis 



10816 Northridge Square 
Cupertino. CA9S014 
{408)253 8085 *^124 



n FLEXIBILITY, SECURITY Remote 
conf igurability with non voiatile 
storage oi command code&* ID and 
tali messages, tone characteristics. 
tiining,and rnore 

□ QUICK. EASY. SECURE AUTOPATCH 
Store /forward patch plus two 
autodiaiers 

D REXIBIE UNKING Supports 
s^fitliesized remote bases 

D VOICE RESPONSE TELEMETRY 

Meter readbacK with natural 
sounding synthesized speech Jets 
you monitor your site, gives 
users diagnostic information 
about their signals 

D SOUNDS GREATr Audio processing 
with delay line to mute squeich 
tail and tones 

n GROWTH POTENTIAL Expandable, 
upgradable to preserve your 
investment 

D LOW POWER ... EASY TO 
IMTERFACE . . A^ID MUCH. 
MUCK MORE! 



Ca It or write for detailed specifications 
on the RC 650 Repeater Controller. 



^See ifSt of Adveriisers on pag^ t U 



TSMagazine • June. 1982 125 




ANNOUNCING 



flF PROOUCTS announces productur^n of S/B wavetenglh VHF 
telescopjng gniemnas tor 14J-U8 MHi (2M), 152-174 MH7 and 
^SO-^JS MHz (1^'*). TfiesE new antennas are inlendea tor use on 
hand-held and base slalion iranisceivcrs. The-v are available with 
BWC conneclof. 5/16-33 Mud. or PL-259 connector. A lelesc-Op- 
ing brass nickel-pfaled nme sectton radiator is used for lighler 
wetgtit and le$5 RF (u-nctions itiani previously available 5f& 
wavelength anler^nas Maxfrnum gain 13 acheived by Ihs gom- 
tnnatmni oi a base sprmg for whip prol^ction and a tuned match- 
ing network for minimum VSWR Mmpmum 2-meter bandwrdth for 
T.5:1 VSWR is 3.5 MH2 Overali length wUh BNC tonnsclor 1$ 
44H mclie$ niO.25 CMf The BNC connecto-r ^nd 5^5-32 stud 
models are ihiended for hand'held Trafiscei^vef iHTsl use and 
(he PL-259 model which includes a type ffifl359 nghj angte adap- 
tor IS intended for dirpctt rear moummg on Ciaae^ siphon irans- 
ceiver^. Suggesled fist price lof ad models is Stg95 the inosl 
popular of whicN are listed below 



PfH DESCRIPTION PfH 

191-200 2 M.5i'16-32 $iud 191-800 

191 2T4 2 M eNC connector }9^3U 

191-2T9 2 M. PL 259 connector iSl-^tS 



ELECTRICAL 
SPECIFICATIONS 

Gi^int'Tel % 4av'$li4liC9lit 6dbmiin 

BandwJEJtPN2Ml 1 4 1 VS^AfR JlMHimin 

BindwJdtrwil '•> Mf. 1 5; i ^EWfl iMHimir. 

MaKimum pOwarlHT mrjdaJBi lOwalSs 

M*iirtnjBri puwe-flPU ?bB mO!fei 30 W3t(5 



DESCRIPTION 

1 ' . M 5/16 32 Blud 
1 '4 W BNC connector 
1 li U. PL -259 connector 



MECHANICAL 
SPECIFICATIONS 



Lang I h «■.■ te ndeftillM i 
Laiigrri ^xtendsdj I ''i Uh 
Lei^glh c<>lEa3pad|?MiJ 
L«A^|hr.DJliJpQd|IS^ 
W«lQ!hl 






SPECiALlZIMG m PORTABLE. FiJCED STATION AND TEST EOUIP'WBNT ANTENMAS 

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« mrx tvffi r Kit.. , tffi 

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rsn, rntt tfi, 9Js.w$ 





33 WASHERS 
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»fffiMii(TtitSt4M #*/ $f 4tft* 



powiR Sf^pptym 

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SWITCH 

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MAIL ORDERS 
ADD $5.00 FOR SHIPPING AND HANDLING. TRIONYX IND. INC. 
INDIANA fiESIOENTS ADO 4% SALES TAX. 6219 COFFMAN RD. 

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Have you tried it yet? 

ATV TRANSMiTTER/CONVBRTER 

•10 Watts Output 
^Standard Frequencies Available 
•Broadcast Standard Sound 
•High-resotution & color video 
^Regulated AC Supply Built In 
TC^I ^Tuneable Downconverter & Preamp 

Connect to the antenna terminals of any TV set, add a good 
450 MHz antenna, a camera and there you are. . .Show the 
shack, home movies, computer games, video tapes, etc. 

ATV DOWNCONVERTER 

For those who want to see the ATV action 
before they commit to a complete stetlort, 
the TVC-4 is for you. Greal for public ser- 
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interested. Just add an antenna and a TV 
settLrnedtoCH.2,3.0T4andpiuq lnto1l7 Ti#jni 

voiisa.c. $89.00 TVC-4 

TVC'4L extra tow-noise version. . .$105 deliveretS in USA 

HOMEBfiEWERS; ASK FOR OUR BASIC FOUR-MODULE PACKAGE 

CALL OR WmiE FOR OUR COMPLETE LIST OF SPECIFICATIONS, stelion set- 
up diagrams, and optional accessories which include antennas, modulaicrs, 
detectors, test gerterators, cameras, etc. WE ARE A FULL-LINE SUPPLIER OF 
ALL YOUR ATV NEEDS. 

TEflMS: VISA or MASTER CARD by telephor>e cr mail, or check of money ord^f by 
malL All prices are deltver&d in USA. Allow three weeks alter order fordeflvery. 




P.C. ELECTRONICS 2522 Paxson Lane, 



Tom W60R0 Mirvinn WtSYSS 



Arcadia, California 91006 



PORMBLE 



/VIODEL 
370-10 



BW 





Designed for 

APARTMENTS — MOTELS ~ VACATIONS 
Quick Simple Installatioa Operates on 2, 6. 
10. 15. 20 and 40 meters. Ai! colls supplied. 
Only 22-1/2 inches long. Waghs less than 
2 lbs. Supplied with 10 ft RG 58 coax and 
counter poise. Whip extends to 57 inches. 
Handles up to 300 v^atts. 

VSVVR — 1,1:1 when tuned 

Wffte for more details and other B&VV products 

BARKER S^ WTLUAMSON. INC. 
ID CANAL STREET 
BRISTOL FW. 1sf007 
215-7Be-55S1 ^11 




H 



126 73Magazine • June, 1982 



RIN60 
RAN6ERII 

7dB GAIN 

HIGHEST GAIN 
2 METER OMNI 

OUTPERFORMS 
CONE AND 
DOUBLE ZEPP 

WORK MORE STATIONS 

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ACCESS MORE REPEATERS 

ASSEMBLE EASILY 

INSTALL QUICKLY 

A COMPLETE ANTENNA 
ALL PARTS INCLUDED 

600,000 HAPPY USERS 
BECOME ONE TODAY 

ARX-2B 134-164MHZ 
ARX-220B 220-225MHZ 

ARX-450B 435-450MHZ 



MORE RANGE 

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5/8 XSTA1NLESS WHIP 

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MAGNET 

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NOWHIPCUniNG 

LOW PRICE 

MAGNETIC MOUNTS 
AMS'147 146-148 MHz 
AMS-220 220-225 MHz 

TRUNK LIP MOUNTS 
ATS-147 146-148 MHz 
ATS-220 220-225 MHz 



BUY FROM YOUR DEALER 




CORPORAflON 

THE ANTENNA COMPANY 

48 Perimeter Road, P.O. Box 4680 
Manchester, NH 03108 
Telex - 953050 ^ 106 



INTRODUCINIl OUR 

M DS-AM ATE U R - ETV 

32 ELEMENT 
YAGI ANTENNA 





• (SJOT A KIT 
• 1.9^2.5 GHz • 3834" LENGTH 
23 dB AVERAGE GAIN 
DIE CAST WATERPROOF HOUSING 
FOR ELECTRONIC CIRCUITRY 

• COMMERCIAL GRADE 

• INCLUDES MOUNTING HARDWARE 
MAE-1 32 Element YAGI Antenna . . . $1 9.95 



SIND-1 VIDEO CONVERTCR 



FOR CABIE TV 




The SWO-1 Video 

Converter is utjiizfld 
on cable TV sys- 
terns to remove 
the KHi's signal 
from ^ distorted 
vtdflo (channel 
3 ►n/out) and 
also P5S5 tin ru 
the normal 
undtstorted/ 
detected audio signal. 
Rocker swi:tch selects oper- 
ating mode to remove KHss distor- 
tion from ths video or pass all other 
channals normally. Simple to assemble— less than 30 
mmutes, Pre-iuned, Input/output Channel 3. Impedance 
TB ohms. n7VAC. 
SWD-1 Video Converter Kit 



. $69.95 



VTR ACCESSORIES 



SIMPLE SIMON VIDEO 

STABILIZER 



■ ^ ^ ^ 



Model 
VS-125 



Simple Sfmon Video Stabilizer, Model VS'12E. Btiminatas the 
V^ rt^ ea I rolJ s nd j itter from ' ' copy ^ u Bed" v i dec ta p es w h en pi ay in g 
through large scfs en projactors or on anotherVTfl. Simple to use^ 
just adjust Ihe Socfi control for a stable picture. Once the control is 
set, the tape will play aJt the way through without further 
■adjustmenls. l^iCf^c^e■s 12V power supply. 
VS-125 VJdoo Stabitizer wired .,..-. §54.95 

SIMPLE SIMON VIDEO 

SWITCHING BOX 

Model VSB-300 
The 

Affordable 
Video 
Control Center! 

EsceMent In isolation' and no loss routing sytem, Simple Simons 
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gainthesbi-ll-ty to recordone channel while viewing another Urtrt 
includes two F-type quick connector ended cables, 
VSB-300 Video Switching Box wifed , . - SI 9.95 




SIMPLE SIMON ELECTRONIC KITS, Inc. 

7 + 11 SWD PARTS KITS 



MITSUMI 

VAR ACTOR 
UHF TUNER 

Model UES-ASeF 



$34.95 

Freq. Range UHF4.70 - EBSMHz 

Anlefina Input 75 ohms 
C^Bn^Efe 14-83 Ouiput Ctiaiml 3 




KIT 



ptttrt 

NO 



DEScniFTioN mic£ 

f VT1-SW Vaiactsf OHFTuftii. ModfllUES-A5&F ^HM 

2 Cfll-SW Pfinled CircuH Botfrt. fffl-Dnllsd .... , . . . . IB.95 

3 TP7-SW P.C.fl. PotErrtiGPneter*. 1-2 OK. 1-lJC. and 

5-1 OK uhms. 7-pistfi£. . . &-9S 

4 Ffl35-SW RHistw Kit. ^ Watt. 5*t Ca*on filcn, 32-piiCK. . .•*.9& 

5 PT1-SW Pflvuer TpaflstormoT. Pfll-IITVAC. Ste-24VAC 

Z^Qma S.9fi 

B PP2-SW Pinfif Hcmiit PatBJitiomiBtflrs and KniJbs. MKBT 

M/\ 1-5KAT w/Switch . 5.8S 

7 SS14-SW ID'S 7-piis. DiDdss 4-|ics, Reifuigttti-fi 2-^^t 

Hfat Sink l-pieti , , - . . 3995 

a CE9'SVV ElKtfDlyik CapiclDar Kit. S-pitiE^et t,9B 

S CC33-SVV Curimk Dtsk Capacitnr Kil. 6Q W,V,. 33-|>det:es . . . . 7.9S 
10 CT-'SW VlEtble Cflis^tmic tnmmBr Cipcitw Kit, 

5-Ei5p(d, &-piBces S.95 

M L4-SW Coil Kfl, IBmlis 2 -pieces, llpihi 1 -piece (prewound 

inductors f and 1 T^T-IZ Ferrilfl Torrijid 

Coifl wilh 3 ft. ftf #28 wire S.PO 

12 9CS-SW LP Sackats.. Tin inla^, B-pin 5-pi»ci£ 

3(uj l4-pin 2-piBtBS 1-95 

13 SR-SW Sp«aiier. ^iC'' Dvai and Pmpunch&d 

Wood EnolQsurB . 14.B5 

14 M^SC-SW iAiu. P^ns Kit IiwMk Hardware, (B/J2., 8/32 

fyuti, b Soltf], HoDbp Wire.. Anl. TwiuSh DMifT 

Aiit. ^Mitch, Fiisi, Fiisdlohf^r, elc t.95 

Whin Ordering All lt«Ria, \\ thru 14^, Tolol Pries t3fl,9S 



UHF ANTENNAS and ACCESSORIES 



ZYZZX 

VHF-UHF WIDEBANO 

ANTENNA AfflPUFIER 

MODEL ALL-T 

50 MHz — 900 n/IHz 

12 dB GAIN-:0 5dB 

A Revoluttonarv Mew 

One Stage HYBRID 

IC Broadband Amplifier 

This unit is not available anywhere else in the world, One unit 
serves many purposes and is av&ilable in Kit or Assembled 
form. Id osl for outdoor or indoor use. Input-outpi^t imped3<it*J 
iS 75 ohms. Amplifier includes separate co-ax Feed povter 
supply- Easily aj&embled in 25 minutes. No coils, capacitors 
etc. to tune or adjust. 

ALL-1 Ccimplete Kit with power supply S24 9S 

ALL-1 Wired and Tested with power supply ...... $34.96 

Our New STVA M.5 dB GAIN, 
14 ELEMENT CORNER REFLECTOR 
YAGI ANTENNA 





**i^-;.^^^ STVA-3 yagiaitfermi 



%..^ 




14 5*, 75 ofim. Chan 80-68 - &nM 
STVA-4 ViqiAm«nna, 

H-BiB.75alwi,Chm44-B2 S1B.95 



$9Ja 



STV A-1 ViQi Antflfma. 1 1.5 dB, 75 ohm, Chan. 42-54 



Rq-B9/tl n ohm Iwt Lass CtMS Caijte $ .12 ji/ft 

F-&9 CoSKl^L CiiiHifictars, sa. '...>..: , , . ... «.. .< r - 39 

MM Spersai UMF 75-301} ohm Mafdi^ frartifofimt. ea t4S 

ALt- 1 \mm EC Wkffihand VHF-UHF-FM AfllewH A(riplifi*f »5t . . . . 24.95 

ftU-1 H VB FHD IC Wideband VHF-UHF-FH Ant Amp. Ass wnblid 34.95 



Available by Mail Order Only — Sertd Check or Money Order To: 



SIMPLE SIMON ELECTRONIC KITS, Inc. 

Calif. Orders^ All Other Orders: 

3S71 S. Vaiiey View, Dept 7 1 1850 S. Hawtfiome Blvd. Dept7 

Las Vegas. Nevada 89103 Hawrthome, Calif. 90250 

Tel: (702) 322-5273 Teh (213) 675-3347 



Miniinum Order: $16.96, Add 10% Shipping 
and Handling orv orders under $40,00. For 
orders o^er $40.00, add 5%. Mirtimum Ship- 
ping and Handimg $5.00 Catalog $1.00. 
— VISA and Mastercard Acceptable — 



^See if St of Advertisers on page 114 



73Msgaiine * Jurte, 1982 127 



CALL NUMBER ONE! 



CARLOAD INVENTORIES • ROCK BOTTOM PRICES 

SUPER-FAST SERVICE 



UNES: AEA 

AVANK 

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ALUAtiCE 



ALPHA 
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CALL TOLL FREE 1-800-325-3609 

MIDCOM ELECTRONICS • 8516 MANCHESTER ROAD • BRENT 



if\^ IN MISSOURI 

IU9 314-961-9990 

BRENTWOOD, MO 63t44 



w*fc 



^ 52 




The FIST FIGHTER "* 

• Send Perfectly-Timed Code 

• Perfea 1 :3 dot:dash ratio all the time 

- Normal key-down tune-up, no switch needed 

• Exclusively for straight keys 
•Side-tone Oscillator 

• Uses CMOS Digital Circuits 
•Grid or direct keying 
■3to30+ WPM 





Assemdied ^nd Tested 79.95 

Kh 59.95 

Shipping and H^ncfrir>g 2.50 

VISA and MasterCard accepted 
Virginia j-esidents add 4% sak^ t^x 



Blacksburg Group 

Box 242 

Blacksburg, Virginia 24060 

703/95 1 -9030 



(^na 



\': 



Jf 



^ij^A 



CALL TOLL FREE 
1 -800-238-61 68 



In TN. call 901-683-9125 

MEMPHIS AMATEUR 
ELECTRONICS 

(Formerly-GermantownSefe-Rose) 

Authorized Dealer for Kenwood, Yaesu, Icom, 
Drake, Mirage, A E A, Info-Tech, Ten-Tec, MFJ, 
Cubic, and B&W. 



MON-FRI 9:00—5:00 
SAT 9:00—12:00 



1^139 



Write: 1465 Wells Stat. Rd., Memphis, Tn. 38108 



HIGH PERFORMANCE 
PRESELECTORS 



MODEL P50 to P500 




• 50 - 500 MHz 

• Ultimate rejectian over 80 d8 

• Five large helical resonators 

• Lew noise 

• High {overload resistance 

• Tvpof rejection figures: 

±600 kHz at T44 MHz: -30 dB 
±1.6 MHz at 220 MHz: -40 ctB 
±5 MHz at 450 MHz: -45 dB 

• The soiutian to interference, intermotf and 
desens prat]lems on repeaters 

■ 12V DC operation 

• Dimensions only 1^6 x 2.6 x 4.75 exclud- 
ing ponnectors 

• Custom tuned to your frequency 

• Low cost — only $69.95 

• Allow $2,00 for shipping and handling 

We liave a complete line of transmitter and retetv- 
er strips and synlhesizers for Amat&ur and corn- 
m&rcial use. Wfite or call for ouj" free catalog. 

We welcDme MasterCard or VISA 

GLB ELECTRONICS 



V 



1952 Clinton St., Buffalo, N. Y. 14206 
^143 1-(716)824-7936,9to4 



110VAC MUFFIN FAN 

cooling farv - SLJitable for elect rontci' 
el€Crriqal equipm^nl cgoJing, 3200 
RPMMOO CFM, PlastfC conslrucCnQn. 
Ouietrunnmg.4-nM6" square x ^■^Q" 
iUiCk, 3 bf^de fan Remuveo if am used 
equip ment,. checked out and guaf- 

3BLADE— iS.OO S BLADE— $T.OO 

10 BLADE— MOO 3.13- Sq.— 17.50 




AN/LJRM250 SfGNAL GENERATOR covering 10 KHz 
to 50 MHz in eighl bands, flF oulpul: 0.1 to 100,000 uv 
in 50 ohm load; 2 voiJs adpustabae across H^^h load im- 
pedance AmpiiilLide mocfujatjon: to 50% 400 or 1000 
Hz internal. Wilh 1 MHz crystal calibrator. Power re- 
quired: 116 VAC 50-1000 Hz, 11 ^^^ 
M LBS Us«d. reparable, less 
wiaccessones S75,W 



* X 14x 10 Vj; SH WT 
accessories. S5&.00, 



HEAT SENSOR ELEMENT 



Manulaclured by Etmwood, Opens 
3T SOOT. Excel tent (or building: 
heat & iirs alarms. 5fB" dia. x 
1102" deep, 3/e" tabs lor push or 
terminals. \5!WCAoC mounting. 




SG-l2.fURlV|.4a FM SIGNAL GENERATOR, 19.5 lo 102 
MHz FM in five bands with devFation ranges !o 26, 50^ 
anct 100 KHz; tDOO Hz modulation. Al^o if oulpulsort 
1 4, 2-5 15, J.eS, 2 SB, 4.3, A. 45, &.0, 5.35, 15 MHz, p(us 
two spaie positions Calibrated out put voltages: 0.5 uv 
to .01 yolls (RF); 0.5 uv lo 1.0 v (IF), output impedances: 
10 ohms (RF): 25 ohms (IF). V^ith t MHz and^or 2 MH? 
crystal ealibiatOT markers. Powder required: 1 15^230 
VAC 50-1000 Hj. Size: 12 >( tS x 12: Shpg Wl: 85 LSS. 
Used, repafabtp, $100.00 



STANDARD SELL & CHIME TRANSFOf^MERS Made 
to exacliy replace The very popular types nrtost com- 
monly lound in homes around th^ nalion. It laHes jusi 
minutes lo replace a bufned oul oriit— and M can save 
you Ciig money in electriciarhS charges These are UL 
approved tor long life. 
|.12iaVAC S3.95 




ELECTRONICTOWN INC. 

440-7lh AVE. BOX 204$ SAN PIEGO, CA 92112 
*^ ^ TS w«£t Coast Oi¥. Phone: (714^ 234 9871 



j^See List of AdverffSBrs on page t t4 



1 




Limited Offer. .. 



SUPER STICK 11 

2 METER 5/8 WAVE TELESCOPIC ANTENNA 

PLUS 

A DUCK FOR 
UNDER A BUCK 



M9 



99 



+ 10 



FOR THE DUCK 



SUPER 

STICK 

n 


PRICE 


GAIN • 


BASE 
CONNECTOR ** 


FULLY 
COLLAPSED 


$19.^^ 


6-9 DB 


BNC'Tempo 

5/15-32 
TNC-F--50239 , 


Co apsed is a 
matched 1/4 
Wave Antenna 


BRAND 
C 


S26>* 


6-9 DB 


BNC ONLY 

■ • ■ ■ I. :^ .:- .J :■ •' : ;• '• ■■■ "■ 


NA 

Will oo! tfansTTTit 

in <iollapS;ed posstion. 


BRAND 
V 


$24.^'' 


5-8 DB 


■ • ■;■ ■:■■■ ■^ 

BNC ONLY 


NA 

Will not transmit- ^^■■ 













■ Measured Field Strength Over Rubber Duck 
''■ Specify Base Type BNC, Ternpo, EgL 



I^D2S 

Stubby 



The Tuned Antenna Company brings you the Super Stick II 
for those fong haufs with your H.T>» pfus our 5/8 WaV^ 
Antenna may be operated coHapsed with the same operating 
characteristic of a Rubber Duck Antenna The Super Stick H 
ii^ avaiiabte )vith Tempo S-T 8NC-TNC-F'RL-259 Bases at a 
'price that Is several bucks under other 5/6„ Wave Antennas, 
making the Super Stick II the best buy around Soe your local 
dealer for stock. Settle for nothing less than a Super Stick II. 

Term»: C,O.D„ ctiecic or money or^fer. Please add $2.00 

for first enlenna and $t,DO for each additional anlenrta 1o cover 

shipping nnd handl^r^g. CaWiarnia re^ldCfits add G% sM&t i&yt. 

FOR DEALER LOCATION 

OR TO ORDER CALL: 

(714) 268-0720 




AMTENHA 
GO, 



73 Magazine * JuneJ962 129 



J 



^53 




ORDER 

TOLL 

FREE 



JUNE VALUES 

1-800-36-4799 

ORDER HOURS: 11 am - 8 pm M-F 

Closed Tuesdays 
9 am - 4 pm Saturday 



Banus; 2% Discount lor Pfepaid Orders 
(Cashier s Check or Money Order) 



KgJ' 




.V9i 



TEN^TEC SPECIALS 
&1S Argonaut HF XCVR 

52S Argosy HF XCVR 

5B0 Delta HF XCVR 

546 OmniC Hf XCVR . 

TEN-TEC Acc«ssoHe£ 
m stock at discount priccrs 



399 
439 

369 



9B 
00 
00 
00 



MJI^ PRDDUCTS (Call for other Mf J itemsf 

989 tMflw 3KW Tunar . 2e7 75 

^62 1 &KW Tuner mtr/switch I99.9S 

949S 300 watt d«luKfl tur^sr 'i 22.00 

041 C 300 watt tuner switch/mtr 78.42 

340 300 watt tuner switch/ mtr 69.70 

4B49 Grandmaster rrwrrrory k«yer 12 msg. 121.72 

422 Pacesetter Koyar w/ Bencher BV1 S7.1S 

4>0@ Didluxe Keyer wJth ^pf^ed mtr . 69 69 

496 K^yboerd II . 296 95 

752B Dual tunable filter. . . . . 78 42 

SUPER STICK II 5/8 2m art* 14.SS 



14 9S 


©9 95 


B2.95 


105 95 


CALL 


35.25/42 95 


99 95 



DAtWA/MCM 
CN 520/CM 540 Watt Meters , 
CNW4ie/CNWS18 Ant. Tunars 
CNA 2002 Auto 2.6W Tuner 



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ASTRON POWtH SUPPLIES n3S ^^C] 
RS7A S ampti continuous, 7 amp IC$ 
RS12A 9 amps continuous, 12 amps ICS . 
RS20A 16 ernps continiurDus, 20 amps ICS 

RS20M same as RS20A + maters 

RS35A 25 ampa centinuQus. 35^ amp ICS 

RS3&M sem* as nS35A + maters 

VS35M 25 amp continuous adjustable . . 
VS20M t€ amp continuous adjustable , 

MINIQUAD HQ-1 ,,^ 



48 

ea 

87 
105 
131 
15V 
171 
124 

129 



9S 
95 
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60 
35 
20 
50 
95 
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00 
00 

95 



VoC M ANTENNA S/2 m Amps 

5/8 wave 2m band bald Ant . . . 

2 watts fn, 25 watts out 2vr% Amp 

200 mw in, 25 watts oul 2m Arnp. 

1 watts in, 50 watts out 2m Amp 
MIRAGE AMPS ft WATT METERS 

MP1/MP2 Watt Meters 

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BfNCHER PADDLES Black/Chrome 
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ALLIANCE HP73 ©9 95 

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AZDEN PCS 300 bandhatd. 2m , 284.00 

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SANTEC S7-7/7 440-450 bandheEd 239. OO 
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KDK FM 2025A 25 watt FM XCVR . . 269 95 



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Upgrade kits for TH6DXX to TH7DX Most antennas 

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A4 New Triband Beam 10 15 20m 
A3 New Triband Beam 10- IS- 30m 
A V3 New 10 15 20m Vertical, 
ARX 2B New Ringo Ranger 2m 
A32-19 2m ' eotsme/" DX Beam 
220 B 220 MHz Boomer 
214B Jf Boomer 144T46 MHz 
2T4FB Jr Boomer T44. 5-148 MH? 
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PROCDM 200 Headset/ dual Imp 
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CABLE RG21 3 Mil Spec. .... 

fiG8/U Foam 95% Shiefd 

fl wire Rotor 2 # IB. 6 #22 

KLM ANTENNAS (other antennas m stock) 

K'n54A 4-Eiem(^nt Tribsnd Beam 

KT34XA 6- Element Triband Beam 

144 14$ 13 LB 2m 13EI*m wfth baEun 
t44-148 16C 2m 16-6lem for oscar 
420 4B0 14 420-450 MHi 14 elem. beam 
420-450 iaC42O-450 MHz TS-elem oscer. 
432 16La 16 «*lBm 430^434 MHi beam/baiun 

HUSTLER 58TV lO-BOm Vertical. . . 

4BTV 10'40m Vertical 

3TBA New I0'16'20m Beam .... 
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10 and 15 meter 8.95 

20 meters 1 1 .95 

40 maters 13.95 

75 meters 14.50 

AVANTI AP 151 3G 2m on glass ant . . , 27.95 



95/32.95 

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168 95 
Super 
13.50 
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ORDER INFORMATION 



Orders: 

Information 

and Virginia Orders: 

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M-W-F: 12 noon-8 pm _ , -^*-r^.^ r^... 

Thursday: 10 am-4 pm ®'^^^ L^c^atian; 4415 Jefferson Davis H^y. 
Saturday: S am-3 pm Woodbridge. VA 22191 



— CALL FOR QUOTES — 
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order. Prices subject to change without notice 
or obfigation. 



DOLLAR SAVER/SPACE SAVER 

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1.8 to 500 MHZ/1 W to 1 KW 




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NOTE: Price, Specifications subject to change without notice and 
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A HAM RADIO PROGR^\iM FOR 
THE APPLE' COMPUTER 
by Fred Pearl man W(*DLM 

BASH DOKS IT AGAIN, . . 
ON DISC, WITH DOCUMENTATION Hi 
Computerize your DX operaticm^i. Speed up and simplify 
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If ordering direct: Retail S29.9B, Add S2. 00 shipping/handling 
California residents, please add $1.95 Sales Tax 



BASH EDUCATIONAL SERVICES, II\IC. 

P.O, Box 2115 San leandm, CA 94577 

(4 1 5j 352^5420 



>^ 



130 73 Magazine • June, 1982 



WtRE AMD CABLE 




f%C 311 


37C/M 


HG aL> #qam, W% braid 


23.54 /rt 


ftG «X foam. 95*** braid 


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n.Si^t 


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19C/tf 


ASOorvm ladd^ iprie. lOOtt roit 


$10.75 


1 conductor rotof cable 


15c /^t 


UG4 Stranded Copper (SOtt. 


JTILlIt J SC/'tt 


13 Ga Soi'dCopp^rweld (50ff^ 


multJSC/*t 


UOd SotrdCo|>per«eid ($0*1. 


muiT.>#c/H 


IG* Solid Aluminum 4 SOU 


rtiglt )6C^t 


ANTENNA ACCESSORIES 




Ceramic Do^&one insulators 


65C^ea 


Amp^e<iol Silver Plate PL IS* 


75c ^ea 


W2AU Balun 1 lor J:1 


tU 25 


VAN GOROEN 11 Baljn 


S8.J0 


VAN GORDEN ):1 Center \mv\ 


$5.50 


BiW Traps &0/<0m thru 10m 


$25.65/pr 


Qa.W 37Sor 376 Coax Switch 


t19.25 


BS.W 593 Coax Switch 


11795 


BiW SflS Coax Switch 


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ftOTORS 




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MINI PRODUCTS Mini Quad 


1177*5 


MINI PRODUCTS CiVef; 


$55 00 


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$99 50 


QUTTERNUT2MCV 


S2a.50 


HY GAIN CaN or write for 1 


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SHURE 144D DUAL IMP MIC ^ 


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BEMCHER PADDLES, bfack/cfrirome i35.00/4275 | 


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, , . . , $15.00 


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15.95 


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COMPONENTS 

D Amphenol connectors 
n B&Wco*is, switches, aniennas 
D Hammond and LMB enclosures 
D Jackson diafs and drives 
n J.W. Miller parts 
n Knobs and shall couplers 
n Mrflen components 
D Multronics roller inductors 

□ Padders and trimmer capacitors 
n Resistors, capacitors, inductors 
n Semiconductors 

n Toroids. cores, beads, baluns 

□ Transmitting/ Receiving Capacitors 

Air Variables Cardwell-^E.F. Johnson 

Hammarlund--Mmen 
Doorknob: Cenfralab— Jennings 
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Wire. Cable, Op€n-wire Trans, lifie 

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Fun-Amp (73 5/82) 2 M Converter (73 4/82) 
R-K Maise Badge (hr 2/77) 40 meter 
QRP Transceiver (hr 1 /81 ) L Meter 
(OST 1/81 ) General Coverage Reception 
with Drake R 4C Receiver {OST 5/81 ) 
Fun-Mitter (73 2/81 ) FunCeiver (73 7/81 ) 
Fun Oscillator (73 2/82) Solid State 
T-R Switch (hr 6/80) Multipurpose UHF 
Oscillator (hr 9/81 ) Split Band Speech 
Processor (hr 9/79) SWR Meter (hr 10/81} 

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TVC-2 ATV OOWNCONVERTER. . , . 155 ppd 

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Tom weORG Maryann WB6YSS 



Arcadia, California 91006 



miV FAST CHAKCE 

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^ 149 DEALER INQUIRIES INVITED 



*^See List of AdverHsers on page^ 1 f4 



73 Magazine • June, 1982 131 



d 



Wayne Green Books 



Xr^ ^ 

^aV 



TEKTEBTX 

a cx)mpl8te 
worc^rocai^g 
system In kit 







A WAYNE GREKN 
FUBLlCATiaK 




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*TRSn80 is a irad^rn^rk or 

Radio Shack Dtvision ot T^raty Cofp 



TEXTEDIT— A Complete Word Processing System In kit form 

by Irwin Rappaport 

TEXTEDIT is an inexpensive word processor that you can adapt to suit your needs, 
from writing form letters to large texts. It is written in modules, so you can load and 
use only those portions that you need. Included are modules that perform: 
— right justification 
—ASCII upper/lowercase conversion 
— one- key phrase entering 
^complete edltonal functions 
—and much more! 

TEXTEDIT is written in TRS-SO' Disk BASIC, and the modules are documented in the 
author's admirably clear tutorial writing style. Not only does Irwin Rappaport explain 
how to useTEXTEDiT; he also explains programming techniques implemented in the 
system. 

TEXTEDIT is an inexpensive word processor that helps you learn about BASIC pro- 
gramming, It is written for TRS-80 Models I and lit with TRSDOS 2.2.'2.3 and 32K. 
*TRS-80 and TRSDOS are trademarks of the Radio Shack Division of Tandy Corpora- 
tion. BK73B7 $9.97 ISBN 0-88006-050-6 Disk Available DS73S7 $19.97 

Annotated BASIC— A New Technique for Neophytes, 

BASIC programming was supposed to be simple— a beginner s programming 
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Annotated BASiC explains the complexilies of modern BASIC. It includes com- 
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to explain in st-jp-by-slep fashion ihe workings of the program. Programs are 
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includes a description of the new concepts which have been introduced. 

Annotated BAStC deals with the hows and whys ol TRS-80 BASIC programming. 
How IS a program put together? tVfty is it written that way'' By observing the pro- 
grams and following the annotation* you can develop new techniques to use in your 
own programs— or modify commercial programs for your specific use. 

Annot&tJMi BASIC Vohmi' 1 contains Projecting PtoUt% Surveyor. Thmgs to Do. Tdi St>eii6T (ntroduclion t' 
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Order Both Votumes and Save! BK738402 $18.95 
Kilobaud Klassroom— 
A practical course in digital electronics 

by George Young and Peter Stark 

Learning electronics theory without practice isn't easy. And it s no fun lo budd an 
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you buiit yourself! 

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FOR TOLL-FREE ORDERING CALL 1-800-258-5473 
WAYNE GREEN BOOKS •PETERBOROUGH NH 03458 

Use the order car^t or iiemjze yoyr oreter an a separate piece of pap6r and mail lo Wayne Green Book^ Att: Sales •Peterborough HH 03458. 
Be sure lo inciude checH or del ailed credit oaifl information. (Visa, Master Charge or American impfess accepted.^ 

No COD, orders accepted. AH orders add t1 .50 for the fifsi book, posiage and nandling; Si. 00 each additional book; $10.00 per book lor«iigr^ air mail. 
Please aHow 4-& weeks after pubNcatJon for denvery. QuestJons regarding your order? Please write lo Customer Service at the above address 



132 73 Magazine • June, 1982 



MBA reader: 

A NAME YOU SHOULD KNOW 





f What does MBA mean? It stands for Morse-Baudot and ASCII. 
What does the MBA Reader do? The RO model (reader only) uses 
a 32 character alphanumeric vacuum fluorescent display and 
takes cw or tty audio from a receiver or tape recorder and visually 
presents it on the display. 

The copy moves from right to left across the screen, much like 
the Times Square reader board. Is the AEA model MBA Reader 
different from other readers? it certainly is! It is the first to give the 
user 32 characters of copy (without a CRT), up to five words atone 
time. itcancopycwupto99wpmand Baudot at 60-67-75 and 100 
wpm. Speeds in the ASCfl mode are 110 and hand typed 300 
baud, The expanded display allows easy copy even during high speed reception. 

The AEA model MBA has an exclusive automatic speed tracking feature. If you are copying a signal at 
3-5 wpm and tune to a new signal at 90 wpm, the MBA catches the increased speed without loss of copy. 
The MBA Reader allows a visual display of your fist and improves your code proficiency; It is compact 
in size, and has an easily read vacuum fluorescent display. 

The Reader operates from an external 12 VDC source- This allows for portable/mobile or fixed 
operation. 

Check the AEA model MBA Reader at your favorite dealer and see all the features in this new 
equipment. If your dealer cannot supply you, contact ^ ^^ ^ 

Advanced Electronic Applications, Inc. -^^ ^^ mm ^^ Brings VOll the 

P.O. Box 2160, Lynnwood. WA 98036 Call 206/775*7373 #%^H^^BreaktnrOUgh! 

Prices and specifications subject to change without notice or obligation 



4 



i 

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WORK THE U.H.F. BANDS 

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Choose from the largest selection of modules available for DX, OSCAR, 
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Varactor tripkrs ^^ Antennas 

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73 Magazine • jLfnep1982 133 




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134 73 Magazine • June, 1982 



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«^Se£ Ust iOf A(fveru$6^i^ on pags^ 1 14 



73Magazme • June, 1982 135 





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ORBIT is the Official Journal for the 
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For a FREE SAMPLE COPY please 
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Computer Aided Design (CAD) is one of the newest 
of the applications of microcomputer technology, 
THE ELECTRONIC BREADBOARD permits the 
design and analysis of analog circuits. It can be 
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This package is ideal for audio component repair- 
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136 73 Magazine • June, 1982 





the 








6. 



7. 




10 
11 



NEVER SAY DIE — If you want controversy* 
Wayne Green W2NSD/1 will give it to you His 
popular column ranges from travelogue to tirade 
and is guaranteed to entertain^ insptfe and 
enlighten you 

DX — This globe-trotting column keeps you in- 
formed about the news of the DX world from King- 
man Reef to Bahrain 

CONTESTS — You get all the news on the contest 
world from Robert Baker WB2CFE. He'll give you 
information on upcoming events and results from 
recent contests. 

FUN — Just for fun, John Edwards KI2U provides 
you with wacky puzzles, quizzes, and games that 
test your ham mettle. 

FCC — If you're looking to the future, these out* 
takes from the Federal Register chronicle changes 
in policy and regulations that relate to amateur 

radio. 

RTTY LOOP — To keep you abreast of radtotele- 
type deveiopments. Marc Leavey WA3AJR ex- 
plains the new RTTY equipment, the increasing 
rote of computers in RTTY, and other matters of 
interest to digital communications fans 

REVIEWS— Before you buy, save yourself some 
money , check 7J's indepth evaluation of the 
latest gear 

HAM HELP— As a service to you, 73 prints your 
questions in our magazine. This helps you to ob- 
tain hard'to-get parts, schematics, and owner's 
manuals. 

SATELLITES- From Phase III to TVRO, 73 Maga- 
zine covers the news of the satellite world like no 
other radio amateur magazine. 

NEW PRODUCTS- This brief look at the latest 
ham equipment on ih? market keeps you on top of 
new developments m amateur radio, 

AWARDS — To find out what certificates are avail- 
able where, read Bill Cosney KEZC's coverage of 
all the ham radio awards. 

CONSTRUCTION- The builder's magazine 
that's 73. You get the best proiects from the best 
authors every month. ^^. 




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VHF ANTENNA HANDBOOK— Th© new VHf Antefifta H^ndboo/^ ctetaHs tne 
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73 DIPOLE AND LONG WIRE ANTENNAS— by Edward M . NoN W3FQJ, Thfs is 
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swr, BK1016S5 50.' ^ i ? . 



ALL ABOUT CUBICAL QUAD ANTENNAS an4 edlirofi}— BK1196--The 

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THE RADtO AMATEUR ANTENNA HANDBOOK -&K1 199- AH about wire amerh 
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SJMPLE. LOW^OST WIRE ANTENNAS FOR RADIO AMATEURS -BKt 200^ Alt 
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Use the ord&r card In this magazine or Itemize your order on a separate piece of 
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clude check Of detailed credit card information. Ho C.O.D. orders accepted. All 
orders add $1 ,50 handling first book, S 1 00 each additional booh, $10.00 per book 
foreign airmail. Please allow 4-6 weeks Jor deNvery Questions regarding your 
order? Please write to Customer Service at the above address (Prices subject to 
change on booi^s not published by 73 Magazine,) 



Front 



mGAZINE 




THE 1982 EDITION 

GENERAL LICENSE 
STUDY GUIDE 

by Timothy Al. Dan/e/ HBRK 

This \s the complete guide to the General License. 
Learning rather than memorizing is the secret This 
is not a question-and^answer guide that will gather 
dust when the FCC issues a new test. Instead, th^s 
book will be a helpful reference, useful long after a 
ham upgrades to General. Includes up-to-date FCC 
rules and an application form. 
ORDER yours today and talk to the world. 
SG7358 S6.95 



'Use ih^ order caf d on the Reader Service page of this magazine or 
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detailed credit card inforrtiaticm. No CO.D. orders accepted. Add 
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FOR TOLL FREE ORDERING CALL 1-800*258-5473 



t30 73 Magazine • June, 1982 




t/y 



NEW from 



THE 

NEW 

WEATHER 

SATELLITE 

HANDBOOK 




BY DR. R\LPH E. TAGGART 

Here is the completely updated and revised editron of the best- 
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The book \s an introduction to satellite watching, providing all 
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WEATHER SATELLITE 
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By Dr. Ralph E. Taggart WB8DQT. Valuable information in this 
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Chapters such as ''How to Build an Electric Timer for Satellite 
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mg and handlmg charge). 



'Use llie order card in this magazine cif *X^miiM yourofd&f on a seoafate piece or paper 
an(3 mail to: 73 RadfO flock shop • Petertjorough NH 03458 Be sure to tnclutSe cfiech Of 
detailed credit card mformanon Add $1.50 first Doqk. Si 00 each a^ditionaJ booK, 
$1Q,Q0 per book tofctgn airrnail Note Prices subjec! to change on faooks not pub4isll«tf 
by /3 Magazine. Questions regarding your order? Please iMnie to Customer Sefvice at 
trie above address- PEeasealtow4 6 weeksfordeSivery No CO D. orders accepted For 
Ton Free ordering call 1'aOO-25a'5473 






[OM 



K\^^ 



JA 



1^ 



* * 



MAKE 
MONEY. . . 
$ELL 
MAGAZINE 

Selling 73 Magazine, the ham radio 
magazine that offers quality and 
quantity, brings the ham into your 
store. Once through the door you 
can sell him anything. 



Our dealers are telling us that '73" 
outsells them all. . .so call today 
and join the dealers who make 
money with 73 Magazine. 

For information on selling 73 
Magazine call 603-9Z4-9471 and 
speak with Ginnie Boudrieau, our 
Bulk Sales Manager. Or write to 
her at: 



I 



MAGAZINE 

80 Pine Street 
Peterborough NH 03458 



\ 



'^ 



73 Magazine • JuneJ982 139 



SYNTHESIZED 

SIGNAL GENERATOR 



MADCIN 

USA 




MODEL 

S610OD 

S3I3 95 

p^% thippmq 



• Covfifs TOO m 185 MHz m 1 kHz steps wilh ihtimh- 
wheet [fiaJ • Accuracy 1 pari per 10 mil (ion al all he- 
quef^dts • iniemal F W adjuslatle Irom to 100 kH^ 
at a 1 kHz rate • Spiirs and noise al least 60 dB be- 
low carrier • RF output adjustable from 5-500 mV at 
50 ofims • Operates on 12 Vdc @ 1/2 Amp • Avail- 
Mb lor immediate deli very * S349.95 plus shipping 
« Add-Qfi Accessories availat^le lo extend freq 
range, add inlinitt re^ohftkm, voice and sub audible 
tones AM, preQision 120 dS calitirated aUenuatttr 

• Call lor details • Dealers wanted worldwide. 



VANGUARD LABS 

iee-23 Jmrniica Ave., Hoills, NV t1423 
Ptionft:(212)4Sa273{) 



311 



C.B. SPECIAL 

(Repeat of a sell out) 

CONVERT THESE TO 
IOMETER FM 

Httvn Hy-Q^m 4Q chan-nel pririlfid c;ircijit 
boards assembly ^Sque^cfr pot i^Qiume 
com rot ana channel! iwtich jioI inctiidedl 
Bostii% sold as 1* D"Tvtnsion ^ X^ 

1-9 pCi S7.Sa ««. 

10-49 pes S6.$0 •!. 

ivyripi« guaniiiN^ last? 

REMOTE 40 CHANNEL C-B. 
Remoies have a meTai Tram* Spea4ief 

pia*lie case. sf^<3 cofilrol mic not fnqluded 



Solid a$ IS. 



Sl4JSea 



C.B. BARGAIN 

C*r> D« i4%ea #o# %|)*ri^ pii ^5 flvv ^#iper*i»* 

S3.S0 ea 

DfHer mfofmahon Piea'&if atkl M QC fo« 
S'W ¥>* UFS CODs acc^tKl ioi t^'a»f% 
loliH»"g S50 00 Of moie Fiondi »rs»aents 
add 4S. saj^s lax HMm^niuni order S^^OO 

Ffjffeigfl orbeT^ US ignds Ofily acta ^O""- fot 
S^H MASTER CARD and VISA flccBpied 

Surplus Electronics Corp. 

7294 NW54thSr 

Miami FL 33166 ^&9 

P H Ji 30^^7 e22S 



Subscrtption 



73 Magaane does not keep subscrip 
lion records on the premises, there- 
tore calling us only adds time and 
doesn't solve the problem. 

Please send a description oT the 
problem and your most recent ad- 
dress label to: 



73 Magazine 
Subscriptior^ Dept 
PO BoK 931 
Farmlngdale, NY 11737 



Tharth. yoy ar\d efipy your sultscripMon 



Take your favorite HX out 
for a drive tonight. 



VISA or MASTERCARD for 
same day shipment 



For S69.95 you get the most efficient, 
dependable, fully guaranteed 35 W 2 meter 
amp kit for your handy talkie money can buy. 

Now you can save your batteries by operating 
your HT. on low power and still get out like a 
mobile rig. The model 335A produces 36 watts 
out with an input of 3 watts, and 15 watts out with 
only 1 watt in. Compatible with IC-2AT. TR-2400, 
Yaesu, Wilson & Tempo! Other 2 meter models are avaih 
able wtth outputs of 25W and 75W< in addition to a lOOW 
amplifier kit for 430MHi ^m 

Communication Concepts 



2646 N. ^^mgon Av«.. Daytewi, OH 454^ 



NEiWAL ELECTRONICS 

COAXIAL CABLE SALE 






POLVETHVLENE DtELECTfliC 

FlG2l3nonconiam4na1lng95% stileldmiFspec. SSc/fi 

RGl74^Umirspf!e.96°/fl shield , .lOt/fL 

RGI 1U 96% shield. 75^ohm mi( spec 35e/ft 

RG8U 96% shield. m( I spec. , 3l^^t 

RGe A/U double sn leid. 75<jhm 2 5«^lt, 

flGSEAU stf arrded mi I ^oec ^ IttH. 

RGSe mil spec %'.slii6kl. .^ . 11c«l 

LOW LOSS FOAW DIELECTRIC 
RG8X96*4 shield iblach.wtiiieQfgrayi.. $14.9^100 ft 



nOBU 80*ffi shvelcl,,.«^ 

RG58U 80% shield 

F!G5BLJ95% shield.. 

RG59U 1W% Ion shield, TV type $7nOQ h. 

f^G^U 97% shifiJtl 1 1 ga. (eqLik Beidert 82 1 4) 

Rotor Cable B^con 2-18 ga, ^22 fla..„„ 



ITcfft. 

ia«^n. 

07e/fi. 
lOtffl. 

31c/ft. 



RGSU mii s|»c 96*a shJeJOf27.9S/lOOit. 3l«rtt 
RG214U ^bl silv«f isbietcJ. 50ohrn „ ,..S1.35/a 

too fl. RGBli with PL'259 on eaet)end$19J5 

BELDEN Coait in 100 f I. rolls 

RG5SU #3201...,. , S1 1.95 

RGaU#S208^^_ S2A3S 

• Grourxling stlfjip. i^ivy duty tAbui«r brifd 

3/i€in. tinned copper .__^„ .„lO«rtt 

3A in. tinned ct>ppef_««^,„_. 30e/lt 

CONNECTORS MADE IH USA 

AfUfitiena! PI £59 79« 

PL259 push-on adapter shtsll Wf%3M 

PL 259 A SO 239 10/S5.89 

Double MaJe Connector, , . St. 79 

PL 258 DoutJl^ Female Gonnectof. 38< 

1ft patchcord w'RC A Eyp€ptuds each end 3/Sl.DO 

Reduce* UG 1 75 or T76 lll/$l 99 

OG 255 (PL 25§ to BNQ S3, 50 

Eibo*(M359^ SI 79 

F5gAiTVt¥pc> 10^2,15 

UG 2 tD/U Am phenol Type M Male for RG8 S3.00 

BNcuGeec/u ma!e..._ _^,... si, 25 

V\B inch Mike PJuQ^Of ColMnsetc. Si. 25 

UQ27aBNCtoPb259 S3O0 

FREE CATALOG 
COD add SI 50— FLA R«s sdd 4% Sftte^ Ta* 



Connectors— shipping 10% add'l, 2,50 minimum 

Cabie-"Shippmg$3 00 tst too ft S2 00 ejch add I too II 
56&5 SW 80th. Stregt OepL RLO Miami, fl 33143 Call (305^ 6ei-5534 



PRESERVE 



73 




l! 




BINDERS & 
FILE CASES 

Keep yoyf issues of 73 Magazine togeihflf, nandy 
^nd protecled in hand:^ome and durable Nbrary files 
Of binders Boih styles bound in red ^eathe^ette with 
Ihe magazine 1 090 stafn{3fH3 m goid. 
Files Each file hofds 12 issues. ^itie» visible 

tof easy teference. S5 9^ eactt. 3 tor $17 00, 

§forS30 00 
binders: Each btntjet holds I? i^^ues snil opens 

ILai tof easy reading. $7 50 each. 3 fot S2l 75, 

6 (or S42 00 
(Postage paid In USA. Foretgn orders include $2,50 
per Item) 

PNfase slate years 1977 lo 1933 
Send check or money order to: 
JESSE JONES BOX CORP 
PO Box 5^20 
Philadelpnia. PA 1914 1 
Allow 4 to £ ukaohs fof deikvefy 



this publication 
is ovoiloble in 
microform 



University Microfilms tniemational 



*^412 



300 North Zeeb ftoad 
Oeot. PR 

Ann Arbor. Ml 40106 
U S A 



ie Bedford: How 

Oept PR 

London, WClfldEJ 
England 



140 73 Magazine • June, 1982 



GO MOBILE WITH YOUR H.T.I 




Mod«l I— Icom IC 2Arr. EIC 

Mod«l K^ f£K TR-2500 

— &lki«i on tonom of rsdio 

ii iii L iii'f fjr iii «!"> "ii « "' I ! ■■■ Bf M^^^^ 



ModilK— TR'24(Nh 

— pow»rod thru battery plu§ 

Mod«l N — FTSOdR 

Mtujel T— Simpit mod lor Teinpo 

NOW FOR FT'20flR & TR 2500 



iv»rl4Hi«*»ll4 l-l«FI44 l«4^^l ■ 




Mod«|¥-"FT*207R. 
—Ills tnio battsry ct>inpartfn«n1 

" A unique baiteiy eUminator * 
HANDITEK Regulator a!low$ 
constant h«nd^t>eld operation 
from auio DC or tuise sujSiply 
with no njc»d drain and 
WrtHOUT RADIO MOD I PICA 
TiOfJf S34.9S PPD in USA CA 
*dd S 1.50 Sales Taji. 

HANOITEH 




P.O. BOX aaw. la pucnte, ca si74« 



NEW YAESU CONVERTED FRO FTIOI 
FRtOI TS520 TS900. PLUG INTO EXTEFt- 
NAL VFO JACK AND GO, 5 ACTIVE DIG 
TO T0H2. REAR PANEL 10HZ DEFEAT 
SWITCH. 3^" RED LED. 1 3/8H. 4 1/2 W, 6 
1/2. 

SENDMOD.no. + US MO SI 20 EXTER- 
NAL VFO USED: ADD S5 FOR DOUBLE 
PLUG/JACK. 

ALSO WORK ON FT620B FT221 R599 
T599 HW1(31 SB102 ETC. WRITE FOR IN^ 
STALLATION INFO WITH MOD, SER. 
NO FT620B UNIT WITH KIT $125 IN- 
CLUDES ALL PARTS. fNFO. 
II DUTT & POST PAID, 6 MOS. WARR. 

FgRAND systems 20352 40 A AVE 
I LANGLEY BC CANADA V3A2Y8 
k (604)530-4551 ^'^^ ^ 



SUPER LOW PRICES! 



AZDEN PCS 3000 2^METER 1279.00 

AZDEN PCS300 2METER HT 1285.00 

SANTEC 144UF 2 METER HT 1289.00 

SANTEC 440UP HANDHELD f 3 19.00 

KENWOOD 2500 HANDHELD S299,00 
YAESl^ FT 208R 2-METER HT S 309,00 

VAESIJ FT 70flR 440 HT $329.00 

TEMPO S15 2METER HT 1249,00 

TEMPO S2 220 HT $249.00 

ALL KENWOOD & ICOM HE RIGS 12% 
OFF. 

ALL LARSEN ZMETER ANTENNAS 15% 
OFF, 

ALL YAESU & TEN-TEC HF RIGS 15% OFF 
ALL HVGAIN & HUSTLER ANT 30% off 
ALL MFJ F^RODUCTS 15% OFF LrST, 
RADIOS ANTENNAS & ACCESSORIES ARE 
m NEW. FACTORY SEALED CARTONS 
FULL MANUFACTURERS WARRANTY 
PRICES CASH & SHIPPING CREDIT CARDS 
ADD 3%, 



SHA VER RADIO, INC. 

137BS. Ba^om Ave. San Jo^, Calir 9S128 

408-998-1101 ^ ^^ 



CB TO TEN METER 
CONVERSION KITS 

KITS lor AM -SSB- FM 40 Channel PLL 
chassis conversions 
DETAILED INSTRUCTIONS for easy in* 
stailation with minimum lime and equip- 
ment 

eANO COVERAQE flexibility provides 
up to 1 MHz coverage for most PLL 
chassis. 

PRICES Low cost prices range from 
$6.00 to $50.00 

All kits are in stock jnclyding 
several different FM kits. 
FREE CATALOG Write or call today. 

^78 INDEPENDENT 
CRYSTAL SUPPLY COMPANY 

P.O. Box 183 

Sandwich, Ma. 026630193 
(617) 888-4302 




THE PROFESSIONAL, 

TOUCH TONE 



»■ • i 





An uttra high quality 
encoder for professional 
application. Absolute reliability and 
function makes the difference. There'ia 
Pipo encoder for every system and 
application. Totally serviceable, easy to 
operate and install. Cail or write for free 
catalog and information! (213) 852-1515 
or P.O. Box 343S, Hollywood, CA 90028. 



PATENTED 



* ATfiT 



<pipo^ommunications 

BfTifx^3SiS IS on Qu&itry S Refisbiisry ^ 500 



RED HOT SPECIALS! 



AZDtN PCS 1000 

2 'meter Traniwieiver 
AZDEN PSC'300 

Handheld Transceiver 
KDK 2025A MK II w TTmikc 
lANFl QSA'S l-metcr PrMmp 
HhAKl AT ZlOXLScanner 
KANTRONlLS Mini Ctidicrc*dcr Pkg 
AllMIJIThMS 12* 

TF.N-TltC Argo^v HF Transceiver 
TFN THC Delta HF Tran^tceiver 
TFN'TFC Omn\ C HF Transceiver 
NewS ASTFC 144 2 ^meter Handheld 
New ^A\ IKC 440 Handheld 
TOKYO Hv Power 2 M Amp HL.12V 
KANTRONICSF.D, II Codcreadef 

azdrn pcs 2800 1 om fm 
ringorangf:rarx2b 



$283,00 



283.00 
265.00 

36.50 
2 1 S.00 
247.00 
« offliai price 
465.00 
738.00 
1040,00 
297.00 
327.00 

75.00 
360.00 
283.00 

33.00 



Ben Franklin Electronics 



115' NMain 



HillsboroKS 67063 



316 947-2269 



1^439 



'vw% AjiAA Aulomtfic 

TR-2400 Btr«lSc«nfi#f 

> >* Kent^ooa TR-2400 &iop5 ind locks on tHfsy, O' ^\<ipi 

^no resuines wri«n cart4«r Oropa Co<nl rolled by key 

baard, ng svu)9c^e$ to ackj. In^Eal^s easily insids ng. six 

■implv connections, no modnt^oalions Does noi use 

Apacii provided for PL 

Aasem&tetf — S24 95 Kil-tl<95 

TR'9000 Mem Dry Scanner 

JQ-r Kenwood TR-9000 scans 5 miiniorv channels Stops 
on tjusy and resumes VMiien cafrier drops Uses e)(^3t^ng 
conifOlSi No swiichta to add 1^ita^ls aasjiy Inside rifl^. 
See |>roducr mvieiAr Sepi issue 7^ Msgazioe. 
Assembled— S30.95 

IC'-2B0 Bind Scanner— S2B.fl5 

M tmefy Sea nne r — 139.9^ bolh tew t S3 ,90 

* Scanners do not aHeel nofmsl rig Qp*raliQR. 

* Digital readouts display scat^nea irequency. 

'All ju^vnniBrs. are easy lo ^nslaH luein-g qomplele ami d«^ 

(liled mslallatidni tnstruCltonA 
' Ali scanners ASSEMBLED & TESTED |eKc;^t liit» 

* Saiisiaciion Guarainteedi 

Ser»d cli«c>i or rnoney OfiCief to 



qSC^^N 



261 4d W Mary Ann Rd.. Acilioct>« jL 60Q02 

inetMde S1 50 postage & ti^ndlLng 
INIna^sres, Include &*/,% «t«l& tiat 



1^27 



S-LINE OWNERS 

EfyHAAJCE YOUR INVESTMENT 



Mvith 



TUBESTERS 



TM 



Plu9'in. solid state tube ^^5placfimlents 

• S-line performance— solid state! 
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• Goodbye hard-to-find tubei 
* Unlimited equipfnent life 

TUBESTERS cost less than two tubes. 
and are guaranteed for so lomt as you own 
your Sline, 



>i\T I C^ Write or phone for 

Box 535 specs and prices. 

Talmage, CA 95481 (707) 462 6S82 



SHERWOOD 




CRYSTAL 

FILTERS 



R-4C^SHERW0OD 

STILL ■!>£ RSESr COMHNATION 

eog HZ LOWfLOSS m if CW filter. In^prove early $tag& 
s«lecTi^rity. Eliminate h If h-p itched leakBQc around 2nd4F Filiei^, 
Improv? ultjrniile' rejection to 140 dB, Flirni'nBtB itroi^ signals 
over load Jng 3nd mixer, causing iritaritKMl and j!itmnni\zat\on. 
CF 600/6: SaO.OO. New PC board rolay iirtfitch kilr S45.00. 

In *F SSB FILTERS. 140 dH uiL raj, CF 2K/fl: *1S0.00 psfr. 

ShHi Ul IF FILTER. R»duc«r^iiiiic^t«f QflW. CF 5K/Br S9Q.D0 

te4>OLE R-4C SSBf fkag^in filter. Un«xcielied tkin telcctivftv. 
180G Hi at -6 de, 2400 Hr at ^0 dB CF-2K/16: Sl3£,00. 

Z50, $00 and tOOO H* STOVL 2ntl\f PLXfGlH FILTEHSL 
CF SSO^'S.CF 500^ wdCFl. GIG'S SSOOO 

PC BoanI mod. wid iwm^nig kin SpeotAl AM Miafv'^detecfiir. 

FfH4ri ^t» tor B4 IB), ft-7, TR7, TPM, StpcM/^Qne, Aftaf. 

Add S3 tfHppinf par order: ^ ow f tfja li«. 



ShSTift/ood Engineering fnc 

126a South OgdenSU 

Denver, Colo. S02t0 

(303) 722-2257 



fiJiS" fll*^!- 




See Ust of Adverfisers of\ page 1 f4 



73 Magazine • June, 1982 141 



bILLIT ELECTB«IICS 

P.0.B0X4aiZ44E GARLAHD. TX 7»)40 2U/27B-3553 '^'^ 



DfMinisday Alarm Kit S9-9S 



i 

9 7 Watt Audio Amp Kit $6-9$ 

d SMALL. &INr.Lk HVBRID IC A.ND CyMF-QNEN t !» ^It QUAi 

4 XT'PCBOfiifiD\mClU0E€i\fiUN&Or-iVJiiJDQ Gnf^ATFOR 

4 ANY pnoject THAT I4EED& *N IM€ XPtNSltf E AJWP L^SS 

THAH f'\ THD Cpi i WAT1B COMPATIBLE WITH ^tQX 

f 5QUt4DM1T 

I 

f 
f 

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^Z I. 



!n^,ijii»![:ilj^ Jvl^^^i'L-'ih^- ^ ui 



14 c^' 



9TZ Time Zone Clock Kit 



fcsrmflil HI L inour f • 



!■■'»! 



"at 



fHrervoltage Protection Kit Sb>9S 



Fused DC iKiwur bUL"- 



! 
I 

L 



.iiiiir» 



Sound EfiSects Kit 

^h^ aiE'Ot iiQiJFHj EllicEi KITJ Ml '111 <tuv<. 

" ' " ■ 1^ fOlj - ■ ... Hill 

M-' ' -J JAd Cvnpvate' '. >na>t, 

£9^ chipa u }£ iti. 



ELECtnONlC MUSIC MAKER 



THIS UNmUC KIT GOhlAINS A 

IflCflOfl^OCfSSQA CW^*^ W(TM flO*f. 

FT HAS BEChf PROGRAMMED ¥0 PLAY 

THE FIRST a ro iO NOfJ^f OF THE 

TUht^ Li5t£a aELOW t:Oft&tituc' 

tKMf$ tmmis, MfDPKS Wftri ANY t 

oci fi OHM SPKR fJf or mri^tuof-flj 
™C KIT WILI. <?p£nArE 0** 
Qimc on uyjc niTM o^frCtwAj. 

1T7VAC» JU£ €Oil^OM£irrf 4 JhOA«D 
C nn i^ f li HH f1g^TiwiClOrnwr$l.3S 

WJ- i ^i ^ < tJP«« ■ t#l«w Ctv4«l^ ■ 441P>nci 

■ :—> »■ ' b*tAH^rt«*4 L>4 — ■, -f -i| H^i-iti 

V**nta>tiM«Hli Miiitlh'ri'ta kiii.-ni. i ... l .^•.E* Ami - 

H-*m aNt *J<¥# Tl»f a... t liH'Bri^ 

M*'^4'i|i.Mk r • !'.■ irnlr M>t> ■ -J »hl* I ui »* " T h» F rtil " ISaif 
ri»n»ifiit hinhiiiit Lu[lul|.r ■ w^-ilniiFinliiih Criim» ' 



Regulator Card 
Kit $14.95 



'.ullElinMtth hAw hD«n aCilfl V.J'OCl'lq It1l*ii uwrt 

trw tir|3oi«4(if Liira p'- igiuuI 

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batn 11 l« It Vtktt*. Un;^fni^1&(tf"t* 1 '-•^n 

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11 KID mn .If twt centDifivi orBd* i3 so 







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iniSfjBriiii 







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ciN5«ecMos * mmacHim 

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TEMP CONTftOLLEtl HOTPLATE 
5x10" TEMPERED GLASS riQ-P 
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38&0(FS) MICRO P CHIP 2.&fl 

10103SENSI 



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TJVE GATE SCR 31.Se ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ ' p 




Your Ham Tube 
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protects 

solid state 

oommuoications 

equipment 

from damage caused 

by high-voltage 
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TTiese transients usuauy are caused by 
atmospheric static dIscMrges or nearby 
lightning striken. 

Th€ n«w Model 1549 Surge Shunt can b€ 
used with both receivers and transceivers 
having up to 200 watts output. 
Convenient UHF type coaxial connections 
are supplied. Price is 924,95 

The arrester pill element has a long 
hfe. t>ut can b« easily and economicaity 
reputed If necessary. 

Crecft-Card nuyers 
mav cam mti Um 

l-aO0-&43 5612 

In Ohio, or for 
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540 Richard Stftjtt Miarnisburg. Ohio 45342 

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has A siattdard "F ' typeconrsei^lQi' fflf RF Qutout Power i* 
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Master code or upgrade m a inatter ol days 
Cod« Quick is a unique break Ihrough 
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Instead of a confusing ma^e of dits and 
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Your amazing kit containing 5 power- 
packed cassettes, visual breakthrough 
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Send check or money order today to 
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Ask im Code Quick «103. Caiilomia 
re^dents add t% saks tax. 

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Huncireds of satisfied customers! 
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m 



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YAESU FT-207R OWNERS 

AUTO SCAN MODULE AND BATTERY 
SAVER Kit 

15 minutes to in- 
stall scan restarts 
wtien earner d^ops 
otf, busy switch 
conirois auiomatic 
scan on-off; in- 
cludes module and 
inslructJons 

ModetAS-1, $25.00 

r^ FT207R BATTERY SAVER KIT 
S^ MODEL BS-I $14.95 

'No more dead tiatter^es <tue lo memory tjach- 

up 

'30*e le^s ppwer drain when squetcfwed 
'Sample to mstafi: stepby-stap instructions 

aiKl pari 5 included 

*A mA memory backup reduced to 500 lA 
'45 mA receiver d:rain reduced to 30 mA. 
^Improved audio Mdeiitv and loudness 

ENGINEERING CONSULTING 

RO. eox396e -"^^ 

ANAHEIM, CAUFORNiA 92B03 



142 73Magazine • June, 1982 




sample tssye 

only 12-50 

PPD 

OURIfTTH V^AR' 



AMATEUR TELEVISION 



MAGAZINE 



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AFV SS TV FA Jf^TTT Sal#//il«s-EME 

Puttished 12 tim^s per ymt bf Mike Stone W&9QCD 
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NEW AUTOPATCH 



Now at last, *u^ autopatch Jesiged lur Uic 
Si '^phi St ica led FM Ama leu r " 1 ' ri v a tc Pa fch ' ' 
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jihtMic within the coverage area of an)' 
si'lcxted repeater. "Private J'atch" ri.»qyirc^ 
no nxxiificalions lo vour base FM transceiver. 
Connects only lo MIC and speaker jacks. Con 
ver?ia!ion is ven* natur^ because "Frivafe 
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CW [[> sends your call- Five digi! owner pro- 
granunahle access code and operator/long 
til stance inhihtt protect your phone bill. Self 
ti>nt£iijied AC supply. No Ume ennxiers 
reijuircd, M CMOS digital logic, no aria log 
timing used. Giinjjare our standard features. 
Send for additional information. 
Available in spring. 

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Torrance. CA 90510 



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1ncli*4r* pull«v and clomp ait^mblK-i 
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AMP LETTER 



{%n^ LET Tllf) n 
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1 . An 
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shed and mailed First 

{17 t imes/yea r) * 
Vf rlE-partmeTits: 



I Editor's Corner 
J [ Lfrtters 
111 T«cf) Topics & Tips 
IV F«Btur# Article 
\f AMP- Lf ITER TRADE*r 

The A«P-LETTE» btlfeves 
• n 4$ip cin h% fufii, educ 
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Kjtiulul* «d«U H***1» 967^1? Ifli* "flC *^ 147 












^Se# irsr o' AtjYeffisers on o^ge' J w 



JSMsg^iine * June, 1982 143 



RAMSEY 
ELECTRONICS 
-'62 Inc. 



PARTS WAREHOUSE 



We now have available a bunch of goodies too 
good to bypass Items are limiled so order today 



2575 Baird Rd. 
Penfieid, NY 14526 

716-586 3950 



MINI KITS - YOU HAVE SEEN THESE BEFORE NOW 

HERE ARE OLD FAVORITE AND NEW ONES TOO, 

GREAT FOR THAT AFTERNOON HOBBY. 



FM 

MTNI 

MIKE 




A super tnqt\ pettormwncm FM w^re- 
jnt mike liiit* Trari&nnif& m $taDlfl> 
ingrial up \o 300 i^irds wtth tactp- 
horiai aucti-Qi q.!jA!tty by itii»afi$ ^f lU 
buift in f^kclrei mi^e Kit unc^Ltdvs 
caie rT>il[« Dn'offs«ntch Anrcnni 
EMlTery a rus super iftsttuc tt omt Th«$ 

fM-3 Kit 114 $S 



Color Orifsn 

See mus^c come 
aliv©^ 3 different 
itgli}^ flicker wilh 
music One light 
each for, high, 
mid -range ar^d 
lows Each Tfidk- 
widuaily adjust' 
able dnd dfives up 
ro 300 W runs on 
110 VAC 

Campiele krl. 
W.9S 



Vi«l«Q Mudulitcir Kll 

Cqnwerts 3ry TV Ira tf«dlJ& mo-nitOf Supei 
itable lunflblfl ovmt cti 4-S Run& do 5- 
T5V Bcc#pts«ld viftikomgniF Bcalumlon 

lh#marKe|i CompiHlp lit VOt iT,»5 



ted a I Ink y K II 
A great aiienhon get- 
ter ^hich alter naltly 
nasties 2 lumbo lEDs 
US€ for Ti«me badges 
buttons nwirnpniQ 
psnei lights ar^fthm^ 
Runs on 3 to t5 vOlt& 
Complefe kit BL- 1 
$2.95 




Super Sleuth 
A super sensMivfi ampi i ■ 
t(©r whhcti wtll pich up a 
pin drop at 15 fe«t' Qf<^^i 
lot monEtofing baby % 
room or as Qeneral pur- 
pose ampliilief Full 2 W 
rrr^a output runs on g lo 
15 vijtti uses S-45 otm 
spealker 
Complete fcrl BN9 

15 95 



Cf»04 

fiuns Of! 3-t2 Vd^ t wait 



oui. 1 KHZ ^DQ^ fO' CPO 
Complete kii ta 95 




Cal^ Yeur Ptione Ordef in Today 

TERMS: Satisfaction guaranteed or rAoney 
fetui^ded. CO D add S2.00 Minimum ordef 
$6 DO Orc^TS under $tO 00 add S i 50 Afkl 5* « 
lof postage msu ranee, handting Overseas 
add 15' N ¥ f&sidents add 7% laji 



CLOCK KITS 

Your old 1ivor|it«t «rc hvnt #g«lin. Over 7.QO0 S«ld Iti Dal« 
Be one oi th« gang and order yours todvy! 

Try your hand at building the finest looking clock on the 
market fis sahn finish anodized aluminum case looks great 
anywhere, while six 4" LEO digits provide a highly readable 
display This is a complete kit, no extras rueeded, and it only 
takes 1-2 hours to assemble Your choice ot case colors 
silver, gold, black ( specif yl- 

Clock kit. 12/24 houi, OC-5 S24.9S 

Clock with 10 mm 10 fimer, 12^24 hour. DC-tO $29.95 

Alarm clock, 12 hour only DC-8 |29 95 

12V DC car dock. DC- 7 $29.95 

Far wired and tested clocks add $10 00 to kit price 
SPECIFY 13 OR 24 HOUR FORMAT 




FM Wirvleit Ulika Kit 

Trarvsmds up :o300 to 

any FM bfoadcasT ra- 

d^o. UEies any type of 

mike Runs on 3 lo 9V 

has added sensitive mik* preamp 

staqe 

FM-1 kil $a,9S FM ? kit S4JS 



Type FW-2 



Wmsper LIghl Kll 

An interesting kit. small mike 
ptcks up sounds and converts 
tfriem to light The louder the 
sound Ihe brighter Ihe light 
IncTudea mfke. controfs up to 
300 W rurts on 110 VAC 
Compipit^ k'1, WL-1 
$6.95 




Tona Deco<f*r 

A complele fOr*e deco- 
der on a single PC 
board Fijatufes 400- 
^OOO Hi adjusiabie 
range via 20 itirn pot voltage regu 
lalion 567 IC Useful for touch- 
lone burst detection FSK. ptc 
r-^n fiiHO be used as a stable lone 

I .. !■■■ Rlfhs on 5 to 12 volts 
Complel*^ +.ir TD-1 S5.SS 



Car Clock 

Tfir UN-KIT. tml^r 5 toltfer Cdnnectioni 



Haf#s ■ njp« ^ooh^n^ mqigrt^ nvd" jicryrete *uto ciof h wftfCh i* a sfiap to lauiirt .ma 

inH»l't Cioct movi^Twril <» tCJ-niplciely as^^JmhlFri - yfJii Ofsl^ ic^id** 3 wJftS AfilJ ? 
1i*Mchff5 lakes «fci-OMi '5 rrnr^uPi^K'' Dispiav ib briiitil qri>i«n (Wh1*i ^M^omnliC bnghlfflta 
CDntfoi phoiocpti - aifioF^ti vuij p^ a h^ffUly r-pi^rlnhlR dmpijiy tiav Di nacfht Carrnt-s m m 
i9]m rmish an.Ddiiei^Jilu'mtnijin cN^pwHrch can hf!dll4ir:ticd^difti!ii<*nl wayiLnsimg^iidefl 
laps Chojce ot 5ii¥#^ rilicli or flolrf cbs* tspeoifyj 



DC-3 kll 12 hour formjil 
DC -3 «nr&d anrt leilHil 






Ul^ivvrifll Timtr Kll 

Ptovides The bajiic paiit an><d PC 
I'd^ FfiHquiri&d id provide i iOutce 
Oi precision riming and puise 
generalion Uses £5^ iirr«f }Q ancj 
includes a range of parts fat itkhi 
timing n^^ife 

UT*s ntt IS fts 



Mad OJaster Kii 

Produces LOUD »ar shattering and 
allentitiiT ^lir^g sirtrt Uke s^und 
Can supply up li? tS watt^ of 
obnotiQus oudto Runs on 6-1^ VDC 



Siien Kii 
Produces upward antl downward 
wait characterii&tic of a poMce 
siren S W peafc audio output tvn^ 
on 3-15 voUs. ifses 3-46 atim 
ip^ftker 
Complete kff SM-:; S2.95 



Calendar Alarm Clock 
Thectdck thats 9dI tt aI» &- 5' LED&. 
12 ?4 hour snoof? 5* rKjur alarm 4 
ytar calertdar batn^ry backup and 
lols more The sup^r 700 t chip fs 
use*} Si^P 5t4tj.rtct>« COfnpl«te 
ii<{ ief£ case (not avail ftb^i 
CH: =^ t34W 



Undar Oath Car Clock 

I ? 7^ hfh.iF ( loch rfi $ ^wflulfFuf* ipiastic oft» leaPiiPfn 
J A^t l'4<(liiiD' dN«Dk|«i [Manki ■■IPr ■^mlwxi i^-rf 

j^ r. ,.*.,-.. r-mtf* samiji 



MB-1 Kff 



S4iS 



tf » 



*T< 



PARTS PARADE 



Vtdcq T*nfHfial 
tii brcBnw a ru^nfM^f ••Pii«n#i nmk* f ii«id'n-.«»ft m'^q** ^V ^ 
~c^ti and ^mf 0n «^ ■ •■ "■j.**ii«*," 









• Pit 

113 ts 
fUM 



IC SPECIALS 



LINEAR 



30t 
5«& 



«» 



5iT 

Tai 



9iU 



I 3S 
11 «) 

ttoo 

It 00 

tioo 

St 2'3i 
t » 



4511 

441 a 

M39 



CMOS 



50 
ST. 85 

50 
$9.00 
$2.00 
S1 35 
St 75 



READOUTS 



TRANSISTORS 
;»^vi *f i»^iai 

.-',**^ ,. :^'F is^n 

?NM«» PUP C«^F YM1 n 

iiM«ii*rTc>r vfi n 

;«4c?i c-F «''Si m 



TTL 



/44/ 

7475 
Ml 96 



$ .40 

I 50 
$1 35 



SPECIAJ. 



new 

7207 A 
T?l60 

no7C 

S3 14 

&375AB 
7001 



$15.00 
$ 1.25 
$17 50 
$ 5 K: 
$21 00 
$1250 
$ 295 
S 295 
$ 6.50 



FERRITE BEADS 

With li^lrj atifl ^pn-t IS/11 00 
fl. hiQlti Bjlun fiiads. VH OQ 



Sockets 

a Pm 10/$ 2.00 

t4 Pin 10/*?00 

16 Pin 10/$a.00 

24 Pin 4; $2.00 

2e Pin 4/ $2.00 

40 pin 3/ $2.00 



Oiodci 

5 1 V lener 20/S1.IXI 

ifsr9T4 Type 5Q/f1,00 

IKV 2Amp S/$1.00 

100V lAmp 15/11.00 



#Oii» 1» M^ 4t3m 


MtJS 


f^OMi T^ PMP «IW 


%fiM 


M#t to? TNSAftI 


SJt 


Nm IHH T}«|H T'R 


ii^tSH 


P«P ms »«» T^a 


la^tu* 


ntsosa 


• w 


7tw»4«UJt 


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■ta 



25 AMP 

10QV Bridge 

$1.50 eftcti 

Mini-Bndge 50V 
1 AMP 

2 for $1.00 



Rfrtislor At» 1 

AasoflTiient oT PopulaT waluGSi - . 
Will C u J lea d f r PC m ou nt I ng '-'" 
H:eMr^:?r \*r teacrs b&g of 300 or 
mora 

S1.50 



Swilchei 

Mini toflgie SPDT |1 ,00 

Rfifl Pushbuirons N O 3^11.00 



Cafphonei 
WCffliilirs. a _- ' i "ic" 

5 for $t.DO 



fcp* Jot *Kj.^» fTtoig etc 
3 'm tztn 



CryilAlm 

3 579545 MHZ 11,50 

10 00D00 MH^ SS-ftO 

5 248800 MH^ IS OD 



AC Adbpl«« 

Gooit io* ctocNi nir.wrt 

» S irdc (fi^ 20 mA Si QO 

' ^ ^ '? »OmA 11 M 



O^rtput «n 1-19' vi^ «^ tQ-30 «*^*r Tit 
-afPifit!* $194 



$hig Tuned Coils 

SinaN 3'16 He> Shigs ium««f con 
3iums 10 lot $1,00 



AC Outtel 

f''»ne4 Mcjj"! *fi«^ LvAds 

411 00 



CAPACtTOnS 

TJkHtAituii 

t.5 uF ?5V 3/$1 00 
1,6 uF 25V 3/S1 00 
,22uF25V3/Sl.0Q 



4LUVIHUI4 

EkKitoivr< 

I'OOO' Iff ir-v i!i«.,„i ifiB 

MO .ji ; I ^ 

1^ ijf lit, ;,.„ i.-tl 00 
tOuF tiVnM'ilia-ltOfl 



Dl&K cf a*Mic 
01 teviHn »it 00 

1 1«V IS It 00 

aei lev » It 00 

iCCoF 20 It 00 



PC 'DC CDnv«n»r 

1 5 i»dc irtpul prod -9 ifldc Lit' 30rna 
>ayncpi'eaMti;s-l5vrfCfB)35rnfl 11,29 



IW 30 Turn Trim Pot % M 



Geramir: fF Filters 

Mini ceramic titters 7 kHif 

B,W 455kHE Jt 5{>ea. 



IE 



Triimnar Cape 

SpragufT • 3 40 pf 
Stable PolvpfQpyi#na 



Audio 
Preioaler 

Make high resoluiicn audio 

measurments, great for inusicril 
msrrument tuning. PL tones, eic 
Wuitiphes aud^o UP ^n frequency, 
salectable kIO or xlO€. gives 01 
HZ resaFution Mrirh 1 sdc gate 
ttme' High ^ensiin^ifv of 35 mv 1 
rrveg input i arpd buittirF liltenng 
gives great performance Huns 
on 9V iMtlery Ml CMOS 
FS-2 ktl $29.95 

PS-2 ¥irtre<i $3a,95 




600 MHI 1 J 

PBESCALER W 

Extend ihe range of your 
counter to 600 MHz Works 
with all counters Less than 
150 mv sensilivily specify - 
10 or -100 



Wrred. tested, 
Kll. PS- IB 



PS-IB $5995 
$44.95 



30 Watt 2 mtr PWR AMP 

Simple Class C power amp features 8 times power garn 1 W m 
tore out. 2 Win for i5out.4Winfor30out Maxouipuiof35W 
ir>credible value, compleie with all parts tess case and T-R relay 
PA-1 30 W pwr amp ktt $22.95 

TR-1 RF sensed T^R feiay kit 6.9S 



MRF-23fl iran^isior as iiiad m PA-i 
6 lOdb ggiin 15Q mh; $11.95 



RF actuated relay senses RF 
(1W) and closes DPDT relay 

For RF sensed T-R relay 
TR-1 Kit $6.95 



Power Supply KM 

Cotnpitie Uipia legulaied power 
syppiy providii$ v^anablB Bto TBvgll^ at 
;?Ot)rnHnPid *&aM Arnp £»c«HenTroad 
reguJahon, good fitte^'ing and smalt 
Biz e Lefti traniif ormefs requires 63v 
i« 1 A and Z4 VCT 
Ccimnlam kit PS-3LT $6.95 



Cryifal Micraphofit 
Sm.iii t • diameter '#" thurk 



Coax Connector 

Chassi'S mouni 

BN€ typ« $1.00 



Mini FIG-1T4 Coax 
10 fL tor $1.00 



t Van ftsttwT cnpf 
HKm cluai'i'r riips^ s lor ii 00 

S nubfrvr GfO^iTsets TO iof 11 QO 



cm iff impo tiaaiQ MflfSQO^i 



Corin#clDni 

":jmcQ«ucm lo* 



L*dii yoyr c^ho4ce. ptecse tpKify 

Mirv R^^ Jumpo Hed l^^glt Intenady Red Ulummator Reo $/$! 

Mtni y pi low Jumbo Velio* Jumbo Gre^n t/11 



V>r*ci9t« 
MolQfGia MV 2200 30 FF Nominal cap ^ to Pf 

.IDaaefret 3/ti.0O 



Tunable rangf» 



OP -AMP SpffciiM 
BI'FET Lf 1 374 \ Difect pm l€>r pm 74 1 compatible bul 500.000 MEG 
input s: sup«r low S0 pa input currefil row pow«r d'atn 

50torim»r tt.OO 10 for S2.00 



7&MG 
71MG 
733 

309K 

7aos 



$13S 
|j50 

$1 IS 
SI 00 



R«gviafoti 



71 1? 

7«15 

7905 

79fa 

rets 



11-00 
SI 00 
$125 
$125 
f 1 2S 



ShfirrlN Tubhni^ Nuba 

HtCt pipe at ppe-^ CJ^ i?-ir.5-.i iij* 1 ■ ► 

^tmk %Q 9" Qttimt tern tpiic** Mktl.fM 



Wfii TO'tt Heal Sink» 

Tt>mnmn»f Brand S lor 1 1 W 

TQ-77Xt Nnt Smfes 3 tor i1 tt) 



Opto Isoiatofs - 4K2B type 

Optq Reflectors * Ptiolo diode * LEO 



lif\ 



$.50 ea. 

Sl.oe ea. 



Molt^ PIni 
fof 14 pm sQcfceta JO atrlpa fw fl^.QO 



cm Ph0lo^*lf< 

Rfriii&UMe^ itMf^ti wiih iifjni ?SjO uhms io 
Qvet 3 mfQ 3 rof II.OO 



144 73Magazine • JyneJ982 



OlAl 



YOUP 



TRADE IN 

TRADE YOUR EQUIPMENT ON 

NEW or USED 



CALL TOLL 
-800- 

FOR THE BEST DEAL ON: 



3636 



YAESU 



ICOM 



KENWOOD 



TEtt-TEC 



INF&TECH 



COLUNS 



^>HA/VlRAQia££NL 

8340^3 Olive BJvd.» P O. Box 28271 • St. Louis. MO 63132 



MastefCard 



TSMagazine • June, 1982 145 



4 



V-^ elect roqic^ 



Introducing 



<602) 242-3037 
(602)242-8916 

2111 W. CAMELBACK ROAD 
PHOENIX, ARIZONA 85015 



TVRO CIRCUIT BOARDS 

Satellite Receiver Boards — Now in Stocic 



DUAL CONVERSION BOARD $25.00 

This board provides conversion from the 3.7-4.2 band first to 
900 MHz where gain and bandpass fiHering are provided and, 
second, to 70 MHz, The board contains both local oscillators, 
one fixed and the other variable, and the second mixer. Con- 
struction is greatly simplified by the use of Hybrid IC amplifiers 
for the gain stages. 



SIX 47pF CHIP CAPACITORS 
For use with dual conversion board 



$aoo 



70 MHz IF BOARD . $25.00 

This crrcuit provides about 43dB gain with 30 ohm Input and 
output impedance, U is designed to drive the HOWARD/ 
COLEMAN TVRO Demodulator. The on-board bandpass filter 
can be tuned for bandwidths between 20 and 36 MHz with a 
passband ripple of less than V^ dB. Hybrid IC's are used for 
the gam stages. 



SEVEN .01 pF CHIP CAPACITORS 
For use with the 70 MHz tF board . . 



....... %f *uy 



DEMODULATOR BOARD. . . $40.00 

This circuit takes the 70 MHz center frequency satellite TV sig- 
nals in the 10 to 200 millivolt rar^ge, detects them using a phase 
locked loop, de-emphasizes and filters the resutl and ampli- 
fies the result to produce standard NTSC video. Other outputs 
Include the audio subcarrier, a DC voltage proportional to the 
strength of the 70 MHz signal, and AFC voltage centered at 
about 2 volts DC, 

SINGLE AUDIO $15,00 

This circuit recovers the audio signals from the 6.S MHz fre- 
quency. The Miller 9051 coils are tuned to pass the 6.8 MHz 
subcarrier and the Miller 9052 coil tunes for recovery of 
the audio. 

DUAL AUDIO $25.00 

Duplicate of the single audio but also covers the 6.2 range. 

DC CONTROL ,•,..., $15.00 

SPECIAL SET OF FIVE BOARDS $100.00 

INCLUDING DUAL AUDIO (2 single audio boards) 



1900 to 2500 MHz MICROWAVE DOWNCONVERTER 

MICROWAVE RECEIVER This receiver is tunable over a range of 1900 to 2500 MHz approximately, and 
is intended for amateur use. The local oscillator is voltage controlled, malting the I.F. range approximate- 
ly 54 to 88 MHz for standard TV set channels 2 thru 7. 

P.O. BOARD with DATA 1to5 $15.00 6to11 $13.00 12to26 $11.00 27-up $9.00 

P.O. Board with all parts for assembly $49.99 P.O. Board with all chip caps soldered on . . . $30.00 

P.C. Board with all parts for assembly P.O. Board assembled & tested $69.99 

plus 2N6603 $69.99 P.C. Board assembled & tested with 2N6603S79.99 

HMR 11 DOWNCONVERTER with Power Supply, Antenna (Dish) & all Cables for installation. 180 Day Warranty, 

1to5 $160.00 6 to 11 $140.00 12- up $125.00 

YAGI DOWNCONVERTER with Power Supply, Antenna (Yagi) & all Cables for installation. 90 Day Wan-anty. 

1to5 $150.00 6to11 $140.00 12-up $125.00 

YAGI DOWNCONVERTER as above but Kit. (NO CABLES) With Box. 

1to5 $125.00 6to11 $115.00 12-up $100.00 

HMR II DOWNCONVERTER as above but Kit. (NO CABLES) With PVC. 

1to5 $125.00 6to11 $115.00 12-up $100.00 



p*««< 



SPECIAL NEW STOCK OF CARBIDE DRILL BITS— YOUR CHOICE $1.99 



1.25mm 

1.45mm 

3.2mm 

3.3mm 

1/8 
3/16 
5/32 
7/32 



13/64 

19 

20 

24 

26 

29 

30 

31 



36 
37 

38 
39 
40 
44 
45 
46 



47 

48 
49 
50 
51 
52 
53 
54 



55 
56 
57 
58 
59 
60 
61 
62 



63 
64 

65 

67 
68 
69 



146 73 Magazine • June, 1962 



Start taking calls in curious places with tiie 
revolutionary, new Cordless G>ik){H/ ^ Phone 



Special Purchase — The 




® 



-h/ 



Cordless Telephone! 



We are pleased to announce the Escort Mark III is now avaOable 
at special pricing* We bought the manufacturer's entire Inventory*- 

and we are passing the savings on to you! 

The Escort Mark III was originally designed to retail for $199.95* Now, we 

suggest a retail price of $169.95 to $189.95. Or, you can move them 

out at $149.95, In any event, you HI like the profit margins. 



QUANTITY 

1 — 2 units 

3 — 5 units 

6 — 11 units 

12 — ^23 units 



DEALER PRICE 

69.75 each 
64.50 each 
62.50 each 
60.75 each 



GROSS PROFIT A T $149. 95 

53% 
57% 
58% 
59% 



On all orders of 12 or more, we pay the freight! This Is your opportunity 
to stock up for the Christmas buying season. These are ideal gift 

items ^ that will really move out! 



ESCORT MARK III SPEC I PICA TIONS 



VHF DUPLEXERS 

This duplexef was made for RF Harris Mobile 
Phones and Two Way Radios. These duplex- 
©rs can be used m any mobile phone or two 
way radio systenn, along with having the ca- 
pabiHtles to be modified for UHF use The 
physical dimensions are 3 3/5" Long, 4 2/5" 
Wide, and 1 1/lC Deep. The approximate 
weightis18o2./1 lb.2oz.. PRICE $74.99 







/-^* 



# 



*0 



• Operates as a regular telephone on touch-tone or 
rotary dial sy stems 

• Flange up to 300 feet 

• Ni-Cad rechargeable batteries Included 
in telephone 

• Charger built into base transmftier 

• Simple plug-in installation! 

• High-performance antenna 

• Full duplex, answer and dial out 

• Full FCC approval 

Exactly As Shown 







HOW WE CUT THE CORD. 

The new Cordless Phone 
works on a simple, 
highly sophisticated principle. 
A small base station plugs into 
your regular phone jack, and 
an electrical wall outlet. The 
base station then transmits 
any in* or out-going call to the 
handheld receiver, anywhere 
up to 300 feet. 



Toll Fra« Number 
800-528^)180 
(For orders only) 




JM^lIz electroqics 



73 Magazine • June. 1982 147 



^'FILTERS' 



Collins Mechanical Filter #526-9724-010 Model F455Z32F 

455KHZ at 3.2KHZ Wide. 



$15.00 



Atlas Crystal Filters 

5.52-2.7/8 5.52MH2/2.7KH2 wide 8 pole 

5.595MHz/2.7KHz wide 8 pole upper sideband 
5. 595MHz/. BOOKHz wide 4 pole CW 
5.595I'1Hz/2.7KHz wide 8 pole lower sideband 
5.595MHz/2.7KHz wide 8 pole upper sideband 
5. 645MHz/ 2. 7 KHz wide 8 pole 
9.0MH2/ 8 pole sideband and CW 



5.595-2.7/8/U 

5.595-.500/4/CW 

5.595-2.7/LSB 

5.595-2.7/USB 

5.645-2.7/8 

9.0SB/CW 



Your Choice 

S12.99 



Kokusai Electric Co. Mechanical Filter #MF-455-ZL-21H 

455KHZ at Center Frequency of 453. 5Kc Carrier Frequency of 455Kc 2.36Kc Bandwidth 



$15.00 



Crystal F- 


i 1 ters 


Nikko 


FX-07800C 


TEW 


FEC- 103-2 


Tyco/CD 


001019880 


Motorola 


4884863B01 


PTI 


5350C 


PTI 


5426C 


CD 


A10300 



7 . 8MH2 
10.6935 

10.7MHz 2 pole 15KH2 Bw. Motorola #48D84396K01 

Thru #48D84396K05 

11.7MH2 2 pole IBKHz Bandwidth 

12MHz 2 pole 15KHz Bandwidth 

21.4MHz 2 pole 15KHz Bandwidth 

45MHz 2 pole 15KHz Bandwidth {For Motorola 

Communications equipment) 



10.00 

10.00 

4.00 
5.00 
5.00 
5.00 

5.00 



Ceramic Filters 



Muratd 


BFB455B 


455KHZ 






CFM455E 


455KHZ +- 


5.5KHZ 




CFM455D 


455KHZ +- 


7 KHz 


. 


CFR455E 


455KHZ +- 


5.5KHZ 




CFU455E 


455KHZ +- 


1.5KHZ 




CFU455G 


455KHZ +- 


IKHz 




CFW455D 


455KHZ +- 


IKHZ 




CFW455H 


455KHZ +- 


3KHz 




SFB455D 


455KHZ 






SFE10.7 


10.7MHz 






SF610.7MA 


10.7MHz 




Clevite 


TO-OIA 


455KHZ 






T0-02A 


455KH2 




Nippon 


LF-B4/CFU455I 


455KHZ +- 


IKHz 




LF-B6/CFU455H 


455KH2 +- 


1KH2 




LF-C18 


455KHZ 




Tokin 


CF455A/BFU455K 


455KHZ +- 


2KHz 


Matsushira 


EFC-L455K 


455KHZ 




ROTRON MUFFIN FANS Model Mark 4/MU2A1 





$ 2.40 
6.65 
6. 65 
8.00 
2.90 
2.90 
2.90 
4.35 
2.40 
2.67 

10.00 
5.00 
5.00 
5.80 
5.80 

10.00 
4.80 
7.00 



These fans are new factory boxed llSvac at i4watts 50/60cps 
CFM is 88 at 50cps and 105 at 60cps. 



Impedance Protected-F 



$7.99 



SPECTRA PHYSICS INC. Model 088 HeNe Laser Tubes. 

Beam Dia. .75nifn. Beam Dir 
lOOOvdc +-10Qvdc 3.7iiia. 



Power output 1.6inw. 
68K ohm Iwatt ballast 



2.7mr. 8Kv starting voltage 
TUBES ARE NEW $59.99 



i 



148 73 Magazine • June, 1962 



ii 



AMPLIFIERS" 




AVANTEK LOW NOISE AMPLIFIERS 



Models 


UTC2-102M 


AP-2Q-T 


AL-45-0-1 


AK-IOOOM 


Frequency Range 


30 to 200MC 


200 to 400MC 


450 to 800MC 


500 to lOOOMC 


Noise Figure 


l,5dB 


6.5dB 


7dB 


2.5dB 


Voltage 


+15vdc 


+24vdc 


-6vdc @ +:2vdc 


+I2vdc 9 -12vdc 


Gain 


29dB 


30dB 


30dB 


25dB 


Power Output 


IdB Gain +7dBm 


IdB Gain +20dBm 


IdB Gain -5dBm 


IdB Gain +8dBm 


Price 


$49.99 


$49.99 


$49.99 


$69.99 



I 



Mini Circuits Double Balanced Mixers 



Model RAY- 3 

Very High Level (+23dBm LO) 70KHz to 200MHz L0,RF,DC to 200MHz IF 

Conversion Loss,dB One Octave From Band Edge 6Typ./7.5Max. Total Range 6. 5Typ./8Max. 

Isolation ,dB Lower Band Edge To One Decade Higher (LO-RF/LO-IF) 55Typ./45Min, M1d, Range 

(LO-RF/LO-IF) 40Typ./30Min. Upper Band Edge To One Octave Lower (LO-RF/LO-IF) 30Typ./ 

25Min. 

Price $24.99 

Model TSM-3 

Standard Level (+7dBm LO) .IMHz to 400MHz LO,RF,DC to 400MHz IF 

Conversion Loss.dB One Octave From Band Edge 5.3Typ./7.5Hax. Total Range 6.5Typ./8.5Max. 

Isolation.dB Lower Band Edge To One Decade Higher (LO-RF/LO-IF) 60Typ./50Min. Mid. Range 

(LO-RF/LO-IF) 50Typ./35Min. Upper Band Edge To One Octave Lower (LO-RF/LO-IF) 35TYP./ 

25Min. 

Price $11.99 



Hewlett Packard L 


inear Power Microwave RF Transistor HXTR5401/35831E 




Collector Base Brakedown Voltage at 


Ic=100ua 


35volts min. 




Collector Emitter 


Brakedown Voltage 


at Ic=500ua 


30volts min. 




Collector Cutoff 


Current at Vcb=15v 




lOOua max. 




Forward Current Transfer Ratio at Vce=15v»Ic=15ma 


15min,40typ,125max 




Transducer Power 


Gain at Vce=18v,Ice 


=50ma,F=2GHz. 


3dBmin,4dBtyp 




Maximum Available 


Gain at Vce=18v,Ic 


=60ma,F=lGHz/F=2GHz 


14dB typ,8dB typ 




Price 


$29.99 








Motorola RF Power 


Ampl ifier Modules 








Model 


MHW612A 


MHW613A 


MHW710 


MHW720 


Frequency Range 


146 to 147MHz 


150 to 174MHz 


400 to 512MHz 


400 to 470MHz 


Voltage 


12.5vdc 


12.5vdc 


12.5vdc 


12.5vdc 


Output Power 


ZOwatts 


30watts 


13watts 


20watts 


Minimum Gain 


20dB 


20dB 


19.4dB 


21dB 


Harmonics 


-30dB 


-30dB 


40dB 


40dB 


RF Input Power 


400mw 


SOOmw 


250mw 


250niw 


Price 


$57 . 50 


$59.80 


$57 . 50 


$69.00 






Toll Free Number 

800-528-0180 
(For orders only) 



(f\f ^i^ elect roi|ics 



73 Magazine * June, 1962 149 






"TRANSISTORS" 



WATKINS JOHNSON WJ-M62 3.7 to 4.2GHz Comniunication Band Double Balanced Mixer 



$100.00 



SSB Conversion Loss 4.9dB Typ. 6dB Max. fR 3.7 to 4.2GHz 

5,5dB Typ. 6.5dB Max. fl DC to 1125MHz fL fR 

fl SSOMHz fL fR 
fR 3.7 to 4.2GH2 
4.9dB Typ. 6dB Max. fl 30 to 1125MHz fL fR 
5.5dB Typ. 6.5dB Max. fl 880MHz fL fR 



SSB Noise Fiqure 



Isolation 

fL at R 
fL at I 



30dB Min. 40dB Typ. 
25dB Min. 30dB Typ. 
20dB Min. 30dB Typ. 
15dB Min. 25dB Typ. 
IdB Max. 



fL 2.8 to 5.35GH2 
fL 4.5 to 5.35GHz 
fL 3.6 to 4.5GHz 
fL 2.8 to 3.6GH2 
fR Level +2dBm 



Conversion Compression 

Flatness .2dB Peak to Peak Over any 40MHz Segment of fR=3.7 to 4.2GH2 

Third Order Input Intercept +lldBm fRl=4GHz fR2=4.01GHz Both at -5d8m fL=4.5GHz 



Group Time Delay 

VSSJR 



.5ns Typ 

L-Port 

R-Port 

I -Port 



75ns Max. fR3.7 to 4.2GHz fL 3480MH2 



@ +13dBm 



.25:1 Typ. 2.0: 

.25:1 Typ. 2.0: 

.4 :1 Typ. 2.0: 

.5 :1 Typ. 2.0: 

.3 :1 Typ. 2.0: 

.8 :1 Typ. 2.5: 



fL 2.8 to 5.35GHz 

fR 3.7 to 4.2GH2 fL fR 

fR 3.7 to 4.2GHz fL fR 

fI=100MHz 

fl=500MHz 

fI=1125MHz 



SGS/ATES RF Transis 


tors 












Motorola RF Trans 


is tor 


Type. 


BFQ85 






BFW92 






MRF901 


2N6603 


Collector Base V 


20v 






25v 






26v 


25v 


Collector Emitter V 


15v 






15v 






15v 


15v 


Emitter Base V 


3v 






2.5v 






3v 


3v 


Collector Current 


40nia 






25ma 






30ma 


30ma 


Power Dissipation 


200mw 






190IT1W 






375niw 


400mw 


HFE 


40min. 


200max. 


20mi n . 


ISOmax. 


30inin. 200max, 


30min. 200max. 


FT 


4GHZ min. 


. 5GHz 


max.l.6GHz 


Typ. 




4.5GHz typ. 


2GHz min. 


Noise Fiqure 


IGHz 3dB 


Max. 


500MHz 


4dB 


Typ. 


IGHz 2dB Typ. 


2GHz 2.9dB Typ 


Price 


SI. 50 






$1.50 






$2.00 


$10,00 


.'National Semiconductor Var 


iable Vo' 


Itage Regulator 


Sale 


1 1 1 1 j 1 j M 





LM317K 

1.2 to 37vdc 

l.SAtnps 

TO- 3 

$4.50 



LM350K 

1.2 to 33vdc 

3Anips 

TO- 3 

$5.75 



LM723G/L 
2 to 37vdc 
150ma. 

TO-lOO/TO-116 
$1.00 $1.25 



LM7 805/06/08/ 12/15/18/24 

5, 6, 8,12,15,18,24vdc 
lAmp 

T0-220/T0-3 
$1.17 $2.00 



P & B Solid State Relays Type ECT1DB72 



May Be Other Brand Equivalent 

Toll Free Number 
800-528-01 80 
(For orders only) 



5VDC Turn On 120VAC Contact 7Aiiips 

ZOAmps on 10"xl0"x.062" Alum.Heatsink with 
Silicon Grease $5.00 



(f|\I*^l|z elect roi|ieg 



150 73 Magazine • June, 1962 



ti 



MIXERS" 



WATKINS JOHNSON WJ-M6 Double Balanced Mixer 



LO and RF 0.2 to 300MH2 

Conversion Loss (S5B) 

Noise Figure (SSB) 
Conversion Compression 



IF DC to 300MHz 
6.5dB Max, 1 to 50MHz 
8.5dB Max. .2 to 300MHz 
same as above 

S.5dB Max. 50 to 300MHz 
.3dB Typ. 



$21.00 

WITH DATA SHEET 



NEC (NIPPON ELECTRIC CO. LTD. NE57835/2$C2150 Microwave Transistor 



NF Min F=2GHz 
F=3GHz 
F=4GHz 



dB 2.4 Typ. 
dB 3.4 Typ. 
dB 4.3 Typ. 



MAG F=2GHz 
F=3GHz 
F=4GHz 



dB 12 Typ. 
dB 9 Typ. 
dB 6.5 Typ 



$5.30 



Ft Gain Bandwidth Product at Vce=8v, Ic=10ma. GHz 4 Min. 5 Typ. 
Vcbo 25v Vceo Uv Vebo 3v Ic 50ma. Pt. 250mw 



UNELCO RF Power and Linear Amplifier Capacitors 



These are the famous capacitors used by all the RF Power and Linear Amplifier manufacutures 
and described in the Motorola RF Data Book. 



lOpf 
13pf 
I4pf 
20pf 



22pf 

25pf 
27pf 
27.5pf 



30pf 
32pf 
33pf 
34pf 



40pf 
43pf 
52pf 
SOpf 



lOOpf 
I20pf 
IBOpf 
200pf 



250pf 1 to lOpcs. .60i£ each 

820pf 11 to 50pcs. .50^ each 

51 to lODpcs. AQi each 



NIPPON ELECTRIC COMPANY TUNNEL DIODES 

Peak Pt. Current ma, Ip 

Valley Pt. Current ma. Iv 

Peak Pt. Voltage mv. Vp 

Projected Peak Pt. Voltage mv. Vpp Vf=Ip 

Series Res. Ohms rS 

Terminal Cap. pf. Ct 

Valley Pt. Voltage mv. VV 



MODEL IS 21 99 

ftftin. lOTyp, Umax. 

1.2Typ. l.Bmax. 

95Typ. IZOmax. 

480min. 550Typ. 630max. 

2.5Typ. 4max, 

1.7Typ. 2max. 

370Typ. 



1S2200 ^^'^° 

9min. lOTyp. Umax, 

1.2Typ. 1.5max. 

75Typ. 90max. 

440min. 520Typ. 600max. 

2Typ. 3max. 

5Typ. 8max. 

350Typ. 



FAIRCHILD / DUMONT Oscinpscope Probes Model 4290B 

Input Impedance 10 meg.. Input Capacity 6.5 to 12pf., Division Ration (Volts/Div Factor) 

10:1, Cable Length 4Ft. , Frequency Range Over lOOMHz. 

These Probes will work on all Tektronix, Hewlett Packard, and other Oscilloscopes. 

PRICE $45.00 



MOTOROLA RF DATA BOOK 



List all Motorola RF Transistors / RF Power Amplifiers, Varactor Diodes and much much 
more. 



PRICE $7.50 



Toll Free Number 
800-528-01 80 

(For orders only) 



Q^^t[x electroi|ics 



73 Magazine • June, 1982 151 






4 



"SOCKETS / 


EI MAC TUBE SOCKETS AND CHIMNEYS 


SKI 10 Socket 




$ POR 


SK4a5 Chimney 




35.00 


SK416 Chimney 




22.00 


SK500 Socket 




330.00 


SK506 Chimney 




47 . 00 


SK600 Socket 




39.50 


SK602 Socket 




56.00 


$K606 Chimney 




8.80 


SK607 Socket 




43.00 


SK610 Socket 




44.00 


SK620 Socket 




45.00 


SK620A Socket 




50.50 


JOHNSON TUBE SOCKETS 






124-115-2/SK620A Socl 


tet 


$ 30.00 


124-115/SK630A Socket 


40.00 


CHIP CAPACITORS 






.8pf 


lOpf 


^ 


Ipf 


12pf 




l.Ipf 


15pf 




1.4pf 


18pf 




l.Spf 


20pf 




1.8pf 


22pf 




2.2pf • 


24pf 




2.7pf 


27pf 




3.3pf 


33pf 




3.6pf 


39pf 




3.9pf 


47pf 





SK626 


Chimney 


$ 7.70 


SK630 


Socket 


45.00 


SK6366 


Chimney 


26.40 


SK640 


Socket 


27 . 50 


SK646 


Chimney 


55.00 


SK711A 


Socket 


192.50 


SK740 


Socket 


66.00 


SK770 


Socket 


66.00 


SK800A 


Socket 


150.00 


SK806 


Chimney 


30.80 


$K900 


Socket 


253.00 


SK906 


Chimney 


44.00 



124-113 Bypass Cap. 
122-0275-001 Socket 



$ 10.00 



4.7pf 
5.6pf 
6.8pf 
8.2pf 

PRICES: 



I to 10 - 

II to 50 
51 to 100 





{For 4-250A,4- 


400A,3-400Z, 




10.00 




3-500Z) 






2/S15.00 


pf 
pf 
pf 

pf 
pf 

pf 
pf 


lOOpf* 
UOpf 

120pf 
UOpf 
150pf 
ISOpf 
ISOpf 


430pf 
470pf 
510pf 
560pf 
620pf 
580pf 

a20pf 






pf 


200pf 


lOOOpf/.OOluf* 




pf 


220pf* 


ISOOpf/.OOlSuf 




pf 


240pf 


27O0pf/.0O27uf 




pf 


270pf 


lO.OOOpf/. 


Oluf 




pf 


300pf 


I2,000pf/. 


.0l2ijf 




pf 


330pf 


15,000pf/. 


.015uf 




pf 


360pf 


18,000pf/, 


.018uf 




pf 


390pf 








t 101 to 1000 


.60C * IS A SPECIAL 


PRICE: 10 for $7.! 


50 


t 1001 & UP 


.354 


100 ■ 


For S65.00 


t 


^ ^m ^H- ^m ^m ^m ^m -ri^ ^m ^m ^m ^m .^h ^m ^h ^h- ^h ^h .^h .-^^ ^h. j^b 4 


1000 


for $350.00 



WATKINS JOHNSON WJ-V907: Voltage Controlled Microwave Oscillator 



$110.00 



Frequency range 3.6 to 4.2GHz, Power ouput, Min. lOdBm typical, 8dBm Guaranteed. 
Spurious output suppression Harmonic (nfo), min. 20dB typical, In-Band Non-Harmonic, min. 
60dB typical. Residual FM, pk to pk. Max. 5KHz* pushing factor. Max. 8KHz/V, Pulling figure 
(1.5:1 VSWR), Max. 60MHz, Tuning voltage range +1 to +15volts. Tuning current. Max. -0.1mA, 
modulation sensitivity range. Max. 120 to 30KHz/V, Input capacitance, Max. lOOpf, Oscillator 
Bias +15 +-0.05 volts 55mA, Max. 



Toll Free Number 
600-528-0180 
(For orders only) 



J\f ^^1^ electronics 



1S2 73 Magazine * June. 1982 



"TUBES" 



TUBES 

2E26 
2K28 
3B28 

3-500Z 

3-1000Z/8164 

3CX1000A/8283 

3X2 500 A3 

4-65A/8165 

4-125A/4D21 

4-250A/5D22 

4-400A/8438 

4-400C/6775 

4-1000A/8166 

4CS250R 

4X150A/7034 

4X1 500/ 7035 

4X1 50G 

4X250B 

4CX250B/7203 

4CX250F/7204 

4CX250FG/8621 

4CX250K/8245 

4CX250R/7580W 

4CX300A 

4CX350A/8321 

4CX350FJ/89a4 

4X500A 

4CX600J 

4CX1000A/8168 

4CX1500B/8660 

4CX3000A/8169 

4CX5000A/8170 

4CX10000D/8171 

4CX15000A/8281 

4E27/A/5-123A/B 

4PR60A 

4PR60B/8252 

KT88 

DX362 

DX415 

572B/T160L 

811 

SUA 

812A 

813 

4624 
4665 
555 lA 
5563A 

5675 



PRICE 

$ 4,69 
100.00 

5.00 

102.00 

300.00 

200.00 

200.00 

45.00 

58.00 

68.00 

71.00 

80.00 

300.00 

69.00 

30.00 

40.00 

50.00 

30.00 

45.00 

45.00 

55.00 

100.00 

69.00 

99.00 

100.00 

100.00 

100.00 

300.00 

300.00 

300.00 

300.00 

400.00 

500.00 

700.00 

40.00 

100.00 

175.00 

15.00 

35.00 

35.00 

44.00 

10.00 

13.00 

15.00 

38.00 

100.00 

350.00 

100.00 

77.00 

15.00 



TUBES 

5721 

5768 

5836 

5837 

5861/EC55 

587 6 A 

5881/6L6 

5894/A 

5894B 

6080 

6083/AX9909 

6098/ 6A KB 

6115/A 

6146 

6146A 

6146B/8298A 

6146W 

6159 

6161 

6291 

6293 

6360 

6524 

6550 

6562/6794A 

6693 

6816 

6832 

6883/8032A/8552 

6884 

6897 

6900 

6907 

6939 

7094 

7117 

7211 

7289/3CX100A5 

7360 

7377 

7486 

7650 

7843 

7868 

7984 

8072 

8121 

8122 

8236 

8295/PL172 



PRICE 

$200.00 

85,00 

100.00 

100.00 

110.00 

15.00 

5.00 
45.00 
55.00 
10.00 
89.00 
14.00 
100.00 

6.00 

6.50 

7.50 
14.00 
11.00 
70.00 
125.00 
20.00 

4.00 
53.00 

7.00 

25.00 

110.00 

58.00 

22.00 

7.00 
46.00 
110.00 
35.00 
55.00 
15.00 
75.00 
17.00 
60.00 
34.00 
11.00 
67.00 
75.00 
250-00 
58.00 

4.00 
12.00 
55-00 
50.00 
85.00 
30.00 
300.00 



TUBES 

8462 

8 50 5 A 

8533W 

8560A 

8560AS 

8608 

8624 

8637 

8647 

8737/5894B 

8807 



8874 

8875 

8877 

8908 

8916 

8930/X651Z 

8950 



6BK4C 

6DQ5 

6FW5 

6GE5 

6GJ5 

6HS5 

6JB5/6HE5 

6JB6A 

6JM6 

6JN6 

6JS6B 

6JT6A 

6KD6 

6K66/EL505 

6KM6 

6KN6 

6LF6 

6LQ6 

6LU8 

6LX6 

6ME6 

12JB6A 



PRICE 

Sioo.oo 

73.50 
92.00 
55.00 
57.00 
34.00 
67.20 
38.00 
00 
10 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 



123 

55 
1000 
260 
260 
260 
533 

12 



1500,00 
45.00 
10-00 

5.00 

4.00 
5.00 
5.00 
5.00 
5.00 
5.00 
5.00 
5.00 
5.00 
5.00 

5.00 
5.00 
5.50 
5.00 
5.00 
6,00 
6.00 
5.00 
5.00 
5.00 
6.00 



"WE ARE ALSO LOOKING FOR 
TUBES NEW/USED ECT." 

WE BUY SELL OR TRADE 



NOTICE ALL PRICES ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE ! J !!!!!!!!!!!! 1 !!!!! H !! H I !! M i ! I ! ! 



Toll Free Number 
800-528^180 
(For orders only) 



i^^l\z elect rof|ic$ 



73 Magazine • June, 1982 1S3 



TEKTRONIX OSCILLOSCOPES 

MODEL 4&3 Poriibl* 50 MHi 

Dual Trace, 

MODEL 4S3A Portlblt 60 MHz 

Dual Trace. 

MODEL 454 Portible ISO MHz 
Dual Trace. 

MODEL 4&4A Portftbit 1 SO MHz 

Dual Trace. 

MODEL 4S5 Portable SO MHz 

Dual Trace, 

MODEL 475 Portable 200 MHz 
Dual Trace. 

MODEL 475A Portable 250 MHz 
Dual Trace, 

MODEL 7514 Storage OecUlQscope 
with a 7A1SA and a 7A15AN-1 1 AmpUftm 
aniJ a 7B50 Time Base 

MODEL 577D1 Storage Curve Tracer 
With a 177 adapter 

MODEL 57TD2 Curve Tracer 
with a 177adaptef. 
Teklronu Lab Cart Model 3 



PAIGE 
S1200.00 

S1 400.00 

iiaoo.oo 

S2000.0Q 
$1800.00 
12640.00 
t2940.00 

S3500 0O 

S3233 00 

S2796 00 
% 3t6.00 



MODEL 547 50 MHi iencti Scope. 

Wdha 1A1 Dual Trace. 

With a 1A2 Dual Trace, 

With 3 1A4 Quad Trace. 

With a 1A5 Differential 

Wilha1A6Qifferentiai 

or with 1 of each above 

MODEL 545 10 MHz Bench Scope 
with a CA Dual Trace 

MODEL 545A 30 MHz Bench Scope 
with a CA Dual Trace 



S 

s 
s 
$ 
s 



722.50 
637.50 
a72.50 
722.50 
612.50 



S1667S0 



S 412 50 



£ 437 50 



MODEL 544 50 MHz Bench Scope 
withaCA Qua (Trace 

MODEL 543A 33 MHz Berich Scope 

With a GA Dual Trace 

HEWLETT PACKARD OSCILLOSCOPES 

MODEL 1d0A Main Frente^ 

MODEL laOE Main Frame. 

MODEL 1B1A Mem Frame. 

MODEL ie2AMBin Freme. 

MODEL 163A Main Frame. 

MODEL iaO SERIES PLUG-INS 
l60lADualTrace50MHz. 

t803ADfffereniial, 

1B04A Quad Trace 50 MHz 

ie07A Dual Trace 50 MHz 

iai5A TDR/Sampler wrth a iei6A DC 1o 4 
GHz 

1821 A Time ease & DeJay Generator 

1622A Time Base & Deiay Ge»^efator 

1831 A Direct Access 6O0 MHi. " 

1B40A Time Bases Delay Generator ' 

iB4lATimeBase&DeiayGener3tOf ' 
•For 183A Only 'n'"»" 

TELEQUIPMENT MODEL 0S3 Oscilloscope 

Dual Trace Portable 50 MHz Wrtha V4 and S2APlug In 

DUMONT MODEL 1062 Oscilloscope 

Dual Trace 65 fWlHz portable. 

TEKTRONIX 

MODEL RMS65 Dual Beam Oscilloscope 

!0 MHz wUh a 3A6 Dual Trace and a 3A72 Dtiai Trace $1107.50 

MODEL 549 Storage Oscilloscope 

Bench 50 MHz wim a CA Ouai Trace Si 000.00 

MODEL &47A Oscilloscope 

Bench 100 MHz wtth a 10A2 Duai T'ace 

and a 1 1 B2A Time Base Si 200.00 



S 650.50 

% 475.50 
PRICE 
I 675.00 
I 7S0.00 

t1 000.00 
I 900.00 
11000.00 

5 495.00 
S 775.QO 
S 795.00 
S 375.00 

SI 500.00 
S 495.00 
S 525.00 
i 200.00 
S 450.00 
S 675.00 



S1 200,00 



S 750.00 



ORDERING INSTRUCTIONS 
DEFECTIVE MATERIAL: All claims for defective material must be made within sixty (60) days after recetpt of 
parcel All claims must include the defective material (for testing purposes), our invoice number, and the dale 
of purchase. All returns must be packed properly or it will void all warranties. 

DELIVERY; Orders are normally shipped within 48 hours after receipt of customer's order. If a part has to be 
backordered the customer is notified. Our normal shipping method is via First Class Mail or UPS depending on 
size and weight of the package. On test equipment it is by Air only, FOB shipping point. 

FOREIGN ORDERS: All foreign orders must be prepaid with cashier's check or money order made out in U.S. 
Funds, We are sorry but C.O.D. is not available to foreign countries and Letters of Credit are not an acceptable 
form of payment either. Further infoTmation is available on request. 

HOURS: Monday thru Saturday: 8:30 a,m, to 5:00 p>m. 

INSURANCE Please include 25e for each additional S1 00.00 over $100.00, United Parcel only. 

ORDER FORMS: New order forms are included with each order for your convenience. Additional forms are 
available on request. 

POSTAGE: Minimum shipping and handling in the US, Canada, and Ivlexico is $2.50 all other countries is $5.00. 
On foreign orders include 20% shipping and handling, 

PREPAID ORDERS: Order must be accompanied by a check. 

PRICES: Prices are subject to change without notice. 

RESTOCK CHARGE; If parts are returned to MHZ Electronics due to customer error, customer will be held 
responsible for all extra fees, will be charged a 15% restocking fee, with the remainder in credit only. All returns 
must have approval. 

SALES TAX: Arizona must add 5% sales tax. unless a signed Arizona resale tax card is currently on file with 
MHZ Electronics. All orders placed by persons outside of Arizona, but delivered to persons in Arizona are sub- 
ject to the 5% sales tax. 

SHORTAGE OR DAMAGE: All claims for shortages or damages must be made within 5 days after receipt of 
parcel Claims must include our invoice number and the date of purchase. Customers which do not notify us 
within this time period will be held responsible for the entire order as we will consider the order complete. 

OUR 800 NUMBER IS STRICTLY FOR ORDERS ONLY 
NO INFORMATION WILL BE GIVEN. 1-800-5 28-0 180, 



154 73 Magazine * June, 1982 



FAJRCHILD 

95 H 90 DC 

95H91DC 

11C90DC 

11C91DC 

11C060C 

11C05DC 

11C01FC 
82S90 



11C24DC 



11C44DC 



VHFANDUHFpRESCALER CHIPS 
350MC Prescaler divide by 10/1 1 
350 MC Prescaler divide by &/6 
650MC Prfiscaler divide by TO/1 X 
650MC Pf^scaler drvide by 5/6 
UHF Prescalef 750MC DType Flip Flop 
1GH2 Counter Divide by 4 
(Rei^ular pnce $75.00) 
High Speed Dual 5/4 Jnpyl MO/NOR Gate 
Pre^ettable High Speed Decade/Binary 
Counter used with the nC90/9l or the 
95H90/91 Prescater can divide by 100. 
(Signeiics) 

This chip is the same as a Motorola 
MC4024/4324 Dual TTL Voltage Control 
Multivibrator. 

This Chip IS the same as a Motorola 
MC4044/4344 Phast Frequency Detectof . 



PRICE 

S 9.50 

8.50 

15.50 
15.50 
12.30 

50.00 
15.40 



HEWLETT PACKARD 
MIXERS MODELS 

Frequency Range 

Input/Output FreQuency L & R 



Mixer Conversion Loss (A) 

(8) 

Noise Perfurmance (SSB} (A} 

(B) 
PRICE 



10514A 

2MHz lo 500MC 

200KHZ to 

500MC 

DC to 500MC 

?dB 

9dB 

7dB 

9dB 

$49.99 PRJCE 



10514B 

2MHzto 

500MC 

200KNZ to 

500MC 

DCto&OOMC 

7dB 

ddB 

7dB 

9dB 

$39.99 



5.00 

3.37 
3.37 



GENERAL ELECTRIC CO. GUNN DIODE MODEL ¥-2167 
f req. Gap (GHZ) 12 10 lB. Output (Minj lOOmW, Duty (%| 
CW. Typ. Bias (VdC) 6,0. Type Oper (MAdc) 550. Max ThreS. 
(mAdc) ItXlO. Max- 8«as<Vdcj lO.O S39.99 

VARIAN GALLIUM ARSENIDE GUNN DIODES MODEL VSX 9201S5 

Freq Coverage 6 to 12 4GH2, Output (Mm j lOOmW, Bias 

Voltage (Max.) 14vdc. Bias current (mAdc) Operatmg 550 Typ. 

750 Max , Threshold 850 Tup 1000 Max. S39.99 

VARI L Co. Inc. MODEL SS-43 AM MODULATOft 

Fre<| Range 60 10 150MC. Insertion Loss l3dB NominaL 

Signaf Porl Imp SOohms Nominal. Sigrfal Port RF Power 

+ lOdSm Max., Modulation Port 8W DC to 1KH2, Modulation 

Port Bias ima Nominal. $24,99 



AVANTEK CASCADA6LE 

MODULAR AMPLIFIERS 

Frequency Range 

Gain 

Noise Figure 

Power Output 



Gain Flatness 
Input Power Vdc 
mA 



PRICE 



Model UTQ-504 


UTO'511 


5 10 600 MHz 


5 to 5D0 MHz 


6dB 




iSdS 


lldB 




2.3dB to 3dB 


+ 17dB 




-2dB to 
-3da 


IdB 




1dB 


+ 24 




+ 15 


100 




10 


$70 00 


PRICE 


$75.00 



FREQUENCY SOURCES. tNC MODEL MS-74X 

MICROWAVE SIGNAL SOURCE 

MS-74X: Mechanically Tunable Frequency Range (MHz) 10630 to 

11230 (10,63 to 11 23GHZJ Minimurn Output Power (mW) 10. Overall 

MuUipiier Ratio 100, Internal Crystal Osctliator Frequency Range 

(MHz) 08.4 to 104,0. Maximum Input Current (mA) 400. 

The Signal source are designed for applications where high stability 
and low noise are of prime concern these sources utilize fundamen- 
tal transistor oscillators with high Q coaxial cavities, followed by 
broadbancJ stable step recovery diode multiptiers. This design 
allows Single screw mechanical adjustment of frequency over stan- 
dard communications bands. Broadband sampling circuits are used 
to phase lock the oscillalOf' to a htgh stability reference which may 
be either an internal self contained crystal oscillator, external 
primary standard or yHf synthesizer. This untque technique aJiows 
tor opttmtzation o' DOIh FM noise and long term stabflity List Price 
IS $1 158-00 (THESE ARE NEW> Our Price— $289. 



HEWLETT PACKARD 1NS712 MICROWAVE DIODE 
This diode wpII replace the MBOiOT, 1N5711, 5082-2300. 
5082*2835 ecL This will work like a champ in all those 
Down Con verier projects. $1.50 or 10/$ 10,00 

MOTOROLA MHW1172R LOW DISTORTION 
WIDEBAND AMPLIFIER MODULE 

Frequency Range: 40 to 300 MHz.. Power G3^^ at 50MHz 
I6.6min to I7 4max., Gain Flatness ±0,1 Typ. ±0.2 
Max, dB,, DC Supply Voltage - 28vdc, RF Voltage Input 
+ 70dBmV PRICE $29.99 

GENERAL ELECTRIC AA NICADS 
Model #41B905H011G1 

Pack of 6 for $5,00 or 60 Cells. tO Packs for $45.00 
These may be broken down to individual ceJIs. 



ORDERING INSTRUCTIONS 

TERMS: DOMESTIC: Prepaid, C.O.D. or Credit Card 

FOREIGN: Prepaid only, U,S. Funds— money order or cashier's check only. 

C,0,D*; Acceptable by telephone or mail. Payment from customer will be by cash, money order or cashier's 
check. We are sorry but we cannot accept personal checks for C.O.D.'s, 

CONFIRMING ORDERS: We would prefer that confirming orders not be sent after a telephone order has been 
placed. If company policy necessitates a confirming order, please mark ''CONFIRMING" bofdly on the order. 
If problems or duplicate shipments occur due to an order which is not properly marked, customers will be 
held responsible for any charges incurred, plus a 15% restock charge on returned parts, 

CREDIT CARDS: WE ACCEPT MASTERCARD VISA AND AMERICAN EXPRESS. 

DATA SHEETS: When we have data sheets in stock on devices we do supply them with the order. 



gM^ 



mister ctiarge 




ViSA 





elect roqicjii 



w*a 



(602) 242-3037 
(602) 242691 6 

2111 W. CAMELBACK ROAD 
PHOENIX, ARIZONA 85015 

Toll Free Number 

800-528-0160 
(For orders only) 



I 

J 



*^Se# U$t ot AifvefrrsefS Ot^ ^9^ f M 



73 Magazine • June, 1982 155 



ELECTRONICS 



FULL LINE ALL PARTS & COMPUTER PRODUCTS 



4^60 



P.O. Box 443QM 
Santa Clara. CA 95054 

Will calli; 2322 Walsh Ave. 

(408)980-1640 

Sarw day shipment Rrst line parts only. Factory tested. Guaranteed 
mmev back, Qual<ty IC's and other components at factory prices. 

JNTIGRATED CIRCUITS P^^one orders only (800) 538-8190 



74DDN iy 

74D2N I ft 

74fld|(if J? 

74ng« 1? 

741014; 1i 

7A2m w 

7iim IB 

7442K ^^ 

7MES .&9 

7*1 ?« m 

J4r^N 3S 

J495N as 

Tll^DN 1.011 

J4H-N 3?) 

7413^ SS 

7-t1-l5ff. EP 

HMOU 1,21) 

?41HM 1.?5 

7J157H -.M 

74igeH :Tt] 

74tlSSII K 

7ii?4Jt .m 

?^17S« la 

74tBa« 79 

r4^9Sh rD 

7J1Z21W 125 

/4?%N .69 

7i13&5fJ .E5 

^'laEAN .EJ 

Td|3S7ly .ffi 

74LSMT1L 

?ilkM5*( ..a 

74L£!33f ■15 

74eJt4M M 

rit.s2t» .25. 

74LSMW .S 

74LS3*N .35 

74LSS5N .S* 

■ ■i.iir.^hi .sfl 

7i1L39SN ,3a 

T^LSsQi'N 40 

7^L5MSN 45 

74Li)im .4i 

74L5lS2hl 75 

?4L&]3flN .-^ 

74L?ii1N .7i 

74ilii55N 7* 

7J4S3.5TN 75 

7^LS162N 95 

3-44.5.163^ gs 

7^L&1MN 95 

74i.5i9aN i.ag 

74iS-£?lH 11? 

LfiEAfI 

CJ^rig l.lli 

bkmz iM 

l'.t3fi^ 3.4I> 

LM3KtH .S7 

Lusnufv .34 

LW3IJ8HI .9?! 

lMJUK'N .1)4 



i.Msm 


I.Sa 


CD4fl1T 


\M 


LH3E?^ 


3,75 


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94 


IM3Se 


1.4.<J 


r41flD?9 


4S 


LM3Hl«r5 


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CO4020 


gs 


LVI32CK-J? 


m 


:d4ki 


,Sft 


LH350)HS 


1.S5 


DD4dS2 


*10 


IJ*5^'& 


^ 


cP4iKa 


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LM32DT'B 


,S5 


CD10E4 


73 


tMS^OT-tJ 


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gD4K5 


23 


LMaaflT-f& 


,85 


CD4aa 


1.65 


I.WK3K'5 


*.fl5 


CD4ez7 


£5 


iMSJiN 


M 


CW02ft 


,90 


IM '►, 


09 


Cd4Q2g 


a& 


LM.-:- 


1 a 


CD403(t 


.A% 


LWl'UDK-Ei 


r:i5 


CD«33% 


f& 


LM94D»t 1i 


i.as 


CD404P 


S5 


LW3fl(!»!-15 


1 » 


£ft«a4t 


,75 


LUMIIM^C 


1 3« 


aw43 


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LW,mi5-5 


,?5 


CM)44 


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lU34CiT-fl 


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+s 


L»:]i 401-1:1 


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oivjugo 


55 


UMMOT-rS 


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LU340T'34 


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C[j4|no 


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35 


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1 00 


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36 


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GD407I 


M 


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imy.in 


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3Q 


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34 


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*5 


I.U,'4rN 


!]£ 


CD40T& 


3Q 


LW;ri)7H,-N 


n 


CCMOflE 


3;) 


LM74BK 


50 


ccwofl? 


^ 


LW1J03W 


i.ft 


CEH116 


,47 


LM13E4 


M(5 


C34430 


i.hi) 


I.Hi:iiVfj 


: tt 


CD^SGiT 


gg 


LMIM/ 


I so 


i-^iBDe 


Uh 


i.Minirj 


2 .■:. 


L^DflbiO 


35 


LMl43ti 


*.?■ 


CD4Sn 


54 


LMlfJ? 


&.?i 


I^P45i& 


Jjtt 


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J. 49 


CDdSIC 


no 


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1 ?b 


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la 


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i.GiJ 


LHQSOilM 


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GD4£27 


1.S1 


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ELECTROKIC SYSTEMS KITS 

Apple Perlphflral KIti 

SERIAL i,''0 INTERFACE Q to 30.000 baud, 
D.T.R, . Inpil & oiilpul from manitCfr or basse, or 
vse Apple as intefHgent terminal, Bd only (P-"N 2) 
114.85. Kit {9iH 2k) 5&1.25, Assembled (R'N 
2C} S62.95, 

PROTOTYPING BOARD (P.i-N 79Q7) $21.95. 
PARALLEL TRIAC OUTPUT BOARD 8 tfiacs. 
each can switch 110V 6A loads. Bd only (P/N 
210) $19.20, Kit (P/N 210A) 1119.55, 
OPTO-ISOLATED INPUT BOARD S mputs, can 
be driven Trom TTL Jogic, Bd only ■(P.'N 120) 
S1S J5. Kit (P/M 120A) S69.95. 

Inlerlice Kits 

SERtALPARALLEL INTERFACE Bidirectional, 
Baud rates from 110 to 13.aK, sw selectable 
polar ety of Input and output strcb?, 5 to S data 
bits, 1 or 2 stop tJtts, parity odd orsVen or nori&, 
ail characters contaJo a start bit, i-5 4 -12V 
required Btf only {9iH 101) S11.95, Kit (P^N 
10m)S42.a9. 

RS^232/TTL INTERFACE Bldirectiorial. re- 
quires x12V, Kit {P/N 232A) |9J5. 
RS-232/20mA INTERFACE Bidirectional, 2 
passive opt o- Isolated circuits. Kit (P/N 7901 A) 
$14.9S. 

PROM Eraser 

Win erase 25 PfiO^s in IS mi notes, Ultraviolet, 
assembi&d, 25 PROM capacity 137.50 (wilti 
timer 169.50). 6 PROM capacity OSHA/UL ver- 
sion STB. 50 (Willi timer (108.5{)) 

NiCad Battery Fixer/Charger Kit 

Operts shorted cells that wgnT tiald a charp and 
then charges ttiem up, a]j in one kit w/full parts 
and irtstructicns. No PC tfOard. S8.95 



ZBO Microcomputer 

16 bit VO, 2 UWi clock. 2K RAM, ROM Breads 
hoard space. Escellnnt fof oontnol. Bar& Board 
S28.&a. Full Kit S99.0Q. Monitor $20. IKl. Power 
Supply Kit $35.0Q. Tiny Basic 530,00. 

Modem Kit $60 JO 

State ol the art, orig., answer. No tuning neces- 
sary. 103 compatible 300 baud, inexpensive 
acoustic coupler pEans included. Bd. only 
^17,00, Articte in June Ra^iiQ Eiectrooics, 

60 Hz Crystal Time Base Kit $4.40 

Converts tiigftal ciocks from AC line frequency to 
crystal lime base. Outslandins accuracy. 

Video Modulator Kit $9.95 

Convert TV set into a high quallly moriEtor w/o 
■ atfectmg usage, Com p. kit w.-'ti>ll instruc. 

Multf-voft Computer Power Supply 

6v 5 amp, ±lBv .b amp. 5v I 5 arT>p, -bv 
.5 amp, 12v .5 amp, - 12v option ±5v, ±l2v 
ar« regulated. Basic Kit $35.96. Kit with chassis 
and all hardware $5195. Add $5.00 shipping. Kit 
of hand ware $IG.0D. Woodgrain case SI 0^00. 
£T.50 shipping. 

Type-N-Talk by Vatrax 

Text to speech syntiiesizerwith unflmited vocabu- 
lary, buift-in text ta speech aiganilim, 70 to 100 
bits per second speech syrtheslzer, RS232C 
interface $359 00, Speectr I C $79.95. 

1002 iaK Dytiamic RAM Kit $149.00 

Ej<pandable to &4K„ Hidden itfriisli w/ciock?:. irp to 
4 MFte w/no wait slates. Addk 16K RAM $25. DO. 
S-tBP 4'Slal expansion S 9.95 

Super Mon itor Vf . I Souice l\^\m $ 1 5. 00 



." ^^M' 



RCA Cosmac1802 

Super Elf Computer $106.95 ' 

The Sup«i" Eft is a small single board computer that 
does many big things. It's an excellent computer 
for iraining and lor learning prooraniming with its 
machine language sf\6 yet it V easily eipanded 
with addltignal memQry, Full Bask, ASCII 
Keytwartt^, video character generation, etc, 

ROM monitor; State and Mode displays; Single 
step; OptionaJ address displays; Power Supply; 
Audio Amplifier and Speaker; Rjlly socketed for all 
tC'a; Full documentation. 

The Super Elt ificiodes a ROM monitor for pro- 
gram ioading editing and execuhon with SiNGLi 
STEP kr proyram debugging which is not in- 
cluded in others at the same price. With SINGLE 
STEP you can see ttie microprocessor dhip opei- 
ating w^Eh Ehe unique Quest address and data bus 
disp-lays before, during and after executing in- 
structions Atso, CPU mode and instructaon cycle 
ari^ decoded and displayed on 6 LED indicators. 

An RCA 1B61 vid-eoi graphics chip allows you to 
connect to your own TV with an inexpensive vtieo 
modulator to do grdpiii£5 and gairi«s. Ttiere is a 
speaker system included for writing your own 
music or uatng many music programs already 
written. Ttie speaker amplifier may also be used to 
drtve relays for corrtnoi purposes, 

A 24 key HEX keyboard in{]ludfi5 1 & HEX keys plus 
load, resat. run, wait, input, memory protect, 
mnnitnr sefect snd sirvgle st^p. Large, on board 

dtspfays provide output and options! high and low 
aiidress. Tliere is a 44 pin standard connector slot 



Quest Super Basic V5.0 

A new enhanced version of Super Basic now 
av^ailable. Ouesi wasihti lirsicoiitpany worldwide 
to ship a full size Basic for 1802 Systems;, A 
complete tunclion Super Basic by Ron Cenker 
including floating point capability with scientitic 
nolation (number range i 17E^), 32 bit integei 
.i2 t)iyion: muiti din> arrays, string arrays, string 
nianipulation; cassette l/D; save and load, basic, 
data and machine language programs; and over 
75 statements, tunctionsand operations 
New improved tasTer v-Hr^inin including re- 
number and essentially unlinrtited variables. 
Also, an exdusive user expandablE? con^mand 
library 

Senal and Parallel I'O roulines mcluded 
Sup«r Ba:|ic on Gazette 155. DO. 



for PC cards and a 50 pin connector slot for tJie 
Quest Super Expansion Board, Power supply and 
sodkats for all iC's are indud^ piua a d<&tailed 
127 pg. instruction manual which now includes 
over 40 pgs. of software info, iincluding a series of 
lessons to help get you started and a music pro- 
gram and graphics target pme. Many schools 
and universities ar^ using the Super Elf as a 
course oE study. OEM's use It for trnrning and 
R&D. 

Remember, other computers only offer Sup'er Bt 
features at additional cose or not at all Dompare 
befDre YOU buy. Super Ell Kit £106.95. High 
address optiun $B.95, Low address oplion 
$195. Custom Cabinet wilh dnilcd and labeJEed 
plexiglass front panef S24.95. All metal Expansion 
Cabinet, paintied and $ilk screened, with room for 
5S-100 haarffs and power supply S57.0D. NiCad 
Batleiv Memory Sawr Kit $6.95. Atl kits and 
options also compteteiy assembl&d and lested. 

Questdata a software publication for ^BQ2 com- 
puter users is available by subscription for $12,00 
per 12 issues. Single issues $i,50. issues 1-12 
bound S16.50. 

Moews Video Graphics S3-&CI, Games and Music 
S3, 00, Chip B inierpTder S5.50. Starship 4K cas- 
sette $14.96- Exciiting aM challenging space 
game. Comptete manual included 

Free 14 page brochure 

pf compiete Super Elt systein. 



Super Expansion Board with Cassette Interface $89.95 

"Hiis is truly an astounding value! This board has gram bugs quk^iy, ttien follow with single step. If 

been designed to allow you to decide how you you have the Super Expansion Board and Supei' 

want it optioned The Siipcr Expansion Board Monilorlhe monitor is upand running at th€ push 

comes Witt) 4K d1 low power RAM fuJiy atidrr^- of a button. 



able anywhere in 54K with butlt-in memory pro- 
tect and a cassette JTd:er1ace Provisions have 
been made for ali other options on the same board 
and it fits neatly into the hardwood cabinet 
alongside the Super Ell Tire board includes siots 
for up to 6K ot EPROM (2708. 2753. 2716 or Tl 
2716) and is tully sucketed, EPROM can be used 
for ttie monitor and Tiny Basic or other purtKises. 



Other on boarfT options include Paraltel tnpul and 
Output Ports wiih lull handshake. They allow easy 
connection of an ASCII keyboard to the input port. 
RS 232 and 20 ma Currenl ijoop for tetetype or 
other device are on board and if you need more 
memorv there are two S-IDfl slots for stE!tic RAM 
or video boards. Also a IK Super Monitor version 
2 with video driver for full capahiiity display with 



A IK Super ROM Montfor $19.95 is available as an Tiny Basic and a video interlace board Parallel 
on hoard option in 2709 EPROM whicti has tieen I/O Pnrts $9.85, RS 232 $4.50, TTif 20 ma l/F 
preprogrammed with a program loader./editor and $1 J5, S-1 00 S4,50, A 50 pin connector set with 



error checking muiii file cassette read /write 
software^ (relocatable cassette file) another exclu- 
sive from Q(wst It Includes register save and 
rea.dout, block move capability and video graphks 
driver with blinking cursor Break points can be 
used with the register save feature to isolate pro- 



ribbon cable is available at 5 IB, 95 for easy con- 
nection between the Super Ell and the Super 
Expansion Boanj. 

Fdwer Supply Kit for the complete system (see 
Mufti- volt Power Supply betow). 



Rocki/VQll AIM 65 Computer 

6tj02 based single t>oafd witn tuMycu keyboard 
and 20 column thermal pnnter. 20 char alphanu- 
menc display ROM inonitor;. tuHy expandable 
$419.00. 4K version $449.00. 4K As^^embler 
S35.IKI. flK Basic Interpreter SBS.Ofl, 

Speciat smaii power supply 5V 2A 24y 5A 
assem. m frame S59,{l0. Mnlled plastic 
eiidosure to fit both AIM 65 and power supply 
$52.50. AiM 65 1K in cabmi't with power supply, 
switch, fuse, cord asseri^, I55S.0D. 4K $579.00. 
AE5 40-5000 AIM 6540 w,16K HAM and monllor 
51295.00. RAM Board Kn (T6K, $195) E3^K, 
$21 5 > VD640 Video Interface Kit $119.00. ,A&T 
$149.00. Cnrnpiete AIM 6S in thin briefcase witti 
power supply S51B.0O. Special Pgcltage Prsce 4K 
AIM. 8K Basic, power siipply. cabinet $529.00 

AIM- 66'KiM,'SYM.''Sxi-per Elf 44 pin expansion 
board, board with 3 connectors $22.95. 



Elf II Adapter Kit $24.95 

Plugs into Elf li providing Super Elf 44 and 50 pin 
plus S-1 00 bus expansion. (With Super ^- 
pansion). High and fow address displays, state 
and mode LED 5 optional $18.00. 



Super Color S-100 Video Kit $129.95 

Expandable to 255 x 192 high resolution color 
graphics. 6^47 with all display modes computer 
controlled, Memory mapped. IK RAM expand- 
able to BK. S'100 bus 1802. 8080. BOBS. ZaO, 
etc. Deaters: Send for excellent pricing/ margin 
program. 



TERMS: $5.00 mill, order U.S. Funds. Caltt. residents add 6% tax. prices 

$10.00 min. VISA anil MasterCard accepted. SI.QQ insurance optional. subjeci 
Shipping: Add 5%; orders under $25.00—10%. to change 



FREE: Send for your copy of our NEW 1982 
QUEST CATALOG. Include O60 stamp. 



156 73 Magazine * June, 1982 



ramsa^j the first name in Counters ! 



9 DIGITS 600 MHz $129 




SPf-CIFlCATlONS: 



WIRED 



r t OD K Ik. 4)1 d«T ftK^ V *«> 

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The CT 90 is^ ihe cnu^t virrsaUle. feature packed counter av Ail able lor less 
Uiui S^^OQ.OO' Ad VB Eli: ed design ttat\iTc*i include, three bidcctfible gule timea. 
rune digits, gaif mdicvior and ■ unicjuc display hold function which hmld^ She 
dii^pltyed count o/ter Lhe tnpui ^ig^i^ is reiiiovetf AJs<a a I OcnHi. TC XO lime 
lnu&e u used vb-h]£h efiAble» ruv ncmbCAt calibcittun ctteclis «|;Amsi WWV. 
PptXML^IEy. BO uitf mat mead lutsery pacKeiiefruil time ba^inpui wid hiiot^ 
pQW0 lugh ftfcbility cry^taf oven lun* hu« wi availabJe The CT-W. 
pnfofmuvce >'ou can ctiuai ok^ 



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1 HH5 MHz rimfcl 
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100 H/ (500 MHz rmnfej 
7 diiiu 4" LED 
10 pfwn TCXO 2040=0 
12 VAC «t 230 ma 



T1*e CT-70 breplts ih« pnce barrier on lab quality frequency counteri. 
Deluiie features such as; three frequency r^ngea eafb wiih pn^amplin^atioiii 
dual telectabk ^le lunca^ and file activity indication make mea^urcmcniA i 
■nap. The wide frequency range enables yoa to accurately measure sitnalt 
from audio thru UHF with I pptn aci^acy that'* 000 1 %f The CT 70 it 
ilie aiiiiwer to aU your measumnent necdi, tn the fields lab cn* liam shack. 



PRICES: 

CT-70 wi red 1 ye ai warranty S99. 95 

CT-70 KiU 90 day parts ww 

ranty g4.95 

AC-1 AC idapter 3.95 

BP i Nieadpact + AC 

adapiet • c har^r 1 135 




7 DIGITS 500 MHz $7955 



MINMOO A^ired. i yctr 

wamnty $79,95 

AC-Z Ac adapter forMINl- 

100 1.95 

B^'Z Nicad pack and AC 

KlapCcir cltai^r 1 Z 95 



Herc'i i handy, gene rat purpose ccninter that provides moil counter 
juncupns ai an uDbelievabJe price The MtNJ 100 doesn't have the full 
frequency range or input impedance qualities found in higMr price uniik but 
for basic lUF signiJ measurements n can't be beat! Accumte measurements 
can be rnadie frxvn I MHz ail the way upta500 MHz witheiceJIeni^fUifiviiy 
thrDufjMiuf the range, and the two ^te tirrkci lei you select the reioltilKHi 
desired Aijkl the oicadpadkcifsikMi and the MIN^ 1 00 makes an kleal addition 
to your loot box lor "iivthe^fieiif' fnequerocy checks sjkj reptirv 



WIRED 



SPECIFICATIONS: 



Range: 

Sensilivity* 

ftctolution: 

Display: 
TtEne tujc: 



1 MH2 Io50a MHz 
Less Ihan25 MV 
LOO HnUkiw gjitej 
LO KKk fast gale) 
7 digsti. 4 LED 
ZO ppn 20-40 C 
5 VDC m 200 mi 



8 DIGITS 600 MHz $1591^ 



WIRED 



SPEClFlCATrONS; 

Ranite: 2^ H^ to 600 MHz 

Senjiiivity: Lett than 25 mv tct 130 MHz 

Less than 150 mv to60U MH£ 
PLtsohiiMOit to Htf&O MHz r»a§fi) 

10.0 Hi (600 MHz ranftJ 
Display! 8 digits 4" LED 

Tune baie 20 ppoi 20-40' C 
PcF*ei:: J 10 VAC ot 1 2 VDC 



TheCT-50 isa vers-itile Eab bench counter that witi meaiure upto^OO MHz 
With S digit precision. And, one of its beat feat tires is the Receive Frequency 
Adapter, which turns the CT-50 *nlo a digital readout for any reeefver- The 
adapier is easily ptopmnu^sd for any receiver and a umpki^iitnectian to tbe 
necerver" 1 VFO it all that is required fof use. Adding the receiver ad^rter m no 
way Uisirts the opefatton of the CT'50. the adapter can be conveniently 
twtLcbed onm dit The CT-JO^ ■ counter that can v/^tk (foubto- chityf 



Vttt. 



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PttiCES: 

CT 50 wired, i yew wazranfy 

CT 50 Kit. 90 day p*fU 

warranty 

RA I . neceiipfcr adapter Itit 

RA-I MnnedaiMtprv-prugjaiiv 

roe4 ( send €!opy ol receiver 

fclwnimlK:} 



S 159 95 

U9-95 
U/95 



29.95 




DIGITAL MULTIMETER $991^ 



WIRED 



PRtCE& 




DM^TOO wind. 1 yew n-^nmity 


59*95 


DM 700 KiL 90 day pam 




niairaniy 


79.95 


AC L AC adapuw 


395 


BP 3. Kicad puA *AC 




adapter cfwEg^r 


19.95 


MP L Prolx kJi 


2.95 



The DM'?CO oKeTi profcssiiinjl l| unlit y perform amie at « hubhyi^t prLie. 
Fearurci linLludr. Zt> ijiffrrcnt r unite* and 5 functioni, all arrjin|ii;rd in a 
convenirfiE, easy to use ^ormar Mrafturemmu atr JthpUvrd t>n « larsf y/: 
digft. y^.' inch LED readout wirh aut^ifnatkc dbcimail plft4fn\FttT, jtiromjtiiL: 
polirtty^ *Mfpft»nir mdu^nrtft mt%d i>:frvftUMd prorcctwm up (»* 12S0 vdfaon all 
f anees, mj^mR n vtrtiullv eoot'proA»f^ Tbc nM-70f) kiokk Ktrvr. « ha2iii&i.]tTu-. 
fei iNjHik, TU|Q(eii AfiS case ^rth civivrfuent rcnractabli- nh hail makes ir jn 
idc^ itti«ft[|iifn TM< any *li*ir 



SPECIFTCATIONSi 



DOACvoil* 

DC AC 

Cunreut 

Resistance: 

Input 

impedance:^ 

Accuracy: 

Powec 



1 00 uV to I KV, 5 rangeB 

JuA to 2 Aitipv 5 ranges 

I ohms to 20 MegMihiftL 6 ranges 

10 Megohms, DC AC votu 
1% bafK DC vc<ta 
4 'C celh 



AUDIO SCALER 



For high rcsolulion audiu mcasurementx multiplies 
Upjn frequency, 

• Great for PL tones 

• Multipliev by 10 Or 100 

• OJ Hz rcbolutionf 

S2<J *J5 Ku S39.95 Wired 



ACCESSORIES 

TekiCopic 4 hip antcrma- BNC plu£ 
Hifh impedance probe, hghi loading 

L<^)W pasa probe, for audio measurements - . 

Direct probe, general purpufie usage 

Till bail for CT 70, 90. MINI 100 
Cctilor burst cahbraljon unil^ i:a1ibratFs counter 
againki color TV sigr^ai. 



S 7.95 

15,95 

15 95 

1295 

J. 95 

U95 



COUNTER PREAMP 

Kor mcasunnii rtrifmcty wcgk ^ij^dK fruim I Ota 1,000 
MH:. 5imii|l swet pitwfreJ by piujj ir^nsliirmer-inkludtrLi 

• Flat 25 db gam 

• BNC Connectors 

• Gnal for ^niffiri RF 'v^ith pick-up loop 

$54 95 Kn 544*15 Wi^ed 



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IT O'd««».rfl4i^¥<0 ■441* M) Hf * m*4 9'i^ o4rf^ >c- 



Ltst af 4laver^rse/5 iyn t>s^e ft 4 



73 Magazine • June. 1982 1S7 



c®MMyif^»Ci^Tn©iNi 



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1S8 73 Magazine * June J 932 



LINKS • REPEATERS • TRANSMinERS 
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Phone: 716-392-9430 ^33 



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Proven perlorfnance — morfi than 10,000 have been delivered 
Permit use ol the foil capabiliiies ol today's S^bantJ xcvrs 
One feed line for opsration on aN bands. 






eO-40HO/A 80/40 Mtr bands (69). . . 
75M0HD/A 75/40 Mtr bands <66). . . 
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73 Magazine • JuneJ9d2 161 



DEALER DIRECTORY 



Phoenix AZ 

Tha SfHJthi^est's most progressive cumrrmnica- 
tioiifs coii]i>jiuy stfickinj^ KenwtxxJ, [com, 
VftcsUp MF], B6tW^ A^tmn^ LanufEi, f liLslu:ra,rt, 
]|y-C^n. Ifearcat, and more, Wtmid like to 
servevniil PfiwerCoiiiinuiiicatioTisCorp., J 640 
Wfsil Ciimulbddt H«!,, Plioenix hZ 83015, 
241- Watt. 

Culver City C A 

l\xr^^ Kbctnmics. 391B ^puJvcda Blvd,,. Culver 
Cilv CA 90230. 3E«)-a*K»3. Trades 4£k3-l8»fiSaij 
Diego. «27-5733 (Reno NV) . 

Fontana CA 

Cbnip]ete lines ICOM, DtriilTOri, Ten-Tec, 
Mirage, Cubk:^ Lunar, over 4000 (?lec:lrfniic 
pruduets for hohi>yih.i, iwhuitiun, experi- 
menter. Also CB ra(iif>> landmobllei FftnUllTa 
Electronics, ^128 Sierra Ave, Fuiitaiia CA 
i»2a35, *3a-77i0. 

San Diego CA 

We buy and 5fll Surplus Army IVa\T Elo(S 
trouiCj alsta Terminated Maltrial, Wliat dti you 
want to sclji:' Write For cataloi^ie. Eketroiilc- 
town, Inc.. 44(K7th Avenue, PO Boi 2048, San 
PicRO CA 92112, 232-M79, 



San Jose CA 
SAN FRANCISCO BAY AREA 

Homebrewei^' httveii: tons uf new apd usetl 
H ajm/Coniputer gear and ccimp<:jnent.s, S<;rvtilg 
Haflis since Ift^iK. Wc speciakte in ICOM, 
KLM, Mirage, CoiTiptronLx. We ship nvor^d- 
wide. Telt^Com ELectmnies, 15460 UnJun 
AvenuB, San Jose C A 95124. S77-447Q. 

San Jose CA 

Bay area'^ newest Amateur tladio stare. Nt*vv fit 
used Amateur Rat^io sa^cs & .&ei%'iLt;. We feature 
Kenwood, LCIOM, AzdL^fi, Vaesu. Tcn-Tetv 
Santtw & manv more. SKaver Rajdio, Inc., 137S 
So. Basconi A ve. , San Jose CA 95 128, ^S- 1 103 . 

Smyrna GA 

For yoMt Kenwfttxl, Yaesu. ICOM, Drake and 
other amateur nuedi, cijiue to sw lis. Britt's 
Two- Way Radio, 2506 N, Atlanta Hd., Sni>nm 
GA 30080, 432-8006. 

Preston ID 

Boss %VB7BYZ, has rhe Largest Stuck of Ama^ 
teur Cf^ar in (he [ntermountain West and tile 
Best Pricta. Call me for all vour ham needs. 
Ross Dktnbvtltig, 78 So. State, Fres-ton ID 
83263, S52-0830, 



Syracuse-Central NY 

HAM-BONE RADIO (sAVES m LOT OF 1;^$ 
on all ItNjm, Ten-Tec, Elygain & Kantrunics 
Gitar. Fast, Dei>endable Serv^ice Before & Alter 
die Salef Servie*- Ls Our Main Bu^iii^ff^sl Need 
Cdsh-Hain-Iktne will sell your gear for lOSli 
cofnmusion. 320(3 Erie Blvd. E., Syracuse 
13214, 446^2266. 

Philadelphia PA/ 
Camden NJ 

Wavegiiiide fit Coaxial Micfeiwavt ConiponenL'i 
& FquJpment- Labctratory Grade Test In- 
5trumenU Power SuppMe*,, Buy, S*-lt & Trade 
all popukr makes -HP. GR. FXB. ESI. Sortn 
sen, Singier, etc, Ijectninic R«a?arich I^h*, 142,1 
rcrrj' Ave., Cftiiiden NJ 08104, MlA2m, 

Amsterdam NY 
UPSTATE NEW YORK 

Kenwciod, ICOM, Draltc, plus many other 
lineSj Anialtmr Dealer for over 35 years. Adiron- 
dack Radio Supply. Inc.. 1 85 West Main Street. 
Amsterdam NT 12010, M2-&i50, 

Syracuse-Eome-Utica NY 

Featuring; Kenwood, Vaseu, ICOM, Drakfr^ 
Ten-Tw], Swan, Di':nTron, .\Jpha, Robot, MFJ, 
Tempo, Astmn, KLM, H\ Cain, Mcislev, Lar- 
sen, Cuahcraft, Hitttler/Miiii Producte. You 
uon't be dUa^>pointed with equipment j'servk*. 
Radio World. Oneida Coui^tn' A irp*)rt- Termi- 
nal Buildint;. Oriitkanv K\ 13424, 337 0203. 



Columbus OH 

The biggeJit and best liain Store in the rnidwest 
fealurii^g quality Kenwood prodirets with 
working displays. Wc? sul] only the bpsL 
Authorized Kenwood Service. Univcfsal 
Anmttiir Radio Inc,^ 1280 Aida Dr., Revnolds- 
buTg (Columbus) DH 43068, !^i-42S7. 



Bend OR 

Satellite 'f\''. Known braiids: tiall todfl\ for 
mure inform atiori and inquire abntit our dealer 
pmgrain. WESPt:RC:OM, P.O. IJox 722fJ, 
flena OR 0770«, 3S0-0996. 



Scranton PA 

ICOM, Bird, CuidiCraft, Beckman, f-luke, 
Larsen, Hustler, Ankmna S[7eclaIijtU, A'itron, 
A%'anit, Bctd«n, W2AU/W2VS, CDE. Ml\, 
Vjbroplex, Ham-Kf^v, CES, Amplienol, Sony, 
Fanon/ Courier, B&W, Amec^i, Shuru. LuRue 
Electronics, 1112 Grand view St.. Suranton FA 
lflJ>09, ■143-2124. 



Terre Haute IN 

Your ham headquariuni ]j:>cated in the htiarl of 
the rnidwest. Utxisier FJectrontisi, Ine.^ tQ 
M«adows Center, P.O. Box 3300, Terre liaute 
IN 478003, 23SH4S6. 

Littleton MA 

The ham store ol N,E. you can rely on. Ken- 
wood, ICOM, Wilson, Vaea^], DenTr^ri, KLM 
amj>s, B6tW switches 6c wattTTietens, WliLstler 
radfar detectors, Beart-iit, Regency, antennae bv 
Larsen, Wilson, Hustler. GAM. TEL-CORjI 
Inc. Communication & Eksetmnira. 675 Gneat 
Rd., Hl us, Lttlbtou MA U1460. 4Sfi"30^, 

Ann Arbor MI 

See us for produete like Ten-Ttsi-, R. L, Drake, 
Dentron and manv more, tjpen Mundav 
through Satyrdav, 1^30 to 1730. WMVC;R 
WBSUXO, VV DflOKN and W8RP behind tiw 
counter, fureliase Radio Supply, 327 E. Hoover 
Ave., Ann Arbor MI 4S104. (508-3696, 

Hudson NH 

New England's Distributctr and Authort2*?d Ser- 
vice Center for all Major Amateur Lines. Titfb 
HodJu ElectPonics, Int., 61 Ltrwell Rnad. Hud- 
son JNH mm\. &83-5005, 

Somerset NJ 

New Jersey's only factory^-autharijwxl ICOM 
and YAESU dirfriButor. Large inventory of ne^% 
and used specials. Most major brands iu litock. 
Complete service and fatillties. Radios 
Utiliniited, 1 7fiO Fusion Avenue. P.Oh Bok347, 
Somerset NJ 08*173^ 4<jOHI509. 



Dallas TX 

Dealer in Used Computer Hardware &: Elec- 
tronit Parb^. Special on Daisy W^heel Printers. 
Xertffl Word Processing Equipment, Dual Card 
Prinfers and Displii\- Systecns. Catalog $1.("XI 
Rondure Company (The Computer Room] 
Dent. 73, 2522 Butkr St., Dallas. TX 75235, 
63(M62L 

San Antonio TX 

Amaietir, Comrnereial 2-say S<Hliog Antenna 
Sptfcialists, Avanti, AmIuci, Bird, lly-f^ain, Stan- 
dard, Vibfoplex, Midland, Henr\% CuhhCraiA, 
Dleloetric, Hustler. ICOM. MFJ, Nye, Shu re. 
Cubic, Tempo, Ten- Tec and other";. A|)pIiiirioe 
& Eijuipmcnt Co., Inc. 2317 Vance jiaeksan 
Road. San .\ntanio TX 78213, 938-3350. 

Vienna VA 

Tht Washinj^on inetropolttaii area'* fading 

(iuppSiei of the lattist in AmattNir Radio and Test 
Equipint-nt. On your next trip to the Natign'i 
Capital, stop by and see m. Fiectroiiie Equip-^ 
ment Bank ant-., 31B MOl St, N.E„ Vimma VA 
221S0, S3S-3350. 

DEALERS 

Your company name arid message 
can contain up to 25 words for as lit- 
tle OJH $150 yearly (prepaid), or $15 
per month (prepaid quurterhj). No 
m^mtion of mail-order husine<!S or 
area code permitted. Directory text 
and payment mtssf reach tts 60 days 
in advance of publication. For ex- 
ample, advertising for the August 
*S2 issue must be in our kanda by 
June Isi. Mail to 73 Magazine.. Pe- 
terhoTough NH 03458. ATTN; 
Nancy Ciampa, 



1$2 73 Magazine * June, 1982 



PROPAG/\TIQN ] 



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4 Plymouth Dr, 
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Reader Service for facing page t^63-^ 



I 



QUITE A SIGHT! 

(AND EASY TO SEE, TOO!!) 



Sporting an all-new Liquid Crystat Display, the FT-230R is Yaesus high-pertomnance answer to 
your call for a very affordable 2 meter mobile rig with an easy-to-read frequency display! 
The FT-230R combines microprocessor convenience, a sensitive receiver a powerful yet clean 
transmitter strip, and the new dimension of LCD frequency readout. See your Authorized Yaesu 
Dealer today — and go home with your new FT-230R! 



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SALE SUBJECT 
RX CeSTlFlCATFON 



LCD five-digit frequency readout wilti night 
light for high visibility day or night 

Two VFOs for quick QSY across the band. 

Ten memory slots for storage and recall of 
favorite channela 

Selectable synthesizer steps (5 kHz orlO kHz) 
in dial or scanning mode. 

Priority channel for checking a favorite 
frequency for activity while monitoring another. 

Unique VFO/Memory Split mode for covering 
unusual repeater splits. 

Up/ Down band scan plus memory scan for 
busy or clear channel. Scanning microphone 
included in purchase price- 



Futf 25 watts of RF power output from 
extremely compact package. 

Built-in automatic or manual tone bufst- 

Optlonal synthesized CTCSS Encode and 
Encode/Decode boards avaif^bfe; 

Lithium memory backup battery with estimated 
lifetime of five years. 

Optional YM-49 Speaker/Microphone and 
YM-50 DTMF Encoding Microphone provide 
maximum operating versatility- 



FT-2QeR 
FM Handheld 
2 iietem 




FT-708R 

FM Handheld 

70 cm 



14 

And don't forget! Yaesu has a complete tine 
of VHF and UHF handheld and battery 
portable transceivers using LCD display!!! 




FT-290R ' 2 Meters 
SSB/CW/FM Portable 

FT-690R - 6 Meters 
USB/CW/AM/FM Portable 





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Price and Specifications Subject To 
Change Without Notice or Obiigation 



The radlf^ 



TAIUj 



482 



YAESU ELECTRONICS CORP. 6851 Walthall Way, Paramount, CA 90723 • 
Eastern Service Ctr.. 9812 Princeton-Glendale Rd., Cincinnati, OH 45246 • 



(213) 633-4007 
(513) 874-3100 




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Superior dynamic range, auto, antenna tuner, 
QSK, dual NB, 2 VFO's, general coverage receiver. 





The TS-S30S is a fiuperlatlTe* high per- 
formance* all -solid state, HF transceiver 
keyed to the exacting requirements of the 
DX and contest operator. It covers all 
Amateur bands from 160 through 10 
meters, and incorporates a 150 kHz to 
30 MHz general coverage receiver having 
an excellent dynamic range. 
Among its other important features arep 
SSB slope tuning. CW VBT, IF notch filter, 
CW pitch control, dual digital VFO's, CW 
full break -in, automatic antenna ttmer, 
and a higher voltage operated solid state 
final amplifier. It Is available with or 
without the AT'930 automatic antenna 
tuner built-in. 
TSbauS FEATLTRES: 

* 16O-10 Meters, with 150 MIz * 30 MHz 
general coverage receiver. 

Covers alt Amateur frequrnries from 160-10 
meters. Including new WAKC, 30. 17, and 
12 meter bands, on SSB. CW, FSK, and AM, 
Features 150 kHx - 30 MH2 general cover- 
age receiver. Separate Amateur band 
access keys allow speedy band selection, 
UP/ DOWN bands witch changes In l-MHz 
Steps. A new, innovative, quadruple con- 
version, digital PLL synthesized circuit 
'provides superior frequency accuracy and 
stability, plus greatly enhanced selectivity. 

* EzceUent receiver dyiuunic rangen. 
Receiver rw^o-ione dynamic range, 100 dB 
typical (20 meters, 500 Hz CW bandwidth, 
at sensiUviiy of 0.25 fiv, S/N 10 dB), 
provides the uttlmale in rejection of 

IM distortion. 

* All solid state, 28 volt operated 
final amplifier. 

The final atnpUfler operates on 28 VDC for 
lowest IM distortion. Power input rated at 
250 W on SSB. CW. and FSK, and at 
80 W on AM. Final amplifier protection 
drcuil wtth cooling fan. SA^'K Power 
raeier built-in. 

* Automatic antenna tuner, bulll-ln. 
Available with AT-930 antenna tuner built- 
in, or as an option. Covers Amateur bands 
80-10 meters, including the new WARC 
bands. Tuning range automatically 



preselected wtth band selection to mini- 
mize tuning time. rAUTO-THRU* switch on 

front paneL 

QW fuU break-in. 

CW full break-in circuit uses CMOS logic IC 

plus reed relay for maximum ncxlbillty, 

coupled with smoolit. quiet operation* 

Sv^ltchable to semi-brcak-ln. 

Dual digital VFO*s. 

10-Hz step dual digital VFO*s include band 

Information. Each VFO tunes continuously 

from band to band. A large, hea%'y* flywheel 



t>^pe knob is used for improved tuning ease. Other features^ 



* Fluorescent lube digital display. 

Fluorescent lube digital display has analog 
type sub-scale with 20-kHK steps* Separate 
2 digit display Indicates RIT frequency shift. 

* RF speech processor* 

RF clipper type processor provides higher 
avenagc 'tiilkpowerr plus improved intelli- 
gibility. Separate "IN" and "OUT" front 
panellevel controls. 

* One year warranty* 
The TS'930S carries a one year Hmited 
warranty on parts and labor. 



T.F. Set switch allows fast transmit 
frequency setting for split-frequency opera- 
tions. A-^B switch for equalizing one VFO 
frequency to the other. VFO "Lock** switch 
provided. RIT control for ±9.9 kHz receive 
frequency shift 
Eight memory channels. 
Stores both frequency and band Informa- 
tion. VFO'MEMO switch allows use of each 
memory as an independent VFO» (the 



• SSB monitor circuit. 3 step RF atlcnuator, 
VOX. and lOO-kHz marker. 

Optional accessories: 

• AT-930 automatic antenna tuner 

• SP-930 external speaker with selectable , 
audio niters. ^tf 

• YG^55C 1 1500 Hz) or YG-I55CN-1 (250 h3^ 
plug-in CW fitters for 455-kHz IF, 

■ ^T< 88C4 i500 H7j CW plug-in filter for j 

8.83-MHz IF. f 



original memory frequency can be recalled • YK-88A4 (6 kHz) AM plug-In filter for 



at will), or as a fixed frequency. Internal 
Battery memory back-up, estimated 1 year 
life. (Batteries not Kenwood supplied). 

Dual mode noise blanker ["puJse** 
or *woodpe c k e r") * 



8,83-MHz IR 

MC-60 [S-8) deluxe desk microphone with 

UP/DOWN switch. 

TL-922A linear amplifier 

SM~220 station monitor 



NB-1, with tlTreshoid eontroL for pulse-type • HC-10 digital world clock, 
noise. NB-2 for longer duration 
'woodpecker' type noise. 

* SSB IF slope tuning. 
Allows independent adjusiment of the low 
and/or high frequency slopes of the IF 
passband. for best inierferencc rejection. 

* CW VBT and pitch controls. 
CW VBT (Variable Bandwidth Tuning) 
control tunes out interfering signals. CW 
pitch controls shifts IF passbarid cmd simul 
tan CO u sly changes the pitch of the beat 
frequency. A "Narrow/Wide" filter 
selector switch Is provided. 

'^ IF notch filter. 
lOO-kH/, IF notch circuit gives deep. 
sharp, notch, better than -40 dB. 

* Audio filter built-in. 

Tuneable, peak-type audio filter for CW. 

* AC power supply built-in. 

120. 220. or 240 VAC. switch selected 
(opertiles on AC onlyj* 



• HS 6. HS 5. HS-4 headphones. 

More information on the TS-930S is 
available from all authorized deaksrs of 
Trio-Kenwood Communications 

nil West Walnut street, 
Compton, California 90220 

^KENXAASOD 



«! 



.p&t§a€iUr tn aau^leur radut 




Speri/lratitiRs and prices are 
subieei so change without notice t>r obHgation.