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Full text of "73 Magazine (April 1984)"

International Edition 



Sargain 
SasGment 
Signal 
Monitor 

>age 20 

Masada! 

*age 94 

Microwave 
l^ourself 

>age 42 

Mobile 
^iplashes 

^age 56 

nside Dayton 

*age 10 

Europe on 
^0 a Day 

^age 48 

rhe Saga 
)f Ishmod 

'age 64 







4 


1 






i 


74470 6* 


5946 



April 1984 $2.50 
Issue #283 



Amateur Radio's 
lechnical Journal 



i A Wayne Green Publication 



Doing It at Dayton 

This unoffitial Hamvention handbook helps 
attendees and dreamers alike, ... WA4BPI 

Me and My Stupid 
Old PMOS Converter 

At last, there's an easy way to get —12 
V from a +5-V supply. Whd said "trial 
and error'7 WB1 HKU/6 

Watch That Signal! 



10 



K 



14 



yri Haul out your ofd oscilloscope and 
turn it into a signal monitor. The con- 



version is easy and the price is right 



W4RNL 20 



Digital Design: 
How to Interface ICs 

T Connect ICs io the outside wo Hd with 
these hints from the author of "Digitaf 

K4IPV 



K 



Basics 



30 



Emulate an EPROM Elephant 

The portable RAM-faker never forgets. 
Well, hardly ever McCarthy 40 



^ 




Crystal Microwave 

"Easedropping" on this part of the 
spectrum is up to you, Here is a simple 
waytostart WA4WDL 

Take a Trip to Europe 

These tips from the world's top SWL make it 
possible Peterson 

Four Bands, One Whip 

Quadruple your mobile operating plea- 
sure, please, but don't blame us, 

K30F 



42 



48 



\ 



56 





Sun Fun— 100 



The Con log Solution 

\iA Whaf s the key to winning contests? 
^**' Put an Atari and this program at the 
helm of your station and find out. 
N5ATD 



Ish mod's Journal 

What happened in 1963 finally surfaced in 
1983. Was he a fool? , . , Whipple 

The Terminal Terminal Unit 

Build this variable-shift TU. Its perfor- 
mance will knock you dead. . 



62 



64 



^l 



K3PUR 70 



Wheeling and Dealing 

with Preamps 

For a switch, from the remote hills of 
West Virginia comes a great antenna 

, WBPMS 84 



\ 



idea. 



How to Have a Sunny Field Day 

when Michigan hams turned to solar power, 
they got more than they bargained for. Does 
success mean anything? W8YZ 100 

Painless Op- Amp Filter Design 

Custom applications can be easy. Just 



H 



follow this step-by-step guide to a per- 
fect triple op-amp filter. .,.. .W4RNL 102 



Dayton Doings— 10 



Never Say Die— -6 
73 International— 92 
Ham Help- 
US, 116, 132, 133 
New Products— 116 
RTTY Loop— 118 
Contests— 119 
DX--120 

Social Events — 122 
Fun!— 124 



FCC— 125 
Letters— 127 
Dr. Digital— 128 
Review— 129 
Reader Service- 130 
Barter *N* Buy— 131 
Awards— 132 
Satellites— 133 
Dealer Directory— 162 
Propagation— 162 




■ 






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FAST COMP 

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HtCEIVL 



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l/gthJ£HAl SE^UCH MOPt-S SCAN 



PHONES AF GAIN €> ftF CAIN SQuaCH ^ TONfE MIC GAIN -0- ftf fWR 



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!COM Is proud to announce 
the most pdvonced amateur 
transceiver In communrcations 
history. Based on ICOM's 
proven high technoiogy and 
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continuous tuning general 
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covers all the new WARC bands. 
And with the optional internal 
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R»ceivor Utilizing an fCOM 
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The 70,4516MHz first IF virtually 
eliminates spurious responses, 
and a high gain 9.0115MHz 
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adjustable AGC and noise 
blanker (can be adjusted to 



eilrriinate the woodpecker )< 
audio tone control, plus RIT with 
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In the presence of strong QRM or 
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OS required. 

Traiismttter. The transmitter 
features htgh reliability 2SC2904 
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100WX full 100% duty cycle 
(Internol cooling fan standard), 
12 voit DC design- Quiet reJay 
seJectfon of transmitter IPPs. 
transmit audio tone control 
monitor circuit (to monitor your 
own CW or SSB signal), X1T, and 
a high performance speech 
processor enhonce the IC-751 
transmitter's operation For the 
CW operator, semi break- in or 
full QSK Is provided for smooth, 
fast br©al<-in l<eying. 

Dual Dual VFOs 

controlled by a large tuning 
knob provide easy access to 



spilt frequencies used in DX 

operation, Normal tuning rate is 
in 10Hz Increments and 
Increasing the speed of rotation 
of the main tuning knob shifts 
the tuning to 50Hz Increments 
automatically Pushing the 
tuning speed button gives IKHz 
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32 Memories. Thirty-two 

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mode, only those memories with 
a particular mode are scanned; 
others are bypassed, Data may 
be transferred between VFO's^ 



from VFO to memories, or from 

memories to VFO, 

Stondord Foafiir#»« All of 

the above features pfus FM unit 
high shape factor FL44A 455KHz 
SSB filter, full function metering. 
SSB and FM squelch, convenient 
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your best choice for a superior 
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Options. Externol frequency 
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power supply, voice synthesizer. 
computer interface, internal C- 
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reference crystal (fess than 
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hand mic. desk mic. filter 
options: 

SSB: FL-70 
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FL-32, FL-63 

AM: FL-33 




r 



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The World System 



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751 1 $4 



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FOR SIX STORE BUYING POWER! 

Phoenix amateurs welcome to our new store! Now take advantage of 
our increased buying power Enjoy best bargain prices, complete stocks 
of leading brands^ friendly, helpful; over-the-counter service. ^ 



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CALL FOR 

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Plus 4 BONUS 

ITEMS 

1) Antenna tuner. 

(FACTORY INSTALLED) 

2) MC-60A microphone 

3) YK'88C-1 filter. 

4) SP-930 speaker 

REG, $2029 VALUE 

$1799 

SAVE $230.00 



t ■» 



2M and 70CM in a single package. 

BUY A TW-4000A 

FOR S599.95 

3Ln6 select two of the following 
items absolutely free! 

1) VS-1 Voice Synthesizer 

$39.9S value. 

2) TU-4C sub-audible 

tone generator S39.9S value, 

3) MA -4000 Duo-band 
Mobile Antenna. S44.95 value. 



NEW! 



ICOM 



*tTs*-TliTV 



SALE! SALE! 

IC-751 
$1229 



I 3R tn: WP iW \ 



HAND-HELDSl 

COMPLETE UNE 
OF ACCESSORIES 

2 MTR 440Mhz. 
IC-02AT IC-04AT 



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W-51 
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LM-470D 

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SALE $199,95 

B-ime REG. $279,95 
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e-lOa REG. $179,95 
SAtE $159.95 

B-23S REG. $89.95 
SALE $79 95 

D-tOtO REG. $319,95 
SAL£ $289.95 



/ 



WEWSTAR VS-1500A 

ANTENNA TUNER 

fieg. $399 

SALE! Ca// 



SERWNG /lAfXTEURS 

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bb Ferrero, W6RJ. 
; Jim Rafferty. N6RJ 
'' ' ^nd other i*ell 
' known amateurs, 
Sive you 

ERSONAUZED ^ 
SERVICE 



ROTOR SALE 



Ht ^- 



U-110 



Call for 
price 



HD'73 



BIRD Model 43 
Call for price 

fyfost elements 
In stock 




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(Cafif. srid Arizona customers piease phone or visit ftsted stores) 

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STORE HOURS: WAM to 5:30 PM MonJhrough Sat 




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OUTLET 




ANAHEIM, CA 92801 

2620 W. LaFalma, 

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999 Howard Ave-, 

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East of Highway 17, 

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Hwy 1&3 & Ctairemdnt Mesa Bbvd. 

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Pnces. specifications, descriptions sut>j&ct to change without notice. Caiif. &nd ArUona r&std&nts pfease add sai&s tax. 



73 Magazine • AprH, 1984 3 




HUSTLER 

DELIVERS 
RELIABLE , 

ALL BAND HF / 
PERFORMANCE 



Hustler's new 6'BTV six- 
band trap vertical fixed 
station antenna offers 
ai band operation 
with omnatched con- 
venience. The 6-BTV 
Offers lO, 16. 20, 30, 
40, and 75/80 meter 
coverage wfth ex- 
cellent bandwidth 
and bw VSWR. Its 
durable heavy 
gauge oJuminum 
construction witti 
Hbergjass trap 
forms and stain- 
less steel hard- 
ware ensures 
long fella bllity. 

Thirty 
mater kits 
;30-MTK) 
for 4-BTV 
ord5-BTV 
are also 
available. 



Don't miss our 30 meter excitement 

HUSTlfR - 
SnUTME STANDARD OF PERFORMANCE. 



NV 



m 



E» 



3276 rsksfth "3" A^nu© 
SOssimnnee, Flortda 32741 



An 



.^12^ 



$15 



DTMF DECODER 



$15 



Cempa^T 



The UM2RK decoder kit corv 

verts your receiver into a special 
receiver or control. When a user- 
selected time-tone combination 
is received, the output provides a 
relay control for activating 
speakers or other devices. 

INPUT: Audio from transceiver, 

scanner, etc. 

OUTPUT: SPST (N.O.) relay. 

FEATURES: Single or dual tones 
adjustable over the 16 digit 
Touch Tone range • Adjustable 
response time • Relay output • 
Manual or auto reset • Single 
tone ON latching with different 
single tone reset OFF • Oper- 
ates on 12VDC • Interfacing of 
multiple boards for multi-digit 
sequential activation and reset. 

APPLICATIONS: Gall-up system 
• Repeater or commercial con- 
trols • Etc. limited only to your 
imagination • 




Actual Size 3'' x 3" 
— Shown Assembled 

UM2RK decoder kit includes atl 
component, relay, and P,C. 
Board . • . 
$15 plus $1.50 shipping. 

LJM2RC enclosure kit includes 

molded case, speaker, input 

cable. . .$5 plus $1,50 shipping. 

For information and to 

order write: 

See the demonstration in 
booth 318 at the Dayton 
Hamvention. ^^ 



THE METHENY CORPORATION 
204 Sunrise Drive, Madison, IN 47250 






INFO 



Manuscripts 

Contnbutkms In rh* Fonn of mmm^ 
ic^pls with drawings vidtatf ptHto- 
Oraph« Mm wvlcome mM «41l b* ooiv 

■.kteFpd for po«albi« pul>lkHTi<Hi. Wi 
cun Maunw no rs&ponsi&lllly fof IcVH 
or dama{)e to arty maCafSiiik, Ple«H 
Bni<claa« ■ vt^inp^d, a^^tddfMSad 
«nvikJDpe Willi eachi 9ubtrit«ttlctn Pay^ 
manl for %h& usa of »ny unbot'cUttl 
rnilwlal will b« rrub* upon tooao 
tane* All conlrtbuilon« stKiuld bo di- 
ractfld la Itw 73 tdtlort*! OftkC«^ 
^Hbw iQ Wt4tfli for 7S' guicMinai «• 
•viilatiiii upon r«quaii 

Editorial Offices: 

PMvtenugh NH 034^ 

Advertising Offices: 



ENi &tri 
PttotKnxigh KH 034M 
Phons 603^4.7138 

Circulation Offices: 

Bm SlFHl 
Peteftffirough NH 034Se 

Subscription Rates 

In Ih* Unt|«d 3lfltM and Po»ft«ukE)nfi: 
Om Ywr (13 luues^ tSS.OO 
Two Vevs (£4 iuuoi) i^&.QCr 
Thrve Ymts (3i laaua*) ^3.00 

Efsewtiere: 

CinMi and UBUccH-tf ? ffT^ yMT 

muM - t f U JTyi yHf Grty. US tk>riQi 
on lia 



To subscribe, 

renew or change 

an address: 

VMI* to 73, S<d»cfl'EMloii Dapwtmant. 
90 Sot 901. Farmiri{}da'ff NY 117S7 
For I'tnewiiA and changoa of addran, 
Includs ffW' addm* tubil from ycui' 
nioflt r^jfiont Issue of T3. Pot Qift aub- 
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dfMft u wbM as thciafl ol gtfi r«cl- 

Subscription 

profoiem or 

question: 

WMm fo 73, ScriMcHplidn Daparlmenl, 
WQ BV ftH, FarminoOa^ NT 1 11737 



fBSH QT4S'0SD)0 b pybtMTwt rrvyimDr 
Bf VM|liB Gf^B\ tt, 8P Ptna StfH^ 
PMarbiMufl^ NH 0346a. 5«l»nd CdHt 
cotiga £ttld St POEfftnou^ P«4 03468 
and iH ^tsmoFOi moiftlng Oinicaa. fntliii 
somantt upyTfahi= iflS4. Ws>iv 
Qnvx mc AH ilt^rta rawvad No pvt of 
mla piOicattan may tia laprtmad or 
otfiaMaa rapuxjucad wtttiouc wfittvi 
parrnlaakin Iram Uie puNti^w bUtrfCk 
tlim edltbori — iMhwaHy MkdtM'im, Ann 
Ai&Qr Mi iBtoe. Poatmular Send ad- 
dnaa chanpn ti? 7:3, Subocdptkin Sac 
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MV 11737. NflHonally dialributed tiy In- 
timaikMiai C4rcuk«tloo D4ainbulpra, 



Manuscripts 



?3 INpflna nS3N QOa»«lOt tt pu& 
IWiad monthly 6v 7a kic^ ■ aytaldtefy 
«( Wfynt Gfwn, Incu W Prn* Stnm, 
4H 034ae. Second 
p«id 14 P a m o o i O Mgn 
qEM« and ■! KidltiBiial jaMMig Dfliow. 
&i(lr* con|«nts oep^fltf^e t964, 
Wifyna Qrvaa Inc. AJI rtgMa rtHnvd 
No 0»^ «f ieii» puOticsiJoi> mar &• 
taprimad or oUwwIaa nomOuem 
wlthoili wnttan pannlaalon fi«m Vm 
pufeliahsr. MJciomni &iilo<^— UkiMral- 
ty Mkroflfni, Arvi Aitv Ml ^eioe. 



J 



4 73 MagazinB • Aprfl, 1984 



A microthin, synthesized, 
programmable, sub-audible 
tone encoder that fits inside 
the ICOM IC-2AT 



Need we say more? 

$2995 ^ 



t5^tt* 



r^l 



7 



.vi 



1 > 



ic- 1.07. . 




[5 0£lf 






■I'^iifc.. 



Olj 




r 





COMMUMCATIONS 
m SPECIAUSTS 



^iia 



i' 



426 West Taft Avenue, Orange, CA 92667 
800/854-0547 California; 714/998-3021 



W2HSD/I 

NEVER SAY DIE 

ecWtoria/ hy Wayne Gre&n 




THE SONY SURPRISE 

A couple of years ago, Sony 
brought out their 2001 alt-band 
digilally-controlled receiver. It 
wasn't terribly sensitive, but it 
wouid tune In CW and sideband 
and the price was, particularly 
for Sony, most reasonabie. This 
was followed by their 7600 
shortwave receiver— truly a 
marvel of compactness, small 
and light enough for the Jacket 
pocket. It also had amazing 
bandspread for the most popu* 
tar shortwave broadcasting 
bands— and a surprisingly tow 
price. 

This was followed a year 
later by the 760OA model, with a 
couple more bands. I liked this 
one particularly because it 
covered 40m and the CHU time 
signals, a nicety skipped In the 
first modeL I took this radio 
with me on alt of my foreign 
trips so I could check the VOA 
newscasts and make tapes of 
local AM/FM and SW stations 
in unusual spots around Asia 
and the Middle East, 

Then last year Sony did it. 
They put the digital tuning sys- 



tem from the 2001 into the 7600, 
calling it the 7600D, (digital, I 
presume). Wowiel Again, as 
with the 2001, the sensitivity is 
about on a par with Don 
Ricktes, but it tunes from 150 
kHz to 30 MHz, plus the FM 
band! It has a bio and a vernier 
on the tuning so you can tune in 
sideband just fine. !t also has 
ten buttons you can program 
for Instant frequency setectlon. 
I find that handy for WWV^CHU 
time and my favorite FM sta- 
tions. Yes, it has an automatic 
scanner, too. 

It's possible that some of the 
ham dealers carry this radio. 
You might want to check 
around. If you travel much, this 
can be a real prize. I love check- 
ing the 20m and 15m bands 
from different places around 
the world as I travel. 

I've been looking for a ham to 
join my staff who might, in addi- 
tion to testing new ham gear in 
the W2NSD/1 ham shack for re- 
views in 73, arrange with Sony 
and other such manufacturers 
to make non ham products 
such as this available via our 




Dayg UFever KMlK 

RD 4 

Manherm, PA 17545 

USA 



Ldnc<iit«r 
Counfv 



QSL OF THE MONTH 

To enter your OSU pux It In an ervveiope along with your chotca of a book from 73"^ 
Radio Bookshop and ma i MHO 73, Pine Street, Peierborough NH 0345fl, Altri: QSL Of the 
Month, intries not tn envalopes or withgut a bcok cholca w\\\ not be accepted. 

6 73 Magazine • April, 1984 



magazines. Every now and then 
i find a toy like this which I think 
might interest readers but 
which could be hard to find for 
most people, 

I'm one of those people who 
rush out and buy almost any- 
thing nevy. I almost always have 
a few surprising toys in my 
Shoulder bag when I travel It 
might be a radio, a miniature 
TV, a new kind of digitai watch, 
or a new briefcase computer. 
Some people are just now 
discovering the Walkman , . J 
had one of those within hours 
of its reaching this country 
eight years ago. 

A lot of these gadgets you 
see in the mail-order catalogs 
are dogs, despite the glowing 
copy and gorgeous pictures. I 
pore over each new Sharper Im- 
age, Markline, JS&A, and so on 
catalog that arrives. Yep. I've 
tried the hanging by the feet 
gadget- 

For instance, take the new 
tiny TV sets. Great technical 
marvels, no question about it, 
but who needs a Walkman TV? 
On most of the TV shows these 
days, you can turn off the pic* 
ture and lose little, so if you're 
an addict, why not just get a 
miniature radio with the TV 
sound channels? I doubt that 
we are going to see many peo- 
ple walking around the streets 
with portable TVs on their 
hands, 

Ciive Sinciair has invested an 
enormous amount of time and 
money developing a very small 
portable TV. But for whom? I 
suspect that it was more the 
challenge of making it than any 
serious market expectations 
which drove Cllve. i'il be watch- 
ing the success of the Sony 
Watchman and the new Casio 

Contmued on page t46 



STAFF 



ASST. EIHTOn/PUSUSH ER 
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EXECUTIVE EDITOR 

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wancy Noy<J 

Richifd PtienlJt 

ASSOCIATES 
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John Edwvt»> Kmi 

BMOomyKOe 

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Avory L Jvnkini waSJLG 
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De^« Wtthorbfw 

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Rogar J. Murphy 

ASSISTANT 

TO THE PRiSiPSNT 

Mattt^mv SmUh KA1IEI 

ACCOUmiNa UAMAOER 
Knu4l Kj^iiAT KV4Gan 

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RETAIL AND HEWSSTAMO 
SALES MAM AQER 
flJflfWfr flotnniou 






ADVUTnSfNQ 

Jim Gray WD^U.M^T- 

Nancy Champa, A»«t< Mpr 

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Doing It at Dayton 

This unofficial Hamvention handbook 
helps attendees and dreamers alike. 



Change may be a hall- 
mark of a democratic 
society, but it is also the by- 
word of the 1984 Dayton 
Hamvention, whose leaders 
have made major modifica- 
tions to the annual April 
event 

The location is the same, 
Dayton's Hara Arena, and 
the dates for the 1984 event 
are in their traditional loca- 
tion: the last full weekend of 
April (27, 28, and 29, for 
1984), but there have been 
considerable changes made 
in other areas, primarily the 
ftea market. According to 
the cochairman of the Ham- 
vention, Harold ''Hal" Judd 
WA8KNM, the changes 
should be "99 percent to ev- 
erYone's benefit" 

Topping the list of 



changes for 1984 are the set- 
up times for the flea-market 
vendors who have waited 
long hours in line in the past 
to get a space, This year, 
those holding flea-market 
permits, which can be se- 
cured only by ordering in ad- 
vance, will be allowed to set 
up as early as Wednesday or 
Thursday in an assigned, 
numbered space. The spaces 
will be assigned on a first- 
come, first-served basis, 
meaning those who request 
a flea-market space and in- 
clude the appropriate mon- 
ey with the request ($15,00 
per space, four-space maxi- 
mum) wi[l be assigned a 
space first Hamvention 
Flea-Market Chairman, John 
Crody WB8TEK, hopes this 
will eliminate the imposing 



practice of vendors waiting 
in line, sometimes as long as 
three and four days, to get 
what some consider prime 
flea-market real estate on 
the Hara Arena parking lot, 

The official times for set- 
ting up in the flea market 
{for those with advanced 
sale permits only] will be 
Wednesday, April 25, noon 
until 5:30 pm local time, and 
Thursday, 8:00 am through 
the time the flea market 
opens to the public at noon 
on Friday. No sales will be 
permitted in the flea market 
prior to noon Friday when 
the gates will be opened of- 
ficially to an anticipated 
crowd of over 20,000. Flea- 
market vendors also are 
reminded that a general-ad- 
mission ticket is required for 



admission to the f iea market 
in addition to your f Sea- 
mark et permit, so be sure to 
order it when you request 
your flea-market permit 

Since flea-market spaces 
are available only by ad- 
vanced sales, the wisdom of 
ordering early is obvious. 
Ordering your general-ad- 
mission ticket early would 
also be wise since the price 
has been increased to $7.50 
in advance and $10.00 at the 
door. No doubt about it this 
year— the early bird gets the 
worm, the best flea-market 
space, and gets to save $2.50 
on his ticket 

For those who were there 
last year, you'll notice that 
the opening time for the flea 
market has been shifted 




Hams show up in droves when April comes to Dayton. Here's 
just part of the typical crowd that overflows the Hara Arena 
each year. 

10 73 Magazine • April, 1984 




You1l find anything and everything electronic at the Dayton 
Hamvention, even a ham who has brought his own street 
light 





The Silver Arena section of the Hara Arena is just one of three M between f!ea-market expeditions, vistors to the Hamven- 
far^ areas devoted to dealers and manufacturers' representa- lion might make a side trip to Wright-Patterson field, home 
lives. of the US Air Force Museum, 



from Saturday morning (as 
in 1983) to noon on Friday 
[as it was in 1982). This 
means that sellers will have 
two and one-half days to dis- 
play their wares, and it also 
improves their odds of get- 
ting dry weather, a must ele- 
ment for outdoor display of 
radios and other moisture- 
sensitive electronic equip- 
ment 

To order flea-market spac- 
es, send $15.00 per space 
(maximum of four per cus- 
tomer) to the Dayton Ham- 
vention, PO Box 2205, Day- 
ton OH 45401. Grody said 
that no flea-market spaces 
will be assigned until after 
January, but that requests 
which have come in will be 
given spaces in order of their 
arrival. 

For anyone needing more 
information, Grody and his 
committee have made yet 
another change by setting 
up a flea-market informa- 
tion hotline at (513)-223- 
0923; this will be answered 
between the hours of 8:00 
am and 10:00 pm EST begin- 
ning well in advance of the 
Hamvention. 

More Changes 

The changes in Hamven- 
tion '84 don't stop with the 
flea market. The Hara Arena 
has been expanded since 
Hamvention '83 and now 
has an additional 10,000 



square feet located near the 
Silver Arena. The new space 
will be used in 1984 for the 
many Hamvention forums, 
while the space previously 
occupied by the forums has 
been made available to in- 
door sellers. Cochairman 
]udd believes that between 
200 and 225 exhibitors will 
be displaying their wares in- 
side the arena this year, and 
that includes the dealers 
and the manufacturers' rep- 
resentatives from such well- 
known companies as Trio- 
Kenwood, Icom, Yaesu, Hy- 
Gain, Drake, and Cushcraft 



With the expanded num- 
ber of indoor exhibitors and 
the expected 1 ,500 flea-mar- 
ket vendors, there's going to 
be a lot for the Hamvention 
attendee to peruse in a 
short, two-and-one-half-day 
tour. But never fear, there is 
a way to do it, and the key is 
planning. Plan to get an ear- 
ly start each day, and plan 
each day as carefully as 
possible 

As soon as you enter the 
indoor part of the Hamven- 
tion the first time, you will 
be given a plastic bag which 
will contain the Hamvention 



CHECKLIST FOR YOUR DAYTON TRIP 

• Secure room resen^ations early, for the nights of April 27 
and 28, and if you intend to arrive early on Thursday » for April 

• Purchase Hamvention tickets In advance and, If applicable, 
flea-market-space permits. 

• Have the members of your group oommitted to attend the 
Hamvention and determine yoor transportation require- 
ments. 

• Save enough money to cover the cost of the trip and to cov- 
er the cost of any planned purchases, Tum most of your cash 
into traveler's checks as these are readily accepted at the 
Hamvention and at the flea market. Personal checks are NOT 
a readily-accepted method of payment. If a dealer has a 
choice of a cash sale or taking a risk by accepting a personal 
check, hell probably take the cash. 

• Pack clothing necessary for your three- or fournlay trip. 
Don't forget, the weather is very changeable. 

• Arrange for time off from work if you're part of the latwDrlng 
class, 

• Make and carry a iist of things you Intend to purchase at the 
Hamvention, The abundance of equipment found at the Day- 
ton flea market is mind-boggling and could make you forget 
what you came there to buy. 



program. This is your key to 
the entire event and it is 
worthy of a few minutes of 
study Flip through the pro- 
gram, find the pages alio 
cated to overall and interior 
maps of the exhibit area, 
and orient yourself, Next, 
check the times of the fo- 
rums and note the ones you 
might be interested in at- 
tending. Try to work your 
tour around these times be- 
cause the forums come only 
once while the flea market 
and indoor exhibitors will be 
there for the duration. This is 
one way to guarantee that 
you won't miss anything and 
be forced to go home with 
some heavy regrets. 

You might atso try to plan 
to have some energy left af- 
ter a full day of hamfestrng 
on Saturday to attend that 
evening's banquet This yearns 
banquet speaker will be 
Harry Dannals W2HD, past 
president of the Amateur 
Radio Relay League. 

Cochaimian Judd added 
that there have been some 
changes made to the ban- 
quet not in the ticket 
prices— which remain $14.00 
in advance and $16.00 at the 
door— but in the menu. 
Judd said that the main 
course this year will be filet 
mignon. If youVe ever in- 
tended to attend the ban- 
quet, this might just be the 
year to do it. 

73M9^zine • Aprrl, 1084 11 



Necessities 

Hamvention veterans are 
well aware of what to bring 
to the event and how to 
dress, but for the sake of the 
newcomer, let me review 
some of the time-tested 
practices. If you plan to 
drive to Dayton in a private 
car from 500 miles away, as 
our group does, set aside at 
least $100 for gasoline, 
weekend accommodations, 
and food. Motel reserva- 
tions should be made as ear- 
ly as possible and the Ham- 
vention Housing Bureau can 
be a big help. You would be 
wise to take advantage of 
the service this Bureau of- 
fers. In the past, food has 
been plentiful and tasty at 
the Hamvention and, I 
might add, reasonably 
priced The same is true for 
most of the restaurants in 
and around Dayton, so if 
you have the money set 
aside for eating, you will not 
starve. Just make sure you 
budget property. 

Let me suggest that you 
dress for the Dayton weath- 
er—and that means bring 
one of everything, I've seen 
years where the weather has 
been exceptionally beauti- 
ful— 70 degrees plus during 
the days and no cooler than 
40 degrees at night— while 
I've also seen the worst- 
constant rain and near- 
freezing temperatures dur- 
ing the days and nights. So 
dress according to the old 
outdoorsman's adage, in 
layers so that you can take 
off or put on as the weather 
changes. And make the final 
layer a waterproof garment 
while keeping the heavy 
coat within reach should the 
temps fall to an extreme. It 
can happen. The weather 
can be great or lousy and it 
can be a determining factor 
in how good a time you have 
^ the Hamvention, so go 
prepared. The weather was 
great in 1982 with the only 
problem being chapped lips, 
while last year's weather 
was fit only for the ducks 
and the well-prepared. 

To keep up with the mem- 
12 73 Magaiine • April, 1984 



GENERAL INFORMATtON 

Send, ticket orders to: 

Dayton Hamvention 

PO Box 2205 

Dayton OH 45401 

Flea-Market Hotline 

{5ia>-223^23 
(Try to limit calls to between 8 am and 10 pm EST*) 

Inside ExhfbTts Informatkai 
(5l3h23&€160 

Prices: Registration general admission ticket is $7.50 in ad- 

vance and $10.00 at the door. Tickets on sale in advance by 
mail Of at the arena during tlie regular Hamvention hoursj not 
awaiiabte over night as in the past, 

Hamvention General Chainnan 

Jack Mftchell AA8Q 

Asst. General Chainnan 

Harold "Hal" Judd WA8KNM 

Fifta-Market Chairman 

John Grody WB8TEK 

Advance Registration 

Marge Mitcheli WD6DSN 

Apri 28 Banquet Speaker Harry Dannals, Past President, the 
Amateur Radio Relay League. Banquet tickels— $14.00 in ad- 
vance. $16.00 at the door. 

Flea-Market Setup Times 
Wednesday, April 25: Noon to 5:30 pm. Thursday, Apr^l 26; 
From 8 am, all night, through to Friday at noon when the flea 
market opens to general public. Ati ffea-market permits wltt 
be sofd in advance this year. None said during the Hamven- 
tion. Fiea-market vendors must have registration tickets and 
flea-market permits to be admitted to the flea market during 
setup times. 

Flea^Market Selfing Times 

Friday: noon to 6 pm. 

Saturday: 6 am to 5 pm. 

Sunday: 6 am to prize drawing. 



bers of your group, 1 would 
suggest that you rely on the 
ever-popular two-meter han- 
die-talkie, but try to have ev- 
eryone bring a synthesized 
rig so that you can be flexi- 
ble in finding a standby fre- 
quency. A crowd of over 
20,000 hams can generate a 
lot of rf. 

Finances 

Don't say it; I know what 
you're thinking. Here I've 
told yoy about all of the 
great changes for the grand- 
daddy of all hamfests, but I 
haven't said how you can af- 
ford to go. 

First things first Talk to 
your buddies on the local re- 
peater about a possible trip 
and find out who would like 
to go, and then get a con- 
crate commitment from 
them so that you can plan 



properly. Then have each 
person arrange to have the 
days off from work that 
theyll need to make the 
trip. Setting aside Thursday 
for travel and Friday morn- 
ing for setting up in the flea 
market may work, but if 
you're traveling far and plan 
to be in Dayton for the prize 
drawing Sunday afternoon, 
you might also consider tak- 
ing the following Monday 
off from work to con- 
valesce. YouH enjoy the trip 
more if you know that you 
don't have to go right back 
to work as soon as you get 
home. 

Enough planning. Let's 
get down to paying for the 
trip. Overtime and part-time 
jobs are possible sources of 
extra revenue, but since if s 
a hanrvradio activity, it 
seems appropriate to me 
that ham radio should help 



meet the expenses, Thafs 
where all of this talk about 
the flea market comes in. At 
a cost of $15.00 a space, 
three people can split the 
expense (investment?) and 
sell a lot of their unused 
equipment Agreed, ifs a 
common ploy at a hamfest, 
but I'm talking about Day- 
ton, and that means you'll 
have probably 20,000 to 
25,000 radio enthusiasts 
checking out your high-qual- 
ity castoffs. As my Daddy 
used to say, "With that 
many fish, you're bound to 
get a bite." And with the 
three or four of you taking 
shifts at watching over the 
gear, you'll get a chance to 
check out everybody else's 
offerings and still not miss a 
sale. 

Buying Gear 

I always tell myself that if 
I sell one particular piece of 
equipment, then HI use the 
money made on the deal to 
buy that new rig I've had my 
eye on. Besides being a 
great place to sell used 
equipment, Dayton is also 
the perfect place to buy that 
new rig since the dealers are 
always in a mood to sell at a 
good price. Call it their an- 
nual low-price fling or what- 
ever you want but I have al- 
ways found what I was look- 
ing for at Dayton and found 
it at the best price. Ask any- 
one who's been there and I 
bet they'll tell you the same 
thing. You'll get to see what 
you want to see, put your 
hands on it push the but- 
tons and turn the knobs, and 
then buy for the best price 
imaginable. 



1 know the dealers wi 
probably skin me alive for 
saying this, but let me pass 
along a word of ad- 
vice—spot the piece of gear 
you want at three or four 
dealers, list the prices, and 
then go back to each one 
and ask them to give you 
their rock-bottom, last-day- 
of-the-hamfest price. If you 
think one of them is offering 
you the best deal youH see, 
make your purchase from 



that dealer. If yoiJ think you 
can get it cheaper wait until 
the second or maybe the 
last day of the ham f est and 
go back to the dealers again 
to get their prices. Be aware 
that if you decide to wait, all 
of the dealers could sell out 
of that rig you've been want- 
ing so badly. With the prices 
being so right and so many 
people looking for a deal, 
the bargains do not last 
long. Once again, be pre- 
pared. 

And keep one other fact 
in mind when you tackle the 
dealers— the more the deal- 
ers sell, the less they have to 
pack up and take home, 
Thats why most of the best 
deals on the remaining 
equipment are made on the 
last day of the Hamvention, 
on Sunday afternoon when 
most folks are hanging 
around for the prize drawing 
or in the process of packing 
up to head home. 

If you have trouble work- 
ing the deal you want, get 
the dealer to toss in an ac- 



cessory for little or nothing 
more. After all, ft would 
make still less that he has to 
pack up and take back with 
him and it makes the deal 
even sweeter for you. 

What Will I See? 

When you arrive at the 
Hara Arena, don't worry if 
you think your eyes are 
starting to bug out. You'll 
probably be seeing a few 
things you've never seen be- 
fore. Just in the past few 
years IVe seen the first syn- 
thesized handie-talkie and 
the first digital-readout low- 
band rig make their irtitiat 
appearances at the Dayton 
Hamvention. And there's a 
reason for it Manufacturers 
like to take the wraps off 
their new items at the Ham- 
vention because they know 
that if s their best chance to 
show it to a large share of 
the amateur-radio commu- 
nity at one time. The more 
people that see an item, the 
better the chances of selling 
it Remember the 20.000 



plus folks I said could be 
walking past your flea-mar- 
ket space? Most of the same 
people will get indoors also. 
The manufacturers also 
know that most of the hams 
who attend the Hamvention 
have a buying urge, and 
they'd like you to satisfy 
that urge by buying their 
product 

What else can you expect 
to see at Dayton? 1 would 
expect to see more comput- 
ers interfaced with hanrv-ra* 
dio equipment at the '84 
Hamvention, and I would 
expect to see more dealers 
selling software for amateur 
applications. Last year, the 
RTTY-CW interfaces were 
on display and drew consid- 
erable crowds, so this year 
look for the dealers to take 
the next logical step and 
explore the computer field 
a few steps further. We've 
got satellite-tracking pro- 
grams that run on VIC-20s 
and other basic machines, 
so don't be surprised if soft- 
ware abounds to turn all 



of your ham-radio drudgery 
into f untime with your com- 
puter. After all, it will be 
the coming thing for many 
a year to come. 

Here We Go! 

Okay, if you've followed 
me so far, you should have a 
pretty good idea as to how 
to prepare for the 1984 ver- 
sion of the Dayton Hamven- 
tion, the hamfest that is 
quickly earning the tag, 
"center of the ham-radio 
universe/' So get your days 
off arranged, pack your 
clothes and the equipment 
you plan to sell, list the 
items you want to purchase, 
get your group together, and 
lefs head to Dayton for 
April 27, 28, and 29. 

The bunch of terrific guys 
I go with started talking 
about the 1984 trip on their 
way home from the 1983 
event so I think we'll be pre- 
pared to have another great 
time in Dayton, Ohio, Grab 
your NT and come join us. 
It's gonna be great! ■ 




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73 Magazine * April, 1984 13 



Me and My Stupid Old 

PMOS Converter 

At last, there's an easy way to get -12 V from a +5-V supply. 

Who said 'trial and error'? 



C R. Bryan Hi WBlHKU/6 
7311 Variel Avenue 4 
Caaoga Fmk CA 91303 



Stupid old PMOS. It's 
slow, it runs hot, it gives 
protective input diodes a 



workout because its output 
low can go below ground, 
and it needs weird supply 



voltages* Most of the newer 
NMOS devices have been 
designed to make do with 

one 5-volt supply, either by 
some design rethinking or 

by inclusion of a substrate 
charge pump on the chip 
itself, but stupid old PMOS 



IN ^14 A Or 

lM4l4e PI 

1 LOOPIV 

ALL 4 



+ 



t 



«T,ir 




jr — 

Fig, 7. Initial version. With 9 to 79 voi fs input ^nd the right toroid, this circuit might provide 
50 V output. LI is 10 bifilar turns §28, L3 is 25 to 50 bifilar turns §28 (I used 25 turns), and L2 is 
8 to 10 turns #26. The toroid is a 375-inch ferrite iron} a Radio Shack ^'Ferrites'^ package. 
Capacitor Ct resonates with 12 to determine oscillating frequency; 200 pF is probably a good 
minimum value to keep interwinding capacitance from getting into the act. The transistors 
came from my junk box; the numbers listed are their rough functional equivalents. With dif- 
f&Bnt devices, the regulator circuit could waste a lot less current 

14 73 MagazirtB * April, 1984 



has to have strange supply 
levels provided in order to 
operate. 

It was that last gripe that 

had me stymied for a while 

I have an old keyboard from 
some junked phototypeset- 
ter somewhere, bought for 
all of ten bucks. It's TTL 
throughout, with maybe Vi 
A drain on the 5-V, 3-A sup- 
ply in my home-brew Cos- 
mac Elf, {One miserable 
PMOS shift register does 
have to have a —12 supply 
if I want anything but smoke 
from it) At that, the key- 
board outputs some weird 
code that makes sense only 
to the machine for which it 
was designed. A local outlet 
sells a keyboard encoder, 
the AY-5-2376. If 1 kludge 
wired that onto the key- 
board in place of the orig- 
inal logic, I'd have good old 
parallel ASCII coming out of 
a single 40pin chip, made 
of=.-PMOS. Yep— it needs 
a —12 supply, drawing may- 
be 4 mA, I should build an 
additional line-powered 
power supply for that? 

I've seen a few upconvert- 
er circuits around; most use 



555s and voltage-doubler 
chains. Motorola even has 
one with a 7406. Somehow, 
all these capacitor-pulse 
designs struck me as being 
wasteful, inadequate, or 
both. 

I'm a bit of a QRPp nut 
and 1 have the toroids to 
prove it— some from Radio- 
kit and Amidoa some from 
those blister cards Radio 
Shack started selling a ye^r 
or so ago. I got out my dip- 
per and my boxes of small- 
signal transistors, turned on 
the 'scope and the Weller, 
and waded in. 

The first circuit I built 
does fine with at least 9 
volts for a supply. The rec- 
tified secondary voltage 
soared up to 90 volts at one 
point in my experiment- 
ing—no load. Thafs why I 
put in the 10k load resistor, 
to keep the voltage within 
the survival zone of the di- 
odes, to say nothing of any 
regulator I might care to put 
in* 

As for the regulator cir- 
cuitry, I musi admit that I 
was playing, I had already 
decided to put a 79L12 in 
the finished unit but I didn't 
have one on hand as yet, so I 
kludged this one up in order 
to see how much fun I could 
have putting together a reg- 
ulator, ff you look closely, 
you will see not only that 
I've abused the reference di- 
ode (which prefers to con- 
duct only about 73 mAl but 
also that the converter is 
cranking out upwards of 25 
mA, still with enough input 
headroom to the pass tran- 
sistor for it to regulate. The 
mediunvcurrent pair of tran- 
sistors in the oscillator got 
warm, but not hot, and no- 
body seemed to be hurting. 

Then I dropped the supply 
rail to 5 volts, and the output 
got very mushy, . .maybe 8 
volts across the output load 
resistor. 

The problem is in the Dar- 
lingtons. I put in the second 
pair of transistors, Darling- 
ton-styfe, because the medi- 
um-current transistors weren't 
being driven fully under 
load, thus, there was not 



-I2V 



+3V0C 
SUPPLt 







ouTHn 



Fig. 2. 5-volt-input version. Note that LZ's phase is reversed. EQuivalent transistor types again. 
The 79L12 only burns about 4 mA. 



enough gain at the frequern 
cy in use. The added pair 
corrected that but brought 
in a new problem: The satu- 
ration voltage (Vc£_5^J ^^^ ^ 
Darlington pair, measured 
from the ganged collectors 
to the lower emitter, is one 
VcE^at p'lis one Vbe for a 
typical circuit because the 
driver-half emitter is held 
high by the final-half base- 
emitter diode (one Vbe), ^nd 
their collectors are tied 
together. The collector of 
the driver-half can't do more 
than saturate — it can't go 
lower than its emitter. More 
current into either the driv- 
er's base or the two collec- 
tors only drives both volt- 
ages higher, making the 
problem worse. I was losing 
virtually 2 Vbe on each side 
of the main winding, even 
with the protective series 
diodes shorted out Thafs 
fine for circuits with, say, 9 
volts or more ratl-to-rail, but 
down at a 5-volt supply 
level, the missing voltage 
swing was proportionately 
too large to be ignored. 

At this point I remenv 
bered the comfxjsite PNP in 
the final stage of National's 
LM380, and the final version 
started emerging on paper. 

I have even more voltage 
gain here, because the 
driver stage is ainning com- 
mon-em itter rather than the 
common-collector driver in 
the Darlington version. More 
important the final stage is 
free to pull its end of the 



transformer's main winding 
as low as possible, roughly 
0.2 volts with these par- 
ticular parts. That means 
that the total possible swing 
for the transformer, ignoring 
coil losses, is 9.6 volts — 
much better. Of course, I've 
ignored here the effect of 
available voltage swing on 
circuit impedance, which af- 
fects the available juice 
(wattage) from what is, in ef- 
fect a self-excited balanced 
transmitter. I chose a more 
rudimentary approach, one 
within my immediate com- 
prehension. In other words, 
Tm lazy, so I just called it an 
astable multivibrator and I 
played around with it until it 
worked. 

It works. The keyboard 
converter starts up every 
time and feeds a dead quiet 
—12 volts to the shift reg- 
ister If II do the same for the 
2376 instead, when I get 
around to the surgery in- 
volved. Then there's that 
Motorola character genera- 
tor few translating ASCII into 
a video bit stream; that 
needs two weird voltages — 
and ifs NMOS! That just 
means there'll be two sec* 
ondaries on the toroid. I've 
even got a couple of PMOS 
character generators that 
need ±14 volts. 

There are several points 
of design and technique to 
be mentioned here. First 
most bipolar transistors be- 
have very nicely like zener 
diodes when their bases are 



driven 5 to TO volts more 

negative than their emitters 
(positive for PNPs). Unfor- 
tunately, the localized heat 
in the base region of the 
transistor chip causes per* 
manent changes in the dop- 
ing arrangement so the beta 
goes down. This is why most 
multivibrator designs have 
diodes with high PIVs in 
them, to keep the sharp neg- 
ative spike through the ca- 
pacitor from doing damage. 
If you are running such a cir- 
cuit with a supply higher 
than 5 volts, you must have 
them too Otherwise, if the 
'scope shows that the col- 
lector voltage has a needle- 
thin negative spike going 
lower than ground on the 
falling edge of its wave- 
form, your transistors are 
being degraded even as you 
watch. 

The second point is one of 
balance. Some of Doug De- 
Maw's QRP amplifier de- 
signs are crawling with 
toroids, just to swamp out 
tolerances and force a 50% 
duty cycle in the output sig- 
nal I got by with just one tor- 
oki by using the twisted-pair 
wiring shown, but a litde ar- 
tistic symmetry in windings 
placement is required too. 
Caveat constnjctor. 

The third point is the 
toroid itself. 1 used some 
from those Radio Shack 
packages, and they work 
very^ well. The ones you will 
pull out of there might 
not- ifs a matter of size 

73 Magazine • April, 1984 15 



and ferrite mix. The highest- 
permeability device is the 
one to use, because you get 
more inductance per turn of 
wire (mine were around 350 
uH with ten tums). Such 
toroids are designed for a 
lower frequency range, so 
you can run them at a lower 
frequency, where the diodes 



rectify better (I've run the 
prototype up to 2 MHz, but 
its overall efficiency is best 
at around 50 kHzL and 
where it's a lot easier to con- 
tain the rf that any power 
oscillator spews out The 
2-MHz version wreaked 
havoc with an AM radio 
across the room; the 50-kHz 



CI 

C2, 4, 6 



G3 
C5 



D1-6 

D7 



L1,2.3 
Ql,2 


Q3,4 


Q5 



Parts List (for Fig, 1) 

200-pF silver mica 

CK05, 104k, ,1*uF monolithic ceramic (Better than a 
disc capacitor for high-frequency decoupling be- 
cause the internal sandwich construction results In 
a low-inductance paci^age. Substituting for one usu- 
ally invotves a .Ot'^uF disc ceramic paralleled with a 
.001 disc or a 100-pF silver mica. Here, a .01 -uF disc 
will do.) 

47-uF, 16-V aluminum electrolytic 
4J-uF, 50-V aluminum electrolytic (Up to around 25 
uF is useful at this current level; more than Ihat can 
cause start-up problems for the osctltator, due to 
loading.) 

1N4148 or 1N914B switching diodes 
1N825A temperature^jompensated reference diode 
(It consists of a reverse junction in the same package 
with a forward junction; at 7.5 mA of current through 
the diode, the compiementary temperature coeffi- 
cients of the two lunctions cancel each other out. 
With the voltages shown, the consent through the 
diode in Fig, 1 is nearly double the correct value, 
which doesn't hurt it but wastes t}oth the current and 
its compensatioa Newark Electronics" Catalog 105 
lists Ft for $1.90.) 
See text 

NPN medium-current switching transistors (The fast- 
er the better. I used 2 N 3568 equivalents; 2N2219A is 
easier to find.) 

I^IPN switching transistors (The faster the better, 
2N3904 is widely available.) 

NPN medium-current transistor (Speed isn't critical, 
but gain and wattage are. 1 used a 2N699, which is 
barely adequate. It should be at least a heat-sunk 
2N2219A, maybe a T1P48. Better to be overcautious 
on wattage than to worry about its surviving a short 
or a stjlhair heat buildup.) 



06. 7, 

8 



NPN small-signal transistors (I used 2N3904 
equivalents. With higher beta, resistor values in the 
regulator may be raised, conserving consent. Beyond 
the voltages shown, start paying attention to the cot* 
Idctor-voltage ratings of these devices.) 

R1, 2. 3 10k,V4-W (With the regulator in place, R3 isn't really 
necessary, but it's a cheap security blanket) 

R4, 5 ^k,V*^N (As mentioned, R5 should be a 1.8k.) 

R6 680-Ohm,V*-W 

R7 4.7k 

R8 5.1k (The regulator (05-7) regulates by keeping the 

R7-RS voltage divider's tap at the same voltage as 
the reference (6.3 V in Fig. 1). Their ratio sets the out- 
put voltage.) 

R9 10-Ohm (This resistor sets the current-limiting level. 

When the voltage across it reaches the .6-V turn-on 
threshold of Q8, 08 will begin stealing base current 
from 05, turning it of I. With this value for R9, that's at 
60 mA output.) 



version doesn't bother it a 
bit, even though the lower 
frequency is more likely to 
provide harmonics within 
easy reach of BCB carriers 
My guess is that the diodes, 
which do take a finite 
amount of time to go into 
and out of conduction, sim- 
ply digest the lower frequen- 
cy more thoroughly, reflect* 
ing a lot less trash back into 
the oscillator, 

The less rf noise, the less 



shielding is required and the 
less hassle you have arrang- 
ing for air flow to carry heat 
out of that shielding. 

My converter simply sits 
parked in one comer of 
that keyboard, unshielded, 
kludgewlred Into holes drilled 
in an etched-clean section, 
making less noise than the 
keyboard scanning clock. 

Obviously, anywhere one 
or two greedy little circuits 
demand a strange supply 



C3 



C5 



Parts List (for Fig. 2) 

CI Select in test (200-pF starting value» may end up at 

.01 uF or higher. In order of preference: NPO ceramic, 
polystyrene, silver mica, mylarTM, disc ceramic. The 
tiighef the frequency, the more the capacitor's quali* 
ly matters* 220-pF silver mica: Jameco DI^15-221J, 

C2, 4, 6 .1-uF monolithic ceramtc or ,01 -uF disc ceramic (.01 
uF: Jameco Da01/50, 8c.) 

47-uF, 10-V electrolytic (47-uF, IfrV: Jameco A47/16, 
24«,) 

4 J-yP or more electrolytic (Working voltage should 
be at least IVi times unregulated output voltage. 
4.7 uF, 50 V: Jameco A4.7/50, 19«.) 

C7 l,Q-uF tantalum or lO-uF aluminum electrolytic, 

(Working voltage should be significantly higher than 
regulated output voltage. 1.0-uF, SS-V tantalum: 
Jameco TM 1/35, 29c J 

D1-4 1N4148, 1N914B, or other silicon signal diodes 
{Should be rated for minlmums of 50 PIV, 50 mA con- 
tinuous forward current, maximum switching time 10 
ns or so. 1N400l'type rectifiers can*t switch fast 
enough, 1N4148: Jameco, 15/$t00. Fairchild rates 
these devices at 100 PIV, 200 mA, 4.0 ns.) 

LI, 2, 3 Windings are determined by application and circuit 
values. See text and schematic for prototype values. 
Bitilar windings are prepared by twisting twin 
lengths of pretenslNzed wire with electric drill to 10 
-20-turns-per-inch pitch. Torold is from Radio Shack 
pacltage of ferrates. A good equivalent is Micro- 
metals FT50^: Radiokit, 60q;. 

Q1,2 NPN medium-current switching transistors— 
2N2219A, MPSU06, 2N3568 (Dissipation limit should 
be at least Vz \N, 2N2219A: Jameco, 2/Sr) 

03,4 PNP switching transistors— 2N2907, 2N3906 (The 
faster I he tetter. 2N3906: Jameco, 4/$1; Priority-One 
#062N3906. 5/$1.} 

R1.2 47k, %.W (PriorilyOne #05RGQ473U 50/S1; Radio 
Shack #271-1342, 5/39e.) 

R3 10k, V-iW (Priority-One #05RCQ103U 50/$1; Radio 

Shack #271-1335, 5/39$.) 

U1 Motorola 79L12 in prototype (Device choice depends 

on application. PC layout will accept 78XX, 79XX, 
LM340. and LM320 devices with Inline pins (L, P, M, T 
types). Check pinout before installing. Positive regu- 
lator may be used to regulate negative voltage by 
making regulator output common. 79Lt2: Priority- 
One #05MC79L12CP, $1,00.) 

Converter will be most efficient in a frequency band whose 
low end is determined by transformer reactance and whose 
high end is determined by transistor and diode speeds and 
capacitor quality. 



16 73 Magazine • April, 1934 



ICOM HF 



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Squelch 

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Built-in Preamp 




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voltage, you can now satisfy 
them, literally on the spot 

This circuit can go in any 
number of directions. A bet- 



ter design couid probably 
fun an 8080A chip set with 
just 5 volts input. If you 
have both phases of a con- 



venient frequency clock 
available, you can slave the 

converter to the clock and 
save yourself a few parts. 




Fig. 3. PC board for the 5-V version. 



guaranteeing the converter 
start-up in the process. A 
couple of VNIOKMs (VMOS) 
would probably suffice, pro- 
vided only that the clock 
signals swing fully rail-to- 
raiL (TTL typically needs a 
pull-up resistor to hoist its 
output above 3.5 voltsj 
Somebody else will proba- 
bly put me to shame with 
the efficiency of their ver- 
sion, but thaf s okay; t just 
wanted to get that keyboard 
running on just a +5-volt 
supply Stupid old PMOS,B 



DIGITAL 
GnOUNO 



+av 








JUMPEfiS WI-V^/4 ESTABitSH GROUNDING, if ANY 

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Fig 4. Component layout 



INSTALL DECOUPLING 
HERE FOR POSITIVE 
REGULATOR 

REGtJLATOft 
OUT 

INSTALL DECOUPLING 
HERE FOR NEGATIVE 
REGULATOR 



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18 73 Magazine • April. 1984 



I 



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m\ 



I 

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Telephone 






Advanced Electronic Applications, Inc. 

P.O. BOX C-2160 • LYNNWOOD, WA 98036 • {206) 775-7373 • Telex: 152571 AEA INTL 



73 Magazine • April, 1984 19 



L fi. Cebik W4RNL 
5J0S Hohton Hfik Rmd 
Knoxviite TN 37914 



Watch That Signal! 

Haul out your old oscilloscope and turn it into a 
signal monitor. The conversion is easy and the price is right 




An external view of the aciaptor show^n in Fig, 8, with shield* 
ed connections to the rear of the scope and onward to the 
vertical deflection plates. 

20 73 Magazine • April. 1984 



Oscilloscope adaptors 
ror rf have been 
around a long time They be* 
came popular with the ad- 
vent of SSB and inexpensive 
scopes after the end of 
World War II Today, many 
of the leading ham equip- 
ment manufacturers, includ- 
ing Heath, Yaesu, and Ken- 
wood, provide matching 
scope units for monitoring 
transmitted — and in some 
cases, received — signals. 
The equipment is excellent. 
but so is the price tag. There 
are cheaper ways to have an 
effective monitor, especial 
ly if you are interested only 
in seeing your transmitted 
signal All you need is a 
cheap working scope and a 
simple adaptor, Fig. 1 shows 
in simplified form what we 
need. 

As simple as this scheme 
is, relatively few hams 



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monitor their transmitted 
signals or use monitors for 
making adjustments. The 
part of the equation that 
stops most hams is probably 
the scope itself and not the 
adaptor. There are several 
good working designs, and 
we shall look at a few before 
closing. However, the idea 
of owning and then modify- 
ing an oscilloscope still 
creates anxiety in many 
hams. So let's begin by look- 
ing at what makes a good 
scope for rf work 

Choosing a Scope for Rf 

Current scope specifica- 
tions make the units of even 
fifteen years ago look bar- 
baric by contrast. The mod- 
ern scope has triggered 
sweep calibrated in frac- 
tions of a second per divi- 
sion on the scope face We 
can no longer create some 



osciu.oscon 









Fig. L The basic elements needed for rf monitoring. 



of the funny pictures of yore 
because the recurrent 
sweep, calibrated in fre- 
quency, is gone. Virtually all 
scopes are solid stale. Dual- 
trace capability is the rule 
rather than the exception. 
The frequency limits of the 
vertical amplifier have gone 
out of sight. Except for very 
expensive lab scopes, a 
5-MHz limit was rare twenty 
years ago: today, the limit is 
fast approaching 100 MHz, 
with 20' and 30-MHz units 
common One other thing 
has kept pace with the rising 
Specifications: the price 

Modern scopes are excel- 
lent. If you own one, then rf 
monitoring is a simple mat- 
ter of taking an exceedingly 
small sample of your trans- 
mitted signal and feeding it 
directly into the vertical am- 
plifier of your scope You 
need oo adaptor. Unfortu- 
nately, few of us have the 
money for a 30-MHz scope 
that will get only an occa- 
sional workout in the shack* 
Indeed, if we have access to 
such a piece of equipment, 
it will most likely go on the 
test bench where it will be 
used more regularly. 

If we do buy an older 
scope, our tendency is to 
choose one of recent vin- 
tage. This would be a solid- 
state scope with at least one 
MHz, and perhaps five, as 
the vertical amplifier limit 
It would have recurrent 
sweep and single trace. 

I should have stopped the 
moment I mentioned solid 
state! Although there are 
good solid-state scopes ca- 
pable of handling the 
SOodd volts of rf that we 
shall put into the case with 
at least an inch or two of 
lead, few of the cheap units 
have sufficient shielding be- 
tween the amplifier boards 
and the neck of the scope 
tube where our leads are 
needed. The odds of pop- 
ping one or more transistors 
is very great. We can add 
shielding, but our chances 
of successfully eliminating 
all rf danger are slim to non- 
existent Modern solid-state 



monitors begin with this 
problem as a design consid- 
eration, and it may be easier 
to build a scope from 
scratch than to rebuild a sol- 
id^tate unit that was never 
intended for rf service. 

Tube-type scopes of the 
next preceding generation 
do not suffer the problems 
of solid-state scopes A few 
volts of rf in the case will not 
injure the tubes or other 
components. A hamfest will 
turn up many of these 
scopes for sale. The main 
item of concern is the qual- 
ity of the cathode-ray tube 
and the power transformer. 
Both are difficult to replace 
and costly at best. If the 
scope puts out a bright, 
weil-defined trace with the 
intensity control at the half- 
way point, then other faults 
can be repaired with the in- 
vestment of troubleshooting 
time rather than money. 

For an rf monitor at the 
operating desk, I prefer a 
smaller scope to the round- 
faced five-inch models. To- 
ward the end of the tube era, 
a number of compact three- 
inch units appeared, includ- 
ing the Eico 435 and 430- 
Theflyj " by 6" by 11 " audio 
frequency 430 cost $69.95 in 
kit form in 1965, and it may 
be worth half to two-thirds 
of that price at a hamfest if 
it is in excellent condition. If 
you prefer a larger scope 
face, there are numerous 
Dumont and Heath models 
(among others) th-rit ^ .tn be 
picked up for a song and a 
few greenbacks. 

Getting a scope is half the 
battle. Modifying it for di- 
rect rf input is simple. Lo- 
cate the vertical deflector 
plate terminals on the scope 
tube socket. As close as pos- 
sible to these terminals, in- 
stall a pair of connectors on 
the rear panel of the scope. 
Phono connectors work well 
if you use thin coax for the 
leads from the adaptor (one 
lead for each terminal, since 
the signal will be balanced) 
Pin jacks or simitar connec- 
tors will work if you use 
twinlead or other balanced 
lines from the adaptor; 




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Fig. 1. Rf connections to typical vertical amplifier circuits, 
(a) Triodo dc<oupled output stu^e. (h) Pentode dc-couplcd 
output stage, fcj Pentode ac-coupted output sfage 



however, shielded leads are 
best, especially with higher 
power, 

Between the socket termi- 
nals and the jacks, install 
.OI-jiF disc ceramic capaci- 
tors of at least 1000-volt rat- 
ing Keep the leads as short 
as possible, and try to keep 
the capacitors at right an- 
gles to anything to which 
you might couple signal. 
Many scopes used to have 
accessory jacks on the rear 
panel for any number of im- 
probable uses (for example, 
dc voltages to power units 
under test if they by chance 
happened to require exactly 
the voltages provided at a 
very limited current). If 
these are close enough to 
the scope lube socket, then 
mechanical work will be fur- 
ther minimized. 

Fig. 2 shows the connec- 
tions schematically, along 
with some typical vertical 
amplifier connections to the 
same socket pins. In most 



cases, you will need no 
other work on the scope It 
wilt operate normally when 
rf is not present. When using 
the scope to monitor your 
transmitter, keep the verti- 
cal gain at minimum, and if 
you have input attenuator 
positions, set them at maxi- 
mum. For monitoring, we 
simply bypass the vertical 
amplifier and generate the 
voltage needed to deflect 
the trace vertically by other 
means. 




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ADAPTOR 



Fig. 3. Isolating rf and nor- 
mal scope s/gfia/s, 

73 Magazine • April, 1984 21 



OPCRATINC PICK Ufr 

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Fig. 5, A miniaturized version of Fig. 4, utilizing toroid 
cores. 



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Fig. 6. A simple rf scope 
adaptor in wide use today. 



TNaNSWiTTER 



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Fig. 7\ The VE7CCK adaptor. 



\i you encounter prob- 
fems with the use of the 
scope for non-rf purposes, 
then you wilf want to install 
the double-pole, double- 
throw switch shown in Fig, 3. 
This will effectively isolate 
the two modes of operation. 

Rf Adaptors 
Through the Years 

While almost every other 
piece of electronic equip- 
ment has grown more com- 
plex through the years, rf 

22 73 Magazine • April, 1984 



adaptors for oscilloscopes 
have grown simpler I have 
built most of the designs, 
discarding them as a more 
compact arrangement be- 
came available. My present 
unit fits in a 2''X2"X4'' 
aiuminum box mounted on 
the back of my scope, with 
only one switch to manipu- 
late. The photo shows how 
compact the adaptor can 
be We may never reach the 
ultimate miniaturization in 
anything, but if another 
adaptor design comes 
along, I will hesitate before 
replacing the present unit. 

Most early designs used 
tuned circuits, one for 
each band. Fig. 4 shows the' 
general design which was 
fairly standard for about a 
decade. There were two 
separate boxes: a pick-up 
unit and a tuning unit. The 
pick-up box contained a 
one-turn coil running be- 
tween the input and out- 
put coax connectors, with 
a two-turn link running to 
the tuning unit. The idea 
was to minimize the im- 
pedance bump in the trans- 
mitter transmission line. 

The tuning unit went 



through stages of evolution 
Initial designs were open 
breadboards. You were ex- 
pected to tack^older a coil 
each time you changed 
bands. Plug-in coils fol- 
lowed, but they required 
you to open the shielded 
box which was added to the 
design. In 1970, W1KLK 
mounted al[ the coils on a 
rotary switch (QS T, October, 
1970, p 36) He also used the 
smallest diameter coils I had 
seen to that time, ranging 
from V} inch for 10 meters 
to 1 V4 inches for 80, 

The principle of the de- 
sign was to generate the nec- 
essary deflection voltage 
through the high Q of the 
tuned circuit. The tuning ca- 
pacitor, insulated from the 
front panel and the opera- 
tor's hand, provided peaking 
when tuned to resonance If 
the voltage provided too 
much deflection (somewhat 
a rarity with older, less sen- 
sitive cathode-ray tubes), 
detuning the circuit at- 
tenuated it effectivety. 
Despite its size, the unit 
worked very well 

The same design can be 
significantly miniaturized 
through the use of toroid 
cores for the inductors 
throughout, as shown in Fig. 
5. The schematic diagram is 
essentially the same, ah 
though some changes have 
been made in the drawing to 
indicate the mechanical 
changes A short straight 
line with Teflon*^* insulation 
runs between the coax con- 
nectors and through a half- 
inch core. I have used from 
6 to 20 turns of #28 wire in 
the secondary without dis- 
turbing the line impedance 
seriously. The tuned circuit 
coils in the aggregate take 
less room than the switch on 
which they are mounted. Al- 
though a three-section 
switch is shown, I have also 
used a two-section switch, 
with one side of each coil 
(and the capacitor) to a com- 
mon. This did not seriously 
upset the balance of the out- 
put. The entire unit can be 
mounted in a single box with 
a partition between the 



pick-up and tuning sections. 

Recent Adaptor Designs 

More recently, designers 
have realized that tapping a 
50- or 750hm coax line 
would cause no significant 
problems if the tap imped- 
ance was fairly high. This 
has resulted in the use of al- 
most direct connections be- 
tween the rf line and the 
scope tube. Fig, 6 shows a 
generalized idea of the 
scheme. The switch controls 
a selection of capacitors ar- 
ranged to successively dou- 
ble the reactance and lower 
the signal level seen by the 
scope plates. Since the 
scope deflection plates re- 
quire a balanced input, the 
ground side is elevated off 
ground The system is per- 
fectly adequate for most 
monitoring purposes, al- 
though a better balance is 
easily achieved. 

In 1979, VE7CCK present- 
ed an interesting scheme 
(7j, June, 1979, p. 110); it is 
shown in Fig 7 His balun 
used an ordinary 2 inch-di- 
ameter antenna core. The 
swamping resistor across the 
core is non-critical in value, 
and anything with up to a 
three-to-one ratio to the val- 
ue given seems to work. It 
evens the frequency re- 
sponse by lowering the Q of 
the coil. However different 
his coupling scheme ap- 
pears to be from that in Fig. 
6, it is electrically identical 
He has used a variable ca- 
pacitor (with a series fixed 
capacitor) to replace the 
switch. Like all the units 
shown, his works well with 
one exception. It is difficult 
to find a variable capacitor 
with a 150-pF top value that 
will go below 10 pF mini- 
mum The S-pf value in Fig. 
6 is needed when viewing 
kW signals on a sensitive 
scope tube. 

The final design that fits 
into the small box shown in 
the photo combines the best 
of these two designs with 
some miniaturization 
thrown in. Fig. 8 shows the 
circuit. The capacitor sec- 
tion is standard. The batun is 




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73 Magazine • April, 1984 23 






^ 






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COBE r 5 TART 
WrMDI-NtjS WITH 
DOTTED ENDS 

TOGETHER J 




to 

CWT 



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4 — • 



f fg. 8- The hybrid miniature 
scope adaptor 

wound on an FT 50^1 core 
and is designed for about 
1200"Ohms impedance at 
3.5 MHz, or about 54 micro- 
henries per section. Twenty - 
eight turns bifilar, con- 
nected as shown, meet the 
requirement. 

Construction is simplicity 
itself As Fig. 9 shows, the 
switch t^ mounted on one 
side of the U-shaped chan- 
nel of the box, the outpLrt 
jacks on Sht^ other. A thin 
aluminum cover with a ho\v 
for the Ctipcicitor UnuI 
covers I he wire between 
coax connectors. The re- 
maining part of the btix 
mounts on the rear of tht* 
scope, so the unit is almost a 
plu^-in device Leads from 
the adaptor to the scope are 
kept short, partly by careful 
thought beforehand on 
parts arrangement. Con- 
struction can vary according 
to what is convenient in 
terms of your scope The on- 
ly rules to tollow an* the 
usual ones about short le^ads 
for rf 

The response of this adap- 
tor is smooth across the ham 
bands from 80 to 10 meters, 
with no significant dilfer- 
ence in the deflection of 
equal power signals among 
bands. Nor are there any pe- 
culiar peaks or other odd 
quirks. In !»hort, the adaptor 
does Its passive task tamely 
but effectively Position 2 
on ttie switch is used for the 
normal 100-Watt output 
from the rig and yields over 
an inch of deflection. Posi- 
tion 1 permits viewing o^ 
much tower power signals. 
The output from my SB'2UU 
produces about an inch and 
a half of deflection in posi- 
tion 4, thus confirming that 

24 73 Magazifte • April, 1984 




Interior view of the adaptor shown in Fig. S. The metal 
shield near the top covers the through tine from transmitter 
to antenna, white tlw switch holds the capacitor-divider. 
The broadband tran^iormer balun is mounted between the 
output jacks at the tower right. The ^rnatl perfboard holds 
an envelope detector for synchronizing the scope's sweep 



the capacitor choice is ade- 
quate for the most common 
range of ham signals The 
scope which the adaptor 
feeds, incidentally, is an 
Eico 430, 



Using the Adaptor 

Synchronizing the moni- 
tored signal to the scope 
sweep is desirable but not 
essential to the observation 
process. It is useful and pos- 



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Fig. 10. A stmple envelope detector for linearity checks and 
sync, ia) Envelope detector, (b) Scope sync systems. 




fig. 9. Physical layout of the 
hybrid scope adaptor. 

sible with CW dots or dashes 
sent at a constant rate (easi- 
ly done with an electronic 

keyer) and with two-tone 
[vsi^ on S5B. For the usual 
Christmas-tree pattern seen 
in casual monitoring of SSB 
or for AM trapezoidal pat- 
terns, sync is useless. 
Nonetheless, the technique 
for deriving a sync voltage is 
simple in principle and 
deserves mention. 

Fig. 10(a) shows a simple 
AM detector typical of 
those found in rf probes. 
With the isolating resistor, 
its output is very tow^ too 
low to drive the external 
sync connections on many 
scopes The problem be* 
comes clear in Fig. 10(b), 
block diagrams of two types 
of sync inputs. In one case, 
external sync is amplified 
before going to the sync lim- 
iter. In the other, sync voft- 
age goes directly to the tint- 
iter. A small external sync 
voltage cannot drive the 
second circuit without fur- 
ther ampiificatioa For two- 
tone testing SSB signals, an 
audio amplifier works well, 
but for CW, a dc amplifier is 
better, If your scope has a 
stable sweep oscillator, this 
additional circuitry adds lit- 
tle to the effectiveness of 
monitoring, but it does cre- 
ate a need for feeding power 
to the adaptor which is 
otherwise a passive device. 
For standard linearity pat- 
terns, of course, a pair of de- 
tectors is needed, but since 
the regular horizontal and 
vertical inputs of the scope 
are used for the test no 
power source is needed 

Using the monitor is an 
easy process. Connected as 
shown early in the article, 
the adapted scope will dis- 



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For other information, etc. please use Regular line 



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73 Magazine • April 1^B4 2S 



Farts List 



1 Single-pole, 5-position rotary 
switch 

1 FT 60^1 ferrite toroidal core 
#28 enamel wire (26 bifilar 
turns on core) 

2 S0^238 coax sockets 
2 phono socl^ets 

1 rSk-Orim, Vi-Watt resistor 
1 40*pF silver mfca capacitor 



1 20-pF silver mica capacitor 
1 10-pF silver mica capacitor 
1 5-pF siJver mica capacitor 
1 2,5-pF (or two 5-pF in series) 
silver mica capacitor 



1 2V4 ' k2V4 * x 4' aluminum 
utility box 



Radio Shack and other sources 



Amidon and other sources 



Radio Shack and other sources 
Radio Shack and other sources 
Radio Shack and other sources 
Avaifatjie frorn mail-order 
sources such as Semiconduc- 
tor Surplus 



Note: disc ceramic capacitors 

with 350-valt or higher ratings 

wilt substitute for the silver 

micas 

Radio Shack and other sources 



Total cost: $10, if all parts new; under $5 with surplus and/or used 
parts. 



play CW waveforms, plus 
two-tone and Christnnas- 
tree SSB patterns. No better 
observation of CW make- 
and-break patterns has been 
invented, and the results of 
adjustments to component 
values become immediately 



apparent. With respect to 
observation of SSB. the sim- 
ple adaptor technique might 
be considered somewhat ar- 
chaic. A spectrum analyzer 
will in fact provide more 
sensitive indications of in- 
correct linear-amplifier ad- 



justment. However, a spec- 
trum analyzer is an expen- 
sive piece of equipment. 

The two-tone test pro- 
vides good indications of 
improper amplifier adjust- 
ment if the operator takes 
the time to become person- 
ally familiar with and sensi- 
tive to the meaning of the 
curves. Handbooks of a few 
years back provide ample 
drawings of various condi- 
tions of operation and their 
meaning. 

Some recent materials on 
the subject have bent over 
backward to discredit our 
ability to read two-tone en- 
velope patterns effectively. 
This is true only if we do not 
thoroughly learn the pecu- 
liarities of our equipment 
The idiosyncrasies of each 
amplifier and each scope re- 
quire that we make exten- 
sive on-the^air and dummy- 
load tests to discover at 
what point slight flattening 
of the pattern top, or slight 
curvature to the pattern 



sides, means distortion of 
our voices or adjustments of 
the drive or loading which 
are out of spec We may not 
be able to match laboratory 
results, bul we can keep our 
rigs well within FCC regula- 
tory requirements and well 
within what courtesy to 
other operators dictates. 

Despite the fact ihat rf 
adaptors for old audio 
scopes have been supplant- 
ed by more sensitive meth- 
ods of monitoring, it will be 
a long time before we can 
all afford up-to<lale test 
equipment. In the interim, a 
small investment [maybe 
$30 to $50 for a used scope 
and $5 for the monitor) can 
go a long way toward help- 
ing us put out cleaner sig> 
nals. The tiny monitor box 
shown here (which might 
even fit inside some of the 
large old scope cases) 
makes the process of moni- 
toring one step easier 1 only 
wonder how small the next 
monitor design will be H 



• TECHNICAL FORUMS 

• AfiRL AND FCC FORUMS 

• GIANT 3-DAY Fl-EA MARKET 

Starting Noon Friday 

All Day Saturday and Sunday 

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• CW PROFICIENCY AWARDS 

• AMATEUR OF YEAR AWARD 

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ADMISSION 

$7.50 in advance, S 1 at door. 
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S 1 4 in advance. S 16 at door. 

FlEA MARKET SFACE 

St 5 in advance. 
(V^lidforaU3day5) 

Checks for advance registration to 

Dayton HAMVENTION 
Box 2205. Dayton. OH 45401 



April 27,28.29. 1984 

Hara Arena and Exhibition Center — Dayton, Ohio 

Meet your amateur radio friends from all over the world at the internationally 
famous Dayton HAMVENTION. 

Seating will be limited for Grand Banquet and Entertainment on Saturday 
evening so please make reservations early. Many Dannals. W2HD. Past Presi- 
dent ARRL will be featured speaker. 

If you have registered within the last 3 yeara you will receive a brochure in 
January. If not, write Box 44, Dayton, OH 4540 1 . 

Nominations are requested for Radio Amateur of the Year and Special Achieve- 
ment Awards. Nomination forms are available from Awards Chairman. Box 44, 
Dayton. OH 45401. 

For special motel rates and reservations write to Hamvention Housing. Box 
1288. Dayton, OH 45402. NO RESERVATIONS WILL BE ACCEPTED BY 
TELEPHONE. 

All other Inquiries write Box 44. Dayton, OH 4540 1 or phone (51 3) 433-7720, 

ALL Flea Market spaces will be sold in advance ONLY NO spaces sold at gate. 
Entrance for set-up available starting Wednesday. Special Flea Market tele- 
phone {513) 223^923, 

Bring your family and enjoy a great weekend in Dayton. 

Sponsored by the Dayton Amateur Radio Association, Inc. 



28 73 Magazine • Apri!, 1984 



i 



I 



I 




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73 Magazine * April, 19a4 



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73 Magazine * April, 1984 29 



ioseph I. Can K4iPV 
5440 South 8th Rosd 
Afitngton VA 22204 



Digital Design: 
How to Interface ICs 

Connect ICs to the outside world with these hints 

from the author of '"Digital Basics/' 



The reader response to 
my three-part series ti- 
tled "Digital Basics" (7J, 
September through Novem- 
ber, 1982) was overwhelm- 
ing even to an old tech-writ- 
ing hack like myself In addi- 
tion to receiving more than 
a dozen positive letters (and 
no negative ones), I received 
a consulting offer; writing 
for 73 surely pays! 

One theme which popped 
up In about one-third of the 
letters was digital interfac- 
ing. Readers wanted to know 
how to interface various dig- 
ital \C logic families with 
each other and with the 
"outside world/' In this ex- 
tension of the original series, 
we will discuss interfacing 



♦5V0C 




"•OUTPUT 



Fig. 1(al 771 totem-pole out- 
put 




•-OUT^sUT 



Fig. 1(b). TTL operhcotJector 

OU0Ut 

30 73 Magazine • April, 1984 



techniques and how they 
can be applied in practical 
situations. 

Logic Family Outpub 
and Inputs 

Most readers will be using 
either the transistor-transis- 
tor-logic (TTL) or comple* 
mentary-metal'Oxide-semi- 
conductor (CMOS) and re^ 
la ted MOS families. These 
will be the devices discussed 
in this article. 

Before we can become 
too deeply involved in any 
discussion on interfacing, 
we must become familiar 
with just what is being inter- 
faced. For digital electron- 
ics, this means a review of 
the input and output circuits 
of the devices, since these 
are what will be connected 
together. 

The TTL logic family op- 
erates from a single-polarity 
dc power supply of + 5 volts 
dc and ground. This supply 
must be regulated to keep 
the voltage within a narrow 
range— 475 to 5 2 volts. 



IMPUT A «- 



W«PUt H •- 



i 



Some texts permit slightly 
broader limits, but practical 
experience indicates that 
voltages lower than +4,75 
volts cause erratic opera- 
tion, especially of complex 
function devices, while po- 
tentials over about +5.2 
volts lead to premature fail- 
ure of large numbers of 
chips. I personally prefer to 
keep the potential within 
the even narrower range of 
+ 4.9 to +5.05 volts dc. 

The TTL output stage is a 
current sink to ground, while 
the TTL input is a current 
source. Figs. 1(a) and 1(b) 
show two popular forms of 
TTL output while Fig. 1(c) 
shows a typical TTL input 
circuit. The high and low 
logic levels in TTL are speci- 
fied in terms of the voltages 
that satisfy the input re- 
quirements. 

The high level will be any- 
thing between +2.4 volts 
and +5.0 volts. In most TTL 
devices, the output will pro- 
duce a potenfiat greater 
than +2,4 volts for high, but 



•IVSC 




Fig. 1(cl TTL inputs. 



considerably lower than +5 
volts; potentials in the 3 0- 
to-4.0-volt range are most 
frequently found. The low 
condition is defined as any 
potential between 0.0 volts 
and 8 volts, i.e., 800 milli- 
volts. The region between 
0.8 volts and +2.4 volts is 
undefined and is therefore 
to be avoided- One problem 
seen in some interfacing sit* 
uations is the creation of a 
circuit that wilt not bring the 
outputs to within the de- 
fined high and low limits, 
thereby creating an unpre- 
dictable situation. 

One advantage of using 
IC logic elements is that we 
are free to avoid the prob- 
lems of impedance matching 
{and other related head- 
aches) when connecting the 
devices together in cascade. 
We can use the concepts of 
fan-in and farhout. The term 
fan-in defines the load pre- 
sented by any device in 
terms of standard TTL input 
loads. Since the TTL input is 
little more than a 1.6-mil- 
liampere current source, we 
define a fan-in of 1 as a cur- 
rent source of 16 mA, at 
standard TTL logic voltage 
levels. The farnjut is the 
drive capacity of a logic de- 
vice defined in terms of the 
number of standard 1.6-mA 
TTL loads that the output 
will drive. In most devices, 
the fan-out is ten, so the 
device wilt successfully 
drive up to ten standard TTL 
loads. (In other words, it has 



a 16-mA output current sink 
capacity.) Some special de- 
vices called buffers or tine 
drivers typically will have 
fan-outs of thirty, but up to 
one hundred are known. 

Most TTL devices have 
an output circuit such as 
the one shown in Fig. 1(a). 
The output circuit is a 
totem-pole power amplifier 
consisting of two NPN tran- 
sistors, A blocking diode 
prevents current flow from 
the output terminal through 
Q1 to the +5-volt power- 
supply line. When the out- 
put is low, transistor Q1 is 
turned off and Q2 is turned 
on. This places the output 
line at or near zero volts. 
The actual potential will be 
the Vce(sat) rating of Q2, 
which may be as much as 
0,8 volts. In the opposite 
condition, when the output 
is high, the opposite occurs: 
Transistor Ql is turned on 
and R2 is turned off. This 
places a potential on the 
output line that is the 
+ 5-volt power-supply volt- 
age less the Vce(sat) rating 
of Ql and the junction drop 
of the series diode (normally 
0,6 to 0,7 volts). 

An alternate form of TTL 
output is the open-collector 
circuit of Fig. 1 (b). The open- 
col lector device is used to 
drive external devices and is 
a prime tool in interfacing 
with other togic families as 
well as with the ''outside 
world/' Transistor Ql will be 
connected to the V + (which 
is not always +5 volts, even 
though the package power- 
supply voltage must be -h5 
volts dc) through a pull-up 
resistor or another form of 
load. Normally, if a simple 
pull-up resistor is used for 
the load, we will need 2000 
to 3000 Ohms for +5-volt 
power supplies, and propor- 
tionally higher for higher po- 
tentials, TTL devices with 
open-collector outputs in- 
clude the following hex in- 
verters: 7405 (+5-vott sup- 
ply only), 7406 (to + 30 volts 
at up to 30 mA), 7416 (to 
+ 15 volts at up to 40 m A), 
and the following hex non- 
inverting buffers: 7407 (30 



volts, 30 mA) and 7417 (15 
volts, 40 mA). These devices 
are of prime concern for our 
interfacing chores. Note 
that certain other TTL de- 
vices also have open-collec- 
tor outputs. 

An example of a TTL in- 
put circuit is shown in Fig. 
1(c). The device shown here 
is a two-input circuit as is 
found in each section of a 
device such as the 7400 two- 
input NAND gate, Each in- 
put will source up to 1 .6 mA 
of current 

A CMOS inverter circuit 
is shown in Fig. 1(d), The 
typical CMOS device will 
have a pair of complemen- 
tary MOSFET transistors con- 
nected in series with the out- 
put taken at the junction be- 
tween the two. Transistor 
Ql is a p-channel MOSFET, 
while Q2 is an n-chanoel 
MOSFET. These devices 
have opposite properties 
such that Ql will be turned 
off (high-resistance channel) 
by a high applied to the in- 
put, while Q2 is turned on by 
a high on the input. Thus, for 
each different binary logic 
level, we will always have a 
series circuit consisting of a 
high resistance and a low 
(approximately 200 Ohms) 
resistance. For output-low 
conditions, there will be a 
high resistance to V+ (Ql 
off) and a low resistance to 

V — [Q2 on). For the output- 
high condition, exactly the 
opposite occurs: there is a 
low resistance to V+ (Ql 
on) and high resistance to 

V - (Q2 off). 

Thus, we will see the 
CMOS output sink current 
on low and source current 
on high. Although this fact is 
not needed when interfac- 
ing CMOS-to-CMOS, it is 
useful for other interfacing 
chores. 

The CMOS input is essen- 
tially an open circuit. CMOS 
devices operate using elec- 
trostatic fields derived in the 
channel from potentials ap- 
plied to the gate terminal. 
This terminal is insulated by 
a thin metal-oxide layer and 
thus represents an immense- 
ly large resistance. Various 



v + 



IMPUT *- 




« OUTPUT 



V- OR ^ 



Fig. 1{d]. CMOS inverter, showing inputs and outputs. 



authorities quote not less 
than 1 megohm, with some 
going to 10^^ Ohms, Thus, 
many CMOS devices can be 
driven from the same output 
with regard for current- 
driven capability. There 
may, however, be capaci- 
tance limitations, especially 
where a rapid rise time must 
be maintained. 

Interfacing Between 
Logic Families 

Fig. 2 illustrates some of 
the circuit situations re- 
quired to interface between 
CMOS and TTL devices. Or- 
dinarily, a single low-power 
(74 L) or low-power Schottky 
(74LS) TTL device can be di- 
rectly driven from a CMOS 
output, provided that the 
CMOS device is operated 
from a +5-volt power sup- 
ply and ground. Normally, 
CMOS devices can operate 
with ±V of ±4.5 to ±15 
volts dc; furthermore, these 
supplies need not be equaL 
We could, for example, oper- 
ate from V+ =5 volts, and 
V— =0 volts (grounded). It is 
only this latter situation that 
will accommodate Fig. 2(a). 
Here the CMOS device will 
directly drive the 74L or 
74LS TTL device. These TTL 
devices operate from lower 
current levels than does reg- 
ular TTL. 

Two specific CMOS de- 



CMOS 
DEVICE 



>- 



OWE 741. OR T4LS 
TTL INPUTS 



Fig. 2(a). CMOS'to-74L or 
-74LS devices. 



> 



4001 /40DZ 
CMOS DEVICES 



> 



TTL INPUT 



Fig. 2(bl 4001/4002 CMOS will 
drive one regular TTL load. 



vices will directly drive a sin- 
gle regular TTL input: the 
4001 quad two-input NOR 
gate and the 4002 dual four- 
input NOR gate. See Fig. 
2(b). Note that the B series 
CMOS (4001 B) would prob- 
ably drive more than one 
input 

Fig. 2(c) shows the use of 
the 4049 or 4050 devices- 
These devices are hex in- 
verter and hex non-inverting 
buffers, respectively. They 
are specially designed to di- 
rectly drive up to two regu- 
lar TTL inputs (output cur- 
rent of 3.2 m A) provided that 
the 4049/4050 package is op- 
erated from +5 volts and 
ground, rather than some 
other V + /V— combination. 

In Fig. 2(d) we see that a 
TTL output will drive a 
CMOS input (actually, sev- 
eral can be accommodated) 
provided that there is a cur- 
rent source. Recall that the 
TTL output wants to see a 
1.6-mA to 16-mA current 
source for its load, while the 
CMOS input is an extremely 
high impedance. In order to 
keep the TTL device operat- 
ing properly, we must pro- 




> 



ANY TWO 
TTL INPUTS 



> 



Fig. 2(c). 4049 and 4050 CMOS 
devices will drive up to two 
regular TTL loads. 






> 



TTL 
DEVICE 



2 K - 3K 



O 



CMOS 

IWPUT 



Fig. 2(d}. TTL-to-CMOS (operat- 
ed from + 5 volt supply). 

73 Magazine • April, 1984 31 



o 



V* 



1 



*4 TO *ia 






?4tT 



^ 



GVQS OPERATED AT 
|V*| > H3VDC1 



f/g.2fej. TTLtaCMOS (operat- 
ed from V'\- greater than +5 
votts, and V— =0 volts). 




OF Vice 



ClilOS 
DEVICE 



Fig. 2(fl TTUo-CMOS [operat- 
ed from ± V supplies} 

vide a 2 to 3k-Ohm pull-up 
resistor between the TTL 
output and + 5 volts dc. We 
must limit this method to 
those cases where the TTL 
voltage levels are compati- 
ble with the CMOS. If the 
CMOS device is operated 
from +5 votts and ground, 
then there is no problem. 

Recall from the previous 
series on digital basics that 
the CMOS device output 
will go through a high/low or 
low/high transition when the 
input voltage is midway be- 
tween the V+ and V^ volt- 
ages. If, for example, the 
supplies are +5 volts and 
ground, then the transition 
occurs close to +2,5 volts. 
But; if the supplies are ±T2 
volts (or any other legal po- 
tential), then the transition 
occurs near zero. Similarly, 
if the potentials are V+ =1 2 
volts and V— =6 volts, then 
the transition point is 
y3[( + 12)-(-6)]=W( + ia) 
or +9 volts. If this method 
were used in the latter case, 
the input of the CMOS de^ 
vice would jump back and 
forth between two 'iegal" 
tow potentials, so the output 



5V0C 



■i? 



1^ t 



2ZK 



H-TYPE 



y* 



IK 



ft-TT*¥ 
CMO$ 



if 



>-^ 



Dl 



LIGHTS am 

OgtPWT LOW 



Fig. 3(a}. CMOS //ght-on-out- 
put'low LED interfacing, 

would never toggle In Fig. 
2(e} we show you how to 
deal with that problem. 
For those cases where the 

CMOS device operates from 
power-supply potentials 
other than +5 volts and 
ground, we will need a cir- 
cuit such as the one in Fig. 
2(e). Here we will use one of 
the "high-voltage'' hex in- 
verter IC devices discussed 
at the beginning of this arti- 
cle: 7406, 7407, 7416, and 
7417 are candidates; 7405 
can operate only from +5 
volts, so it is ruled out Note 
that the package power*sup* 
ply voltage for these TTL de- 
vices must remain at +5 
volts only, but the voltage 
applied to the open-col- 
lector output transistor via 
the pull-up resistor can be 
up to the CMOS V-h limit of 
+ 15 volts dc A lOkOhm 
pull-up resistor will suffice. 

Fig. 2[f) shows how to in- 
terface the TTL device with 
CMOS devices that are op- 
erated from bipolar power 
supplies instead of V — = 0. 
In this circuit, we use a 
MOSFET transistor (or one 
section of the CMOS 4007 
device) in between the two 
logic devices. Resistor R1 
provides a current source 
for the TTL output, while R2 
limits the MOSFET current 
to a safe value and develops 
the potential applied to the 
CMOS input VH- and V— 
must be nearly equal. 

Finally, in Fig. 2{g) we see 
a circuit that has a certain 
universality. In most cases, 



-^W*" 



/tr 



^"" 




F/g- 2fgjL Universaf TTL to other logic devices, 
32 73 Magazine • April, 1964 



> 






I HOI I 



LEO 



Fig 3(b). CMOS light-orhout- 
put-high interfacing, 

the function of this circuit 
will be to interface TTL to 
certain other higher-voltage 
logic families (such as 
CMOS operated from sup- 
plies over -1-5 volts, HNIL, 
HTL, etc.) In the majority of 
such instances, you will use 
a 7406, 7407, 7416, or 7417 
device in place of transistor 
Ql, but this circuit may 
prove useful in some sit- 
uations. 

For example, in an ex* 
isting device, there may be 
too little room to add an IC, 
but plenty of room to 
kludge on a 2N2222 or simi- 
lar transistor. This situation 
turned up one time when I 
worked for a medical school 
electronics laboratory. It 
seems that one of the re- 
searchers had an elderly fre- 
quency/period counter that 
used zero and -1-12 volts as 
the logic levels, yet she 
wanted to interface this 
counter to a modern instru- 
ment that provided TTL out* 
put levels. The solution was 
to kludge R1-R3 and Q1 on- 
to the PC board inside of the 
older instrument, and create 
a new input. 

Register R1 is used, regard- 
less of whether open-col- 
lector logic is used, and 
serves to provide a current 
for the TTL output to sink. 
When the TTL output is low, 
point A in Fig. 2(g) will be at 
zero potential, so the base 
of Q1 is turned off. Under 
this condition, the output is 
high (inverted). Similarly, 
when the output of the TTL 
device is high, the potential 
at point A is 3 to 4 volts, so it 
can bias the base of Ql on, 
Under this condition, the 
transistor is saturated and 
will produce a low output. 
This method is useful so 
long as an inverted output is 
sufficient Otherwise, cas- 
cade two similar stages. I 



fli 



<S§) 






->-^ 



TTL QCVICE WltM 



Fig 3fci TTt opefhcol lector 
LED inferfacing (circuit will 
also drive very'low-current 
tampsX 



suspect, however, that any 
situation where cascading 
twoQl stages is feasible will 
also permit the kludge of a 
14-pin DIP, thereby making 
the use of the hex inverter 
the preferred method. 

Interfacing Lamps and LEDs 

Incandescent tamps and 
light-emitting diodes (LEDs) 
are often used in digital in- 
struments to indicate logic 
status or to signal some 
event like the completion of 
a process, etc. The B series 
CMOS devices can often be 
interfaced directly with 
light-emitting diodes, pro- 
vided that no more than 
about 15 mA of current will 
light the LED to an accept- 
able brightness (the usual 
case). The A series devices 
are not able to do this neat 
trick because they have as 
little as one-third the current 
sinking/sourcing capability 
of the B series devices. 

Figs. 3(a) and (b) show the 
use of direct interfacing be- 
tween a B series CMOS de- 
vice and the low-current 
LED. The circuit in Fig 3(3) 
uses the LED as a pull-up be- 
tween the CMOS output 
and the positive power sup- 
ply and wilt cause the LED 
to light on any output4ow 
condition. The CMOS out- 
put in this case operates as a 
current source to ground. In 
Fig. 3(b), the LED is con- 
nected between the CMOS 
output and ground and will 
light only on output-high 
conditions. In this case, the 
CMOS output is used as a 
current source. 

Fig. 3(c) shows the use of 
an open-collector TTL de- 
vice to drive the LED. If V + 



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73 Magazine • Apfll, 1984 33 



> 



CliOS 

m 



4T0 




fig. Jfcft /n candescent tamp in- 
tracing with PNP transistor. 



svnc* 



•; 



m 







«« 



TTL OH 
CWOS 




74}Cl Oft T4ir 



Fig. 3(el Incandescent iamp in- 
terfacing with NPN transistOL 

is +5 volts, then the 7405 
device may be used. The 
7406, 7407, 7416, and 7417 
devices may also be 
used at +5 volts or any 
potential up to the rated 
potential for the specific 
device (-hi 5 or +30, de- 
pending upon type) Resistor 
R1 is used to limit the cur- 
rent through the LED and 
the TTL output to a safe 
value, usually 15 mA. The 
value of R1 is given by 
Ohm's law: R1=(V + )/Iled 
or V + /0.015 if the 15-mA 
figure is acceptable. In this 
circuit, the TTL device 
operates as a current sink 
for the LED and will light on 
output-low. 

Incandescent lamps typi- 
cally draw a lot more cur- 
rent than LEDs. Some small 
current lamps ("grain-of- 
wheat" lamps) will operate 
directly from the 7417 TTL 
device, but most require too 
much current for safe opera- 
tion directly from TTL. We 
can, however, use the TTL 
(or CMOS) device to drive a 
transistor switch that will, in 
turn, operate the lamp or 
other load. This situation is 
depicted in Figs. 3(d) and 
3(e). In Fig. 3(d) we see the 
use of a PNP transistor to 
turn on the load When the 
base of Q1 is made low, 
then the base-emitter poten- 
tial is proper to turn on tran- 
sistor Q1; current will flow 
in the c-e path to the load. If, 

34 73 Magazine • April J 984 



t 






> 



TTL W 
CMOS 







Fig. 4. Driving large loads using Darlington-pair transistors. 



however, the logic output is 
high, then the base-emitter 
voltage is nearly zero, so the 
transistor is cut off. 

Fig. 3(e) shows the use of 
an NPN transistor for Q1. 
While the lamp in Fig 3(d) 
writ turn on for output-tow, 
the circuit shown in Fig. 3(e) 
turns on for output-high, 
Again, either TTL or CMOS 
devices can be used, within 
certain limitations. One limi- 
tation applied to TTL de- 
vices is that a putl-up resis- 
tor (Rl ) be provided so that 
the TTL output sees a cur- 
rent source. For CMOS de- 
vices, we must use a transis- 
tor that has a high enough 
beta gain that it will saturate 
with the current available 
from the CMOS output. Re- 
sistor R2 is used to limit the 
current applied to the base 
of Q1 , When the IC output is 
high, then a current flows in 
R2 that will turn on the tran- 
sistor Under that condition 
Q1 IS saturated, so its collec- 
tor will be at or near ground 
potential This condition 
makes the load see a current 
flow, so if it is a lamp then it 
will light up. 

Large loads, i.e., those of 
high current but limited 
voltage, can be accommo- 
dated with the circuit of Fig. 
4. Here we extend Fig. 3(e) to 
account for the higher cur- 
rents of the toad, There are 
two transistors used in this 
circuit In most cases, we 
will use a ''driver" transistor 
such as the 2N3053 for Q1 
and a "power' transistor 
such as the 2N3055 for Q2. 
Note that some semicon- 
ductor manufacturers offer 
TO-3 packages containing 
both Q1 and Q2 and term 



the combination 'Darling- 
ton'' transistors after the 
fact that the circuit in which 

these transistors are con- 
nected is catted a "Darling- 
ton amplifier" or "Darling- 
ton pair" 

The advantage of this cir- 
cuit is the amplification of 
beta (Hfer) that occurs. The 
total beta is the product of 
the individual beta ratings, 

or: Hfe^total) = Hfe(Qi) 
xHfe(Q2)- If you recall your 
basic transistor theory, the 
beta is defined as the collec- 
tor current divided by the 
base current, or Ic/'b For ex- 
ample, if the beta of Q1 is 80 
and the beta of Q2 is 50, 
then the total beta is (80X50) 
or 4,000. The implication of 
this is that the drive current 
need only be 1/4000 of the 
load current! Let's assume 
that there will be approx- 
imately 1.2 mA available to 
drive the Darlington pair 
when the TTL output is high. 
With a beta of 4000, the 
load current will be more 
than 4 Amperes 1 Of course, 
a transistor must be selected 
for Q2 that will "hack" the 
current of the load. 

The diode shown in parai* 
lei with the load is advisable 
for all creative (capacitive 
or inductive) loads, and for 
most very high current 
loads. It is especially neces- 
sary in inductive-load cir* 
cuits, for example, when the 
load is a relay or solenoid 
coif The problem is the in- 
ductive spike produced by 
an inductor energized with 
dc when the circuit is inter- 
rupted. Under this circum- 
stance, the energy stored in 
the magnetic field around 
the inductor will collapse 



{ 



I 



HI 



Di 



> 



JM 



TTL {>EVlCE 



Fig. 5fa) Interfacing opefhcol- 
lector TTL to low-current 
relays. 

and the counter-electromo- 
tive force generated will be 
opposite the polarity of V-F 
and will have a very high val- 
ue (kilovolts are possible). 
It you have studied calcu- 
lus, then you will see that V 
= L(dl dt) can reach a very 
high number in the situation 
where the current flow is 
abruptly terminated [di/dt is 
negative and has a rapid fall 
time). 

The diode is reverse- 
biased most of the time but 
will conduct when the 
CEMF potential is applied. 
Since the potential can easi- 
ly reach hundreds of volts in 
practical situations, the 
diode must have a piv rating 
of 1000 volts or more. I rec- 
ommend 1N4007 for all but 
very heavy inductive loads; 
for heavier cases, use series- 
connected 1N4007 devices 
with each diode shunted by 
a 470k-Ohm-to-1-megohm, 
Vi-Watt, carbon resistor 

Fig. 5 shows two situa- 
tions where electromechani- 
cal relays — those work- 
horses of electricity/elec- 
tronics left over from the 
19th century but still via* 
ble — are interfaced with 
digital IC devices. 

In Fig. 5(a) we see the use 
of an open-co I lector TTL 
device for directly interfac- 
ing with a low-current relay. 
Some manufacturers offer 
low-current (40*mA and 
under) relays, both in regular 
relay packages and in 
packages resembling IC 
packages (both metal-can 
and DIP packages are 
available). Keep in mind the 
voltage and current limita- 
tions of the 740b, 7407, 7416, 
and 7417 devices listed at 
the beginning of this article. 

For heavier relays, we will 




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73; Amateur Radio's Technical Journal • Box 931 • Farmingdale, NY 11737 



344FS 



I 



73 Magazine * Apr! I J 984 35 



»s»oc 



TTL>0- 



m 



a.7K 




CGNTACTS 



Fig. 5(b}. Interfacing TTL or CMOS to higher-current relays. 



the high voltage transient 
will blow the senniconductor 

Relays are used for many 
applications. Of course, if 
the current is too high to be 
conveniently handled by the 
semiconductor, then a relay 
is in order But. today, we 
have numerous high-current 
power transistors and Dar- 
lington devices, so this ap- 
plication Is fading. The isola- 
tion provided by the relay, 
however, makes it attractive 
whenever the logic device 
must be interfaced with a 
high-vottage circuit, or the 
ac power lines (115 volts ac). 

Finally, we see one fur- 
ther method for providing 
isolation between a digital 




Fig 6. Drivingan isolated load 

use a switching transistor, as 
in Fig. 5(b). This is merely an 
extension of the earlier cir- 
cuits. The diode transient 

suppressors are mandatory, 
however, If these are not 
used, especially in Fig. 5(a), 



circuit and some outside- 
world load. There are de- 
vices called optoisolators 
(Fig. 6) available in which an 
LED and either a phototran- 
sistor or a photodiode are 
placed such that the LED 
will illuminate the transis- 
tor/diode (whichever). The 
pair is housed inside of an 
opaque DIP package that 
has the same 0.1 " X 0.3" pin- 
outs as the digital IC devices 
in the circuit. When the LED 
is turned on, i.e., when the 
logic device output is low, 
then the phototransistor 
base is illuminated, so the 
transistor is turned on. Un- 
der this condition, the out- 
put will be a potential close 
to V+. When the LED is 
extinguished, i.e., when the 
logic output is high, then the 
phototransistor base is 
turned off and there will be 
no voltage across the load 
resistor In most cases, the 
dangerous isolated circuit 
will be on the transistor side 
of the optoisolator In some 
cases, however, the danger- 



ous side of the citcuit will 

send the signal and thus will 
be on the LED side. 

Conclusion 

The advantages of digital 
logic are even greater when 
we can interface either be- 
tween logic families or to 
the outside world. The tech- 
niques in this article allow 
us, among other things, to 
interface elderly digital 
equipment obtained on the 
surplus market to modern 
equipment, or to interface 
essentially non-digital cii^ 
cults (control) that are still 
binary in nature to some dig- 
ital instrument For exam- 
ple, a trivial case would be 
the push-to-talk circuit on a 
transmitter. As another ex- 
ample, the transmitter con- 
trol circuit on a linear power 
amplifier could be placed 
under control of a computer 
in which the digital inter- 
facing is between a 3.2 mA 
(fan-out — 2) output port 
terminal and the radio equip- 
ment. Lots of luck.B 



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Rnvfl^i Pn>a * ^rnJ GfAgAm 4 ^criifhg &mc*,i 4 1\am Aid 

Shopiping ikki: 4 'S-iinCiA 4 ^i\till V-uii;.* 4 S^HSOfry Hirvi 
Sp*ili^ Aid 4 &r«^w^Jtiih 4 6uf\tmmlf>%t'ntt 4 5ym T Atwn 

ranmi 3 4 T^ Hlltlt'tcm ).nw 4 fv^i^nu r>*i 4 VKJO-ri 
VfehClfl t«t 4- VlC Ottlll 4 Vlt 5yn^oNdrt^ 4 Wym^ut IfibI 



36 TSMagazirm * April, 1984 




PRIVATE PATCH II 

THE ULTIMATE SIMPLEX AUTOPATCH 



PRIVATE PATCH II is for the discriminating amateur 
who demands the finest in simplex autopatch perfor- 
mance, features and quality. Our digitafly processed 
VOX and simplex loop create a level of communica- 
tions quality which is not even closely rivaled. Please 
. , , do not confuse our technique with sampling!! 
PRIVATE PATCH II has the following major advan- 
tages over sampling type autopatches: 

• Compatibte with every known transceiver — yes, synthesized 
arxJ relay switched types included. 

• No transceiver modifications are ever required! 

• Connects only to MIC and external speaker jack— no inter- 
nal connections to your transceiver required. 

• Natural push to talk operation — no need to pause— you rrey 
talk the instant the button is prassed. 

• Much greater range — noise on your weak mobile signal 
causes no performance degradation. (Noise sampled auto- 
patches fail to operate when your signal becomes r>oisy.) 

• Private Patch 11 offers natural 'Take-turns" style of communi- 
cations in the manner you are used to. There are no annoy- 
ing sampling kerchunks and missing syllables punched out 
of every other word. 

• in addition to supertD simplex operation, Private Patch It will 
operate through any repeater from your base location. Yes, 
any repeater! Tone encoding equipment and repeater modifi- 
cations are not required. 

b 

STANDARD FEATURES 



CW identification— ID ROM chip included. 

Single chip XTAL controlled tone decoder. 

Tone to pulse— compatibility with all telephone systems— 
eliminates critical tone adjustments in the mobile — ^no wrong 
numbers, ever! Can be strapped for straight tone dialing. 

Speed dialer compatible— can consume up to 15 digits per 
second. 

Sophisticated toll restrict logic— user programmable restrict 



• Five digit access code— 59,049 user programmable code 
combinations! (Their three digit code beginning with * has 
less than 196 combinations.) 

► Ringback (reverse patch)— alerts you with CW ID. 

» Busy channel ringback inhibit— will not send CW ID alert if 
channel is in use — defeatabie. 

• Three/six minute "timeout" timer— resettabte from the 

mobile— four CW ID warnings during final minute, 

• Control interrupt timer- assure reliable and positive control. 

• Self contained 115V AC supply— 230V 50«0 Hz available at 
slight additional cost. 

• Modular phone jack— and seven foot cord, 

• 14 day return privilege — when ordered factory direct 

• One year factory warranty. 

OPTION: FCC registered coupler 

Inquire about commercial and half duplex models. 




i 




I 



OUR QUALITY GLASS BOARD, SUPERB ENGINEERING 
AND EXCELLENT COMPONENTS BLEND TOGETHER 
TO PRODUCE THE FINEST AMATEUR AUTOPATCH 
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HENRY RADIO 

Los Angeles CA. Anaheim CA. 
Butler MO 

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Cutvef Cily CA, R^o NV 



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23731 MADISON ST. TORRANCE, CA 90505 
PHONE (213) 373-6803 

73 Magazine • April, 1984 37 



4 





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)HAF 


IGES! 







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1 




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■ ! 


TYPE 


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2C39/7289 


$ 28.90 


813 


$ 42.50 


7843 


$ 90.95 


2E26 


6.75 


1 1 82/4600A 


425 00 


7854 


110.50 


2K28 


170.00 


4600A 


426,00 


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3-500Z 


86.70 


4624 


263,50 


7984 


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3-1000Z/8164 


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4657 


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8072 


71.50 


3B28/866A 


8.10 


4662 


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8106 


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4665 


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8117A 


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3CX1000A7/8283 


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482.00 


5721 


212,50 


8122 


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5768 


106.25 


8134 


399,50 


3X2500A3 


402.00 


5819 


101,00 


8156 


10.20 


3X3000F1 


482.00 


5836 


198.00 


8233 


51.00 


4-65 A/81 65 


58.65 


5837 


198,00 


8236 


29.75 


4-125A/4D21 


67.15 


5861 


119.00 


8295/PL172 


425.00 


4-250A/5D2Jr 


83.50 


5867A 


157,25 


8458 


29.75 


4 -400 A/8438 


83.50 


5868/AX9902 


229.50 


8462 


110.50 


4-400B/7527 


93.50 


5876/A 


35,70 


8505A 


80.75 


4-400C/6775 


93.50 


5881/6L6 


6.80 


8533W 


115.60 


4-1 000 A/81 66 


377.50 


5893 


51.00 


8560/ A 


63.75 


4CX250B/7203 


46.00 


5894/A 


46,00 


85 60 AS 


85.00 


4CX250FG/8621 


63.75 


5894B/8737 


46,00 


8608 


32.30 


4CX250K/8245 


102.25 


5946 


335,75 


8624 


85.00 


4CX250R/7580W 


76.50 


6083/AZ9909 


80,75 


8637 


59.50 


4CX30aA/8167 


144.50 


6 146/6 146 A 


7.25 


8643 


70.55 


4CX350 A/8321 


93,50 


6146B/8298 


9.00 


8647 


142.80 


4CX350F/8322 


97.75 


6146W/7212 


14.75 


8683 


80.75 


4CX350FJ/8904 


119.00 


6156 


93.50 


8877 


395.25 


4CX600J/8809 


710.00 


6159 


11.75 


8906 


11.05 


4CXioooA/ai6a 


206.00 


6159B 


20,00 


8950 


11.05 


4CX1000A/8168 


412,25 


6161 


276,25 


8930 


116.50 


4CX15OOB/8660 


471 .00 


6280 


36.25 


6L6 Metai 


21.25 


4 CX 5000 A/8 170 


935.00 


6291 


153,00 


6L6GC 


4.25 


4CX10000D/8171 


1067,00 


6293 


20,50 


6CA7/EL34 


4.60 


4C XI 5000 A/8281 


1275.00 


6360/A 


4,85 


6CL6 


3.00 


4CW800F 


603.50 


6399 


459.00 


6DJ8 


2.15 


4D32 


204.00 


65 50 A 


8,50 


6D05 


5.60 


4E27 A/5-1 25B 


204.00 


6883 B/8032 A/8552 


8,50 


6GF5 


5.00 


4PR60A 


170.50 


6897 


136,00 


6GJ5A 


5.30 


4PR60B 


283.25 


6907 


67.15 


6GK6 


5.10 


4PR65A/8187 


148.75 


6922/6DJ8 


4.25 


6HB5 


5.10 


4PR1000A/8189 


501.50 


6939 


18.75 


6HF5 


7.45 


4X150A/7034 


51.00 


7094 


212,50 


6JG6A 


5.35 


4X150D/7609 


81.00 


7117 


32.75 


6JM6 


5.10 


4X250 B 


38.25 


7211 


85.00 


6JN6 


5,10 


4X250 F 


38.25 


7213 


255.00 


6JS6C 


6.15 


4X500A 


350.00 


7214 


255.00 


6KN6 


4.30 


5C XI 500 A 


561 .00 


7271 


114.75 


6KD6 


7.00 


KT88 


23.50 


7289/2C39 


28.90 


6LF6 


5.95 


416B 


38,25 


7360 


11.50 


6LQ6 G.E, 


5.95 


416C 


53.00 


7377 


72.25 


6LQ6/6MJ6 Sylvarna 


7.65 


572B/T160L 


42.50 


7408 


2.10 


6ME6 


7.55 


592/3-200A3 


179.50 


7609 


80.75 


12AT7 


3.00 


807 


7.25 


7735 


30,60 


12AX7 


2.55 


811A 


12,75 


ML7ai5AL 


51,00 


12BY7 


4.25 


81 2A 


24,75 






12JB6A 


5.50 





NICORN ELECTRONICS 213-341-8833 

10010 Canoga Ave, Unit B 8, Chatsworth, CA 91311 

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^203 



38 73 Magazine • April, 1984 



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MRF247 


30.30 


! 2N1562 


19.99 


2N5646 


17.59 


MRF304 


36.95 


2N1692 


21.25 


2N5651 


9.39 


MRF309 


28.75 


2N2857JAN 


3.49 


2N5691 


15.30 


MRF314 


24.25 


2N2857JANTX 


3,49 


2N5764 


2295 


MRF315 


24.55 


2 N 2876 


11.49 


2N5836 


2.95 


MRF317 


64.35 


2N2947 


15,60 


2N5842 


7.20 


MRF420 


17,00 


2 N 2948 


11.05 


2N5649 


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MRF421 


31 .28 


2N2949 


13.19 


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2.75 


MRF422A 


35.19 


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r.32 


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30 60 


MRF427 


14 65 


2N3375 


14.55 


2N5922 


650 


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39.10 


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1.32 


2N5923 


21.25 


MRF433 


10.25 


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1319 


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1955 


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10,75 


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935 


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8.80 


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12.20 


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4.25 


2N5945 


9.80 


MRF4S3A 


15.65 


2 N 3866 


1 10 


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12 25 


MRF454A 


17,10 


2N3e66JAN 


1.87 


2N6080 


8.80 


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13,60 


2N3924 


2.85 


2N6081 


10.25 


MRF45a 


17.60 


2N3927 


14.65 


2N6082 


10,75 


MRF463 


21,25 


2N3950 


21.25 


2N6083 


1 1 25 


MRF472 


0.85 


2N4012 


9.35 


2N6084 


12.75 


MRF475 


265 


2N404t 


11.90 


2N6094 


9.35 


MRF476 


1,70 


2N4072 


1.53 


2N6095 


10.20 


MRF477 


12.70 


2N4080 


3.85 


2N6096 


13 70 


MRF492 


19.55 


2N4127 


17.85 


2N6097 


17.60 


MRF502 


0.90 


2N4427 


1.10 


2N6105 


17.85 


MRF503 


5,10 


2N4428 


1.57 


2N6136 


18.55 


MRF504 


5.95 


2 N 4430 


1003 


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34 20 


MRF509 


4.25 


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2.93 


2N6201 


42.50 


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910 


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1.95 


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1 35 


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1.70 


2N5090 


11.73 


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15,30 


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855 


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1840 


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7.35 


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13.70 


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47,60 


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11.25 


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23.45 


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13.15 


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25.45 


2 N 5589 


8.30 


MRF231 


9,28 


MRF816 


1275 


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9,30 


MRF232 


10,25 


MRFa23 


17 00 


2N5591 


11.75 


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10,75 


MRF901 (3 LEADS) 


85 


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270 


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^203 



^Sea List ol Advertisers on page 130 



73 Magazine • April, 1984 39 



Calvin B. McCarthy 
98 W/ndsof Street 
Thunder Bay. OrrtBrio 
Canada P7B 1 T7 



Emulate an EPROM Elephant 

The portable RAM-faker never forgets. 

Well, hardly ever. . . 



Members of the 2716 
family of erasable, 
programmable, readonly 
nnemories [EPROMsJ are ex- 
tolled as the hobbyist's 
friends because of their ease 
of programming, either with 
a simple manual program- 
mer or by microcomputer 
control However, in the lit- 
erature also appears a re- 
curring theme of inconve- 
nience. For example, you 



could spend four or five 
hours toggling in data with a 
manual programmer only to 
make a mistake in bit 
16,383. What is the fix? Erase 
al 1 1 6,3&4 bits of the E PROM 
and begin again Totally un- 
acceptable! Even repeating 
20 minutes of data input 
with a hexadecimal key- 
board is too much! 

Or maybe instead you 
eventually want a program 




The EPROM Emulator mounted on the KUobaud Klassroom 

SBC-2 computer Here, you see three extra DIP sockets 
under the HM 6116 instead of the described two because I 
have mounted the RAM on a carrier so that repeated inser- 
tions will not hurt the RAM pins, I then can use the memory 
without the Emulator circuit most of the time. 

40 73 Magazine • April, 1984 



in an EPROM but you want 
to try the program first 
before it is burned for 
posterity. The 'EPROM 
Emulator/' a RAM that 
pretends it is an EPROM, 
can help you. 

The HMSlie static RAM 
is almost pinout-compatible 
with the 2716 EPROM. 
Where the HM 6116 puts the 
WE on pin 21, the 2716 has 
Vcc pulling pin 21 high All 
other pins are identical This 
first suggests that empty 
EPROM sockets could be 
filled with 2K bytes of RAM 
to extend a smalt comput- 
er's memory. From here the 
CMOS construction makes 
the idea of battery backup 
of RAM data practical Then 
the next logical step is to 
build a small package con- 
taining RAM with battery 



backup which can be pro- 
grammed at full computer 
speed, data modified al will, 
but which can be removed 
from its socket without los- 
ing its data, placed in 
another socket in the same 
or any other computer wired 
for 2716 EPROMs, and used 
as an E PROM Once the pro- 
gram is debugged and run- 
ning satisfactorily in the 
Emulator, it can easily be 
copied into a 2716 for a per- 
manent record. 

A few simple modifica- 
tions are made to the basic 
RAM circuit to make it emu- 
late the EPROM, The Vcc 
must be applied through 
steering diodes so that the 
memory will see only one 
supply source at a time- 
Output enable (pin 20) is 
made continually low by at- 



Parts List 

1 Switch, DPDT, Radio Shack 27S626 ($2.69) 

2 Diodes, 1N914, Radio Shack 276-1620 (50 for S2.99) 

1 Resistor. 100k Ohms. V4 Watt (5 for $.49) 

2 24-pin DIP sockets, Radio Shack 276-1969 ($1.69 each) 

1 HM 6116 CMOS static RAM ($16.50 Quest; $14.95 James) 

2 Batteries, 1 V2 volt 



^ 



DATA flETEIiriO'W MODE 



CS f i 




EfiROM £4iULArM 



wm 



ft »i^^ 



2V^ 



CSiVoft'OtV 



F/g. t, low Vcc data-retention waveform. 



taching it directly to pin 12 
and disconnecting it from 
computer pin 20. The low 
Vcc data-retention mode 
needs the chip select held at 
y/cc to retain the data. This 
is achieved with a put I -up 
resistor connected to mem- 
ory pin 24 and a switch to 
disconnect the CS from ex- 
ternal circuitrv when in the 
data-retention mode To 
enable the computer to 
write to memory, pin 21 is 
disconnected from the com- 
puter and brought out to a 
clip lead so that pin 21 can 
be connected to the com- 
puter WE tine instead 
of being forced to Vcc in the 
2716 socket. When used as a 
2716, the WE line is 
attached to Vcc so that ac- 
cidental and catastrophic 
wntes do not occur 

These connections can be 
made using a small PC 
board to hold the com- 
ponents and using wire-wrap 
wire to make connections I 
use masking tape as a PC 
board etch resist and cut 
away the tape where copper 
is to be removed. This is 
quite satisfactorv for simple 
circuits such as this. The 
board then is epoxied be- 
tween the pins of the bot- 
tom DIP socket and makes a 
secure foundation for the 
rest of the circuit. The com- 
ponents are attached to the 
copper side of the board fac- 
ing up. Some miniaturiza- 
tion enthusiast could even 
find a way to store watch 
batteries in the case to make 
a one-box unit although f 
am using an external battery 
pack. 

To use the Emulator, I in- 
sert it into a 2716 EPROM 
socket with the switch set to 
battery supply. (?t must 
never be inserted into the 
computer with the com- 

t^Sve Uif of Adveftii9r& on pag^ 130 



puter supply off if the switch 
is in the computer-supply 
position. The result would 
be a quickly-discharged bat- 
tery.) The computer is then 
turned on and the Emulator 
switched to computer 
power It can then be used 
either as RAM or ROM 
depending on the WE con- 
nection. 

Construction 

The EPROM Emulator is 
built on two 24-pin DIP 
sockets and a small PC 
board. This serves as the 
support for the HM 6116 
RAM package. 

1) Pin 20 of the bottom 
socket is re mov ed. 

2) Pin 20 (OE) of the top 
socket is connected with a 
piece of wire to pin 12, the 
common pin. 

3) Pin 18 (CS) of the top 
socket is bent in so that no 
contact is made with the 
bottom socket. It is con- 
nected through a resistor to 
pin 24 of the top socket and 
through half of the DPST 
switch to pin 18 of the bot- 
tom socket. 

4) Pin 21 of the bottom 
socket is removed. 

5) Pin 21 of the top socket is 
connected to the computer 
WE line with a flexible wire 
and clip. 

6) Pin 24 of the top socket is 
bent in and made to contact 
the PC board land to which 
the diode cathodes are con- 
nected. 

7) Pin 24 of the bottom 
socket is connected to the 
anode of diode D1 to pro- 
vide computer Vcc. 

8) The second half of the 
DPST switch is connected 
across diode D1. 

With the switches closed, 
the computer Vcc powers 
the memory and allows the 
computer to select the 



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HMGIIt 
CMOS RAM 



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1 I I d I I 1 I I r I I 



PIN ?4 



fig. 2. The Emulator schematic. PC board is not to scale. Let- 
ters after pin numbers are B for bottom socket, T for top 
socket 



RAM for either a write or 
read With the switch open, 
the battery backup can 
power the memory and 



forces CS to be at Vcc back- 
up, putting the chip into its 
low Vcc dataretention 
mode, ■ 



coaxial R. F. 

antenna switches 



*99i 



::^: 



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*594 



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73 Magazine • April, 1984 41 



lohn M. franke WA4WDL 
1310 Boiihg A ven ue 
Norfofk VA I35QS 



Crystal Microwave 

Easedropping'' on this part of the spectrum is up to you. 

Here's a simple way to start. 



Interest in the microwave 
spectrum has increased 
rapidly since the introduc- 
tion of the "Cunnplexer" 
by Microwave Associates, 
Many amateurs, though, 
have expressed interest in 
finding a more economical 
way to get started What I 
hope to accomplish with 



this article is to show how 
to get involved in micro- 
waves with a minimum in- 
vestment of time and 
money. 

The microwave spectrum 
is populated with myriads 
of signals, ranging from 
telephone relays to televi- 
sion-studio links to radar to 




satellite signals. How can 
we detect and monitor 
these signals? The simplest 
way is with a crystal receiv- 
er. Don't scoff. I know of 
several production micro- 
wave systems that use crys- 
tal detectors or crystal vid- 
eo receivers as they are 
called. The common police 
radar detector is a special 
type of crystal video re- 
ceiver 

A crystal receiver can be 
broken down into four 
basic parts: an antenna, a 
tuned circuit the detector, 
and an amplifier [see Fig. 1), 
The most common tuned 
circuit is not really a tuned 
circuit but a high-pass filter, 
a waveguide. In this mode, 
the antenna and tuned cir- 
cuft can be combined. If 
the detector is mounted in 
the waveguide, then the on- 
ly external component is 
the amplifier 

Rectangular waveguide 




AWTENftiA 



will pass all frequencies 
above a cutoff frequency 
(f J, The cutoff frequency is 
determined by the internal 
width dimension of the 
waveguide. The cutoff fre- 
quency occurs when the in- 
ternal width is exactly one- 
half wavelength. A simple 
formula for calculating this 
is f^ =15/b, where b = inter- 
nal width in centimeters and 
f^=^ cutoff frequency in 
GHz. For example, the most 
common waveguide for the 
3-cm amateur band (10 GHz) 
has an internal width of 0.9 
inches or 2.29 cm. Hence, 
fc^6.55GHz, 

If the frequency is raised 
such that the width is now 
one wavelength, the guide 
can support another mode. 
This occurs at f = 2f^. So, the 
maximum stable frequency 
range is from f^. to 2i^. Well, 
if you consider skin losses 
and other factors, the prac- 
tical frequency range is 



O^o) 




TUNtD ClACVIT 



PTTECTOB 



JUtFLiriER 



front view of S-band unit stiowing diode placement 
42 73 Magazine • April, 1984 



Fig, 1, Basic elements of a crystal video receiver. 



from 1 .25 f^ to 1 .9 f^. For the 
previous example, the prac- 
tical or useful frequency 
range is 819 GHz to 12.44 
GHz. This h in good agree- 
ment with the published 
range of 8,2 GHz to 12.4 
GHz. Fig. 2 is a graph of the 
upper and lower practical 
frequency range of rectan- 
gular waveguides having in- 
ternal widths from 2 cm to 
18 cm. 

The graph is not meant 
just to enable you to deter- 
mine the frequency range of 
a piece of surplus wave- 
guide. It will also enable you 
to decide how wide to make 
a piece to use. Yes, you can 
make your own waveguide 
and do it without a machine 
shop. Waveguide can be 
made from flashing copper, 
brass shim stock, or, my fa- 
vorite, printed circuit board. 
To illustrate, i made a crys- 
tal video receiver to monitor 

several radars located near 
my home. 

There are three S-band 
search radars within 20 
miles of my home. The term 
S-band refers roughly to any 
frequency between 1,5 GHz 
and 5 GHz. Table 1 is a list- 
ing of these informal desig- 
nations. Table 2 is a listing of 
some microwave frequency 
ranges of interest. The local 
search radars are grouped 
from 2.7 GHz to 2.9 GHz. 




Fig. 2. Upper and lower fre- 
quencies shown tor rectan- 
gular waveguides. 

Hence, from Fig. 2, the 
waveguide should have an 
internal width between 6.9 
cm and 9 5 cm. I chose 8 cm 
as a compromise. The inter- 
nal height should be one 
half or less than the internal 
width* The guide height de- 
termines the impedance and 
power-handling capability 
of the guide. The useful fre- 
quency range of the 8-cm 
guide is approximately 2,4 
GHz to 3.6 GHz. This range 
just happens to include the 
amateur 240{>MH2 and 
3300-MH2 bands. Higher fr^ 
quencies can travel or prop- 
agate down the guide, but 
the mode structure would 
be uncertain. I mention this 
because the guide will pass 
X-band signals and you 
should not be surprised to 
hear them. 

For a crystal receiver, 1 



Band Designation 


Freq. Range (GH^ 


P 


^- .4 


L 


.4- 1.5 


8 


1.5- 5.0 


C 


4.0- 6.5 


X 


5.0-12.0 


K 


12.0-36.0 


Q 


36.0-45.0 


V 


45.0-60.0 



Table 1. Microwave band designations. 



Sourca/Emltter 


Freq, Range (GHz) 


ILS Glides ope 


.3286- .3354 


TACAN^DME 


.96-1.215 


Radar Beacons (IFF) 


103, 1.09 


Air Route Radar 


1.3-1,35 


Airpofl Radar 


2.7-2.9 


Aircraft Doppler Radar 


8.8 


Precision Approach Radar 


9.0-9.2 


Marin© Radar 


9.3-9.5 




Detector/ampt liter with X-band tread and nearby S and 
K-band heads. 



prefer to make the guide 1 

to 2 widths long. For the ex- 
ample, the guide is 9.5 cm or 
1.125 widths long. This 
length was chosen on the 
basis of available pieces of 
circuit board. Since the re- 
ceiver will not be used for a 
specrfic frequency but rath- 
er for a band, I mounted the 
BNC connector and de- 
tector one-half guidewidth 
from the shorted end. 

Construction is simple. 
The circuit board material is 
easily sawed or sheared to 
size. The BNC mounting 
holes and the opposing 
diode hole are drilled next. 
The guide is taped together 
and the seams are soldered 
with a 10O/150-W iron After 
assembly, the diode is placed 
inside and soldered No by- 
pass capacitor is used. I find 



that normal construction 
techniques are adequate to 
biock the microwave energy 
and pass only the modula- 
tion Surplus mixers have a 
very efficient bypass scheme 
and function well as crys- 
tal receivers. I use an 
X-band mixer to monitor 
small marine radars in the 
harbor. 

The weak detected signal 
is boosted by the amplifier 
shown in Fig. 3 An LM301 is 
used instead of the more 
common 741 because of the 
lower noise output of the 
LM301. The output of the 
amplifier is further boosted 
by Radio Shack's "Mini Am- 
plifier-Speaker/' The low 
current drain of the ampli- 
fier makes it inviting to ob- 
tain its power from the mini 
amplifier, but problems with 




Table 2 Selected emitter frequencies. 



Internal view of preamplifier showing circuit card and bat- 
tery^ 

73 Magazine • April, 1984 43 



DCTECTO" U«ft 



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Fig. 3. Schematic of a 50 X audio preampUfm. 



motorboating forced me to 
use an independent batteiy. 
The compact assembly ts 
quite portable and accoirh 
panies me on short outings. 
Waveguides are not the 
only usable fomn of crystal 
receivers. For narrowband 
signals, a separate antenna, 
tuned circuit or cavity, and 
detector might be better. 



Preamplifiers, if available, 
greatly enhance the overall 
sensitivity. 

Try something simple and 
build one of these. This 
might be the easiest micro- 
wave construction article 
yet Let me know Vi^hat you 
build and how it worked, 
and please remember to en- 
close an SASElH 



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44 73 Magazine • Aprtl. 1984 



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73 Magazine • April, 1984 45 




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73 Magazine * April, 1984 47 



Mi^ 



Take a Trip to Europe 

These tips from the world's top SWL make it possible. 



Roger N. Fetmson 
25 Orchard Lane 
New Canaan Crim40 




Want to visit a ski resort 
in Switzerland? Lis- 
ten to a concert in Vienna or 
the Scots Guard's Band on 
parade in London? Or go be- 
hind the Iron Curtain to hear 
the latest word from the 
Kremlin? 

You can experience alt of 
these and much more by 
tuning to the European 
shortwave broadcasters. 
With more than thirty sta- 
tions daily sending out 
broadcasts in English, you 
have a wide variety of pro- 
grams to choose from. And 
most are heard easily on 
even the most modest re- 
ceivers here in North 
America. 

The major ity of these sta- 
tions are stateowned and/or 
operated and afl but one 
are noncommercial. Some— 
particularly those located in 
Eastern Europe — can fill 
your ears with propaganda, 
but even some of these 
broadcasters can offer good 
programs to listen to. 
Others, like the BBC from 
London, Radio Netherlands^ 
and the Swiss Broadcasting 
Corporation, produce a mul- 
titude of excellent programs 
every week with practically 
no poli treat undertones. 



The programs you bear from West Germany emanate from 
this brand-new Broadcasting Center of Deutsche Welle in 
Cologne, 

48 73 Magazine * April, 1984 



so many stations 
and programs to choose 
from, you should easily be 
able to discover some of 

particular interest to you. 



Are you interested in pro- 
grams giving the latest DX 
news? There are some good 
ones coming out of Europe 
every week, The best is 
probably from Radio Neth- 
erlands, where every Thurs- 
day night they broadcast the 
popular Media Network, 
The producer, Jonathan 
Marks, talks with a network 
of correspondents in various 
parts of the world, examin- 
ing developments in the 
electronic media on both 
the technical and the pro- 
gramming side. In addition 
to reporting changes in 
broadcasting frequencies by 
stations all over the world, 
Media Network does an ex- 
cellent job of keeping listen- 
ers informed about new re- 
ceivers, antennas, and other 
equipment for the short- 
wave enthusiast Hear this 
on 9 590 or 6.165 MHz at 
0230 GMT and 9715 and 
6.165 MHz at 0530 GMT 
Fridays. 

Another excellent DX pro- 
gram comes from Switzer- 
land—The Shortwave Mer- 
rY-Go-Round. This features 
the "two Bobs," Bob Thom- 
ann and Bob Zannotti. This 
team answers letters with 
technical questions, reports 
on new developments in an- 
tennas and receivers, and 
carries on lively discussions 
about the state of the art. 
This program is on twice 
each month — on the 2nd 



and 4th Saturdays. Hear it at 
1315 CMT on 21370 or 
25 780 MHz 

Radio Sweden Interna- 
tional brings you another 
fine DX program, Sweden 
Calling DXers. This is on 
every Tuesday and Wednes- 
day and gives you a whole 
list of new or changing fre- 
quencies for stations all 
over the world. It is one of 
the best for keeping your 
"where to tune to" list up to 
date. Hear it Tuesdays at 
1415 GMT on 21.61 5 MHz or 
at 2315 GMT on 9.695 and 
11.705 MHz, and on 
Wednesdays at 0245 CMT 
on 9.695 and 11.705 MHz. 

Radio Sofia from Bulgaria 
is the one broadcaster from 
behind the Iron Curtain that 
is worthwhile listening to for 
its DX program. It is particu- 
larly good for radio ama- 
teurs, giving club news from 
around the world and hold- 
ing contests. You can hear it 
on Mondays at 0045 GMT 
on 9 700 MHz. 

There are some nine or 
ten other DX programs com- 
ing out of Europe, but at this 
writing, the ones mentioned 
above are by far the best. 
Belgium has a nice little pro- 
gram on Mondays at {)045 
CMT on 1 1 .695 or 9,870, and 
Austria has an excellent pro- 
gram on Sunday mornings at 
1230 CMT on 21 .615 MHz 

The Spanish Foreign Ra- 
dio from Madrid broadcasts 
a number of frequency 
changes and other DX mat- 
ters on Mondays at 0050 on 
11.880. Reception is usually 
excellent here in North 
America. And Radio Prague 
from Czechoslovakia has a 
DX show that features news 
and information for radio 
amateurs. It is very elemen- 
tary, however, and most lis- 
teners won't gain much 
knowledge from its usual 
fare. The program is on Fri- 
days at 0135 GMT, on 5.930 
or 9.630 MHz, 

World and local news are 
popular with experienced 
European shortwave broad- 
cast listeners. Almost every 
station broadcasts news, 
usually at the start of their 



ADDRESSES OF EUROPEAN SW BROADCASTERS FOR USE 




IF YOU WAKT QSL CARDS OR PROGRAM INFORMATION. 




Albania 


Great Britain 


Poland 




Radio Tirana 


BBC (British Broadcasting 


Radio Polonia 




Ruga Ismail Qemal) 


Corporation) 


Komitet do Spraw Radia 1 




Tirana 


Box 76, Bush House 


Telewlzjl 




Austria 


London WC2B 4PH 


ul Woronicza 17, 00-950 

1. ■. I 


■ 


Austrian Radio 


Gre#c« 


Warszawa 


! 


Short-Wave Service 


Voice of Greece 


Portugal 




A-1136 


PO Box 19 


E)cternal Relations 




Vienna 


Aghia Paraskevi, Attlkis 


Av, Engl Duarte Pacheco, 5 




Belgium 


Athens 


1000 Usboa 
Romania 




BRT 


Hungary 


Radio Bucharest 




PO Box 26 


Radio Budapest 


PO Box 1-111 


(I 
! 


6-100 


Brody Sandor 5*7 


Bucuresti 


!, 


Brussels 


H-1800 






Bulgaria 


Budapest 


Spain 

Radio Naclonal De Espana, SA 




Radio Sofia 


Italy 


Apartado 150,039 




BuigarJan Dragan Cankov 4 


Radiotelevlslone Itallana 


Madrid 24 




1421 Sofia 21 


Viale Maszini 14 


Sweden 




.^K L k 1 " 


00195 Rome 


Radio Sweden International 




Czeclioslovakia 

Radio Prague 

12099 Vinohradska 12 


Luxembourg 

Radio Luxembourg 
Villa Louvigny 


S-105 10 

Stockholm 




Praha 2 


Switzerlend 




r 1 '□1 m & 


Pare Municipal 


Swiss Radio International 




Finland 


Matta 


Giacomeltistrasse 1 




Radio Finiand 


Xandir Malta 


CH 3000 




PO Box 528 


PO Box 2 


Bern 15 




Helsinki 10 


Valletta 


U.S.S.R. 

Radio Moscow 




Franc© 

Radio France Internationale 

PO Box 9516 


Monaco 

TWR Monaco 
PO Box 141 


Pyatnitskaja ylltza 25 , 
Moscow 




Paris 16 


Monte Carlo 


Radio Kiev 
Radio Center 




Germany (West) 


Netherlands 


Kiev 




Deutsche Welle 


Radio Netherlands 


Ukraine 




Postfach 100444 


PO Box 222 


Vatican 




D-5000 


1200 JG 


Vatican Radio 




Koln 1 


Hiiversum 


Vatican City 




Federal Republic of Germany 


Norway 


Rome 




Germany (East) 


Radio Norway 


Yugoslavia 




Radio Berlin International 


Postboks 6701 


External Broadcasting 




160 Berlin 


SL Olavs PI. 


2 Hildendarskaa 




German Democratic Republic 


Oslo 


Beograd 





programs, Some attempt to 
cover the world while others 
tend to stay strictly with 
news of their own countries 
or sections of Europe. 

The leader in news pro- 
grams, by a wide margin, is 
the British Broadcasting 
Corporation (BBC), They 
broadcast more than 250 
news programs a day from 
their London headquarters. 
News is fed to their editors 
from BBC correspondents 
located all over the world, 
and from their world-fa- 
mous Monitoring Service 
which provides round4he- 
clock reports on what for- 



eign broadcasters are saying 
over the air. This service is 
so popular that the BBC 
sells it to subscribers— other 
foreign broadcasters, gov- 
ernments, news agencies, 
etc. 

You can hear world news 
in English from the BBC 16 
times a day. It is broadcast 
on the hour except for the 
GMT hours of 0100, 1000, 
1 200, 1 400, 1 500, 1 900, 21 00, 
and 2200. If you are interest- 
ed in local Great Britain 
news, listen daily at 0009, 
0309, 1109, and 1809 GMT, 
and, on weekends, also at 
0709 CMT. 



The BBC has many other 
news-related and special- 
news programs such as Brit- 
ish Press Review, Financial 
News. etc. A BBC buff could 
spend 24 hours a day listen- 
ing to their programs, many 
of them about current 
affairs. 

The other European sta- 
tions that broadcast world 
news are West Germany, Ra- 
dio Netherlands, Swiss Ra- 
dio, Spanish Foreign Radio, 
Radio Portugal, Belgium, 
Austria, and a whole slew of 
Iron Curtain broadcasters. 
Few people would bother to 
tune to these stations for 

73 Magazine • April, 1984 4& 




These modem broadcasting fadlities of Radio Netherlands at Hilversum, Holland, bring you 
some of the best EngHsh-language programs from Europe. 



their world news alone as, 
for the most part, they are 
not in the same league as 
the BBC. There are, howev- 
er, occasions when it does 
pay to tune to one of these 
countries. Those would be 
when particular news events 
take place in that country or 
area: earthquakes, revolu- 
tions, invasions, big fires, 
etc. This is when shortwave 
listening really comes into 
its own. You can get the 
story firsthand and often 
before the international wire 
services get it to your local 
AM radio or TV newscasters. 

Some European short- 
wave stations skip world 
news entirely and stick to re- 
porting localized news. The 
Scandinavian broadcasters 
are good examples. Rather 
than try to compete with the 
BBC for world news report- 
ing. Radio Sweden broad- 
casts news only about that 
country. The Norwegians 
and Finns do likewise. (The 
Danes do not broadcast any 
English language programs, 
so I have no idea how they 
report the newsj 

You can, of course, get lo- 
cal news from the stations 
that also broadcast world 
news, but often, as is the 
case with the BBC, it comes 
in separate and distinct pro- 

§0 73 Magazifte • April, ig&4 



grams such as the daily 
''News About Britain" and 
the weekly ''Letter from 
London" programs. 

Listeners to Europe gener- 
ally either concentrate on a 
few select stations or on cer- 
tain types of programs that 
appear on a number of dif- 
ferent stations. It all de- 
pends on the listener's back- 
ground or interests. If family 
ties are to a certain country 
or if travel or being sta- 
tioned there during time in 
the service generates inter- 
est, these may be reasons for 
listening. Other listeners 
stumble onto certain sta- 
tions as they tune around 
the frequencies and find 
that certain programs grow 
on them. 

Most of the European sta- 
tions try to broadcast to the 
US in so-called "prime 
time " This is the period be- 
tween 0000 GMT and 0430 
GMT. This is to catch the 
maximum number of listen- 
ers in their evening hours. 
Many stations will have two 
broadcasts of the same pro- 
gram, one at the earlier hour 
to catch East Coast listeners 
and the other at the later 
time to pick up the West 
Coast, 

There are exceptions, like 
Radio Finland, which directs 



its broadcasts to North 
America only in the morn- 
ings. And some of the ''pow- 
erhouses" like Radio Mos- 
cow and the BBC can be 
heard at almost any time, 

A recent survey among 
shortwave listeners indicat- 
ed their favorite broadcast- 
ers. The question simply 
asked, "What is your favor- 
ite shortwave broadcast sta- 
tion?" The results, in order 
of popularity, were as fol* 
lows for European stations: 
1)BBC 

2) Radio Netherlands 

3) Swiss Radio 

4) Deutsche Welle 
(W. Germany) 

5) Spanish Radio 

6) Austrian Radio 

7) Radio Moscow 

8) Radio Finland 

9) Vatican Radio 
1 0) Radio Sweden 
11} Radio France 

International 

Your choice may be dif- 
ferent. If you haven't lis- 
tened to European broad- 
casters lately, here in alpha- 
betical order are brief out- 
lines of what you can expect 
to hear from each. See table 
for best frequencies and 
times of broadcasts, 
m ALBANIA (Radio Tirana) 
—Unless you have some 
special interest in this coun- 



try, this station is not likely 
to become one of your fa- 
vorites- Mostly political 
discussions. 

• AUSTRIA (Austrian Radio) 

— One of the better stations 
to listen to. You can hear it 
every night with news fol- 
lowed by a feature program. 
Additionally, Mondays are 
for answers to listeners' let- 
ters, Tuesdays are for sports, 
Fridays have music, and 
Sundays feature tourist at- 
tractions. This station is 
presently upgrading its 
transmitting equipment and 
should be easier to receive 
in the months ahead. 
mBELCIUM (BRT)-Has 
the usual news programs 
first and then various 
features, many dealing with 
the European Common 
Market which is head- 
quartered in Brussels. You 
can hear their DX program 
on Mondays at 0100 GMT. 
m BULGARIA (Radio Sofia) 

— Their best program is their 
DX news on Mondays at 
0045 GMT The rest is pretty 
much "party line'' discus- 
stons of politics. 

m CZECHOSLOVAKIA (Ra- 
dio Prague)— Many listeners 
feel that this is the best of 
the Iron Curtain broadcast- 
ers. While it has its share of 
political discussions, it also 
has a number of interesting 
shows that are free from 
that taint 
m FINLAND (Radio Finland) 

— This is one you catch in 
the morning hours, and re- 
ception is usually good. 
They start with news about 
Scandinavia called The 
Northern Report and then 
switch over to various fea- 
ture programs, including 
pop music. 

• FRANCE (Radio France In- 
ternational]— You can hear 
this one only in the early af- 
ternoon hours, and then you 
are listening to their broad- 
cast to Africa — the only pro- 
gram they offer in the En- 
glish language. Much of 
their programming is devot- 
ed to listeners' interests in 
Africa, such as Third World 
countries. Rumors persist 
that RFI will increase Erv 



glish programming, but so 

far this is all they offer. 
'•£ GERMANY (Radio Ber- 
lin International}— A typical 
"Iron Curtain" country 
broadcaster Lots of news, 
all with political implica- 
tions. 

• W. GERMANY (Deutsche 
Welle}^ Excellent news 
broadcasts and interesting 
current-events discussions. 
If you like music, listen on 
Saturday evenings. Want to 
learn German? They have a 
language course on Sun- 
days. 

m GREAT BRITAIN (BBC)^ 
Besides news and current 
events, this station offers a 
whole slew of other pro- 
grams including both jazz 
and concert music, short 
stories, and dramas. One of 



their most popular programs 
originates here in the US 
where Alistair Cooke tapes 
his Lettef from America. 
There is something for ev- 
eryone during the 24 hours 
of broadcasting by this 
station, 

• GREECE (Voice of Greece) 
— Probably will be of in- 
terest only to those with spe- 
cial ties to the country or 
area. Can be interesting 
when one of the frequent 
quarrels with Turkey comes 
up or Cyprus erupts. 

m HUNGARY (Radio Buda- 
pest)^ Sometimes, but rK>t 
often, you can hear an inter- 
esting program. I would 
rank it about in the middle 
as far as Iron Curtain SW 
broadcasters go, 

• /MLyrR/4/j-lfyouarea 



lover of music, this is the sta- 
tion for you. They have op- 
era, Italian folk music, and 
"pops/' Also, programs on 
other aspects of Italian cul- 
ture and life. One of the bet- 
ter European stations, 
m LUXEMBOURG (RTL)~ 
This is a rare one, a commer- 
cial station that you can 
hear from Europe. It beams 
its programs to London, and 
you can hear commercials 
like those on a US AM or FM 
station. The programs are all 
"mod'' music. 

m MALTA (Xandif Matta)- 
This little station is heard 
only once a week, on Satur* 
days, and at an impossible 
hour for most of us here in 
North America (0700-0800 
GMT). Not much to recom- 
mend, but if you can't 



sleep some Friday night 
give it a try. 

m MONACO (TWR Monte 
Car/oJ— Another one with 
very late hours for North 
American listeners This is a 
religious station and the pro- 
grams are a(l in that mode* 
• NETHERLANDS (Radio 
Netherlands)— Many fine 
programs to hear on this 
popular European station. 
On Sundays, host Tom 
Meyer has the Happy Sta- 
tion show. Mondays feature 
life in Holland. Tuesdays is 
Shortwave Feedback which 
answers listeners' letters. On 
Wednesdays listen to Dutch 
Spot on a magazine-format 
program about events in 
Holland. Thursday is 
devoted to that very popu- 
lar DX program, Media Net- 



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SHIFT on receive • AUTOMATIC PTT • demodulator circuitry powered by your 12 VDC 
supply to AVOID OVERLOADING HOST COMPUTER and for maximum EMI ISOLATION • EXAR 2206 SINE GENERATOR for 
AFSK output • SHIELDED TRANSCEIVER AFSK/PTT INTERFACE CARLE PROVIDED • FSK keyed output 

The MicroAmtor Patch is structured for easy upgrading to the AEA CP-1 Computer Patch™ advanced interface unit vy it hout having to 
buy a different software package! Simply unplug the external computer interface cable (supplied with the MicroAmtOf Patch) from 
the MicroAmtor Patch and plug it into the Computer Patch, 

£149 95 List S129* MAP64 The Model MAP-64/2 incorporates the 0-64 MBATEXT" prom 

"^ ' . "^ on the same board with AMTORTEXT for low cost RTTY/CW/ 

$239.95 / $199-95* MAP-64/2 ascii/amtor operation. 




r 

I 



The AMT-1 Is the DEFINITIVE AMTOR TERMINAL UNIT which aM future AMTOR units 
will be measured against. All you need for full AMTOR operation h a dumb ASCII terminal 
(or personal computer and emulation software) and a normal HF transceiver and antenna 
With the AMT-1 you will receivethefoHowmg features: •SENSITIVE FM DEMODULATOR 

• FOUR POLE ACTIVE RECEIVE FILTER • TOTAL CONTROL FROM KEYBOARD or by 
COMPUTER PROGRAM CONTROL • 16 LED PANADAPTOR TYPE TUNING 
INDICATOR • CRYSTAL CONTROLLED AFSK MODULATOR • RECEIVE/TRANSMIT 
standard RTTY • TRANSMIT MORSE CW • MORSE RECEIVE field installable option 

• AUTOMATIC PTT • 13 front panel LED STATUS INDICATORS • all METAL 
ENCLOSURE for maximum RFI immunity • operates from your 800 ma 12 VDC power 

'''''''^ $589.95 List $499,95* AMT-I 

Applications software for C-64 or VIC-20 

AEA also offers an applications software package for the Commodore VIC* 
20 (model AMT-1 /VIC20- 1 ) or 64 computer that is resident on a plug-in PROM 
CARTRIDGE and includes the INTERFACE CABLE to go between the 
computer and the AMT-T KEYBOARD OVERLAY instructions are also 
included fof easy operation without the instruction manual. The COMM-64 
program (model AMT-1/C64-1) offers SPLIT SCREEN OPERATION with ten 
MESSAGE BUFFERS- ll also offers UNATTENDED OPERATION with 
automatic MESSAGE RECORDING and AUTOMATIC STATION 

"IDENTIFICATION $89.95 Llst $69.95* 



AMT'1 




Shown with optfonaf AMT-1 Consote Stand, 
COMMS4 with CRT Monitor and csssBtiB 
recorder (Not mclud^) 



PLEASE SEND AEA CATALOG 



n 



Nam© 



1 



Address 



City 



^SUGGESTED AMATEUR DISCOUNT PRICE THROUGH 
PARTICIPATING DEALERS ONLY 



I State Zip 




Advanced Electronic Applications, Inc. 

P.O. BOX C-2160 • LYNNWOOD, WA 98036 • (206) 775-7373 • Telex: 152571 AEA INTL 



73 Magazine • April, 1984 53 



work. Friday features Opin- 
ion and discusses some of 
the views of the Dutch press. 
Saturday is a light program 
with talk and music; it is 
pleasant listening all the 
way. 

• NORWAY [Radio Nor- 
way}— Jhh is one you have 
to catch on Sundays since 
that is the only time they 
broadcast. Some good pro- 
grams for people interested 
in traveling there some day 
and also interested in good 
music, 

m POLAND (Radio Potonia) 
—Not the best of reception 
for most of its programs. But 
then the programs aren't 
anything to write home 
about, anyway. 

• PORTUGAL (Radio Portu- 
ga /J— Their first program 
isn't on until 0300 which 
makes it pretty late for East 
Coast listeners. While their 
programs are not particular- 
ly earth-shattering, it is a 
pleasant station to listen to 
and most programs are non- 
political 

• ROMANIA (Radio Bucha- 
rest}— Has some interesting 



programs. DX Mailbag is on 
Wednesdays, and other DX 
programs are on Mondays 
and Fridays. Tuesdays they 
have a very interesting Tour- 
ist News program that 
makes you want to visit the 
country. Interested in stamp 
collecting? Tune in on Sun- 
days for a special program 
on this hobby. 

• SPAIN (Spanish Foreign 
RadioJ— Another one of the 
top European broadcasters 
providing good listening on 
most nights. Reception is 
consistently good, too. Their 
DX program is on Mondays 
at 0050 GMT. 

• SWEDEN (Radio Sweden) 
— Another good one from 
Europe. Aside from their DX 
program, already men- 
tioned, they have a very fine 
program on the weekend 
called Saturday fronn 
Stockholm, 

• SWITZERLAND (SRH- 
One of the most popular of 
all from Europe. While their 
weekday programs, primari- 
ly news and background, are 
good, their weekend pro- 
grams are superior On the 



second and fourth Satur- 
days, listen to their popular 
DX programs— among the 
best on the air. On Sundays 
they have a new program 
called Balance Sheet This is 
about Swiss business. Don't 
think, however, that it is dry 
statistical reporting. Instead, 
it is a very lively description 
of Swiss industry. Recently, 
for example, they had a very 
interesting program on the 
Swiss chocolate industry. 
Another one brought us up 
to date on clocks and 
watches, 

• USSR (Radio Moscow and 
Radio Kiev}— Many people 
listen to Radio Moscow just 
to hear their viewpoint on 
wodd affairs, US diplomatic 
steps, etc. One of their most 
popular programs is called 
Listeners' Forum and you 
can hear this on Sundays at 
0010, Right after this comes 
Russian by Radio, if you 
have any interest in learning 
to speak their language. An- 
other good program is 
Round about the USSR, 
heard on Tuesdays and Sat- 
urdays at 0210 and 0510, 



Radio Kiev is preferred by 
many people over Radio 
Moscow. Weekdays provide 
the usual news followed by 
feature programs— most po- 
litical. They have a DX pro- 
gram on Wednesdays which 
is pretty good, but perhaps 
their best program is on Sun- 
days when you can hear Mu- 
sic horn the Ukraine. 

• VATICAN (Vatican Radio) 

—You can hear it every eve- 
ning, even though it is on for 
only 16 minutes. Programs 
express Vatican opinions on 
current events and other 
matters. 

• YtJCOSMVM (Radio Yu- 
goslavia)— Slnctly news. 
and all handpicked for polit- 
ical implications. 

So there you have it. 
There is a wonderful choice 
of programs from Europe in 
English just waiting for you 
to tune in. Most are easily 
heard and offer you enter- 
tainment, education and/or 
enlightenment. With your 
shortwave receiver, you can 
travel to Europe every 
day ■ 



QUALITY COMPONENTS - NOT MAIL ORDER SECONDS 




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Ttia battery Jufit Wrap'' Tool 

Hpift ^Mdlvfy pe<««ivcj Eixit'<f)jifi>*ii li'i^iildiEis 

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MACHINE AND TOOL 



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64fli, ckI« tliTK^ buy r>al44v "t^ *l^ 

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2»13 taoatASXiq 5 93 

tWIl 9p4a 4^4 r«l«i*ittt ...... 5.94 

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BATTERY TESTER 

Tests all tiiitt&ri^ mrKftng 
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Contfoda: 

3- cpoeitior) switeti pF0vid<e9 
fanges 1 35- ! 5V: 2.7-3.0W: 
4 0^-4^ Dtirabte. pockOt !■£« 
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V^tocfc No. 13733 ■■■ 




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over tO' dew tees B thru 40 PtNSI 

6CX) (inters Put dewic* ^'''™'W*^'^» 

in tool and SQi^ste ilocfc Ha. P«» 

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HE^- AN Tl* STATIC MODEL »0«W tt* M 






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^^^^ 28 8m St Box 410 
CO* FrenchtDwn. N J 06825 




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Sli?cK No. 47005 3twii 

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47000 4 (Jig, 5 5.BS l.M 

Stock No. 47006 ^^°^^ '^^^^ 11. »0 11.00 



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■litCUlDe SHIPPING CHARGES 

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Hf Eqtupmem Rffylar SALE 

IC-740* 9 band 200w PEPicvr w/micS 1099.00 349" 

*FREE PS*740 Internal Power Supply & 
S50 Factory Rebate until gone! 

1*5*740 IfTternal power suppl^..,.. 159.00 149** 
•EX'24i Mariner unit ....^ 20.00 



* * i ± w w 



39.00 
50.00 
59.50 
4?. 50 
96 50 
96 50 

159.00 144'* 
39-00 
39.50 
19.50 



89« 



*EX-242 FMumt...... 

*EX-243 Electronic heyer unit 

*fL45 boo Hz CW filter (1st fF) 

•FL'54 270 Hz CW filter (1st IF).... 
•PL 52 A 500 Hz CW filter {2nd IF) 
•FL53A 250 Hz CW (liter (2nd if) 

•rL44A SSB filter (2nd IF) 

Sli-5 8 Pin electrel desfc microptione 
HM-lO Scanning mobile mtcrophone 

liB-12 Mobile mount.... 

*Opfions ^ho ior tC-745 tisfe<i befovv 

IC-730 8 band 200w PEP Kcvr w/m!C$S29.00 599" 

Fi-3Q SSB filter (passband tuning) 59.50 

FL-44A SSB filter (2nd IF).. 159.00 144'^ 

F^45 500 Hz CW tJlter 59.50 

EM95 Marlterunit......... 39.00 

EX-202 LDA interface: 730/2KL/AH-1 27.50 

ESE^ZOa 150 Hz CW audio fiUer 39 OO 

EX-ZQS Transverter switching unit 29.00 

SII-5 Spinelectretriesfcmicfophone 39 00 

HIi'lO Scanning mobile inicroplione 39 50 

MB-S MotHle mount 19.50 

IC-720A 9-t»nd xcvr/.l-3D MHzrcvr $ 1349 00 B95«* 

FL'32 500 Hz CW filter 59.50 

FL-34 5.2 kHz AM filler 49.50 

SW'5 8 pinelectretdeskmicropfione 39.00 

M6'5 I^Dbile mount ,,,. 19 50 

IC-745 9'bsnEl xcvr w/.l-30 Mhi re vr $999.00 899^^ 

PS-35 Internal powei supply . . 16000144'^ 

CF5-455lt5 2 8 kHr wide SS8 filler IBA 

Hi 12 Hand micropbOil€.. ,.-.-- 39-50 

SH-6 Desk microphonf .,.. .,- 39.00 

*5ee IC-74Q fol abovf^ fnr ath^r opt torn f*) 




IC-751 9band Jtcwf/.l 30MH;fcvr $1399.00 
PS-3S internal power supply....... 160.00 

FL52A 500 Hz CW filter ... ., 96 50 

FL53A ZSOHrCWfiitef..,. ^50 

FL-33 AM fitter, 31,50 

FL'70 2.8 Kt\i wfde SSB fitter 46.50 

HM42 Hand micfopfione *.. 39.50 

SM-6 Desk microphone 39.00 

RC'IO External treQuency controller 35.00 
Cli'$4 H# stabtlity reference ictal 56.00 

Options: 720/730, 740/745/751 ReguJar 

PS-15 20A externa! power supply..,,, $149 00 
EX'144 Adaptor lor CF1/PS15.... 6.50 
CF-1 Cooling fan for PS- 15..^.....* 45.00 

PS'20 20A switcfimg ps w/ speaker ... 229.00 



1229 

g9« 



SALE 
134« 



199« 



ICOM 



Opiion^ - contifiui^d 

CC-1 Adapt, cable; HF radio/PS20 

CF-l Cooling fan for PS'20 

EX-310 Votce syntfi: 745. 751 

SP-3 External base station speaker , ., 
S pea iter/ Pfi one patcfi - specify radio 

BC-lOA Memory back-up , 

EX-2 Relay boi witb marker 

AMOO lOOwBbandautoniaticanttwfief 
AT' 500 500w9-band automate ant tuner 

IIMOO Mar^ual antenna tuner .... 

AN'l 5 band mobile antenna w/tuner 

PS-30 Systems p/s w/cord, 6-pin plyg 

OPC Optional cord, specify 2 or 4'pin 

GC-4 World cloc^ . , 

IC-2KI w/ps 160' 15m solid state amp 

VHf/UHf baie muf^i- modes 
IC-251A* 2m FM/SSe/CWtransceJver 

*$50 Factory Rebate 



Regular 

lO.OQ 

45,00 

39,50 

4950 

139.00 

8.50 

34.00 

349,00 

44900 

24900 

289.00 

259.95 

550 

99.95 

Regular 

1795,00 



SALE 



129« 



314** 

259^^ 
233" 

94^^ 
SAIE 
1299 



Regulir SALE 
$749 00 545»* 

until gone! 



IC<551D 80 Watt £m tfansceiver...... 

PS 20 20A switcbmg ps w/speaker 

EX- 106 FM option........,...,., .. . 

QC-lOA Memory back-up .H........ 

SM-2 Electret desk micropf^one .... 
IC-27iH lOOw 2m FM/SSfi/GW jtcvr 

PS-35 Internal power supply 

IC-271A 2Sw 2rTJ FM/SSB/CW J(Cvr,„ 

AG- 20 2m pfeamphfier , 

10^47 lA lOw 43a450 SSB/CW/FM icw 

EX-310 Voice synthesi?er ,.... 

PS-25 Internal power supply ._ 

EX-310 Voice syntf^esizer 

HM-12 Hand microphone 

SM-6 Desk micropfione 

VHF/VHF mobile mukl-modes 
IC'290H 25w2FnSSB/FMxcvr,nPmic 
IC 4S0A lOw 430-440 SSB/FM/GWxcvr 
VHf/UHF/}J GHz FM 
IC-22U lOw 2m FM non-digital tm 

fX'199 Remote frequency selector 
IC'25A 25«.2m.|rnieds.up'dnTTPmic 
IC*25H as above, but 45w.. (Speciatl) 

BU-IH Memory backup ........... 



$699 00 

229.00 

125.00 

8.50 

390D 

TBA 

16000 

699.00 

5695 

799 00 

3995 

99,00 

39-00 

39.50 

39,00 

54900 
64900 
Regular 
299.00 

35.00 
35900 
3B900 

3830 



5391. 

199« 
112** 



144« 
629*^ 

71f*» 

89»5 



489*^ 
579« 
SALE 
249»^ 

319»* 
339« 



Umiied Offer! Get a FREE BU-IH Memory 
back-up with your purchase of an IC-25H. 



IC-27A 25w 2m mobile transceiver.... 

EX- 388 Voice synthesizer ........... 

IC-45A lOw 440 FM itcvr. HP mic .... 

AG-1 15 db 440 Mhz preamplifier 

EX- 270 CTCSS encoder .*,•.,... 

BU-1 Memory back-up,.,. .*.*.. 

RP 3010 lOw 440 Mb? FM repeater 
IC^ 120 Iw L2 GHi FM transceiver .... 
RP-1210 lOw 1.2 GHz FM repeater.... 

Cabinet for RP 1210 or RP-3010 

6fn portable 

IC^SOS 3/lOw 6m port. SS8/CW xcvr 

BP-iO Internal Nicad battery pack 

8P 15 ACcfiarger 

EX'24S FM unit 

LC-10 Leather case.., 

SP-4 Remote speaker. 



!-#*■>■*'■ 



■ r-h >«■*■■■*■ *''«■ VWVPi^Vi*^^' 



369,00 329« 

TBA 
399 00 359« 

89.00 79'^ 

39.00 

38 50 
999 00 899*^ 
499.00 449" 
1199.00 
249.00 
Regular SALE 
$449 00 399^* 

79.50 

12 50 

49 50 

34 95 

24 95 




Harrd-hetd Transceivers 

Dffuit moilels Regular SALE 

IC'02A lor 2 meters $ 319 00 ISr^ 
IC-02AT w/DTMF 349.00 314" 

IC44A for 440 MHz TBA 
IC 04AT w/DTMF TBA 



Standard models 
IC-2A for 2 meters $ 
IC'2AT iritliTTP ...... 

IC-3A for 220 MHz.,. 
tC-3AT wtfiTTP...... 

tC-4A tor 440 MHz, „ 
IC-4AT with TTP .,..., 



Regular SALE 
239 50 214" 
269 50 219'^ 

269.95 234*^ 
299J5 239»* 

269.95 234»* 
299J5 23r* 



At I t-.s) }ries for Deluxe modeh Regular 

BP-7 800mah/!3 2V Nicad Pak ■ use BP-35 67.50 
BP-fi 80Omati/3 4V Nicad Pak - use BP-35... 62.50 
BC'35 Drop m desk charger ^ all batteries.... 69 00 

BC 160 Wall cfiarger BP7/BPa....*i,** lOOQ 

Acce%'>ones (or both modek Regular 

BC 25U Entra wall cftarger for BP2. ......... I 10 00 

BC'30 Drop m Cftarger - BP2/eP3/6P4/BP5 69 00 

BP-2 425mafi/7.2V Hm6 Pak - use BC30 39 50 

BP-3 Extfa Sid 250 m8h/8.4V Nicad Pak..-, 29 50 

BP-4 Alkalme battery case .,.,.... 12.50 

BP 5 425mah/108V Nicad Pak ^ use 8C3D 4950 

CP'l Cigarette lighter plug/cord ■ BP3.. 9 50 

OC 1 DC operation pak for standard models 1750 

LC-2AT Leather case tor standard models 34 95 

HM9 Speaker microphone ,..^*-,... 34.50" 

HSIO/HSIOSB Boom mic headset/iwitchboat 39 00 

HP-IOSA Vojt unit for HSIQ. -.«.«- TBA 

iUl 2m2.3win/10ivoutsmplifter.....SAiE 79,95 
liL-25 2m 23m in 20w out amplifier .,., SALE 179.95 

3A n»# Optional TT Pad - 2A/3A/4A 39 50 

SS-32li Commspec 32tone encoder. _*,...... 2995 

Marine modef 

M-12 12 ch Marine Handheld SPECIAL 269 95 




Shortwave recetverit- 

R-71A 100 Khz- 30 Mhz digital receiver 

R-70 100 Khi-30 Mhz digital receiver 

EX-257 FM unit..* 

IC-7072 Transceive interface, 720A 

FL-44A SSB filter (2nd IF) 

FL'63 250 Hz CW fitter (ist If] 

SP-3 Eiternal speaker . — ,. 

EX- 299 (CK-70) i2v DC option 

MB- 12 Mot>iie mount. 



■*****V9'¥ *^*! 



Regylar SALE 

$799.00 699^^ 

749.00 599*^ 

38.00 
112.50 
159.00 144" 

48.30 

4950 
9.95 

19.50 




MastefCofd 

V 




HOURS: Mon. thru Fri. 9-5:30; Sat 9-3 

Milwaukee WATS lioe 1-800-558 0411 answered 
evenmgs until 8:00 pm, Monday thru Thursday- 
Please use WATS tina for PlscJngOrdars. 

For other informatmn, etc, please use Regular liEie. 



Order Toll Free: 1-800-558-0411 



I 



In Wisconsin (outside Milwaukee Metro Area) 

1-800-242-5195 



tfdujai 



inc. 



4828 W. Fond du Lac Avenue; Milwaukee, Wl 53216 - Phone (414) 442-4200 



AES BRANCH STORES 



WICKUFFE, Ohio 44092 ORLANDO, Fla. 32803 

28940 Euclid Avenue 621 Commonwealth Ave. 

Phone (21$) 515-7388 Phone (305) 894 3238 

Ohio WATS 1-BOO-3G2-0290 Fla. WATS 1-800-432-9424 

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73 Magazine • Aprils 1984 55 




Wit Ham C, Clomnger. jr. K30F 
4409 duckthom Court 
RocJtvi7/e MD 10853 



Four BandS; One Whip 

Quadruple your mobile operating pleasure, 

please, but don't blame us. 



Did you ever want to 
change bands while 
operating mobile but didn't 
want to stop in the rain to 
change resonators? Now 
you can change bands with- 
out a thought about your 



mobile antenna. How about 
a bandwidth as much as 
one megahertz [see Fig. 8X 
with swr of no more than 
1.5:1? You can build this mo- 
bile antenna for a fraction of 
the cost oi a commercial 





mobile antenna The materi- 
als are readily available and 
are not costly, 

A Look at the Basics 

The six-foot mast is con- 
structed from Va" copper 
water pipe. The overall 
length is not critical, but sig- 
nal reception will suffer at 
anything much less than a 
five-foot mast length. If you 
own a Hustler or similar 
mast you already have the 
first part of your new multi- 
band mobile antenna. 

Mu It i banding is obtained 
by the use of multiple LC cir- 
cuits—one for each band 
desired. A typical mobile an- 
tenna has resonators (LC cir- 
cuits) with an adjustable 
whip. The adjustable whip is 
actually the C of the reso- 
nant LC circuit. You might 



i^% 




Fig. 1. Top-ioaded mobile 

antenna. 




P'^'^^l-x 



A 



Fig, 2. Resonator positioned 

at 90* (vertica! polarization 
retained). 



think of such a mobile an- 
tenna as shown in Fig, 1, 

Adjusting the whip 
changes the C and raises or 
lowers the resonant frequen- 
cy, A tip: In general* a 
greater amount of capaci- 
tance wHI result in a greater 
bandwidth. These mobile 
antennas are "top-ioaded," 
i.e., the LC circuit is at the 
top of the antenna and, for 
all practical purposes, the 
only part ot the antenna that 
radiates is that portion be- 
low the resonator That is 
the reason you should make 
the mast as long as is practi- 
cal. Since the whip is ba- 
sically C, why stick it up in 
the air where it will just give 
your antenna increased abil- 
ity to reach all those nearby 
objects — trees, carports. 
etc.? You can actually place 
a typical resonator at a 90** 
angle to the mast and prob- 
ably notice no difference 
in performance, although 
tuning may thange slightly. 
This couid present an eye 
ha^a^d or you might even 
spear a bird Let's look at 
this change as shown in 
Fig. 2. 




Fig. J. Multihand antenna 
setup. 



73 Magazine * Apr! M 984 



LOCK 




iOLT HEAD WAS PUT IN 
DRILL 4ND NEADTURNEE 
WITH ^IIIDER 50 IT WOi/ 
FIT 4NSIDt NIPPLE — 



1/2* COPnn PtPC 



COPPER COUPLER 
DRILL S/S* HQL€ 
m iilPPLE 



BRASS NIPPLE 

3 /A i. 2* eR4S^ OR 
STAINLESS KUJ 



-3/a I 24 $TWNl€SS bolt 




1— P^«" BRASS 
BRAZLNG ROD 



Fig. 4. MasNo-fnabile attachment. 



Capacitance does not 
have to come in the form of 
a whip. Two wires in the 
shape of a V form a capaci 
tor proportional to the area 
within the V. The V is easy to 
adjust (change C). In fact. I 
used exactly this method in 
my initial experiments It 
doesn't work too well for 
aclual mobile use because 
the V is not rigid during vehi- 
cle motion and the vibration 
of the V causes fairly wide 
and constant changes in 
resonance. 

Now that I had decided 
to place the LC in a horf- 
zontal position, I also decid- 
ed to multiband the antenna 
by using more than one LC 
circuit. The configuration 
now becomes that shown in 
Fig. 3. 

I am currently using four 

LC circuits on my mobile an- 
tenna, but you can use one, 
two, three, four, or more. I 
haven't tried five yet, but 
that's one of the next steps. 
The LC for the lowest fre- 
quency should be at the top 
of the mast with the next 
higher frequency below that 
and so on. 

Mechanical Construction 

The idea for the mast 
came from an article in 73 
JWagaz/ne (February, 1979, p, 
42). I used non-ferrous ma- 
terials to avoid any rust 
problems. The mast itself is 
a six4oot length of Vi " cop- 
per water pipe The details 
of the fitting which attaches 
the mast to your mobile 
mount are shown in Fig. 4, I 
used a brass end cap 



through which 1 drilled a 
3/8" hole for the 3/8" x 24 
stainless steel bolt. The 
brass end cap is consider- 
ably stronger than the cop- 
per end cap used in the 73 
Magazine article However, 
it does require that the head 
of the bolt be reduced to al- 
low it to tit in the inner di- 
ameter of the brass end cap. 
I simply chucked the 3/8" x 
24 bolt in my 3/8" electric 
drill and used my shop 
grinder on the bolt head 
while letting the drill rotate 
the bolt for a nice even 
"nitK hining," The end cap is 
assembled with a bronze or 
stainless steel lock washer 
and a brass or stainless steel 
nut. If you have any difficul- 
ty in finding a stainless steel 
bolt, you might try a local 
boat or marine dealer 

The end cap is assembled 
to the mast with an ordinary 
copper sleeve and soldered 
with a propane torch Do a 
good job here because there 
is a lot of force at the base 
of the mast, I use a rigid 
mount and do not tie or guy 
my antenna. Now we close 
the end of the mast to keep 
out water I soldered a flat 
piece of copper to the end 
of the mast. 

LC Construction 

I used some spare trap 
covers from my Cushcraft 
HF antenna for the support- 
ing structure for the induc- 
tor and capacitor These 
trap covers are thin and do 
not offer much wind resis- 
tance as the wind flows 
through them. They are prob- 
ably a phenolic material, 



-STAINLESS 
MOSI CLAMP 





HOt^LOW COtL R>RW 
THAP COVE RSI I i/Z' OlA. 



1—1/2 OF PIPE COUPLER 
(5AW£Q m HALFi 



fig, 5. Detaih of mounting bracket 



which is very suitable for an 
inductor form. 

The part which kept me 
from building the antenna 
for over a year (I love to pro- 
crastinate) was deciding 
how to fasten the LC circuits 
to the mast, Fig, 5 and l^hoto 
A show the construction de- 
tails of the mounting 
bracket. I cut a copper 
sleeve in half longitudinally 
and brazed copper tabs to 
the half coupling. Copper 
for the tabs was obtained by 
splitting a short length of 
copper pipe, opening it up, 
and flattening it with a ham- 
mer. (I had four feet of cop- 
per pipe left after cutting six 
feet off for the mast, so the 
material was handy) The 
tabs were bent 90*^ and a 
piece of V4"' copper tubing 
was brazed between the 90*^ 
tabs so that the inductor 
form would not be crushed 
when attaching it to the 
bracket Brass nuts, 6" x 32, 
were soldered to the top and 
bottom of the bracket You 
might want to use one long 
screw to attach the whole 



assembly and not be both- 
ered with the brass nuts. 

A word about brazing the 
copper parts; The high heat 
anneals the copper. It 
becomes soft and I have had 
one bracket fail due to the 
vibration. It lasted over 
eight months and over 
20,000 miles The TS-meter 
LC was made with #12 cop- 
per wire and was quite 
heavy, You might solder or 
silver solder your bracket or 
find an even better method 
of attaching the LC assem- 
bly to the mast. 

I have made inductors us- 
ing #12. #18, and #20 wire 
The #12 wire is quite heavy 
for a 20-meter LC circuit and 
probably impractical for a 
40-meter LC circuit. The #20 
wire gets warm when using a 
steady carrier but has 
caused no problem with 
SSB If you run a kilowatt 
mobile, the #12 wire should 
do just fine. 

The capacitance was add- 
ed by using 1/16' brass weld- 
ing rods I chose the modi- 
fied rhombic because it did 





Photo A. Disassembled mounting bracket- 

73 Magazine • April, 1984 57 




24 m 



Photo B. Cnd<iip meter position. 



not have a sharp end as 
would a V and should avoid 
some static problems. I had 
hoped to adjust the C by 
bending the rhombic (in- 
creasing or decreasing its 
area], 1 found that vibration 
and vehicle motion caused 
erratic changes in reso- 
nance, so I added the adjust- 
ment spanner to the center 
of the rhombic. This allows 
easy adjustment of the reso* 
nant frequency. 

Detefmining LC Values 

If you like to experiment 

by trial and error, you'll fove 
this. I spent many hours re- 
moving one turn at time, 
varying capacitance, and 
trying to find where the LC 
was resonant. I would be 
looking for a 15-meter or 
20-meter resonance and 
would alt of a sudden find 
myself in the IOmeter 
range. This is not the best 

58 73 Magazine « April, 1964 



way to start, although you 
will probably have to use 
this cut and try method for 
the 10-meter LC 

I found that I could use 
my Heathkit ® grip-dip oscil- 
lator (gdo) to find the res- 
onant frequency of the LC. 
The secret is to put a pickup 
coil at the base of the anten- 
na and insert the gdo coil in- 
side the coil (see Photo B). 
The Heathkit gdo is a handy 
piece of equipment but 
hardly a laboratory -grade in- 
strument I first found a res- 
onant frequency of 14.2 
MHz. so 1 connected the an- 
tenna to the transmitter and 
checked swr It was not reso- 
nant anywhere in the 20- 
meter band! Suspecting 
something funny, I used the 
same pickup coil and con- 
nected it to my frequency 
counter and, since a gdo is 
actually a signal generator, 
the counter showed that the 



lOm 



'fi*J* 



4Qn 



Om 



WATER PIPE Oft 
OTHER MAST 
&-e FEET NldH 



LOOP FOR 
CfilO Dip 




«niD DlPUtTEft 
U^€ AS CLOSE MS 
POSSIiLe TO 
ANTEI^HA Ft CD MMIfT 



fig. 6. Grid-dip meter posi- 
tioning. 



indicated 14 2 MHz was ac- 
tually 13.8 MHz. It was con- 
venient that the error was on 
the low side because I had 
to remove only one turn to 
raise the frequency of the 
LC circuit (or decrease ca- 
pacitance, which would not 
be as desirable as it would 
reduce bandwidth). You 
don't need a frequency 
counter to check your gdo. 
Just use a short antenna on 
your HF rig and sweep the 
frequency with the gdo until 



CW«CfTAH»CE- 
TTST SCTl^P 



in 



2.0 
iM 

l.Z 



\\] 



40m 



f.O. 



d.i J L ii.i..A.I J 

72 723 7 3 

FREQUCMCY 




FREOUEMCY 



1.4 

f Z 



p w 



mm 



1 C L 1 I ..J— 1 4 

211 tl.A >-£l.4B 
IM tl-4 




2&0 



2910 



r^/ 



Fig 8. Typica! swr and band- 
width, fa J 40m swr iapprOK. 
25 kHz @ 15 or /ess swr| lb] 
20m swr (approx. 1 50 kHz @ 
1,5 or less swr/. /cj 15m swr 
tappro)i, 300 kHz @ 1.5 or 
less swrl id] 10m swr lap- 
proK. tJ MHz @ L5 or less 
swr). 

you hear its signal on your 
HF receiverThfS is an easy 

method to calibrate or com- 
pensate your gdo. 




CHANGE SPP^AD T« 
ADJUST RESdhtAI^CE 



FIK*L *L' AMD 'W' TO SUIT 





6 - 32 

BRAS 5 nvTs 



4-SZ BWASS S^CftEW 
CUT NtAO OfF 
OfllLL l/l*' HOLE 
Af40 SOLDER fiRASS ROO 
FOB SPACER- 



Fig. 7. Resonance adiustment assembly Inductance— ar\y 
diameter, any wire size (to suit power level), number of turns 
to suit frequency. 



1*19/32"*Dtoitietar Inductor Forms 
Band # Turns 



L X W 



#12Wrre 


20m 32 


ID" 2<t/6^^ 




15m 16 


11-1/4" 1-3/8" 




10m 11 


9-1/4" M/8" 


#20 Wire 


40m 55 


14-1/4" 1-1/2" 




20m 22-1/2 

Addftionai data using #20 wire 
92 turns = 5.5 MHz 
83 turns ^ 5.9 MHz 
67 turns = 6.6 MHz 
62 turns - 6.8 MHz 
59 turns = 7,1 MHz 
55 turns = 7.25 MHz 
38.5 turns = 11 MHz 


13-1/4" 1-1/2^' 



Note: L and W are the length and width of the rhombic (C). 

Table T. Inductor winding data. 



As previously mentioned, 
I used a V configuration 
tPhoto C) for the initial ca- 
pacitance as it couid be eas- 
ily changed to adjust the res- 
onant frequency. Work on 
one LC circuit at a time 
Table 1 gives some dimen- 
sions which are intended to 
be a guide and give you a 
place from which to start. 
Differences in form diame- 
ter, wire size, and materials 
will require that you find 
your own right combination. 

Weatherproof 

Your LC assembly must 
be weatherproof. I learned 
from experience what a lit- 
tle rain will do to the reso- 
nant frequency I guess I just 
figured out why commercial 
antennas use trap covers! 
My first attempt at weath- 
erproof ing was by dipping 
the LC assembly in polyure- 
thane varnish. This lowers 
the resonant frequency 
about 500 kHz and is heavy. 
I have used epoxy resin, the 
type used to make fiberglass 
repairs, with good results. 
There is no appreciable fre- 
quency change; it is tough, 
medium in weight, easy to 
apply (pipe cleaners make 
excellent disposable paint 
brushes), and cures in about 
30 minutes. 

My preferred method is to 
put some silicone seal at the 
end of the LC assembly and 
enclose the inductor in heat- 
shrink tubing (obtained sur- 
plus or at a hamfest, in case 
you don't know how much a 

0fSa9 U^l of Aii¥0f1istfs Oil A>9t S30 



piece of new Z^-diameter 

heat-shrink tubing costs!). 

Assembly and Adiustment 

When you have com- 
pleted the desired number 
of LC assemblies, they are 
attached using stainless 
steel worm-type hose 
clamps. The LC assemblies 
should be positioned fore 
and aft very carefully to 
minimize wind resistance, 
They should be carefully 
aligned or you may have 
one big rudder and a very 
*'mobile" antenna. I have 
used care in alignment and 
have watched the antenna 
at highway speeds — it does 
not whip around. Proper po- 
sitioning may actually cre- 
ate a stabilizing effect. 

Fig. 6 shows the position- 
ing I am presently using. 
There is some interaction 

between the LC assemblies, 
and "four in a row" caused 
some swr problems, par- 
ticularly on 15 meters. 

Adjust each LC circuit to 
the frequency you desire- 
Start with the highest fre- 
quency first (10 meters) and 
adjust each until you have 
adjusted the LC circuit of 
your lowest band. 

More Thoughts 

You donl have to make a 
multiband antenna. You 
may make an LC assembly 

for only one band. It might 
be used on a four-foot mast 
when height is a considera- 
tion such as on a motor 




Photo C Resonator test assembly. 



home or tractor-trailer You 
might combine two or more 
LC circuits on a single induc- 
tor form. You might use a 
circle instead of a rhombic 
for capacitance. You might 
leave the circle or rhombic 
open at the end and adjust 
the spread with a movable 
insulator. You might use a 
ferrite core to reduce the 
size of the inductor You 
might use the LC assemblies 
for a temporary or space* 



restricted base antenna 
(with proper radials or 
counterpoise). You might 
build a small beam or rotat- 
ing shortened dipole, You 
might 

Thanks to Bo Owen 
K4QKH, senior staff engi- 
neer at Teledyne Avionics in 
Charlottesville, Virginia, 
for the fundamentals and 
basic ideas. 

CU on 10 ov 15 or 
20 or 40 or. . ■ 



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73 Magazine • April, 1984 S9 




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RS-A SERIES 







MODEL RS-7A 



IfOOfL 

RS-4A 
RS-7A 
RS-7B 

RS-10A 
RS-12A 
RS-ZOA 

RS'50A 



Contlnuout 
Duty (Ampt) 

3 
5 

5 

7.5 
9 
16 
25 
37 



ICS* 
(Amps) 

4 

7 

7 

10 
12 
20 
35 
50 



S»2a (IN) 
H S W X D 

3V-I X 6^1 X 9 

m X evi X 9 

4x7'AxlO% 

4 X 7Vi X 10V* 

4V2 K 8 X 9 

5x 9x101/2 

5x11 x11 

6 X 13V^ x11 



Shippliif 

Wt (Ibt) 

5 

9 

10 
11 
13 
16 
27 
46 



RS-M SERIES 



Switcliable vqH and Amp meter 




MODEL 

RS12M 
RS-20M 

RS-50M 



ContlnuDus 
Duty (Ampi) 

9 
1& 

25 

37 



ICS* 
{Ajnpi) 

12 

20 

35 
60 



(IH) 
H K W x D 

Wt X a X 9 

5x9x %OVi 

5x11 x11 

6 X 13V- x11 



Shipping 

imps) 

13 

IS 

27 
46 



MODEL RS-3SM 



VS-M SERIES 




MODE L VS'20M 



RS-S SERIES 




MODEL RS IZS 



Seperate Volt and Amp Meters 

Output Voitage adjustable from 2-15 volts 

Current limit adjustable from 1.5 amps to Fufl Load 



MODEL 

VS-20M 

VS-35M 
V&-50M 



Continuous Duty 

(Amps) 

16 9 4 

25 15 7 
37 22 10 



ICS* 

(Amps) 

@i3.av 

20 

35 
50 



Size (IN) 
NmWxO 

5)(9x lOVi 

5x11 X 11 
6x 13V* xll 



Stiipping 
Wt (Ibt) 

20 

29 
46 



Built m speaker 

MODEL 

RS7S 
RSI OS 

RS'lOUForLTR) 

RS12S 

RS-20S 



ConttiMMtt 
Duty (Ampi) 

5 

7.S 
9 
16 



ICS' 
Arapi 

7 

10 

10 

T2 

20 



SIfl (IN) 
H x W x D 

4 X 7H X I0?4 
4 x7V^x 10^ 

4 > 9-13 
4^ X 8 X 9 

5 X 9 X 10^ 



SNppmg 
Wt (ibi) 

10 
12 
13 
13 
IS 



The Conlog Solution 

Whafs the key to winning contests? Put an Atari 
and this program at the helm of your station and find out 



Charles D. Moore NSATD 
PSC#2Box3Q00 
EimGndorf AK 99504 



This program enables a 
radio operator to keep a 

more accurate contest !og. 
It fits quite handily into a 
16K Atari 400/800, yet will 
save and compare up to 750 
call signs. The information 
can be saved or recalled 
to from disk or cassette and 
output to the screen or a 
printer A callsign can be 
compared with up to 750 
others in slightly less than 
one second. 

I never really intended to 
write this program. But the 
rest of you hackers out there 
wilt recognize the symp- 
toms. At the request of a 
friend, I tried to translate a 
short program written in 
Microsoft Basic to Atari 
Basic. But, after adding a lit- 
tle bit here and a ''Hey, this 
would be nice" there, it grew 
into the present monster. 
Well, maybe not a monster, 
but certainly more than I 
intended. 

As usual, the hardest part 
of translating to Atari Basic 
is the string handling. In 

62 73 Magazine • April, 1S84 



Atari Basic, strings cannot 
be directly dimensioned in- 
to arrays. Instead, DIM A$ 
(1000) sets aside 1000 spaces 
for one long string. While in 
some ways not being able to 
dimension a string array is 
more ditficult, having a 
single long string is in other 
ways very fast and control- 
lable. I made a single string 
9000 characters long and 
sort of partitioned it off into 
segments of 12 characters 
each (12 * 750= 9000) By 
taking, for example, the 
seventh callsign and multi- 
plying it by 12, the 84th 
through 95th characters in 
A$ can be accessed by 
A$(84,95). In other words, for 
N = 7, A$(N*12,NM2 + 11), 
The subroutine to search 
CALLS, the string that holds 
all the caltsigns, is a 
machine-language subrou- 
tine loaded into page six 
by line 445. The subroutine 
searches the length of 
CALLS for a match to the 
current entry using X = 
USR(XX). This is accom- 
plished in lines 160 through 
170. The variable GOOD is 
used to count the number 
of good contacts. I used 
GRAPHICS MODE 2 be- 
cause the letters were bigger 
and I could throw in a little 



color without using up room 
needed for string space by 
taking advantage of the ad- 
ditional colors available in 
MODE 2 with inverse tetters, 
lowercase letters, and in- 
verse lowercase letters The 
sound is simple, but 1 found 
that anything more elabo- 
rate tended to slow down 
the program a great deaL If 
a callsign is good (it has not 
been encountered before), a 
high tone is sounded. A bad 
callsign wilt result in a low 
tone. This way the operator 
cannot tell if an entry is 
good without looking at the 
screen. 

Operating Coniog 

First of all, type in the pro- 
gram. It helps, believe me. 
Hopefully, upon RUN, the 
screen will display the num- 
ber of stations worked, zero 
at th[s point. In the text win- 
dow, two lines of informa* 
tion are displayed in inverse 
video. The first merely re- 
minds you that no more 
than 12 characters may be 
made on each entry; the pro- 
gram will ignore any extra. 
The second line gives the 
functions. To access these 
instead of a callsign, type: 
SCREEN for output to the 
screen, PRINTER for an out- 



put to the printer, or MENU 
for saving or loading in- 
formation. The output to the 
screen is pretty quick but 
may be stopped and restart- 
ed by CNTL 1 at any time. 
The output to the printer is 
one callsign per line because 
I was running out of program 
space. Now you are ready to 
enter a callsign. Upon typing 
one in and RETURN, the pro- 
gram will print the callsign in 
the box and then search the 
string CALLS for a duplica- 
tion A message, GOOD or 
WORKED, will be printed 
below the callsign in the box. 
If at any time you desire 
to save or load information, 
use MENU and follow the 
questions you will be asked. 
First, you will be asked if 
you are using disk or cas- 
sette Just press the first let- 
ter, D or C If you are using 
disk, you will be asked for a 
file name. Follow the gener- 
al guidelines for a file name 
given in the Atari Basic ref- 
erence manual. Next, a 
message SAVE LOAD QUIT 
will be printed. When you 
press S or L, you will be 
asked to ready the device 
you are using. Q will return 
to the callsign entry portion. 
Now, if you operate on a 
band and want to change 



10 
15 
20 
25 
30 
J5 
40 
45 
SO 
93 
&0 
65 
70 
15 

eo 

65 
90 
95 

100 
105 
UO 

lis 

120 

125 
130 
135 
140 
145 
150 
155 
160 
165 
170 
175 

lao 

185 

190 

1^5 

200 

205 

210 

215 

220 

225 

230 

235 

240 

245 

250 

255 

260 

265 

270 

275 

280 

295 

290 

295 

300 

305 

310 

315 

320 

325 

330 

335 

340 

3^5 

350 

355 

360 

365 

370 

375 

300 

3S5 

390 

395 

400 

405 

410 

415 

420 

425 

430 

435 

440 

445 

450 

455 

460 

4&5 

470 

475 

4ao 

405 
490 
495 
500 
505 
510 



7 -SCBEEM 
70 



PRINTER ME^ftJ* 



65 



TUEH 5O0 



REK CONTEST L0G^ChAries Moore M5ATP 

CRAPHiCS 2 

GOSUB 445:GOat^0 

MM CAU4t^lO}.e*(12},TEST|U2KHOLI^(12KFILEfa4KO$(14) 

FOB ^^1 TO 40jCALU<Z,ZJ = * •aHBCT 2 

TftAP 655CIjOSE tl 

POSITION 0,2s? «6l*infJUt callsigr*i"i 

POSITION 1,5!? ifej-********* *•••••••" I 

POSITION l,6i? »6|"* »*j 

POSITION 1,7*? #6»"* *"| 

POSITION l.Sr? t6rw**»*******«»***»»«; 

PnS IT ION Q , 1 ? *e ^ '* WOSKE D= " r GOOD 

T *• "i 

IF GDOD^D THEN CALL$=" '^ iC$="" 

IF GO0D=75a THFJ^ 255 

7 **maximum entryi 12 char* 

INPUT C^slF LEN(C$)*0 THEM 

HOLPiri rLEWt C$ j )=»C|U ,LEN(C| ) J 

POSlTIQif 3,6t? •^i* 

POSITION 3^7t? t^i- •) 

7 • -1 

POSITION 3p6 

7 «6iCJs 

IF C$^-SCREK<r THEN 335 

IF C$=-?CElrfU- THEN 255 

IF C$="PEINTEH* THEN 415 

IF OOOD=0 THEN GOSUB 250= GOTO 

eCSUB ISSsCOTO 65 
CKLEN^CU + Ut" - 

LY»LEIsr{ CALL$ J i UCsLEN(C$ ) t POKE 207 ,LX-1 

h-ly-ij:-i+3 

A3U5K{1664,ADB(CALL$U) )^ADR(C|3 |B} 

IF A^O THEN 190 

f*05tTlOK 3,7i7 #6> ♦'WbrKeD'* j J S"230iGOTO 240 

ir H01J>f (1,12 ^-CAU.$ ( LEN( CALLI ) -I I , t£N{ CALL| J > 

POSITION 3^,7*? #6j"GociD! J-} 

£-50 

? " -I -ADO TO LIST {Y/NS-i:OPEH •! ,4,0, "K* " tSO«€D 0,122,14,1 

GET »l,T!CLOSE •!*? ■ "tSODKB 0*0>0*Q!lF C3IBt(TN'Y* THEH 220 

IF CH«${TH*K* THEH B5 

GOTO ZOO 

es-ll^GOOO*-! 

CALL|{ CS, CS^ I 1 ) -HOLDf ( 1 , 1 2 } 

FOB Z^l TO 50i50tlKD 0*S#lO, lOi NEXT ZiSOUND 0,0,0,0 

fiertiRN 

CAU4il-12)=H0LD$U.i2)iGOTO 503 
GRAPHICS Os CLOSE *liTRAP 255 
GOTO 2m 

? "INPUT FILE NAME cxi 'BAND10^"i7 
INPUT FILElilF LEM{ FILE* 3=0 THtN 2&5 
RETURN 

OPEN #l,4,0,*Ki* 

7 " DISK Oft CASS- J GET #1,7 

IF Z=6S TKEh" GQSUfl 2fe5-D*i 1 ,2 J-»Di "iGOTO 510 

IF 2±^6T THEtf D|U i2H"C;* (GOTO 3iO 

COIfO 255 

7 - -;? - SAVE LOAO QtllT';GET *1,2 

IF Z^ai THEN GltAPHlCS 2:GOrO 35 

ir ^31 THEN CLOSE tliGOStIB 435iOP^ tlrQrO^MiGOlt) 375 

IE Z^ 76 ''then close tlsGOSUB 43SiOP^ #l,4iOj DfiGOTO 400 

GOTO 255 

If COQB=0 THEN CBAFHICS 2 i GOTO 35 

Ca-i5R=0 

GRAPHICS OsFOS Z>0 TO G0OO-ltC3»l3*^-H 

C=C+liIF C=2 THEJ^ a«=H+liC=OtIF Hi>2 3 THEN R=0 

TEST$=CALLJ ( CS t CS+ 11 J s POSITION C* 20+4 , K 

? TEST$:NEXT Z 

7 CALL? { LEN f CALL} ) - 1 1 , LEN ( CALL$ ) j 

FOR Z=l TO lOOOtJ^EXT Z: GRAPHICS 2 1 GOTO 35 

IT GOOD^O THE*J 7 * NOTHING TQ SAVE* i FOR Z=l TO lOOOiNEXT ZiGOTO 

PRINT #l,GaO0 

FOR 2=0 TO GO0D'liCS=i2*2+I 

TESTS=CALl4(CS,CS*ll)i? »1 j TEST S i NEXT Z 

TESTf=CALL${LEI*{CALU|)'lliLEH(CAU4Hi? ♦IfTEST* iCWJSE tl^mM 

GOOl^Os INPUT »1, GOOD; FOR 2^0 TO GOOD iC^l 2*2*1 

IHPilT #1 M TESTI 1 CAIXI ( CS » CS+ 1 1 J -TESTf (1,12} 

WBCf ZsGSAPHICS IiOCfTQ 35 

OPEN #l,S,O,-Pi-|F0ll Z=0 TO COOI>-1 fCS=lZ*Z*l 

TEST J= CALL* { CS , CS-*- 1 1 J i ? »1 r TESTI t NEXT Z 

? »hCALL|(LEN{ CAIXI) '11 rLEHiGALLin 

CLOSE #ltGRAFHICS 2:G0TO 35 



35 



? « -I? ♦•PREPARE DISK/CASSETTE'*!? i? ♦'I'HESS REtlJiRN* 
INFlfT TESTIS RETURN 

FOE 1=1664 TO 1 7 55 1 READ A i POKE I, At NEXT 1 1 RETURN 
DATA 104. I04r 133,204, 104p 133.203, 104, 133 

206,104,133,205,104,141,222,6,104 

I41,22I,6,1&9, 1,133,212, 169,0, 133 

213, 160, 255r 200, 177, 203, 209, 205 

240 , 4D, 24 , 1 &5 , 203 « 1 05 , 1 , 113 * 203 

1^5,204,105,0, 133,204,24, 165,212 

105,1,133,212,165,213,105.0,133 

213,205. 222,6t20S,2I6, 165,212, 205 

221,6, 20a. 209,240.7, 152,197, 207, 208 

204,240,6,169,0,113,212,133,213,96 
POSITION 5,7t? *6i''l*oaicBcl"| jS=230t<3OTO 240 
S* 150 1 GOQD=CO00*li POSITION 5,7i? «6? "GcmD* j sCOTO 240 
G|(l»LEN(FXLE|}*3>«FILE|(IjLE}l(FIL£^}):Gmtl 310 



DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
D*TA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
DATA 



Program listing. 



bands for a while because 
conditions change, you can 
dump the information to 
disk or cassette and easily 
start again later by calling 
up prior call signs by file 
name. This can lead to a few 

t^S9€ Ust i^f Adv^isars on page f30 



less headaches and 
proved eyesight. 



im- 



Notes 

Unfortunately, there was 
very little room left for re- 
marks, so they are rather 



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Sparse in the listing If you 
are using disk, you of course 
have more than IbK, so it 
would be easy to expand the 
number of entries. When 
you save the information, be 
sure you have plenty of 
room, as 750 entries takes 
about 75 sectors on a disk 
and a correspondingly great 
amount of cassette space. 

This program is designed 
as a help for contest logging, 
but it could be used to check 
for duplicate entries for just 
about anything. With minor 
effort, the string partitions 
could be shortened or 
lengthened. Likewise, the 
graphics could easily be 
changed to fit a specific ap- 
plication. The substring 
search would only need to 
be changed so that the new 
length of the substring b 
used for comparison, 

I hope this program will 
make all the users of other 
than Atari Basic jealous. It 
runs quickly and looks nice. 
With the small blend of ma- 



chine language, the program 

makes a nice addition to the 
ham's computer librar\^ If 
you really mess up and 
break the program, you can 
restart it by CR.2:COTO 35 
and nothing will be lost or 
affected. It you have any 
comments, questions, or 
(hopefully) improvements, 
please let me know Til 
answer/comment on any- 
thing with an SASE. Also, if 
you would Itkeacopy of this 
program, just send a blank 
disk or cassette with a 
stamped, self -ad dressed 
mailer and $3 00 to PSC 
#2 Box 3000, Elmendorf AK 
99504. 

Credit Department 

I learned the technique 
used for the substring search 
from a very good article by 
E. C. Smith in the August, 
1982, issue of Compute 
magazine. My Basic version 
of the same type of search 
took about 13 seconds to 
compare 750 entries. ■ 

73 Magazine • April, 1984 63 



Spenser Whipple, /f. 
c/o73 



Ishmod's Journal 

What happened in 1963 finally surfaced in 1983, 

Was he a fool? 



It all started out inno 
cently enough. Planning 
a DXpedition to an area 

that was thought to be in 
the control of one of the 
Balkan States. But what a 
story. I had agreed with Ish- 



mod that the story would 
not be told until he was 
gone. He believed that the 
telling of his story would 
provide him with a great 
deal of money and power 
and he wanted nothing but 



\ 




7 



^ C 








i-i 








^urm^. 



■**'«^ 




c 






>i 



Map page from the Ishmod lournai The map is hand-drawn 
and centers around the Bay of Bengal and the tiny speck of 
land that was to be the DXpedition's destination. Water 

damage has obliterated the coordinates of the island and 
other critical parts of the puzzle, 

64 73 Magazine • April J 984 



to be left alone. 

It began in early July in 
1967, My wife and I had 
spent a relaxing holiday on 
Capri. On our way back to 
Athens she wanted to do 
some more shopping, so we 
looked for a locker at the 
train station to temporarily 



store some of our packages. 
When I opened it, a crum* 
pled paper bag was in it. 
Curious as to its contents, f 
looked inside. A strangely 
familiar sequence of letters 
and numbers caught my 
eye on the front of an old 
leather- bound notebook — 



7&ir^ Minder, A/avi ^aJt^Pt/jpoor^^ 



All eouiprndfi-^ Aas^ hccn checked rW 
checked aau^mm U/r UiUi hav^ cn^H^h 
iced -for pcrmpS ^O <ia!yB. ^ 

a p€.ihncif-dtr^n^inGi^sr^ 

t^rLci^^iismf fo4tnc^ 44^ as ky ^^^ 

'Mlc^ w/// have TUJ0 c^mfy. 








fhc north 

I 



Another loose page from the journal. These entries were 

made the night before tshmod and his friends were ferried 
to the island. 



what turned out to be what 
I would fater call the 
Ishmod Journal 

Unaware of its historic im- 
portance, I tucked the rag- 
ged notebook under my 
arm, figuring I would take a 
quick look at it while my 
wife made still another of 
her forays into the local 
shops. So, when I did look at 
the cover again, it dawned 
on me why the faded legend 
on the cover seemed famil- 
iar. It read S7Z2B. That 
could well be an amateur- 
radio call sign, although I 
had no idea to which coun- 
try it might have belonged. 
Settling under an olive tree, 
I began to read. When my 
wife came back about 40 
minutes later, she thought 1 
was crazy from too much 
sun. I was babbling about 
someone named Ishmod 
and that the world had to 
know about him. So this is 
Ishmod's story, at least as 
well as I could put it to- 
gether. I say that because 
there still are some areas 
that can't be accurately put 
together. 

Though the handwriting 
was poor and some of the 
pages were damaged from 
moisture, I think I figured 
out most of it. I do wonder, 
though, because most of it 
if I interpreted it correctly, 
is almost too much to be- 
lieve. Hams around the 
world have had some won- 
derful and disastrous DXpe- 
ditions, but this one takes 
the cake. And through an in- 
credibly intricate string of 
events, the story has re- 
mained hidden all these 



years, A novel could be 
based on the travels of the 
journal itself. 

It seemed that Ishmod 
Kaduk S7Z2B, an amateur- 
radio operator from the In- 
dian state of Sikkim, had 
gathered a group of fellow 
hams from two neighboring 
vitfages to share in his 
dream of putting a new pre- 
fix on the air. Ishmod had 
intended to use a barren 
rocky footprint of land 
about 70 miles off the coast 
of India in the Bay of 
Bengal. The exact location 
is hard to determine as this 
information was on one of 
the pages damaged by 
water, but it appeared to be 
southeast of Chilka Lake, 
which is about 200 air miles 
from Calcutta, down the 
eastern coast of India. 

Apparently, Ishmod was 
an experienced sailor, hav- 
ing grown up in Chatrapur, 
a small village near Chilka 
Lake and the sea. He had 
spent his boyhood there un- 
til he went off to the univer- 
sity at Delhi. This much was 
clear. 

One summer after his 
next to last exams in what 
was to lead him to the 
equivalent of an electrical 
engineering degree, he had 
packed his small sturdy sail- 
boat with enough provi- 
sions for a week and was 
planning a relaxing cruise in 
the familiar bay. Three days 
out, he saw something 
ahead in the water. There 
was no land indicated on 
any of his charts, but there 
it was. Using a sextant, he 
noted his position and re- 



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WAMNBU HILL [603 J 434-5 371 




sumed his vacation from his 
studies. 

When he returned to 
school in Delhi, he spent 
Sonne time in the great li- 
braries and government rec- 
ord buildings looking for 
some reference to the small 
island he had found the pre- 
vious summer. Having grown 
up in that area and sailed 
there all his life, he could 
not recall any mention of 
the land from the sailors he 
used to talk with down on 
the dock near his village. 

Eventually, he did find an 
old document at the Indian 
Registry of Vessels that 
warned ship captains of the 
menace of a reported shoal 
at about the location he had 
seen the rocky island. The 
document also noted that 
"landing rights thereon" had 
been claimed over a hundred 
years ago by a Serbo-Croa- 
tion prince through some 
special diplomatic agree- 
ment. Although claimed by 
the prince, the landfall had 
not become the legal territo- 



ry of any Goyntry. Ishmod 
could not believe what he 
read. The following summer 
he planned to have his 
DXpedition. And this was the 
beginning of the adventure 
chronicled in the Ishmod 
Journal. 

Late in the evening on 
June 24, 1963, Ishmod and 
four other hams sat around 
a small table on the dock 
at Chatrapur, double-check- 
ing their equipment lists. 
They had pooled their mon- 
ey and chartered the only 
boat large enough to ferry 
their equipment and provi- 
sions to the rocky island 
that was to be home for the 
next six days. Little did they 
know then that they were 
about to make history. They 
were to be the first to 
observe a phenomenon that 
defied the laws of physics 
and electromagnetism. The 
rocks of the island ex- 
hibited the incredible ca- 
pacity to alter the infundib- 

Continued on page 224 




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•RTTY TODAY"— the qnly up-tcndAte 
handbook on RTTY avaiFabEe, covering all 
phases of radto-teletype. Answers many 
questions asked about amateur RTTY. Ex- 
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Authored by Dave lngrarr» K4TWJf a 
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'RTTY TODAY"— Table of Contents 

Chap, 1 The EKCiting World of Amateur 
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Chap. 4 RTTY Systems for Home Com- 
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Chap. S RTTY Converters You Can 
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Chap. 7 New Mini-RTTY Systems 

Chap. 8 Fascinating RTTY Outside the 
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Chap. 9 Fre^juency List of Commercial 
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Chap. 10 Secrecy and Other Codes 
Used \n Radioteletype 

Chap. 11 Tables of Abbreviattons Used 
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7$ Magazine • April, 1984 65 



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CU^HdWIFT 20-3CD 20M 3 CLEHEMT BEAM .1B3.95 

CUBHCJIAFT 2Q-4CD JOH 4 ELEt^NT SEftH 237.95 

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ALLIANCE tm.fwy DUTY ROTOR. ...« .^99* CMI 

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CODAvstlabto 

Hours: B:30 a.m. to SM p.m. Monday thru Fridty 
9:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. Siturday - CST 
PrlcBs subject to change without notiea. 



^— CWJLFrtANKWCSQZUORJOEKASROO 

FOR QUOTES ON OTHER RELATED PRODUCTS 
FOeORMUlH 

Amateur 
Equlpmefit, 
Accessories 
& Antennas. 
ExpCMl Anywhere 

2317 Vance Jackson Rd. 
San AntQnlo TX 7S213 

(512)733^)334 
(Toll free nunfiber 800-531*5405) 




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not mquiritd in maai utsmiatHsmi 



Model ZMGV'Tfombona"'" — ommdiferiTior^alcotljnBaf 
^ftin v^ntntfll tor 2 metHrs havinia' the BttfriB gain as 
"doiible-%A'' types, but thra i-^ntcfriltid '"ironibctnc" 
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kiweal poswbJta SWH hteks^f 9 B fl/2 98 meters 



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vwii* tOf our FREE CATALOG' 



N 

ELECTRONICS 

405 E. Market St. Lockhart. TX 76644 



66 73 Magazine • April, 1984 








COUUD 




THE 



KEYS TO YOUR FUTURE 



Unlock all the potential of your 
Commodore 64 and VlC-20* with 

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Explore. . .Experiment* • .Enjoy* . . 
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Here's a system-specific magazine written with 
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•ELECTOR 






300 WATT ANTENNA TUNER HAS SWR/WATTMETER, ANTENNA SWITCH, BALUN- 
MATCHES EVERYTHING FROM 1 J to 30 MHz. 

MFJ'tftstftst salllnq ttinar pacNs In plantv of niw fBaturei! 

• Naw Styling] Brushed aluminum front. Ail metal cabinet. 

• Now SWI^/Wattmatarl More accurate. Switch selectable 
300/30 watt ranges. Read forward/reflected power. 

• Naw Antenna Switchl Front panel mounted. Select 2 coax 
lines, direct or through tuner, random wire/balanced line or 
tuner bypass for dummy load 

• Nowairwound Induttor! Larger more efficient 12 position air- 
wound inductor gives lower losses and more watts out. Run up 
to 3O0 waTTs RF power output Matches everything from tS to 
30 MHz: dipoles. inverted vee, rar^dom wires, verticals, mobile 
wtiips. beams, balanced arnJ coax lines^ ByilHn 4:1 balun for 
t)alanced tines. !QOOV capacitor spacing. Black. 1tx3x7 inct>es. 
Wofks with all solid stale or i\M rigs. Easy to use. anywhere. 



MFI VEBSA TUNEB a 




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%m^ and receive computflrlzad RTTY/ASCil/ 
DW with nearly any panonal computer (VIC-20. 
Apple, TFtS-eOC, Atari. TI-99. CommcxJore 64. 
etc ). Use Kantronics or most other RTTY/CW 
software. Copies both mark and space, any shift 
Pficiuding 170. 425. 850 Hz) am] any spe^ (5-too 
WPM RTTY/CW. 300 baud ASCII). Sharp e pole 
active filter for CW and 170 Hz shift. Sends 170, 
B50 Hz shift. Nornoai /Reverse switch eliminates 
retun^ng. Automatic noise iimiter. Kantroflics 
compatible socket plus exclusive general purpose 
socket. 8xr/4x6 m. 12-15 VDC or 110 VAC with 
adapter. MFJ^1312. SSJ6 

RX NOISE 
BRIDGE 

Maximize 

your antenna 

parformanca! $59*95 MFJ-202B 

Tells whether to shorten or lengthen antenna tor 
minimum SWR. Measure resonant frequency, 
radiatiof^ resistance and reactan<£. 
Mew Featufts: individually calibrated resistance 
scale, expanded capacitance range (±150 pf). 
Built-in range extender for measuremeols bt* 
yond scale readings MOO MHz, Comprehensive 
manual. Use 9 V battafy. 2x4x4 \n. 

INDOOR TUNED ACTIVE 

ANTENNA 

''World OrabtHir'' rivals or exceedi riceptlen . 
of Duttlde long wirail Unique tuned Active 
Antenna minimizes intermod, improves select- 
ivity, reduces noise outside tuned band, even 
functions as preselector with external antennas. 
Covers oi-30 MHz, Telescoping antenna 
Tune. Band, Gain, 
On-oif bypass controls. 
tcixS in.Uses 9V 
battery. 9-18 VDC or 
no VAC with adapter, 
MFJ-13t2, S9.95 5^3.30 HFi^lOEO 




CQNVEJITIII 






jm 




POUCE/FIRE/WEATHER 
2 IVI HANDHELD CONVERTER 

Turn your tyntheifzed scanning $39,95 
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Flre/Weither band scanner! J 1 -31 3 

144-148 MHz handiields 
receive Police/ Fire on 154- 
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quency readout, Hear 
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plus more on 160-164 MHz, 
Converter mounts between 
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Feedthru allows simultaneous 
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MFJ/BENCHERKEYER 
COMBO 

MFJ-422 

#33p30 

The Dett ol 

lE) CW worlds- 
a deluxe MFJ Keyer in a com pacfTon figuration 
that fits right on the Bencher iambic padd!e! 
MFJ Keyer - small In size, big in features, Curtis 
8044 IC, adjustabCe welghl am] tone, front panel 
volume and speed controls (8-50 WPM) Built- 
in dot-dast! memories. Speaker sidetone, and 
pieh button selection of semi-automat+c/tune 
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paddle is fully ad]usiaple, heavy steel base with 
non-skid feet. Uses 9 V battery or 110 VAC with 
optional adapter, MFJ-1305. $9,95. 

VHF SWR/WATTMETER 
Lowcott MFj-ei2 $29.95 

VHF SWR/ 

Wattmeterl 

Read SWR I - ^ ^1^ 

(14 to 170 MHz) I ^ 'iiVjl 

and forward/ I '- 9^ 

reflected power 

at 2 meters Has 30 and 300 watts scales. Also 
read relative field strength. 4x2x3 in. 




■,ilalMiH 



*«* •««<:■ 



■fflf 



1 KW DUMMY LOAD „, „^ 

MFJ-250 $34,95 
Tune up tail, avtand -^^^Jj^^^mt^ 
life of final I, reduce ^^^5^5^^^ 
QRMI Rated IKW CW ^\ ffff M^.m* 
or 2KW PEP for 10 min- M 
utes, Half rating for 20 I 
minutes, continLiOusat , 
200 W CW. 400 W PEP 
VSWR under t,2to30 
MHz. 1.5 to 300 MHz, 
Oil contains no PCS. 
50 ohm non-mdu€tive resistor. Safety vent. 
Carrying handie. r/zxev* in. 

24/12 HOUR CLOCK/ ID TIMER 

MFJ-1Q3 

Switch 10 1% 
hour GMT or 

1Z hour format! 
Battery backup 

maintains time during power outage. ID timer 
alerts every 9 minutes after reset. Switchable 
seconds readout. Elapsed timer. Just start clock 
from zero and note time of event up to 24 hours. 
Bright blue ,6" digits. Alarm with snooze 
function. Synchronizable with WWV. lock 
function prevents mis-setting. Power out. alarm 
on indicatcrs. Black. 5x2x3 in 110 VAC. 60 Hz. 

DUALTUNABLESSB/CW 

^^^^^^ MFJ 752i $89-95 



3:53.-- 




• • o o 



Dual fllten give unmatched performance! 
The primary filter lets you peak, notch, low 
pass or high pass with extra steep skirts. 
Auxiliary filter gives 70 db notch. 40 Hz peak. 
Both filters tune from 300 to 3000 Hz with 
variable bandwidth trom 40 Hz to nearly flat. 
Constant output as bandwidth is varied: linear 
frequency control. Switchable noise limlter for 
impulse noise. Simulated stereo sound for CW 
lets ears and mind reject QRM . Inputs for 2 rigs. 
Plugs Into phone jack. Two watts (or speaker. 
Off bypasses filter, 9-18 VDC or 1 10 VAC witfi 
optional adapter. MFJ'1312. $9.95. 



ORDER AN¥ PRODUCT FROM MFJ AND TRY IT*NO 
OeUGATION IF NOT DEUGHTED, RETURN WITH* 
tN 30 PAYS FOfI PROMPT REFUND (LESS SHIPPING) 
■ One year uiwandtUmiil guarantee • Made In USA. 
• Add $4.00 each shipping/handNng « Cillof wrila 
for trie atalog, ovtr 100 products. 




MFJ ENTERPRISES, mC, ^^ 
80X 494, MfttfitippI SUti^ MS 39762 



TO OROER OR FOR YOUR NEAREST 
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800-647-1800. Call 601 323-5869 
in Miss, and outside continental USA 

Telex 53-4590 MFJ STKV 




66 73 Magaim^ • April, 1984 



MFJ RTTY / ASCII / AMTOR / CW 






RTTY/ACSII/AMTOR/CW 
INTERFACE 

CARTRIDGE 

FOR 
VIC-20/C-64 

Moit verittlli RTTY/ HP, ^m^ 

ASCIl/AMTOR/CW fnlir- #i!*m qr 

fm cartrfdgt ivaHabie for ^ RQ "^ 

V I C * 20 and C ommodof e *#*# 

64. Gives you more feamres, more por^irmaiieet 
more vafu€ for yoor moriBy man any other iniertace 
GsiTJdgfi avaiiaote. 

Simfl InterftM eartridgs works for b^th V1C-20 and 
Comrnooof e 64 Plugs into user's pod. 

ClwoM \rm wttte viHtt^ €l RTTY/ASCff/CW. 
ffven AMTOR sotTware. Vou are not married to {me 
0n-board sattware package. (J&a MFJ, Kantronics, 
AEA plus most other software eartridQe. tape or disk. 

850 Hi ind 170 Hz shifts m receive ind transmit. 
HBt m»rh snd tpsct mitputi for scope tuning. 
Normal/Revene twiteli eliminates retjning. 
Tryi dual chinnal mark tnil aiMce ictlvt ffltars and 

automatic threshold correction gives good copy when 
one tone Is obliterated by QRM or selective fading. 

Eiiy, poilttve tuiilng with twin LED Indicators, 

Narrow WQ Hi sctive CW filter. Automatic PTT. 

Eiar Z2&6 sine generator for AFSK output. 

ShJflldad XCVR AFSK/FTT intirTici citsJe provid- 
ed Plus or minus GW keyed output. FSK ouT. 

Powartd liY campHtar (few mAj^no power adapter 
to buy or extra wire to dangle or p4ck iip/radiate RFL 

Glaii apQxy fC B . ^ymmimi eficiosure . 472x4^2x1 ". 



MFJ INTERFACE plus MFJ 
SOFTWARE CARTRIDGE 



for VIC^20 or Cpmiiiedort S4. 
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or MF4-12S1 for one low price 



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Save $20.00 



SOFTWARE CARTRIDGE FOR 

VIC-20/ C-64 MFJ-1ZS0/MFM2ST 

PowirtuI MFJ «Oftwari $ AQ 95 

cartridge for VIC-20 (M FJ- ^^^^ 

1250. S49.^)aiMl Comnrtodore 64 (MFJ 1251.149.95), 
Plugs into expansion port Deveto^ t>y MFJ. 

Ftaturei RTTY/ASCif/CW sand and receive, splFt 
screen display, type ahead buffer, message ^jorts, 
status displiy, automatic CW speed tracking, paraitej 
printer comfKitlUIFty plus much more. 

SUPER RTTY FILTER 



39 



95 



MFt CC?MFUTtH mTVMPM^ fUt** 



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SM^.'-A-:!, t- 



Super RTTY 
filter greatly 
Improves copy under 

crowded, fading and weak signal conditions. Improves 
ittf fiTTY receiving system, B pofe bandpass active 
filter for 170 Hz shift {2125/2296 Hz mark/space). 200 
or 400 Hr i^nd widths. Automatic no^se tlmiter . Audio 
m, speaker out jades. On/off /bypass switch. "ON" 
LED. 12 VDC or 110 VAC with optional AC adapter. 
MFj^iaiZ. IBM. :^4xl Inch aluminum caUrwt, 



GENERAL PURPOSE RTTY/ ASCII/ 
AMTOR/CW COMPUTER INTERFACE 

Lets ymM send and recetve computerizBd RTTY /ASCI I /AMTOR/CW. Cupies 
ail shifts and all speeds. Copies on both mark and space. Sharp 8 pole active 
filter for 170 Hz shift and CW. Plugs between your rig and VIC-20, Apple, 
TRS-80C, Atari, TI-SS, ComnHKlore 64 or most other personal computers. 
Uses MFJf Kantronics software and most other RTTY/CW software. 




JtK/ 



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MFJ-1224 



99 



New MFJ-1224 RnY/ASCIJ/AMTOn/CW Com- 
puter tnterface lets you use your personal computer 
as a computerized full featured RTTY/ ASCII/ 
Af^^TOR/CW station for sending and receiving. Plugs 
between rig and V1C-20, Apple, TRS-flOC. Atari , 
Th90. Commodore 64 and most ottiers. 

Utt MFJ (tse MFJ-1250/12S1 bilow) svttware for 
VlC-20. Commodore &4 and Kantronics for Apple. 
TRS-aoc, Alan, TI-99 and most other software ftM- 

RHY/ASCI [/AMTOR/CW. 

Eity. potittM tufklfH) with twin LED Indicators. 

CepY iflf tnift (170,4^,850 Mz and ai^ mm shifts) 
and any speed (5-100 WPM RHY/CW and up to 300 
baud ASCIi). 

Copiii on i»tli mfrfc ind tptci, net mark only or 
space only, to improve copy under adverse conditions. 

Sharp 8 pole 1TQ Hz ihift/CW actt¥i flfter gives 
good copy under crowded, tadlrrg and weak signal 
conditions. Automatic noise ilmlter suppress static 
crashes for tetter copy. 

Normil/Revene iwltcli eliminates retunlng. +250 
VDC loop output drives RTTV maclilne. Speaker |ack. 



Autamitlc tr»cklng copies drifting signal 

Exer 2206 line genentor gives phase continuous 
AFSK tones. Standard 2125 Hz mark and 2295/2975 
Hz space Micropfione line; AFSK out, AFSK ground, 
PTT out and PTT ground. 

FSK ktylfio output. Plus and minus CW keyiriQ. 
CW transmit LED. External CW key jack. 

Kimronid tompjtibli todett. 

Exclyifvi Qifieni p^jrpott sodnt allows interlac- 
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out, CW demod out CW-ID Input, +5 VDC, ground. 
All signal lines are buffered and can be inverted 
using an Internal DIP switch. 

Uta Gallo toftwan wittt Appit, RAK with VIC-20, 
Clay Abrams with TflS^SOC. N4EU with TRS*80 Iff, 
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CW INTERFACE CARTRIDGE 

FOR VIC-20/ C-64 

High ptrformtnci CW 
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ynder weak. crowcM* notsy 
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4 poll too Hz bindwl{tt1i ^ettve fitter. 800 Hz 
center frequency. 3 pole acUva iowpass post detection 
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Plui and mlnui CW keving. Audio In, speaker out 
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Includes Basic llttinQ of CW transmit /receive pro- 
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73 Magazine • April, 1984 69 



f Dale WiTiiams K3PUR 
S592 S. Moore Street 
Littleton CO 80127 



The Terminal Terminal Unit 

Build this variable-shih TU. 
Its performance will knock you dead. 



Following the advent of 
the affordable home 
computer, increased inter- 
est in RTTY operation was 
generated in the amateur 
communitv. The benefits of 
being able to do away with 
the noisy printer and use 
video displays for received 
and transmitted data moved 
this mode of operation into 
the electronic age Since 
computers are not normally 
designed to perform RTTY 
operations unaided, special- 
ized hardware interfaces be- 
tween receiver/demodulator 
and transmitter, as well as 
software to control them, 
were required. Aside from 
those specialized or dedi- 



cated systems for RTTY now 
available from manufactur- 
ers such as Hat, Robot and 
DCM, hardware/software is 
commercially available for 
the popular Radio Shack 
TRS^O/ Apple/* and the 
Pet* * * computer systems to 
provide this added capabil- 
ity to the ham station. 

For RTT^ Baudot opera- 
tion, the requirements of the 

'TRS-80 is a registered tradfr 
mark of Tandy Corp. 



* * 



Apple is a registered trade- 
mark of Apple, Inc. 



** p 



Pet is a registered trademark 
of Commodore Business Ma- 
chines. 



demodulator/terminal unit 
(TU) for computer operation 

have changed very little 
from the days of the Model 
15 printer and current loop 
driver/relay. The input signal 
is still provided by the re- 
ceiver audio, filtered and 
conditioned by the TU, and 
output as either an "on" or 
"off level depending upon 
the mark or space frequen- 
cies. However, while the 
output for the Teletype® 
prmter was required to be a 
20 or 60*milliamp current 
driver for the mechanical 
system, the computer re- 
quires only a plus-five-volt 
(1) or zero-volt (0) level. 
Over the years, many '1m- 




Photo A, Terminal unit fronl-panet lay out 
TO 73 Magazine • Aprilj984 



proved" TU designs were 
produced to overcome the 
effects of signal fading, in- 
terference, noise, etc. The 
variation of mark and space 
shift, that is, the separation 
between these frequencies, 
required different filters to 
be incorporated in the TU to 
be able to copy the desired 
signals Similarly, in order to 
copy different speeds, switch- 
able-speed filters were re- 
quired. Amateurs have al- 
most universally standard- 
ized on the 170-Hz shift for 
better noise immunity and 
on 60 words per minute, 
since most surplus printers 
are equipped for this speed. 
With the approval by the 
FCC of ASCII operation on 
the ham bands, new re- 
quirements were necessary 
to enable amateur use of 
this new mode. Many 
surplus ASCII machines are 
available, but not too many 
amateurs desire to purchase 
and maintain two machines 
to be able to operate both 
Baudot and ASCII. Addition* 
ally, ASCII operation is au- 
thorized on the HF bands to 
28 MHz at speeds of 110 and 
300 baud. These speeds are 
approximately ^J and 4.6 
times faster than 60 words 
per minute, respectively, 
thus affecting TU filter pa- 
rameters for reliable copy. 

In originating design re- 
quirements for a TU ori- 
ented to computer opera- 
tion, a number of tradeoffs 
must be considered. First, 



we must decide whether we 
will be satisfied with copy- 
ing only amateur 170Hz- 
shift signals as opposed to 
the older 850-Hz-shift and 
commercial RTTY stations, 
such as news service at 
425-Hz shift. The trade-off 
incorporated into the 
described design provides 
an input bandpass filter to 
allow reliable copy of the 
1 70-Hz shift and the capabil- 
ity to switch this filter out of 
the circuit to pass wider 
shifts. Differing shifts mean 
different mark and/or space 
frequencies which lead to 
the requirement for multi- 
ple filters. This problem is 
solved by using active filters 
and designing the space fil- 
ter with a center frequency 
which can be varied by 
front-panel control over the 
shift range desired. For addi- 
tional selectivity on wide- 
shift signals, an available re- 
ceiver filter may be used to 
perform the function of the 
switched-out bandpass unit, 

Second, we must deter- 
mine the amount of sophisti- 
cation or ''bells and whis- 
tles'' we desire to add. The 
incorporation of a limiter 
circuit is a basic require- 
ment for accommodating 
signal fading. However, the 
capability of switching out 
the limiter or changing its 
parameters for AM-type sig- 
nals or interference thresh- 
olding should also be avail- 
able and is included in the 
design. Since this TU is also 
used to copy CW signals 
with a TRS-80, a threshold 
control is provided to allow 
the level of the desired 
signal above interference to 
be set with or without the 
limiter in the circuit. 

Active filters are sensitive 
to increases in signal level 
over the design amplitude 
and distortion in the desired 
response will occur if this 
parameter is not considered, 
Therefore, a single transistor 
stage has been included 
which adjusts the signal 
level when the limiter is 
switched out of the circuit 




Photo B. Terminal unit rear-panel jack arrangement 



and precludes overdriving 
the mark and space filter 
through the use of clipping 
diodes in the base circuit 
Fig, 1 shows the circuit per- 
formance for varying input- 
signal levels with the limiter 
switched in and out. 

Filter response/width is a 
function of signal intelli- 
gence bandwidth versus 
noise and interference. The- 
oretically, a filter of band- 
width ''n" should be able to 
pass ''2n'' bits of intelli- 
gence However this figure 
does not take into account 
noise, fading, and interfer- 
ence. Naturally, we v^ould 
like to have the narrowest 
filter response which will 
cut off all interference on 
either side of the desired sig- 
nal, but one wide enough to 
preclude having to retune 
for drifting transmitter oscil- 
lators. 

The input bandpass filter 
used in this design can be 
tuned by the circuit-board 
trimmers for a bandwidth gf 
160 Hz with the values 
shown. This is wide enough 
to pass 170-Hz-shift mark 
and space signals without 
any problems at both 
60-word-per-minute Baudot 



and 110-baud ASCII, How- 
ever, at 300 baud, with the 
input filter tuned for maxi- 
mum amplitude at 2210-Hz 
center frequency (f^X the fil- 
ter response drops off rather 
sharply, decreasing the 
mark/space intelligence 
bandwidth [as shown in 
Fig^D^ 

In order to provide a good 
recovery capability for 
300-baud signals, the input 
filter is slightly detuned, as 
described later, to widen the 
3<IB Width. The LM3900 op 
amp used for the active fil- 



ters is a Norton amplifier It 
differs from the common 
741 op-amp series in that it is 
a current-differencing de- 
vice. The main consequence 
of this difference is that it 
makes the amplifier a lovv- 
impedahce device as op- 
posed to the high-imped- 
ance 741, Further informa- 
tion on the LM.3900 is avail- 
able from National Semicon- 
ductor Corporation in their 
AN72-15 Application Note. 

With the values shown 
and careful alignment, the 
2295-Hz mark filter achieves 



Sensitivity 


0.1 volts p-p 


Input filter width, 3 dB 


170 Hz (adjustabte) 


Space fitter width, 3 dB 


85 Hz (adjustab e on panel 




from 1700-2700 Hz fo) 


Mark filter width, 3 dB 


85 Hz. 2295 Hz fo 


Shift reception 


100-600 Hz wrth botii mark 




and space filters in use; 




adjustable from panel 


Adjacent-channel filter 




rejection 


20 dB 


Dynamic range (limiter out) 


>3QdB 


Minimum threshold 




separation 


0.2 vofts 


Output 


5 volts (1) or volts (0) on i 




space or mark 


' Supply voltage 


+ 12.5voits 


Current drain, space on 


100 mA; add 100 mA for 




relays 


7ab/e t. Terminal unit specifications. 



73 Magazine • April, 1984 71 




Photo C internal view, AFSK board at top right 



a 3-dB bandwidth of 85 Hz 
This value is about optimum 
for any of the RTTY modes 
encountered in the HF 
bands. The space filter is 
that part of the design which 
provides the capability for 
copying different frequency 
shifts and varying bandwidth 
signals. Front-panel controls 
allow the operator to tune 
the filter for a 3-d B width of 
85 Hz at the nominal 170+lz 
shift frequency of 2125 Hz 
or tune the center frequency 
over a wide range of values 
to accommodate other fre- 
quency shifts. 

With the component val- 
ues shown, the old shift of 
850 Hz cannot be tuned. 
This was considered an un- 
necessary requirement that 
would have lowered the Q 
and response of the filter. 
Obviously, the wider shifts 
can be implemented, if de- 
sired, by switching in differ- 
ent component values. 

Although the specifica- 
tions in Table 1 indicate that 
100 Hz is the lowest fre- 
quency shift copyable, the 
TU will copy smaller shifts, 
depending only on adjacent 
channel interference and 
fading. As shown in Fig, 1, 
the skirts of the mark and 
space filters are not steep 
enough to provide more 
than 20<1B rejection at fre- 
quency shifts of less than 
100 Hz, but if the only signal 
in the passband is the de- 
sired one and feedthrough 
in the adjacent filter is not 

72 73 Magazine • April, 1984 



excessive, smaller shifts are 
possible. 

At my QTH, the TU is in- 
terfaced to my TRS-80 com- 
puter through a Macro- 
tronics M80 unit, Only the 
space frequency is required 
for copy. However, this is 
not an advantage w^hich al- 
lows only one channel of the 
RTTY signal to be processed 
from receiver to computer 
Rather, if such a scheme is 
attempted on other than a 
clear FM channel, noise and 
interference will cause er- 
ratic copy and an amount of 
"garbage'' which is directly 
proportional to the speed of 
the desired signal versus 
ihat of the noise/interfer- 
ence. , This anomaly occurs 
due to the fact that, in a 
single-channel system which 
reacts only to the space sig* 
nal level, when the desired 
signal IS not there (normal 
mark condition! a time span 
is open to receive any type 
of interference which might 
simulate a space signal. 

This problem can be mini- 
mized by clocking the de- 
sired signal only, but cannot 
be completely eliminated 
due to the variation which 
must be allowed for pulse 
timing. Therefore, the sim- 
plest method of precluding 
the occurrence is to process 
the mark signal in the normal 
manner in the TU and use its 
detected level to keep the 
output from switching in the 
absence of a space signal. 

Of course, this method is 



not valid for copying CW us- 
ing the space frequency fil- 
ter. In this mode, we rely on 
the threshold control to set 

the switching circuit input to 
react to the desired signal 
level only, while the mark 
channel is switched off. Al- 
though the design allows the 
separation of desired and 
undesired signal levels to be 
within 0-2 volts of each 
other, the desired signal 
must always be the stronger 
for reliable copy. 

The facility for reversing 
mark and space filter out- 
puts for AFSK operation is 
included in the design; a 
Flesher FS-I AFSK oscillator 
board is installed in the TU 
cabinet for transmitting in 
this mode on FM. 

Circuit Description 

Audio input for the TU is 
obtained from the receiver 
speaker jack, as shown in 
Fig. 3. A jack on the rear 
panel allows the connection 
of a speaker which can be 
turned off via a front-panel 
switch. Transformer Tl con- 
verts the 4/80hm audio 
input to a 500/600Ohm im- 
pedance signal which is con- 
trolled in amplitude by a 
front-panel-mounted 5k pot 
and switched either to a 
phone-patch jack or the 
RTTY/TU position for the de- 
modulator. The 8.2k-Ohm 
resistor precludes loading 
down the U1 filter input, 
while the back^o-back diodes 
ensure that the input signal 
will be clipped at a level 
which precludes overdriving 
Ul 

Relay K1 allows filter Ul 
to be switched out of the cir- 
cuit to enable copying wide- 
shift signals outside of UVs 
passband. Bandpass filter 
Ul consists of a 2-pole con- 
figuration tuned to a center 
frequency (fg) of 2210 Hz. 
Trimmers R1 and R2 allow 
the tuning of the filter poles, 
while the overall Q and gain 
of the circuit are controlled 
by the 27k-Ohm feedback 
resistors. The response with 
this filter, as shown in Fig. 1, 
sets the overall bandpass ca- 
pabilities of the TU. Test 



point TP1 provides a con- 
venient monitoring point for 
the output of the bandpass 
filter. 

Limiter U2 captures the 
strongest signal provided at 
its input and maintains the 
output level of that signal 
despite a decrease in signal 
strength caused by fading or 
adjacent signal ''pulling/' 
The operation of the limiter 
circuit for varying signal 
levels is depicted in Fig. 2. 
Trimmer R3 sets the offset 
voltage on pins 2 and 3 to 
plus six volts, while the 
390kOhm feedback resistor 
controls the gain and sym- 
metry of the limiter. The 
output of U2 is a symmetri- 
cal square wave monitored 
via TP2. 

Relay K2 allows the lim- 
iter to be switched out of the 
circuit for better reception 
of AM/CW-type signals. 
Transistor stage Q1 main- 
tains the signal level to the 
mark/space filters when U2 
is switched out and clipping 
diodes in the base circuit en- 
sure that the signal level 
does not reach a point at 
which the filters will be 
overdriven. When relay K2 is 
activated, relay K3 also 
switches input resistors to 
the mark/space filters to 
maintain appropriate signal 
level. 

The mark and space fil- 
ters. U3 and U4, operate 
similarly to bandpass filter 
Ul. The mark frequency of 
2295 Hz is set by trimmers 
R4 and R5. while the space 
filter frequency of 2125 Hz 
(or other shift frequency] is 
set by two pots located on 
the front panel. The output 
of these filters is a sine wave 
which can be monitored at 
TP3 and TP4. 

Relay K4 allows the mark 
and space filter outputs into 
the detectors to be switched 
for AFSK or reverse-shift op- 
eration. The detectors con- 
vert the sine waves from the 
filters to a doubled dc level 
and filter the remaining ac 
to ground. Test points 5 and 
6 provide a means of mont- 
toring the detector output 
voltage and ensuring that 






II 




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both mark and space signals 
are equal in level. The 
diodes in the base circuit of 
Q2 and Q4 prevent any in- 
teraction between the de- 
tectors and transistors, while 
57 deactivates the mark out- 
put for CW or space-only 
operation, 

Pot R9 is mounted on the 
front panel and sets the 
threshold level to Q4, which 
in turn determines at what 
point output transistor Q8 
will switch to "on." This ca- 
pability precludes triggering 
on interference or signals of 
the same frequency as that 
of the desired signal but 
tower in level. When S7 is in 
the open position, Q2 can- 
not receive the necessary 
bias to drive mark indicator 
Q3 into conduction or turn 
Q4 off, preventing an out- 
put. Thus, any interference 
in the mark channel during 
CW or space-only operation 
will not affect copy. 

When driven ''on" by the 
detected space signal, Q4 
draws current and applies 
approximately 4.5 volts on 
the emitter. This voltage and 
available current then turn 
on Q6 (to give an LED indi- 
cation of space) and Q7, 
which drives Q8 to the on 
state, switching the high in- 
put from the Macrotronics 
M80 interface key terminal 
to ground. 

Construction 

The TU circuitry was fab- 
ricated using a Radio Shack 
prototype board (which has 
solder pads for each hole) 
and point-to-point wiring. 
This is a time-consuming pro- 
cess requiring careful atten- 
tion to detail to prevent 
shorts. However, this proce- 
dure was adapted in lieu of 
the hassle of designing a 
printed-circuit pattern and 
to allow ease in circuit mod- 
ification between breadboard 
and final-design stages. 

Almost all parts are avail- 
able through local Radio 
Shack stores; the part num- 
bers listed are Radio Shack 
numbers. Major exceptions 
are the power-supply trans- 
former and the AFSK gener- 

74 73 Magazine • April, 1984 




LIM^TEfi OUT 



LlMITER 1N 



OUTPUT SWITCH POINTS 



_L 



_L 



X 



3 4 & 

AUDIO [VOLTS RMS] 



fi 



Fig. 1. Circuit performance curves. 



ator board. The power-sup- 
ply design is not shown since 
any supply of 500 milliamps 
or better will work. A regu- 
lated voltage is necessary to 
ensure constant filter pa- 
rameters; this requirement is 
easily accomplished via a 
12-volt 1-Watt zener diode. 

Although Radio Shack 
stocks 12-volt transformers, 
these units are not enclosed 
in a metal shield. The metal 
case is necessary to prevent 
coupling of the ac field into 
the audio lines and circuit of 
the TU. Appropriate trans- 
formers are available from a 
number of supply houses 
such as Circuit Specialists 
or froin local consumer 
electronics repair shops 
which handle Japanese 
equipment from Panasonic^ 
Pioneer, etc. 

Vernier dials or lO-turn 
pots were considered for the 
space-filter tuning controls 

but not irtpprpprated due to 
the increase in cost over the 
last year. However, good- 
quality pots are necessary 
to preclude dead spots or 
dropouts when tuning. The 
FS-1 AFSK oscillator board is 
available from Flesher Cor- 
poration, PO Box 976, 
Topeka KS 66601, with con- 
nector, for $37.50. 

Circuit-board wiring is not 
critical, with the exception 
that components such as ca- 
pacitors, which are located 
in each mark/space channel, 
should not be placed in close 
proximity to each other (to 
prevent adjacent-channel 
signal pickup). Those capaci- 
tors which function as fre- 
quency-determining compo- 
nents in the filter circuits 



should be of mylarT^"^^ or 
polyester construction while 
others may be of the disk 
type. 

Resistors are quarter- 
Watt, five percent, for mini- 
mum board-space require^ 
ments. Sockets are used for 
all integrated circuits, but 
transistors are soldered di- 
rectly to the board, Intra- 
cabinet wiring for audio 
lines should be shielded and 
the power-supply ac wiring 
kept away from other ca- 
bles. The DIP relays should 
have a dab of contact ce- 
ment applied to each side 
where the relay touches the 
socket to ensure that vibra^ 
tion does not cause them to 
rise out of the sockets. 

The Radio Shack Mode! 
270-253 cabinet provides 
just enough front-to-back 
space to mount the proto- 
type board and connector 
on the bottom of the chas- 
sis. There is space on either 
side of the board for the 
power supply and input- 
audio transformer. The 
AFSK board is mounted 
above the TU board with 
Gbflhectdr brackets made 
from thin aluminum stock 
and anchored by two of the 
front-panel switches and an 
L-b racket support from the 
rear panel. Intracabinet wir- 
ing is shown in Fig. 4, 

Power-supply wiring 
should be done first in the 
enclosure, followed by the 
TU-board connector wiring. 
Installation of the switches, 
pots, and jacks is then com- 
pleted, followed by installa- 
tion and wiring of the AFSK 
board/connector. The space- 
filter tuning pots are mount- 



ed in the front panel so that 
the left and right controls 
both have maximum fre- 
quency setting at a marking 
between the two. Wiring to 
the pots must be reversed 
on each to allow the left to 
operate in a clockwise direc- 
tion for maximum frequen- 
cy while the right pot is 
moved in a counterclock- 
wise direction for the same 
frequency. Decals or trans- 
fers should be applied to the 
front panel to indicate scale 
marks around the control 
knobs. 

Alignment 

After the normal checks 
for solder bridges and 
power-bus shorts, alignment 
can begin. None of the 
switches needs to be con- 
nected for calibration, but a 
shorting wire should be con- 
nected across the S7 diode if 
it is mounted on the board. 
Use temporary connections 
to the LEDs, which will be 
panel-mounted later. As a 
signal source, an audio sig- 
nal generator is required. If 
that piece of test equipment 
is not part of your inventory, 
you might consider building 
a breadboard variable audio 
generator using a function- 
generator integrated circuit 
or a 555 timer chip. 

Another option is to use 
the calibrator on your trans- 
ceiver and adjust the beat 
note to provide the nacesi- 
sary audio output In any 
case, a frequency counter is 
required to ensure that what 
you see is what you get. The 
fifters are extremely narrow 
and any alignment which is 
off the desired frequency 
will produce tower gain, dis- 
tortion, and undesirable op- 
erational characteristics. 

An oscilloscope is helpful 
in tracing the signal and con- 
firming relative waveshapes 
and amplitude. However, 
the Q of the filters, which 
makes precise tuning/align- 
ment essential, precludes 
the use of the scope for 
monitoring maximum filter 
response while calibrating. 
A VOM/VTVM with a dB 
scale is much simpler to use 



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4 



for this function, After 
coupling via a 0.1-uF 
capacitor from the ap- 
pitcable test point, the 
meter will show the change 
in signal level as the filler is 
aligned to the input frequen- 
cy Anv oscillation or false 
response will exhibit a 
higher-than-normal swing of 
the VOM needle and should 
be monitored by the 
oscilloscope- 

As a first step in the align- 
ment procedure, adiust R3 
for plus six volts at pins 2 
and 3 of limiter U2. Next at- 
tach an input signal source 
of 2210 Hz to the input and 
couple (via a 0.1 -uF capaci- 
tor) the output of filter Ul 
from TFI to the VOM/VTVM 
which has been set to the 
10*volt scale- Adjust Rl and 
R2 until the meter indicates 
maximum output at this fre- 
quency* The i-dB band- 
width will now be approxi- 
mately 160 Hz 

If you do not desire to 
copy anything other than 
170-Hz shift in Baudot or 
110-baud ASCII, the re* 
sponse of the filter is fine. 
However, if you desire to 
use the filter for 300-baud 
ASCII, you may wish U^ m- 
tune the bandwidth to in- 
crease the width and noise 
characteristics. This may be 
accomplished by alternate- 
ly changing the frequency of 
the input signal from 2125 
Hz to 2295 Hz and adjusting 
Rl and R2 for a meter read- 
ing 3 dB below the maxi- 
mum value obtained at 2210 
Hz. Repeat this procedure 
until the meter reading at 
both the mark and space fre- 
quency is equaL 

As you change the input 
frequency from the tower to 
the higher frequency, you 
will notice that maximum 
gain is still at 2210 Hz, show- 
ing that the response has not 
been degraded but only wid- 
ened at the 3-dB point via 
stagger tuning. Note that 
this adjustment will not af- 
fect the capability of the 
bandpass filter to accept on- 
ly 170'Hz-or-less shifted 
signals. 

If a scope is available, 

76 7B Magazine • April, 1964 



BANDPASS 




15 



ie IT 10 19 



to Mi 

FnEQUENCYIHixtOO) 



Fig. 2. Active filter response. 



check the output of the lim- 
iter, which should appear as 
a square wave of equal 
pulse widths. A check of the 
filter outputs should show a 
sine wave without distor- 
tion Once the input signal 
has been set to the timiter 
capture level, which is 
matched to the limiting ef- 
fect of the diodes across the 
input and the gain of Ul, 
there, should be no notice- 
able change in output am- 
plitude for further increases 
in signal level. 

Bandpass filter U3 is 
aligned at 2295 Hz in a man* 
ner similar to that accom- 
plished at Ul, Use TP3. a 
0,1 -uF capacitor, and adjust 
R4 and R5 for maximum me- 
ter indication. No further 
tuning for widening the re- 
sponse of this filter is 
required. 

Bandpass filter U4 is 
aligned during operation 
from the front panel by pots 
R6 and R7. After wiring the 
pots and connecting the 
leads to the circuit-board 
connector, ensure that a fre- 
quency range of 1800-2150 
Hz can be covered and that 
when both pots are set to the 
same frequency, the output 
level is approximately the 
same as that provided by U3 
at its center frequency. 

During the alignment pro- 
cedure, the appropriate indi- 
cator LEDs should have 
lighted as the filters were 
tuned. If all is well to this 
point, continue the align- 
ment Otherwise, go back 



and determine where the 
problem exists. 

Set the input frequency 
for 2295 Hz and attach the 
meter leads across TP5 with 
the meter set to read 5,5 
volts dc- Record the indicat- 
ed value. Now, move the 
meter leads to TP6 and 
ground and change the in- 
put frequency to 2125 Hz. 
Adjust the front -pane I filter 
controls for maximum me- 
ter indication and note the 
value. If the two readings 
are not the same, adjust R8 
and repeat the procedure. 
Note that equal output of 
the detectors is mainly de- 
pendent upon the alignment 
of Ul to pass equally both 
frequencies and the align- 
ment and gain of U3 and U4. 

Since the mark and space 
voltages drive different 
parts of the circuit after de- 
tection, you should check to 
ensure that both LEDs light 
with the same level of input 
signal Set the signal genera- 
tor for 2125 Hz, tune the 
space filter for maximum 
output/LED brightness with 
the FSK/CW/AFSK/Reverse 
switch in the FSK position, 
and lower the generator lev- 
el until the LED is just light- 
ed, ff the FSK switch is not 
yet wired into the circuit, 
the relay will still be in this 
position, unactivated. Now 
put the switch in the Reverse 
position, or apply 1 2 volts to 
the relay lead for K4, and 
note the brightness of the 
mark LED. If the mark and 
space LEDs do not light at 






the same level, adjust R8 un- 
til they do. 

Depending on whether 
you have used the mark or 
space signal to provide a 
high or low output, the ap- 
propriate LED should illumi- 
nate when that signal is ap- 
plied to the input The out- 
put should measure either 
4 5 volts at the "1 " jack or al- ' 
most zero at the '0" jack | 

Check the front -panel „ 
switches to ensure that they 
all work, activating the re- 
lays or switching the appro- 
priate parts of the circuit in 
or out. A continuity check 
with the VOM of the out- 
put/input jacks on the rear 
panel will prevent surprises 
after the cover is attached. 

Operation 

After a complete bench 
check and filter alignment, 
you are ready to place the 
TU on line and connect all 
the interfacing cables On- 
line tests should start with 
reception of various RTTV 
signals to allow you to be^ 
come familiar with the op- 
eration of the TU\ Some ap- 
prehension was originally 
felt during the design phase 
about the ability to tune a 
signal into the mark chan- 
nel before tuning the space 
filter. Operation of the 
completed unit has shown 
that this is not really a con- 
cern and that the procedure 
is quickly learned. I had 
also previously installed a 
1-mA meter on the original 
space output LED of the 
Macrotronics M80 inter- 
face, which helps in the 
fine-tuning of the space fil- 
ter and displays the actual 
level of the switching signal 
from the TU.' 

For normal RTTY opera- 
tion, with all fitters and the 
limiter in operation, the 
audio-level control on the 
receiver need only be set in 
the low range, 2 or below, 
for a front-panel scale of 1 
to 10. The level control on 
the TU will then provide sat- 
isfactory copy for an S9 sig- 
nal when set about one-third 
of the way into its range. It is 
important to ensure that the 



IIV . 11 


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M5 


M6 


A 



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FOR 1 44 VHI^ 220 VHF & 440 UHF 



SANTEC Handhelds just got a little smarter, with new com- 

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were Ihe first to offer you varactor diode tuning in a hand 
held, first to offer you thick-film technofogy, first to provide 
35Wasa selectable handheld cation and first to give you the 
time of day on a handheld read-out, have made another user- 
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controlled handhelds. 

Now three SANTEC Handhelds can lock out selected memory 
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less commonly used ones or from unprogrammed memory 
channels. SANTEC Handheld s new operating programs now 
allow you to store variable offset values in all 10 user-written 
memory channels; and, as always with SANTEC Har^dheids, 
your stored offset automatically comes back when you select 
a channel through the memory mode, and the plus or minus 
indication shows on the LCD display. 

Other new features are the provision in Memory 9 for split 
memory offset operation, for those really unusual offset situa- 
tions, and the capacity for hardware storage of a special PL 
tone for each memory channel (requires an optional 
encoder, available December, 1983X The new SANTEC Ha\}& 
helds will also accept the keyboard input of ail frequencies as 
either short, fast 4>dlgit numbers or the familiar a^digit ver- 
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you want, either way 

The handhelds with the most now have more for you Don't 
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Handheld today! 



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Fig. J. Terminat unit sche- 
matic. T1: 8-Ohm primary, 
600-Ohm secondary, or 
273-1380. U1, U3, U4: quad 
op amp 276-1 71 3, U2: 741 op 
amp 276-007. Q7; 2030 
276-2030. Q2^Q7: 2N2222 
276-1617. Q8: 2N1305 
276-2007. K1^K4: 12-V DIP re- 
lay 275-213. LEDs: jumbo 
276-021. AH front-panel pots 
have linear taper; all others 
are miniature trimmers. 

input level is great enough 
to place the signal in the up- 
per portion of the limiter 
curve for reliable copy on 
fading signals. 

The threshold control is 
nprmally ieft in the extreme 
counterclockwise position 
unless it is being used to pre- 
vent triggering of an interfer- 
ing lower-level signal. Once 
the space filter controls are 
$et to the approximate shift 
value by the front-panel 
markings, the signal can be 

78 73 Magazine • Apr! 1,1984 



.1 (ON BOARW 



^"l" ON SPACE 



+5V FROM 
UQO TU IW 



flV ON SPACE 



tuned to give an indication 
on the mark LED. If correct- 
ly tuned, the meter on the 
M80 will show no deflection 
if there is no space signal. 
Depending on how close the 
original settings on the 



space filter controls were, 
the space LED may flicker 
or light with a corresponding 
M80 meter deflection. The 
tuning of the first and then 
second space-filter pole 
controls will display an 



equal mark/space LED in- 
tensity and maximum space 
signal on the meter. 

Printer or CRT copy 
should also be evident. 
Switching to AFSK/Reverse 
should reverse the mark/ 




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n Video Graphics highlight important details. 

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n Working examples of every ham 
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1983 N2MY productions, Inc. 



TO HF TRANSMITTER 



M80 fliLAY 



Hl-l LO-I HC COM 



+ 12 IV *■ 




TO weo 



FSW/t* 



space LED indication and 
meter response and print 
garbage The only differ- 



Fig. 4. Cabinet wiring. 

ence in receiving AFSK, as 
opposed to FSK, with the 
function switch in the AFSK/ 



Reverse position is that you 
are now receiving the 
2125-Hz signal on the mark 



Parts Ust 



Part No. 


Description 


276-153 


Plug-in circuit board 


276^1551 


44-plo card^edge connector 


273-1380 


Audio output transformer 


EM 28 


115/12*volt transformer 


276-1713 


LM3900 quad op amp 


276-007 


741 op amp 


276^2007 


2N1305 transistor 


276-2030 


2N305 transistor 


276-161? 


2N222 transistor 


273-213 


12'V subminiature DIP relay 


276-021 


Jumbo LEDs 


276-060 


LED holder 


276-563 


12- V, VW zener 


270-253 


Enclosure 


276*1995 


B-pin DIP socket 


276-1999 


14-pin DIP socket 


275^24 


SPST toggle switch 


27S«25 


SPOT toggle switch 


E2469 


2'position, 6'pole rotary switch 


276-1123 


1N270/1N34 diodes 


276-1122 


1N91 4 diodes 


272^1029 


220-yF (150-uF) electrolytic 


276-1101 


Rectifier diodes 


271-210 


500k pot (place 270k fixed 




resistor across for 200k) 


271-226 


500-Ohm trimmer 


271-1714 


5k pot 


FSrI 


AFSK board/kit 


M1143 


AFSK board connector 




Miscellaneous fixed resistors 




Miscellaneous capacitors 


274392 


Knobs 


274-346 


Phono jacks 


73 Magazine • 


April, 1964 



Source 



Price 



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$ 3.69 


Radio Shack 


2.99 


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1.29 


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449 


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4,80 
6.00 



LED. This is due to the fact 
that AFSK mark and space 
frequencies are reversed for 
VHF operation. Therefore, 
the tuning of the filter con- 
trots must be monitored on, 
the mark LED and the first 
tuning (if not channehzed 
FM) done on the space LED 
and M80 meter. It is easiest 
to tune in the normal man- 
ner and then switch to AFSK. 

For CW or AM signals on 
HF (such as AFSK), vo<J m^V 
find that switching the limit* 
er out of the circuit will pro- 
vide better reception when 
noise or interference is pres- 
ent. When this is done, the 
input level should be adjust* 
ed to maintain a reliable 
switching point and com- 
pensate for the hold-in range 
of the switched-out iimiter. 
The same level adjustment 
should be made when 
switching out the bandpass 
filter to copy shifts wider 
than 170 Hz. 

Referring to Fig. 4, the 
FSK/CW'AFSK transmit 
function switch makes all 
connections for the selected 
mode. The relay on the M80 
interface board is activated 
by the computer in trcinsmit, 
but all relay contacts are 
brought to the TU for the ap- 
propriate mode connec- 
tions. In AFSK, the relay con- 
tacts are connected directly 
to the transmitter vfo.^ In 
AFSK, the relay contacts are 
connected to provide a 
mark/space keying input to 
the Flesher AFSK board. 

The CW output of the 
M80 interface is connected 
to the ID input of the Flesher 
board through a switching 
transistor which precludes 
transmitting theCW ID tone 
at the same time as the mark 
tone. When the transmit 
function switch is in the 
AFSK positioa the mark 
tone is on and a 2125+12 sig- 
nal is sent to the transmitter 
The AFSK board has the ca- 
pability of supplying either 
850" or 170-Hz shift Since 
only 170-Hz shift is used at 
my QTH, the 170-Hz posi- 
tion is hard^vired on the 
AFSK board connector 




Specifications: (40M-4) 

FREQUENCY ..... 7.0-7.3 MHz 

20dB 

FEED IMP-: 50 ohms 

ELEMEOT' LENGTH: - ... 46 a 

BOOM JLENGTH: 42 ft. 

WINBLOAD: ••,,,,.,. 12 sq, ft. 
GAIN: 7^dBd 



KLM 



electronksj Inc. 
Full Line Pefformance 



The Mbi^dimS prfonxiflHee 01 IHe Wor 
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Specifications: (20M-'., 

BANDWrniH: . . . 13.9-14.4 MHz 

#SWK: 1.5:1 

%B.. 35 dB 

FEED IMP.: 50 ohms 

ELEMENT LENGTH: .... 37 ft. 

BOOM LENGTH: 57 ft. 

WINDLOA0: 12.8 sq. ft. 



vmm} 




Speciicatioiis: (15M-6) 

BAISIBWTDTH: . . , 21 .0-21 .5 MI^ 
.^ySWH:... .....<. ..1,5:1 

F/B: .....30dB 

FEED IMF.: ..:m ohms 

ELEMENT LENGTH: , . * . 25 ft 

BOOM LENGTH; 36 ft. 

WINDLOAD:, , 8 J sq. ft* 

GAIN: ,^^^m^.. 10 J dBd 




BANDWIDTH:. . , 10.1-10,150 MHz 

VSWR:, L5:l 

F/B. ...... 20 dB 

FEED IMP.: . - - 50 ohms uiibah 
ELEMENT LENGTH: .... 35'6^* 
BOOM LENGTH; , . , 24*3'' 

^^^'"^mBlimm 7 sq. ft: 

'AIM; 






Fy :.i5: ; ; ■•■ ■--ia'vr 



And there's more! 

See your local dealer or write to KIM, ElectronicSt 

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(7-2/10-30^7LPA) 

BANDWIDTH: ,,7,2/10 30 MHz 

VSWR: ..2:1 typical 

F/B: ;. 10/15 

FEED IMR: 50 ohm unbal 

ELEMENT LENGTH: .... 46 ft 

BOOM LENGTH , 42 ft 

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Most rigs will take the low-Z 
output of the AFSK board, 
but both the levels are 
brought out to the rear 
panel for use as required. 

The FM/'HF switch selects 
both the audio and push-to- 
talk relay line from the 
desired transmitter. When 
using the M80 interface unit 
with the M800 software, a 
PIT module is provided 
which automatically ac- 
tivates the transmitter The 
M80 PTT output is the con- 
trol line which is switched in 
the TU. 

lor CW operation, the 
CW/Space Only switch is 
used to inactivate the mark 
circuitry in the TU. Only the 
space LED is used for tuning 
with the filter controls, to 
provide maximum M80 me- 
ter deflection. The threshold 
control can be used to set 
the switching level to pre- 
vent lower-level adjacent- 
signal interference. In CW 
transmit, the transmit func- 
tion switch connects the CW 



output of the Mao through 
the TU switch to the trans- 
mitter key input This same 
connection is made for FSK. 
Operation has been both 
gratifying and educationaL 
It is interesting to watch the 
independent fading of mark 
versus space signals, as 
shown by LED brightness 
and M80 meter deflection. 
The only other evidence of 
poor copy occurs when the 
signal of interest fades while 
a background signal, which 
was not heard before, in* 
creases in strength and cap- 
tures the limiter. Good copy 
has been obtained on low- 
level signals which arc not 
strong enough to provide an 
LED indication. ■ 



References 

^.Speciatized Commumcations 

Techniques, ARRL. 

Z "Active Banrfpass Filter for 

RTTVr Nat Slinnette W4AYV. 

ham Radio, April, 1979. 

3. "Welcome to the 'SOs/' R 

Dale WMIiams KSPUR, 73, July, 

1980. 




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Culver City, CA 



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In San Diego P.O. Box 1762 
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Call (714) 463-1886 

Mnn.-Sitl.: 10:00 d.m. tu 5:00 p.m 



S2 73 Magazine • April, 1984 





Ci^ 



1 11 1 . i i 1 PI 1 



^m 



Our new HD-3030 Computer Interface Termina 
takes you around the world on RTTY and CW 



PERFORMANCE 

The HD-3030. a computer and 
software are all you need for uni- 
versal RTTY Baudot. ASCII, and 
Morse Code communication. The 
HD-3030 provides reliable decod- 
ing of RTTY signals up 1o 300 baud 
in 170Hz, •425Hz and '850Hz 
hightone shifts while crystal- 
generated AFSK tones provide 
superb stability for transmit. Inter- 
national Morse code can be cop- 
ied up to 100 words per minute. A 
built-in loop supply is included for 
hard copy with earlier teletype- 
writers when a computer is not 
available. 



CONVENIENCE 

Front-panel push buttons allow 
finger-tip control of all HD-3030 
functions while complete com- 
mand information is instantly 
relayed by LED status indicators. 

VERSATILITY 

The HD-3030 is RS-232 and TTL 
computer compatible, offering a 
full complement of rear-panel con- 
nections for greater versatility The 
HD-3030 keys any transmitter - 
AFSK. FSK, positive or negative 
key line, tube type or solid state. It 
even has a provision for scope 
mark and space output. 



There's more for the Ham at Heath. 

See our complete line includmg computers, SS-9000 computer 
conlroJIable transceiver and SS8 CW RTTY active audio filter. 

Order toll-free MasterCard and Visa: 800*253-0570. 



Outstanding quality. Superb per- 
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building the HD-3030 Computer 
Interface Ternninat - then simply 
nde the waves around the world, 

*Oplional accessories includG Ibe HD 3030-2 
425/050 Hz universal filter, HD-3030-4 170 Hz 
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software programs for the 
Heaih H-8 and H-B9 
computers. 

FREE CATALOG! 

Write today: Heath 
Company, Dept 
01 1-164, Benton Harbor, Ml 49022, 

Or visit your local 

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AM-44D 



Wheeling and Dealing 

with Preamps 

For a switch, from the remote hills of 
West Virginia comes a great antenna idea. 



Robert E. flrossman W8PMS 
175 Oakmont Hilh 
Wheeling WV 26003 




An Qverall view of the completed preannp. 



ftlAS METWORK 
C*PS 




"mOuSH LINE 



*S0tCN0lf> COULD 
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;0Z39 



^.>'^— 30E19 



After many years of 2- 
meter FM operation, I 
found myself increasingly 
interested in SSB operation 
on the lower portion of the 
band. After spending an 
evening in the shack with 
Don WB8ZTV and hearing 
for myself the potential of 
SSB and CW operation, I 
was soon the proud owner 
of a brand new all-mode rig. 

The old n -element verti- 
caliy-polarized beam soon 
went to its storage place 
(holding up tomato plants) 
and a homemade 6-element 
horizontal took its place on 
the tower. Local FM opera* 
tion was unaffected by this 
change, and contacts out to 
75-125 miles were possible 
with the 10-Watt output of 
the all-mode rig. 






J 




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OLASS FE£0 ttimjS 



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PREAMP INPUT 



Fig, 7, The approximate method of fabricating the doubte-sided printed circuit board base 
and shielding of the preamp. The shields are covered with copper foil 'lids'" that are 
soldered to the edges of the shield enclosures. The drawing also shows the mechanical 
details of the switching contacts. 

M 73 Magazine • April, 1984 



A 4CX250 amplifier that 
provided around 300 Watts 
output in linear or Class C 
had been around for a while 
and this enabled occasional 
contacts in the range of 
150-200 miles. Before any- 
one scoffs at the limits, let 
me remind them that this 
area of West Virginia is 
quite hilly and that 1 live 
well below the tops of 
the surrounding aforemen- 
tioned geographic features; 
hence, I felt reasonably 
pleased with the perfor- 
mance of my equipment. 

My only problem was lis- 
tening to Don run his week- 
ly SWOT net and realizing 
that I didn't hear half of the 
stations that he was rou- 
tinely conversing with week 
after week. Now. don't get 
me wrong, I fully realized 
that he had a superior loca- 
tion, stacked 8d-element su- 
per whjzbangs. and an an- 
tenna-mounted GaAsFET 
preamp, so I decided that 
my first proiect would be to 
try putting together a re- 
spectable preamp to mount 
at the antenna. 

After researching several 
articles on preamp con- 
struction, it became appar- 
ent that one of the major 
problems and least dis- 
cussed chores associated 
with remote devices such as 
this was switching the pre- 
amp in and out of the trans- 
mission line during use. 



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ITEMS SUBJECT TO 
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Tokyo fTighpower HC400L 

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ETO-Alpha CALL FOR 

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Magnet Antenna , 25.00 

Amphenol 2900 Bnc Male 

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Robot 1200c high resolution 

color SSTV ....... 1139.00 

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400c kit. ..469.00 

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160M CW KW input trans . . 295.00 
Kenwood TS-530SPREAL BUY-CAU 
Cushcratt Proline distributor CALL 
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1 2/24 or 24/24 format , . , , 25.00 



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YAESU F101ZD , . 500.00 

F901DM ., ,...,,.. 600.00 

DRAKE TR7/PS7/NB/Fflters 1000.00 

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KENWOOD TS820S .500.00 

TS520/TS520S 400.00 ea. 

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4-1000 150.00 

Antenna Tuner waterproof 200vv', 
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Rohn 25G, 45G, 55G, accessories . . . . , CALL 

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8000 14GA-standard antenna wire . . 12*/ft. 

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B&W AV25 , 90.00 

Radiol kit 19.00 

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Trlex Wr-51 , (FOB CA) 969,00 

AEA Hotrod 16,00 

Butternut Hf6V . . , , , 125,00 

Hustler 6BTV 129.00 

Amprienol PL259 siiverpiote 1.25 

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Simpson 0-150VAC 4" square 10.00 

Sprague 1000PF/500V feedthnj 1.95 

CDE 001/20KV Axial end 1 .95 

RG14 (40' max(mum) 50*/ft. 

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A detailed view of the input contacts of the preamp. Tfie 
glass feedthfoughs are visible, and the method of attaching 
the relay contacts to the feedthroughs can be seen. 






Some details of the output end of the preamp. The relay 
contacts and the mounting of the solenoid are seen. The 
copper foil covers of the preamp shields are not in place. 



Being a peculiar type of 
person that hates to cut and 
strip coax for BNC connec- 
tors, I felt that there had to 
be another means of switch- 
ing a device like a preamp 
without the need for multi- 
tudes of ^/i-wave cables 
and 2 BNC-type relays. 
What could be simpler than 
making the whole PC board 
(containing the preamp cir- 
cuits) switch back and forth 
with a solenoid? 

After several attempts, the 
mechanical layout shown in 
Fig. 1 was produced. The rf 
circuit does not represent 
the state-of-the-art in VHF rf 
amplifiers, but it does serve 
to illustrate the concept 
With the addition of a few 
more contact strips, it 
would be possible to ei- 
ther ground the input and 
output of the preamp dur- 
ing transmission or switch 
them to ground through 
50-Ohm resistors. The latter 
method seems to be the 
manner of choice when us- 
ing CaAsFETs, 

The preamp is switched 
out of the transmission line 
until the solenoid is ener- 
gized. Power for the pre- 
amp is now supplied sepa- 
rately through an extra pair 
of wires in the antenna ro- 
tor cable. A 24-volt-dc sup- 

86 73 Magazine * April, 1984 



ply is used, and an LM317 
adjustable voltage regula- 
tor is now inside the pre- 
amp box. Remember to in- 
clude the bypass capacitors 
on the regulator input and 
output. The solenoid is also 
shunted with a IN 4004 di- 
ode to protect against the 
voltage spike produced 
when the magnetic field 
collapses on turn-off. 

Isolation of the preamp 
circuit during transmission 
is at least as good as some 
of the VHF BNC relays and 
could be increased by phys- 
ically increasing the spac- 
ing between contacts. The 
design routes the rf path 
during transmission to the 
underside of the double- 
sided PC board where it 
fonns an air-insulated trough- 
line between the PC board 
and the diecast box. Grant- 
ed, there would be other 
ways to improve the im- 
pedance bump that this 
arrangement produces, but 
it is no worse than the aver- 
age swr indicator. 

I plan to eventually dedi- 
cate an MGF-1400 CaAsFET 
to the MRF-901's role, but it 
did provide a wealth of ex- 
perience in rf amplifier de- 
sign at a low cost. The orig- 
inal circuit (Fig. 2) proved 
to be extremely unstable, 



even with several changes 
of transistors, and the cir- 
cuit of Fig. 3 eventually 
evolved. It was much easier 
to tame while still providing 
usable gain. The instability 
is a function of the device 
and only means that the 
MRF-901 is really a poor 
choice for a 2-meter rf 
preamp. Anyone who would 
like to check out that state- 
ment is referred to an article 
by B. H. Krauss WA2GFP, in 
the December, 1981, issue 
of QEX. 

Construction 

The circuit is mounted in- 



side a diecast metal box ap- 
proximately 45'' x 2.5'' X 
y (Hammond 1590B). Input 
and output connectors 
shown are SO-239, but BNC- 
or N-types are easily substi- 
tuted. A fine saw is used to 
cut a slit in the center pin of 
the connector in order to 
mount the fixed contactor 
(salvaged from a 5-Amp 
DPDT relay). The saw 
blades are available from 
X-acto® and can be found 
in any hobby or hardware 
store. 

The feedthrough connec- 
tors are an item I picked up 
in a flea market and are 





1 




ca — 1 


I 1 
1 ' 


J2 

1 ^ 



LI 



4T0 



L Jl 



cr 
l-io 



/7> 




/rf 



*00 



/77 



Ifb 



(sOOpF SOOpF) 






,01 



330 



100 



H *• -i/VV — 9-^ *■ 



JM400fl 



SOLENOID 



^ "^ ] -^ 



:.oi 



Lr -ei #20 !l/4iiT. DIA. kSm. L0PH5 



fn 



35V 
TANT 



LM3J7 



£70 






fff 



SOOpF 



I 



-*»+£4V 



m m 



5SV 
TAMTALUM 



f /g. 2. The original circuit diagram. The MRF-901 proved to 
be very unstable in this configuration. 




I COM tC-730 



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(91 9) 299-3437 






73 Magazine • April, 1934 87 






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soopf) 



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M4 
1000 

SCT 
Vet 



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Ul ■ IT LINK #2B t/i in Dl^ 

La* BT *£0 1/4 m, DIA. l/£i(» LONG TAP J TURN 

L3' ST #20 k« In. 0\A, J/?lfi. LON& TAP | TUflN 

CI - tOp-^ PIS'TOIM TFIIIMMER 

C2»i-l2pF CERAMIC TRlMWEfl 

FB>FEnmT£ BEAD 

JI,j2»S0-2J^ COAX COMNECTOB 

R2, n4 •^QXV TO SK^ELEt 



^ 



TA«T 



LMStT 



270 



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lev 

TANT 



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TANtfli,U(M 



Fig, 3. The //na/ circuit that was used in this version. It is rea- 
sonably stable once the initial tune-up is completed. It is 
much more narrow-banded than the originaL 



glass tnsutated. They repre- 
sent the only parts that 
might have to be specially 
fabricated and might be 
substituted by using brass 
rod epoxied in the center of 



brass grommets. These are 

available anyplace that 
sells sewing supplies. The 
silver contacts for the relay 
end should be soldered to 
the rod before trying to fill 



in the epoxy resin. I made 
loads of these for feed- 
through use years ago, and 
they can be made by stick- 
ing the rod into a wax block 
(paraffin canner's wax), cen* 
tering the grommet and fill- 
ing in the center of the 
grommet with epoxy on a 
small screwdriver blade. 

The PC board is mount* 
ed on a pair of brass rails 
that act as guides during 
the mechanical shifting. A 
springy piece of finger stock 
maintains a good ground 
contact on the underside of 
the PC board during opera- 
tion. Teflon® blocks are at- 
tached to the side rails and 
are used to hold the PC 
board- Any method that will 
pennit good electrical con- 
tact with freedom of motion 
should suffice. 

The solenoid used rs a 
Ledex #12180133-REV A. It 
just surfaced in the junk box; 
hov^ever ft is possible to 
modify any screw-mounted 
solenoid to perform the task 



of pushing the PC board into 
its preamp position. There is 
sufficient spring tension to 
return the PC board to the 
neutral, or transmit, position 
when power is removed from 
the solenoid Radio Shack is 
currently selling a 12-volt 
solenoid that should be 
usable. 

A final construction tip is 
to drill and tap a hole on the 
end of the diecast box that 
will allow you to run a VS-20 
screw into the shielding to 
manually switch the pre- 
amp to receive position 
during tune-up. 

I would not recommend 
trying to use the Hammond 
box out in the weather. It is 
not waterproof, and the sol- 
enoid, having a steel anna- 
ture, will probably rust and 
freeze up if used where it 
can get wet The whofe as- 
sembly should be packaged 
inside a weatherproof en- 
closure of metal or plastic if 
it is mounted at the anten- 
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INTERNATIONAL 







Each month, 73 brings you 
ham radio news from around the 
world in this cotfectton of re- 
ports from our foreign corre- 
spondents, we present the lat- 
est news in OX, contests, and 
events, as weti as keep you 
abreast of tfm technicai 
achievements of hams in other 
countries. 

if you would tike to contribute 
to your country's column, write 
to your country*s correspondent 
or to 73; Amateur Radio's 
Tectinicai Journal, Pine Street, 
Peterborough NH 03458, USA, 
Attn: Jack Burnett. 




AUSTRALIA 

Jtm Joyce VKSYJ 
44 Wren Sfra^ 
Afipna 3019, Victoria 
Ansffsim 

It has been cJ aimed that r>o tvw rvatioa's 
pMpie are mom ai4Ka kn all «ay& than Aua- 
tialians and New Zeainndora- Coosfdeftng 
our (xxTtmon haritaQe, it Is «>ot surprising 
Iftal there *efe mo^o* tn ihe late 19CX)s lo 
m^e N^w Zi&aland anotNar slate of Austm- 
Ha, but tf>e plans were eventually dropped 

Wfelh Hew Zealand bemg cioser to the 
aastem states of Au&tralia than our own 
Wes! AustraHan cHy Of Forth and with, up 
Ljntl4 latety, no travel restrictions between 
our two countries (e.g., passports, healthi 
certiftcatas, etc.), It Is no wonder we have a 
unique relationship with our Kiwi {as we 
eafllhefn} nelyhborm. 

Wtttt ttie In miral the ai^nual VKZL- 
Oe^ania oontest Itas a special sJgnirteanoe 
10 JMth of us in further cefhentihg our ciose 
relationship ^a amatetir radtai Sponaofed 
toiFTtly t3y ttie WlA and NZART on alterna- 
tive years, ttiis oonleBt aims at attracting 
ovefseas participation looking for contacts 
In those areas. 

This year there should be a good change 
of picking up e rare one with Warrick 
ZLilAFi-t from Kermadec, If he gets the time 
with his work load— and also if he gels his 
amateur gear fixed. At the present time, he 
is waiting fof an aJr drop of either another 
rtg or parts to rapiir his own gear. Warrick 
also has beeri hrnrd using oofnmerdal 
maitna goar, operating oti both 40 and 80 
meters, the fnequencifls being 3074^38^ 
and 7774. 

David VKOCK la operating from Mac- 
quafie istand^; with an SL^det} bonus of a ^it- 
fheter beac^on In operation from this loca- 
tion, VKiJGL should be active from Mawson 
with an interest in both HF and VHF. 

I cannot guarantee that these stations 
will be on frequency during this contest^ but 
with most of the South Pacific is^lands hav> 
ing at least one or two Australian or New 
Zeiaiand antaieurs aa residerits, the chance 
ol picking up a new <xifi is quite QOOsL 

This contest is tieid on tiie ffrst and third 
w e eken ds in Oclober each year, w^th phone 
on Iho iirst weeMnd and CW Ofi the thinj. 

92 73 hSagazine * April, 1984 



The contest lasts for the full 43 hours each 
weekend. 

We in VK have lately beefi given exterv 
sions to our frequenclea of operation, two 
of whioh should be of interes-t to DX opera- 
tors^ cofisideilng the downturn In the sun^ 
spot cycle. We now can opo'atA on 40 me- 
ters from 7000 to 7300, ar\a we have a DX 
window of 3795 to 3800 ort 80 meiers. 

When listening, please don't fofget that 
Our Novice operators can operate only on 
10 meters up lo 28600, on 15 meters up to 
21 2O0, and 60 motors up to 3825, With only 
30 Waits PEP output allowod, you wilt 
have to f listen real hard to hear them, with 
the bend conditions of late. 

Any queries regarding VK contests In 
the 1981-1954 period should be directed 
to our Federal Awards Manager. Reg 
Dwyer VK1BR, PO Bok £36, Jamison, Aus- 
tralian Capital Terrilory 2614, Australia. 

Good luck In the contest! 




BRAZIL 

Gefson Ris$in PYlAPS 
POBojf 1277B, Copac^bana 
20000 fiio ^9 Janeifo, fU 
Brazil 

RR SYMPOSIUM 

Sponsored by the Brazilian Amateur 
Radio League (LABRE) and the National 
Telecommunications Department (PEN- 
TEL), the symposium was held in the city 
of POflO Alegre, the first such trying to 
sol we RFl problems between the radio op- 
erators and the sound listeners, The most 
important factories of sound equlpmeni 
in Brazil were represented, among them, 
Ptiilco/Hitachi, Sharp, Telefunken, Sanyo, 
anKl Evadin. 

Accordir^} to Brazilian iaws, the partlcJ- 
pania igrMd that Ri^i should always tie 
oonsidered as due to the sound equip- 
ment, and all complaints must be met by 
the (aciofies. Thla decision made the 
radio operators happy, and it was a big 



step toward solving also ttie TV I p>roblem, 
wt^n sometimes It is due to the TV maiUH 
facturers. 

WOf^LO CDMMUNICAnONS 
YEAR STAMP 

To commemorate World Communica- 
lions Year, the Brazilian Post issued a 
special stamp. A must for collectors, the 
stamp shows the domestic Srazillan 
seteJIite and is printed In offset, In blue 
and orange over phiosphorescent gummed 
paper. If you are interested in the special 
stamp, you may request il from: Divisao 
Central Filateli{;a, Edificio^Sede, EOT, 
SBN. Coniunto 3. Bloco A, 20^ aiidar, 
?D0Q2 Brasilia, DF, Brazil. 

144-MH; E^PEDOIOm 

During the last weekend of Juno. 1964| 
will be neid the Third 144'MI-I2 Expedi- 
tions, an event which brings together Bra- 
xlilan operators fnteresied in propagation 
ejtporiences on the two-meter band. The 
expedltloners reach the top of the higher 
hills with their equipment— generetors, 
antenna arrays, etc., doing their tiest to 
make long-distance QSQs. Last year, Irt 
spite of poor weatrier conditions, more 
thaii 1,500 l^ig^istar»c« QSOs were 
made tay aoout fifty expedltiofiers. 

DMS AWARD 

Sponsored by IJ^BRE in l!>e state of 
Mato Grosso do Sut, the QMS Award is 
available to all licensed amateurs for con- 
firmed contacts with PT9 stations as 
follow^: South American countries: 10 
contacts; other countries; 6 contactSn 
DSOs must have been made after Febru- 
ary 2; 1978, on any amateur band and any 
mode. No QSLs; send GCR list of PT9 sla^ 
tions worked (call, dale. time, band, mode, 
and report) and 15 IRCs fof mailing eit^ 
penses to DMS Managar, PO Box 08, 
79100 Campo Grande, MS. Brazil. 

SAO PAULO A/Z AWARD 

Sponsored by the Brazilian Amateur 
Radio League of ttve Stale of Sao Paulo 
CLABRE-SP), the Sao Paulo Ml Award is 
available to ail licensed amateurs for con- 
firmed contacts with 28 stations located 
In the state of Sao Paulo {PY2} which have 
all 26 different letters, conside/ing on- 
ly the last letter of each call. Example: 
PV2XXA, PY2XXB. .P¥2AAy, PY3A6Z 
Contacts must have tseen made attet 
August t, 1977, on any amateur band. On* 
iy two-way C^ mode. No QSLs- send GCR 
list of stations worked (call, tfate, time, 
band, mode, and report) and 15 tRCs for 
mailing exper^ses to lABRE-SAQ PAULO, 




GBTS&n PY1APS and hrs wife, mritft PY1XBT, s/fd tfmit twin daugArers. NstAShs and 
Tatisna. 



Diretoria de Cor^ursos e Diplomas, PO 
Box 22. 01000 Sao Paulo, SP. Brazil. 

I 1 ^^^ 

FRANCE 

Claude GueeFIDGY ' 
f1 Rua Emiia L^bicha 
28100 Dreux 
France 

FRENCH USTENERS (FE) 

For two years new Frafich SWLs have 
not been receivir»g official licenses. As a 
matter of fact, before tfie CB legalization 
and during the big growth of CB, many 
CBers asked for ttiis FE call (free of 
chargeh this way getting the official OK 
for their antennas^ Neict year, it Is likely 
they will be issued again, nevertheless 
with, probably, two alterations: an annual 
charge (why not!), and no official OK for 
an antenna. So, till tn«n, don't be afraid to 
receive so^ne French SWL OSLs with calls 
like R£F. URC. Of eventually, FEM. instead 
0( the official FE, In fact there are prov*- 
aiofml '*calfs" issued by different ham 
associations tassociation code numbefaji 

7(K:M 3 and 

In 1984, a new band plan will be used for 
a maritime radio-navigation system called 
Syledis. Frenct^ hams living near coasts 
and harbors are rather worried; I hey have 
to share the 430- 434 -MHz pad exactly in 
the new UHF repeater's band. Some years 
ago» this pari was unused. Fortunately. 
Sytedis is known as a very excellent sya- 
tem. and QRM could be weak. Well wait 
and see... 

COLUMBIM. ST&g. W5LFU AMD 
EUROPEAN SPAQELAS 

For this eveni, the French broadcast 
station Europe t, thanks to its scientific 
reporter Alt»en Ducrocq, had the bright 
idea to light up the Greer>wlch meridian 
(and also partly the Paris meridian) when 
I he shuttle crossed this I ine, for the begin- 
ning of this mission. This was done with 
hundreds of headlights along about a 
180-mile line! The center (La Fieche air- 
port) was marked by a fiery cross, Thanks 
to ciear skies, the shuttle's passengers 
should have seen this winking! 

WSL^L was fteard by many hams here., 
ifid many fioped to receive the first space 

EXPEDtTION fItlMORS IN 1S>84 

FD Ciipperton with W and F08 hams, 
and YVO. 

SOME FRENCH OVERSEAS AWARDS 

The usual conditions apply to these 
awards. Sent certified iog extracts onty. 
QSLS are not required. 

1) PO: Tahiti— b contacts with fOB sta- 
lloos; fee: 12 iBCs; manager RkjIo Club 
Oceanien. BP 374 Papeete. 

2^ FK: Nou¥aiia Ca/edanie— 8 contacf s 
with FKS stations; fee: 12 IRCs; managin 
Guy Francois FK8DH. Villa 55 Toot out a. 

3) FP: Saint Pierre Bt Miqi/efon—lwo 
classes: phone. 3 contacts with FP sta 
tions, and CW, 2 contacts with FP sia- 
tions; fee: 3 IRCs; contact after January 1^ 
1981. manager: Henry Ufltte FP8HL, BP 
1 107. 975O0 St, Pierre et Miquelon, 

4) FY: Guy anna— B contacis with F¥ 
stations; fee Is ^ IRCs; manager: Christian 
Lolt FY7AN. Cite Rebard. BP 746. 97305 
Cayenne. (Note: in Fref>ch Guiana there is 
a 50,035^Hz beacon call: FY7THF (100 
Watts, GP aniennaj; Send reports lo 
FY7AZ, BP toot Cayenne.]! 



5j Diploma de& Ameriques Fran- 
caisfrs— CertltJed contacts (after January 
1, 1966J with 2 FPSs, 2 FG7s, 2 FY7s. and 1 
FM7 or FS7; tor Asian or Oceanian stA- 
ttons, Ofiiy of\6 (Qfitac! i^ r^uifed; Fee: ItO 
inCs, manager A1«k D^meuies VE2AFC, 
2SZ5 1^ Flech« Sainte Foy. Quebec G1V 
Ijg, Canada. 



^1^ 
^P^ 



GREAT BRITAIN 

Jeff M^ynara G4EJA 
W Ctiurchfiefds 
Widnes WAS 9RP 
Cheshire 
England 

THE UK SCENE 

8y the time you read thia. the night of 
W5LFL in CQfumbfa wiil be some months 
old and wlli have entered the reaim of ham 
folKlore, However, aa I write this piece, the 
shutiia has barely landed and I guess the 
comptrters are still warm. 

You might be wandering wtiy 1 hiave 
choean even to men i ton the project krvow- 
tng it will iae so long before this is ^n print, t 
am <k>iDg ao becauea I feel that thefe is a 
lesson to be learned and a message to be 
refmated ioydly to all hams. The message 
^s, of coiifse. do not Is! us have another 
ham in ^pace. 

Please donl give up readin^j in diSQuel 
at this poini, thinking I am a head-in-the- 
^^and n'lefchanl against progress and in- 
novattofi. Fa? from it; I do like to see new 
act i VI lies, new ventures, and new lech- 
no^OQ^. I also think ihe entire shuttle pro- 
gram is a msfvfltous tribute to American 
technologlcai krtow-how. and W5LFL ts 
my new hero. 

Why then, the antipathy towards any 
lurlher auch missions? Well, this ts targe- 
ty because. I am sorry to say. WSLFL's trip 
brought out a side of amateur radio I 
wouJd not wish to see again, i will explain 
this, but flrit some backgrounds 

There has been keen fnterest in the 
United Kingdom In the ham-lnspace pro- 
gram since II was first mooted about 
some time ago. When r^ASA gave tenta- 
tive approval there was considerable ac- 
livtty. The RSGB magazine. na<fio Com- 
munication, Qu thread the proposals as did 
the AMSATAiK newsletter. O&car News. 

With ttie shuttle flight quite dose. 
Radio Communication featured a long ar- 
tlc*e {^scribrng the proposed operating 
method and sugg«stirij| likely times of 




One 0/ the test entennas^ 



spscec/aK visl^bMity in the UK. Oscat 
News featured more detailed information 
on the orbital parameters expected. As 
the time of taunch drew closer, the Sun^ 
day morntng news bulletins from RSGB 
(on 2 meters and 60 meters} gave very 
comprehensive coverage of the final 
plans for operating and the expected 
launch program, AMSAT-UK nets on 80m 
and on OSCAR 10 talked of itttle else but 
the shuttle program^ and much time was 
spent swa|>ping orbital prediction pro- 
grams and planning strategy. 

Ttve R&GB set up a telephone-answ^M- 
Irlig m^cNne giving up-to-theHminyte infcM- 
mation. (So popular was this, that I ended 
up cailir^g WestUrA In Califorma a^tef try- 



ing unsuccessfully for two days to get 
through to RSGB.) The Sunday morning 
newscasts became daily, with bulletins 
each evening at 1 700 iocal 1 1 me on 80m for 
the duration of the mission. AMSAT-UK of 
course was having a ffeid day with nets 
and special news sheets (even Radio 
Communication for December carried a 
loose insert with the latest orbital predic- 
tions). 

So you would eiCpect everyone to know 
what to expect and to know what to do, 1 
was active for five ot the projected over- 
passes of the UK- l did not hear W&l^U 
but I did hear enouph to susi>ect that he 
woutd not wish to have had any QSOs with 
UK stations. Firsts there were the i^ds who 



oanu read, c^idn't read, or Just did not be 
lleve what they were given by the f^SGB. 
Galling on the downlink was the favorite 
of course — even l>y some GSs wh^se call- 
Signs indicate that they have held a II- 
coitse for at Jeast 15 years {and are pre- 
AumNably. therefore, of mature years). 

lids a 1513 invented their own brand of 
bTi'sfi shorty snappy calls to minimize up- 
Itnk occupancy: CQ CQ CQ W5LfL—a.f¥l 
CO CQ CQ Oolumb^a, and €0 CQ CO Ca4- 
timbia. Wis is Gei^? i^tting from Puddfe- 
hampton in. . . ali of which was enough to 
occupy ttie entire pass, ryever mind the 
one-minute listening period. Mind you, 
stations were heard catling Co/4/mNt up 
to one tiour before the computed (and 
much ptibticrzed) AOS tirne^. 

One couid^ perhaps, forgive the atM^e- 
mentione«l operators for just enthusiasm. 
But what of the foHowing — 

• running RTTY (RYs) on one of the uplink 
frequencies 

• publiciy stating thai 146.550 (the down> 
lln4c) ia for everybody's use, and csiilng CO 

• responding with foul language to a po> 
lite request to move from the downlink fre- 
quency 

• telling listeners that the mission Is "all- 
ly" end threatening to jam If heard 

e boasting of running enough power to 
drown every other UK station 

I might have heard more, hut I gave up 
tisten^ng. I did no! think hams anywhere 
could behave so badly, but to hear it in En- 
gland was very sad. 

I salute the shuttle program and Or. Gar^ 
flott, but please don^ givei him a fig again. 



IE 



GREECE 

Manas Darkadakis SV7IW 
FO 00* 23051 

Ath&ns mw 

Gt&ece 

With AMSATs new tslrd, OSCAR 10, the 
need for a good UHF antenna ia a must for 
some body who wants to work wlih li. So, 
many amateurs in Greece, after I he suc- 
cessful departure of the satellite, were 
thinkmg of what antenna Ihey should put 
on. Since Greece doesnl otfer many 
choices for buying goods like that, many 
of us make our own antennas, bul there 
STB r>ot suitable instruments to test them. 

So, one day while on a round table on a 
lOCftf ehaiinei on two meters, SV1PH 
pfoml&ed to bring a very accurate pOw# 
meter in order to test ttie homemade an^ 




t 







i#/r 10 right: SVfOE, SVlfU, SV1E}C. SV1IW, SVIDM, amS SVfHM. 



Left to rtghf (sTantSfng}: SV1DS, SVIDH, SV7DC, 5VtAH, SV7R/, andSVlRC; SifuaWog: 
SV1BL SVTOf, SVfRL and SVliW. 



73 Magazine • Aprils 1984 93 



tonnas along wttti some commafclal 
ones. too. 

The antertoa party was orfpnizdd *wy 
fwM^ and aixHil tofi days latef on » beauli- 
ftit Sunday moming* more than 25< 5V 
hams were gatherad in Spat a. a place 
some 10 mi las east ot Athens. This place 
i9 a verY lar^e area Iree from obslacles of 
any kind, as Ihe new Internal lonal Airport 
of Athens will be th^re, 

In the transmitting position, an FT 7ftOR 
UHF transceiver was put with a 23-81- 
emeni Fracaro anrenna on a 2(^rciot ntasr. 
On ttie other end. 200 feet apart, the HP- 
432 A power meter was ready with all the 
antennas ur^<d«r lest. 

' The measur ement $ for Ihe ant ennas drft 
In Rg. 1 Note Ihai all of them were put cm 
a similar 20-foot mast just hhe the trartS' 
mittir>g anienna. As you can see. tof soine 
of the home-brewers things are not an 
easy, while on the other har^d a few have 
made very ^ocxj copies of some popuim 
antennas such as the Jaybeam Para- 
beam, 

Finally, besides all ot these measure- 
ments^ it was a very pieasant Sunday 
morning; the weather helped a lot for 
at>oij! 25 people to meet and have fun 
playing amateur radiol 



Antenfwi 



Id^lemerrt F9FT 
2T-elemefit F9FT 

fia-tiemenl Jayt>eam'3 Mtillitwvn 
1&e4emenl Quagi (homemade fii>m SVlRt) 
17-elemen| Parabeam (t^orrventade from 

SV1RCJ 
19-eleniBnt F9FT (homemade from SVILY) 
23-elemenl Fracaro 
13-element K2fllW (homemade from SV1LY) 



Clifn 


Front 


Front 


lianufac> 




totedi 


to side 


tumr'* 






L 


R 


gain 


ia.r 


22 


ts 


15 


le 


14 


20 


17 


12 


IS 


15,2 


21 


11 


13 


18J 


10j5 


4 


n 


14 


15 


125 


15 


11 


13 


14J 


8.6 


23 


22 


22 


IB 


SM 


2G 


22 


22 


— 


B3 


17 


13 


t3 


^— 



Fig. t 




ISRAEL 

Ron Gang 4Z4MK 
Kibbutz Urim 

N^gev Mobif» Post Office 
aS^^O /free/ 

THi MASADA EXPiOmON 

**Masada? You'll never be able to gel a 
signal out from il^e^e down tsry the Dead 




That was the kind of reaction received 
by Dani 4Z4GU and Adam 4XeiY when 
they tet it be known (hat they were orga- 
nizing an amateiir-radio expedition to thts 
aiHiient forlfess. 



The e^ent— the 19^3 Scouts' Interrw- 
tionai JamtMxee On The Air, the place— 
Masada, a tortress dating back to the time 
of Chrtat situated on a rock plateau 
overlooking the Dead Sea, the lowest spot 



on ttie face of tfie Earth. Dani end Adam, 
leading six membefs of tfw Tel Aviv Sea 
Scoyts" radio Club, ventured out to this 
forebod'fng spo^ sel up 4Z4HS/Masada, 
and dispelled toe once and for all the mytfi 
that Ihis area la an rf trap! 

A few words abnul the histmy of Ma- 
sada; Situated In the parched Judaean 
desert, hovering 1,4^ feet over the Dead 
5ea^ stand the remains of this stronghold 
built by King Herod around the ^ear zero. 
Containing vast food stores and a ctever- 
ly-engineered system of drainage canals 
and cisterns to catch every valuable rairv 
drop, King Herod designed this pEace to 
tie both his wintsf palace and a ptace of 
rafuge from nis many en^nies, both rea] 
and imagined. Perched on top of sheef 
roek ditf Jt was easily defensibie. 

A few generations later, with the Jewish 
rebellion against the Rornan Empire, Ma^ 
sada was the site of ttie last stand of the 
Zealots. Jeruaalem fell to the legions ol 
Emperor Titus in 70 AD, and Masada's de- 
fenders hefd oul under siege lor Ihiree 
more years. Painstakingly building e mas- 
sive embankment up to the top of the pi a* 
teau, the Romans were able to brin^ their 
catapults and ba tiering rams to the walls 
of Masada. When they reached the top 
and entefed, they found Itiat tfw defend- 
ers had taken their own fiv^ rather tfian 
tall into captivity. This closed the last 
chapter of Israel's mdependence In arv 
dent times 

Today, Masada has become a kir^J of 
nalmnal shrine. EKcavated by arGheolo^ 
gists, many ol Its ruins have been recc>n« 
strutted to give an idea of what It was 
once II Ke, A few years ago, a cable car was 
ins tat led to ease the visitor's aacent up 
the rock face. 

Armed with a T5<S30, gasolme genera- 
tor, storage battery, a twenty-foot mast 
and assorted di poles* the group trom the 
Sea Scouts rnade their way from Te* Aviv 
to the Dead Sea m the Great Bift Valley. 
Unloading the g«ar from the cable car, the 





?7»e Tet Atflr Sea Scot/fs on tfm if §83 Scouts' ffttwnatkmaf Jamboree Cvt The Air. at llaaatfa, overfookfng the Dead Sea. (Photos by Dan Sfmhrn 4Z4QU.) 

04 73 Magazine • April, 1984 



Owen Garriott Will Be At The ARRL National 



ni Whi I lniini[TAV/1li 



COME TO THE HOTEL PENTA IN NEW YORK on July 20 22, 1984, 
for the ARRL National. Register now for the special convention room 
rate of S56.00 per couple, per night, and along with the convention's 
fantastic parties, technical and operating seminars, League com- 
mittee meetings^ banquet, DX gatherings and nrianufacturers' 
disptays, you and your family can enjoy all there is to do in 
New Vori<, the cultural capital of the world! 

FOR A TRULY »OUT OF THIS WORLD" EXPERIENCE weD be 

celebrating both the 15th Anniversary of man's first moon landing 
AND the first off -world amateur radio operation during the STS-9 
Spacelab-1 mission. Our special guest will be astronaut DR. OWEN 
GARRIOTT, W5LFL, first ham to operate from space! You can meet 
W5LFL in person, at the Moon Landing Anniversary Party on Friday 
evening^ July 20th^ AND hear him speak at the Banquet on Saturday 
evening, July 21 st. 

IMACINE, THE MOST IMPORTANT ARRL NATIONAL EVER 
HELD... AND YOU CAN BE THERE! Register now to assure your 
room and banquet reservatrons. For detailed information and 
registration forms, SASE to Mike Troy, AJl J, R.R. 4-Box 19C, 
Pound Ridge, NY 10576. ^^^^ 





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73 Magazine • April, 1984 95 



setting up of trie station went without a 
fittch and it looked like clear sailing 
»hea<L 

Suddenly a sandsiorrn b4ew iFp frofn tfm 
Juda^an d^^rt The scouts wete forced 
10 mtreat intq a focijnstructed bulldir>§, 
arvd when they got back on the air they 
found that they w«fie in wftat ha^d once 
been King Herod's bedrodml 

The tweftty-metef ttajid wat in ^xxi 
itMpe and good, c^ea/ signal a were pour- 
log in from Europe and Africa, with weaker 
ones being heard from Oceania and the 
Aniericaa. In tfie finest tradition of the 
Jambofee On The Air, Dan I and Adam's 
SGouls were making contact with their 
counterparts around the world, exchang- 
ing their names and ages, f^any pages of 
the log were filled, and the group fait the 
voniure to be a huge success, 

Masada will t>e on the sir again! Oani 
has Invited me to a similar expedition he 
Is ptvining with the Sea Scouts. So, in Qc- 
tober, 1984, keep ymjr sar? open for 
4X4HS^3£ada? 




JAPAN 

Roy Waits W9PQN 

Tomig&ya Grani:t-$Oh 2-1^-5 Tomigaya 

Shibi/ya-Ka 

Tokyo 157 

QUESTIONS MOSTOFTEH 
ASKED ABOUT JAPA^* 

Throughout ttte years as a resident h&re 
in Ja{?an. i have been asked rrmny ques- 
tiOAs about ham radio in trii$ countiy. 
such as regulations. statistic:aJ informa- 
tion, eic^K as well as many nort^Tajtwe- 
tatad items. Here are some of the most-of- 
tafvasked questior^s along with the aiv 
awers, which I thought migm be interest- 
ing. This also might possibiy be savirtg of 
my time so that I don't have to answer the 
same quest lens mere than onceT 

0/ Wd* many Jepa/iese hsms sr& 
tfiGre? 

A: There are 1,080.000 operators and 
576,000 stations at the present time. 

0, Why this ^iffer&nt& b^iwe^n Qpem- 
ton anrf stations? 

At In Japan, iht ofMvator's license 
(good for life} and the statioo license ^ 
years) are separate. 

0: it fooks like a lot of Ofmratof^ cfonY 
ftav9» station. RJght? 

A; Righi. Many aie high-school and unk 
ver»ity students who cofifirtpa ttieir operat- 
ing to the school club statioft arfd have 
rvevnr applied for their own station li- 
censes. Also. In Japan son>e farnllles have 
i '1 amity club calls ign;* which aU f amity 
members with an operator's permit may 
use. Another factor Is that since the oper- 
ator's license is lifetime, the big numt>6r 
doesn't reflect those who hav^ lost Inter- 
est In ham radio. 

O: StrtQ^ there a/e so m&ny hams in Ja- 
pan, i am ^urprisac^ that ttte DX CaHbook 
fists so few. Why is that? 

fie Simply t)ecause r^ one has taken the 
time lo translate the Japanese callt»Do4; 
Into English. tT>e Japanese calls and ad- 
dress^ listed tn itw American DX Csif- 
bO0k have apparently either tM«n sent in 
by thii Japanese ham himselt or sent In by 
an American ham frfand Incidentally, the 
Japanese ham call book Is enormous— as 
you woulis expect. It contains l fiOO pages, 
weighs over 4 pourvds, and costs approx- 
imately S27,00. And, as stated at>ove, It la 
Sfitlraiy in Japanesa. 

0: tarn a US cftfien pianning to be in Ja- 
pan for a month. Can I operate? 

96 73 Magazine • April, 1984 



A: As of the date of this writing there is 
no reciprocal agreement yet, but you 
couJd postHlly operate a dub slatiorL The 
problem is that it takes from two weeks to 
a rrKHTtth to obtain pefmission to operate, 
assuming that you firxt a cluti willing to 
lend you its callsign. The Tokyo interna- 
tJonat Amateur Radk» Association (TlAnA)i 
might t>e able to help you. Just call 5SS- 
2236 alter you arrive in Japan. 

0: ts repeater op^atian parmitted tit 
Japan? 

A: Yes, on 435 and 144 MHz, sinca ^^&Z 

0: How attout phone patcha$? 

A; Not allowed. 

Q: How about fax. ftTTY, and sfow-scan 
TV? 

A; Yes, they are allowed. 

0: What are the power iimitationa? 

A: The two Novice classes are limited to 
10 Watts output; Second class Is tOO 
Watts: and First class generally Is 500 
Watts arifK>ugh Rrst class is actually 
Opon-ervied, applications being consid- 
sfsd on a case-by-case basis. For in- 
stance, I kfKvw of one Japariesa ham wtio 
runs 13 kW lefiaily. In Japanctse law, no 
distirkction la made between amateur and 
commercial regulations. The power limits 
gi^en above appiy to (he HF bands. On 
VHF and higher, the limitation is SO Watts 
output, 

Q; / undarstanif that the Japanese have 
another code in addition tQ th^ Morse 
coda. 

A; Yes, It Is called "wabun" and bs one 
of the requirements to obtain a first-class 
licensa. When a Japanese operator lis- 
tens to wabun he writes down Japanese 
tetters on the paper, not English. When 
you first listen to wabun it sounds like or- 
dinary Morse until you come to some 
""new" characters— I tke four dashes, for 
Instinct. 

Q; Has any Arnerfcan ewf pa99ad tfm 
Jmpan»B€ amgt^ur-radio test? 

A: As tar as ts known, no non-Japanese 
has ever sat for the First-lass exam, 
which would include a wal?un exam But 
on the other hand, several Americans and 
others have passed the "denwaKyu" or 
Novice no-code exam. We believe that the 
first non^apanese ham to pass the Japa- 
nese Novice test was Nor mart Smith 
G3HF0 In 1970 while he was working for 
the British embassy here In Tokyo. Since 
that time several Americans hav^e taken 
and passed the test, and more recently a 
Mew Ze a lander, Keith Wilk^nsbn ZL2BJR. 
passed the Second-cFass tast^ Definitely 
a first! 

O: So f assume that tttose who paas the 
t9St can get a catisign amt goontha air. 

A; No. ttwy cannot 3 At this wfiting. only 
Japanese citizens can feceive a station li- 
cer^e am) caftsign. Pass I r^ the test gives 
ofve only an operaior's ttc^nsa. which you 
could obtain by showing your ham license 
from your own courtt ry If you happen to be 
American, German, Irish, or Fmnlsh. ^So 
why bother with the Japanese test?] You 
still need to find a club station to operate. 
But that may all be behind us by the time 
you read this, as we soon may have a full 
reciprocal agreement with Japan. 

Q: it is pretty weii i^rrown that the Japa- 
rrese aro ganerai/y iaw-a tiding c^fkens, 
so Pasad on that in format ton t wouttf as- 
some that IherB are not many viaiatians 
with tegat^ to amateur-mdio op^ratofs in 
Japan, is that right? 

A: Tt\ere are sonw probiems^ I am told 
(fiai many First-class operators apply fof 
tow power to escape a station inspect Ion, 
then operate with 2 kW or moce. Also, 
thete la a lot of repeater Jamming. 13ellber^ 
ate Jamming, apparently. Also, we often 
observe out of -band operation on the 
40-meter band, which seems to be deliber- 
ate as the opefators use fake or comical 
call signs. The percentage of bad apples Is 



probably very low, but the repeater lam- 
ming has really gotten out of hand. We are 
told ttiat English-speaking hams are spe* 
dal targets for these |ammers. This 
seems to tw tru6^ We also have hMfd 
siftgtng. dirty talk, and sex tapes on 2 me- 
tefs from time to lirrte. (Some people civeer 
them on.) then, too, ther« was a p€obiefn 
when Owen Garrlott orbitted this part of 
Ihe wo#td, t>ringing the iammefs oul In 
force. Japanese country -style enka" 
music was heard on one of the downlink 
frequencies, ruining it for everyone, ft was 
a lot of fun. Generally, Japanese hams 
have a good reputation on the DX bands 
and are known for their good manners and 
good operating techniques^ 

O.' Who i^ the presideni of the JARL? 

A: Shozo Ha ra JA1AM Is the president 
of the JAAL He Is 57 years old and has 
been JARL president lor 14 years. 

O; Can f save money by tx/ying a rig in 
Jap&n and fringing it home? 

A: Yes, If you hand<arry it with you. Bui 
be sure the rig you buy f^as an English 
manual, Itiat the warranty is good In your 
country back hnm*, tMt It has taps for 
110/120 volts, and in the case of a 2-met«r 
rig. thai It covers the entire band and not 
fust 144 arvd 145 f Japan fr«quenci«d)^ fncJ- 
dentally, since the compantes want to • 
lot of tfouble to set up dealerships in the 
US and other countries, thay prefer that 
you buy In your own country through 
those deaiers. 

Q: i'd Ki^e to stay in a Japanese inn, 
catied "ryoHan," In Tokyo, Can you recom^ 
mend one to m&? 

A: We're not Iri the travel business, and 
since we live here we don't need to look 
for a ryokan in Tokyo to stay in, tnit I un^ 
derstand thefe are some inns in Tokyo 
that caief to toreignefs. T?ie information 
clee4c at the N«w Toicyo Inteniatlonal Air^ 
port can provide you with tnformatioa In- 
ctdentally^ the Japanese twt t>aihs are 
very good fof arttuitis sufferers like my- 
self. Outside of Tokyo at the various m- 
softs you can Find many beautiful inns 
that you might anfoy. Generally, supper 
and bfeakfast are included in the price, 
which ranges from S40 to S3D0 a night, per 
person I 

0: fs Engiish understood widaiy in Ja- 
pan? 

A: No, not really. You wlU have no prob- 
lems at international hotels and restaur 
rants, but outside of that youVe on your 
own. 

Or What Qfm ptttce of advice woufd you 
gh/e to a person coming to Japan as a 
t^H/rist^ 

A. Bring large bucKets of money I Prh»s 
are high hersv 




LIBERIA 

Brother Dona rd Steft^s, C- S^ C- 

BL2AUWB8HFY 

Brothers of the Hoiy Cross 

St Patrick High &choat 

POBoxIQQS 

Monrovia 

f^pabiic Qt Uberta 

How wou^d you like to know aJI t^ ama- 
teurs in the United States? 

Welt, In Uberla ihe amateurs all know 
each other. When a new call is heard on 
the ajr, all iht hams want to know wtio he 
is^ wtiere f>e llves^ wtiene he came from, 
and what he is doing In Uberia, It Is not urv 
like many small communities in the 
States. There Is one exception, though. 
Here the new amateur is always welcome 



and any doubts will be erased on his first 
contact 

The country, Efom Its northwestern tip 
lo its southeailwty point, runs about 
three hundred miles, and It is alx>ut tr>e 
same diagonally from southwest to norlh- 
^st. But in araa^ the country, roughly rec- 
tartguiai, is t^ite a bit smaller. Ut>eria Is 
dJvkfsd into nine cotfnties. Ttie most 
densely populated is Montserrado tEL2) in 
which ts found Monrovia, the capital city 
and the greater part of the Rrestor^ Rub- 
ber Fiantation. More than half of the hams 
In Liberia operate from Montsefrado 
County, so many of the amateur operators 
around the world get the idea that Liberia 
ts EL2 land. Moai of the radio amateurs In 
Liberia are expatriates, and In the Monro* 
via area most of them are either American 
or German. The Americans are associated 
with the embassy, with the Voice of /^ner- 
lea. or with ttie administrative offices of 
vanot^ Ameiican government activities. 
Also, a number of Americans are engaged 
tn fioapita] and dispensary work and in od- 
ucatlon. Thie Germans, for the most part, 
are engineers, 

Ntmba County fELS) has seven ama- 
teurs and all Of ifiem are missionaries. 
Bong County {£L7> has four amateurs. 
They are engineers operating an irorwjre 
mine. Grand Gape 1EL9) has four amateurs 
who are mlssLonarles Grand Basse {ELi) 
had two One of them has left, so In that 
county the count Is down to one. Sinoe 
{EL3^ has none. Maryland County (EL4) 
has one. Lofa County (ELS) has four. 
Grand Gedah ^ELB) has one, and all of 
these are missionaries. 

Some of the missionaries up and down 
Ubena use comdmafcial-type flxed-tre^ 
quency radios lor ihei^ tnisine^s commu- 
nications and use tt« amateur radio to 
ke«p in toucn with theJr fiiends both in U^ 
beria and In their hametancfs. Commune 
cation in this country is difficult or nonex^ 
Istervi except fo^ the radio, in the outlying 
areas there is eitf>er no electrical poorer at 
all or it is supplied for a few hours a day. 
Radios in those areas are operated on bat- 
tery power. 

The problem of building amateuf radio 
among the natives becomes mora under- 
standable^ The missionaries must supply 
the Instrjctibn and the equipment, other- 
wise little is going to happen in this area. 
Area club stations seem to be the answer 
and It is In this direction that present ef- 
forts are going. 

It would be an Intei^estlng project to 
contact all the amateurs in Uberia. There 
are less than a hundred. Perhaps one of 
these years, tfie LHAA (Liberia Radio Ama* 
teur Assocfation) will Issue an award for 
such an aocompllshrrkent. Wouldn't it be 
nice to have a beautiful caftificate on the 
wall of your shack statirfg that you have 
contacted every ham in Liberia^ 




MExrco 

Mark K, Toutfiart XEtKMT 
Aparladb Postal 42-048 
06470 
Mexico^ D.F- 

NEW tOMFti TO 3M FM UNK! 

t was recently informed by William Al- 
zaga Ch. XE2WAU here in MeitJco City, 
that a new link from 10m FM to 2m FM la 
b^ing irkstalled and used thmugh tl>e Sat^ 
el lite Radio Qlub repeater (147.030/ 
147.630) so that locaf hams can operate 

Continued on page 153 




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73 Magazine • April, 1984 97 



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73 Magazine • Aprfl, 1984 99 



David A. Smith W8YZ 
530 Holiywood Drive 
Monroe Ml 48W1 



How to Have a 
Sunny Field Day 

When Michigan hams turned to solar power, they got more 
than they asked for. Does success mean anything? 



Our club. The Monroe 
County Radio Com- 
munications Association, has 
always earned the natu- 
ral-power bonus points at 
Field Day by hand-cranking 
a generator and using the 
power produced to operate 
a 5-Watt CW QRP rig. Be- 
lieve me, it takes real con- 



centration on the handles 
when the operator keys 
down to adjust the antenna 
tuner. 

Well, to a radio ham who 
is always looking for a better 
way to improve a station, it 
seemed that there had to be 
a better way to earn the bo- 
nus points. 1 had seen a dem- 




Battery box, charge controller, and sohr panel with (from left 
to right) Paul DeNapoli WD8AHO, lee Loose KD8DA, Dave 
Smith W8YZ, and Ron Loveland KA8RNE. 

100 73 Magazine • April, 1984 



onstration of photovoltaic 

power at a local hamfest 
and it sure seemed like a 
better way to go. 

We contacted Mr. Paul 
DeNapoli WD8AHO, the 
Communications Director 
for The En con Corporation 
(27600 Schoolcraft Road, Li- 
vonia Ml 48150, [31 3^523- 
1850). Paul was glad for the 
opportunity to demonstrate 
his company's products. To 
our surprise, he told us to 
plan on running at least one 
solid-state rig of the 200^ 
Watt class for the entire pe- 
riod on equipment that he 
would loan us for demon- 
stration purposes. We ex- 
pected only to run a hand- 
held on 2 meters for five 
contacts* 

We took Paul at his word. 
One of our members sup- 
plied an I com IC-740 for the 
project This station was to 
be operated on both 80-me- 
ter phone and CW with ca- 
pability for other bands as 
well We planned to use it 
around the clock. 

The equipment provided 



by Encon was four Exide re- 
newable-energy, deep-cycle, 
6-volt batteries connected in 
series parallel, 12 V dc @ 
370-Ah storage, an Encon 
charge controller, and three 
Encon solar panels each 
measuring 17 by 42 inches. 
The latter were mounted on 
an aluminum framework 
and pointed south under 
Paul's direction. We expect- 
ed to need to rotate the 
framework to follow the 
sun, but Paul explained that 
this was not needed. 

We started Field-Day op- 
eration using the mad-scram- 
ble technique which permits 
27 hours of operation The 
solar installation proved to 
be easier to set up than a gas 
generator, Paul brought the 
whole installation to our site 
in the back of a compact au- 
tomobile. All that was need- 
ed was to make several 
connections to the rig and 
batteries with #10 copper 
wire and aim the panels 
south. 

We were quickly able to 
make the needed 5 contacts 



for the natural-power bonus 
points, Everything was work- 
ing fine and we continued to 
operate the station full bore 
on both phone and CW. 

The charge controller sui> 
plied by Encon had a battery 
voltnneter as well as a sepa- 
rate charge and discharge 
ammeter The voltage re- 
mained at a steady 13.4 
volts white the charge indi- 
cator indicated between 1 
and 6 Amperes to charge. 
This was due to the periodic 
cloud coverage. Under full 
sun, we had 6.6 Amps. The 
output ammeter fluctuated 
wildly between 1 and 20 
Amperes while we were op- 
erating! 

The station was on the air 
all night and of course there 
was no charge current to 
the batteries. The voltage 
dropped to 12,6 volts. Thfs 
was quickly recovered, how- 
ever, with the batteries top- 
ping off at full charge by 10 
am. The charging current 
from the panel array was 6,6 
Amperes. 

It became clear at this 
point that the three panels 
and batteries were large 
enough to run at least one 
more rig. We had failed to 
consider how low the full- 
current duty cycle is with 
solid-state amateur gear, 
even during a contest 

Considering the advan- 
tages of solar power for 
Field Day, one must think 
beyond multipliers and bo- 
nus points- For example, 
there were a couple of times 
when the solar station was 
the only station operating, 
once because of a break- 
down of a generator when a 
spark plug fouled and an- 
other time when there was a 
fuel-line blockage. It was 
clear that the solar installa- 
tion is far superior for 
emergency applications. Al- 
so, there was no ignition 
noise to contend with when 
the generator failed. The 
"ears'' on the solar station 
got even better. 

This demonstration of am- 
ateur radio was well covered 

t^Sse List of Aiivertfsers on page 1$0 



by the press with all area 
papers giving it attention. 
The county's general-cov- 
erage paper, The Monroe 
Evening News, did a half- 
page photo story on our 
Field Day with particular 
emphasis on the solar-power 
aspect This publicity got a 
lot of attention for our hob- 
by and provided many op- 
portunities for the club 
members to explain to their 
friends the hobby with its 
unique emergency capa- 
bilities. 

One response is most in- 
teresting. The local power 
company contacted the 
club and offered to ''do 
whatever is needed/' in- 
cluding setting poles and 
transformers free of charge 
and providing free power, 
for any future field activities 
of the club. They wish to em- 
phasize the dependability of 
commercial power. 

In Michigan, users pay a 
penalty for "excess use" of 
electricity. Consumption be- 
yond 810 kwh is charged at a 
rate of 14? a kwh. This 
means that any optional use 
of electricity such as am- 
ateur radio must be consid- 
ered to cost the penalty rate. 
Nearly every ham I know 
has a part of his electrical 
consumption in the "excess" 
category; any home applica- 
tion of photovoltaics must 
take into account ham oper- 
ating at the penalty rate 

Also, hams who are es- 
pecially interested in emer- 
gency preparedness would 
do well to'' consider the 
potential of photovoltaic 
power for their home sta- 
tions. After all, a widespread 
outage of commercial pow- 
er would have no effect on 
an operational photovoltaic 
system, while the demands 
upon a ham who was need- 
ed to send health and wel- 
fare traffic might well in- 
clude cleaning spark plugs 
and gas lines of infrequently 
used equipment before the 
traffic could be sent Clear- 
ly, there is an advantage in 
using something that works 
every day of the year, ■ 




View of charge controller and battery box. 




.3 




70 




V SW R LESS THAM 1 .5:1 




CONTROL LEADS « 
f YEAR WARRAMrr • 

CONTACT i 




PANO 8CH. Fl.. 3»660 
aOS-TSS'-tOlQa TLX ei43&9 



X .■: : A' 



liHiHiiiili 



73 Magazme * April, 1984 101 



L B. Cebtk W4RNi 
5105 Hohton Hilk Road 
Knoxvitte TN 37914 



Painless Op-Amp Filter Design 

Custom applications can be easy, just follow this 
step-by-step guide to a perfect triple op^mp filter. 



The triple op-amp audio 
fitter has become a stan- 
dard, not only in amateur 
circles but in commercial 
design as well Easy to de- 
sign and nearly foolproof in 
construction, the various 
configurations of this filter 
have found their way into a 
large percentage of existing 
ham shacks, either hidden 
within a transceiver or sit- 
ting on the speaker as an 
audio adjunct. Numerous 
small companies offer post- 
receiver audio units using 
from one to eight f i Iter units. 
Even though popular; op- 
amp filters seem to confuse 
most ham builders. Despite 
the low cost of parts, few 
hams build their own. A sim- 
ple but effective single filter 
with a bandpass of between 
100 and 200 Hertz would 
cost about $1000 for parts, 
excluding the case and pow- 
er supply, which together 



might double the cost. This 
is a small investment in 
selectivity, considering what 
one might learn in the pro- 
cess. Still, there are few 
takers. 

Part of the problem stems 
from the volume of material 
that has been written about 
triple op-amp filters. There 
are at least three semi<lis- 
tinct configurations of these 
filters, but only two dif- 
ferent models. However, be- 
cause designers recast sche- 
matic diagrams in different 
ways, the average ham 
comes to believe there may 
be dozens of models. Going 
even further, different 
designers choose different 
circuit values without ex- 
plaining their choices: the 
variations seem to grow 
without limit and without 
any clear sense. The avail- 
able books on filter design 



uri 




mire the ham builder in the- 
oretical design math while 
simultaneously claiming 
simplicity. There is some 
necessary malh to designing 
a personally -satisfying triple 
op-amp filter, but it is 
straightforward hand-calcu- 
lator stuff. 

For the CW buff, most of 
the existing designs have 
limitations. Many are fixed- 
frequency units allowing no 
tuning to please the ear. The 
units that permit tuning tend 
to cover 300 to over 3000 
Hz, a fine range for the 5SB 
fan who can use high- and 
lowisass capabilities built 
into the filter, but ex- 
traneous for CW. A filter 
that covers a span ranging 
from 300 to 400 Hz at the 
bottom to perhaps 1200 Hz 
at the top would reach two 
goals. First, the filter would 
cover the main receiver 
passband for CW, which 



runs (depending upon pref- 
erence) from 400 to 800 Hz 
wide. Second, the filter 
would spread its narrower 
tuning range across the filter 
frequency dial, permitting 
the operator to find more 
easily the desired signal. 
Unfortunately, most home- 
brew designers have merely 
guessed their way into a 
tuning range. 

There is a very direct and 
easy-toTollow procedure for 
designing triple op-amp fil- 
ters in the ham shack. Not 
only will the procedure en- 
sure a filter that works, but 
also it will allow the builder 
to refine the filter's tuning 
range to his desires. The fol- 
lowing notes present a pro* 
cedure used to design sever- 
al dozens of different filters 
for experimental, evalua- 
tive, and operational use, 
and those who have tried 
the procedure claim they 



mrw 




Eq^IT 



Fig. 1. The t^sic bi-quad fitter. 
102 73 Magazine • AprlM984 



Fig. 2 A basic state-variable filter (--SVf). 



have finally made a filter 
that works and that they 
like. The procedyre even in- 
cludes steps that show how 
to let a hand calculator do 
most of the work. 

Some Op-Amp Basics 

There are many triple op- 
amp filter designs but only 
two fairly distinct types. Un- 
fortunately, the history of 
op-amp filter terminology 
has obscured the subject 
Originally, the mathemati- 
cal methods of designing fil- 
ters gave rise to the name 
"bi-quad" as a label for all 
designs. Newer derivations 
yielded the name "state- 
variable fitter/' For some, 
these names refer only to 
the design methods; for oth- 
ers, they refer to circuit con- 
figurations. At the risk of 
arousing the wrath of some 
professional designers, let's 
follow the latter course. 

The bi<]uad (or B-Q) ap* 
pears in Fig. 1. Note that the 
input op amp is an in- 
tegrator; as is the third op 
amp. (Theory aside, an in- 
tegrator circuit is little more 
than an op amp whose feed- 
back is provided by a 
capacitor rather than a 
resistor.) The middle op amp 
is an inverter, and we take 
our bandpass output from 
this stage. Feedback from 
the first and third stages is 
fed back to the first stage in- 
put By controlling the 
amount of feedback from 
one of these stages, the first, 
we control both the gain and 
the Q or selectivity of the 
filter. The components 
marked RF1, CF1, RF2, and 
CF2 control the frequency 
of the filter. 

Fig. 2 shows the other tri- 
ple op-amp filter design. The 
state-variable filter (or 
— SVF, with the minus sign 



to be explained very soon) 
also consists of two inte- 
grators, but this time in posi- 
tions two and three, with a 
summing amplifier as the in- 
put stage. Feedback from 
the integrators combines 
with the input signal at the 
inverting or negative input 
of the first op amp We con- 
trol the gain and Q of the 
filter by the ratio of resistors 
R4 and R5, and we set the 
frequency by the compo- 
nents marked to correspond 
to those in the B-Q filter. 
Bandpass output comes 
from the middle stage, this 
time an integrator Unlike 
the B<3 filter, the -SVF 
design provides high^ass 
and low-pass outputs, but at 
different signal levels than 
the bandpass output. 

The -SVF filter has a 
near tw in which we can call 
the +SVF. Fig. 3 shows the 
configuration. The major 
difference between the 
SVFs is that this version 
feeds the input signal to the 
non-inverting or positive in- 
put of the summing op amp. 
(The reason for the labels 
+ SVF and -SVF should 
now be clear J Gain and Q 
feedback also return to this 
pin, now being controlled by 
the ratio of R4 to R1. 
Although this filter belongs 
in the SVF family, some of 
its components require 
slightly different values 
from its brother, and the 
gain vs. Q characteristics 
will differ. Otherwise, it 
works perfectly well. 

The B-Q and SVF filters 
have different properties 
that, for various needs 
around the shack, give one 
advantages over the other 
First, both SVF filters will 
have a constant Q and gain 
throughout their tuning 
ranges. This means that the 




bandwidth, when measured 
in Hertz, will increase as the 
filter frequency increases. In 
contrast, the B<J filter has a 
constant bandwidth in Hertz, 
but consequently increases 
in Q and gain with frequen- 
cy. For fixed-frequency 
filters, this phenomenon is 
meaningless, but for tunable 
filters, it is important The 
constant output of the SVF 
designs makes follow-up 
amplification simple. How- 
ever, every SVF section [i.e., 
three op-amp filter) requires 
a dual potentiometer to 
change RFl and RF2 to- 
gether. 

The B-Q filter is tunable in 
the same way but may also 
be tuned by changing just 
RFl Since, like virtually all 
other filter sections, these 
filters will ring if the Q is 
very high, we can cascade 
two lower Q B-Q sections 
for a sharper bandpass using 
only one dual pot. Dual pots 
are hard enough to find; 
four-section pots in audio 
(log) taper are nearly impos- 
sible to come by, being 
either inaccessible or very 
expensive (which amounts 
to the same thing for most 
of us). A newer variety of op 
amp, the operational trans- 
conductance amplifier 
(OTA), promises to relieve 
us of these problems, but 
few practical ham designs 
using the device have yet to 
appear. 

Notice that there is no 
clear winner in the contest 
between the B-Q and the 
SVF filters. Rather, we must 
design around their limita- 
tions. For example, we can 



overcome the gain change 
of the B-Q filter by making 
the Q resistor, R4, variable, 
or by following the filter 
with a limiting amplifier 
such as the one in Fig. 4 This 
is the W4MLE variable-com- 
pression version of the 
N6WA Audio Elixir (See 73 
for September, 1979, p. 116. 
and November, 1982, p. 32.) 
Until OTAs become more 
common, there is no way to 
solve the multiple-pot prob- 
lem of cascaded SVFs; how- 
ever, for most work on CW; 
a single-section, moderate<J 
filter requiring just one dual 
pot Will do wonders. A Q of 
20 theoretically yields a 
half-power bandwidth of 
just 30 Hz at WO-Hz center 
frequency. Even allowing 
for low-precision compo- 
nents, we do not need exces- 
sively high Q filters to en- 
hance CW. In practice, de- 
sign Qs in the range of 1 5 to 
20 will yield -6 dB (half- 
voltage) band widths in the 
lOO-tO'120+lz range for a 
600-Hz center frequency. 

Designing Your Filter 

In Fig. 1 through Fig. 3, 
components having com- 
parable duties have the 
same designation. For all de- 
signs, the frequency -deter- 
mining components are the 
same although differently 
placed. R2 and R3 provide 
feedback and can be treated 
as alike in all three cases. In 
the —SVF design, R1 equals 
the feedback resistors, while 
in the +SVF version, it will 
be half their value. In the 
B-Q, the input resistor can 
equal the feedback resistors 



iw • — v^ ■ 



EiOyT 




COliPfES3M3li L£Vf L 
*f OUTPUT LCVEL 



01- ZN3^8»9 OR EQUIV 



Fig. 3. A basic state-variable filter (+ SVF} 



Fig. 4. A limiter/compressor tor postfilter amplifying. 

73 Magazine • Aprti, 1934 103 



^1 



Filter Type 


State-Variabid 
Inverting Input 


State-Variable 
Non^lnveiiing Input 


Bi-Quad 


Schematic 


Fig. 2 


Fig. 3 


Fig.1 


Frequency 


F^ = 1/2piRA 


Fc = 1i2piRA 


Fc = 1/2piRjCf 


Frequency'determining 
resistors 


RF1=RF2 


RF1=:RF2 


RF1=RF2 


Frequency-determining 
capacitors 


CF1 = CF2 


CF1 = CF2 


CF1 = CF2 


Bias resistors 


R1 - R2 - R3 


R2 = R3 = 2R1 


R1 = R2 = R3 


Q-determining resistors 


R4-R5{3Q-1) 


R4 = R1(2Q-1) 


R4 = R1Q 


Q 


Q = (R4 + R5)/3R5 


Q = (R4 + R1)/2R1 


Q=R4/R1 


Gam (A^ = B^^^^IE^^) 


A,-Q 


A^ = 2Q 


A, = Q 


Non-inverting input 
bias resistors 


N/A 


Fig. 6, Norton amplifier 
configuration only 
m = R5 = 2Rf 


N/A 



Fig. 5. A comparison of filter design relationships. 



orvary sonnewhatfronn their 
value according to the 
needs of the Q relationship. 
Only in the — SVF design 
does Q leave the input resis- 
tor unaffected, being deter- 
nr^ined by the relationship 
between R4 and R5. In the 
other designs, the input re- 
sistor will be a con^promise 
(if needed) between the dic- 
tates of Q and the desired 
situation of having the input 
resistor correctly related to 
the feedback resistors. 

This discussion may make 
designing a filter appear dif- 
ficult. In fact, design is quite 
easy if done according to a 
straightforward procedure. 
Taken step by step, the pro- 
cedure almost ensures satis- 
fying success. Let's start 
with some basic relation- 
ships, as shown in Fig. 5. 

This table reveals where 
the differences between de- 
signs will occur Calculating 
R4 will be slightly different 
for each case. Notice that 
the +SVF filter has twice 
the gain of the other de- 
signs for a given Q. This may 
or may not be an advantage. 
For a filter inserted between 



the detector and audio am- 
plifier of a receiver, the dou- 
bled gain with a low-leVel 
input can be useful. For 
post-receiver use with nor- 
mal speaker input to the 
filter, the lower gain of the 
— SVF and B-Q designs may 
be more than we need In all 
cases, we should have a 
means of varying the input 
level. 

Aside from these points, 
design of the three-filter ver- 
sions will be nearly identi- 
cal. The first step is to think 
about the ICs we will Use. 
The LM324 is perhaps stan- 
dard for both single- and 
dual-voltage supply applica- 
tions. Its current require- 
ments are relatively small 
and it is easy to handle. The 
TL084 is an FET input ver- 
sion with an identical pin- 
out; its current requirements 
are even less. The 3900 Nor- 
ton amplifier also is popular 
in single-voltage designs, 
but its biasing is different 
Fig. 6 shows the basic con- 
figuration of the +SVF 
design with Norton biasing. 
Notice the additional for- 
mula that sets the values of 



P Rl 




OL>T 



the bias resistors to the non- 
inverting positive op-amp in- 
puts. Otherwise, our work 
will be the same as for 
regular op amps. 

Much of the available lit- 
erature on filters is still writ- 
ten in terms of the relatively 
high current 741 op amp. 
Hence, about the highest 
value shown for feedback 
resistors is 10k. in fact, 10k 
should be about the mini- 
mum value for Rl, R2, and 
R3. Something approaching 
100k is more appropriate, al- 
though we will not freeze 
that value at this point. In- 
stead, we will start by select- 
ing an op amp and the de- 
sired frequency range. 

This differs from textbook 
procedures, but for good 
reasons. First, the ham 
builder ordinarily has access 
to components with 5% or 
10% tolerances rather than 
the 1 % and .1% tolerances 
commercial designers pre- 
fer. Consequently, absolute 
peak performance from 



ham models of op-amp fil- 
ters is not possible. Very 
good performance is possi- 
ble and practical. Since we 
will aim at good though 
imperfect performance, we 
can take a few liberties with 
absolute precision at some 
points to gain better preci- 
sion at points more impor- 
tant to hams. 

Second, one of the most 
evident shortcomings of 
home-brew filter designs is 
the fact that tuning controls 
for frequency and Q rarely 
cover the most desirable 
ranges. The techniques for 
designing filters are easy, 
but almost never described. 

Third, the current crop of 
op amps available for fil- 
ter work is very forgiving 
when we compare the pre- 
cise operating level to over- 
all filter performance. 
Hence, we can set our own 
priorities when establishing 
a design procedure. In fact, 
feel free to modify the fol- 
lowing procedure to suit 
personal needs and desires. 

While the procedure in- 
volves twelve individual 
steps, they cover only three 
areas of concern: setting the 
frequency or tuning range of 
the filter, ensuring correct 
feedback, and setting the se- 
lectivity and gain of the fil- 
ter. With a few reservations 
noted in the procedure steps, 
these are almost indepen- 
dent design operations. To 
make the procedure more 
thoroughly clear, let's step 
through it, working an exam- 
ple as we go along. 

Twelve-Step Filter Design 

Step 1. Select an op amp. 



Effj« — v^Ai-^4 



iC\. ICa. [C3-3/4 LM3900 




° EQUt 



/f7 



Fig. 6. A +SVF filter using the 3900 Norton amplifier. 
104 73 Magazine * April, 19S4 



Fig. 7. Setting up the 324 for filter design. 



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73 Magazine * April, 1904 105 



In this case, let's use the re- 
liable LM324, 

Step 2. Select a circuit. 
We can start with the — SVF 
of Fig. 2 and later see what 
happens when we convert 
the design to the other cir- 
cuits. 

Si^p 3. Choose a power 
supply^ In this example, we 
have chosen a single 12-volt 
source. This forces us to pro- 
vide a voltage divider to 
feed the positive input lines 
that we would directly 
ground if we used a dual 
supply Fig. 7 shows the ba- 
sic configuration of our cir- 
cuit, with the 324 pins and 
power connections drawn in 

Step 4. Choose a frequen- 
cy range For CW, let's try 
300 to 1200 Hz, 

Step 5. Find the center fre- 
quency, F^. This is our first 
calculation. Let k be the ra- 
tio of the highest (Fhi) and 
lowest (F|p) frequencies of 
our chosen range. Then: 
k =Fhi/F|o = 1200/300 = 4. 

The square root of k is 2 
(and let's call this ks). If we 
have not made a mistake, 
then Fc = FhAs = F|oks = 
1200/2 = 300 X 2 = 600 Hz. 

This is the design center 
of our filter. Since the filter 
is tunable, let's next turn to 
the task of being sure it 
tunes exactly the range we 
want it to tune. 

Step 6. Choose a dual pot 
to tune the filter. This is a 
practical decision. Since we 
have already said that we 
would like to keep the feed- 
back resistors well above 
10k and hopefully near 
100k, a dual 500k pot would 
be nice. Dual 100k audio-ta- 
per pots may be more acces- 
sible, so let's see what hap- 
pens if we use this value. 

Sfep 7. Calculate Rh, and 
Rjo. !n order to limit the tun- 
ing range to specific values 
(e.g., 300 to 1 200 Hz), we will 
need a fixed resistor and a 
pot in series to make up each 
of the trequencv<ontrolling 
resistors. Rkj will be the need- 
ed resistance when the fre- 
quency is the lowest, and Rio 
will be the resistance at the 
highest frequency. 

We know something 

106 73 Magazine • Aprn,1984 



about these values, even 
though we have not yet se- 
lected a capacitor. First, we 
know that their difference 
will be 100k, the value of the 
pot. Hence, Rhi^Rb^^OOk. 
We also know that Rhi = 
4R|q, since the ratio of low 
to high frequency is 4:1, 
(Note: If we hold the capaci- 
tance constant, as we will 
do with a fixed-value unit, 
the frequency and resis- 
tance will vary inversely 
with each other, i.e., Fhi/Fjo 

Knowing the two relation- 
ships between the highest 
and lowest resistances lets 
us substitute and solve for 
Rlo Since the ratio of the re- 
sistances is 4:1, then Rhr^ 
4R|o. In the difference for- 
mula, we now can say that 
^Rb-Rlo^lOOk, or 3R|o = 
100k. Dividing 100k by 3, we 
get Rio = 33Jk, Since the 
highest resistance is 100k 
higher, Rf^j = 133 3k As a 
check, we can use the other 
original formula and let R^, = 
4Rio^4x333k = 1332k 

I have carried out the cal- 
culation to more precision 
than we can possibly get 
with real components to 
show how good the method 
is. In fact, since real pots are 
often shy of 100k by as 
much as 10%, it is wise to 
have a pot in hand before 
working out a design The 
decimal places might get 
long, but rounding to the 
nearest whole number for 
resistors and keeping k and 
ks to no more than two deci- 
mal places will give perfect- 
ly good design accuracy 

We now know the fixed 
series resistor for RF1 and 
RF2 will be 33k. with the 
look pot making up the rest 
of the resistance. If we dis- 
cover that our dual pot does 
not track and can determine 
by how much it is off, we 
might make one of the two 
fitted resistors a 50k trimmer 
pot. (Adjustment of trim- 
mers in the frequency<leter- 
mining circuits of a filter is 
best done with the circuit 
wired but the op amp out of 
its socket, using a precise 
ohmmeter. Accurate adjust- 



ment with the circuit in 
operation requires a scope 
with frequency-scanning ca- 
pability. Output-level read- 
ings taken on an ac; audio 
voltmeter can be mis- 
leading.) 

Step 8. Calculate capaci- 
tors CF1 and CF2. At all fre- 
quencies, the resistance will 
equal the capacitive reac- 
tance. Hence, the standard 
formula for calculating ca- 
pacitance from frequency 
and reactance becomes CF1 
= CF2-1/2piFRt. In this 
case, start with either end of 
the tuning range For the ex- 
ample, use 300 Hz, where 
the resistance is 133k. If 
your calculator has a 1/X 
key, you can just multiply 
all the denominator num- 
bers together and then hit 
the inverse key. The answer 
is likely to appear in expo- 
nential notation. For exam- 
ple, Cf = 1/(2 X 3.14 X 300 X 

133,0001= 3.99X10''. 

We need to convert this 
to either microfarads (10*^ 
or picofarads (10'^T to see 
what capacitors we should 
purchase 3990-pF or 04^JF 
capacitors will do the job. 
We can parallel some 5% 
polystyrene capacitors to hit 
4000 pF fairly closely. Given 
the fact that we can rarely 
buy the exact value that the 
formula says we need, we 
should design the frequency 
range of the filter with an ex- 
tra 5% on either end to 
allow for the slight range 
shift our approximations 
will produce. 

We can check our work 
by calculating the two fre* 
quency-determining capaci- 
tors from the other end of 
the range. This time, Cf — 1/ 
(2X3.14X1200X33,000) = 
4,02 XI 0"', or about 4000 pF 
again Because we used pi to 
only two decimal places and 
dropped the last 300 Ohms 
off the resistance values, the 
answers diverge by about 
1%, well within the 5% 
component tolerance. Note 
that had we used the 500k 
pot we considered at the be- 
ginning of the example, our 
capacitors would be about 
one-fifth the present value. 



Some builders have difficul- 
ty obtaining 5% capacitors 
in the higher values and may 
want to use Ihe larger pot in 
order to combine it with ca- 
pacitors in the 800-pF range 

Step 9. Calculate the resis- 
tance at the center frequen- 
cy, ^c- Since the resistance 
at center frequency will 
equal the reactive capaci- 
tance, Rfc-1/2piFcCf = 1/ 
(2X3.14X600X4X10"') = 
66,348 Ohms. This is the re- 
sistance value of the fre- 
quency-determining resis- 
tors at the design center of 
the fitter. We will use this 
figure in a very broad way to 
determine the remaining re- 
sistors in the filter Most fil- 
ter-design manuals scale a 
filter from an initial assump- 
tion of equal value resistors 
throughout as much of the 
design as possible On this 
assumption, R1 through R3 
should equal the center-fre- 
quency resistance, and R5 
should approximate it, if 
possible Similar assump- 
tions apply to the other filter 
designs, with adjustments 
for values that must differ. 

In practice, using compo- 
nents readily accessible to 
amateurs, the assumption is 
not very important as long 
as filter resistor values fall 
within the range that per- 
mits the op amps to per- 
form well Values from TOk 
to look have been used 
with no specifically notice- 
able change of perfor- 
mance. As a rule of thumb, 
try to let the feedback resis- 
tors fall within a 2 to 1 or 3 
to 1 ratio of the center-fre- 
quency resistance. 

Step 10. Determine the 
feedback and input resis- 
tors, R1 through R3. On the 
basis of the previous calcu- 
lation and discussion, 68k 
resistors appear to be the 
closest value to the calcu- 
lated center-frequency re- 
sistance. In practice, 100k 
resistors do not change the 
filter performance. What is 
important is to use the 
same value for all three. 
Since 100k is a nice round 
value found in most ham 
junk boxes, let's use it No- 



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73 Magazine • April, 1984 107 



ft 3 
noon 




4 ^hM 



^ 



CFI 

-41-1 



TH 




J5k idOK 




Trx> 



— •£0UT 



Fig a A itxed-Q -SVf tUtef. 



c IDOK 




*E0UT 



/ft 



^W 



Fig. ft A variable^} - SVf filter. 



tice that, like many ham 
building decisions, the 
grounds for our choice have 
little relationship to theory. 
If our value does not work 
for some reason, we have 
another value to try. 

Step 17. Select a value for 
Q and choose the Q-deter- 
mining resistors, R4 and R5 
Since both resistors affect- 
ing Q and gain are indepen- 
dent of the input resistor, we 
have more latitude in choos- 
ing values than with the oth- 
er two designs. For CW fil* 
ters, there is rarely a need 
for a Q greater than 25, and 
the range of 10 to 20 will 
generally produce sufficient 
selectivity without ringing. 
For greater selectivity, we 
should use identical succes- 
sive filters which will give us 
a steeper bandwidth curve 
and greater ultimate rejec- 
tion on unwanted signals, As 
a rule of thumb, using 5% 
and 10% components, I an- 
ticipate that the half-voltage 
(—6 dB) bandwidth will ap- 
proximate 3Fc/Q' ^bout 
50% wider than theory indi- 
cates. For the SVF filters, 
bandwidth in Hz will vary di- 
rectly with frequency. Thus, 
if i choose a 100-Hz band* 
width for the 600-Hz center 
frequency, it will vary from 
50 Hz at the 300+1 z end of 
the range to 200 Hz at the 
1200-Hz upper end of the 
tuning range If this band- 
width is acceptable, then 
Q = 3Fc/BWtc = (3 X 600)/100 
=18. Lefs see what hap- 
pens if we use this figure. 

From the formulas gov- 
eming the —SVF filter, R4 = 
R5{3Q— 1). For our case, 
3Q-1=(3X18)-1=53, 
and R4 = 53R5. If we let R4 

108 ?3 Magazine * April, 1984 



= 100k, then R5 = 53 meg- 
ohms; use either 4. /-meg- 
ohm or 5.1 -megohm stan- 
dard resistor values. In fact, 
we can change the values 
proportionately by factors 
of ten without disrupting fil- 
ter performance Values of 
10k and 510k work well and 
may be easier to find. A rule 
of thumb is to let R4 be the 
highest easy-to-find value 
that permits R5 (or R1 in the 
other two designs) to ap- 
proach its proper theoretic 
relationship to the other re- 
sistors. However, other con- 
siderations may enter into 
the final selection. Fig. 8 
shows our completed fixed- 
Q design. 

One major consideration 
is whether we wish to be 
able to vary the Q of the fil- 
ter and thereby to broaden 
or narrow the bandwidth 
over some useful range. For 
example, we might wish to 
have a Q ranging from 10 to 
20 for this design At Q =10, 
the resistor ratio (3Q^1) 
will be 29, and at Q - 20, the 
ratio will be 59. Suppose 
that we have a 500k pot we 
wish to use to vary the Q. 
Since we will not vary the Q 
to nothing, we will need a se- 
ries resistor with the pot to 
make up R4 We know that 
the value of R4 at Q = 20 
will be the series resistor R^ 
+ 500k, the highest value of 
the pot. At Q- 10, R4will be 
just R5, the value of the fixed 



IN- 



i^H 



iff 



FlLTEft 

(SVF Dfi a-Qs 



ftl 






lOK 



series resistor. At the higher 
Q, R5=(R5 + 500,000)/59, 
while at the lower Q, R5 — 
Rs/29, We can solve for the 
series resistor by letting RJ 
29 =^(R, + 500,0001/59. Cross 
multiplying, we get SOR^^ 
29X500.000, or R^ = 
1.450,000/30 = 483.333 
Ohms. This is the series resis- 
tor to go with the 500k pot 
for R4 R5 = R^29 = 483333/ 
29 = 16,667 Ohms. (As a 
check, R5 = (483,333 + 
5OO,00Q)/59 = 16.667.) We 
can choose a 15k or 18k re- 
sistor for R5 and a 470k or 
51 Ok resistor for R^ respec- 
tively. Exactness will not 
matter too much here since 
we will tune the control for 
best reception rather than 
for some specific value of 
Q. Fig. 9 displays our com- 
pleted variable-Q design. 

Step 12. Consider the 
gain. This step does not re- 
quire special calculations, 
but it does bring the matter 
of gain to your attention. For 
the ^SVF design, gain will 
equal Q. If you design a 
fixed-Q filter, you can ac- 
commodate the filter gain 
with preceding and succeed- 
ing level controls, as shown 
in Fig, 10. Set the input-level 
control so that the strongest 
signal will not drive the filter 



■J I — '^ — 




4 -en 
spnn 



fig. TO. Fiiter input- and 

output-!evel controls. 



Fig, IT. A simple post4ilter 
amplifier for speaker or 
phones. 



to clipping. A scope will 
show this as a sharply flat- 
tened sine wave. Since the 
voltage gain will be consid- 
erable, the filter may drive 
the succeeding stage too 
hard, causing distortion in 
the amplifier feeding the 
speaker or phones. We can 
kill the unwanted voltage 
with another trimmer set to 
hold the amplifier relatively 
distortionless at full volume. 

If the filter has a variable- 
Q control, then its gain will 
also vary To avoid the need 
for constant volume-control 
adjustments, the compres- 
sion amplifier shown in Fig. 
4 should follow the filter 
and precede the output am- 
plifier. With the values 
shown for the compression 
circuit, a normal CW signal 
will leave the speaker quiet 
between dots and dashes. 
The circuit needs no input- 
setting pot, and the output- 
level control serves the 
same function as the filter- 
output control in Fig. 10. 

These 12 steps complete 
the design phase of the 
work. The next step is to 
breadboard a model, verify 
its operation, and finally 
construct a permanent ver- 
sion complete with case and 
power source Robbing pow- 
ef from the receiver and in- 
stalling the filter in either 
the receiver cabinet (espe- 
cially if inserted between 
the detector and audio 
stages) or the speaker cabi- 
net {along with an audio 
amplifier such as the LM386 
circuit shown in Fig. 11) is 
one popular way to handle 
final construction. However, 
to avoid cabinet and circuit 
modifications, you may 



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73 Magazine • April, 1964 109 



wish to make the filter a self- 
contained unit 

Additional Procedures — 
+ SVF and B^ Designs 

The first t'ight steps of the 
procedures just outlined are 
identical for all three filter 
designs. Nothing changes 
until Step 10, selection of 
the input resistor, where we 
have only a minor modifica- 
tion for the + SVF fitter. R1 
should be half the value of 
either R2 or R3 if we wish to 
have the relationship of Q 
and gain follow the formu- 
las given with Fig, 5. Other 
ratios are possible, although 
the input resistor should not 
be greater than the feed- 
back resistors. The gain will 
change but remain constant 
across the tuning range. 

Let's look more closely ^t 
the final steps of the proce- 
dure, customizing them for 
each particular design. First, 
the bi-quad filter: 

Step 11: B-Q. Select a val- 
ue for Q, and choose the 
Q-determining resistors. In 
the B<J design, the input re- 
sistor, R1. interacts with R4 
to determine Q and gain. 
Having selected an input re- 
sistor, R4=QR1. Selecting 
Q follows the same guide- 
lines given for the — SVF de- 
sign, with the proviso that Q 
will vary across the tuning 
range, since bandwidth in 
Hertz is constant. Using our 
— 6-dB (half -voltage point) 
rule of thumb, we can 
design with the formula 
Q = 3F^/BW, where BW is 
the desired bandwidth in 
Hertz. If we wish about 100 
Hz, then Q = (3 X 600)/100 



= 18. RV = 18R1 = 18 X 
100k = 18 megohms, a 
usable value. However, with 
very little change in perfor- 
mance, we can reduce both 
Rl and R4 as long as we 
keep them in the proper 
ratio. Fig. 12 shows the full 
results of our design work. 

We can vary the Q and 
consequently the bandpass 
of B<J filters. We need only 
make R4 variable Suppose 
we wish to vary the Q be- 
tween about 10 and 20, If Rl 
is look, then R4 needs to be 

1 megohm for a Q of 1 and 

2 megohms for a Q of 20, 
We can use a one-meg fixed 
resistor in series with a one- 
meg pot for R4, and the 
problem is solved. Fig. 13 
shows the changes neces- 
sary for variable Q 

Step 12: B-Q. Consider the 
gain. Variable Q plus the 
natural gain variability of 
the B-Q filter makes a com- 
pression amplifier almost 
mandatory. However, the 
10040-1 compression capa- 
bility of the audio elixir cir- 
cuit will more than cover 
the situation. The natural 
gain variability of a fixed 
B-Q filter with the 300-to- 
1200-Hz tuning range is 
about 4 to 1, while Q vari- 
ability expands the total 
range to 40 to 1, well within 
the amplifier's capabilities 
and with room to spare for 
audio signal strength vari- 
ations. 

The B-Q filter has one 
special property not shared 
by either SVF design. You 
can tune the B-Q using only 
RF1 , leaving RF2 fixed for Fc- 
The variable resistor, how- 



ever, will change frequency 
only with the square root of 
the resistance change, 
meaning that the pot will 
have to have a much wider 
range to cover the chosen 
frequency range. Since the 
frequency limits in the ex- 
ample are 2Fc and Fc/2, the 
resistance range must be 
Rf J4 and 4Rfc In this design, 
Rfc = 66,348 Ohms. The low- 
est resistance (for the high- 
est frequency) will be 
66,348/4=16,587, while the 
highest resistance (for the 
lowest frequency) will be 
66,348X4 = 265392. The 
difference is 248,805. A 250k 
pot in series with a 15k fixed 
resistor will form a satisfac- 
tory RF1, An audio taper or 
reverse log pot is mandatory 
in this application, since 
even with a log pot the fre- 
quency will compress at one 
end of the scale. 

In this example, we were 
fortunate to wind up with a 
required value close to an 
existing potentiometer 
value. For designing a single 
pot B-Q filter from scratch, 
we can begin at Step 6, 
choosing a pot to tune the 
filter Lets select a 500k pot 
and see what happens. 

Step 7: B-Q, single pot 
Calculate Rhi and Riq. Since 
frequency will vary as the 
square root of resistance 
changes, the total resistance 
change will be k\ where k is 
the frequency ratio. Since 
k = 4 (1200/300 Hz), k^==16. 
Rhi=16Rio. We also know 
that Riii^Rjo + 500k. Now 
we can solve for Rjq: 16Rto = 
Rjo + 500,000. or R|o = 
500,000/15=33,333 Ohms, 



This is the value of the fixed- 
series resistor. R\^^ — 33,333 
+ 500,000 = 533.333 Ohms, 
As a check, 533,333/16=^ 
33,333 Ohms. 

The resistance at center 
frequency (and fixed fre- 
quency-determining resistor 
RF2) will be Rh,/4=4R|o = 
533,333/4 = 33,333X4 = 
133,333 Ohms. We can use 
look and 33k resistors in se- 
ries or use the nearest stan- 
dard value. 

Step 8: B*Q, single pot. 
Calculate capacitors CF1 
and CF2. This calculation 
uses the same procedure as 
in the —SVF filter. Since re- 
sistance and capacitive re- 
actance are the same at the 
center frequency (and we 
must use F^ for this calcula- 
tion). Cf^1/2piFcRF2^1/ 
(2X314X600X133,333) = 
1.99X10"* This is about 
2000 pF, an obtainable 
value in polystyrene ca- 
pacitors. 

Determine the remaining 
values for the filter in the or- 
dinary way, 100k feedback 
and input resistors appear to 
be in order, since they vary 
only a little from the value 
of RF2. Considerations of Q 
and gain will be identical to 
those for the dual -pot hi- 
quad design. Fig- 14 shows 
our new filter. 

The SVF fitters always re- 
quire dual pots. Therefore, 
the only difference between 
the -hSVF fitter and the 
— SVF design concerns Q 
and gain. 

Step 11: +SVF. Select a 
value for Q, and choose the 
Q-determining resistors Q 
selection for the -f SVF is 



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F/g. 12. A fixed-Q B-Q filter, 
110 73M3gBiine • April, 1984 



fig. 13, A variabh^i B-Q filter. 





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73 Magazine • April, 1964 111 



ni 

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HFI 






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►-Fifc* 



Jfr 



^ 







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;*Q*F 



fig. 74. A single-pot tunable variable-Q B-Q filter. 



identical to that for the 
— SVF design. We must 
make mental note that gain 
will double Q if we follow 
recommended resistor rela- 
tionships. Let Q=18. R4 = 
R1 t2Q-1). If we use 100k 
resistors for feedback, the 
R1 is 50k. Many designs use 
200k values for R2 and R3, in 
whrch case, R1 =100k. Let's 
use this latter value for our 
design. For a Q of 1 8, 2Q - 1 
= 35. and therefore R4 = 
100k X 35 = 3,5 megohms. 
3.3 megohms would work 
welL For a variable Q of, say, 
10 to 20, the maximum resis- 
tance value of R4 would be 
39R1 and the minimum val- 
ue would be 19R1, R4 will 
range from a series resistor 
value of R^ to R^ + pot, 
where pot is the potent iom- 
eter value we select. Let's 



try a 2-megohm pot. Then 
R1 =R^19 at low Q and (R5 
H-2,0O0,0O0)/39 at high Q. 
Solving for R^, we get R5 = 
38.000.000/20 = 1.9 meg- 
ohms. R4 thus becomes a 
1 9-megohm fixed resistor in 
series with a 2-megohm pot. 
R1 = R4/(2Q - 1 )= 3.9 meg- 
ohms/39 =1.9 megohms/1 9 = 
100k, a desirable value. 

Step 12: +5Vf, Consider 
the gain. The gain of this 
+ SVF filter, shown in Fig. 
1 5. ranges from 20 to 40. de- 
pending upon the variable 
Q. Again, following this de- 
sign with a compression am- 
plifier is a must for easy use. 

Construction and Results 

All of the designs shown 
in the examples have been 
breadboarded to confirm 
that they will work. In fact, 



R3 

aootc 



HZ 
ZOOH 



Rl 




BSK iOOk 



CFI 

4O0OpF 



*i2V 



4;^ * ;; tj *p^ 




WT 



m 



Fig. 15. A variable-Q -^SVF filter 



they all work even when 
some non-frequency-de- 
termining components vary 
by 20% from the design val- 
ues, Fig. 16 charts the test re- 
sults. (Always test a design 
on a breadboard before wir- 
ing a final version. If nothing 
else, the breadboard tesi 
will turn up bad compo- 
nents. More important, ad- 
justing the design to more 
precisely meet your needs is 
much simpler on a bread* 
board.) 

Construction of the final 
model can take any form. 
Perf board and printed cir- 
cuit board peform equally 
well Layout is not critical 
with the LM324. The TL084 
requires some care to pre- 
vent inadvertent coupling, a 
more serious concern with 
the very high impedance in- 
puts to each section. One 
easy way to overcome the 



problem is to avoid com- 
pressing the components in- 
to too small a space. Spread- 
ing the fixed components at 
the IC corners in a radial pat- 
tern tends to prevent un- 
wanted coupling and makes 
component replacement 
simpler Beyond this, con- 
struction is left to individual 
ingenuity. 

Part of the construction 
ease stems from the low Q 
of these filters. Most practi- 
cal filter article^ ^Till man- 
age to repeat the virtually 
useless fact that these de- 
signs are good to a Q of 500 
At normal CW audio, the 
bandwidth would be just 
over 1 Hz, and the filter 
would ring for a week with 
just one receiver electron 
pop, if it was not already os- 
cillating. With normal com- 
ponents, practical Qs of 5 to 
25 ensure good stability and 



Figure 


niter 


Tuning Range 


Bandwidth 


Q 


8 


- SVF, 
HxedQ 


330-1250 Hz 


25-100 Hz 


26 


9 


-SVF, 
variable Q 


330-1250 Hz 


40-75 Hz at 
(at FJ 


16 


12 


BO, 
fixed Q 


330-1250 Hz 


30 Hz 


35 


13 


B-Q, 


330-1250 Hz 


30 He at Qhi 


36 




variable 




50 Hz at Q,o 
(atFd 


21 


14 


B-Q. 


350-1330 Hz 


55 Hz at Qh[ 


18 




single pot, 




1 40 Hz at Q|o 


7.3 




vartable Q 




(at FJ 




15 


+ SVF, 


340-1260 Hz 


40 Hz at 0,11 


32 




variable Q 




75 Hz at Q,ft 


17 



Qutpiit Voltage Ratio 

I.O81I Ff|i»F|(j 



2.5:1 Q|ii:0|o 



1.4i1 FfijiFjo 

2:1 Qh.:Qto 

2.8:1 total change 

due to both F and Q 

2.6:1 total change 
due to both F and Q 



Notes; *AII filters except 
polystyfene capacitors. ** 



1.6:1 total ctiange 
due to both F and Q 
(in passband) at R4 

the single-pot B-Q used 3900-pF; 5% polystyrene capacitors. The single-pot B- 
In any of the fiJters, raise or lower Q by raising or lowering R4, the O deterniining 



Notes 

3900 pR 5% C*; 
reduce R4 from 51 Ok to 
330k' ' 

Reduce fixed-series 
Q resistor from 470k to 
330k 

Reduce R4 from 1.8 
megohms to <820k 
Reduce fixed series 
Q fesisiof from 1 
megohm to 470k 

awopF. 10% Ct; 

increase fixed tuning 
resistor from 33k to 
>47k to adjust tuning 
range 

Reduce fixed series 
Q resistor from 19 meg- 
ohms to <1 megohm 

Q model used aoOO-pF, 10% 
resistor. 



Fig. 76. Test fesults and comments on the s/x sample filters. 



112 73 Magazine • April, 1984 



CALL LONG DISTANCE ON YOUR HANDHELD 



The Model 335A will deliver 35 watts of 
power ysing the latest state*of*th6*art cir> 
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TR24O0, TR2500, IC*2AT, 
Yaesu. Santec, and Ten* 
Tec. Only 300 mw input will 
deliver 5 watts out; 3 watts 
ri will deliver 35 watts out. 
yaximum input drive level 
© 5 watts. 




Our products are backed by prompt fac- 
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p^S^i U%t Qf Adv»rTi&0ft on pfl^ 130 



73 Magazine • Apri], 1984 113 



r 



WORK THE U.H.F. BANDS 

Add 3 trans vert er or converter to your existing JChn, 6m or 2m CQuipmcnis. 
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i 




easy adjustment for ham au- 
dio filters. Using 5% and 
10% tolerance components 
(or bridge-matched 20% 
components), Q will be 
slightly less than theory pre- 
dicts but more than ade- 
quate. Moreover, a close ex- 
amination of the peak of the 
response curve will reveal ir- 
regularities compared to the 
theoretic ideal, but these 
will always be too small to 
make a difference to CW or 
to phone reception. In short, 
for all practical purposes, 
home brew can be as good 
as commercial when it 
comes to simple audio fil- 
ters to enhance reception. 
To the degree that we can 
customize the design to our 
specific needs, they might 
even be better than com- 
mercial for some hams. 

The purpose of outlining 
these procedures is to re- 
duce the design of custom 
ham CW bandpass filters to 
a series of steps that ensures 
not only a filter that works. 
but, as well, a filter 



tunes frequency and Q over 
just the operator's desired 
range. The procedures are 
applicable to today's run of 
multiple ICs such as the 
LM324, the TL084, and the 
3900 Norton, A:> new genera- 
tions of op amps emerge, 
with different biasing, input, 
and current requirements, 
the rules of thumb will likely 
change. However, the basic 
principles of determining RC 
tuning ranges will not. Only 
our selection of pots and 
fixed resistors will vary for 
new impedance-matching 
conditions. Hence, with ad- 
aptation for new devices, 
CW operators and other 
hams who need bandpass 
filters using the usual lot of 
reasonably priced 5% and 
10% components should be 
able to satisfy their needs on 
their own work benches A 
hand calculator, a sharp 
pencil, and a breadboard 
are the basic tools for good 
filtering. Triple op-amp de- 
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PA5 10 Watt ATV Hww Amplitier $39.00 ppd 

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Cat! or write tor our corriplstQ catalog of spealfiGations, stallori setup d^agramSp 

arid optional accessories which Includes antennas, modulators, test generators, 
cameras and much, muth more. See Ch. 14 1983 ARRL Handbook 

TERMS: VtSA or MASTERCARD by Telephone or maii. or checl< or money order by 
mall AH prices are delivered in USA Charge ardors normally shipped within 24 
ftours Personal chectUm u SI c fear tirst 

S«e You at Dayton. (81 8) 4474566 

P.C. ELECTRONICS 2S22PaxsonUne 





Tom W60RG Maryann WB6YSS 



Arcadia, California 91006 



114 73 Magazine • April, 1384 



HAM HELP 



W» i/tf fitppf tQ provide Htm H0tp fist- 
ings tr99, wi 9 sp^c^avsilBbie btsis. Wv 
am not happy wft»n wb ha\fe to iako tima 
from ofhar duties to dociphar cryptic 
ftotas scfawiad Ufagitty en dog-aarad 
po^tCsrds and odd-sUed scraps ot paper. 
Pioase type 0f print youf raQUBSt (naAtlyf), 
dcui>fa spaced, on an 3Vm "x 71" sha9t ot 
p$p0f and u&e upper- &nd iowerca&a iat- 
fars wfiare appropriate. Also, pie^sa maka 
a "f " fook like a "V not an "C ^^'c^ 
ccuid ba atf "aC* & an '"aya," and so on, 
Hmrd as it fttay ba tQ befmva, wa ara fict fia- 
miiiar with avmy pi9c^ of aqmpmartt mafh 
ufactutad Off Earth tot the taat 50 yaar^* 
Thanks toe youf coopetatioti. 

Wanted: bfo transceiver For a Hamfnar- 
tund SF«0(MX 1 am 4fi2B {R274G/FRR 650^, 
part ni^mbor 31^60-1. Also li«w a box of 
Oi>its foe Nationat RAO^ w^idi I wiN donate 
lo th« first iaker. 

Peter Doherty WI UO 

PO B4^x 261 

Port Townsend WA sases 

About 2& years ago, Ernefson {{ believe} 
came out with a portable radio powered by 
battefles and/or a built-in solar cell. They 
only rna£^ a few. fl wonder why?) It worked 
weU wjtfi both sun and aniftclai llQhi- I 
would like Ihe naine and address of the 
nia/iufacturaf since I wani one of these old 
rad»o& 

O, tL Estrada 

1g6S-4eiti Av«L 

San Fr«nd«co CA »41^ 



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103 KaHa OHw 

WMtahouse TX 75791 




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13313 Forest Hill Rd 
Grand Ledge, Ml 48837 

New Phone: 
(517) 626-6044 



6-10 P.M. 
Sun. tKru Hiurs 



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AT DAYTON! 



LOOK FOR OUn PEOPLE IN THE 
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HAM SOFTWARE for COMMODORE M & VtC-^ (H. IH) 

Tilt log BoelL a general putpose orDgfain lof ttiA^^ : <r^»y !i>i \!&t c^^ ciand. OTH i OSL SUlim). f«4iiewng A (opbonailyl 

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* use fl-ta ke^ to sav€. pnnt (optional RS-232. Commodore m 4045 w iui£t«:::£f^ ft/ ^ VF^ 
no pnnteil t display QSOs' phdenix. A2 35029 

* cassetlfl. With albumi & insttuiliofl faoott 
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AT LAST! 



• SendiRece^ve CW with youf VIC 20. PET* ^' 
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TU CIRCUIT BOARD 510.00 
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Many other Programs. Irv stock. 
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QUALITY QSL'S PRINTED ON 
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Sae List ot Advertisers on page 130 



73 Magazine • April, 1984 115 



NEiy PRODUCTS 



DANISH SWITCHES ARE MADE 
USER'FRIENDLY 

MEC, « D4nl$l) compare situated it^ Bal- 
leryp. a suCMjrti af Cop^ihagdn, Dervnark^ 
h&i tteen i switch m«juifacturef since 
1998, yni^l rdesfitlv ct^iKdntraiina oa rotary 
mtim 9wficfi6a. H rww artncKmces Itw mul- 
tl|Hjrpoee UKIMEC modulaf switch f«nge 

Rg. 1 allows ttw bas^e altemat»^<ilion 
version of the PCSflwunHiio switcfl {the 
Qtfisr ofitton being i momentaiy^akw ««r- 
skw|. Hie lanovatkMi Is tfmt each ol the two 
evrftches contains all rne contacts nacoe- 
sary to provide five aitemativo CiOni»ci 
functions; two do eoniacts two make con- 
tacts, two bfeaM comacts, two mske and 
two lireafc contacts, and reversed poianly, 

Fpcm the potni of view of onderlng arid 
stodging, ihts gh^^ the great athrantage 
mat orily two types of switch need to be 
hel^ in iXve- The required tuncttvi ts deter- 
mined tiy Simply sefeeting ine appfopfiate 
switch temiirmi witti ihe PCB tracking. 

Tfie UNIMEC ts « low^srotlle ewdtcli {\0 
mm high) designed tor 234'mrTV^^ PC6 
mourning The nousing and key afe of 
glass^eintorced polycartx»iat« (Makfolon^v 
me keycap syatem is ABS (t^^ovodyr). and 
the contacts, both fixed and niovtng, ate 
0.006-nim sJlver-pfat^sd Ixasa. with go^d 
pfat^ng available on r«c|uiest Stainless ^teei 
is used for lh« momeni sprang, latch p^n, 
and keyBpdng. The swilcti has a minimum 
li)«!lme o4 1 million cycles. It can be posi- 
tioned on the board straight or with a 180*^ 
twIsL Gontacl fsslstance after 1 million 
cycles is t^p^cally 20 mlll^ohms and contact 
bounce Is less ihan t ms. 

Figs. 2 end 3 show Ihe assembly of the 
finished switcti with kfKib ar>d tieiel. The 
design is Intended to ha^i/e tactile appeal » 
and Ihe keys, knobSn and bezels are all 
available in a choica ot ten colors. In addl- 
lion to the dolor-coding poSBibJlllJeSi the 
UNIMEG can also tm Illuminated with up to 
four LEDs on any or>e switch. The LEOo are 
available In reciangulef or pinhead format. 




fig, T. UNIMEC m&dul&r switcii. 

In Older to make up In#<ii4dua3 switches 
into a keyboard, MEC pfoduoes the Vario- 
SuppOft, a MakrDton matrix system avaJl- 
at>le In any cell oombtrtatlon up to 10 x 10 
(Fig. 4X The suppod it provides to the 
switch ensures accurate allgnmient and en< 
ables the switch to be mounted on a front 
panel. Pressure on ttw PCB is minimize^ 
and PCB mounting is. In fact* no longer 
necessary. 

The whole amphasjs i$ Qn maklnQ things 
easy— the <}esigning, ordering, and as- 
sembling— while the materials satisfy the 
engineer and the emphasis on a tactile de- 
sign makes the finished product easy arxj 
pleasant to use. 

To get the name of distributors in coun- 
tries other than the US, contact MEG, PO 
Box 26. DK-a750 Balbrup. Denmark. The 
US distributor Is Et^Gtmnfc Components 



HAM HELP 



I ein looftlng for a echefrtat^c cfiagram 
andtor manual for the Etectronica rntecna- 
tlonal Corporation mockd 150 WF receiver. 

John Vinlng 

tSU A. 2nd Street Wwl 

Cornwall, OnUiki 

HU 1J3 Cansda 

I need a copy of Ihe Kenwood phone 
pet<^ PC-1A manual. Will pay for the r«prek 
eviction gladly. 

JUbHtS.Wflde W8JZZ 
5S90 E Qalbralth Aoid 

Clftdnnatt OH 45236 

Wantact schematka lor fl} ^CA WCX33A 
scope. 12) Radio Shack catalog no. 40-217 
^ereo amp, f:i| Olson nA-l93 stereo receiv- 
er, and H) Realisth; 13-1100 stereo receiver. 
Adwiaa coat. 

J. L Oiy»en 

2D2S Sunfclet A«L 
Waukesha m &3iae 



I need fnstallation instructions for the 
Icom AH-1 automatic mobite anteima 
tuner. 

Tom Ptiipps KA4CSC1 

POioxS404 

Ft Hood TX 7ftS44 

A fdsnd of mJne in Africa asked me If 1 
coii\ti ge* for liim a circuit diagram (sch^ 
maitc dEagram) for a HaJlicraftcrs HT-SS A 
and a National KRO model STA 1» 

I will f^adly pay postage and copying 
oosts if anyofke c^n supply tlnesa- 

Rob Harrlnglen 

PO Sox 3434 

Utlielon CO Htf t1 



I raed service literature and m operating 
mamial for a Fhden ^305A TTY Ftexwriter. 
Hame your prio& Also, does arvyone ttnow 
the location of the manufacturef^ 

Bob Somers W20 YH 

411 KamlHonFUL 
Glaaaboro NJ 06028 





Fi§. a UNtMEC sw/fcA with kfwt *r>d 



Flig. Z UMtMBC ^wifch mm tHjUon. 




vm 




fig. 4. The V^rh matrfx system for design-to-purpose panBf$, 



Group, 2€ Worfh Ffffh Street MinneBpotls 
M^f 55403; (512^73-1606, Reader Service 
number 480. 



NEW HAMTR0NIC5 
CATALOG 

HamtronicSp Inc. has announced publi- 
cation of thelf new \964 malloriier catalog 
fqr the VHF/UHF/OSCAR enthusiasl and 
iwo-way radio shope. The 36-page two* 
color cataiog teatures many new products, 
Including an exparMled tine of FM repeaters 
and accessories «uch as power amplifiers. 
OTMF tone decoder/cont rollers, and auto^ 
palcrtes. Also included are the lines of FM 
and AM recervers. FM iransmitters, VMF 
and UHF transmitting and recetvlng corir 
vertera, apace^uitle paceivefS, fi004iiHz 
scanner oorrverters, prearT\ps. and ottier 
products Hamtrontcs has long been noted 
lor. 

For youf free copy ol this attractive r^ew 
cataiog. write to Hamfnxiics. tnc^ 65P Moui 
/id, Hiiton NY 14468. Of l^K (71^-392^30 
(For overseas mailirtg, ple^e send S2JQ0 or 
4 IRCs^ Reader Service mjntum 4?9. 



REGENCrS 10CHANNEL 

PROGRAMMABLE SCANNER 

Itogancy Eiedronica. Inc.. now offers a 
l£k:hannel programmable acanner with an 
araertai of advanced features— including a 
JHtle extra help during pfogramfmir^. Be- 
ger^ <Ihe only Amerioarvmade scanner 
brandl^ haa announced the producllon of its 



Z10, covering six complete VHF and UHF 
freqiiency bands for access to thousands 
of police, fire, public service, business, 
co4Timercial, and amateur-radio frequerv 
ciee and channels. Selected frequencies 
from any band are easy to program into Ihe 
scanner's memory; the ZIO can scan the 
frequencies In its memory or search the 
bands for whomever happens to be lf>era, 

TheZlOcan scan its 10 channels in 2/3 of 
a second. Searching its three VHF banda* it 
can cover 1 MHz £200 frequer^cies in &-KH2 
Increments) in at>oul 17 seconds; on Its 
three UHF bar>ds, it can search 1 MH2 (80 
Chanrtels in l2-5-kHz increments]! in about 6 
ss^onds. An automatic priority control 
cnecks any selected cnannei every two siec^ 
oncte and switches instantly il it's acthAk 

ProgramrTMng tf>e Regency ZIO Is madt 
easief bv a series ol pla^aftgua^e met- 
s^es that appeal on its display. Theae 
prompts identify the actkm ttiat's In pro- 
cess or lequirBd next. IndMdual ctiannels 
are programmed by usir>g the numeric key- 
pad to enier a desired frequency or by i«lefV 
tifying a desired frequency when searchtng. 
A special circuit saves these entries in 
meniory fer up to a week (should power f aJJ 
or if the unit is transported or temporarily 
stored^ it does so without batteries (the 
ua«al method Ot memory protedionl to 
avoid probleme associated with battery 
failure from neglect. 

The ZIO can pk^ up most transmtssions 
in the low VHF (30-50 M^^ VHF two^TMiter 
anriateur {144^148 MHz^ standard UHF 
(450-470 MK:3, and extended UHF (470-512 
MHz) bartds. Its teteacofring antervta ia 



11i 73 Magazine • April, 1984 



tlBctranlcalJy opljmized for each band, and 
an anLenna lack is provktad for an opiion^t 
fSGtafna) anienria. 

A chftfined tockout oxctudes se4ect«d 
channels from being scamod, a usefuJ foia- 
ture wit«n {nierest is in monitoring sofno 
limited number of channels or when « s^ 
(acted dwnnel becomes cmly occaskTrsaJfy 
of inierest. Scanners in n&maroonm, for ax^ 
ample, ollen exclude finMtepartfFienl tac- 
tical channels ej(cept during ma^of flraa^ 

A 3can<|eray featura helps keep on top 
both ald^g of a convefsatlon on channels 
whore call& are usual Ey met by replEes. With 
scan delay selected, theZtO wajts for abcui 
two seconds at the end of a transmission 
(In case there's a reply) btefore II resumes 
scanning; without scan deEay, scanning re- 
sumes Jn at>out six-tentl^s of a sacond 

When search Ing, the Z10 delays louf sec- 
onds after a trarksmi&sJon tiefora resun^irig 
its search. This not only aJ^o^rs lirr^ to lis- 
ten lor a r«pily, but a^so provides erxx^Qh 
lime to »e*«ct ttie frequency *oi pcogranv 
ming into one o1 ttie t@i scanner channel 
memonea— or simply to note it*e frequency 
on paper 

Ths human factory in the design of Itie 
Regency Z10 are quite apparent, Ita «Balty> 
rBBdabta (vacuum fluorescentl display has 
t^g digits and a ctioice of two bright ness 
levels. SMding volume and squelch controls 
are easy to position accurately and easy to 
mad with a glance. Its audio ampllfbr 
delivers a full 1 Watt at fess than 10% 
distortion, and a jack for an external 
speaker is provided. The keytKjard and dls- 
play are angted for ea^y legibility. 

Dual power supplies are tiuilt In to permit 
p|y(Hn ac operation at home or dc opera- 
tion in a car or oth^ vehicle (wtiere not pro^ 
tl^ed by law). 

IhD flt0incy 210 is UL-listed and PCO 
oeitffted (Fsrt t5. Subpart Ci It measures 




7b» fl offsnc y ItO scantm: 



10^4 inches wide by 2-7/8 inclies liigh by 
6-3A Inches deep. 

For additional information, contact Pt»* 
gency Ef&ctronics, too,, 7707 Recofds St., 
tndianapofis fN 4^26 9986; (3r7)-545^2B1. 
Reader Service number 484. 

SEA'S AUTOMATIC 

ANTENNA COUPLER 

St&phems Engineering Associates (SEA]i 
has rust introduced the SEA 1612 fully auto- 
mattc antenna QQupler- A stateot th&art 
nucmprocessor-based coupler, itie SEA 
1612 features a "learning modie'' that at- 




Idws I! to ramember , ttorep and i m wi o d Li tfr- 
ly access data for Instant recall and match* 
^ng the rwxt time the same frequency Is 
used. On-the-spot tuning is fast accurate, 
and automatic. 

The 1812 activates on the first syllable of 
a voice transmission and functions auto- 
matically to effect optimum transoeiver-to- 
antenna power transfer ow«r a fulf 1.6-to-25- 
MHz frequency range Ttw matching prooe- 
dure is fuEty autortiattc and require no ac- 
tkNi lpy the operator other Than ttie normal 
press4o-taJk function. Trie SEA 1612 does 
not require setup by a tochnician and tias 
viftualty no channeling limitations, pro- 
vidtng an infinite numter of channets vwitli- 
in hs spiecified frequency range. 

The >612 witi operate with any HFiSS8 
transceiver that has standard SO-Ohm out- 
put. (Connections beti^raen a transceiver 



and the co4>plef consist only of 50- 
CMim co^ ar>d a l3.&^ott-<Sc cable. An ""An- 
tanna Tuned" flag line is «lso avaiiatile to 
signal the operator that the antenna ^ys- 
tam has timecL A single 2Z- to 76-foot anterK 
na is »il that is r^utred. 

The coupler js seff^contained wittiin a 
sturdy hous^rtg ol molded fibergiass with a 
gaskel-sealsl wealherproof cover. For 
complete details and t^itinlcat specifica- 
tilons, please contact Stoph^s Engifwer- 
ing Associates, inc.. 7030220m SW, Mwnt- 
f^kB Terrace WA 98043: (206^771-2782. 
leader Senrice numbar 47B. 

SOLDERING SYSTEM HAS 
OVER 270 OPTIONS 

with Wahl Clipper Corporation's rww a»- 
sortrnent of 15 miniature soldering irons 
and 23 tips, a user can ct>oose from ov^ 
27Q different soideftng comtainations to 
rnatch precise soldering needs. 

The 15 Otyi^ miniature IronSv eacfi 
weighing ^ ^n ounce or leisA, are avail at>le 
for temperatures raj^ilng from S75° to BSO° 
P. from 5 to 26 Watts, and irom 4.5 to 24 
votis. Thar ooinpact s)2e arM iiKecise tem- 
poiBtufe coaitcA make th«m useful for sol- 
dering heat-sensitive components. 

Tt^ irons can Ije combined with any of 23 
tips ranging tn size from 1^" to 3^32" in 
several choices of configuration. Tip con- 
struction is nickel plated or Iron-plated cop- 
per for most applications, with solid nickel, 
gold-end. and bare copper alloy {NASA^ tips 
available for special requirements. Tip 
charges are easy arvd no lools are required. 
Cooled tips simp]y slide off ar>d on. 

For further IniormatiOfiH contact WaM 
Cifppw Cofporsrion, Sterii/tg it 610B1; 
(8t5}^2^^25 ^^<^ Service number 483. 

FLESH ER CORPORATION'S 
NEWTU-IZOO 

The new Tll^1200 UHF/VHF mVf lenm^ 
nal unM from Resher Corporation fs in an- 
swer to rapidty^rowlng high-speed conv 




Ths SEA BUtOfTtatic antenna tjouphr. 



Ttw Oryji ministum soldering system. 

73 Magazine • April J 984 117 




n 




ft^Mi^r Cofpofstkm's fU-f2O0. 



municalton needs. Th« TU-120C tBceiyes all 
eaudot and ASCII raies to tZDO baixl and 
IIMt Bdl 202 stajidafid tones {1200 Hz and 
2200 Ht^. The Tin 200 has many apptfc^ 
tions for modem oommunicatJon^, includ- 
ing RfTY repeater eystema. The Tin 200 
pfO¥idea TLL- and FIS'2a2G<;ompatible I/O 
and Includes tmnsmhter PTT output for 
complete remote control. It aleo pro^des 
AFSK output and RDA (recaivad data ava(3- 

«bkiK 

Frofit^anel controls Include onty three 
puah-bi/ttop ^witcli«s to Operate: POWER 
SEND, and NOf^MAUREVERSE SHIFT. 
TKrw LEO indicatqrB show Xfmt Status. The 
TU1200 is constnjcted with a alknetat 
case for protadioa It's S-l^** W x 1<3M" H 
K i" I, tnd rear-panel DS-2S lO comedors 
nvilw rnstaJling and using the T\l-1200 
aimple, 

/ miMM eittier wtrod or in kit lotm. tt>e 
TU-1300 (^omes eofnpleta wlitt a mating 
D&29 I/O ptyg* power soppiy. and an oper- 



ator/a&sen'tily nmnuaL The TIKT200 wUi Ii^ 
availatxe fo# defTvery lyy Apni 30, 1984. 

Tor more tnlormation and for a i^taiOQ, 
wr^te the Fiesfwf Cofporatiot), PO Box 976. 
Topek9 KB ^601 &^ can l^dOO-HAMRTTY. 
Reader Service number 4B2. 

BTTY TODAY 

RTTY Tad Ay is a completely new guide to 
amateur RTTY which covers all phases of 
radiotalelype This new book answers 
many questions asked about amareur 
RTTY and olher areas such as the home 
compter for RTTY use. 

Authored by Dave Ingram K4TWi. a not- 
ed authority on all phases ol flTTY. It's wrU- 
19) iin a clear, concise manner; all material 
k» mm and up-^OKJate and covers the moe) 
reomlly developed RTTY eqyipmefii and 
ayatteits. ftTTY Todtsy i* futly llltislrated 
with pIkMOSk diagrams, FTrTY-stattorv sqI- 
ups^ and equipment 




K4TWJ's rmw gvide. 



In a Large B'A" x 11" softbound edilkm 
with an easy-to^read type style and forrrtat, 
Bie book's ol0si«n chapters cx^mt. The Ex* 
dtlng Wofid of Amateur RTTY, Operating 
PararriBtors and Cor^cepts <3i RTTY, 
Simsdht Taftc ori Home Computers and RTTY, 
RTTY Systems for Home Compot&rB, 
RTTY Ca«ive<r1a Yo^ Can Build. Dedicated 
RTTY Teiminala af>d Systems, Mew Min^- 
RTTY Systems, Fascinating RTTY Outside 



the Amateur Banda f Press, Military^ 
Wfjather, EtcL Frequency list of Commaf- 
cial Press Services, Secrecy and Other 
Codes Used in Radioteietype Vlod^ and 
Tables of Allbrtviations Used ii\ RTTY. 

For further infomatioa or to ortter^ write 
or caJJ Univerami Etectfonics, irnu ^^55 
Groves Boad, Suiia 3, Cofumbtis OH 43227; 
{dU)^G&4$0S. Reader Sefvice number 4d1. 



RTTY LOOP 



Marc I. Leavey, M.O. WA3AJR 
6 Jwny Lane 
PfkBSwm MD 27208 

Last month I wrote a bit about a new toy 
here at WA3AJR, a TR&^IOC Color Com- 
puler. Based on the moat powerful a^ght* 
bit mlcroprocerssor around, the Motorola 
6809. this is a Fascinating compulei' which 
givea huge potential at a bargain prfce. 

Well, I have had a chirkce to take a 
quick look at one place of RTTY software 
aval fable for the CoCo— a RTTY/CW pro- 
gram from Ciay Abrams Software. Clay Is 
known to us eBxx mavens from way back 
and has ^een one of a kernel of Ixx^ters 
for iOx^t systems for many years. ThJa 
looks like one fine piece o^ software, 
folks- 1 will have a full review next months 
tNji for those of you wti^ Just can't wait, let 
me dangle a few choice tidbits. This pro- 
gram w^ll receive and trgnsmri RTTY at all 
common speeds, either in Murray or 
ASCII and receive and transmit Mo^se at 
up to 09 words per minute. It has buffers 
for transmit, tape save, ar>d more. Not all 
is golden. Clay, but I am impr^sedt More 
about this gem^ next month. 

Not to stay stuck in one CPU vein, t have 
a card here from Henry KIrchmer KF4UW 
in Rockledge, Florida. Henry asks, "Do 

118 73 Magazine * April, 1984 



yoo know if anyorke makes an Interface 1^ 
RTTY and CW and the software lor the 
Timex^inclair 1000 or new 1500 th«l t 
could use with my (transceiver?" We^l by 
a stroke of serendipity^ also in the ma 1 1 ar 
;ftvfid an Issue of OZX, billing Itself as 'The 
Journal Cqwerlng Amateur Radio and Sin- 
clair Computers— ZX^, Micro Ace, 
ZX-BI, and TlmeK/Sindair 1000^500" In 
the issue l received (November, 1963), arti- 
cles Include several for interfacing the 
TimeK/Slnclair-iype machines on RTTY 
end CW, with explanatlona of ASCII and 
Murray (although they call it Ssudol) code 
for the com p uteri St ham. They even have a 
short bibliography in the back with art^ 
Dies in various amateur-radio maga^lnas 
related to RTTY. I am a bit disturbed, how- 
ever, that while ttiey have a listing for 73: 
Amaret/r Radio's T&chnicaf Joumat. ihey 
do not mention this column. Oh well, I 
quess somebody at QZX reads this col' 
umn— ^aftet all, I did get a copy. Anyway. 
Interested prospective readers might dro|> 
them a line at QZX, 2025 D'Donnell Drive. 
Las Cfuces, New Mexico 38001. A year's 
subscription is $1 2, according to the infor- 
mation received. It wouldn't hurt if you 
mentioried that you read about them in 
"RTTY Loop ;■ would it? 

Another source of RTTY for tha 



TtmeK^inclalr is Ken Carpenter KC4UQ 
who makes a series of programs under the 
business name of Kent rentes. Thai Is not 
to be confused with Kantronics, mind 
you! Well. Ken offers a series of pro* 
grams, including RTTY Jranscelve pro- 
grams. Morse programs, and some ama- 
teur-raddo utiiittes, all designed tor the 
TlmexySinclair IDOO or Sinclair ^^1. His 
RTTY program, tor example, is touted as 
featuring receive and transmit tHtflers, 
sptit-screen disptay. multiple t>aud rates 
for either Murray or ASCII modes, hard- 
copy option, and mora Requirenrienls irv 
clude a ccm|>ulef wHh 16K or more of 
RAM, a RTTY HO port, and a terminat unit 
capable of inteffacing with TTL-tevel {not 
RS-2321 signals. 

That \iO port Is designed around an G250 
ACIA which takes care of providing a baud 
Clock along with converting serial to paral- 
lel and back again. Apparently, there are 
also transistors provided for some degree 
of isolation from oulside voltages. No men- 
tkjn is made of optoi&olators or the like. 

T)^3^cal prices for these items am $25 for 
a tape of ttie RTTY pro-am, guaranteed to 
load or il will be repilaced upon ret um, and 
$70 for an assembled and tested interface 
lAii^ plus pottage and handling, t have no 
information on how wefl or easity this RTTY 

mterf aoe operates; rnaytw some o* yow who 
have played with 11 will let me know. How- 
ever, It does seem as ihtough more is lie- 
ooming available for tf^3 truty tow<cosi 
computer. 

If you tftfould nice more details, write to 
Ken at his office. Kentronics, Inc., PO Bok 
5Se, Vernon. Alebama 35692, Be sure to 



watch the spelling of tiieir name^ arK) drop 
ours, OK? 

While I cannoi speak from Ihe experi* 
erKie of having used the following program 
myself, a letter from Jarry Welkrauch KftHZI 
in North Riverside, lltlnois, speaks very hi^- 
ly of a RTTY program tor the VIC-20 and 
Commodore44 computers. Avaiiable from 
f^^K Electronics, these pacirages future 
software to turn either computer irrto a 
basic RTTY terminal and sell for under 
tw e nty dollars each. Sourxte like qune a 
bargain! You have to provide a temunal unit 
or some othi^ way to lufn ttie receh«r audio 
into onfoff pulses and an AFSK oscilJator to 
garwrate the necessary tones. If you're in- 
terested, drop RAK a line at PO Box 1585^ 
Orange Park. Florida 32067-1585. I donn 
need to prompt you as to vsriiere to tell ttiem 
you read at>out them, bul let me know what 
you think if you try the software. 

QoJng from systems that aeem lo have a 
lol written for them to the other extreme, \ 
have a letter hare from Philip Shulins 
WD40SS in Davlona Beach. Florida. Phii 
TWtes that tte Is "droo4lng with anticipa* 
tion" looking for a RTTY program for his 
Kaypir&2 computer. WalL Phil, as I ha^ in- 
dicated hkere before, there r»ve been re^a- 
hvefy few programs, or ewn program an- 
nouncements, ttiat have crossed rny dosfc 
for Itie IBM-type computers. If you can run a 
Siiandard CP/M-type program, you may be 
able to find one on a local RBSS, but othev^ 
wise, I am afrsKI t c^w a blank, 1 wifl keep 
my eyes out, ttKHigh, and pass along any in- 
formation! ! receive here to you and the fest 
of the gang. 

t htave a letter here from Hughie Chavis (I 
can't find the envelope, so I am not exactly 



sure whare h# Ig). Anyway, Hiighiie is trytng 
to run a Teleeype* KSR4S Uom his TJ-g9/4A 
computef by running data out of an F^232 
nio(fijt«. Ha writes, niw K5R^3& is sat fof 
100-wpm sefial data tra/isfef. The Joweat 
l»aud rite for (tia m 9S-232 rnoduie 's 1 10 
{»ud. The T1 85-232 module has a PIA port 
in addition to the serial UO port. My ques- 
tion 15, fKfitt do I connect the KSR-i^ to the 
PS-SSi module so the printer capadlltty can 

WeHt iM^a to t V9rv tiasJc pfoblem with 
(sonneciiflo th«w two units t o g aih e f« tttey 
a/e not sp9akLn$} the ft^me languiioe. For- 
get diaiecta^ I'm talking majo^- Ian- 
gyag aa ASCit artd Murray a/e about as 
ditterant as Er^llsh and Habraw. It would 
not t» too hard IG conr^ect the parallel port 
of theTl Inierfaca module lo a simple UART 
chip (such aa iha common 1013 variety), 
provide a clock circuit, and put the data out 
at the correct ratQ, but Iha problem remains 
that the data comlno out of the computer is 
in the wronQ coda. 

Let me explain. To b^ln wtlh, feali^e that 



lh« "tMud'' dflsJQnatJon merety refers to 
tww nviny daia t>tt$ per second are being 
trajismitted. There b no nslatiort between 
tl^ "tiaud rate" arxj ihe type of encoding 
uaed to send tba data^ With plain old Mur- 
ray code— the dne we are all familiar with 
Oft RTTlf* and the Of» wWcft your KSR-36 
apeeKs— one common speed is the so- 
called 60 MKKds per minute. Now, not to go 
Into a^l ttie math rigtit now. ea^ character 
eOftSiat^ of riv« data bits, one start bit, artd 
a stop tM t which IS a lad longer ttian the oth- 
era. Tttis works out to 7^1 units per cttm- 
acter, with each unit being one bit of 21 ma 
tength- Each character thi^ taJcaa 741 
times D,021 aeconds, or DJ63 seconds. Jn 
one minute, there would be 368 characters; 
in ofw second, 6 134 characters. Now. 6.134 
Characters per second times 7.4 1 bits per 
character ^remember how the units can- 
cetsd out In algebra?) yields 45.45 bits per 
second. Thia Is 45.45 tsaud. 

Without working through all this math 
agala trust me that the commonly caJled 
"IQQ'wpm" spedd la about 75 baud. That'a 



one problem, and we're still talking (Ive- 
levU Murray code. 

The Tl computer, as moat others, use® 
aoven^t ASCII to communicate with (tw 
outside world, ^kiw each character con- 
aiats of a stan bit, s&4&y data bits, a parity 
bil, and eitt>er one or two stop tiits. depend- 
ing often on Ihc hardware invoh(«d. Theee 
bits do not in any way, shape, or form corre- 
sporkd (0 the RTTY Murray code, Wtial you 
wilt fiave to do Is corwert ttie ASCII coming 
out ol the computer to Murray, shift speeds, 
tfwi put ilin a form that the KSR^ can 

I'll let you thinK on tt>at one for a bit, and 
nasct month I'll show you a few ways to ac- 
complish this task. White software leciv 
niques have tieen the most popular with 
usars of some computers, the limited ac- 
cesa to ihe TI-99i/4A's Inr^aids might well 
hamper that approach, ar>d I feel that you 
might be Inclined to stick with a totally out- 
board approach. Let me get out the drafting 
tioard and &ee what develops. 



Now, a note to all of you who have tried 
to cati m© on the phone over the last few 
months. Please don't. Jt's not that I diaiike 
your calls, but I am a physician and my 
home number Is not listed ft win stay that 
way for professional reasons. My office 
nymtxv. or answering s^vice. has fielded a 
number o* RTTY oaJIs in past month*, ar^ 
they dont always Know wttat to do with 
thenL SOp {f you ttave a Question or would 
like to offer some words to the co^unwi, Jo* 
trkem down on a card or fetter and mail them 
to rrw at the atjowe addre$&. tf you would 
like a repfy. enclose a seJfnaddressed« 
stamped envelope, and I shall try lo awwir 
you as &oon as po^Jttle. { try lo schbt>le 
somBth^ng down, usually at the bottom of 
your letter^ and return il to you within a few 
days, unless t need to hold It for Informa- 
lion. pubUcatJon, or the like, I Iciva hearing 
from you ail, pro and con, arx5 it la often 
your Input, suggestions, and quest Ions 
which make many readers write that the 
rirat thing they look for when they get their 
copy of 73 Is "RTTY Loop/' 



CONTESTS 



Robert Baker WB2GFE 
15 Windsor Dr. 
Atco NJ 08004 



HOLIDAY INOIXIE QSO PARTY 
IdOO GMT to 2300 GMT April 7 

The seventh annual Holiday^n-OiKle 
QSO Party will be sponsored a§ain this 
year by Shreveport, Louisiana, ham-raddo 
operators. Operators will be working on 40 
meters, 20 meters^ ar>d 15 meters. If 1 me- 
ters is open, we will try It from 1800Z to 
1900Z 

HoNday-in-Dlstie Is an annual ten^day 
celebration of the Louisiana Purchase. 

EXCHANBE: 
RSfT) and QTH. 

FREQUEt^CiES: 

CW— BO kHz up from low edge of 40-, 
20-. and 15-meter trends. 



SSS— 7240, 14280, 21370, and ^570. 
Noyice-71^ and 21 12S. 

AWARDS: 

Send an SASE with QBL card to IHoll- 
day*ln4>iKie QSO Party, PO Box 4842. 
Shrevepori LA 71104. 8^A*x11^ certlfl^ 
Cates will be mailed upon receipt of the 
SASE and OSL card. 



QRP ARCl APRfL QSO PARTY 
Starts: 1200 GMT April 21 
Ends: 2400 GMT April 22 

Qtationa may tse worked once per band 
for QSO multtf^lier credits. Participants 
may operate a ma^dmum of 24 hours dur- 
ing the con lest period. 



c 

AprF 


ALENOAR 

HotkSay-ln-0<itla QSO Party 


Apr 21-22 


OftP Amateur Radk) Club April QSO Party 


Apr 28-29 


Ua aaachuseHs QSO Pirry 


Apr2i-29 


County Huntara SSB Conl^l 


A|ir 28-29 


Hehretta Contest 


llayS-« 


Lite S|Kin$r QRP SSB Actlvtty Wftikand 


WayS-e 


f lorkla QSO Parly 


May 19-21 


Michigan QSO Party 


Jiin9-10 


ARAL VHP QSO Party 


Jun 23-24 


ARFtL Fiald Day 


JutlS-IS 


AS International SSTV-DX Conlaal 


Aug 4-5 


ARAL UHf Ci^ail 


Aug 11-12 


Maw Jersey OSO Parly 


Aug 24»27 


AS North American UHF FSTV^DX Conteat 


Sep fi-S 


ARRL VtHF QSO Party 


Sep 15-17 


Washlrigton State QSO Party 


Sep 22-23 


Late Summer QRP CW Activity Weekend 


Oct fl-r 


ARRL QSO Party— CW 


Od ta'-l4 


ARRL QSO Parly— Phone 


Nov 3-4 


ARRL Swe«patskeS"CW 


New 17-18 


ARRL Sweepstakei— PhOfM 


0«et-2 


ARRL 160-Metar Coniait 


Dm: 8-9 


ARRL ICMMfltsr Cofiteat 


Dec 2«-Jan 1 


QRP Wintef Sporta— CW 



BXCHANBB: 

Membefs— flS(T>, state-provlnce-coun- 
try, and QRP AflCl membership number, 
Nonn%emt»rs— RScn, st3tef)rovlnce^:cun' 
try, and power output. 

SCOfUHQ: 

Each member OSO counts 5 points m^ 
gardleas of location, Honmember QSOs 
ire 2 points with US and Canadian sta 
tions. others 4 points eacht Multipliers are 
as follows; 4-5 Watts output— x 2, 3-4 
Watta output— X 4, 2-3 Watt* output — 
X 6, 1-2 Watts oirtput^xS, and less than 
1 Watt output— X 10. Entries from sta- 
tions running more Ihan & Watta output 
will count aa check toga only. Statksna 
are eligible for the following txxius multi- 
pliers: if 100% natural power (solar, wind, 



«ie,} with np storage- x 2, If 100% bat- 
tery power — X 1 .5. 

Final score is total QSO points times tO' 
tal number of states-provinc^is -countries 
per t>arhd limes the power multiplier times 
the bonus multiplier Cif any}. 

fBEQUENClES: 

1810^ 3560, 7040. 14060, 26080. 50360. 
MO¥icen'ech-'3710, 7110, 21110, 2fttia 
Ho 30-iTketer contacta will be counted! 

AWARDS: 

CerlfUcates to the higt^esi^scorlr^g sta- 
tion in each state, province, or country 
with 2 or more entries. Entries automati- 
cally considered for annual Triple Crowna 
of ORP Award. A special MILL! WATT eer* 
liticate is b^ng sponsored b^ WiBSP for 







NEWSLETTER OF THE MONTH 

Dateline Nashville: Source of muflied guffaws amanatir^g from city sewers 
confirmed, RATS J Don't panic. Music Gity, I fa only members of the Radio Ama- 
teur Transmitting Society of Nashville enjoying the I at eat issue of BBt*s Tsie. 

This publication Is a pleasure to read. Surrounding the obligatory meeting an^ 
nouncements are the exploits of Chairman Mac, Boy George^ and the ublq^ultoua 
Or. Jack Byrd. Animals tiptoe across the pagas^ Seedy rodonta in thiee-piece 
Bulta adorn the masthead. 

Deapite the light hearted mood of Rars Ta/e, editor Wayne Renardson NZ4W 
hae skillfully tempered the hilarity with genuine news stofiea, thought -provok- 
ing commervtary, and scathing letters from the memberahip. Close attention to 
mechanical detail rounds out a package any RAT would be proud of. 

To enter your club's newsletter in 73'^ Newsletter of the Month Contest, send 
11 to 70, Pin« Street, Petaffoofough NH 03458, Attn: Newsletter of the Month. 



73 Magazine * April, 1984 119 



the higrmst-scorir>Q silalliQfi In |he le&s- 
thafi-l4Afatt category, providod Ihefe sm 
two or more entries In Itial power 
catagoiy. 

COGS AND Em^HiES: 

SapftTste log srveeis am tug^6;$i&d for 
$4Cti band fof «ase o1 acorirtg. Send full 
log data, ioclud^ng lull fiam«. address, 
ami bands u^ed. Also send a work sneet 
showmg details and tirT>e(s} off air. MaKa 
sure your ca^l^ign Is wrttteri on the top 
margin of ^very page sutifnltled! No log 
copies will be relurnod. All entries desir- 
ing re9utl:$ and scares please enclose a 
buslrtess-size enveEope with return post- 
agie for one ounce or an IRQ. It Is a condi- 
tion o1 entry that the decision of ttie QRP 
ARCI Contest Chairman is final In easfi oi 
dbpute. Logs must be received by May 21 
to quality- Send all logs and data to: QRP 
AUCI Contest Ctialrmaiv Eugene C 
Smim. Jr. KA5NLY. i16 Fairmont Drive, 
Uttle Rock AR 72204, 



MASSACHUSETTS QSO PARTY 

Starts: 1600 GMT April 28 

Ends: 2400 GMT April 2S 

sponsored by the PiEgrlm Amateur 
Wireless Association. A si at I on may be 
worked once per band. Phone and CW are 
considered separate bends. No cross- 
band or repeater con tads are permitted. 
Mobiles end portables may be contected 
each time a county chiange takes p3ace- 

EXCHANGE: 

RS(F) and state, VI province, or Massa- 
ctHJSMis county, liassachij setts staticsfts 
alao will indioate It n^ember of PAWA. 

SCOftiNQ: 

M\ stations count 2 points fof eachi 
completed SSQ exchange ajxl * points for 
each compfeted CW exchange. Masaa- 
chuseits stations then take the total OSO 
points and multiply by the total number of 
Massachusetts counties, states, prov- 
inces, and PAW A members worked to 
compute the final score. Others, multiply 
the total QSO points by the total number 
of Masaachu&etls count ies and PAWA 
members worked. Multiplier credit for 
PAWA club members worked may be 
counted only Or^oa 



fRBOU£NCf£S: 

Phocie— 1620, 3960, 7260, 14280, 21380. 
2a5dO,ar¥]50tm 

CW— laiO, 3560. 7060. 7120. 14060, 
21060. 21 120. 28060, and 28120. Usa of FW 
simpteii is eTK^}grag«t. Plaaae u34 CW am 
CW bands ontyi 

AWARDS: 

i^ftitlcalea wiU be awarded to 1st-. 
2nd-, and 3^d-place winners In each Mas- 
sachusetts county, state, and V£ prov- 
ince, plus the high-scoring NovEct In each 
state. A plaque will be glv^n to Ihe MasBa- 
ehusetts station submitting the higheet 
number of QSOs bettering the record of 
1483 QSOs now held by K1QSK In the 1979 
Massachusetts OSO Party. 

ENTBiES: 

Log^ must show date, tlrr>e, band, 
mode. oallB^gnH state ar>d province 
worked, and excliange RSfTy. Siibmll a 
MpVtli summarv sheet atong «rith tf>e 
togt^ Symmary sheet should include: 
namie, call, mailing aijdress, Massachu- 
aelts county, toUl QSO points, multiptiers 
ctaifTtod, and lotal scorei Ait entries with 
more than lOO QSOs please send a dupe 
sheet. Deadline for mailir^g is May 31. For 
awards and results include $0,40 postage 
{no envelope). Address entries to: Ed 
Peters K1KJT, 29 Greenbrier Drive, New 
Bedford MA 02745. 



COUNTY HUNTERS 

SSB CONTEST 

0001 to OaOO GMT April 26 

1200 GMT April 28 to 

0800 GMT April 29 

1200 to 24O0 GMT April 29 

Rease rM>te the two 44KMjr reaf periods. 
Mobiles may be worked each time th«y 
cnange counties of bands. Mobiles that 
are worked again from Xfm same county 
on a different b^iid count foe point credit 
ooly. Mcbties that are contacted On a 
county line count as one contact but 2 
muEii pliers. Mobile teams count as two 
contacts If both participate In the ex- 
change. Fixed stations may be worked by 
other fixed stations oniy once during the 
contest. Repeat QSOs between fiKod sta- 
tions on other bands are not permitted. 
Fixed stations may be worked try mobltea 



each time they change counties or bands. 
Repeal cool acts bilvieen mobiles are pW' 
milled provided iftev are on a differefit 
band oir co«unty. MtKod-mode contacts am 
permitted provided ttiat on^ siatiofi Is on 
SSS. Contacts made on rtet trequencl^ 
Witt not be AltoMfOd for semiring In this 
year's contest 

EXCtiANQm 

Signal report, county, and state or 
country. 

FREQUENCtES: 

Suggested frequencies are as followar 
3&20-3&40, 7220-7240, 14275-14206, 
21375-21395. 28625-28650 There will be a 
"mobile window'' of 10 kHz on the follow- 
ing (requencies: 382&-3a35. 72^-7235, 
142B0-T4290. Mobiles will be in this 
10-kHz segmtnt and fixed stations are 
asked to refrain from callino "CO 
contest'* in the mobile window. After 
working moMtos In Ihe wItkIow, fJEad sta* 
tlons are raqtiosted to OSY outside the 
window to work (ixed statioos In the con- 
test. This will allow the rT>o<biles running 
lower power a cha/tce to be neaid and 
worked in tt>e contest. 

SCORiNQ.' 

Contact with a fixed US or Canadiart 
station— 1 point- Contact with a OX sta- 
tion {KL7 and KH6 count as DX)— 5 pointa. 
Contact with a mobile station— 15 points. 
Contact with a mobile team station— 30 
points. The multiplier Is the total number 
of US counties plus Canadian stations 
worked. The final score is this multiplier 
times the total QSO poifits. 

AWARDS: 

MARAC plaques to ttte hlgheat^corlng 
fixed US or Canadian station^ DX station, 
mobile team, and top 2 motNle staiions. 
Certificates lo tiw top 10 fixed, mob^te 
leam^ arKt mobile stations in itie US aiKi 
Canada, and to the tiigheat-scorirkg ata- 
i ion in each PX country. 

ENTRIES: 

Logs must show date and time^ station 
worked, reports exchanged, county, state, 
band, d aimed QSO points (1, 5, IS, or 30), 
and each new multiplier must be num- 
bered. Logs and summary sheets are free 
for a #10 SASE or SA£ and appropriate 
fRCs. Wfite to; Jo*in Ferguson WHOWS, 



3820 Stonewall Ct., Independence MO 
6405$. Atl entries must be received by 
June 15 to t)e eUf^ble for aw^nls. DX en- 
trtes should use Air mail. Winners will be 
armounced at the 19S4 ffKlependent Coun- 
ty Hunters Gonventkm during July, ar¥] Ln 
the MARAC N^wsletmr. 



HELVETIA CONTEST 

Starts: 1300 GMT April 2S 

EiKls:13OOGMTApnt20 

Use all bands, 1.B to 28 MHz, on CW or 
phone. Each atatiion can be worked once 
per bar^d regardless of mode. 

EXCHANGE: 

RS(0 plus three~1l0ure serial numt>er 
starting at OOt. Swiss stations will also 
give their Z4etter canton. 

SCOfUNG: 

Each contact with art HB siali<»i courtIs 
3 points- The multiplier ^s thte sum of 
Swiss cantons woriied o>n each band, 26 
maximum per band- Fina^ score is tfie sum 
of QSO points multiplied by ftie sum of 
cantons worked on eact^ band. 

ENTRIES AND A WARDS: 

Certificates will be given to Ihe hi^ghest 
scorer in each country. USA and Canadian 
call area are considered as separate coun- 
tries. Entries with more than 1 log sheet 
must have QSOs separated per band. A 
multiplier checklist Is appreciated. Use a 
summary sheet as usual and indicate call, 
name^ address, single or multi -operator, 
numtier of QSOs« poinis ar»d multipliers 
per band, plus total final score. Atso in- 
Clwfe station description, power output, 
and declaration that rules oi the contest 
and license regulatlofts f^ve tieen ob- 
sen^ed, liigs must be postmarked not 
later tfvan 30 days itter ttie (^>ntest and 
sent to: Gody Sialder HBSZY, Tellenholl, 
CH-6045 Meooen. Swlt2efiand. Canton ab- 
bieviations are: ZH. 8E. LO, UR, SZ, OW, 
NW. GL. 2G, FR. SO. BS. BL SH. AR At, 
SS, Ga AG, TG, Tl, VO, VS. NE, GE, JU- 

H26 AWARD: 

This award Is for contacts made after 
January 1. 197&. Send a list and OSL for 
each of the 2S cantons worked to: Kurt 
Rindschedler HB9MX. Sirahleggwsg 2B, 
CH-B4{!0 Winterthur. Switzerland. 





Chad hams VP2ML 

Box 4881 

Santa Rosa CA 95402 

THE WONDROUS WWV 

What one station do hams listen to 
more tttan any otfwr? WWV probably has 
the lock on that slattstlc. WWV has twen 
pnoviding time and froquaicy Information 
(o amateurs and ottiers ^ot more tfian 60 
yfMTi^ Let's tiave a dose look at tf>e sta- 
tion and how WWV can imfirafMe fom 
DXin^ 

Rrst, you trave to heat Ihie station. Al- 
rrtt^t every modem amateur rig ftas a sep- 
arate position on the bands witch to re- 
ceive WWV, usually on tO MHjl Simply 
connect an antenna, switch to the WWV 
position^ and tune to the appropriate fre- 
quency. Note that WWV transmits in AM, 



so use Ihe AM position on your receiver or 
turn off the bfo. 

The first thing you will hear IS a steady 
500^ or 800-Hz tone, Interrupted every sec- 
ond by a "tick" or pulse. At lf\e end of 
each minute, the tone stops and a voice 
gives the time in C^oordinated Universal 
Tlme(UTC), Tt>e next minute begins with a 
longer tone of 1000 Hz, The staff of this 
longer tone is ttie en act start of the minute 
just identified by ttie vo^ce announce- 
ment In othier wofda, you hear "At the 
torve ?7 hours, 19 minutes Goordinaled 
UniversaLl Time. . . .Beep." The time is ex- 
odty 1713 UTC at the start of ifie beep. 

RrotabJy the first thing a DXet will do 
when 11 sterling to WWV is to reset his or 
her watch and radio^haclc cfock. Every 
OXer Should have at least one feasonabty 
accurate clock set to UTC. Since you can 
purchase a digital watch or small, stick-on 
clock lor less than five dollars, there is 



really no excuse not to fiave a timepiece 
dedicaied to UTC. And do you know tww 
you can tetl a true OXer? His wristwatcfi is 
set to UTC* 

How oi^en sfKHilcl you reset your clock 
or watcli? That depends on how well II 
keeps time. My ancient Tyirreter clock (tfie 
one with the numbers en plastic cylinders 
which provided a "digltar' readout years 
before liquid-crystal dispiaysj keeps such 
good lime that I oniy reset it every month 
or so. You can note the time you reset Ihe 
clock In your log so that you can look back 
to see how much time your timepiece has 
gained or lost J I your clock is off by more 
than one minute a day, reset it every day. 

An error of only a few minutes in '^ur 
log can make the ditf ererkce between coiv- 
firming ihe contact and not, A DX station 
might t>e makirtg as many as 6 contacts a 
minute- If your time on your OSL card IS 
off by only 3 minutes, your callsign mi^l 
be 20^30 calls away from your claimed 
lime. Tlie DX station or QSL manager may 
have to search an entire log sfieet for your 
calf, 6y having your tim^ accurate to the 
minute, you can reduce the chances that 
the DX station will not find your c^ll. 

You can aiso check the tlrrke on your 
shack clock after an Important contact. 



Simpty tune immedtately to WWV and 
note the time difference betw^m WWV 
lime and your clock then criange the time 
in your tog to rnatch the correct time. You 
can trust WWV to tiroedcasf the corr^t 
time 

The Atomic Clock 

L£t's have a look behind the signal and 
see why you can trust the accuracy of 
WWV. The time broadcast on WWV de- 
rives from the clock a few miles south , in 
Boulder^ Colorado. There, nestled against 
the Rockies, only a lew miles from the 
Gontinenia] Divide, sits NBS-6 (see Photo 
A), NBS-B is the latest In a line of cesium- 
beam clocks produced by the National 
Bureau of Standards. These ^ium-t>eam 
clocks use an aulomattc fe^back system 
to produce a microwave signal of exactly 
9,192j63t;770 Hz. This tr«quency is a reso 
nant frequency of the eesliim atom, upon 
whidi the atomic dock is based. 

During thie 30 years that tbe National 
Bureau of Standards has been workirn] on 
atomic clocks in Soutder. ihey have prO' 
duced the most accurate and stable time> 
piece In the world. In fact, scientists re^ 
cently redefined the Intematlonal unit of 
length, the meter, on the basis of the ac- 



120 73 Magazine • April, 1984 





PttofQ A N8S^, th^ cGsium-i>eBm 9Wmh dock at f/» Nsfio/tat BomAU of Sfamt^fiis in 
BoifUfv* Coiofwdou This dock is iim most accurate timept9ce in ifm worfdf 



Photo C. Engin^^ Howtrd MAChfart wit ft two of tfw thrse itientiCAf cesium-im&m docks 
which ke^p the tim^ at tfm WWV ttansmitt&r sitm in fort Ct^tins, 



curacy of the cesiym-l>eam clock. N8&6 
(s accurale to belief than one part in ID 
Irlllion. That's about one secomi In 3 mlt- 
Hon yeartl 

NSS-fi ia so accurate that the time it da- 
term I nes Js more accurate than the 
Earth'^ rotation. Since all our clocks are 
based on the cesium-beam atomic Ctock 
in Boulder^ it would t>e possible tot this 
time 10 be "out of synch" with the raat 
world. MJdrviQht wotiEd move slowly to- 
ward evenmg. A far mone practical p^ob- 
Fem would be that sailors navigating by 
the stafi would find themselves in tlie 
wfofkg piocef Scientists got around this 
proMwn by agreeing lo add "leap sec- 
onds" to UTC as often as needed to keep 
aiemk tirrie in step with sunrises and sun- 
sets. About orvce a year they add an extra 
3e<poncl to {he day at midnight, to kee^ ev- 
eryone on the same time scale. 

But all this is down In Soulder. about 30 
miles from the site of WWV, outside Fort 
Col line, Colorado. What's the connection 
betweer> the atomic clock in Boulder and 
the WWV transmitters? Sufprtsingly, 
there is no direct connection. The time 
transmitted by WWV Is generated right 
there at the WWV site, by smaller cesium- 
beam clocks. WWV us^ three of these 
Hewlett-Packard ^ommefclal-nrtodel cesi- 
um clocks {«t atXHjt S25,Q00 eachK 

Why ltir€« clocks? The argument is as 
follows: If you have only i^ne clock, it 
mi^hi thfeak down, putting you off the air. 
<x It miflttt be wrong. Tt>efe would be no 
way lo chick its accuracy. On the other 
hand, If you had two clocks, and thoy 
showed different tirnes, you wouldn't be 
able to tell which one was correci. Only 
With three clocks can you tell if one is in- 
corfeci' M one of the three ciock$ malfunc* 
tions, an operator must repair it as quick- 
ly aft possible, to avoid the two-clock 
problem. 

Of course, these atomfc clocks keep 
pretty good time all by themselves. J 
welched a strip<hart recorder measure 
the time variation in the WWVB clock$^ 
and with a full scaie of only on^ microsec- 
ond, I he pen didn't even wiggle down the 
c^ntvr of the chart! Even so, the timfe they 
genefBle 1$ regularfy (XHtipared to thai 
produced by the master atomic cfock 
down ^n Boulder. 

At one time they physically moved a 
portat>le atomic clock from one town to 
the next to make this comfiarjaon. but the 
WWV Chief Engineef, John Milton ex- 
WSDAV. came up with a better way usmg 
Denver TV staUons. He compaies the time 
a certain reference point on the TV elffnal 
arrives at Boulder and at the WWV site fur- 
ther north. He knows how much further 



Fort Collins Is from Denver than Boulder 
and can detentiine ttie extra time the ref* 
erence point should take to reach his 
receiver. A custom computer program 
handled th6 actuaf comparison and recali- 
brates the WWV atomic clocks dally. 

Even without this daily check, John Mjf- 
ton feels confident enough of his equ^P' 
ment that he could maintain the high ac- 
curacy of the WWV information. "We 
know the drift rates of each clock so well 
that we can keef» go^ng for months with- 
out any reference standard," John says. 
This drift Isn't much: about one4enth of a 
microsecomJ in four htours! 

Getting the Wofd Out 
Of course, all tne accuracy in the world 



wouHd be worthless if you had to go to Fort 
Coliins to check your watch. Thanks to 
WWVt however, you don*1 have to travel to 
Colorado for this Information. 

All the WWV signals, tones, and even 
the basic carrier frequencies are derived 
Trom the same cesium-beam clocks which 
keep track of the time- The extremely sta- 
ble SignaJ from the clock Is divided and 
mixed to produce each different signal, 
tick, tone, and beep. Onty the voice an- 
nouncements don't come out of the ctock. 
This means thai lust about eveiything you 
hear on WWV {carriet ffeqtiency, tone fre^ 
quefkcies, etc.) hias the same high degree 
of accuracy. That rnass oi cables above 
the digital readout (see PnoioC} is a patch 
panel for all the frequency dhwders af>d 




Photo B. John Milton, chief engin&er at WWV, keeps the Ume-and-ff^v&nOy'$tAftdaref 
statioft on the air. on time, and under budget 



other circuits which produce the pattern 
of tones and ticks on the WWV signat. 

The only parts of the WAA/V signal which 
are not produced by the cesium clocks are 
the voice announcements of time and otiv 
er factors. These voices are recorded on 
ht{;h<quallty drums and added to the WVW 
signal at the approprlale time. No, there 
isn't anyone sitting there reading (he time 
aft 24 hours. 

All the WWV signals, on 2.5, 5. 10> 15, 
arKJ 20 MHl are ampfitude modulated 
ikUt After thie basic signal is generated 
by the cJock. complete wflh lones^ etc.^ ft 
leaves the lieavffy-shieid^ clock room 
and go^ to the aeffes of ft amplifiers ar- 
ranged in the circle arourKl the buifding. 
The«« transmitters are 1 1 near amptiflfifs 
which lake the low-level signal from the 
Clock room and amplify it to about 10^000 
Watis output! fThe ^5- and 20-MHt amps 
ftin a mere 2,500 Watts.) For good rellabili^ 
ty. these amplifiers are 40, DOG- Watt units, 
run at low power. 

ReJJablllty Is a key factor a I WWV, The 
total "down time" is less than 0002%! 
Engineer John Milton has developed a 
complete package of procedures and 
equipment to ensure this fantastic reli- 
ability. First, each of the three cesium 
clocks has a backup battery system, 
9tiouid commercial power \a\l A huge die- 
set generator sits in the back of I he WWV 
buMdirtg, ready to kick in at a moment'? 
rtot^ce and power all the transmit tecs. And 
e^ch tran^mittef has an automatic reset 
feature. If the transmitter tails for wttat- 
ever reason, ttw built-in system will re- 
start the transmitter. If it fails again, one 
of the standby transmi Iters takes o^er. 

There Is a "dedicated" standby trans- 
mitter for the 5-. 10-. and 15- MHz signeis. 
all wired and tuned, set for automatic re- 
placement. WWV monitors the attuaJ 
transmitted rf, listening for any change in 
signal strength. 

The signals leave the WWV building 
through gas-filled coaxial lines to one- 
half -wavelength, vertical antenna^^ Tt^se 
are simply dipoles stood on end. This 
filMt a good omnidlrectionaf pattern. 
Tfmm are even spare antennas: Two all- 
band verticals stand ready to take over if 
Ofte of the primary antennas is damaged. 

WWV has achieved this e)(celieni on- 
line record in spite of nriaior cutba^ts in 
fuPKlina. The station had as many as 20 
lueopte at onie time, monitoring the e^urp- 
m«nt around the clock. Now, thanks to au- 
tomated backups, the staff consists of ex- 
actly three engineers and a single secre- 
tary, all wo/king standard hours. The rest 
of the time the entire station is deserted, 
except for dozens of fuzzy brown rabbits 



73 fAagaiine • April, 1984 121 



and an occasional d^r. The entire annual 
budget for the statiorf, tncludirg the low- 
frequency WWVB, Is about $200,000, and 
that includes an electricity bill of about 
S6,0OQ per month! 

One casualty of the budget crunch has 
baen the 25'MHz signal, which was dis- 
continued In 1977. It waan t taken off the 
air because it cost too much to operate; 
the transmitter was needed as a dedi- 
cated standby for the other frequencies.. 
Still, WWV Is one government organtza- 



tion which provides an excellent service 
for a remarkably small amount of money* 
(Next month well look at some of the 
of/ier (nontlme) reasons to listen to WWV. 
Meanwhile, tune in to 10 00000000 MHz at 
13 minutes after the hour.) Don't worry; 
well show how this WWV intoritiation Is 
vital to successful DXtng In future col- 
umns. 

DEVIL'S MOUNTAIN 

Chiirum-\/ena Expedition. In one of the 



more unique DXpedltlons of 1984^ a group 
of Venezuelan amateurs will operate from 
Devil's Mountain, deep In the heart of Ven- 
ezuela. Churum Vena Is better known as 
Angel FalEs. At 3213 feet, It is the htghest 
waterfall in the world. The waterfall 
(named after [ts discoverer; James Anget) 
plunges down the side of seldom-ciimbed 
Devil's Mountain. The normal viewing 
point tor the falls is at the bottom of the 
canyon below, but at the end of March and 
ear^y April, 4M5ARV^B wlH be on ail bands 



from the top. Frequencies are: CW— 3710, 
7010, 14010, 21110, and 28110 (Novices 
take notef); SSB— 3795, 7095, 14195, 
2129&, and 28595. QSL via PO Box 3636, 
Caracas lOlO-A^ Venezuela. 

And who is that you hear on 15-metef 
SSB? VP2ML? Montserrat might not be 
the rarest of DX, but I look forward to 
working you the last week in March and 
the first week In April. QSL via K1RH. 73, 
and see you on the bands I 



SOCMl 



Listings in ttiis coiumn are pmvid&d tree of 
c/fSfge on a space-avail sbfe ba$is^ Tt>e fat- 
hwfng informatioft shoufd be mciud&d In 
every announcement: sponsor, event, date, 
time, fniace, city, state, afJmmsion ctisrge ^if 
any), features, tsik-in frequencieSf and the 
name ofwtiom to contact for funt}er informa- 
tion. Announcements must be received by 73 
Magazine by the first of the montfi, two 
monttis prior to ti^e monffj tn wiiict^ the event 
t&kespiace. Mail to Editorisi OtfiG^s, 73 Mag^ 
a2:lnei Pine St, Petertx^rough NM 0345&, 



EVENTS ] 



CHICAGO IL 
APFt4 



FRAMINQHAM Mk 
APR 1 

The Pram Ingham ARA, Inc., will hold its 
annual spring ftea market on Sunday, 
April lt I9fl4, beginning at 10:00 am at the 
Framingham Civic League Building. 214 
Concord Street |Rte. 126). downtown Fra- 
mingham. Admissiofi is $200 and tables 
are 910,00 (pre-reglstratlon required}. 
Sellers may begin setups at B:30 am. 
There will be radio equipment, computer 
gear, and food inhouse. Talk-in on 
147.75/15 and .5Z For more information, 
contact Jon Weiner KIVVC^ 52 Overlook 
Drive, Framingham MA 01701, or phone 
(617>S77'7166. 

TRENTON NJ 
APR1 

The Delaware Valley Radio Association 
will hold its 12th annual flea market and 
computer show on Sunday, April 1, 1964, 
from 8:00 am to 4l00 pm, at the New Jersey 
National Guard 1l2lh Pteld Artillery Ar- 
mory, Eggerts Crossing Road, l^wrence 
Township, Trenton NJ. There will tae an in- 
door and outdoor flea-market area, com- 
m>erclal dealers, and refreshments, Sell- 
ers are asked to bring their own tables^ 
Talk-In on 146,52 and 146.07/,67. For ad- 
vance tickets and space reservations^ 
p tease send an SASE to Walter L. Sharpe 
KB2ZY, 140 Susan Drive, Trenton NJ 
0B&3@. 



The Chicago Amateur Radio Club wilt 
hold an open houae on Wedne3day^ April 4, 
1984, from 7:00 pm to 10:00 pm, at Edge- 
brook Golf Course Field House, 610O N. 
Central Avenue, Chicago IL Everyone is 
welcome— especially those Interested in 
learning about amateur radio and how to 
obtain a license. There will tre a film shown 
and live demonstrations of all aspects of 
amateur-radio oommuntcations and equip- 
ment. For additional information^ call {312)- 
54^6622. 

ftOCHESTERNH 
APR? 

The Great Bay Radio Association will 
hold its 4th annual hamfest/flea market, 
Sprlngfest 'a4, on Saturday, April 7, 1984, 
from &:00 am to 3:00 pm, at the Rochester 
VFW Post 1772 Hall, Pickering Road, Roch- 
ester (Gonic) NH. Admission is S1.00. Food, 
refreshments, and plenty of free parking 
win be available. Ta1k4n on 147,57. For ad- 
vance table resentalions and further infor- 
mal ion, write Great Bay Radio Association, 
PO Box 911. Ctover NH 03820. 

SAN ANTONtO TX 
APR 7 

The San Antonio Area Radio Club will 
hold its first annual Swapfest and Bar-8-Q 
on April 7, 1984, from 7:00 am to 5:00 pm, 
at Comanche Park. Talk- in on 147.36 WHe. 
For more details, write Melvin Anderson, 
8932 Saddle Trail, San Antonio TX 78255. 

ROCHESTER MN 
APR 7 

The Rochester Arnateur Radio Club and 
the Rochester Repeater Society will spon- 
sor the 7th annual Rochester Area Ham- 
fe&t on Saturday, April 7, 1984, beginning 
at 8:30 am, at John Adams Junior High 
School, 2535 NW 31 Street, Rochester 
MN. There will be a large indoor flea 



MULTI-BAND SLOPERS 

160, 80, 40, 30, & 20 METERS 

Outstanding DX performance of W9JNM Slopers is well knownl Nowen- 
'ioy mulllbancl BIG-SIGNAL reports! Automatic bandswjtching ■ Very 
low SWR *Co3x feed ■ 3kw power - Compact - FULLY ASSEMBLE D 
. Hang from any support 25 ft. high Or higher - Easy to instan . very 
low profile ■ Com;)lete Instructions -Your personal check accepted 

^BAND SLOPER- 16 0,80, 40, 30 Meters -6011 long S 48.55 trt.ppd 

2 BAND SLOWER' SO & 40 Meters ■ 41 H. long $ 35.&g trt.ppd . 

3-SANONQTflAP PI POLE, 160.80, &40M- 113 ft. long $ 66. po frippd 

g-BANDNOTRAP OiPOLE. aO,&40M > a4ft Jong $ 49. QQ tri ppd 

FOR ADDN L I NFO on these and Other umque antennas.., ■■ SEND SASE 

W9INN ANTENNAS 
BOX 393- S MX PROSPECT, IL 60056 



market for radio and electronic items ^ re- 
freshments^ and plenty of free parking. 
Talk-in on 146.22^.02 MHz. For further in- 
formation^ contact RARC, cio W. C, Mc- 
Gurk WeOYEE. 2253 Nordic Court NW, 
Rochester MN 55901. 

FLEIiillNQTON NJ 
APR 7 

The Cherryvitie Repeater Association 
will sponsor the annual Flemlngton NJ 
Harrifest on Saturday, April 7, 1^84, from 
8:00 am to 3:00 pm. at the Hunterdon 
County High Sohooi Fieid House on Route 
31. General admission is $3.00. For ear!y 
birds, breakfast will be available on site 
from 6:30 am. Talk-in on 147.375. 147.015. 
146.52, 224,12, and 444. S5, For additional 
tnfonnalion or table reservations, write 
BUI Inkrote K2NJ, RD 10. Sox 294, Quaker- 
town-Cro1on Road, Flemlngton NJ 08822, 

or call (201 pee 4080. 

GREENCASTLE IN 
APR 7 

The Putnam County Amateur FladEo 
Ciub will hold Its second Amateur Radio 
and Electronics Auction on April 7, 1984. 
at the Putnam County Fairgrounds. US 
231, north of Qreencastle IN. Admission is 
S1.00, sales commission is 5%, and there 
wfkl be a $1,00 service charge on buy^ 
backs. Doors will open at 8:00 am and the 
auction will start at 10:00 am. Bring your 
equipment to be sold on consignment. AH 
activities wilt be Inside and food will t^e 
available, Taik-in on 147.93f,33. For more 
information or a flyer, contact John Un- 
derwood KSIIB^ RFD 1, Box 10, Hitmore IN 
46128. 

KANSAS crrv MO 
APR 7-a 

The PHD Amateur Radio Association, 
inc., will sponsor the 1984 Missouri State 
ARFIL Convention on Saturday and Sun- 
day, AprJI 7-8, 1984, from 10:00 am to 5i30 
pm (both days), at the Trade Ivlart SulidIng, 
at the downtown Kansas City MO airport. 
For both days, registration is $4.00 and 
swap tables are 110.00, which includes 
one registration with each table. Commer- 
cial exhitiitors may set up from 7:00 pm to. 
9:00 pm on Friday or 7:00 am to 10:00 am 
on Saturday; swappers may set up at 9:00 
on Saturday. The Saturday-night banquet 
at the world-famous Gold Buffet is S10.SO. 
Those desiring banquet tickets and swap 
tables are urged to order in advance. 
Other features will be a complete program 
of forums, commercial booths, a large 
fiea market, a home-brew contest, Mis- 
souri-Kansas Amateur-of'the-Year and 
CW Contest awards , and on Sunday, a 
Missouri-Kansas Repeater Council meet- 
ing, as well as OCWA and YL luncheons. 
Unlimited free parking. Including RV 
space {no hookups j, will t>e available. 
Talk-in on 146.34/.94. For more Informa- 
tion and regi St rat ions^ write PHD Amateur 
Radio Association, Inc., Liberty MO 64068- 
0011, or call (816^781-7313 or 452-9321, All 
pre-registrations will be held at the door. 



AMBOY IL 

APRB 

The I9th annuai Rock River ARC Hanv 
test will be held on Sunday^ April 3. 1984, 
beginning at 8:00 am, at the Lee County 
4-H Center, one mite east of the junction 
of 52 and 30. Ticket donations are 12.00 
each in advance and S3.00 at the gate; 
3-foot tables are $500 each. Camping 
space will be available for a nominal 
charge and breakfast and (unch will t>s 
served. There will tie an auction of am a* 
teur-reialed gear. Talk- In on .37/.97 re- 
peater. For more information or advance 
tickets (available until April 1, 1934) and 
tables, write to Shirley Webb KA9HGZ. 
618 Orchard Street, Dixon IL 61021, or 
phone (815)"284-381 1. 

MADISON Wl 
APR a 

The Madison Area Repeater Assocfa- 
tion, Inc. (MARA), will hold its I2th annual 
Madison Swapfest on Sunday, April fi, 
1&84, at the Dane County Exposition Cen 
ter Forum Building in Madison Wl. Admis- 
sion is £2.50 per person In advance and 
$3,00 at the door. Children twelve and 
under will be admitted free. F lea-ma ritet 
tables are $4.00 each in advance and £5,00 
at the door. Doors will open at 5:00 am for 
commercial exhibitors, 8:00 am for flea- 
market sellers, and 9:00 am for the general 
public. Features will include commercial 
exhibitors, a ftea market, an all you-can- 
eat pancake breakfast, and a barbecue 
lunch. Plenty of parking space and neartiy 
hotel acoommodatmns are available. 
Talk In on 146.1 6/.76 {WB9AEWR|. For res- 
ervations (early ones are advised) or more 
information, write to MARA, PO Box 3403, 
Madison Vyi 53704. 

WySKEQQN Ml 
APR 14 

The Muskegon Area Amateur Radio 
Council will hold the ARRL Michigan 
State Convention and Muskeg^on Hamfest 
on April 14. 1984, at the L C. Walker Are- 
na, 4th ai Western, Muskegon Ml. Fea- 
tures will Include Friday-evening hospital- 
- ily rooms, programs covering areas of am- 
ateur radio Interest, ladles' activities, and 
a Saturday-evening convention dinner 
program. Setups for manufacturers and 
dealers will begin at 2:00 pm on April 13th. 
For more Information, write Muskegon Ar- 
ea Amateur Radio Council, PO Box 691, 
Muskegon Ml 49443. 

WELLESLEY MA 
APR 14 

The Wellesley Amateur Radio Society 
will conduct its annual auction on Satur- 
day, April 14. 1984, at the First Congrega- 
tlonal Church of Wetlesley Hills, 207 
Washington Street, at the intersection of 
Routes 9 and 16, Wellesley MA. Doors will 
open at 10:00 am and the auction will 
begin at 11:00 am. Talk-in on .63/.03, 
.04/.e4. and .52. For more Information, 
contact Kevin P. Kelly WA1VHV, 7 Lawn^ 
wood Place, Charles town MA 02129. 



122 73 Magazine • April, 1984 



PIKES PEAK CO 
APR 14-t5 

Ihe Pfkfs Peak Radio Amateur Associa^ 
t\on will present tfie 1st annual Electronic 
Exhibition and Traide Shew on Saturday 
and Sur>day, A|m1I 14-15, 1S&4. iwm lOaOO 
•m b> &00 pm, at a site soon lo be con- 
nniieiL A tee wlir be charge at ttw door, 
WelMmown equ^pmet^t manufacturefe will 
present seminars on Saturday, starling ai 
1:00 pin, and admb^ion will t>e free. Uve TV 
and radio broadcasts will tre on during the 
show, TatN-in on t4d^2 simpteic or 146.97/ 

JACK^N MS 
APR 14*15 

The Jacheon AmAteur Radio Club will 
host ttie Capital City Handiest and 1384 
ARRL MJsslasIpp^ State Cortventlon on 
Saturday and Sunday, April 14-15, I3fi4, at 
(tie Communications Workers of America 
Building. (-220 at Country Club Dfive. 
Hours on Saturday are 9:00 am to 5:00 pm 
and on Sunday. 8:00 am to 1:30 pm. Admis- 
sion is tree and Ilea markm tables are 
$5.00 each. Attractions Include com me p 
cial dealer exhibits, a large indoor flea 
market, conceesEons. forums, and free 
parking ^Including self-contained RVs). 
For special tiamfest rates, contact the 
Holiday Inn Southwest directly. Talk-In on 
i46.te/,76. For funher information, con- 
lacl Carol Kemp NASY^ 3S61 Beaumon! 
Drive, Pearl MS 39206, or phone 
(801)^9-7612, 

Ifalt^QHNC 
APR IS 

The RalelQh Amateyr Radio Society will 
hold lis 12tti annual hamfest end flea mar- 
ket (all under cover) on Sunday. April 15, 
10B4. t>eg inning at 3:00 am, at the Oratj- 
triae Valley Shopping Mali, Focated at the 
Intersection of US 70 west and US 1 aruj 
&4 Admission 1$ $4.00 at the gate, with no 
extra charge for 1ailga!efs. TatHes will tte 
ev^iiatiie for rent. Features will <nclu{^ a 
CW contest, a home-tirew conlesl. and 
special-Interest meetfngs. Talk4n wHi be on 
146.04^146.64 (W4DW) and 14a,2d/14&S6 
(K4ITI_). For more information, contact 
Pete Thacher N4HQZ at p19h87&4073 or 
Jim Bradley WA4AOO at (919^951-2437 
from &00 pm to 8:00 pm weekdays or on 
weeker^ds, or wrtte RARS, PO 19127, Ra- 
leigh NC 27619. 

DAYTON OH 
APR 27 

the 15th annyaf 8*A'S'H w*1l be held 
on Friday nighL Apdi 27, 1084, at the Day- 
lOfi Hariw^nlion at th© Convention Center, 
Main and Fifth Streets, Dayton DH. A^ 
mission is free and parking ts available in 
iha adjacent city garage. There will l>e 
sandwichas, snacks, end a COD bar, as 
well as Mve entertalnmeni. For fufther \i\-\ 
formation, contact the Miami Valtey FMH 
Association. PO Box 263, Dayton OH 
45401. 

DAYTON OH 
APR 27 

The Dayton-Clncinnatl Chapter of the 
Quarter Century Wireless Association will 
fKi^d its annual bar^quel during the Dayton 
Hamventiofl on Friday. April 27. 1964. at 
Neil's Hefttage House flestauram, 2180 S- 
Olitle Drive. Dayton 0>H. Tickets are $1?.50. 
The cash bar will open at B:30 pm and din- 
ner will liegin at 7:30 pm. Tt^ dinner speak- 
er is Dr. Jerroid Petrofsky, developer of 
computerized equipmant that enables paf- 
aplegics to waik.The pres^itation will tw Il- 
lustrated. For more details, write Doug Hor- 
nm WQPH. 186 Solfwood Drive, Dayton OH 
454^. or call (StS^^^^^BSlO. 



DAYTON OH 
APR 27-20 

The 19B4 Dayton Hamvenllofi's tnterna- 
tlonal VHFAiHF Conference will be h^Fd 
concurrently with the Ham vent Ion from 
Friday through Sunday. ApHI 27-29. 1984. 
at ttw Hara Arena end E3thSt>ition t3enter. 
Dayton OH. There will Ih technical forufns 
Iry acknow/iedged experts; noise-figure, 
dynamic-range, and antenna ran^e mea- 
Burement contests; and a hospitality sufte 
with refreBhmenta. Technical papers and 
presentations on VHF/UHF topics of inter- 
est ^re being solicited for conslderatioa 
Potential speakers Should submit I tieir re- 
quests i^mmediateiy. For furttier informa- 
tion, contact Jim Slltt WAflONQ. VHFflJHF 
Conference Moderator, 4126 Crest Manor, 
Hamilton OH 4501 1. 

DAYTON OH 
APR 27-29 

The Dayton Am^ateur Radio Associa- 
tJon, tnc., will sponsor the Dayton Hairv 
wention on April 27-29, 1984, at the Hara 
Arena and Exhibition Center, Dayton OH. 
Admission, valid tor all three days, Is S7.50 
In advance and $10.00 at the door. The 
Saturday evening Grand Banquet and En- 
leflalnnient Is $14.00 in advance and 
S1&00 at the doo<. Harry Dannais W2H0, 
ptst president of the ARRl^ will t>e the 
featured speaker. Because seating is lim- 
ited, eariy reserve 1 1 ona are requested. 
There will be a giant flea market starting 
at noon on Friday and continuing all day 
Saturday and Sunday. Flea-mafket space 
la $15.00 for all three days and will be sold 
In advance onSy. Entrance for setups will 
tw available starting Wednesday and ihe 
sf>eciaJ flea market telephone is fSlS}- 
223-0923 Oth^r features will include to- 
rums, awards, and exhibits. For apeciaJ 
motel rates and reservations, write Ham- 
vention Housing, Box 1288. Dayton OH 
45402; no telephone reservations will be 
accepted. AOdress aM other inquiries to 
Box 44. Dayton OH 45401. or pho<ie (513^ 
433-7720. Please semi advance registra- 
tion Checks to Dayton Hamvention, Box 
22&5, Dayton OH 45401. 

HARTWELL GA 
APR 26-29 

The An(|«rson, Hart well, and Toecoe 
Ha^ Clubs will sponsor the sixth anr^ual 
Lake Hartwelt Hamtest on ApriF 28^29, 
1984, at the Lake HartweFJ Group Camp lo- 
cated on Highway 29, about 2 miles south 
Of Hart well Dam. Admission, camping, and 
flea-market space are alF free. Aclivities will 
begin mt StOO am on Satuiday and include a 
ho weat ioa totmiament and a left-foated 
CW contBsL The oamplng area virtll be open 
Friday and Saturday nights. Tal*c-ln on 
146.895^295 and 146.1 9^.79. For further in- 
formation, contact Carl Davis KV4T. 20S 
College Avenue. Hartwell GA 30643. 



niie 



EAST HARTFORD CT 
APR 29 



seventh annual Pioneer Valley Hadio 
Association (PVRA) Ftea Market will be 
held on Sunday^ April 29, 19B4, from 10:00 
am to 4:00 pm, at Panney HlQh School, 
Forbes Street. East Hartford CT. Taik-ln on 
J9/:7B. For feservatiqns arKi more Informa- 
tkWK write Jon Patz KAlFYt^ 34 Whiting 
t^anc. West Hartford CT06T19, or call C203J- 
232€772 (evmlngslL 

MMNTREE MA 

APR 20 

The South Shore Amateur Hadio Club of 
BraJniree MA will celebrate its 53rd year in 
amateur radio tiy holding an Indoof flea 
market on Survlay, Apcil 29, 1984. rain or 
mirm^ from 11:00 am to 4:00 pm. ai the Vik- 



ing Club, 410 Qmlncy Avenue, Brain tree f^A 
The entrance fee Is S 100 and 8-loot lables 
are $10.00 {which includes 1 free admission 
per table}. Vendors will be admitted at 9-30 
am and plenty of parking will be available. 
For advance lal>le reservations. ser>d a 
check payabl« to the South Shote Amateur 
Racfio Club to Ed Dotiefty W1 M PT. 236 W^kl- 
wood Avenue, Braintree MA 02184, Aconfir- 
rrration of check receipt wtii tm sent and 
there will t« no cancellation refunds after 
April 25. For more information, call Ed at 
t517>843443t, svenlngs. 

CHJCAGOiL 
MAY 2 

The Chicago Amateur Radio Club's Eve- 
ning Mini^Hamfest will be held on Wednes 
day. May 2, 1984, from 6:00 pm to 10:00 pm, 
at the Edgebrook Gorf Course Field House, 
6100 N. Central (tietween £ 1st on and 
Devon), Oioaoo IL Admission is S1.0O and 
card-tatile Sfiaces are SlOO. Refreshments 
will be available. Talk-in on 14652 MHz. For 
tickets, space reservations, or mone infor- 
mation, send an SASE to CARC, 5631 W. In 
vlng Park Road. Chicago IL G0634, or phone 
(312V54&^22. 

ST. DAVID AZ 
MAY 4-6 

Tt)e Cochise Amateur Radio Assoc! a- 
lion, Inc., wJII ttoid a hamfest (upgraded 
from a swapmeet) on May 4-8, 1984, in St. 
David AZ. There will be a flea market and 
all tallgaters are welcome. Tours planned 
to Tomt^tone. tfie Bis bee lavender Pit. 
and other places of imefest. Talk-in qn 
.16^.76 and .52 simplex. For more details, 
contact CARA. Attention: Bob Clay K87HB. 
PO Sax tSSa, Stefra Vista AZ 35^38. 

CEDARBURG Wl 
MAYS 

The Ozaukee Radio Club will sponsor 
Its 6th annuat swapfeat on Saturday, May 
5. 1984, from 8.-00 am to 1:00 pm. at the Cir- 
cle B Recreation Center. Highway 60. Ce- 
darburg Wl (located 20 mtJes north of MiF- 
waukee). Admission is $2.00 In advance 
and S3.00 at the door. Six-foot tables are 
52.00 and eight-foot tables are S3,00. Food 
and refreshments will be aval Fable. Seik 
efs will be admitted at 7:00 am for table 
setups. For tickets, tables, maps, ot mo«^ 
Inforrriation, sernl a business-si^e SASE 
to 1384 Ozaukee Radio Club Swapfest, PO 
Bo* 13, Port Washington Wl 53074, 

COLUMBIA MO 

MAY&-6 

The Central Mlssoori Radio Association 
will fiokl Columbia Hamfest "84 on May 6-6, 
1864, at ttie Hltlon inn, 1-70 arxt Stadium 
Boulevard, Columbia MO- Features will in- 
clude forun^, a hospitality room, a Satur 
day-night banquet, a hard-surfaced flea 
market, display tables, and shultle-Ous ser- 
vtce to parking ajneas and shopping centers. 
Talk4n on .1&76 or 220 42/02, For boncfuet 
lldkets. reseHTvations for fxJtels, fleanmafket 
Spaces, Or dataier tables, and more informa- 
lion, contact Ben Smith KiPGK. Route 1* 
Prairie Home MO 65068, or phono {8t6H27- 
5319. 

GREENVILLE SC 
MAY 5-fl 

The Blue Ridge Arruiteur Radio Society 
will sponsor the Greenville SC Hamfest on 
Saturday and Sunday, May 5-6, 1964, at 
the American Legion Fairgrounds, White 
Horse Road, Vi mile north of 1^5, Oreen' 
vitie SO. Admission Is $3.00 in advance 
and $4.00 at the door. Talk-in on 146.01/ 
.61, For advancs tickets, write Mrs. Sue 
Chlsm M4ENX. Rte, 6. 203 Lanewood 
Dfive, GreenviUe SC 2i607. For fiirtt>er in- 



formal ton, write Phil fyfuftfrts WD4KTG, 
Hamfest Chairman, PO Box 99, Simpson- 
vilJe SC 29681. 

LONGtSLAND 

MAYS 

The Suffolk County Rac^ Ovib Indoor 
and Outdoor Flea Market will tw held on 
Sunday. May 6, 1984, from 8.^ am lo 3;:0d 
pm, at Reputs^ic Lodge No. 1967, 585 Broad- 
holFow f^ad tr^oute 110), Melvieie NY. Gen- 
eral admission Is S2,00; children under 12 
and wives will be admitted free. Indoor sell- 
er's tables are S7.0O and outdoor space is 
tSJOQ Cif¥:ludes one aiiniissiofi). There will 
t>e refreshments on the premisa6 and pA&h 
ty of free parking. Talk-In on 144.81^45^1 
and 146.52 For additional information, con- 
tact Richard Tygar AC2P at (516)^43^5956 
(evenings). 

SULLIVAN 11 
MAY 6 

Ttte Moultrie Amateur Radio Ktub will 
hold its annual Sullivan IL MARK Hamfest 
on May 6, T984, at the 4-H Fairgrounds, 3 
mites east and 1 mile north of Sullivan on 
the Cadwfiii Road. Features include cov- 
ered facilities, lunch, and a free swapper's 
row. Talk-tn on T46-6fi&.055 and 146^20. 
For more Infonnation, contact William 
Guennewig WA9WOB at (2l7)^2e&ai39 
(evenings). 

SANDWICH IL 
MAY 6 

The Kishv^uKee Radio Club of DeKalb 
IL will hold its annual hamfesi on SumSay, 
May 6, 1964. at !f>e Sar>dwich Fairgrounds. 
Sandwich. Tidtets are S2.50 In advance 
and 13.00 at the door; tables are S5,00 
each, Overnight camping without hook- 
ups will be aval Fab te. For more Informa- 
tion, contact Howard Newqulst WA9TXW, 
PO Bo» 348, Sycamore iL 60176. 

CENTRAUA IL 

MAY 6 

The CentraMa Wireless Association, 
Inc., wIM hold Its annual hamfest on Sun- 
day, May 6, 19B4, at the Kaskaskfa College 
Gymnasium^ 3 miles northwest of Centra- 
11 » IL Admission (o the tvamfest Is free 
and there will be no charge for the flea- 
market and exhibit space (a limited num- 
t>ef of ta&les will be issued on a fifsl- 
come, first-sen/e Oasis). Doors will open at 
7:0D am for flea market and exhlOit set- 
ups. Food and refreshments will be avail- 
able, as well as plenty of free parking. 
TftUwn on 147^7/.B7 and 14652. Fof fur- 
th«r Information, contact Bod Kirrg 
WB90EG at |6l8>-532-6606 Of Lou Hodges 
WStL at |6l8>-633^?24. or write to CWA, 
inc., PO Box 1166, Centralla IL 62801. 

PARAMUS NJ 
MAYS 

Tfie Bergen ARA will hofd a Ham Swap 
'n' Sell on May 8. 1864. frofn 8iO0 am to 
4:00 pm, at Bergen Community College, 
400 Paramus Road. Pa ram us NJ, There 
wlH be tall gating only and admission for 
seliera Is t4.00 fbring your own table). 
Buyers will be admlUed free Talk-in on 
.70/. 19 and .52. For more informatton, con- 
lac I Jim Greer KK2U. 444 Berkshire Road. 
Rid^ewood NJ 07450, or phone {201H4S- 
28^. 

DUIIHAM NC 
MAY 12 

The Durham fU Association will hold 
the Durham Hamfest on May 12, 1984, at 
the South Square Ma^t. Durham NC Talk- 
In on 147J25. For more information, write 
Milan R Burger, President, DFMA, 5711 
$prti>«^ Drive, Durham NC 27712. 



I 



73 MagBzine « April, 1S84 123 



FUN! 



John Edwards K12U 
PO Box 73 

Middle Village NY 11379 

HOW HAMS VIEW 
THEMSELVES 

You can say orie thtng about haims: 
They're «H a( alt shy. 6f *ng up an t^avie *!- 
fecting our hobby, and hams., like (lo oiher 
Sp«c!al4ntfirest Qrotip. are cortaln to «)(- 
press ttieir views about U. Raniember Iha 
Jack AfKlerson Inc^idsnt back tn tha 
1970s? And what abowl no^ode? r ihink it 
was no mere coincidence that iha FCC 
commissi oners switched from a unani- 
mous endorsement of no-code to « po^i* 
Hon of unanimous disapproval within ttie 
$pan of onty a few mo/ittvs. Tens of Ihou^ 
ssfKls of letiam fTom concerrwd amsteurt 
certainty |>layed a rote^ as did the In* 
lluencx of so«T>e frfends in tiigf! plac«$. 

Yes, hams love to a* press thetf ¥<ews. 
Af)d that's wtty wa take time out each year 
to let the FUNT readership comment ofl 
the day's important ham issues. One 
never knows exactly what form I ha re^ 
sponses will take, bul there's always lots 
of input. 

This year, as in preivious FUN! pollsp 
we're keeping some old questions In order 
to keep track of developing trends in our 
hobby arid adding s<»Tie new ones to keep 
up with I he times. Whatevef your v^enirs, 
sand your responses to PO Box 73. Middia 
Village NY 1 1373. Or, if you've given up on 
the US. Mule, you can Iransinlt your an- 



swers electronically wla CompuServe's 
Emali or HamNet. My 10 Is 70007,412. My 
Source ID, If you prefer thai system, Is 
TCII335. 

ELEMENT l-BAQKQROUNO 

n Sei^: 

A) Mala 
6| Fimalt 

2| Ag<K 
A} 15 or belO(M 

B) 16-21 
Q 22-3g 
Q) 40-59 

E) 60 or above 

3) License clasa: 

A) Novice 

B) Tectiniclan 

C) General 

D) Advanced 
E]f Ejctrs 

4) Nun'ktMr of years ficenaed: 
A^ 1 year or less 

B| 1-5 fn^t^ 
Q 6-10 years 
0) 11-20 years 
Q 21 years and up 

5) Do yoy have a new (poat44arch T€) call? 

A) Yes 

B) Mo 

6} How many hourB a week do you devote 
to amateur rad^o? 

A) 0*1 hour 

B) 2'S hours 

C) 6-10 hours 
P) 11-20Tiour^ 

E) 2i noyrs or more 






%MV 




ORBIT is the Official Journal for the 
Radio Amateur Satellite corporation. 

For a SAMPLE COPY please 

send $2 to: 

(AMSAT), P.O. BOX 27, Washington, DC 

20047. 



7) Which HF band do you u»e most? 
A] fi0^7S meters 
B} 40 n^ers 

C) 20 meters 

D) t& andtor 10 meters 
6 Don't ofwrate HF 

3} Which VHF4JHF band cfe you lise most? 

A) & maters 

B) 2 meters 
C} 220 MHz 

D) 420 MHz andJor up 
E} Don-t operate VHF-UHF 
^ Which mode do you use rnost? 

A» sse 

B) CW 

a FM 

€) other 

10) How much money have you sperrt on 
amateur rad^ wtthin the past year? (In- 
clude QSL expenses, magazine subscrip- 
tions, c4ub dues, end other incidental eN> 
penses.) 

A) 0-$25O 

B) S251-S500 

C) $501-11,000 
O) SI. 001 -$2,500 
£) $2,501 and up 

ELEME^2— SOCIAI. 

CHARACTERISTICS 

11) Has srateur radio influenced your 
cajraif efiokMi? 

A> Greatly 
B) Sornewtiat 
q Not at ail 

12) Should the ARRL get rid of the DXCC 
Honor Roti? 

A) Yes 
9) No 

13) Potltically, how would you define 
yourself? 

A) Conservativa 

6) Mlddl&of-thO'road 

Q Uberal 



iij Should the ARRL gel fid of the OX 
Century aub? 

A) Yes 

8» rto 

151 How old were you wt>en you first b*' 
came a ham? 

A) 15 or below 

B) 16-21 

C) 22-39 
Dl 40-59 

E) 60 or abova 

16) Should the FCC Increase the speeds 
on amateur CW sn ami net ions? 

A) Yes 

B) No 

17) Do you own a Nime compuloi? 

A) Yes 
B1 No 

16) Do you think hamsK compared to ccfn- 
puter hobbyists, are: 

A) More technically ifictined In their 

B) Less leclinlcally inclined in their 

hobby 

C) Both are about equally akllled In 
their hobby 

19) Do you think that home computing is 
siphoning people (Including youngs tera) 
away from amateur radio? 

A) Yes 

B) ^kJ 

20) Will the volunteer exam system \f¥ 
crease cheating? 

A^ Y^ 
B) No 

21) Should volunteer examiners be al^ 
lowed to collect a fee to help defray ex- 
penses? 

A) Yes 

B) No 

^ Has ham radio hielped to make you a 
better person? 

A) Yes 

B} No 




Selling 73 w?ll 
make money for 
you. Consider the facts: 
Fact 1; Selling 73 increases 
store traffic— our dealers telt 
us that 73 is one of the hottest- 
selling amateur radio magazines on the 
newsstands. 
Fact 2: There is a direct correlation between 
store traffic and sales— increase the number of 
people coming through your door and you1l increase 
sales 

Fact 3: Fact 1 -h Fact 2 = INCREASED SALES, which 
means more money for you. And that's a fact. 
For information on selling 73, call 80fr 3430728 (in New 
Hampshire call 1-924-9471) and speak with Ginnie 
Boudrieau, our bulk sales manager Or write to her at 
73, 80 Pine St., Peterborough, NH 03458. 



75. 



Amateur Radio's 
lechnicalJournai 



80 PIfve Street Ptterborough, NH 03450 

800-3430728 



124 73 Magazine • April, 1984 



RESPONSE FORM 

instructions: Bead eacli quddlton a^ mark your response try cfrcllng the appropriate fettef fvext to Itw numtMf of Ihe question. 



Etement f : 
DAB 

2) A e C D E 

3) A B C D E 

4) A B C E 

5) A B 

6) A B C D E 

CftfniTiMil^ 


7) A B C D E 

8) A B C D E 

9) A B C D E 
114 A B C D E 

Bi^m^nt 2: 
11) A B C 


12? A a 

13) A B C 

14) A B 

15) A B C D E 

16) A B 

17) A B 
1«) A B C 


19) A B 
2C^ A B 

21} A B 

22) A B 

23) A B 

24) A 8 


EienmntS: 
25) A B 
£6) A B 
27) A B 
2Q A B 

29) A B 

30) A B 


31) A B 

3^ A B 
33) A B C D E 
3D A B C D E 
36) A e 

36) A B 

37) A B 


30) A B 

39!! A B C D £ 

40) A B 

41) A B 
42} A B 
43t A B 


45) A e C D E 
49) A B Q D E 
47) A B C & E 
40) A B C D E 

49) A B 

50) A B 
















































- 












V 









23) Should ham tlcQn&eis have a mmlmum 
age requir^TTtent? 

A) Ye$ 
8) No 

24) StKMjEd tiam^ be subject io periodic 
relesting? 

A) Yes 
fl) Ho 

ELEMENT 3— OPERATING HABITS 

25) M the users were mtrteted to d^ta 
comfTiunlcatiiXi onty (rto phone or CW op- 
eration), ^iwQuld you be In favor or a no- 
code 220-MKz Digital-class license? 

A) Yes 
m No 

26} Would you be In favor of a no^ode 
220-MI-Lz Digital-class ticKet if il permitted 
phone operalio^n in addition to data trans- 
mission? 
A3 Yes 

B) 1^0 

27) Have you ever used a personal com- 
puter h connection with your amateur* 
radio activities? 

A) Yes 

B) No 

28) Is it lima to comptelelv deregulate 
amateur radio hy having the FCC turn over 
aH responslbtty for ham operation to ttte 
amateitr communilylf 

Aj Ysa 
B| No 

29) What ifo you think of people who view 
pay4el«Hsion services with MDS con- 



verters and satellUe dishes that are not 
approved by tiroadcastars? 

A) They're skunks 

B) They're within their rights 

30) Should we gel rid of, or reduce in size, 
the CW subl^ands? 

A) T'l^ft 

B) No 

31) Do you rhink DX nets have a ptace In 
ham radiio? 

A) Yes 
B^ Ho 

32) Do you thbnk nets in ger>efal tiave a 
ptace in ham radto? 

A) Yes 
m No 

33) The next lime a ham operates from 
space, whicA band stiould he/stw use? 

A) 2 melerB 

B) 220 MHz 

C) 450 MHz 

D) An even higher band 

E) Shouldn't bother to operate 

34) if, while tuning across a band, you 
heard a net called "Jammers Intematlon- 
al" in progress, would you; 

A) Jam it 

B) Ignoi'ait 

C) Complain to the FCC or some other 
organization 

D) Listen 
^ Join II 

35) tt required, could you sotfdty copy CW 
at the speed at wfifdi you were licensed? 

A) Yes 
S) No 



36) If required, could you pass the FCC 
thecfv test for your license class? 

A) Yes 

B) No 

37) Have you ever purposely operated in 
an amaiaur subband you weren't licensed 
louse? 

A) Yes 

B) No 

3$) Do you ttiink ttte At^RL affects amft> 
teur rwlio in a posilhre manner? 

A) Yes 
m No 

39) Do you ever speah to foreign, non- 
Engiisfh&peaking, hams in tt^r own tan» 
guaga? 
A J Always 

B) Sometimes 

C) i attempt U 

D) Hara!y 

E) Never 

40J Do you feel yourself competent to re- 
place the finals in a tube-type rig? 

A) Yes 

B) No 

41 j Do you feel yourself competent to re* 
place the finals in a transistor- type rig? 

A) Yes 

6) No 

42) Do you solder together your own coax 
connectors? 

A) Yes 
6) No 

43) Is your antenna system mounted on 
your house or a lowcf? 

A) Hotise 
6) Towei 



44) Have you ever designed your own an- 
tenna? 

A) Yes 
B} No 

45) What do you think of contesting? 

A) Great 

B) Good 
Q Okay 

D) Don'l tilt^ it 

E) Despise it 

46) What do you think of DXing? 
A) Gfeat 

Bl Good 
Q Okay 

D) Don1 ttke it 

E) Despise il 

47) Whai do you (hrnk of repeat eftt? 

A) Great 

B) Good 

C) Okay 

D) Oon'l like them 
E^ Despise them 

48) What do you think of traffic hsndling? 

A) Gfeat 

B) Good 
CI Okay 

D] Don t like it 
El Despise it 

49) if you heard an emergency net in prog- 
ress, woufd you Immediately join in and 
offer your services? 

A) Yea 

B) No 

50) Shouid all hams t« required to join 
some type of national amateur-radio or- 
ganization? 

A) Yes 

B) No 




47 CFR Pail i7 

[PR Deckel Ho. 03-}?; ftM-422^] 

Allow ttia Use of Volunteers to Prtpnv 
and Admtnlstsr Operator Examinations 
In the Amstaur Radio Service and 
Correction 

aaENCTr Federal Communkatlons 
CommiBaionH 

action; Final RuLei and Cortecitoa. 

ftuitMAPiY: Th\t docunent corrects FCC 
niEea regAiding the use of voluntary and 
uncompenaated voliinteera to prepare 
and adminisier amaieur operator 
exaOLUiahciiii m order to eliminate 



unLntended inRonfiBtencies in the ni!e» 
adopled in the Report and Order in this 
proceeding, 

EPFECTIV1 OATi; January 11. 1984, 

FOR FUPtTHin INFOflMATfOM COKTA^lf 

John ], Borkowekl Federal 
Cammiinicaiiuna CommisBion, 
Washington. D.C 20554. (202) 632-4964. 

Effata 

Id the matter ofdmendmenl of Parli 0. 1 
mmI 97 of the C4itUT3JBiic:^fi'e ni[e« to aIIoiw tlliB 
of votynfeert to prepare and adjninjjtef 
I tar exjurLinilionA in tiic Amateu; Radio 
Service {V% Dw^ket N<^, 83n-27 RM^1229), 

1. Qa Septeml»er 22, ]S83, the 



Conuniftiion adopted a Report and 
Order. 46 PR 45653 (October 6, 1983). in 
lilt ttiove captioned proceeding, tn the 
Btpoft and Order, the CammiMiaii 
■mended Parts 0, 1 and 97 oHts Rute* to 
allow the use of vnltinteera to prepare 
and administer operator examinstiona 
in the Amateur R^din Service. 

2. En the nties set forth in i)ie 
Appendix to ihe Report and Order^ 
voiunteeri are given ten days from the 
time ihey administer an examination to 
forward candidates' applications to the 
VEC (! B7.2a(hl). However, VEC's are 
given only ten daye From the dale of t)ie 
examination to forward candidates' 
applications to tlie FCC (§ 97.519(0)). 
Thii could result in a VEC having no 
timfl to perform the funcdons listed in 

I 97. Si 9, and was not intended. The 
Com mission intended to give the VEC 
adequate time to perform these 
fttnctionf, 

3. Al paragraph 28 of the Report and 
Order, The Commission aiated: ''. . , we 
have incorporaied all of the presenl 



lelegraph requiremenlB and guidelines 
from our present rules/* With respect lo 
Iclcgraphy examine lion grading, rvo 
changes were intended. However^ 
I 97.29 (c) in the Apper^dix imposed an 
additional burden not included in the 
pHitenl rules of grading on the hasii of 
'^one continuous minute^-" Inciuiion of 
(his new burden was not in I ended . 

4. Section! 97.503 and 97,515 of the 
Rules in the Appendix cro^s-reference 
I 97 JO. There is no 5 97. m The a-nsft- 
reference* should be debled^ 

^ Section ^7.2a[i][2) provides for FCC 
relefiting of any person who obtained an 
operator ilcensu Ihrough the vt/Iuntti^er 
ixamination process. It doea net 
indicate what the FCC will do if hucIj a. 
person does not pass the examination. 
This was an inadvertent omission. 
Therefore, we are adding a new 
parngraph (j) to § 97. Z& to clarify that an 
«3Uiminee who fails to appear for 
readmmfstraticiT) of an examination or 
who faih to pass the retested 
eJcamination elemenl[^) wiU hove hll/ 



73 Magazine • ApfiU984 12S 



her Dpcratofa licence cancelled and wilt 
be issued a new operator license for the 
operator license dats previously held bf 
the examiflee^ We are alia clnrtfyuig 
that FCC reieiling applies only for 
examinationi abov« the Novice Claftv. 

d. AddjiHonsHy. the deTinition of the 
term "Amfileur Code Credit Certificaie" 
in 1 973 was inadvertently reiained. 

7. Pinaliy. the wqrdja|[ of 9 d7.513 
regarding where VEC's n^y coordinAte 
examinAtioni is unuitenr^ooaUy 
ambiguous. White th'm wording w«j 
d^i^ed to permi! VBC'i to coordinate 
examinations outiide of iKe regions 
Esled in 1 97 507(b) jsuch as UnUed 
States military bases m foreign 
countries), it wis nol intended to pennit 
one regional VEC to ec»eirdina1e 
examinations in another rcgioo- 

& Accofdiqgly» the fotlowiiig 
coTTef^ion* tfv made to the Apptf^jx of 
the Hep^fri and Ort^r io this pmcsading; 

ItfJ fConvdMl 

1. Paragfaph (aaj of ft? J is removed 
and rwervtd 

Z. Section 97 Z$ is smended by 
revising p«ra^a|i|i^ I ) and adding a new 
^■sfDtkwt: 



iwfm 



[i] The FCC Teserves the tt^t without 
qualiEicatioa, lo: 

11) AdmmiilFT eKimtnations itsdf: or 

[Z] Keadmmister eKaminations i tielf 
or under ihe supervision of an examiner 
designated by the FCC to any p«r>on 
who obtained en ciperator bcenie above 
the Niivice Class ^m>ugh Ibe v olunleer 
examination process. 

(]] If a licensee fditi to appear fof 
re administration of an examindftoa 
pursuani lo parsgraph (i}(ZJ of (Mi 
■ecttoiL or does not sucxesBfuOy 
complete the examination elenient(sl 
which are readmmislered^ the licensee't 
operator license b tub I eel to 
cancellatJon; in au instance of such 
cancelation, the licensee will be issued 
an operator license cansistertt with 
completed examinution elemenls which 
have not been in valid a led by nol 
appearing for or falling rendmln is t ration 
pf an examinotion. 

3. The words "for one conlinunui 
minute*' are removed from the firs I 
sentence of pnragiapb |c) of S 9?.2§. 

4. The crtsfl-relereniej lo ( 97.30 are 
removed from § 97.503(b} and from 
§87,515. 

5. The first two ientfinceu of ft ff7.513 
ore revised to read: 

§B7.fl3 Sctiedullng of examlnalkonL 

A VEC will coordinate the dates and 
times for schedding exami nations (see 
|fl7.Z6} throwghaut the reglon(s) it 
serves. Any VEC may also ooordtnnle 
the scheduling of testing opp<jftunities 
outside of the regions listed in 
$ g? J07(b}. 

• « • i 4 

G. Paragraph [c] of § 97.St9 Is revised 
lo read: 

m ■* # * * 

{c\ Porwird the appllcatton within ten 
days of its receipt frfim the eJiamlnem 
Lo^ Federal ComRiintk«Hon« 
Commissi otx Licensing Division. Private 
Radio Bureau* Gettysburg Pennsyivania 
17M5. 

fSecs. 4(t} and 303 of ibe CofmnuBkiatiani Ad 
of li^. mm aiMiMlecL 17 US.C. 151{iJ smt 30:1) 

Secrvfoiy. 

«7CFRP»rti7 

IPR D«*et NOk I^M4; ¥CC 14- 1«] 

Making Ackimofial Fr*qiMf>d«i 

A¥tllal>^ to th« Radio Amattuf ChrU 
Emargwicy Safvtca Dwrfrig Daciartd 
Hatlonai Ein«fg«nci«« 

aacmcy: Federmi Q^mmiinicaiions 
CommiBsion. 

ftCnoic Final ruk*. 

126 73 Magazine • April, 1084 



tUMMAftv: Thia document amends the 
Amataur Radio Service Rules to make 
additional frequencies available to the 
Radio Amateur Ovil Emergency Service 
(RACES) during dedared national 
emergencies- Additional RACES 
frequencies are needed sin^e. even in 
peace Ume. the number of RACES 
frtt<|uefvcies are inadequate. The effect of 
Ihia action ia lo assure ihat sufficient 
RACES frequencies would be available 
tf the President invokes the war 
emefgeni^ powers, 

tFPlCTiva date: March 26» IflM. 



Federal Conmmnicatiocia 
Commission^ Washington. D,C. 20554 

poii RiRTMEFt mfomumom cowtact: 

liastrice f- HePont. Private Radio 
Bureau. Washington, D.C 20554. 

List of 5^bj«ctt tfi 47 CFK Part W? 

Cirtl de&nae, Defenae 
communicallaQa, Radin^ 

Repdt and Order 

fa] the msttei of smeiidnmit t^ the Amstets' 
Radk) Scfvice Rules, Fart P7, la lAoke 
tfJ4^*f^?i"f fracpacndes sviilsbSe tc th« ^idio 
Affsitw QvCI EfflETgieQcy Service during 
dedsnd lutioiial ii i isusiirt es (PR 
NcLi3-524)H 

Adopted Isnuary IE 19iC 

Released; lanaary i^ l^M. 

By Hbe Commission. 

t.f>n May % 1983^ the 
adopted a Notice of Pti^KMed Rtila 
Making (48 PR SmtT-. Jmm% li63) 
proposing to maJ^e addiuonal 
frequencies available to Ibe Radio 
Amaleur Civil Emergency Servica 
(RACES) in the event of an emergency 
which causes the President to Invoke 
certain war emergency powers, pursuant 
to Section 906 of the Community tions 
Act of 1994^ as amended. Also proposed 
were operatignal limita lions on the 
additional Frequenciee so ai to provide 
protecticm to the Government 
Radiolocation Service , to (he 
Aeronautica] Radinnavigatlon Service 
and to Canadian radio itations. The 
restrictionfi that limited RACES 
operations to thirty days and to specifjc 
geographical areas were alao proposed 
lo b« deleted. Nineteen comments were 
filed in this procoeding- 

2. This proceeding originatAd In 
response (p a request from the 
Departmeol of Defense (DOD). through 
the National Tekcommimj cat ions and 
Information Adminiatrabon (^f^A} and 
the Interdepartmental Radio AdviBury 
Committee [IHACh for addiUonol 
Frequencies for RACES stations during a 
declared natinnal emergency. DOD had 
reviewed the role of RACES in support 
of civil defenae activities during a 
national emergency declared by the 
President and had concluded that 
additional RACES hrequenciea are 
needed under waf emeigeOiC^ 
conditions. DOD said that linco the 
presently available RACES frequencies 
have proven inadequate in peacetime, 
ibey would be compkta^ tmsa tufa dory 
in wartime. In addition^ DOD noted that 
although the number of amateur radio 
repeater stations have increased, they 
operate on &e<q(Kndea which are not 
now available to RACES Henoe. DOD 
wanted the frequenciea that lepeatefi 
operate on mad€ availabte to RACES 
atationa. For the tame reason. DOD 
asked that frequencies used by hi^ 
frequency (HE] nets also be m^d* 
available to RACES s tatkniL Tba 
deletion of the rettridkin on tlie use of 
certain RACES frequencie* to the LDltiat 
W days of the emei^encgr and lhe«t«fta 
ivlieie they could be uwd was pm pgaed 
ctecc those resthctloita are no longer 
needed. 

3. The comments generally supported 
the prapoaal to make additional 
frequencies available to RACES 
stations. ' Robert N. Dymff wanted all of 



* The Utc-ri3«d eoBMPwri of Tdhn A. CarroU «r* 
•cnpHiMt ^Ui hflve been conttdend iiwofBi^ *■ tb*f 
tttoto le Ms fftKcniiiafl, 



the Amateur Radio Service frequencies 
made avaHable to RACES. He also 
suggested that the RACES rules should 
be delete in their entirety and replaced 
by a joint working amngement between 
the Federal Emeigency Management 
Ageni^. State Office* of Emergency 
Services and local organixatlons of 
amateur radio operators, The 
BtiggestloRi of Mr Dymff ore so broad 
ai lo exceed the scope of this 
proceeding, in our Notice of Ptopoaed 
Rule Making, we propoaed to maiie the 
frequencies 149^14a MHi amikye for 
RACES oparBtinns. Seirenl of the 
commenters, however, stiggeated that 
the repeater subband 144.50^14&^ MHz 
be included lor RACES operation, tn thia 
connection^ the American Radio Relay 
League. Inc. ( ARRL) ttated that this 
would makf it unnecessary for anyone 
to oiler esasting equipment. especiaUy 
Wpaitflra. to operate on RACES 
frequencies dukng a declafad 
emergefkcy^ since Amateur Radio 
Kmergency Servica lARES) membeia 
could switch froES ARES to RACES 
immedialeiy without a shift m 
equipmi«it* 

4 We referr^ the matte? of inct using 
the aubband 144.50-145^0 MHz to DOD 
(ihrough [RAC], it ifttefposed no 
obJAdian Tht^relore, since in<:lu:sion oi 
Iheaa ftequencteawUl bring more 
g e| ie« te ii inio RACES operation and 
wiU expand the potential for use of 
RAC^S statioms in the hrltEi*. we wiU 
include the 14*JO-H5.^ MHz pubband 
tn these fmal rules. Some commenters 
tuggatl^d that additional h^uendestn 
the S. It). 40. and 7&'meier bands be 
added for RACES operations. Thoae 
frequendei wort not Included in DOO"b 
original rvquesl. Therefore, we have not 
induded them in these fmol rules. 

5. In OUT proposal, we stated that 
addltonal amateur radio frequencies in 
the 10 MHje and W MHi fiequency 
bands might also be considered If the 
Uniled States ratified the flnal acts of 
the World Admtniitralive Radio 
Conference (WARC). IfiTS. Although 
such rEilification took place on 
Seplember %. 1963, it would not be 
appropriate to include those frequencies 
in Ihifl Report and Order since the 
Amat<,^ur Rules have not yet been 
amended to make those bandi available 
for use in the Amateur Radio Service on 
a regular basil. 

e, We will adopt the rules as 
proposed, with the inclusion of the 
additional 2-meter hand frequencies, 
The thirty day hmitaiion on the use of 
the frequencies Is deleted since the use 
of amateur frequencies for RACES 
would undoubtedly be authoriited 
beyond the thirty day period if an 
emergency continued beyond that time. 
Also, we have deleted the geographic 
limits lions smce to retain them could 
hinder emergency co mm uni cations 
between the continental United Slates 
and the Slates of Hawaii or Alaska^ or 
between the continent a 1 Umted States 
and US. possesiiona. Theso latter 
amendments are in keeping with our 
continuing afforta to eliminate 
unnecessary rules and restrictions. 
FinAily. necessary correctiona have been 
mede to the table in | 97.1g5(b). 

7* It ii ordered, that Pitrt 97 is 
atiiended as set forth in the Appendix 
beftto. This action is taken pursuant to 
the autiiority contained in Sections 4(1) 
and 309|r) of the Communi cations Act nf 
1834. as ainended. Il Is further ordered, 
that these rule amendmrnts shall 
become effective March S8.. 1964. 

gv it is further ordered that Ibe 
Secretary shall cause a copy of iMi 
Report and Order to be published m the 
Faderal Reglater. 

v. It La further ordered that this 
proceeding is lermlnaied. 

IQ. loformation in thts matter may be 
t^talned by contactmg Maurice I^ 
DeponL (302) 63Z-I98i Private Radio 



BureaUr Federal CDmmunicatiom 
Commission. Washington. D.C 20554. 

Federal QonununicAlliaiu Coromisiioll. 
WHUam 1^ TricsriQi. 



Appendix 

PAirr 97^AMEKDEO| 

Part ©7 of Chapter I of Title 47 of Iht 
Code of Federal Regulations ta 
amended as follows; 

1. Section 97,185 is revised to read as 
follows: 



I f7.ft5 Fr*(|i,f*<Kl#s 

[a] All of (he authorized frequencies 
and emissions allocated to the Amateur 
Radio Service are alsn available to the 
Radio Amateur Civil Emefgency Service 
OD a abared basit. 

fb) tn ihs event of an emergency 
which necessitates the invoking of the 
Pt^dent's'War Emergency Powert 
undex the proivisinns of 1 603 of the 
Cammuni cations Act of 1934. as 
■mmded unless otherwise modified or 
directed RACES stations and amateur 
radio station! participating in RAUE#d 
will be limited in operation to tbe 
foliowin^ 

FREQUENCY OH FREOUENCY BAHOS— 
Continuadi 



1*^ 



TBO-tl 
T#T5-2000 . 



39X-3SH}^. 



7215-725$. 






50 35-^73, 
53,30. 



BWt^V^vL/SI ir nii iai l B i B liK H 1 1 | I ■ m W PTP^T^WI^P^^ 



iBiMiMhliliait i Hi II II 



IP ■ II I^Mlil lllliU 



14J 50-1*5.71^ 
14S-t« ,._„ 

tX-^SO 



,*M*^|MMriir|rii.ll.H — NI«iB»MM*irfHM 



23BO-245C! 



^•tft^rwrmmlr 




[t] Umiiaiions. (1) Use of frequencies 
in the band 1975-2000 kHz is subject to 
the priority of the LORAN system of 
radionavigation In this band and to the 
geographiceL frequency^ emission, and 
power limitations contained In |97,Q1 
(Subpart C of this part pertaining to 
Technical Standards). 

(2) For use in emergency areas when 
required to make initial contact with a 
military unit; also, for communtcationa 
with military stations on matt era 
requiring coordinstion. 

(3) Those station! operating in the 
bands 420-450. 1?4IK>1%I0 and £34K>-2450 



Have you 
found 

page 224 
yet? 



h^Hx ill ill not cause harmfii] 
Interference to. sitd must tolerate any 
fnttrfsrence from, the Covermnent 
Radiolocation Service: and also ihe 
Aeronautical RadmriBvi^atioTi Service io 
the cmm of the 1240-1300 MHz band. 

f4j TTtote ilations operating in the 
hmnd 220-224 MHz ihalJ aof cauM 
bimtifitl interfefencs to, and mu»l 
tolerate any interferetice from, the 
Govemment RadjolDcation Service tintU 
Unumry h 1990, Additionally, the Fixed 
and Mobile Services shall have equal 
right of opera ti on. 

(5) In Ihe band 42&-43{) MHz. no 
fliDtion shall operate North of Line A* 
Line A boglno el Aberdeen, WdiihJngtont 
running by great circle arc to the 
inlerijcctlon of 4e* R, 120' W.. J hence 
along parallel 48' N., to the inlerseciion 
of 95' W.. thence by great circle arc 
Ihrough the louthemmost point of 

DuJuth. Minn,, thence by great cir^ie arc 



to 45* N.. as* Wm thence southward 
a]on;g oieHdlan 85' W.. to iLi intersection 
with paralkt 41 'N., thence along parallel 
41*^ N^ to ita intenection with meridian 
B2* W^ thence by great circle arc 
throu^ the ■outhemmiiti point of 
Bangor, Maine^ thence by greet circte 
arc through the touthemmoet point of 
Searsport. Maine* at which pomt it 
tenninatee. 

[6] in the band 42CM50 MH± and 
within the following areaa, the peak 
envelope power output of a transmitler 
used in the Amftteur Radio Service ahaU 
not exceed SO wutta, unless expressly 
authorized by the Commiaaitin after 
mutual agreement, on a case-by-caae 
basis, between the Federal 
Communications Commission En^ineef- 
in-Charge at the applicable District 
Office and the Military Area Frequency 
Coordinator at the opplj cable military 
base: 



(i) Thofte portion! of Texai and New 
Mexico bounded on the south by 
latitude 31' 45 North, on the east by 
longitude 104' 00" West, on the north by 
latitude 34^ 3Ct North, and on the west 
by longitude lUT W West: 

[ii] The entire Sttite of Ftoridd 
induding ihe Key Wet t area and the 
areai enclosed within a 30Q-mile radiua 
of Patndt Air Force Base. Florid a 
(latitude 26' 21^ North, longitude SG* 43' 
West), and within a 200'Tnile radius of 
Eglin Air Force Base. Florida {latihide 
30* 30' North, longitude se' 30 West}; 

(ill) The entire State of Attzona; 

jiv) Those portions of California and 
Nevada douth of latitude 3r 10' North, 
and the areas inclosed within a SOO-mile 
radiua of the Pacifjc Missile Teal Center* 
Point Mug^, Califomia (latitude 34' 09* 
North, longjfude lir It Weit). 

(v) In the State of Mafsachtisetts 
within a 160- kilometer (lOQ mile) radiua 



around loc^doni at Otif Air Force Bese. 
Massachusetts (latitude 41"^ 45" North, 
longitude 70' 32' West). 

(vil In the State of Cahfomia within a 
2404iIomeIer (ISO mde) radius around 
locatlona at Beale Air Force Base, 
Cahfomia (latitude 39* 06' North, 
longitude l2l' 2& WesI). 

fvii) In die Stale of Alaska within a 
ISQ-idbiiietjsr ft 00 mile) radius of Clear, 
Alaska (TBtihide64' 17' North, longitude 
149* ID West). (The Military Area 
Frequency Coordinator for this area it 
located at Ekuendorf Air Force Base« 
AluslcaJ 

(viil) In the Stale of North Dakota 
within a leo-kilomeier (lOO mile) radius 
of Concrete, North Dakota [ latitude 4fl' 
43' North, longitude 97" &4' West}. [The 
Military Area Frequency Coordinator for 
this area can be contacted at: HQ 5AC/ 
SXOE. Offutt Air Force Base, Nebraska 
66113.) 



LETTERS 




PET PEEVEp CROSS LINK 



] 



WtUKZ's artlcJe ("Breakthfouoh 'o Bos- 
ton: The Birth of Gross linking,'' 73. Janu- 
Afft 1964| provides mB witti an opportunity 
to »kr a pat paave atxtut wiring diagrama 
afiown as achafnatica. 

A drawing such as shown In fig. 1 of 
David" a article rrtay De 900d to use vvhite 
wiring the unit, t>ut a "flow^t-informa- 
tion'' type o< dTAwmg would totter hoJp 
trie reader umSerstand what the writer is 
saying. 

Ttiit ii an excellent article, doing Just 
what 73 does b^sl^-hfoaking now ground 
Kesp op the good woric, 

W. S. (Bill) Kfrmper W4KOf 

Miami FL 

Your commenis make se/iae, 0//^. tut to 
avoid drawing two diagrams t think that a 
cfrcuit dssurfptfon a fa good oid BSP (Betl 
Syst&m Practices} would msko tettar 
sensa. That way we need show only the 
wiring diagram (most necessary}, i have 
written soch a cifcuit description for the 
crosstink fogic tHtx. {See beiowj 

I nati&e that in mdrawiifg the eircmt you 
found tfte error in ttw onginat drawing 
with th9 article. Pin 9 ot RYl dbM NOT 
connect to thm microphone Cir&jit as 
shown txjt. instead, should connect to tfta 
top of ttm ooii of fiYI, contad J 3. 

Thank you ¥ery mitch tor ymtr insigfit, 
mH—OavidP. Aiien WTt/XZ 

CtfiCUfT DESCRtPTIOH 

When connected as shown in fig. 2 artd 
turned on with both rigs powered, the cir- 
cuit defauita to receive mode (n both 
transceivers. Signais normaiiy wouid be 
hearth via externai speakers (not shown} 
paratfeiing ttie externat speaker circuits 
for each rig. None of tt)e LEDs wiii t>e iiiu- 
mine fed. 

Wtten micfophorte PIT swH<^ fa 
c/oaad. ground pin t of RY3 fs grounded 
through D6. opmrntkig fiY3, flY3 corftacts 
4 mntS 8 cfose, /ffi/minatiftg LED2 ro indh 
cafe microphone "^on" condition. PTT 
gmand is pessed through normaiiy- 
dosed comaas 3 and it of RYt end f^Y2, 
keying ttQih transceivefs Hotmafff- 
closed contacts 2 and W of f^Yt ar>d f^Y2 
feed microphone audio info &oth trans- 
ceivers. When the microphorw i$ re- 
f eased, default receive mode Is restored 
and RY3 reieaseSr 

from defeutt condition^ If SX1 ta 



pressed to dose contacts 7 and E and 4 
and 5 {HF listen, VHF xmit}, then the 
following takes place: Vqg is f^ through 
normally-closed contacts 4 and 6 of RY3 
through contacts f and 2 of SX1, through 
normally -closed contacts 1 and 9 of flfVZ 
ro ttte coii df flVS!, &nce 02 is forward-bi- 
ased by Vcc through fi4. Q2 ads as a 
dosed switch between emitter and coitec- 
tor. providing a ground for RY2 coii. RY2 
ofieraies and LEDt is iituminated. Con- 
tacts 5 and 9 dose on HY2, providing 
iatchiftg voltage forBYZ arHfRY2 remains 
operated when SX1 returrts to rteutral 
Ctosed contacts 7 and 11 of BY2 provide 
keying ground tor ttte VHF rig artd closed 
corttacts 6 and tO of flY2 feed Hf speaker 
audio into the microphone input of the 
VHF rig. C2 provides ttoiding voitage for 
RY2 white contact B Is traveiiing from con- 
tact 1 to co/ttact 5. 

//, 3t this point, microphorte PTT switch 
is ctosedf RY3 operates opening contacts 
4 and 6 of RY3. thus releasing RY2, Simui- 
taneous locaf keying of both rigs will fol- 
low as described above. 

if instead of iocat microphone PTT key- 
ing, SXJ is thrown downward, then ffte fol- 
lowing se<juence will happen: Closed con- 
tacts 5 and 6 of SX 1 remove the forward bi- 
as from 02. Thts opens ttte circuit be- 
tween emitter and collector ot OZ open- 
trig the ground circuit of RY2^ and RY2 
drops open. By process descrfbed attove 
tor operation ot RY2, RYl rtow operates 
and audio is transferred from the VNf 
speaker output to the HF microphone in- 
put^ If SXT were pressed upwards, then 
contacts 4 artd 5ofSXl would cause Q1 to 
op&n the ground circuit of flfVJ, dropping 
RYl as RY2 operates. Thus signals maybe 
transferred from rig to rig by the iocat op- 
erator by successive reverse operations 
of SXT. LEOI and LED3 wilt show the cur- 
rent status. 



EXTRA PANE RELIEVER 



I've read KCSDU's anicfe. "Instant Pano 
Refier* (73, January^ 1964), and I believe a 
few follow-up coowThants are needed to 
roynd out the article. 

KCSDU stated that one of his goals was 
to produce a weatheftlQht and fn^ect^ight 
assembly, Having wo^'l^ed most of my 
adult life In the building-material irvdo$try, 
I t>eiieve i have spotted an oversight in hit 
reasoning. 



Gary described an efliclent system for 
makin§ a wealhflftiQht seal as iar as It 
goes. However, tt^ article failed to men- 
tion tha^ raising the saah breaks ti>e 
weatherseal between ttw top and bottom 
saahes of the wfn^Jow. 

To fix this problem, samel hing haa to 
besHd In between the overlapping top and 
bottom sashes to seal the gap created by 
separating the sashes. FIbergiass insula* 
tlon or sponge rubber come to mind to do 
this. If a storm window la mounted on the 
prjme window, don't fofget to seal be- 
tween those sashes, too. A piece of 
weatherproof tape placed across the gap 
should resolve the storm^sash problem. 

JafiMS C. Burtoft KC3HW 
Waahingtofi PA 



WEST INDIES THANKS 

On tsertalf of the Tr'inidad and Tobago 
Amaieur Radio Socl«ty« I would like to ex- 
tend our sincere thanks to you ar^ 73 
magazine for the booka, magazines, and 
tapes you so generously donated for wse 
in our WCY exhibit. All of Ihe materials ar- 
rived In good condition and In time for the 
exhibition. They were atl used in our publi- 
cations exhibit and helped to ilJustrate 
to our visitors what a wett-organized and 
well supported hobby amateur radio is. 

Our exhibit was visited by several thou- 
sand pefsons, many of wh>om had never 
even tieard of this holidy before liie deftv 
onstration radio stations made about 
1000 contacts during the weeklong exhiM- 
tlon on tt>e various bonds, on SSB, CW, 
and RTTY The exercise turned out to be a 
very successful public relations one and 
we have added about 40 new associate 
n^emt>ers as a direct resutt of it. Many of 
ttiem have Joined the training courses 
presently befng conducted in preparation 
for this year's amateur-radto exam. The 
materials you prcvlded have been passed 
on to those responsible for the training 
course, and Ihe Morse-code tapes should 
prove Invaluable to our tutofs. 

Once again, thank you for your support^ 
arid I wish you prosperity in 1984. 

John L Webster ty4JW 
Trinidad, West Indies 

And weicome, 9Y4JW, to T3. (See the Trinh 
dad and Tobago column in *73 imema' 
tionat.'J—Edttot. 



DX WORLD ON THE C-64 

Recefved the February, 1964, Issue and 
adapted the WB7RLX computer progfam 
for the V 10-20 to the Oommodore 64 fPut 
tha OX World on a Screen 'j. While making 



the necessary chai>ges, I found a few er- 
rors that others might correct v^tten typings 

Une 1059— DATA omitted 

Une 1068— OGEN shouid be OCEAN 

Um 1037-SAUDlA ARABIA should to 
SAUDi ARABIA (line 1125 has the ccMrect 
speihng, but the two lir>es would not cross 
ulerence). 

My compliments to Gena for a very FB 
program. Mine works t^autlfully on my 
C-04. I've changed the screen col el's for 
better contrast and formatted the s^^reen 
printouts to fit the C-&4. Memory re<|uired 
la 12,6K, which is no problem for the Cqrrk- 
modorei 

ft anyone is interested In the C^&4 pro- 
gram listing, serMl n>e S2.00 plus an SAS^ 
a personalized tape is available for $£00 if 
you irKlude your QTH's latitude and 
longitude. 

I towe 111 Congratulations to WE7R|Jt 
and to 73! 

Bubba Johnaan N4Ci 
5043 Victoria AvaAue 
l^harleaton SC 29406 



LIMELIGHT PROBLEMS 



I had to chuckie as I read your laat edito- 
rial regarding the impression by otners 
that your ego is suffering from overir^lul- 
gencel 

Ws share the problems ifKl benefits of 
being in the timelight and auffoflng acnrtl- 
ny by tfie pub41c. Too often our images, 
proiected to that pubJic, are far dlffefent 
frotn reai life. 

1 am often amused by th« reaction that I 
recerve when nveeijng new amateurs here 
in Indianapolis. There is a sudden '^recog- 
nitton*' that flashes across their faces 
when they realize that the fellow standing 
in froni of them, dressed In cut^ffSt a 
T-shirt that touts the ioy of computerized 
RTTY, and a much abused hat J a really the 
"star'* they see each night on television t 

ijjst making an appearance without a 
three-ptece suit Is enough to prove that I 
am, after all, an OK guy. 

I can't count tfie times that newcomers 
to my circle of friends have made the com- 
ment that t am certainly a tot different in 
real life than I am on television. What they 
expect of me I have r^ever been able to nail 
down, otfier than tr>e fact that they expect 
the "image" and rwt trie real pereont 

To ttwse wt>o offsf you the adfedlve of 
egotistical, you may use Ihis quote— no 
cturgal 

Th^e are those who do^ 

and those who don't. 

Winners achieve their dreams. 

The others lusl , . .won't. 

There is certainly a difference: profee^ 
slonai desire and inner-drlve versus ego- 
11 a m^ I believe that your comments over 



73 Magazine * April, 1964 127 



the monltis have been composed rriDre 03 
an iTitet>ded inspirationAl message for 
your readers, not mare backs! apptno- So 
keep up the good work. If you oan gel juat 
or^ or iwo of those beer-guz2llng, televl^ 
sfofi addtota to reconsider their Iffeatyle, 
you *tl\\ nave achieved a worthy ^oal. 

For me, each new day lias to be filled 
With some tangible achievement 

t have the unique opporturtlly of ttaving 
mosi o( the day for my persorval piirsuits 
and then worfting ai the lelevtaiort station 
In the evQo^ngs. 

I deoldad at tfie first of the y«ar that I 
was going to do more wfiting, a pleasur- 
at)4e porQuit t^at I have neglected for 
atXHit five yeare. My free Ume needed to 
beoome mon«y talcing time. 

It took ma a couple of weeks to @et orga- 
nized, and Monday I sal down to research 
some ideas. 

I mailed a laltef to your editorial starf at 
?3 this moitiing^ wilti four slory 
ideas and found two mofie this after« 
noon that took promising, 

I had btan wtifking on a computer dala- 
base thai provides a Itating of beam head- 
ings for almost 600 DX, US, and Canadian 
cities. After six months ol hesitation, the 
program is complete, and another letter 
^111 leave here this afternoon addressed 
lo the "Barter *N' Buy" column, Altef all, 
why enjoy the results of the labor without 
atiaring it with others, at a nKJdest price? 



In addfiion, I outlined quefy betters for 
ttie kx^l city magazinee for four stories 
and completed a much-fieeded giveaway 
booklet about Indiana weather for the TV 
station advertising sales learn. 

By this ilme» you are pfobabty asking, 
what's the point? 

Tefl peop/e io quft dreaming and start 
doifigf 

Tell tho^ who doubt your adv^^ce to c|uil 
questioning and take act^Or\. The hardest 
part of achieving a dream Is the fear of 
failure. Failure can at times tM a success 
In itseff; ahef all, Columbus salted west to 
find The East He failed in hla quest, iKit 
his failure proved to be more profitab^ 
than his original dream! 

Cheers, and thanks for Uatenihgl 

Bob Foafer WB70WQ/B 

wrrvTV 

IndEvnapolls IN 



HW^ ON 30 AT 2,1 W 



t ^ust completed modifying my Heat hk it 
liW-6 for 30 meters as descrlt>ed by Kerry 
Holliday WA6BJH In your Decemt>er, 
19^3, Issue ("A Perfect Match for the 
NW-3"). I really appreciate the great job 
Kerry did rsaearching and documenting 
the modification. 

Kerry reported thai the 30-meter output 



of the rfvodified HW-a was abtout 1.2 Watts 
That seemed tow since my HW4 puts out 
a full 2 Watts on 40 ajfd 20. Ttie problem 
turned out to be that tt>e mixer output dr- 
cutt« L15/CW, doea not reach resonance 
when fetuned fof 10 MHz:. As Kerry de- 
scribes In step S, a peak output Is noted 
when the slug is turned almost to the bot- 
tom. HoweverH the rf voltage at the test 
point, the emitter of 05. was only atxiuit 
QM V whUe the ott>er t>ands produced tie- 
Iween 1.1 V and f .5 V. Adding 6B pF kn par- 
ahel with the exfaijno C&3 £>< ought the ad- 
justment range of lt>e slug within reach of 
to MHz, and ■ peak of about 1^ v was 
noted- The rf output rose to 2J Watts, wii- 
tuaUy the same as on 40 meters. 

Incidentally, there Is yet another tuned 
circuit at the output of the driver^ Q8. It Is a 
very broad-tuned circuit, however, and no 
adjustment was provided In the original 
circuit. Adding more capacitance to bring 
the resonant peak to 10 MHi only in- 
creased the powet output by anottier O.OS 
dS; clearly this is not wonh the effort! 

Again, thanks to Kerry for making the 
rrK>ve to 30 so easY! 

Iton O^Eau Claire AC6Y 
Sam* Cruz CA 



S-UNITS ON A PINHEAO? 



Regarding VElBZJ's "Ttwnk You. for 



Ustenlng" (73, Januarv, I9ft4), he says, "(t 
certainty adds a few 5 units wf^en tryfrvg to 
make a QSO through the QflM." 

One S unll = 4 lo B dBs; 2 S units = a 
couple. A few S units would seem to be at 
least 12 to I6d&s. Most S-metera react to 
peek povver, not average power. Can you 
have BZJ expiein how his "expander" in- 
creased f>eak power by a factor of 40 or 
so? 

UCXill. 

A^XMasaa WSV5R 
NMiOfttsm LA 

llMve m>t actuafff b^sfi abt9 to counf th€ 
S tinftsBt ihe distam statioft ami couid on- 
ly go fey fhe rspofts mceiwd tfom Ihe otfi- 
or stations which confirm that rny signal 
Is not vopyabte without ths oomp/e*- 
sorf&xpander unit turned on. 

Vte ^tatsmenf concerning "a hw S 
units** was tigvrBJlvefy writtm to convay 
tfw point thMt tho sfgnm! d09S get en* 
hanced- Since ff»fs ts 9 t^chnlcai ioum^i 
and Bfttcii^, i mill not was^fs youf time and 
mine in expiamtng semantics^ It wou/d be 
more eniigntening if the mader experi- 
fn€ffted with the unit rathm than nit-pick- 
ing the literary style or choice of words oi 
the article. 

t am hoping that someone else wlif 
build the unit and then perhaps I could 
judge for my self, and from my end. the ex- 
act numt>er of S units that make fhe differ- 
©free. — Dennis P. Sladen V£}&2J. 



DR. DIGITAL 



Robert Swirsky AF2M 
PO Box 122 
CedarhurstNYlJSte 

THE END OF AMATEUR RADIO 

Nothing has prompted moire argument 
among hams than the issue of noooda li< 
censes. Many feel that the code require- 
ment is what keeps the emateur band cM- 
liisd It has bean argued tt^at tt>ecodeiathe 
oniy thing ttiat keeps iaroa numbers ol "un- 
desirables" off the afnaieuf bands; without 
rt, we would haw chaos. 

For some maso€\, many hams waivt to 
make It extremeiy difficult 10 obtain a li- 
cense, and a MorBe-code requirement ful- 
fills this need nicely. Apparently, those thai 
take this position don't seem to realize that 
a large ham population is In the t»est inter- 
est of amateur radio. With a large and ac- 
tive tx^dy of hams ttiere could be more ama- 
teur-radio^ated b^tsiness, A^o, other sv- 
yices would be les^ likely to want a piece of 
our aifeady<]irniiiished portioo of ^ye radio 
aped rum. 

In New Yorit, ttie FCC now gtves ham ex- 
ams quarterly. This is hound to discourage 
many people from gelling theJr tick- 
ets—something aure to please those who 
want to restrict the ham population. The 
way I see It. this could easily cause the 
amateur-radio service to disappear. As 
Osirtd Byrne said: "Watch otft— you mlohl 
gel iMiit you^re after," 

PACKET RADIO UPDATE 

The riewest amateur-radio frontier ta 
packet radio. Interest in this mode is stead- 
ily growl ng^ although slowly. 

A few months ago, i mentioned SLAPR 
Protocol, the St. Louis Area Packet Radio 
Club's newsletter. The r>ews letter la r>o 
kxiger beihg pubiisbsd, and ttie gmup is t» 



Ing reornanued M you am in the St LjOU^ 
area and want to get rnvotved in packet rw 
^a ttieiT new address is: 

• St. Louis Area Packet Radio ^LAPf^ 
q^o Spetice Branham KAdlXl, 9926 Lewis 
and Clark, St. Louis MO 63136. 

St. Louie Is certainly not the only area 
where packel radio Is thriving, if you live 
near Tucson, Vancouver, or Menio Park CA, 
you will find the following groups useful: 

# Tucson Amateur Packet Radio (TAFR^, 
PO Box ^^88, Tticson AZ SS734. 
eVanoxnier AmateiH' [>igit«ii Corrmunica' 

Itena (VADCXi db Don Oliver VE7AOG, 818 
Rondeau St.H Coqurtlam BC V3J 5Z3, Carv 



• Pacific Packet Radio Society iTPHS), cto 
Hank Megnuski KA&M, 311 Stanford Ave.. 
MenIo Park CA 94025. 

NMROWBAND VOICE 
MODULATION, REViSITED 

A ffW years back, there was muc^ talk 
about a ''new" mode. The Amerkan Radio 
Relay Laague tfKXight this mode (which in 
my opirviofl was just a fancy speech pr^ 
cessorli was so important that they devot^ 
ed a chapter to it In thelf annual Hand- 
book. II never did oatch on^l suppose 
NBVM went the way ol quadraphonic 
sound and other similar technological 
"breakthroughs." 

Now that computers have entered the 
ham-radio scene, there Is a iow-cost way 
to have extremely nairowband voice sig- 
nals transr^ttjed over the air. What's 
more, this te^mlque only takes up 170 Hz 
{I) ol bandwidth and Is legal in the CW por- 
tions of the band. 

The way to acccwnpllsh thie is to use a 
phoneme speech synthesizer. One such 
device is the Votfax (5CX3 Stephenson 
Highway, Troy. Michigan 48084) SC4>1 
speech-synthesizer IC, which la the basis 



of a number of speech-synthesizer prod- 
ucts (e.g., Votrax Type 'n' Talk). 01 course, 
Ihefe Is a limitation— one must provide 
phonetic data for the synthesizer, which 
can be encoded manually or by computer. 
There are a number of firms offering text- 
to-speech programs for miGrocomputers. 
These programs take ASCII-encoded En- 
glish, and t^y folFowir^ a set ol rules, con- 
vert it into the phonetic equlvaterrt. 

According to the data sheet for the Vo- 
trax SC-OT speech-synthesizer IC. only 70 
bits per second of data are required foi^ 
continuous speech production. If you can 
prepare whai you want to say In advance, 
this provides a way to have "speech" over 
extremely narrow band widths, ll would al- 
so provide a way lor a visually Impaired 
person to communicate with FtTTY. 

As I menifoned before, a synthesizer 
based around SC-Ol is programmed using 
phonemes— The basic speech sounds of 
English, TfwH© are 6* phonemes— this 
means th^t only 6 bits need to be transmit- 
ted for each sound (since any digttaf code 
lis now legal, within band limitations, 
there is nothing wrong with using S-htt 
"words"). Votrax has symbols associated 
with each phoneme to make transcription 
easier. For example, "catalog" would t>e K 
AE2 EH3 DT UH3 L AW2 AW2 G. and "emp- 
ty'' would be EH3 EH3 M P T Y The pho- 
name syrrttiola that end in a numtier (EH2, 
EHS, etc) are foe vowel durations. Pfio^ 
nemes that end in a higher number axe lor 
short^u ration vowel sounds. 

WUh a bit of practice, one can encode 
text into phonemes v^ quickly. A text-to- 
speech programn such as the one avail- 
able from MicroMInt {§17 Midway, Wood- 
mere NV 1 1598) for the Apple II computer, 
permits the user to simply type the text in 
English and »et the computer worry atXMJt 
the conversion. 

Baoeivjng phonemeencoded data over 
tfie air is a simple process. Just feed the 
received data, through a buffer^ Into the 
speech synthesizef. AIM he buffering and 
controlling can be handled easily with a 
short machine-language program. 

Since this "mode" is not a true speech 
mode. In that one must type one's trans^ 
mission rather than speak li. It la not 



suited for CQOwsational eommunlcar 
lions. An appfopriaie application would 
tie for radio huiletins aryd similar one-way 
communications, where the tranamitting 
Station has prepared the message far In 
advance. 

A novel use Of this technique might tie 
to have a "'sut)carrier" voice chann^ on 
an FM repealer. By FSKIrvg ttie repeater's 
output, a lew stations can receive the da- 
ta using the discriminator output on tfieir 
fU receivers. Any station using the re- 
peater for conventional voice communica- 
tions would not be abte to rvotice the small 
frequency Shift on the repeater. Such a 
subcarrier channel could be used to trans- 
mit repeater-stetus Information, club bul- 
letins, weather reports, etc. 

Other Spe«ch^yTi|h«sis Technjques 

There are a number of apeech-synthe^ 
sis techniqws available f*f^oneme syn- 
tttesis. th« technique just described, 
requires a very iow data rale (70 bps)v 
Speech quality, however. Is not that good. 
It Is understandable but requires a bit of 
gettmg used to. (An analogy is the "mon- 
key chatter" of SSB. It sounds strange to 
people who have never heard SSB before,) 

If one wants better speech quality, 
ttvere iktm I wo choices: linear predichve 
coding and speech digitizatioa Unear 
predictive coding fLPC) is what Texas ifi- 
slrurr«nis u««a in its "Speak and Speir 
talking toys, The technique involves ait- 
aiyzirrg human speech with compi/ter and 
breaking it down into sound components. 
To reproduce these sound data, they are 
fed into a circuit which, by simulating a 
human vocal tract, reconstitutes the da- 
ta into fairly natural sounding speech, 
Unfortunatety, lo encode UPC data, time- 
conswnlr>g algorithms are needed. Be- 
cause of this, the calculations are usual iy 
done on mainframe computers or large 
minleompulers- The encoded data take 
up more room than phoneme^encoded 
speech, per second. 

Speech digitization Is much ike using 
the computer"s memory as a tape record- 
er. Speech is artaiyzed with an anaiog-to^ 
digital converter— samples are laken at a 
rate ol 12^000 per second. The data from 



128 73 Magazine • Apiil, 1964 



Itie A/0 cofivQTter are stored In memory. 
To recreate the sound, tbedala are played 
back into a digital-to-analoQ converter, 
whlcti la ci^rinected to an amplifier Digiti* 
jEAlion usee a lol of memofy — 64 kitobyies 
can only hold e few secomfs of speech. 
The quality, tH^wever, is eMtrefT>e4y nalurel 
sounding. 



As you can see, there is no ''best^' way. 
Eacli rDethod has distinct advantages and 
disadvantages. Alier working with pho- 
neme synihesi^ers fof a number of yeara, I 
tend to lavor tt>em. The speech sounds 
much like one would expect a oomptjter to 
taik-'With a heavy monotone 'robot" ac- 
cent— but consioerlng the memory effi- 



ciency that a pliorieme aynthesfier offera* 
it la or>e of the t>est methods arouFMJ. It's 
aJao th« ofi^y method that Can provide an 
unhmited vocabytary w4tho<it ext^isive 
preparatiDn, 

nMMiefne-eynihesUed speech can be a 
useful and piaciicai part of a digilat com- 



munications system. In addition to us^ng 
kl as a narrowband speech technique. iH$ 
usefut in providing voice output on a RTTY 
maitbox^ Stat ions without RTTY (or mo- 
bHe atationa) can tvear what messages are 
In memory. I will update sf}eech^yn thesis 
lechr^ogy aa more hardware becomess 
availableL 



REVIEW 



NOVICE GUtOE FROM BASH 

Bash has doiw rl aga^n! The ail^new 
Noific^ Class Amsteur Radio Ofmfwtof 
6iiMe la now avail at>ie. and it's a beauty. 

No, donl expect ttie old ffnat £xMm 
bocii^ and don't expect to get the exact an- 
swers to evefy question on the htovice ex- 
amination, because ttve Guit^ is not that 
kind of a boolL Thia time, due pemaps to 
lh& new FCC requirements (which are 
omered by the Qwth). the format Is tutori- 
ai, but not pedantic or dulL II la light, easy 
to road, and /i/n! Virtually ew^erylhlng the 
|Hrosp«ctlv6 Novice will need to know lo 
pass the theory portion of the exam la Irv 
eluded. 

Let's take a look at some specific fea^ 
lures covered by the guide, as well aa the 
mechanical speclfJ cat ions. The book 4t- 
seJt haa a $oft cover with a glosay ftn^ 
Ish In light tHue ajid btack. measurea 
CmS^xV*". and weighs only a lew 
ounces. . .exactly the neat^ eaay-tocarry 
Size that you will find convenient lo take 
with you but not so smaft tfiat It wifi be hid* 
den under the piles of Ihlngs on your dealt, 
tahle, or bench. Of course, you can'1 Judoe 
a book by its covm, siie, or weiffht . . . you 
have to look Inside. 

Divided into 26 convenient chapters or 
sections with such titles as "In the Begin- 
nino," "The Ruiea Jewels.'* 'Zip Zap; Atjout 
Ughtning;' 'Shorties," "So What Do I Say 
Now?", and the 9 Ike, the Guid& tells you 
neither too much nor too little, but gives 
you exactly what you need to know to 
pass the eKarrt. 

As many of you know, the FCC has now 
followed a long-tlrne practice of the FAA 
with respect to exam guestlona— that la, 
the questions that wtil be asked on eximlH 
fiatlOfIt are published. That's right. THE 
quest iorrsf So, wfiai's the tnck, you ask? 
Wdl, the trick it that they choose only one 
questton out of i possible ten or tvvonty In 
^ich of twenty categories covering (he 
Subject matter you are supposed to know. 



Thsfefor^t it doesn't do any good lO 
fnenrtorize specific answers to particular 
questions. . you have to know the t:taslc 
material. Knowing thai, you witi be able lo 
answer any quest loniS asked, and that's 
tile way it slioyld be^ ff you read t^ie Quid* 
and understand what it t^K^ties arMi are 
able to answer the practice questions, 
ttien you wil^ be at>le to take tt>e Novice ex- 
amination with full confidence that you 
wttt pass. You'll t» able lo answer any 
question In any category. 

The Quiif0 provides a catch-all chaf>ter 
covering many miscellaneous quest lona 
that don*t fall oonvenlently into any of the 
twenty categories, Dick Bash doesn't 
want you to be caught by any surprise 
Questions. 

A very helpful chapter is "So What Do I 
Say Now?** tt covers the Novice version of 
mike frigh^l-^a condition that often occurs 
wtien you are making your first tiaif -dozen 
or ao coatacta. Ufa say you cair CO and 
syddenly, magicatfy^ receive an answer- 
Maybe It's a more experienced Novice on 
trie oltiec end, and he seems to tie sendirtg 
50 last that even your call (much less hi$ 
call) is barely recognizable. Before you 
know iU he has signed over to you. . ^^ft^ 
thej'e's a great dead spot on the band, 
waiting for your answer. You shaite, you 
sweat, your fingers cramp, and you are 
scarcely able to send your call. I^ou think. 
"Oh my flosh, he's waltfng for me to aay 
something, and I don't know what to aayf '' 
Enter Bash, stage left, to hetp you out of 
the dilemma. He gives you sample ex- 
changes, things that are &aid by both 
SJdes in a typical CW exchan^. You could 
almost copy the Informailcsn vertutim, or 
you can vary It to suit your own special 
case by rnerely changmg a word or two 
here and thiere. it does get you ovec those 
first few critical moments wt^en every- 
thing goes blaniL 

There's much, much rnore^ of course, to 



the Gufds, but we don't want to spoil ft lor 
you tiy teHIng you everything that Dick 
Bash has up his sleeve. Join in the fun. 
Give the Gf//de to e Bon or daughter, a 
friend, or anyone who might be thinking of 
taking a Novice exam, Here^s a thought: 
Maybe you will be giving the Novice ejtam 
yourself to some potential hams in the 
ctub or neighborhood, and you're saddled 
with teaching the course. If you need a syl- 
labus aiid lexi to work from, you could use 
the Bash txx]4c lor this purpose, too. In 
fact, t'll bet that you will find things there 
that even you have forgotten. Heck, it'll 
cost you only a well-spent ¥Sj96 (covei 
price} from Basft Edacstioftai Services, 
PO Box 21 f 5, San Leandro CA 94577. 
Reader Service number 476. 

JlmCrvy W1XU 
71?Slan 



THE COMPLBTE OXER 

Few enjoyments surpass the comtort- 
ablQ pleasure of settling In for an 
evening's reading of a good book In a 
snug and cozy environment. For best 
results, the book should be Interest- 
ing— whfch could mean entertainingly 
written or instructive, preferably both. It 
Should be fact-filled, yet eKcltinig ervough 
to move the reader quickly through the ac- 
tion, never permitting txxedonx Most of 
an, a good tiook should fascinate tfie 
reader aiKl. wt>en possible, piece him or 
her right In the middle of the action. The 
reacjer thien becomes immersed and Is no 
longer aware of being a reader; Instead, 
he becomes a participant. . .Involved in 
the Story. Time loses meaning, and the 
Story is all. You will find Bob Locher 
WSKNI's The Comptete DKer such a book. 

Written by an experienced DX chaser, 
yet clear and simple enough for the begin- 
ner, the ixsok tantalizes and teaches at the 
same time. It recognizes that we all start 
as beginriers. but, more than that, it helps 
us learrt to do things ihe rigl>t way, to 
avoid ttie traps and pli falls waiting to turn 
a n>eophyte into a lid, until the goat ts In 
Sight— tt>e DX Honor f^ll. II you're not on 
your way to Honor Roll after reading and 
practicing Boh s brar>d Ol DXing magic, 
then it>e fault will be yours, not hia. 

The Complete OXer can t)e a reference 



and a guide. . .a welcome companion to 
be savored at leisure. Most assuredly, It 
represents a solid-^ld ireaaure trove of 
information amassed by a skilled operator 
during a lifetime ot DX chasing. After 
reading the brief foreward and acknowl- 
edgements, you are plunged into Chapter 
1 , "A Night on the Bands," a foray Into the 
OX jungle of twenty meters on an evening 
wfien ttie band is open. YouVe there wf>en 
Bob stalks — arid Oags— a rare A71 statiOfi 
on Qatar. t}eatlng out tf»e r^t ot the wortd 
lor this bitH^ame trophy. Thin, almost be- 
fore you can recover yoyr breath, you hap- 
pen upon the trail of a T56 but don't man- 
age to track htm to his J'air before he disai>- 
paara. Bob has managed to decipher his 
wily hai>its, howevef, and you know that 
next tln>e, Somalia will be yours. Th^s 
chapter creates the desire to krtow morei 
to t>ecome a patient and skfi^lfui hunter, so 
you can go out on your own and capture 
your own OX prizes, You learn that Iraten- 
Ing and patience and skill mean more than 
raw power, setting the stage for Chapter 2, 
"Basic Listening." 

The first section of the t>3ok deals with 
basic and intermediate skills ar>d equips 
ment. What to use, wf»ere lo II nd It, how to 
use it, . a primer of great and lasting 
value. TTie second section of thte book 
builds upon the fUst. adding refinements 
of technique, special trlcka of tlie tradep 
and hkow to be a sportsman in the trveet 
sense ol the word, tt teachiU you aOout 
"Winning, Losing, and Ploying the 
Game.'^ Finalfy^ Bo4? teaches you his 
"last Secret" belore turning you ioosa on 
the unsuspecting world In "Conclusion," 
you are leh with a philosophy arid a new 
beginning. 

Just the other day when I was talking 
with Bob about his book, he asked me how 
t liked it. I gave this anawer: ''I wish I had 
written ^t"— the ultimate accolade. . .and 
the truth. The Complete DXer is bound to 
be a smash hit., so you had better get out 
the checkbook right away and put (n your 
ofder tKfore they^re gone. The price is 
$10:95 plus SZQQ postage and handling. 
VISA and Mastercard are accepted, tt's 
available from tdtom Press, 8qx 593^ Deer- 
ttetd it 60QJ5, Reader service nijmt)er 477. 

Jim Gray W1XU 
73 Stall 




■202 




> 



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See List ot Adveftfsers on page 130 



73 Magazine • April, 1984 129 




To receive full informatiori from our advert is- 
ers ptaasa complete ttis postage-paid card. 



R.S.Na 



P«9« as. Nil 



P*gl R.SyNo. 



PAfitt R. S. NOL 



176 
196 
127 



216 

* 



211 



kce CkNTumiriTcat Jons, Inc. ..... 

Acquis Cofnm., tna ...,,. 

Advance<l Computer Controli 

..148 

AEA/Advanced E^ecUofiic 

ApplEcalJons ,....,.. 19, 53 

Alden Electronics , .27 

Alpha Oefta CQmmunic^ticfia, inc 

Amateur Accessories. ....... .115 

Amateur Communications^ Etc. 



w 


i . ) .'■'. i'.'. . *'■ . b ^ . . . . b J 1. H b 

Amateur Electronic Supply 


. 41 . .tlQ 




...b...:,. b. .25.55.115 


5 


Amateur-Wholesale Electronic* 






....75 


243 Amateur-WhHOlesale Electronics 






...,33 


334 


Amidon Associates . . 


...,m 


109 Analog Tech:rhalogy ...... 


...134 


71 


Applied Invention 


....100 


-■ 


AHRL Nationa] Contention 


,= 95 


• 


Asttori Corp. ..... . 


B1 


228 Austin Dust orrtAmennas. . 


.....4B 


« 


Autflif Researcli .^.-,i. 


.....go 


266 AzjmuthComrTiLCorp. . , . 


45 


« 


BHCInc 


.,,.135 


202 B & L Ei\g\neef\ng ........ 


....129 


11 


BaH^ef & Will Eamson Joe. . 


90 


177 Barf^ef&WilliamsofiJnc... 


.....41 


305 


Barry Eleciror^ka 


47 


476 


Bash Ecf ucational Servicea 


....129 


152 


Beflcher.lnc, ...,.*,,-»,» 


. 40 




BillAshby&Son.. 


....109 




BfacksburQ Group. . 


, *4.82 




BHtt 5 2 Way. •...•*-..., 


.-...e7 




Break Camm, Systems, Inc. 


,.,.109 




Broadway Electronics .... 


.,..135 




Butternut Electronics 


.66,113 


462 CES, Inc 


95 


12 


CZLaba 


45 



111 CeooCommunicalioosJnc ..,.60 
69 Qutterf ree Modular Consoles 

13 Coin InEematJooal ........... 134 

14 Qommunications Cortcepts, Inc. 

181 Com mun teat ions Conceiit^, Inc. 

AfannBiK. ■■'■■<■■»■■■»■■ ■«■■■ lii I tf^^^ 

166 Communications Spec ha I lata, Inc. 

.-l.T...b.. ■....., :. a. J.J .? 

15 Communfcatjons Spectalista, ^nc, 

* k hl4h I ■■ ri ■■ kfr-li-pl ha m i ^ ^ ^ 4 g f W 

Compui&r Trader ♦ , ♦ , , 135 

* ConnectSystems, Inc. ....... .37 

37 Cofitempora ry Tec h noloQy , I nc . 

45 

25 Contrcf Products, Untimtted ... .46 
141 Cushcraft Corp. ......*...... .89 

DGM Electronics 44 

345 Data Service 13S 

Dayton Hamwent ion .......... .36 

1S6 Diamond Worldwide..,...,,... 19 

4^ Doppler Systems ... 107 

480 Elect ronic Comporwnts Group 

18 Bectronic Specialists, Inc. ..,,.60 
1 35 Encomm, Inc. ...,,, .77 

29 Esoteric Ervgineefing .,,,,.,,. 13S 

99 Faxscan 46 

23 F^eshef Corporation..* ii 109 

482 Flestief Corporation ...... 117 

as FoKTango Cofpof atioii ,,.,,,. ,40 

143 GLB Electronics 97 

352 Gfove Enterprises. . . .^^. ..,v*, . .90 
31 Hal^Tronix .^ ^ . * f'^i-m-*'-*:'*-^-* ...... .Sv 

101 Ham MaaterTapes ... . . .79 

Ham RadioOutlet .3 

33 Hamtronlcs.NY ,.158.169 

479 Hamtronics.NY 116 

303 Heath Company . , , , B3 

184 Henry Radio 23 



1^ 

477 

36 

93 

122 

156 

82 

9 

48 

45 

54 



4$ 
51 



Horizon Printing Go. 115 

Hu^tief Jnc. . .»»*... 4 

IVOm . ..J. ...T. .«.,*.*■. OOW. (1,1/ 

Idiom Pt&ss ....... 129 

IntefTiational Crystal Mlg^ Co. ... 146 

JALBadloComm iCfi 

John J. Me^oa, Jr.. \^vc. ...,.,.. 1 57 

Jun's Electronics ...,...,. 82 

/rMagazine 96 

KLM Electronics 81, 147 

Kantrpnics .......... .8,9^50, 151 



l\^n WOOQ .1 1 I '.;.».... b . i 


.CovJV,7 


MCMCcmmuhicatiOns ., 


...60,105 


MFJ Enterprises ........ 


Aft AO 


MHz Electronics ........ 


,.136-145 


Madison Electronics 


.......86 


Magnum Distributors, Inc. 


101 


Microcomputer Business 




Applications 


..,•.,116 


Micro Control Speciaities 


.......IB 


Microlog Corporatioa .... 


51 


MifageCommunicalio^is . 


153 



Missouri BadioCenter . 155 



130 
318 
412 
137 



212 

170 
148 
61 
^4 

62 

484 

133 

500 



Moler Antenna, Inc. ,...*... 
Nampa Sat el I lie Systems . . . 
Natiortal Cornm. Group Co 
Nemal Eiectronira . 

Nuts & Voits ♦ t * - 4 - - - 

Orbft Magazine 

PC Electronics ,,.*..*.... 
Parsec Commun' cat tone , . . 
PipoCommL. _.........,,. 

Processor Concepts 

PuCrfIc Domain, Inc .... 

Radio Amateur Cattbook, Inc. 

Radionjt 

Radio Werenouse ,,..,.* 

Ramsey Etectfonic* 

Regency Electronics, Inc. . 

Rivendel I Associates .... 

RUN Magazine . , . 

73 



m 1 1^4 

28.29 

111 



134 
124 

114 
115 
.46 
113 
.36 
149 

113 



..*,.107 
.156.161 
lie 

■ F I ■ ■ H vO 

.67 



BOOKS, etc. 



AMATEUR RADIO/ELECTRONICS TITLES 



MICROCOMPUTER TITLES 



Catslog f 


K«m 


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CT7313 


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4.95 


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CT7320 


20 + WPM Co6b Tape 


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BK7386 


Ct7325 


25+ WPM Code Tape 


4X 


flK7404 


CT7^^4 


Code Tapes (any tour above) 


1636 


BK7400 


BK7308 


Contest Coo*5boo*t 


5J95 


CX;74001 T 


BK7321 


A Guide to Ham Radio 


4.95 


CC740012 


BK7322 


Hcjtitoy Cotnputers Are Hece 


Z49 


CC740013 


BK7393 


Uving on a Shoestring 


7.97 


BK738e 


BK7312 


The Magic of Ham Radio 


4.95 


BK7311 


BK7340 


The New Hobby Cksmputsfs 


2.49 


BK7334 


BK73a3 


The New Weather Satellite 


B.95 


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Propagatlofi Wizard's Handbook 


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SSB. . .The Misunderstood Mode 


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Annotated BASIC Vot. 1 
Annotated BASIC Vol. 2 
Inside Your Computer 
introduction to TRS* Data Files 
Kilobaud Klassroom 
Mach. Lang. Suiiroutines for CoCo 
Pfog. for Electronic Circuit Design 
BK7400 with Apple disk 
BK7400 with IBM PC disk 
BK7400 with TR&BO disk 
The Selectric^ Interface 
Some of the Best ham Kllotkaud 
TRS-BO as a Controlief 
TRS^/ZBO Assembly Lang. Ubrary 
UncJef standing & Prog. 
Microcomputers 

SHELF BOXES 

(tem 

Shelf box— 1 
Shelf boxes— 2-7 
Shell boxes— a and up 



Pegs 



'PA'^^'UlU r>iT-a-i«-«-l^it^-..k ■■■■■> m VvV 

SutTSCriptions ............ .35, 134 

197 Sintec Company .S4 

154 Slep Electronics -....,.,,_, ,1^ 

68 Spectrum Communicati<3ns 91 

436 Spectrum I niemaiionaUr^. ...,114 

Spfder Antenna ,140 

473 Stephens Engineering Associates, 

Inc .117 

206 Surplus Sales of NE ........... 1 1 1 

192 T^n" Radio Sales, Inc .97 

63 The Antenna Specialists Co 13 

& The Computer Journal . , 134 

* The Ham Shaoft ,.......,160 

305 Ttie MethenyCorp .4 

104 Trionyx Industries ....,, 90 

136 Tucson Amateur Packei Radio 

,, ...105 

203 Unicorn Bectrpriics ,,*...... 33, 39 

l9e Unrffif^al AmaTetir Radio ...... .111 

481 ynivGfS^ Electronics ^ 118 
179 Universal El«ctrontea , .iS 

tInivefBiity Microti Ems .......... 135 

149 ymqueComniCorp. ...136 

UrHty Eleclronics . . ... 135 

* Van Gofden ErbQifwering , . . , 90 

311 Vanguard Lab$ .*,-.,.,-,. 134 
90 VqCom Products Gofp..., -»*,.. 107 

W9fN hi Antennas -- .122 

79 Wacom Products 46 

483 Wafil Clipper Coqj, ........... 117 

Weatcom 115 

Westech Electronics. Inc. ..... 113 

SO Western Radio Efecironic$ 45 

tdO Western Radio Electronics . . . . 13S 
' Wheeler Appl:ie<J Research Lab 

Williams Radio SaEes , 46 

107 Woodall & Associates ..,..,.. 134 

B3 Yaeau Electronics .Cov. Ill 

338 ZAssocLaies 134 



Prf« 

10.95 
10.95 
12.97 
24J7 
14,95 
29.97 
14J95 
24,97 
24.97 
24^7 
12J7 
10.% 
12.97 

10.95 



To Order 



Pi1c« 

2.00 
1.50 ea. 
1.25 ea. 



SHiPPINQ AND HAN- 
DUNG: $1,50 for the first 
book. $100 for each addl^ 
tior^al book for US delrvery 
and foreign surface. 
S10.0O per book for for- 
eign airmail. Orders pay- 
able in US dollars on ly« 

Complete the postage 
paid card, or itemize your 
order with payment or 
cofnplete credit card irv 
fgrmation Occlude post- 
age and handling) to: WQ 
Boc^s, ATTN. Retail 
Sales, Rte. 101 and Bm 
St., Peter1>0fOMgh, NH 
03458. 




130 raMagaztne • Aprit, 1984 



BmER'N'BUY 



73 CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING 



RATES 



Jniji V Idua Knon-commerc ^a I) 
CoFTimercJal ...,,__,_,. 



15( per word 

50« per word 



Prepayment by check of money order is required with your e{S. No discounts or 
Gommiasiona are available. Please make your payment to 73. Bates for mulUple 
insert lens are avaiiaDle on request. 

ADVERTISING COPY 

Advertising must pei'tain to amateur radio products or services. No special 
layouts or positions are possible. All advertising copy must t>e submitted type- 
written (double-spaced;^ and must include full name and address. Copy limited to 
100 words, ma)(imum- Count only words in text. Address, free. 

73 cannot verify advertising claims and cannot be tield responsible for claims 
made by the advertiser. Uability will be limited to making any necessary correc- 
tion in the next avai fable issue. 73 reserves the righlio reject any copy deemed 
unsuitable. 

DEADLINES 

Copy must be received in Peterborough by the 5th of the second month pre- 
ceding the cover date. If copy is recei^ved after the deadline, 11 will be scheduled 
to run the foliowing month, unless specifically prohibited by the advertiser. 

MATERIALS 

Send to Advertising Department, 73, Elm Street, Peterborough NH 0345S. 



WYOMING-UTAH RAf^CH LAND. 10 
acres, S60 down, seo/month, FREE infor- 
mation, maps, photographs. Trade equity 
for ham gear, home computer, test equip- 
ment-, etc. Owner— Mike Gauthier K6ICS, 
&550B— Gallatin Rd., Downey CA 90240. 
BNB001 

MOBILE IGNITION SHtELDJNG. Free 
literature. Estes Engineering, 930 Marine 
Drive, Port Angeles WA 9fl3^2. BNB006 

COMPUTED OWNERS! Super new IVIFJ 
1224 CW/HTTY/ASCII terminal units- 
Send/receive CW/HTTy/VlC-20 and Com- 
modore 64 software. Full-featured, disk or 
cassette. Kantronics, too. Low prices, 
speedy delivery. Hundreds sold Interna- 
t tonally. SASE for details and catalog of 
Commodore, Atari, PET, ZX-81, Tl, TRS-BO 
software and accessories. Amateur Ac- 
cessories, 6 Harvest Court , RD 7, Dept. 
BB, FTemington NJ 08B32. Telephone 
(201>7&2-I55r, 6:30-10:30 Eastern time. 
BNe0l9 

COLOR COMPUTER owners— call (212> 
441-2807 for FREE color computer hard- 
ware and software catalog or write to 
Spectrum Projects. 93-15 86 Drive, Wood- 
haven NY 11421. BNB023 

AZDEN SERVICE MANUALS, PCS 3000 
and PCS 3O0— $5,00 eacti; PCS 4000— 
5^9,00. N,P,S , 1136 Boxwood^ Jenlcintovtfn 
PA 19046. BNB029 

PSST* HEY, wanna make professional- 
quality printed cfrcuit boards? One or 
more Jn only SO minutes. Simple, inexpen^ 
sive, new system. Free 1984 catalog. PIN- 
COR, 530 Palace, Aurora JL 60506; (312)- 
696-0015. BNB036 

MIHTAAY TECHNICAL MANUALS for old 
and obsolete e£|uipment. 60-page catalog, 
$3,00. Military Technical Manual Servicei 
2266 Senas ac Ave.^ Long Beach CA 90815. 
BNS045 

DX HIDDEN ASSET LOOP ANTENNA. Get 
on the air, comply witti no-visible-antenna 
rules, from most tndoor locations. Inex- 
pensive, easy-to-buHd antenna couples di- 
rectly tofiO-Qtim coax; no antenna match- 



er required. Omni direct ton a I with vertical, 
bi-directjona! with horizontal polarization. 
Vswr typically 1.2:1 at re&onanca; useful 
bandwidth 3 to 5 percent of resonant fre- 
quency, Plans and instructions, $12.50 
postpaid, H, Stewart Designs ^ PO Box 643, 
Oregon City Oft9704S, 8NB047 

DftESS UP YOUR CLU8! Jackets, tee- 
shirts, hats, sportshirts^ etc., wtfith your lo- 
go or we'ii Custom design. Wav^Jength 
Productions, 20-22 120th St.i College 
Point NY 11356. BNB048 

DEALERS IN SURPLUS TEST I^JSTRU- 
MENTS, microwave equipment, and com- 
ponents. Wanted: Late test equipment 
(HP.t Tek, G.R,, Narda, etc,}, waveguide/ 
coax components- Immediate needs: HP, 
K3&2A. R38aA, S382G. 432A, e52aA, 41 5E, 
G.R. B74- and 900-serles coax ^tems^ G.R. 
1633, 1863, 1B64. Request want list. Lec- 
tronics, 1423 Ferry Ave., Camden NJ 
06104; (609)-541-4200. BNB050 

WANTED— your unused Teletype^^ re- 
pair parts. High prices paidl Send SASE 
for list of Teletypewriter parts and sup- 
plies. TYPETRONICS, Box 8873, Fort Lau- 
derdale PL 33310; {306>5a3 1340 after 9:00 
pm. N4TT. BN&052 

COLLINS: 325-3, 755-3B, 30L-1, more. 
Also HyGain TH65DXX, rotator, tower. 
Make offer, WA7WOC, (602)^67-2376, 
evenings. BNB054 

TS-§30S with YKBeC/YG455C filters and 
SP230 speaker, 1600.00. Heat hk it SB200, 
$30000- Heath kit SB-634 station monitor 
console, $50.00. Heath kit SB-614 monitor 
scope, $75.00. Yaesu FT'7j $275,00, Robot 
400 with Sanyo video monttor and earners, 
$600.0C, Radio ShacK TRS-60 Model I with 
Macrotronfcs M800 RTTy program and 
Flasher TU170, $400,00, Denjron Super 
Tuner, $50,00. James F, Kraus^ 1100 West- 
over Ln., Schaumljurg IL 60193; (312)- 
894^398. BNB056 

WANTCO: Old keys for my telegraph and 
radiotelegraph key coJiectton. Need 
pre- 1950 bugs. All models of Vlbroplex, 
MartJn, Boulter^ Abernathy^ McElroy. etc. 
Also need Spark keys, Boston keys, iarge 



or unusuaF radiotelegraph keys, side- 
swipers, cooties, homebrew, and foreign 
keys. Meal McEwen K5RW, 112B Midway, 
Richardson TX 75081. eNB063 

BECOME ALARMINGLY SUCCESSFUL Ra- 
dio amateurs quickly grasp the relatively 
simple hookups of burglar alarm systems. 
We can help you get started tn this ex- 
citing, rewarding business. Our Buyer's 
Guide lists oyer 300 manufacturers and 
wholesale suppliers and we have loads of 
information on how to get started in this 
rapidly growing field. Information, S2.00 
(redeemable). Plenty of employment- 
business opportunities. Security Elec^ 
tronics International, ROB 1456, Grand 
Rapids Ml 49501. BNB064 

WE ENJOY creating ham pEaques, tro- 
phies, awards. Pse QSO. Prices, shtp- 
ping— low. Care— free. J & J Trophy, 
Grove Street, Peterborough NH 03453; 
(603) 924-7804. BNBOBS 

WANTED: Pr9-1950 TV sets and otd TV 
GUiDE magazines. W3CRH, Box 20-S, Ma 
comb IL 61455; (309)-833^1S09. B1MB066 

RETIFtING? Consider a business of your 
own. Security alarm systems are easily 
learned. InstailatJon in businesses and 
residences js easy, enjoyable, fascinat- 
ing, profitable work. Information that 
could change, improve your future; $2.00 
(redeemable). Security Electronics Inter- 
nationa I, PO Box 1456-\/, Grand Rapids Mr 
49S01. aNB067 

WANTED: Military surplus radios. We 
need Collins 6181, ARC-72, AflC-94, ARC- 
102, RT-712/ARC 106, AflOl14, ARC-US, 
ARC-116, RT^23/ARC'131 or FM622, RT- 
857/ARC'134 or WJIcox B07A, ARC-159, 
RT1167 or RT1168/ARC-ie4. RT-1299/ 
ARC-186, RT-esa/APX-ZS, APX-76, AflN^a, 
ARN-S4, ARNm RTne04^APN-l7lf RT^329/ 
APN-171, MRC-95, 71BF-1/2, HF-105, Col- 
lins antenna couplers, 490T^1, 4MT-2, 
490T-9 , CU^ 1 658 A/ A RC, CU ■ 1 m2iQ RC, 
490B-1. CU-12a9/ARC-l05, 4900-1, Top 
dollar paid or trade for new amateur gear. 
Write or phone Bill Slep, (704h524'75l9, 
Step EEectronics Company, Highway 441, 
Otto IMG 23763. BN8071 

19&4 WIRE & CABLE prices cutJif Call or 
wrEte for latest listings. Certified Com- 
munications^ "The CB to 10 Meter 
People,'' 4138 So. Ferris, Fremont Ml 
49412: (616^924-4561. eNB073 

KQ6P NOVICE EXAM KIT^M pCC no 
longer supplies written test! The Novice 
Exam Kit provides everything you need to 
give the Novice exam including. . .Smulti- 
pfe-choice written exams, . . 6 code tests 
on cassette (3 tests using 5-wpm cliarac- 
ters and 3 tests using IS-wpm charac- 
ters),,, all FCC forms (610 and PR1035A) 
. . . plus "Instructions and Helps for the Ex- 
aminer." Only $5.95 (plus 11.00 slilpping) 
from Spirit PubJications, 2200 Er Camino 
Real Suite 107, Redwood City CA 94063. 
Discount to clubs! BNB076 

SAN ANTONIO, TEXAS, OTH FOR SALE. 
4-2-2 with 70foot tower, etc, WeClVl, (512)- 
684^129- &NB077 

TI99rta flTTY. Mini -memory required. 
Mark and space tones are internally gen- 
erated In send mode. TU Is needed for re- 
ceive-only, $17.95. Mark Schmidt, 4^61 
Lark Dr., BeaJe AFB CA 95903. BNB078 

'♦FOOLPROOF LOQG^NG" program de- 
scribed in November, l&SS. 73 magazine 
available for TRS-BO Model III. IBM PC, 
and CP/M-80 computers using Microsoft 
BASIC. $35.00 for diskette, manual, ppd. 



'Super-Jog" written In dBASE^H source 
code for almc^t any computer, $5000. 
Specify disk format. Write for datatls. GRF 
Computer Services, 6170 Downey Avenue, 
Long Beach CA 90605. BNBQTS 

COLLINS MONITOR 1012 for three 455^ 
kHz Inputs, $25; TS-1&6D frequency meter, 
100-1 000 MHz with case, $25; TS 909 null 
bridge, 10k decapot, manual, cables, her- 
metic aluminum case, $25; Dolinko-Dolins 
vacuum capacitors, 6-50 mmF, $18; Taffet 
Q^neter, $50; Heath Q meter, $40; SB8B 
Panoramic analyzer, no P.S., $25; band- 
pass filters, Krohnhite 31 DAB, $60; Day- 
tronics 720, $50; HP FM detector. 10- 
500 MHz, $20; shipping extra. Lisatus, 116 
Orton, Caidwell NJ 07006; (201^226-7943. 
SNB080 

ABC denotes Arson, Burglary equals 
Crime. Security alarm industry really 
booming. Tremendous demands. Employ- 
ment-business opportunities terrific. Get 
in now. ]nformati;on package, $2.00 (re- 
deemabie). Security EEectronics Interna- 
tionai. PC Box 1456-FR, Grand Rapids Ml 
49501. BNB081 

iCOH IC-730 xcvr w/mfcrophone, FL-^O 
and FL^5 fitters, HM-10 scanning micro- 
phone. Eiccellent condition. Complete 
w/manuais and original packaging. S539. 
Glen KA7IWL, (Q01)-375-4074. BNe082 

WANT TO GET ON RTTY CHEAP? Klein- 
schmidt page printer, reperf, and TQD. 

Practical ly new with manuai, adjusted 
and ready to go, $100. Cal Stiles W1JFP, 
PO Box 664, Hanover NH 03755. BNB0e3 

OlGtTAL DISPLAYS for FT-1013, Ta-5203, 
Collins, Drake, Swan, and others. Write for 
information. Grand Systems, PO Box 
3377. Blaine WA 98230: (604)-530-4551. 
BNB064 

KV4/KP2 STATION, ST. THOMAS- Con- 
test s/DX/ vacations. Singiesi^clubs. Paul 
Mufi-ay WA2UZA, RD 4, Princeton NJ 
08540; (201)-329-6309. BNB0S5 

ATTENTION C-S4 USERS: Don't buy a log- 
ging program until you've read our fact 
sheet. For free information, write to Crum- 
tronics, PO Box 6187, Ft Wayne IN 468%. 
BNBOee 

STOPI! SUPER SAVfNGSf Kenwood 
R-200a, $499.50; R-1000, S409.50; 
FRG-7700, S429,50; Sony 2002. £225.50; 
Panasonic RF-B300, RF-S600, call 1 1 
Uniden CR-2021, $209.50; Regency HX- 
1000, HX-3000, MX-5000, MX-700D, in 
stock— cal II! Bearcat BC-100, $288 .50; 
BC-250, S249.50: BC-300. $359.60. Fre- 
quency directories, cordless phones, 
rotors, coax, antennas, much moreE! Free 
UPS siitpping and insurance to 4S states. 
25-page picture catalog. Si. 00 {refund- 
able). Galaxy Electronics, Box-1202— , 67 
EPer Ave., Akron OH 44309; (216)-376'2402. 
9:00-5:00 pm EST. BNB0a7 

ROHN TOWERS— Wholesale direct to 
users. 23% to 34% discount from dealer 
price. All products avallabie. Write or call 
for price list Also, we are wholesale dis- 
tributors for Antenna Specialists, Regen- 
cy, Hy-Gain. Hill Radio, 2503 G£ Road. PO 
Box 1405, Bloomington IL 61701-0687; 
(309)"663-2141. BNB088 

EMERGENCY COMMUNICATIONS— An 
Organizational and Operational Hand- 
book^ by K3PUR. A complete reference 
guide for ARES/RACES and other public 
service groups, as reviewed In December 
'S3 QST and January 'S4 CO. $9.95 plus 
$1.50 PyH to: FDW Arts, 1394 Old Qufncy 

73 Magazine • April, 1984 131 



Une. Roatofi VA 22090 (VA residents, am 
4% tax}. BN60&d 

BECeiVlftS-Motorola WWV, S35; Hanv 
m«rlund HO-100A, ¥85; i^alional NG^IQO, 
195; rl signal Qsnerator, 30 kfi-€0 mc. $30; 
R P. aij(]lo siDHfll Q»»ratOf, S30. K&KZT, 
2S5e Al«jcftnaer, Los Osos CA 93402. 
BMBuOu 

FOR SAL£: Kenwood TS520. SSSOOO; T» 
TKO. S260iK}. E3(cetleftt condftion. Cal 
Swtnson weWYJ. PO Box 1395, GraM 
Vall«y CA 96945, (9ie>Z754l67.BNaOd1 

flJUIHz SSe CRYSTAL RLTEHS, 6-flOle. 
2i4cH; bandwldm. 1,85 shape factor, 6- to 
eo<IB. New^ with hardware, specirica- 
ik^r St7,S0 postp^d. 4CX250B chinv 
neys, Johnson i 1 24-0 111 -001 ^ r^fiw, box^: 
$5.00 postpaid, two for S9.00. Dentron 
Scout CAP tranficelver, new: $300 post- 
paid. Mosley CM-1 recelvef, 80-10, VGC: 
S60,00 postpaid. Hammarlund SP0OO 
JX-17, GC: $140.00. VW. E Delage, PO Sox 
231 , Kent OH 44240. BNB092 

FOR SALE: New CLBJicraft R3 half wave 
vertical, $215. Tom WA1RTD,21 Bayberry, 
Aclon MA 01720; {617>263r238Z BNB093 

OX HEADING MAPS for Boston, NYC, 
PhiUdfllplila. Banirnore, Detroit, Atlanta, 



Chicdgo, Hmt Ofteans. St. Louis. Dallas, 
LA. 11'x^17', $1J5 pp. 22*k34\ fS.96 
pp. Specify dty. Massey. PC Box 397. 
Halnfisport NJ 08030; (609}-26V2d&2. 
eN6094 

COMMO[>ORE fi4 CW lNSTRL>CTOfl PRO 
GftAM. Q6f^9rat&& CW on TV speaker. 
Random cotit^ keyboard Input, or prcnr^ 
GOfdwd "CW tests." Ctiaracter spe«d *n*l 
^paein^ $«t IrKlep&rMtentfrv. OMtgned for 
classes Ami IncreaBliH} (Ode 9peed- 
(1&.00— di&k^tte or cassette (sp«cNty)- 
Denn^s Olver N7BCU, 20909 S. Ferguson 
Rd.. Oregon CJty OR 97045. 8NB09i5 

STATE-OF'THE-AHT, rugged, tow-prollle 
antenna sysl&nns Helical designs from 
3.5 to 50 MHi DDRRs Irom 144 to 450 
MH^. Refer to 73 magazine revi>ews in Oc- 
tober and November, 1982. Co^n-Rad In- 
dus tries, 25 Imson Street. Buffalo NY 
14210; (7l6)-773-1445. BN8096 

ANTI-STATIC DUST COVERS by Cover 
Craft Corporation, Amateyr radio, conv 
putera, printers, dish drives, VCRs. New or 
olclar models. Over 1,000 designs in stock 
and over T, 000,000 in use. Call or write (or 
brochure. Birch Hill Sales, PO Box 234, P#. 
teftxjrough NH 03458; (603)^924 7959. 
BNeOST 



FREE FREE GIFT, interested in amateur 
radio, cofnputers. video? Large SASE pse 
and menttofl 73 magazine. Free gift to etL 
Narwld Electronics. €1 Beltot Road, Ring- 
wood NJ 074a@. dN809e 

FIND Otrr wt\at e^se yoy can hear on your 
Qmm^<&*BTag& transcetvef or rec«lv^. 
Complete infortnation on major North 
American radios rstenlr^ clubs. Send 2Sc 
and SASE Association of North Armnctm 
Radio Clubs, 1500 Bunbtjry Oflve, Whittier 
CA 90601. eNBC99 

THE 8IG UST: a custorrvpfoduced com- 
puter printout on bor>d papet, wiin letter- 
equality pftnu showing preflxoa, locations, 
beem heading, and distance to almost 600 
OX, US, and Canadian locations. All pro^ 
duced for your location! No more guess- 
ing where a country or US city Is located! 
Listing is alphabetical according to DX 
prefix and also by cliy Please provide 
your exact latitude and longllude with 
order, or we can use data based on the 
closest airport, ttils printout is over 11 
feat In length! $15.95 ($17.35 with deluxe 
binder). The 8lg List, 10126 Catalina Drive. 
Indianapolis IN 4623«, BNB100 

MAGICOU ftp SPEECH PROCESSORS— 
Add 6 dB of ai^erage output with genuine rf 



clipping in your trar^smittef's l-f stages 
Custom engineered lor Kenwood TS-IBO. 
TS-t3Q, TS-430, T&^520, TS-530. T^^2Q^, 
Drake T4X TR-7; Yaesu FT-102- Excel leftt 
speech quaUtVi simple Installation, af- 
for^Ms prices! SASE for data and cost. 
Maaicom; PO B<» 6552A, B«3ievue WA 
96007. BNB101 

SULTRONICS otters TET anjenna sys- 
tems With facto<ry tj^diup and parts- C«ll 
Of write fof our compJete catalog with full 
descriptions and $i>m& on the full tirve ot 
TET antermas^the best! Fof fast aiKJ 
friefid^ service as usual, oortiact Dan 
WOaiOZor Nina N8ANU at Suftron^cs Anrv 
ateur Radio, 15 Sexton Drlvit Xertia OH 
45385^ (;513)^7&2700. BNB102 

SULTRONICS has Hy-Gain at the lowest 
prices anywhere!! TH70X— $369,96; 
TH5MK2S— J303.95; new ExploreM4— 
only $264,951! Limited to stock on handi 
30 call or write nowM Sultronlcs Amateur 
Radio, 15 Bex ton Drive, Xenia OH 45385; 
(513)^76-2700, BNB103 

WANTED: older tube-type amateur or gen- 
eral^overage receiver In Qood condition. 
Send description and asking price. Steven 
0. Jones N2AMY. Bom 6685, Ithaca NY 
14851. BNB1D4 



MARK 



DAVY CROCKETT 

On April 2S, 1984, the Bryan Arr^ateur 
Radio Club will run a spectal-event station 
In the Crockett National Forest to cofii' 
memorale tfw contTlbutlons of Davy Croc^^ 
ett to the fight for Texas Indapendence. 
The club will operate W5RAS from 1800 
UrC Saturday to OBOO UTG Sunday on 
SO-2 meterfi on the phone bands. Certifi- 
cate for $^1 and an SASE to QSL nianager 
KASOnr, 2203 rranklln, Bryan VC 77B01, 



TATER DAY 

The Ma^ahall County ARA will be oper- 
ating a special-event station from 1000Z 
April 1 to 2400Z April 2 to commefrvorata 
the I4lsl Tat«f E)ay Ceiebratiork. Opefa- 
Iton will be on CW. 7120, Operation 20 km 
up from Icnwer 40-lSme4er General pfvone^ 
bund ed>ges a rut 146.55 simplex. Certlli- 
cate will be given. Ser^ QSL aAd la/oa 
SASE to WG4U, Route 2, Benton ICY 42025 



XWARN 

X-WARN (Xenia Weather Amateur 
Radio Met) ar\r40unces the planned oper- 
ation of special -event radio station 
WeeOZZ on Marcfi 31 and April 1. 19&4. 
Our operation commemorates the rebuild* 
Ing of Ihe Xenia community on the lOth 
anniversary of the killer tornado of Aprli 3, 
1974. Th I & triple twister damaged half of 
the homes and businesses in a city of 
25.000 and killed 33 persons. Amateur ra- 
dio contributed immensety with emergen* 
cy communications In the hours and day a 
after the stomi. X-WARN was organized 
subsequent to the tornado as a means of 
providing prompt local weather observa- 
tions during National Weather Service 
atarts^ 

TT^e spectat event will Operate two HF 
transceivers from 1500 to 6300 tJTC on 
Salufday and 1500 to 2300 UTC on Sun- 
day, Frequencies wtJI bte SSB 7.275, 
1 4^75, BnH 21^75 ( ± 10 kHz), We will also 



have a third rig on S-meter FM' 146,52 Sim^ 
p4e]e or the X-WAHN repeater 147.165/765. 
PlflS8« send QSL and SASE to N8QYS ip^r 
Csttfbook] for special commemoraiive QSL 

ARBOR DAY 

A special-events station will be operat- 
ing from the Neb^'asita Stale Artior Lodge» 
former rmme ol J. Slsftlng Morton Ifound* 
er of Arbor Day), m Netiraska City, Nebras- 
ka, during the annual Arbor Day celebfai- 
XkOKU Ttiis station^ in addition to ottier 
club-member stations, will be operating In 
the Genera! portion of the phone and CW 



bartds on 60 through 10 meters from 2400 
UTC April 27 lo 0600 UTC April 29. In addi^ 
iJofK oth& ciutHt>ember stauons wilt be 
operating from their own OTHs Irom 2400 
hours UTC April 23 10 08O0 nou/s UTC 
April 29. All amateurs oofitactir>o tfiis sta- 
tiori^ KiTIK. or any other cluiHtiambef sta- 
tions durir^g these times will be iill||0lle to 
receive an ArtxM Day comm«moraiivs cer- 
tlffcaie ftom the N^s^aska City Amateur 
Radio Clubu f^ease send one dollar and a 
business-size self-address^ envelope to 
John K. Nlhart KAliOKl. 7731 Holdredge. 
Uncoln NE 66505. 



H/IM HELP 



1 have recently purchased a Radio Shack 
TR&BO rrwdef 100 and would like to kncm if 
tfi<ere is any ttam software available for it 
commeffctally. I am particularly Intartalwl 
in any CW sefKi^rec^ive and FTTTY software 
»nd would appreciate having Itw names of 
«ny companies ttiat might hai« such 
Systems, 



CALL LONG DISTANCE ON 2 METERS 



Only TO watts drive will de*rver 75 watts 
of RF power on 2M SSB. FM, ot CW. It is 
biased Cla^ AB for linear operation. The 
current drain Is 8-9 amps at 
13.6 Vdc, It comes in a well 
constmcted, rngged case 
with an overs i zed heat sink 
to keep it cool It has a sen- 
sitive C.O.R. circuitry, 
reliable SO-239 RF connec- 
tors, and an amplifiar 
IN/OUT switch. The max- 
imym power input is 15 




Our products are backed by prompt fac- 
tory service and technical assistance. To 
become familiar with our other fine pro- 
ducts in the amateur radio 
martcet^ call or wrrle for our 
free product and small parts 
catalog. 

Mode* 875 

Kit $109.95 

Wired & Tested $129.95 



watts. 




IQDmnnunication 
I Concepts Ina 



CCI 




Information about software for other 
compiit^^ that run Basic would even be 
h^^ful, as I think that I cou^ld adapt it for ihe 
rttadellOO. 

DavkS C. Eanee MAZI 

46ee Dnjsilla Lm 

iMon flouoi LA 70000 

I want someone to ha«t a sked witfi rrie 
to increase my CW spaed Mi^t use key^ 
boanf and start al ^ wpm For mora info^ 
call 004>9e3-2t57. 

Varrftirfc IQCSY 
RL 2, &QK 388X 

own WV 28505 



I would like to hear fr%im anyone who has 
modifications to put the Ten-Tec Omnt on 
lO-rrketer FM. 

Stephen J. O^Mallay N2CLE 
140-26 Poplar Ave, 
Rushing NV 11 3SS 

I need a service manuat or achematic or 
copy of same foe a Yaesu FM FT-202R 
handle-talkie Also need crystals for 2 
meters or charger. 

Cyril T. Wo«f WATiOV 

S. 5507 Marstutl Road 

Spokane WA 98204 



132 73 Magazine * April, 1984 



•S* •!• O^^*^ 'S^^S'^&^^S* ^*&^4••*•4♦*J' *S**2* »y *J*^4**C* C*^* •***J* ^»i* ^*^ •^^^h^tjt ^ttjit'i **4f^ 1^4^ 



MM HELP 



I want a program for a Commodore 64 
where I can put in iriy latitude and longitude 
and the other station's latitude/tongitude 
and get the other station's distance In 
miles. 

I have tried converting programs fof this 
written for the Radio Shack models 1 and 3, 
Heath, and He wfell- Packard 9845 and can- 
not get any to run. Also, one written for the 
VlC-20 didn1 work either. 

Gaiy i^ayne KE6CZ 

1347 E Dakota 

Fresno CA 03704 

i need the schematic and op&rating man- 
ual for the Knight TR-106 6-nieter trans- 
oeiver wUh the model V-107 remote vfa Any 
hdp wiJI b^ appreciated. 

P. J. Mlhuln KAanZL 

70 Clay St. 

Manlstae Ml 49660 

I have a HalElcrafters SR-150 transceiver 
and need a replacement rf switching relay, 
Halilcrafters part numt>er 021-000651. It's a 
3-pole, double-throw miniature manufac- 
tured by Jayco. A used but operable relay 
woufcT be fine. Would also t^e interested In 
an SR-150 that someone is willing to "part 
out." 

Larry Kaja WA9RW0 

4001 H. Holstef 

Tucson AZ 65749 



I would appr^late hearing from anyt)Ody 
who operates 10 through 20 meters from a 
travel trailer, I need to know the type of an- 
tenna being used and tK>w It Is mounted. 

James L. L^herty KA6CMD 

laOS Bahia 

San Mateo CA 94403 

I need a schematic and operation man- 
ual fof DuMont 274 scope. I will gladly pay 
copying costs and postage. 

Rolwrl A. Johnson N7CFX 

633 E. Gwinn Pt 

SeattteWA96ia2 

I would like to hear f nsm anyone who has 
converted any Motorola UHF Motracs 
064 LKT or LI54LHT units to the 440 ama- 
teur band. Areas of most concern are the 
osctiiator and the front-end cavities. 

RUfrion L Kasekamp KK3L 
PO Boat 222 

Eltefslls MD 21529 

I am looking for a sefvice manual for a 
Pace BI-SIOO UHF FM 6H:?hannel business- 
band rig artd a Lafayette Micro PI 00 UHF 
tunabie receiver. J will pay for copying and 
mailing charges. 

S. May 

PO Box 2S5 
SImcoe, Ontario N3Y 4L1 

Canada 



mE LUTES 



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<• 
♦ 












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288 1.8 KHZ a POLE LADDER FILTER FOR 5a0i560 

1 1 25 DC C I RCUrr BREAKER WITH CABLE FOR 525 

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444 HenCULES 1 KWSOLID STATE AMPLIFIER , ., . ,.,,...., , 

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IG471 A 430450 MHZ BASE XCVR25W. 12V, NEW MODEL 

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WE ACCEPT MJC. VISA, OR CHECK. ADD UPS SHIPPING. SAVE MONEY BY ORDERING TODAY AT 
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Slop Fleet ranics compamf 

P.O. BOX 100, HWY. 441 

OTTO, NORTH CAROLINA 28763 



— ^' T %"* 1 



p^154 



♦ 



t 

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•I* 








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*^S&e List of Advertisers on p&ge 130 



73 Magazine • April, 1984 133 



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t^See Li&t of Advertisers on page }3Q 



73 Magazine • April, 1984 135 






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SILICON DIODES 










FEED THRU SOLDER RF CAPACTORS 


MR751 




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6 Amp 3 


10/$5.0Q 


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for 
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for $40.00 



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PRICES SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE 



(fM*9|z eleetroi|ie§ 



'All parts may be new or 
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if we a/e out of stocii of an itefn." 



i 



136 73 Magazine • April. 1984 



"MIXERS" 



WATKINS JOHNSON WJ-M6 Double Balanced Mixer 

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Noise Figure (SSB) 
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8.5dB Max. .2 to 300MHz 
same as above 
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.3dB T^p. 



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dB 4.3 Typ. 



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Ft Gain Bandwidth Product at Vce=8v, Ic=10ma. GHz 4 Min. 6 Typ. 
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NIPPON ELECTRIC COMPANY TUNNEL DIODES 



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IP 

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MODEL 1S2199 
9min. lOTyp. Umax. 
1.2Typ. l.Bmax. 
95Typ, 120max. 
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370Typ. 



1S220O * '^ 

9min. lOTyp. Umax. 

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2Typ. 3niax. 

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350Typ. 



FftlRCHILD / DUMONT Oscilloscope Probes Model 4290B 

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For InlormatJon call: (602) 242-3037 



Toll Free Number 
800-528-01 80 
(For orclert only) 



Q^^^^T, electraqics 



"All parts may be new or 
surpluSr a.nd paft& may bt 
^tstif uted with comparable parts 
if we are out ot stock ol an item." 



PRICES SUBJECT TO CHANGE WflHOUT NOTICE 




I 



73 Magazine * April, 1984 137 



^ 



RF TRANSISTORS, MICROWAVE DIODES 



■m^ 



ISKS 



Toll Free Number 
e00-52S-0180 
(For orders only) 



TYPE 



pfuo: 



TSfPE 



micE 



Tf^ 



PRICE 



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mim % 


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200.00 


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PCR 


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vm 


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61^57 


15.24 


mg?23B 


13 m 


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10,92 


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22,21 


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8.94 


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13.06 


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43.45 


l»r^632 


4.70 


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14.03 


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33.81 


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215643 


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28.52 


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216645 


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mw/m 


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?0.70 


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PCR 


22^764 


27.00 


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36.80 


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41.40 


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17.25 


prft6.T9 


PCR 


35849 


20.00 


Dexcel GaAa li;!" 




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49.30 


MRF433 


ia.07 


HH679 


put 


2N591£ 


36,00 


PiijitELi GaAa WT 




MRF-149/A 


12.65 


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14.37 


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2.50 


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18.40 


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29.00 


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23.00 


lihJ^/fi 


4.95 


1WF454/A 


20.12 


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vm 


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40.0n 


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11.40 


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16,00 


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10.35 


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30,00 


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20,70 


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2>^945 


11 50 


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14.40 


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32.70 


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10,35 


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25.00 


jept75 


3.10 


PI9790 


56, m 


2NB0S1 


12.07 


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n.34 


mewm 


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KH 


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12.65 


Hewlett E^dERTd 




IHF477 


14.95 


poidss 


vm 


2ivn3 


13.25 


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L12.Q0 


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23.00 


pmnR3 


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?mnm 


15.00 


35i£dlK 


38.00 


WffSQQ 


1.04 


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pm 


mmm 


11.00 


368266 


32.00 


lffiF503 


6.00 


ECA 




^6005 


12,00 


35iVii¥. 


32.00 


IHF504 


7.00 


40t»l 


5,00 


a»R«w 


16,10 


35831E'H31 


30.00 


1«F508 


5,00 


4(^/1^ 


10.00 


2N6C07 


20.70 


35831E 


30.00 


MFSll 


10.^ 


40fiitt0 


4.62 


2N&1Q6 


21.00 


X^A^F 


50.00 


l«EF515 


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21.35 


35SSTF: 


50.00 


\m^i7 


2.00 


40282 


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40.24 


35S53E 


71.30 


lilFb59 


2.05 


4(^30 


2.80 


2N6201 


50.00 


35S54t, 


75,00 


mF&^ 


20.00 


40292 


13,05 


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1.50 


35S6t>E 


44.00 


mtmu 


25.00 


40294 


2.50 


2Ne^5g 


18.00 


HKTR3101 


7.00 


Mhi<!B23 


g.65 


40341 


21.00 


2N6567 


10,06 


iiX'IH310a 


a. 75 


MnJB29 


3.45 


4Q60S 


2.48 


2N6680 


ao.oo 


lffi:TE5101 


30,00 


klliFB44 


27.60 


40894 


1.00 


liiL7U3 


3.00 


IDi'ilflalM 


6a, 00 


SiffiFS46 


29,90 


40977 


10.00 


2a:?56A 


7.50 


Hjcmeios 


31,00 


fc!IU>il6 


15.00 


62aOQA 


60,00 


s^'Tm 


2.80 


KJCIWBIOB 


33.00 


lffiFB23 


20.00 


R07M 


25.00 


2SC101fi 


1.00 


J310 


.70 


imFSOl O) Lead 


i,nn 


6E37a9 


25.00 


29nC>t2 


12.00 


•mm 




mP^l (4) Lead 


2.00 


Hmo 


25.00 


RsnnTo 


2.50 


JCSOUO 


10.00 


IIIF^04 


2-TO 


S50-12 


25.00 


2SCIZ3& 


2.50 


«IO@(Xki 


25.00 


Wf911 


3.00 


S;«I06 


5.00 


23C12S1 


12.00 


JtiMMS 


25.00 


IIRF9t51 


2.30 


K«I31 


5.00 


29CtJUb 


2.90 


licjtorola Ca^n. 




ltff8004 


2,10 


S:!A3S^ 


5.00 


S&Cl.JO^ 


5.50 


ini^i 


8,50 


IB26ir 


PUR 


dC^l3S23 


5.0Q 


25n424 


2.80 


mi:^. 


11.95 


asaTso-is 


725,00 


pfticE CN fajijiaagr - pqr 



''All parts may b€ new Or 
surplus, mid parts may be 
substituted with ccmparatile parts 
Lf we at'e out o1 stock of an Mm" 

For Information call: (602) 242-3037 



PRICES SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE 

JVI^l|z electrolytes 



1 38 73 Magazine * A pr 1 1 , 1 9S4 



GaAs, TUNNEL DIODES, ETC. 



TYPE 



pprc^ 



'nCUSQN CSF 




SU345 


$ 5.00 


SM45 


5.a> 


mnnm 


15.00 


anood 


15.00 


s>ija»-3 


15.00 


aJioi2 


e,90 


SD1012-3 


9; 30 


a>1012-9 


&,m 


SD1013-3 


13.50 


331013^7 


13.50 


SDiai4 


LI. 00 


SDlOH-fi 


11.00 


SU1016 


15.00 


SD1O10«5 


15. DO 


SSIOIBhmI 


15.00 


aJ101&-6 


15,00 


SD1018-7 


13.00 


a>ioiB-La 


15.00 


SIIQ20-S 


10.00 


aniQBB 


15.00 


SJ1030-2 


12.00 


S0XO43 


12.00 


SDlfK3-l 


10,00 


SP10I5 


3,7S 


aJlOS0-l 


2,00 


S310G3 


4.00 


ano65 


4.7S 


SD1068 


15.00 


SD1074*2 


IS. 00 


aDl074-4 


28.00 


aU074^ 


28,00 


911036 


20«00 


a>MK7-l 


4,00 


anor7T-6 


4.00 


SO107B-6 


24,00 


SOlOBO-8 


6,00 


SDt06D-9 


3,00 


SDLW4 


&.0O 


5011167 


l&*O0 


93Ke9^ 


15.00 


soioes 


15.00 


a)uoo 


5.00 


^llD© 


IB. 00 


S>in5-2 


a. 00 


3DU1^3 


a, 00 


S5111S-7 


a, 50 


smxm 


5.00 


amis 


22,00 





* B F "mA:^. . 


_. flS - 


I^ 


PRICE 


IVPE 


SBflllff 


S 5,00 


ail278-5 


mu24 


50.00 


S>12Sl-2 


a>ii2T 


3.50 


SI1283 


SKiiaa 


14,00 


301289^1 


saiaa-i 


14*00 


SD129D-^ 


S51154-1 


3.00 


3D1290-7 


SD1135 


S,00 


ajiaoo 


soiiae 


13,00 


a>1301-7 


SD1136-2 


15.00 


SI1305 


^1143- J 


12.00 


WlMfT 


mttl43-3 


17,00 


3n3X 


S)l 144^1 


3.00 


snail 


^1144» 


15.00 


Sm317 


auu^T 


IS.QQ 


331335 


a^iise 


10.00 


SDi>l5-6 


s}ii«ie 


21.00 


301365-1 


SD1200 


1.50 


a>136&-5 


2)1201-2 


10.00 


511375 


amoc 


DO, 00 


§01375^ 


S>1212-11 


4.00 


331379 


SD1212-12 


4.00 


5Di:ift0^1 


.^1212*1© 


4,00 


SDi;«iCt-3 


SU1214-7 


S.OO 


331380-7 


SU214-U 


5.00 


SD1405 


S>1210 


12,00 


a>i«e 


^l2ld-4 


15.00 


muio 


S?121&-5 


15.00 


ffln4l0^3 


SJ^W-B 


15.00 


SDM13-1 


S]t220 


e.oo 


a^Hie 


SPEIS^O-? 


8,00 


331422-2 


331222^ 


16,00 


an42d 


Sni222-H 


7,50 


an423-2 


a>l3S4-lO 


18.00 


3>1429^3 


S11225 


16.00 


an42d-5 


SD122B-8 


PO? 


331430 


SD^29-7 


13.00 


331430^2 


S0l2S9-ie 


13.00 


331434-5 


3D123I 


4.00 


331434-9 


^124&-8 


15.00 


3^1438 


3^244-1 


14*00 


SD1441 


SH262 


12.00 


Sn442 


an263 


15.00 


^1444 


331263-1 


15.00 


SD1444^ 


aDl272 


13,00 


SD1450-1 


an2?2-2 


15.00 


SD1451 


331272-4 


15.00 


SD1451^ 


an27B 


20.00 


3314S2 


311278^1 


IB. 00 


SD1452-2 



TYPE 



FRIGE 



MICE 

918.00 

B.OO 

10.00 

15.00 

15.00 

15.00 

3.00 

3.00 

3.00 

3.00 

3.00 

1.00 

10.00 

3.00 

5,00 

2.50 

2.50 

7.50 

7. SO 

15.00 

1.00 

l.OO 

1.00 

40,00 

la.qo 

22.00 

21.00 

18,00 

50,00 

S4.Q0 

33.00 

15.00 

15.00 

15.00 

12.00 

16,00 

30.00 

30.00 

%.oo 

91,00 
15,00 

e,oo 
e.oo 

2B,00 
Ifi.OO 
16,00 
30,00 
30.00 

le Gau Gross fleferencs Host RF Transi;atQr^, DIck^s, Hybrid Modules And Any Other Type Of Semioonductor. 

* UlQtlES nUT CAHftI KR, HICROHfAVE , PIN , SQUnin' . lUNNEL, VAFWCTOft, GUNN ) * 



331453-1 


S4^,Q0 


aDl454-l 


48.00 


ail477 


48.00 


a>147B 


21,00 


mx4m 


60. 00 


mum 


1.50 


331484-5 


1,50 


SD14ftl-6 


1,50 


SDl4a4"7 


1.50 


spi4aa 


3e.do 


801488^1 


^.00 


an48B^7 


27.00 


S>148S-^ 


28,00 


a;l400-l 


39,00 


331520-2 


13. GO 


331522-^ 


33,00 


331528-1 


34,00 


33lSaS-3 


34,00 


S>153&-2 


3S.0O 


S3I53&-1 


41,00 


33X545 


34,00 


331561 


7&.00 


SF4557 MSL, 


25.00 


SSOOm RCA 


5.00 


aOlTT HCA 


15,00 


3ISr7l4 Hot. 


2.50 


^lF75d lt>t. 


3e.oo 


SRF1018 mu 


s.oo 


SHr2147 lot. 


22,00 


mF2356 iHot, 


38.00 


SRF2378 Mot. 


16.00 


SBTTSm Hoc. 


40,00 


srsmimA, 


25.00 


SRraSST UK. 


20,00 


ttiBam tcA 


15,00 


TISWe/MBFBSe 


3.35 


TP312 


2.50 


TP1014 IWI 


5.00 


1F1028 Ittl 


15.00 


oi-arranuM/ 




■tZS-mS Mnt.GKTTB 


. 65.00 


TXVJ2201 M.P. 


450.00 


62803 »CA 


100,00 


TA7205/2S5921 


80.00 


TA74e7/2*©92)0 


73.00 


TA7995/2NS3S7 


150,00 


Sf30S2 mi. 


IS. 00 


iepti9 


8.05 



sjm 


3 3.40 


mziD 


4.00 


L'CIK 


5,80 


1M^ 


3.40 


1K23CB 


4.00 


imsw 


10.00 


1W76 


26.00 


1K78B 


26,00 


iin4e 


e,€o 


1IM15G 


15,00 


1}«31 


10,00 


1IG930 


15.00 


LN3713 


IS, 00 


Uf3717 


14,00 


1N3747 


21.00 


1N4812B 


d.oo 


liei42A/B 


4.25 


Iiei4fi4/B 


4. 25 


11^53 


3.75 


1^713 


5.00 


1^200 


15.00 


A2XXiai Aertech 


50.00 


BL181 Qamc 


5.00 


Di23:m Alptm 


nm 


I&047C AlplK 


VOR 


£££6158-98 Alpte 


vm 


GC3 691-89 CiiZ 


31.35 


QC2542-^6 (312 


37.40 


HP9Q62-D112 


14.20 


HP5082'43375 


POR 


iff5fle2-102& 


pce 


W>50fi2-Z303 


5,^ 


lffQO^-2800 


1.00 


llP50e2-3039 


6.70 


HPB082-3379 


1,50 


tl>S082-8013 


PCft 


IU475 


FCit 


ttA4t7e6 


ton 


IIM363& 


POR 


Mumoo 


3.05 


MA47SD2 





IIGIB 


S 3.40 


iKiim 


$ 3.40 


L^IC 


S 3.40 


UQIIK 


4,00 


1N21QI 


6.00 


miiMF 


5.00 


USllQ 


5,80 


1J^2 


5.00 


WS3fk 


10.00 


USSC 


3,40 


imxR 


3,40 


V&3D 


4,95 


lN231ffi 


5,00 


11425 


7,50 


IJQfiAR 


18.00 


li©9 


10,00 


IH32 


20.00 


iNsrjA 


55,50 


IN76R 


26.00 


IH78 


25.00 


iX?BA 


30.00 


INTSO 


28,00 


urmm 


28.00 


jxim 


38.00 


imsofi 


18,00 


1M15 


4.00 


u*4iac 


4.00 


WtXSi 


5,00 


IMlfiE 


e.oo 


lli446 


10.00 


1NB33 


10.00 


ll»50 


4,00 


1N1064 


2.00 


uesss 


15.00 


m3^40 


15.00 


1N3712 


11.00 


110714 


11. OO 


IN3715 


16.00 


1N3716 


10.00 


1II3718 


10.00 


IN3721 


14.00 


1N3733 


10.00 


1N438S 


20.00 


IN4396 


15.00 


1N47S5 


11.00 


lim39A/B 


4.^ 


11B14QA/B 


4.25 


1IB141A/B 


4.25 


l]^l43A/6 


4.25 


1J&144A/B 


4.25 


1%145A/B 


4.S 


L*5147A/B 


4.^ 


L^ol48A/B 


4.25 


imim 


5.50 


1IB465 


7.65 


UB711 


1.00 


1N5711 JAN 


2.00 


lie7ti7 


2,00 


UCSBS 


1.00 


1E2199 


15,00 


1S2206/9 


1.00 


aB1087/4aRa6B553 


S5.00 


803020 


66,00 


WJICSB 


1.00 


BBi06G 


l.OO 


a>4/4JFBH G.E. 


15,00 


affi514AB C.U, 


PCR 


P1060 Mrtm 


Ptit 


D1159 Alpha 


PQR 


DiaOO Alpha 


PGR 


M30S Alpha 


FOR 


ll«d87U Alpha 


PCB 


D6J47D Alpat 


PCK 


D&503 Alftm 


FOR 


IBS08 Alpha 


POR 


»f36022 Alpha 


TOL 


IlDB4eQlA AUiha 


POR 


19^0064 Crem 


POR 


0Cl50fl-a9 QU 


31,35 


0C1607^0 (IE 


31.33 


oca53i^8s as 


37,40 


OC3208-40 CHZ 


37.40 


0C170'1-1 GHZ 


50,00 


I{P3:)&14A-|P1 


135,00 


Hl%082'^0241 


75.60 


HP50eS-0253 


105.00 


IffS082-0320 


58.00 


WSOa2^386 


POR 


^5082-0401 


poa 


»>50e2-O138 


POR 


»>eoe2-i332 


FC£ 


E|i50e2-2254 


PCM 


n>90^'Z3Qa 


10,70 


Iff5£362-26S€ 


FOR 


S^5062-2711 


23.15 


llPS0e2-2727 


POR 


»>5O62-2805 


4.45 


HP5062-2835 


l.OO 


S>5062-23S4 


PCtL 


WS082-3040 


3e.oo 


HF6082^3080 


2.00 


HP5082-31S8 


l.OO 


HP50a2-6459 


POR 


HP50B2-&462 


POR 


HP5DB2-6a8a 


pen 


lff^082-8323 


POR 


K3A Kkmtpon 


7.00 


MA450A 


POR 


KM0006 


POR 


MA^i 141^7 


fOR 


IIA41?^ 


f(» 


l£^13004 


48.00 


MM3S6S 


POR 


liM3G22 


PGR 


ttf45im 


27.00 


1IA47CH4 


nn 


IIA47Q31 


25. SO 


I1IM7202 


30.80 


MM 7771 


POR 


HA47B3&* 


POR 


IM9108 


37.95 


UA43558 


POR 


liAa6731 


125.00 



• an smoi aiANt^ miu- so call if if the p/wt yod need is not lisieo .•»•«•.•♦♦*.••••.••••••••••••••»»«••***•"••••**• 



For Inlonnation calf: (602) 242-3037 



Toll Free Number 
800-528-0180 
(For orders only) 



"All pans may b« new or 
surplus, anCi parls may he 
substilul^ wHh comparable parts 
If we are out of stock of art Item,** 



Q^^i\x electroi)ic$ 

PRICES SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE 



73 Magazine • April, 1984 13fl 



COAXIAL BELAY SVXICHES SPm* 



Electronic Specially Co ^ /Raven Electronics 
Fart i 23K28 Part # SU-Ol 

26Vdc Type N Connector, DC to I GHst. 



FSN 598S-5S6-96a3 



$49. 00 





Asp hen ol 

Fart # 3 Ifr-I 0102-9 

115¥ac Type 6NC DC to 3 GHz. 



$29.99 



Fart f 300-11182 

120Vac Type BNC DC to 4 GHz, 
FSN 5985-543-1225 

$39,99 



FXR 

?art f 300-11173 
12QVair Type BNC Same 
FSN 5995- 5i> 3- 1850 

$39,99 






mC To Banana Plug Coax Cable RG-5S 36 Inch pr BNC to H Coax Cable llG-58 36 Inch. 



S7.99 or 2 For $13.99 or 10 For 150,00 



$8*99 or 2 For $15,99 or 10 For $60.00 





SOLID STATE RELAYS 



P&B Model ECTiDB7Z 
PRICE EACH $5*00 

Diglsig, Inc, Model ECS-215 
PRICE EACH S7.50 

Grig«by/ Barton Model GB740D 
PRICE EACH $7.50 



3vdc turn en 



5vdc ttim on 



IZOvac concaci at 7araps or 20aiips on a 
10^'x 10"x ,124 aluminum* Heatalnk with 
all Icon grease . 

24Dvac contact I4antpe or 40amps on a 
10**K I0**x .124 aiutolnum. Heatsink with 
silicon grease. 

140vac contact at J 5ainps or 40amp3 on a 
10"x 10"3C .124 aluminum. Beatslnk with 
silicon grease. 

NOTE: *** tte^s nsay be substituted vith other brands or equivalent model numbers, *** 



Svdc turn on 



(^Vf^ 



For tnlonnation call: (602) 242-3037 



elect roqiGjki 



"All parts may be new or 
surplus, and parts may be 
sul}«^titutecl wimcofTiparable parts 
it we are out oi slock of an ilem " 



Toll Fr«« Number 
000-528*01 80 
(For ardtr* only) 

PRICES SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE 



140 73 Magazine • April, 1964 



RECALL PHCME MEHORY TELEPHONE tflTH 24 HOMBER AtTTQ. DIALER 

The Recall Phone Telephone employs the latest state of art 
cannnimicAtlons eechriology.lt Is a coixtbinatioit telephone 
aod automatic dialer thet uses premlust-quallty ,flolLd>stjite 
(lirciiitry to assure hlgh-rel lability performance in personal 
or buainesfi applications* $49*99 




AflOS ALPHA RAPID BQMDtKG GLUE 

Super Glue fCE-4a6 high strength 
rapid bonding adhesive. Alplia 
Cyanoai:rylate*Set--Tli»e 20 to 40 
sec. t0.7fl.o2. (20g;m<) 

$2.00 




TOUCH TONE PAO 

This pad contains all the electronics to 
produce standard touch^^tone tones i Nev 
with data. 








MHfl 




> 



$9.99 or 10/589.99 



HTTSUHI UHF/VHF VARACTOR TUKER MODEL UVElA 

Perfect for those unscraiobler projects. 
New irith data* 




S19.99 or 10/5149,99 



IHTBGRATCD CIRCUIT- 



MC1372P 

MCI35BP 

MCr350P 

MC1330A1P 

MC1310P 

MC1496P 

LM565N 

LM380N14 

LMi889N 

NE564K 

KE56iM 



Color TV Video Hodulator Circuit- 

IF Amp. ,Limicer,FM Detector, Audio Driver, Electronic Attenuator 

IF Amplifier 

Low Level Video Detector 

FH Stereo Demodulator 

Balanced Modulator /Demodulator 

Phase Locked Loop 

2l^att Audio Power Amplifier 

TV Video Modulator 

Phase Locked Loop 

Phase Locked Loop 



1 CO 10 


tlup 


4.42 


S2-93 


5.00 


4.00 


l.SO 


1,25 


1*50 


1, 15 


4.29 


3.30 


1.50 


1.25 


2.50 


2.00 


1.5& 


1.25 


5.00 


4.00 


10.00 


8.00 


10.00 


8.00 



FERRA.NTI ELECTROHICS AM RADIO RELi:lv£R fflJDEl ZN414 tSPTEGHATED CIRCUIT^ 
Features: 

1*2 10 1^6 volt operating range., Less thim 0,5iBS current consuaptioti. l^OICHz t<» 3MHz 
Frequency range* ,E9^ to Assesable ^no alignment necessary. Effective and variable AGC action., 
WHl drive an earphone direct. Excellent audio <}ualltyi. , Typical power gain of 72dB*|IO-ld 
package. Vlth data. S2. 99 or 10 For S2A. 99 



NT CAD RECHARGEABLE BATTERIES 

AA Battery Pack of 6 These are Factory 
New* $5,00 

SUB C Pack of 10 2*5Amp/Hr* $10.00 

Gates Rechargeable Battery Packs 



12vdc at 2*5Aiiip/Hr. 
12vdc at 5Amp/Hr, 



$11.99 
$15.99 





z electroi|}Ci 



"'AM pafis may b« new or 
fturplus, and parts may be 
suDsiituted w^lh comparable parts 
It wa are out of slock o1 an Uem" 



MOTOROLA MRF559 RF TRANSISTOR 

hfe 30nin 90typ ZOQrax. 

ft 300CtTtiz 

gain Sdb min 9.5typ at SZOrtiz 

13* typ at 512itiz 
output power .5watts at 12.5vdc 
at 87QTtiz. 

$2,05 or 10/$a5.00 



For informatton call: (602) 242 3037 

Toll Free Number 
800-528-0180 

(Far ord«rt only) 

PRICES SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE 



73 Magazine * April, 1984 141 



^M 



"SOCKETS AND CHIMNEYS" 



EIMAC TUBE SOCKETS AM) CHIMN^EYS 



^t-R!— iPHHi 



SKliO 

SK300A 

SK40G 

SK406 

SKAie 

SK500 

SK600 

SK602 

SK606 

SK607 

SKBIO 

SK620 

SK626 

SK630 

SK636B 

SK640 

5K700 

SK7HA 

SK740 

SK770 

SKeOOA 

SK80& 

SKBIQ 

SK900 

5K906 

SKUZO 

SKli90 



Socket 

Socket For 4CX5000A,R, J, 4CX10,OOOD, 4CX15,O00A,J 

Socket For 4-l25A,250A,AOOA,400C,4PR125A,400A,A-500A,5-500A 

Chimney For 4-250A,400A,400C,4PR40QA 

Chliroey For 3-4D0Z 

Socket For 4-1000A/4PR10QOA/B 

Socket For 4CX2 50B.BC,FG,R.4CX350A,F,FJ 

Sockec For 4GX250B,BC,FG,R,4CX35OA,F,FJ 

Chimney For 4CX230B»BC,FG,R,4CX330A,F,FJ 

Socket For 4CX600JjJA 

Socket For 4CX60QJ , JA 

Socket For 4CX600J^JA 

Chimney For 4CX600J,JA 

Socket For 4CX6aaJ,JA 

Chimney For 4CX600J,JA 

Socket For 4CX600J»JA 

Chimney For 4CX600J , JA 

Socket For 4CX300A,Y,4CX125C,F 

Socket For 4CX30€A,T,4CKi25CtF 

Socket For 4CX300A,T,4CX125C,F 

Socket For 4CX300A,Y,4CX125C»F 

Sockec For 4CX1000A,4CX1500B 

Chimney For 4CXiOOOA,4CX1500B 

Socket For 4CXia00A,4CXl500fl 

Socket For 4X50OA 

Chimney For 4XICM}A 

Socket For 5CX3(H>OA 

Socket For 4CV8000A 



SPOR 

$520.00 

260.00 

74.00 

36,00 

390.00 

51.00 

73.00 

U*00 

60,00 

60.00 

66.00 

10,00 

66.00 

34,00 

36.00 

71*00 

225,00 

225-00 

86.00 

86.00 

225.00 

40.00 

225.00 

300*00 

57.00 

650*00 

585vO0 



JOHNSON TUBE SOCKETS AND CHIMNEYS 



124-11I/SK606 

122-0275-001 

124-OU3-00 

l24-n6/SK630A 

114-U5-2/SK620A 



Chlnmey For 4CK250B,8C,FC,R, 4CX350A,F,FJ 
Socket For 3-500Z, 4-125A, 250A, 40OA, 4-500A 
Capacitor Ring 

Socket For 4CX250B,BC,FG,R, /4CX350A,F,FJ 
Socket For 4CX250fl/BC,FGpR, /4CX350A,F,FJ 
813 Tube Socket 



5*500A 



$ 10.00 
(pair) 15-00 
15,00 
55.00 
55,00 
20.00 



CHIP CAPACITORS 

*8pf 

Ipf 

Klpf 

1.4pf 

hSpf 

L8pf 

2.2pf 

2Jpf 

3.3pf 

3.6pf 

3,9pf 

4.7pf 

6,6pf 

e.spf 

S.2pf 



PRICES 



I to 10 - 

II to 50 ' 
51 to 100 



lOpf 
12pf 
15pf 
iSpf 
20pf 
22pf 
24pf 
27pf 
33pf 
39pf 
47pf 
51pf 
56pf 
68pf 
Upf 

,99t 

90e 

.8oe 





lOOpf* 




UOpf 




I20pf 




130pf 




ISOpf 




160pf 




laopf 




SOOpf 




a2Dpf* 




240pf 




270pf 




lOOpf 




330pf 




aeopf 




390pf 


101 to 1000 


.60c * 


1001 i UP 


-35c 



470pf 

SlOpf 

S&Opf 

620pf 

680pf 

SgOpf 

100Qpf/*001uf* 

1800pf/*001Suf 

2700pf/.O027uf 

10,000pf/.01uf 

12,000pf/.012uf 

15,000pf/.0lSuf 

ie,000pf/.018uf 

IS A SPECIAL PRICE: 10 for $7.50 

100 for S65,00 
1000 for $350.00 



TUBE CAPS tPlate) 


$11,00 
13.00 
14.00 
17.00 

20. OC; 


URl, 4 

HR2.3, 6 fi. 7 
HR5. 8 
M9 
HRIO 





WATKI^jS JOHNSON WJ-V907 : Voltage Controlled Microwave Oscillator $110.00 

Frequency range 3.6 to 4.2GiHz, Power oyput, Min. lOdBm typical* 8dBrn Guaranteed* 
Spurious output suppressicm Hamwriic (nfo). ^i^- 20<iB typical, In-Band Non-Hamionic, min, 
eOde typical. Residual FH, pk to pk. Max. SKHz, pushing factor, Majc, 8KHz/V, PyVlIng figure 
(L5;l VSWR), Wa*. 60Klz, Tuning voltage range +1 to +15volts. Tuning current, Hax. -0.1mA. 
modulatiofi sensitivity range. Hax. 120 to 30HHz/V, Input capacitance. Max. lOOpf, Oscillator 
Bias +15 +-0.05 volts @ 55mA, Hax. 



Toll Free Number 
S00-S2&^)180 
(For orders only) 



^'All parts may be new or 
surplys. and parts may be 
sut^tEtuteo with comparable parts 
it we are oul of stock oi an i^im," 



(^^^ff[z elect roi|ics 

For information call: (602) 2423037 
PRICES SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE 



142 73 Magazine • April, 1984 



TUBES 



TYPE 



PRICE 



TYPE 



PRICE 



TYPE 



PRICE 



ZC39/7289 


S 34 . 00 


n82/4600A 


5500,00 


HL7B15AL 


S 60.00 


2E25 


7.95 


4600A 


500.00 


7843 


107.00 


2K28 


200.00 


4624 


310.00 


7854 


130.00 


3-500Z 


102.00 


4657 


84.00 


HL7855KAL 


125.00 


3-1000Z/8164 


400.00 


4662 


100.00 


7984 


14.95 


3B28/866A 


9.50 


4665 


500.00 


8072 


84.00 


3CX400L17/8961 


255.00 


4687 


P.O.R. 


8106 


5.00 


3CX1000A7/8Z83 


526.00 


5675 


42.00 


8117A 


226.00 


3CX3000F1/8239 


567.00 


5721 


250.00 


8121 


110.00 


3CW30OOOH7 


1700.00 


5768 


125.00 


8122 


110.00 


3X2500A3 


473.00 


5819 


119.00 


8134 


470.00 


3X3000F1 


567 . 00 


5836 


232.50 


8156 


12.00 


4-65A/8165 


69.00 


5837 


232.50 


8233 


60.00 


4-125A/4D21 


79.00 


5861 


140.00 


8236 


35.00 


4-250A/5022 


98.00 


5867A 


185.00 


8295/PL172 


500. 00 


4-400A/8438 


98.00 


5868/AX9902 


270.00 


8458 


35.00 


4-400B/7527 


110.00 


5876/A 


42.00 


8462 


130. 00 


4-400C/6775 


110.00 


5881/6L6 


8.00 


8505A 


95.00 


4'1000A/8166 


444.00 


5893 


60.00 


8533W 


136.00 


4CX250B/7203 


54.00 


5894 /A 


54.00 


8560/A 


75.00 


4CX250FG/B621 


75.00 


58943/8737 


64.00 


e560AS 


100.00 


4CX250K/8245 


125.00 


5946 


395.00 


8608 


38.00 


4CX250R/7580W 


90.00 


6083/AZ9909 


95.00 


8624 


100.00 


4CX300A/8167 


170.00 


6146/5146A 


8.50 


8637 


70.00 


4CX350A/8321 


110.00 


6145B/8298 


10.50 


8643 


83.00 


4CX350F/8322 


115.00 


6146W/7212 


17.95 


8647 


168.00 


4CX350FJ/8904 


140.00 


6155 


110.00 


8683 


95.00 


4CX600J/8809 


835.00 


6159 


13.85 


8877 


465.00 


4CX1000A/8168 


242 . 50* 


6159B 


23.50 


8908 


13.00 


4CX1000A/8168 


485.00 


6161 


325.00 


8950 


13.00 


4CX1500B/8e60 


555.00 


6280 


42.50 


8930 


137.00 


4CX5000A/8170 


1100.00 


6291 


180.00 


6L6 Metal 


25.00 


4CX1.0000D/8171 


1255.00 


6293 


24.00 


6L6GC 


5.03 


4CX15000A/8281 


1500.00 


6326 


P.O.R. 


6CA7/EL34 


5.38 


4CW800F 


710.00 


6360/A 


5.75 


15CL6 


3.50 


4D32 


240.00 


6399 


540.00 


6DJ8 


2.50 


4E27A/5-i25B 


240.00 


6550A 


10.00 


6DQ5 


6.58 


4PR60A 


200.00 


6883B/8032A/8552 


10.00 


6GF5 


5.85 


4PR6CB 


345.00 


6897 


160.00 


6GJ5A 


6.20 


4PR65A/8ia7 


175.00 


6907 


79.00 


6GK6 


6.00 


4PR1000A/S1S9 


590.00 


6922/6DJ8 


5.00 


6HB5 


6.00 


4X150A/7034 


60 00 


6939 


22.00 


6HF5 


8.73 


4X150D/7609 


95.00 


7094 


250.00 


6JG6A 


6.28 


4X2 5DB 


45.00 


7117 


38.50 


6JM6 


6.00 


4X2 50F 


45.00 


7203 


P.O.R. 


6JN6 


6.O0 


4X500A 


412.00 


7211 


100.00 


6JS6C 


7.25 


5CX1500A 


650.00 


7213 


300.00* 


6KN6 


5.05 


KT88 


27.50 


7214 


300.00* 


6KD6 


8.25 


416B 


45.00 


7271 


135.00 


6LF6 


7.00 


416C 


62.50 


7289/2C39 


34.00 


6LQ6 6.E. 


7.00 


572B/T160L 


49.95 


7325 


P.O.R. 


6Lq6/6HJ6 Sylvania 


9.00 


592/3-200A3 


211.00 


7350 


13.50 


6ME6 


8.90 


807 


8.50 


7377 


85.00 


12AT7 


3.50 


31 lA 


15.00 


7408 


2.50 


12AX7 


3.00 


812A 


29.00 


7609 


95.00 


12BY7 


5.00 


813 


50.00 


7735 


36.00 


12JB6A 


6.50 



NOTE * = USED TUBE 



NOTE P.O.R. = PRICE ON REQUEST 



"ALL PARTS MAY BE NEW, USED, OR SURPLUS. PARTS MAY BE SUBSTITUTED WITH COMPARABLE PARTS IF WE 
ARE OUT OF STOCK OF AN ITEM. 



NOTICE: ALL PRICES ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE . 



For ififorniation call: (602) 242 3037 



Toll Free Number 
800-528-0180 

(For orders only) 



'*AH parts may b« new Qf 
surplus, and parts may be 
substituted witti qgrnparable pa^s 
if we are oirt of stocit of an item/' 



(^^^|z elect roiycs 



PRICES SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE 



73 Magazine • April, 1984 143 



"FILTERS" 

COLLINS HechaniCQl Filter #526-972^1-010 MODEL Fit55Z32F 

455KHZ at 3,2KH2 wide. May be other models bat equivalent, Kay be used or new, $15,99 

ATLAS CrvstQl Filters 

5.59S-2*7/8A^B, 5. 595-2. 7A^ 

8 pole 2.7KH2 wide Upper sideiard. Srpedence SOOohms 15pf In/800ohms Opf out. 19*99 

5. 595-2, 7/8 AJ^ 5.595-2,7A>SB 

e pole 2.7Khz wide Upper sidebard, Irrpedende SOOohms ISpf In/800ohms Opf out. 19.99 

5. 595-, 500/4, 5. 595-. 500/4/0^ 

4 pole 500 cycles wide O^. Inpedance SOOohms 15pf IiVSOOohms Opf out, 19.99 

9.0USB/CW 

6 pole 2-7KHZ wide at 6dB- Inpedance 680ohTis 7pf In/BOOolins 8pf oat, CW- 1599Hz 19.99 

KOKUSAI ELECTRIC CO, flechoniCQl Filter #HF-455-2L/ZU-21H 

4S5KHZ at Colter Fteque:nGy of 453* 5KC, Carrier Frequency of 455KHz 2,36KC Bandwidth, 
Utfer sideba«3- (ZU) 19,99 

UyMQT sidebard. (2^) 19.99 



*«•«»••«»•««««»*««•••« 



«»**«»•*•*«««»» 



*«•*«•«#««»•«»«*«•#«««»*##•#•••«««« 



CRYSTAL FILTERS 



WTKKO 

TEW 

SDK 

TYCO/CD 
MOTOROIA 

pn 

FTI 
PTl 

FRC 
FILTEOi 

CERAMIC FILTERS 



FX-07800C 

FEC- 103-2 

SCH'113A 

TF-3IH250 

001019880 

4884363301 

5350C 

5426C 

1479 

A10300 

ERXF-15700 



7.8MH2 

10,6935MH2 

11,2735KHZ 

GF 3179. 3KH2 

10.7MHz 2pole 15KHz b^ldwidth 

11.7MHz 2pole 15KHZ bandwidth 

12MI1Z 2pole 15KHZ bandwidth 

21,4MH2 2pole ISraz bandwidth 

10.7MEiz ©pole bandwidth 7.SKHZ at 3dB, 5KH2 at 6dB 

45Mi2 2pole 15KHZ bareiwiath 

20, 6MHz 36KHZ wide 

CF 7-825MBZ 



510,00 

10 . 00 

10,00 

19 , 99 

5,00 

5.00 

5.00 

5.00 

20.00 

6-00 

10,00 

10.00 



«*«•##«*« «»««*ii«#«»««#«#4-#«*«»**«ftft#«^*«-i «#••### 



**-»*«««*•»«•**» 



AXEL 

ci£vrrE 



^UPPOf 



TOKIKf 
MATSUSHIRA 



4F449 

TCHOIA 

1CF4-12D36A 

EFD455B 

BFB455L 

Cra455E 

CTM455D 

CFR455E 

Cru455B 

CFU455C 

CFU455G 

CFU455H 

CFU455I 

CFW455D 

CEW455H 

SFB455D 

SFD455D 

SFElO.Tm 

SFElO.TMS 

SPGlO.Tm 

ir-B4/CFU455I 

If'-B6/CFU455II 

IF-B8 

IP-CIB 

CF455;V^FU4S5K 

EPC-L4 55K 



12,6KC Banipass Filter 3dB bandwidth l,6KHz frcm 11.8^13.4KHz 

455KHz^-2KHz bandvddth 4-7% at 3dB 

455KHZ-I-1KHZ bandwidth 6dB min 12KHz, 60dB max 36KHz 

455raz 

455KH2 

455KHZ H-5,5KHz at 3dB , -i-SKHz at 6dB , 4-16K]iz at 50dB 

455KHZ 'f-?KHz at 3dB , 4-lOKtlz at 6dB , +-20KHZ at 50dB 

455KH2 -h-5.SKH2 at 3dB , -I-8KHZ at 6dB , 4-16KHZ at 60dB 

455KH2 -1-2^2 bandwidth ■I-15KHZ at 6dB, +-30KHZ at 40dB 

455KH2 -I-2KHZ bandwidth +-12,5KHz at 6dB , +-24KBZ at 40dB 

455KH2 -i-UCHz bandwidth -»^4.5Kliz at 6dB , -i-lOKHz at 40dB 

455KKZ +"limz bandwidth ■f-3KHz at 6dB , 4-9KHZ at 40dB 

455KH2 -l-lKHz bardwidth 4-2KH2 at 6dB , -I-6KH2 at 40dB 

455KH2 4-lOKHz at 6dB , +-20KHZ at 40dB 

455KRZ 4-3KHZ at 6dB , +-9KHz at 4GdB 

455KH2 

455KHZ 4-2KHZ , 3dB bandwidth 4,5KHz -l-lKKz 

10 •7MHz 280KH2 -f-50KH2 at 3dB , 650KHZ at 20dB 

10,7M12 230KHZ -fr-SOKHz at 3dB , 570KHz at 20dB 

10,7B4Hz 

455KHZ -l-LKHz 

435KHZ 4-lKHz 

455KHZ 

455KHZ 

455KHZ -^2KHz 

455KHZ 



10.00 

5.00 
10*00 
2.50 
3.50 
6,65 
6.65 
8.00 
2.90 
2.90 
2/90 
2,90 
2.90 
2.90 
2*90 
2.50 
5,00 
2,50 
2,50 
10*00 
2.90 
2,90 
2.90 
10.00 
5 . 00 
7 . 00 



#«««««»«»««»+«»*«»»« •«««««««*»««»»»»«««#»«*•»««*»«##*««« «««#««#*#«««««««#*«««« 



SPECTRA PHYSICS INC, Model 088 HeNe LASER TUBES 

BEAM DIA, .751*! BEAM DIR, 2,7MR 

lOOOVDC -t-lOOVDC At 3,?MA 

ROTRON WUFFIN FANS Model HARK^/HUZAl 



POWER amnm i,6m^. 

68 K OHM ira.Tr BALIAST 



SKV STORrn*^ VOLTAGE DC 

559.99 



115 V7C 14 WATTS 

105cm at 60CPS 



50/6 OCPS 

THESE ARE NEW 



8S*'2FM at 50CPS 



(fVI^l|z elect rai|ics 

PRICES SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE 



Toll Free Number 

BOO-528-0180 
(For orders only) 



$ 7.99 

"AU parts fnay be new or 
surplMs. and parts may be 
sut^stitutedi wilh cQ)mp<i^rabi« parts 
if we are out of slock of an ilem.^ 



For information caft: (602) 242^3037 



144 73 Magaiim • April, 1984 



HEWLETT PACKARD SIGNAL GENERATORS 



60GB 



TS51Q 









SOKHi to 6SflH2 in 6 Donds * -11, Output level adjustfltJie PJuV 

10 5V Into b.D ohfns.BulU^n crtstot ccl Itjrator.™ -IOOOh^ 
ntodiiloUQn, 

Seme OS cit}0ve Ckjc nas rreauency control feature to oil oh 
opefoiiod mtn HP 87C^ SyncfifoniiEr. 

imii iQ ii20iti?, 0.1uV^3.5V Into 50 ortB5.*-Q.5t occurocr* 
&ullt^tn crvstoi ccUlirator, W-DI Qf puIs€ atjtuut. 



iRuroved vers 
stobHlty.loid 



ion of Dooulcr 

residual FM, 



BOECOO to IV oytput. trnnrovefl 



lOrtHz to i<55MH£ in 5 
buHt-m crvstol col 

.SV Into 50 oiifti. 



tKinds *-il frequency accuroQV with 
I bra tor r Can bs used with HP B/OflA 
tontmuously mJJusttitila frow 4uV co 



tiS0-123(»li2 .o.IiiV-D.^ Into 50 



^CQlt&nitefr mjtDot. 



dOO-ZlflfiWi Hi tit mxiv fcotiires Incloding cal United Dutwt 
and oti ivxiulotlon enor^cteri sties. 



1 650.00 
fUQO.OO 
I 500.00 

(1100.00 
I 7S0.00 

f 500*00 



Pi reel reodln? oncl dlreu control from LB to i*^GWl- tne 
M*P>frl6fl feiJtures +-1.5d6 coli&roted output cccurocv from 

-31^7d^ to -dBi^.Tne outDut is directly ctJH&rQted In mtcro- 
vDlts and dBn> wuh contirmous .Fronltorind. sitoI^ aoerotion 
freouency d:,ad accurqcy is '-IS and stacnitv ej^ceeds 0-D05!I- 
/ C change In cmblent terffteroture^ Calibrated otlenuotor js 
MUhtn +-tSd& over entire outDut bond. 50 qItjh lrtiD**dani;e unit 
has Ifiiemal pulse motiuJcilon **lth rep rate variodle from 40 
Hi to ^KHi.vtJflOible Duisewldthtj to lOuseciond voriooie cuUe 
itelovtJ to JOOuseO.ExteftMil iDdulailnt? inputs increos ver- 
satlSlty. * jre^OO 



tl€X y«(»ITORJ£S T>S>2R£XlCIIIl€;S]SO. 

0cse neoc^LS cote mtn d3ta to Peck ic to a IQB moics ma miv QWtr ec]uli?iHit, 
Perfect for Airplanes * i^IiosJters * HcDile ftnios ^ or just die Teleptime. 
niese Are Factory New In Seoled Boxes. Limited susply Unly *69,95 



ciM'H; 



electroqicsi 



GIBB 

&ia€ 

€2011 
6KIB 

B708A 



Some OS dtsove hut later niadel, 



t 6011. CD 



5. a to F.6SH2 ronge^witrt call Dro ted outout and selection of _. __ 
DuUe-FM or squore wave mtKjumttor^. * BOO. GO 

Sam as otove but later videL t220D.OO 

7 ttp llGHj r^n^^iiitti cglibretea ouxmi m& ^i&^tim of ^ ^^ ^ 
pulse-fn or sf^jane mtmc «Ddiilatiirt. « /»i.ao 

Sane s» obove but loier tBdti. sZ200,00 

10 to 156Hi.lOnirf oulDyt verier wUh cailbroieq output ond ^,^^^ ^ 
pulse-squore wove or FH modulaiion, *4ZUO.og 

SyncJirontier usfld with 605B,6C]aF,The synchronlaer is o 
phdse-lpck fretjuencv stotitlizer which provides crystal- 
osci Motor frequency stability to iiJVjmz jn the 6QeF sfgnol 
genefotOJ'.flKisE locking eiimirtotes mlcropnonlcs gid drift 
resulting in excellent frequency stobUlty.lfte 8703* IncfiKtes 
a vernier uhlcfi cm tune tfti reference Oscillator over o range 
Of *-0.251 DCTiilttlng freduencv ^ettofciUiy to 2 sorts in iO 
to tne seventh. Provides a very stable signal tnat soilsf les 
nof^v critical ap^tlcotlans. _ 

(wttn i^" goes or ^mi 

< Without] 



I 550.00 
s 450.00 



PK-10 
NF-105F 



ELECTftO»«IillCS EMC-10 Rf l/EHI RECEIVER 

Lokf treouency onolyj!er cov^r no 20Hz to 50lCHz freouencv 

rDngeȣKtendaDle to SDD 4<Hz In wideband modei 

Empire Devices Field Intensuy Meter ^ 

Hos NF-IOS/TA,NF-105/TX.NF-iaS/Tl.NF-ia5/r2*NF-10&/n* 

Covers WKiiZ to lOOOWi. 

ALL EQUlFfEMT CAiUtY A 30 OAY OUARAHfEE. 

EOUlRfCifT 1% HOT CALlSllATEfi. 



IZ5t]€.QD 



fHOQ.QC 






CXI-0 lerCHuM 



CfwcK Ofwy 



CQi9'' AccapuM* &f tilMipdvni or nwil PjiimiBnl ^jvt\ cwHorf^*!' wrti t* &» C^Mft, Monn Ordor, orCintmr * Qitck 
IHA iM« ccnrK?r Aocapl pvnOnvl chscki Im G O.D'K, C^.D.'« iW «hlpp«t J^r ^i' «ihv indthfij UntlnJ Pm««I S*/vlce 

OONFINUINO Oni>E11B: Wi wOuld pitHsr EFUf aonrlfmlM OKl«n nnt dq senE aFltr • titophone orctaf hii bwn pl«oad, ir rjQtftptnf 
pcNcy iiacQGSitaleft ■ cj^rii^rmjng ^idcr. pb«iM mirk -"OElt^FinMlNO" boldly on tim imimj M pns^JMM W i^upltcalifi ainipnMMti. dc 
mr dUi IE) «i ofd« wNcn «• rrad pratwflr m***! »m cmftom* *iH to rwlU raipdmiloi* (or amr cMrgw iTcufred. plui ■ IftS 
fHlMi «l«ii^ on thp^ r«i4*rFMd |M4l» 

30 DA-rS intf rytipt_^ «■ 

la 

KUVIirV: Oretore nv uiusHy ttirwwJ ff» Mm* *»■ Wwy ■»• P<»™a of llw nurt »iAn«*l wy, wHMI •• w oiC pf bi™:* Df» w> 
llpn Thfl cuBromar *ii| I Cw fKiitl fiod by jx*! t*HJ I F w6 #K QOJnfl lo tip<*jjfdftr Itw ll«(tt, Qu* nonnil thtpdng mPtiiiad -In UPS w U B 
Mill I dipondlnp an b\£b or tna wapohl oF IhB P#tMfl<i Tim I FnulpmifH ia sAlppaddHly Iff iir iifld !■ tralgftt CoJiePt, unlwi pfiof 
^n^ngcfliinl & hara bcwn FnjKJB and apprEinmd 

FOftSmN DRDCAfi: Al« lurnign <?riter» rTiuiit tw |3'ii«ak9 mlft m C»N«'s Cnflck, <Qf Mnmiy Qr^Jar rfi^ilif aul m U.S. FUNDS OHIV 
W* ■ra wrry but CO D It noi nBilabU Id FCMHOn {soumdM ind IWlw* ol cn0lt nn wwcEflptBblfl u * l«mi Ot |iaynwi( Furtl^w^ 
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plwfeM trKtude 2S% 04 Ui« ordwd wnOiad for stiip^ng, and nwnSiin^ CQ-D'i mtm shipped Am 
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PUflCNASE Ofll^ERS^ VtJ« accept purcttasa ortkfi only wh«n thty ira acfiiQmpinJK} by a ctieck. 

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CuAlomar win be iwirt r^sponslbfe for all teei Incurrftd and will M charged a 15% RESTOCK 
CHARGE with Iharamslnder In CREDIT ONLY, Th« followFog must afOOOmpanv any ratom; A copy of 
our Jnvcica raluiti aulhorlzatlon numbor i^hhch must bAObtainad prior to shipping Ihid m^cKandiaa 
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ba obtained by calling (BO^ 242-a9l6 or notltyiriQ ua l?y poai card. Riilurfi authod^lkKm Mill not ba 
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5ALES TAJt ARIZONA rUJdarrti mufti *dd B% $*im tu^ ijril«» a a^gnad ARIZPNA ruala taj card 
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SMORTAQE OR AM AGE; AH daima for shortagM pr ti Mmg B a muat be mad* wffhir^ 5 &AVS o* 
recwiri oi paTcti Ctams masi include a cow Of ft^ liwote*. aloriQ *iih a ratum authortz^iion 
nuffiber which can t* oblaiiwl toy contacting ue a1 (604) 242-89 ie ot s«f>d4iw a PO»t c*nJ AolbOf i?a 
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PHOENIX, ARIZONA 6S015 



^ AM parts rnay be new or 
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sutisti t u t^ wi t Iv conif>af abie p^rts 
if #fi are Qui o( stocK o( a*i ItenK" 



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aoo-52a*oiw 

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■Sm List ofA^verTisars on pege t30 



73 Magazine * April, 19S4 145 



mmt 



W2NSD/I 

NEVER SAY DIE 

ec//tor/a/ by W&yne Green 



from page 5 

TV-10 to see If Tve guessed 
light about hand TV sets. 

Speaking of Sinclair, the ab- 
sence of Tlmex from The Win- 

lef Consumer Electronics Show 
was most obvious. Last year 
they made a big fuss about in- 
troducing the Sinclair Spec- 
trum, only to change their 
minds when the Model 1000 
was bombed out by the \fiO20. 

Timex, which has been quite 
stand-offish to firms interested 
in supporting their computers 
with a magazine or software, is 
paying the piper for this bit of 
fotiy— to the tune of hundreds 
of millions of dollars. They fired 
the paopie who engineered the 
disaster, but il Is probably far 
too late now to recoup. Texas 
Instruments pulled the same 
stunt, with even greater losses. 

Despite the dead and badly 
wounded microcomputer manu- 
facturerSp the industry itsetf 
is still growing at about the 
same 250Vo per year rate. It's 
Just that Timex, Texas Instru- 
ments, Atari, and so on are not 
getting big chunks of It. Radio 
Shack has been holding oa Ap- 
ple is at the crossroads, gam- 
bling everything on their Mac- 
intosh. 

Ail of this has been a bonanza 
for hams who early on got inter- 
ested in computers and who 
have jumped at>oard the Indus* 
try. The micro Industry is rife 
with hams, as 1 see when I'm 



stopped by hundreds of old 73 

subscribers at the Comdex and 
CES shows, fvfany claim that it 
was my editoriais and articles in 
73 that got 'em into comput- 
ers—and rich. 

The next big field, as IVe writ- 
ten before, Is going to be conv 
muntcations. Some ham is go- 
ing to design a simple radio 
system to automatically send 
messages and parlay that into 
a S500 message communica- 
tions system for private aircraft 
which will eliminate the need for 
voice communications tjetween 
pilots and towers. This chap 
could easily get extremely 
wealthy. The nice thing about 
this is that everything needed 
for the system has already been 
invented. All it takes is an exper- 
imenter to put it together, test it, 
and find a venture capitatlst to 
back him. Eureka! Millions, 
And, you know, a kid of 15 could 
doit. 

Lef s get some work done and 
get some articles in 73 to spur 
more experimenting. It's possi- 
ble for hams to again get up 
front in developments and re- 
gain some of the prestige we 
once had The FCC Is off our 
backs now, so we can experi- 
ment. 

COME FLY WITH ME 

Are you looking for some 
small electronic or ham product 
from Asia which you might im- 
port and sell by mail order? 



Quite a few big businesses have 
been built In the last few years 
doing this— JS&A, the Sharper 
Image, Markline, and so forth. 
The best time to see the smaller 
Asian firms is in October during 
a series of consumer electron- 
ics shows. 

These shows are set up so 
you can attend four of them in 
the four key Asian electron- 
ics manufacturing countries^ 
Japan, Korea, Taiwan, and Hong 
Kong—one after the other, all in 
two weeks, TTiis could be two 
weeks which might change your 
Ufa— if you have some entre- 
prenaurial spirit 

Commerce Tours has been ar- 
ranging trips to Asia which bring 
people to these four shows for 
several years now. Tve been go- 
ing on them for five years and 
have been very impressed by the 
fine hotels, the number of spe- 
cial events and meals, and the 
planning of every detail by the 
firm. And the price— i don't see 
how they provide so much so 
reasonably. 

I've encouraged hams to ac- 
company me on these trips in 
the past and every one of them 
has had a great time— often 
meeting with Tim Chen BV2A in 
Taipei, shopping for electronic 
equipment in Hong Kong at in- 
credibly low prices (1 have my 
shopping list already made out), 
loading up on dirt-cheap Apple 
boards, and so on. 

The tour is timed to get you to 
all four of the shows, complete 
with all transportation, This is 
about the only real way for you 
to meet and talk business with 
the hundreds upon hundreds of 
small manufacturers In Asia, 
This is where you may find some 
brand-new products which 
haven't yet migrated to the 
US— or perhaps some lower- 
cost versions of popular items. 



The whole trip costs $2,000. 
That includes ali transportation, 
first*class hotels, lavish break- 
fasts^ a numt>er of other meals, 
show admissions, several op- 
tional shopping tours, and so 
on. Bob Chang and his family, 
who organize electronics and 
computer tours, are at home In 
Asia and thus have everything 
under superb control 

We've always had a group of 
hams on these tours, which usu- 
ally run from 150 to 250 in num- 
ber. This year weYe going to be 
joined by a group of Australian 
amateurs, so we should have 
even more fun. And wait until 
you see the price of Japanese 
ham rigs in Hong Kong* 

The trip leaves California Oc- 
tot>ef 2 and returns October 16, 
You can leave from either San 
Francisco or Los Angeles. Fur- 
ther, If you want to take some 
extra time at the end of the tour, 
you can come back for a small 
additional fare any number of 
ways. I've made low-cost side 
trips to China, Macao, down to 
Borneo, stopping off at Sara- 
wak, Brunei, Sabah, and Manila, 
or via Bangkok and Singapore, 
Hawaii, and so on. Why not add 
a couple unusual shopping 
stops and visit some rare DX 
hams? They'll love It and so 
will you. 

Please let me know as soon 
as you can if you are planning to 
join me this year. But watch out, 
I'll be looking for things to im- 
port, too. Drop me a line for de- 
tails: Wayne Green— Asial, 73, 
Peterborough NH 03458. 

Operating? Japan Is still 
tough, but we might be able to 
make it in Korea if you ask 
ahead. Taiwan is still tight. 
Hong Kong is a song—just 
bring a copy of your license. 
Yep, they have two^meter re- 
peaters there* 



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146 73 Magazine • April, 1984 



Attenti on 
Moonbouncers 

and Satellite Communications Enthusiasts 



Introducing New Ultra High 
Performance Antennas 
from KLM Electronics, Inc. 

KLM Electronics is fueling the Moonbounce and Oscar 10 
revolution with Antenna Equipment that delivers truely 
Out-of-This-World performance. 

For the Moonbouncer, our New 2M-16LBX is designed 
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The New 432-30LBX follows the same pattern as the 
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of comparison. 

Featuring straight forward construction, and an innova- 
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to insure years of trouble-free performance. 

For the satellite enthusiasts, the 2M-22C high gain 2 
meter, circular polarized antenna, features the same rugged 
construction and total flexibility as our very popular 
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Four or more 2M-22Cs make an excellent array for 
Moonbounce (EME) by elminattng Faraday fading. 

Fiberglass/aluminum stacking frames are available as 
well as 2 and 4 port power dividers and phasing harnesses 
to optimize the performance of these type arrays. Watch 
for our new elevation drive system coming soon. 




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WT. (lbs.) , 11 lbs. 



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Write for Information 



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REPEATER 
CONTROLLER 



«,<<v<^ 







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REMOTE BASE 
REMOTE BASE 



^ 




Does your repeater have a remote ba$e? Ever wonder what you're missing? 

The RC-SSO Repeater Controller lets you attach transceivers to your repeater to operate 
other frequencies through your repeater. Control the fraquency and mode with Touch-Tone 
commands, and get readbacl^ from the system in synthesized speechl 

"We have an Azden PCS-2800 for ten, and a Yaesu FT627RA for six meters on our 220 
repeater", reports WA1RYZ "We've worked the Marshall Islands and Norway on ten meters 
from OLir HT's. And we'll t>e able to run high power on six meters without worrying about TVf, 

WB5UKI told us "We llnl< our Dallas machines to outlying repeaters for our SKYWARN net. 
The weather sen/ioe can talk directly to the spotters far away to get early storm warnings." 

From N6E2J, "With our two meter remote, we can check into two meter nets through our 
220 repeater. We can get on any two meter frequency from our 220 HT's." 

Link up with other repeaters . . . extend your range on simplex frequencies ... let your group 
share equipment for other bands . . . even work DX from your HT. 

No one else supports synthesized remote bases for your repeater 

ACC is changing what repeaters can do for YOU. 



MAKE YOUR REPEATER A WHOLE NEW ANIMAL 
WITH THE RC-S60 REPEATER CONTROLLER 

Call or write for detailed specifications 



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AntennB far 

motile Work 



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Whether 
you ^Tt driving 

a fuii-sizfe van or a compact car, 
you can't beat the Spider^** for con- 
venience. Once it is tuned for 10, 
15, 20 and 40 (or 75) meters, you 
just switch from band to band on 
the transceiver — ^the antenna fol- 
lows by itself- 






A Truly Practical 
MntennB Adafitei 

If you now have a 

single - band 
mobile an- 
tenna with a 
Vi^ mast, the 
Adapter will 
convert it in- 
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In response to requests for 75 meter 
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7131 DWENSMQUTH AVE., 463C 
CANOGA PARK, CALIF., 913Q3 
TELEPHONE: (818} 341-5460 



148 73 Magazine * April, 1964 




.:-:r-::-:'--?::-:-^-j;.*;:.';'";^ 




Whether sending (^l^smiim^m^^^: 
the new 1984 CALt^BpOKS a^^;SH^p^ 
active amateur. Respected far a<:cyr:3fe^ 
beginnings of amateur^radlPt:thB;ti/;S.^ 
CALLBOOKS list the adarei^s frtfornriatl^n^^ 
800,000 hams around the y^or0-m-m^^ 
format. Not simpiy a reprint of -fic^t^i^jp^ 
CALLBOOK listings are taken: f r om; i tJif r- '^ 
extensive master files, updated con tifiuoMS^^^^^ 
bring you the latest information srvaMiabfe^r-; 



As an added service, optional supplements v*^iH 
your 1984 CALLBOOKS up to date thrd*!^ 

the year. Published March 1^ June 1^,:: 
September 1, each supplement ccJiiW^fti^ 
activity for the preceding 3 month^^rfh 
of new licenses, call chan^i;^ Snd 
hanges are listed iN each iss^^v 

The 1984 CALLBOOKS are iQad^^?^?^^ 
features for TsgncliBvvers iand QK| 
Order your copies novif^ $m-y^i:4 
order directly f rom th^- pafeliiii^ 




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Table tif Amateur Pref tx AHocations ♦r iPref ikes of the World * 




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Publication; December 1, 1983 



D Single 1984 U.S. Callbook 

D Single 1984 Foreign Callbook 

D SPECIAL OFFER; Order both 1984 Callbooks 
at the same time for shipment to one address. 

D Set of 3, 1984 U,S, Supplements 

DSet of 3, 1984 Foreign Supplennents 

Name 



fncluding shipment 
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$24.50 
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radio amateur 



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Dept B 

925 Sherwood Dr., Box 247, 

Lake Bluff, IL 60044, USA 




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t^See List of Adveftissrs on page 130 



73 Magazine • April, 1984 149 



Kantronics Interface 

The Interface For 

Apple, Atari, TI'99/4A, THS-SOC, 
VIC'20, and Commodore 64 

Computers 








Interfiicri' II is i\w new Kantroniczi LiixnaiLi^^fiuei -lu 
coini ice II features a hiqhlv 

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from psg& 96 

DX from 7:00 am to 9:00 am at first, and 
then Eater perhaps for another hour. Later^ 
it is expected that there wiSI tw a new 
repeater for the lOm-FM band (whjcti 1 
understand has already t>een purchased^ 
go that daily DX contacts can be made 
continyousty, especially with frlen-ds in 
the United States, Question: Would you 
t^e able to recommend a frequency that 
we could set our repeater on tor lOm-FW 
ys6? If so, please contact me immediately 
with the information and I will have It 
relayed to the proper authorities. We need 
to have &n idea ol a frequency that would 
be preferred to our fellow hams in the USA 
as well 

REPEATERS tM MEXICO CITY 

As you may know, Mexico City Is said to 
be the largest city In the world (popula- 
tion-wise). Some have said that there are 
more than 16 million people (taking into 
accouM the metropolitan area as well as 
the surrounding areas that are practically 
part ot the city itself). Well, if you come to 
visit us someday, you'll know what I 
mean] Better freeways and overpasses 
are qonstantly heing const ructed^ 
adapted, and changed. To Illustrate the 
point, I was driving along with my father- 
in-law one day (he's a native from Mexico 
City). Well, we got lost for atfout 2Vi 
hours! So you can imagine what it's like^ 
even when you think you know what 
you're doing! (Unfortunately we did not 
have our 2-meter equipment with us at the 
time. Last time Til make that mistakel) 

SOj where you have a big city, you have 
a larger han:i population as well, and even 
a few repeaters and radio clubs who own 
them. (See Fig. 1 for a list of clubs and 
their repeaters in Mexico City,) 01 course, 
you have to be authori2ed by the Mexican 
Communications Department in order to 
use your equipment here in Mexico, Be 
sure your papers are in order before vaca- 
taon time unless you |ust want to go "all 
ears." The (ocai operators here are very 
friendly and sociable and enjoy having for- 
eign visitors drop in. And it's nice also if 
they have personally been in contact 
(QSO]i with you beforehand, which makes 
it alt that more interesting. 

With most radto clubs that I have known 
in different parts of the country, It's a cus- 
tom to get a few of the members together 
for a cup ot coffee and maybe a smalt 
meal (tacos anyone?) whenever foreign 
colleagues show up. It's a real social oc- 
casion and sometimes ver/ interesting. At 
one celebration that the Satellite Radio 
Club sponsored, Marclano XEIGIY flew 
his jet overhead a couple of times as we 
made contact on two meters with him t>e- 
fore his departure. I'm sure you'd enjoy 
good^ld Mexican hospitality! And your 
friends wouid enjoy sharing it with you! 




THE NETHERLANDS 

H. J. G. Meerman, Jr. PD&DDV 
Zan^ivoort^rweg 33 
2111 GRAsrdenhout 
The NetheriaridSf 

THEVRZA 

This month I would like to write some- 
thing about the VRZA (the Vereniging van 
Radio Zendamateurs). As you may already 
know, there are three amateur-radio so- 
cieties in Hoiiand and one of them Is the 
VRZA, Translated into English, these let- 
ters stand for Union of Ham i^adlo 
Amateurs. 

The VRZA was founded in 1951, about 
33 years ago. The number of members is 
enormous for a small country Wke ours. As 
far as i itnow^ they have 450O members, 
but by the time you read this the number 
will no doubt be much higher. Well, as you 
see, amateur radio is a fast-growing style 
of lite in Holiand, 

The VRZA has also its own magazine 
which is sent out to members once a 
week, it is full of news and technical arti- 
cles concerning ham radio. Many of the 
buiid-it-yourself projects that are put>- 
llshed in this magazine (called CQ-PA) are 
from VRZA members. Often the VRZA has 
circuit boards available for these build-lt- 
y our self projects, for cost price Another 
service is the seiling of hard4o-come-by 
parts, such as special coils, ff Iters, tran- 
sistors, etc. 

PACVRZ/A Is the callsign of the VR2^ 
club station. This station is on the air ev- 
ery Saturday morning on the 80- and 2'me- 
ter bands with news on phone, CW, and 
RTTY. Aiso a code course is given. 

AWARDS 

Although the VRZA has a large number 
of awards, there is one that deserves s pe- 
el ai attention, namely the WAP Award 
(VVorked All Provinces). This award is 
avallabie to hams who have worked all 
Dutch provinces or to SWi^ who have re- 
ceived amateur stations from ail prov- 
inces. For those who wish to know more 
about VRZA awards or about the VRZA it- 
self, Hi give you the address: VRZA, 
Postbus 61420. 2506 Ak Den Haag, The 
Netherlands. 

Don't forget some IRCs to cover the ex- 
pense of answering and mailing your let- 
ter. 

DUTCH QRP ACTIVITY 

For the QRP enthusiast in Belgium, Hoi- 
iand, and Luxembourg, we have the Bene- 
lux QRP ciub {BQC). This club [s especial- 
ly for amateurs who like to work with Eow 
power. An output of 5 Walts for CW and 



ID 


Frequerwy 


Radio Club 


X£1RPV 


14a31/.9l 


Aztec Radio Club 


XE1ERA 


146.34/,94 


Aztec Radio Club 


XE1RUL 


1 47.72^.12 


La Salle University Radio Club 


XE1RSC 


147.63/.03 


Satellite Radio Club 


XEITU^ 


147.a4/,24 


l^tfn American Tower Radio Club 


XE1VHF 


i46.28/.ae 


VHP Association 


XEIYG 


146. 16/. 76 


VHF Association 


XE1UHF 


449.100/444JOO 


VHF Association 



13.4 Watts for S3B Is the maximum power 
that can be considered as OBP. 

The Benelux QRP club gives advice to 
Its memtjers^ organizes QRP contests, 
and has its own low-power network every 
Saturday morning at 0930 UTC Members 
of the club use the International QRP tre- 
quencies: 3,560. 3,690, 7,030. 21,060, 
21,2B5, 28,060, and 2S.Sa5 MH2. The BQC 
is aiso a member of the World QBP 
Federation, The address of the BOG is: PC 
Box 15, 2100 Heematede, The Nether- 
lands. 




Fig. 1 Rep&at&rs in Mexii^o City. 



NEW ZEALAND 

a J. iOes) Chapman ZL2VH 
459 Kennedy Road 
Napier 
New Zealand 

As this column Is befng prepared during 
December, white our northern-hemi- 
sphere confreres are ceEebratinQ: the 
Christmas festive season in true forrm 
with the tradttionai winter scenes and 
trappings, we here down under celebrate 
under somewhat different conditions. 
There is no snow, and a large part of the 
populace heads for beach and lakeside re- 
sorts to celebrate Christmas In tempera- 
tures of 20* C plus, depending upon the lo- 
cation. 

But no matter where we are in the world, 
as tar a^ seasons are concerned, Christ- 
mas will aiways constst of a Christmas 
tree trimmed with lights and artificial 
snow, Santa Cfaus in his heavy red uni- 
form, complete with while t)eard and hat 
(always a very hot lots), with his sleigh full 
of presents for ail, and a huge dinner on 
Christmas day of roast turkey, chicken, 
pork, or lamb (depending upon choice) 
plus vegetables, followed by Christmas 
pi urn pudding and complemented with the 
usuai beverages. 

Although it is somewhat out of season 
for us here in ZL-iand to have a huge hot 
midday meal when the weather would In- 
dicate a cold-cuts-and-saiad-type meal, 
followed by cold sweets, most New Zea- 
land families stiii stick to the traditional 
dinner and ceiebrations. following the tra- 
ditions ot our forebears who, in most 
cases, came from the northern hemi- 
sphere, Christmas in ZL is also the main 
holiday sea son ^ most of the commercial 
concerns closing from Christmas Eve un- 
til about January 10th for their anniual holt- 
day, with the exception ot small staffs to 
handle urgent lausiness.The retail section 
Of the business community goes on as 
usual, although aimost everything closes 
dowrt completely on Christmas Day. 

BITS W PIECES 

Recently NZART obtained permission 
for radio amateurs to play chess against 
other radio amateurs on the air. This is an- 
other step in the expanding international 
group: Chess Amateur Radao Internation- 
al (GARI), whose headquarters are at PO 
Box 6S2, Cologne NJ 08213, USA. This 
group Is encouraging participation in on- 
air chess games between radio amateurs, 
and the group has interested members 
from W, VE, HH, I, OH. VK. ZL. DA, KH6, 
and KL7. Write to the address stated for 
further information, 

Th$ first CARl Oceania tournament was 
hetd In August, 1953, with stations from 
KH6, VK, and ZL participating. Now in Its 
second year, CARl has 160 members, has 
regular weekly and dally schedules, and a 



special "contact wheel" for finding chess 
QSOs. A rating system has bean estatn 
1 1 shed and regional tournament directors 
appointed in seven areas worldwide. The 
founder and first president of CARl is 
Vince LucianI K2VJ. It is Interesting to 
note that amateurs in fslew Zealand were 
playing chess over the air prior to 1932, 
and an article in Br&ak-in, the NZAflT offi- 
cial journal, in August, 1932, covered the 
activity, in the Intervening years, the actlv- 
ity went into recess untlllt was revived by 
the formation of CARl. 

Morse code is alive and well —so goes a 
report from ZL4FC In Break-in on the use 
of Morse code In commerclai communica- 
tions, particularly marine communica- 
tions, here in ZL. There are still profes- 
sional brass pounders here, employed by 
the New Zealand Post Office at three of 
the four Marine Coast Stations operated 
by the f^ZPO, and many of them are ama- 
teur-radio operators, too. Morse is the 
main mode of long-distance high-f requen- 
cy communication and still proves reli- 
able when all else fails. 

Morse is the main mode of communica- 
tions at Awarua Radio, situated at the 
southern end of the South Island and, to a 
lesser extent, at Auckland and Wellington 
Radio Stations. The New Zealand Post Of* 
fice stili trains operators at their school in 
Wellington, where the trainees have to at- 
tain proficiency in the code at 25 wpm 
tsoth sending and receiving, over a 10-min- 
ute test period, with only two errors al- 
lowed. This high standard of f:)roficiency 
in Morse has been unchanged since the 
days of th^ telegraph I and line circuits, 
when the Post Office employed hundreds 
of Morse operators on circuits throughout 
the country. 

Morse is on the decline in the commer- 
cial communications area, with the in- 
roads made into Morse traffic by Telex 
[SI TOR) and satellite traffic, but the big- 
gest impact on marine traffic has been the 
decline in the number of ships now in 
world fleets. Two vessels now do the job 
of 10 ships since the concept of carrying 
cargo in containers was introduced, and 
this has had more impact on Morse traffic 
than anything else. But as the writer of the 
Bre^k-fn article says, ''Morse Is alive and 
well, and the skills of the brain and fingers 
of the Morse operator still play a part in 
modern technology." 

The historic Space-Shuttle flight of 
Owen Garriott W5LFL during the latter 
part of November was followed with great 
Interest in ZL, but as far as can be ascer- 
tained to the date of this writing, no ^L 
was able to record a QSO with W5LFL, 
and I don't think any ZL was^ successful in 

copying him, either. But I am awaiting 
confirmation of this trom the VHF and 
satellite experts elsewhere In the country. 

An extract from a lecture sponsored by 
the Auckland University Foundation, giv- 
en by the distinguished space scientist 
and ZL, Sir William Pickering, congratu- 
lated New Zealand communications engi- 
neers on the development of a hand-held 
radiometer, produced as a joint venture by 
the government Department of Scientific 
and Industrial Research and an Auck- 
land electronics firm, Delphi Industries. It 
proved that local New Zealand industry 
and engineers are capable of competing 
with the world's best. Trie newly devel- 
oped radiometer is to t>e tested on a forth- 
coming space-shuttle flight. 

In a recent issue of one of the popular 
US amateur magazines, I noted In the DX 
column that some concern was expressed 
by a prominent DXar about the Kermadec 
Islands and the possibility of them being 
the likely subject of a DXpedition In the 



152 73 Magazine * April, 1984 



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73 Magazine • April, 1964 153 



n^ar future. 1 was somewhat dl9ma¥«<l to 
read thka report when there Is at present a 
reatdent amateur on Raoul laland at the 
weather station wtio was actkvs for 
shon periods during the latter part of l9dS 
and Who Intenda to be rTK>re active durlr>g 
1984, Ha is WawIcK ZLaAFH/Zl^AFH 
(n«w call sign of the Kannadecs), and ao 
cording to my Infoimatlon, after the set- 
tting-in period Just before Ctirlstn^as, n& 
was to gat antefinai up and be as active 
as his duti&s pe^rnit Ofi rr>ost bands during 
1964. (f ^/rof '« fTOfe: See ttm Australia cot- 
ttrnfit this issue.} 

The Bom City NZAHT Ccnfefertce wtll 
be fwld in PaJmerston Nonh ffom June 1 
to4« 1984. Details of the conferance vefiue 
are as foUows: The Rose C4ty Conference 
wH} be hefd at the Awapgni Racecourse 
and will commence with a receptioci^ reg- 
iatration, and a wine and choeee evanlng 
on Friday nlglit. The formal tMJSlnats of 
t^NZARTwIII ba condticted on Saturday, 
followed by ttie Gra^ Dinmir and Dance 
In the eventrrg. On Sunday, ll*» AR6C, 
QTC, WARO. ar\d ott>er rfieetir^ will take 
ptaca. as well as oihaf activiiie? including 
the transmitter hunt (fox hunt| and a 
mobiia rally. An inforrtiat social arKt prize^ 
givtng de&qion will conctuda Sunday's ac- 
trvities. Enquiries for accommodation, 
etc., lo PO Box 1718. Patmerston North, as 
soon is poaslbli. 

NEZCHEQ 63, !t>e »cofid Mtnngal 
Nofth Afnencar!/New Zealand County 
Hunters Ey otjaH OSO Party mentiorwd In 
a praviouft column was a greai succ^s^- It 
was held over the US Labor Day weekend 
fit Shelton, 50 mt(as west of SeaTtie, 
Wast^ington, ar^d tinish&d wHh a banquet 
at the AlderOrooh Resort Hotel on Sunday 
night trv all, 17 2L hams and VLs were 
amongst the 40 US and ZLa at the QSO 
Party. In the US group were some from a& 
far away as Oklahoma and Alaska, The 
weekend activftlea war^ mainly socja! 
with a Nttle "hamming" at the otfictal 
County Hunters station and plenty of eye- 
b^lling with those so orten heard and 
worked on lt> and 15 maters. The festivi- 
ties ware continuous fun Irom dawn until 
almost dawn. 

It b reported that one station which 
worked the Convention station SfilO he be- 
lieved that the whole gathering was in tha 
stale of Intoxication, but he was Informed 
that no, the station was In the State of 
Washington. At the banquet, after the 
obligatory short speeches, the fun cli- 
maxed with awards presen tat ions. Spe- 
cial aw^ards were mad^^ lo Jay W7KBC, the 
first-ever North American County Hunters 
W7KBC Award, in honor of Jay being the 
first North Americati amateur lo work all 
1 12 Mew Zealand counties for the NZART 
Coynliaa Awards 

A special gift was made by th« attertd- 
Ing ZLs to the host, Toim KB7Mrf, ar^S alt 
other members present e^cchanged souve- 
nirs and gifts. The next convention {KEZ- 
CHEO 05) will be in Houston, Testes, and 
moat of !t*e ZLa »r>d Nortti Americans 
preisent at the t983 convention plan to be 
pre^nt again. 

Anothef member of tr» Did Timers Club 
fias Jo^rted that eliia band o1 eo-y«ar J util- 
ise Ceftiticate f^ioers Ha is FranJc Bell 
2L4AA. {tm first licensed amateur in ZL, 
wtio received his license in January, 1S23. 
Frank ia a llle rrMmber of ttie OTC and is 
Its Immediaie Past Patron, 50-year certifi- 
cates have also bmn lss%i«d to J. rRoilot 
Schofte^d ZL1 JK, Artfiur Allen ZLU a and 
Arthur Lyes ZL3JD. 

Silent Keys recorded rec«nlly were 
John Palmer ZLTKV, Norman Walding 
ZL2GZ. Sam Hopkins ZL2AQX, Stan 
French ZL2JB, and &»c Poof ZL2MZ 





POLAND 

78-200 Biatc^ard 

PQisnd 

SCOUT RADfD AMATEURS 

Soout radio club acttvity was sus- 
perKled alter martial law was declared In 
Poland, bvt even before a mmsfatement 
of individiiat ham activity, 30 Scout radio 
clid» got licenses. Two cofitests. ^"Scout's 
Wave" and "Silesia^Polish Scouts' Assoc^ 
ation,** wwB organized this y«ar. Amon^} In- 
dividual stations, th^ other contest was 
won by SPQEMI. The best club statJon was 
SP7KTE and the best momitof was SP7- 
iSOlfIC Regularly on MofMtays arKt 
Fndays at 1700 GMT on 3700 khtz. the so- 
called Scouts' Circles taJce place. An ex- 
t^iange of training radio telegrams on 
3S50 kHt CW on MofKlays, Wednesdays, 
Thyrsdays, and Satuirdays, afid oa 3700 
kHz SSB on Tuesdays and Fridays begins, 
always at 1E00GMT, 

Scout radio stations working Oin 3-5 
MKz revived the activfty of Polish hams 
this fiummer. Many young hams in Scotit 
uniforms prac^ticed theif skills In camps 
competing for the certificate, "Scout's 
Camps " One of these camps was orga- 
niied by the Communication Committee 
of the Polish Scouts Association (PSAJ to* 
gather with tha Kcmin Troop of PSA In Ml- 
kofzyn, near Konln. 15 Scouts and 2 In^ 
stmctors fro^n tha Korin, Lsszno. and 
Poznan troops were to take part In a 
school of Scout communication and ama* 
teur-radlo looatlon. Final I y^ 49 partici- 
pants for the communications course and 
10 candidates for referees of amateur-ra^ 
dio location gathered in this beautiful 
spot, 

Psrtict pants at the Mikorzyn camp ware 
taught all i^inds of Scout walking, tele- 
phone, and radio communication, Short- 
wave Instructions* treated at this camp as 
an Introduction, will be continued at a 
winter camp in KieKrz. Instructors were 
confronted with the problem ot teaching 
communications courses to budding nov- 
ices of the communication art, 13 lo 16 
years old. In spite of nearly 10 compulsory 
lessons dally, these Scouts elected to 
have supplementary sessions. Radio sta- 
tlor^ SP3ZCy/3 was establish ing contacts 
during the time of the camp. Films on priri- 
eipies of electrical engineering and elec- 
trantcs rounded o^t theoretical and prac- 
lical course. 

A final session took place on Augusi 
iihL Candidates for feCerees of amateur^ 
radio location prepared and carried oul 
ttie final contest on ZS MKi and 144 MHz 
by themselves. Other participants at tfie 
school acted as compelitors and proved 
ttrair skills before the cqmirig Badlotqca- 
tion Contest of PolarKl Ski I Jed stall and 
the tovejy noighbortrood of SJesinsl^le 
take contribu^ted to a nice atniosptiefe at 
the camp. Many Polish arvj foreign visi- 
tOfS 0hesie last from (Germany and BulQar- 
la) wont and saw their friertds. 

Some months ago i mervlior>6d Itw 
SPDX Contest 1983 that was doubtful 
tfiea Among indtviduaJ statlor^s taking 
part in this rajntest were SP/AW* leading 
with 609 points and 232 ceflif^cates, 
SP90H (573 and 138), arKl SP9A0U (557 
and ia^ Tfie best club station of the corv 
test was SP7KTE (6eC and 201), and 
among monitoring stations. SP9"33&4'KA 
(132 and 40)- 



SWEDEN 

RaoB fcVende SMiCOP 
freiavagen fO 
S-J55 00 Nykvaffi 
Sweden 

SSA ANNUAL MEETING 

The Swedish amateur radio league, 
SSA. is twldtng Ha annual rT>e«Tit>ership 
rffeeting this yeaf in th« city of Falun in the 
provtnce of Oaiarna (D alec art ial The 
meeting is taking place during tfie wMk> 
end of April 14-tS. The hosting Falu 
Radioclub Is celebrating lits 601 h anniver- 
saiy. 

The province of Dalarna has played an 
imporiani role In Swedisi) history. The 
famiers were willing to fight for their free- 
dom and. among olhet kings, Cu^tav 
Wasa managed to get Ihem to uprise 
against the Danish Intruders ^n 1521. To 
oetefacate this, every y«ar over 10,000 
skiers compete m th« world's oldest and 
lATQBSt cross-country ski race from Salon 
lo Mora, a distance ot close to 90 
kJloowters fSS miles). Besides the regular 
fTkeetlng on Sunday, there will be ex hi bi- 
ll ons. spsakers, women's activities, and 
the Saturday night banquet. Dal am a is in 
the SM4 call area. 

PACKET RADIO 

The Softnet User Group at the Universi- 
ty Of Unhoping l» Jnvlting everybody imer- 
ested in experimental packet radio for 
twth ground and satellite systems to 
D<PRAN S4. this year s Softnet workshop. 

The Experimental Packet Radio tJet- 
work Symposium ts taking place in the 
city of LInkoping (SM5 call area) on May 26 
and 27. 1964. Planned subjects tor semi- 
nars are packet radio, network control and 
routing, distributed processing, propo- 
sals for standards, and Softnet. The Swed- 
ish high-iechnoiogy aeroplane and corn- 
put ar industry, SAAB, Is located In LInko- 
ping, 

TELEPHONE INTERFERENCE 

Teieverket is the National Swedish 
Telecommunications Administration and 
has the monopoly for telephone commu- 
nications distribution in Sweden as well 
as being the licensing authority Tor radio 
communications. T^ieverkei ie also a 
manufacturer of telecommunications 
equipment as well as the approving au- 
thority fof equipment manufactured by 
others that is designed to be connected to 
theif syslams. 

Only a couple of years ago the tele- 
phone system in Sweden allowed modem 
push-button tet6fjlton«s. Those ha^, of 
course, turned out lo become very popular 
and are raplaclr^ the old rotary^lal 
fitiofies. Tefeverket manufactures a pust^- 
tHJlton phone called Oiavox, about the orv 
ly o«^, fot the time ttalng, appfow«d for 
ihelr own system, I.e., the only systam \n 

These rww telephones made by Teiever - 
kel and spreading wary npidly are ol great 
conoeffi to us acthre radio amateurs. The 
Olavox telepfvorw is exiremeiy susceot^- 
t>ie to rf. Televeilcet Is now very well aware 
of th^s fact and is irying to take care of 
problems when inter1efa#^ce eompiaints 
are filed Before then, fKiwevef, tf>e inno^ 
cent ham operator has had anottter con- 
frontation with his neignows Everyone 
that has had such an eK|>erience can lett 
Ittat there are more pleasant meetings 
than trwse, l fsad one fellow irom Teiever^ 
kel workir^ on my DIavoJt telephone tor 



2Vi hours without complete success. The 
interference was there either when 
operating on 14 MHz or 2d MH^. Consider- 
ing the low sunspot cycle we are In now. I 
chose to have the Interference on 28 MHz I 
tt Is very unfortunate to have this unnec- 
essary Interference problem, especially 
now with the growing popuiaflty of video 
recorders that may become our worst RF1 
problem to date. Ttie ^deo recorders 
seem to be n'>ore susceptible to rf than any 
of the other home electronic equipment 
we ha'ire fought so far. 

WINTER CON DfTIONS 

In this arctic region, aurof a boreaHs Is 
very common during the wiriter season. 
This dark time of the year favors the low- 
bSTKl DKers propagationwise. It is even 
poesjt^e to wofk tt^ leO-meter band 24 
hours a ilay during several weeks around 
Christmas. 

As a rule, you can say that "the ckMMT 
to the equatof you are, the belter short* 
wave propagation you have." Being a DX- 
er, Ihring tttis far north as we Scan^iruh 
vians do is sometimes toygh. About the 
only time we have a more lavorabfe sltua- 
Uon than ttie south Eufopaans is when 
propagation to tf>e Pacific is over the 
f^orth Poie. Til** 1$ comn>on during early 
morning local time in tf>e summ-er. 

During the f^eep winter season^ our 
most stable DX band. 20 meters, closes 
down cofnptetety in the evening around 
18O0 hours and opens up whefv it is time to 
leave for work in the morning. If you do not 
like the very noisy low trends, there Is not 
much hamming to do thesa darlc wintef 
nights. It is hard for tYon*European» to 
Imagine how crowded the low bands are 
here at night. The broadcast and other 
commercial intruders on the 40-meter 
band that you may bs bothered with are 
much stronger here than anywhere else! 

RiCEIVER SHORTCOMINGS 

In the late 60s and early 7Qn, many 
hams here lost Interest In tha 40-meier 
band, I think this was primarily because of 
the crossHTiodulatlon problems the new 
transistorized receivers were Impaired by. 
One ma|or Importer of Japanese ham 
equipment once told me that he could not 
convince tha manufacturer how severe 
this problem was here Is Europe until they 
got to experience this on the spot. Tha re- 
ceivers certainly have improved In thfa re- 
spect, but the Intruders are stIEi pounding 
their hundreds of kilowatts within the 
ham-exclusive 100 kH^ of the 40-meter 
band. 

«0 METERS SHAPIED 

The 80-meter band is shared with other 
sorvices In Region 1. In the evening It is 
hard to find a spot where the S-meter 
drops below the S9 level. With good anten- 
nas, sharp filters, and a great deal of 
standi na^ £>ome avid DXers manage to 
break throufh tfte noisa level and to work 
distant statiofis even on eighty, 

AURORA AMD TWENTY UO£RS 

Wtien there is aurora, which happens 
quite pftOTk, the 2-fTieter buffs are happy. 
However, it also fav^HS very slKXt skip^ 
QSOs on 20 nwtefS- Normal ly« you caruiot 
work within Scandinavia on twenty, but in 
aurora conditions LA, SM. OH, and UAI 
are w^orlcable. Very seldom we can reach 
as far south as OZ DenmailL In aurora a 
totally dead barid suddenly t>ecoiTies 
aliv& 

STKAMQE OPENINGS FROM LM>LAMO 

I grew up in t^ptand, nortlMirn Sweden, 
j[u3l rKMth of the Arctic Circle, which Is the 
call area SM2L My OTH was located fur- 
Ihef north than Fairtianka in Alaska, 
which might be of some reference help lo 



1S4 73 Magazine • April, 19S4 



you- In thfl winteftEme Troni up tt\me I usu- 
ally could work ihe west coast of the 
No<th American continent at night. VEB, 
VE7. KL7. W7, and allthe way down to W6 
was land, o* couf se, still is) workal>le. The 
siflnais cf09slnq itte Noilh Pole are char- 
acterized tJy a very r»pid (lutiaf. In those 
operiFAgs you may r>0't hear too many sta^ 
tiofis from liere The reason is sirnpl^e^ Ttie 
popufation ia small In those arctic areas 
a^ Sweden, Norway^ Ftnliand, arHJ the 
ScMl«l Union. 

Now summer is quiclcly approaching. 
The conditions are charH}ir>g' With the 
midiiioht sun artd daylight 24 hours a day, 
the change is not entirely to the belter, bul 
it surely is differsmi 




TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO 

John L Webster 9Y4JW 

cfo Depanment of Soil Science 

Uniyersliy of the West Indies 

St. Augostine 

Trinidsd 

West indies 

The Trinidad and Totsago Amateur 
Rid to Society nTARSji. formed in 1951 
artd incorporated by ar^ Act of Parliament 
30 years latw m 196 1. has a membefshi|i 
of 1A0, from a total population of 1^ mii- 
lion persons on the two ^slarKte. There are 
also atx>ut 1O0 associate m^nbers \n llie 
society. Onty about fifty percent of the 140 
hams are act We, some on VHF, some on 
HF. and others on both. 




jQhnL W6b&t&r9y4JWmP6KX, 



The TTAftS has been a member ot the 
lARU for about 10 years and is an aff Htatd 
of the Radio Society of Great Britain 
fUSClB). 

The British City amli Goilds Radio Ama- 
teur's Examlnatjoo tRAE) is the certifica- 
tion required by the Government of Trini- 
dad and Tobaoo, aJono with Morse co6e 
proftciency at 13 wpm, for the issue of a 
Wi Hcenae. The code test is adinmisTered 
by Itie Difector ot Tetecommunications 
after the successful compielion of the 
RAE exam. In 1962. ttie TTA^ stef>ped up 
tts training program in an effort to encouf- 
age more persons to become hams, arid 



weekly classes are conducted lo prepare 
its associate members for both. 

Unroftunateiy, the exam ^s offered only 
once a year as it is an external examina- 
tion. It is written in May and the results are 
not known iintit the end of Ay gust of 
at>out three months later! The successful 
candidate then applies foe the code test. 

The td62^S3 training classes were cori' 
ducted at two centers, one in tt>e north of 
ttie island, In the captlal dty of Port^- 
Spain. and the o4her In the south, in San 
Fernsncki, the industriaj centef. There Is 
now a third c#nter tor the 1 983/84 classes, 
in I he center of the island, at Chaguanas 



At each center, classes are conducted 
twice weeKly, one sesslor^ fo/ theory and 
the other for CW. 

The TTARS normally charge* a Sittail 
fee. the main objective toeing to encouf* 
a^e those who started the course to com> 
plete it- Any funds raised in this way are 
avatiabie to assist in acquiring equipment 
and materials needed In running th« 
course. Howevef , as 10&3 was World Com- 
munications Year, ttve TTARS decided on 
an "open-house" policy for the 1QS3^ 
I raiful:^ classes and thei^e is no charge for 
the coufse this tinve. 

Good reaults have been achieved t>y the 
TTAF^ In the RAE examinations. In the 
19B2/83 examinaljon, 90 percent ot the 
candidates prepared by the TTARS were 
successfuL In actual niimt>ers th^s means 
that there are 22 potential new 9¥ hama If 
they complete their code tests. One of the 
successful candldMes, Mark Mass I ah, ob-- 
talned a double distinction in the exam 
and provided a very good showing in his 
code test. Mark, who has been asaigned 
the callsign 9Y4M, favors CW operating 
and should be providing a new country to 
many of you still needing 9Y on this mode- 

The TTARS does not have a clubhouse 
but is allowed the use of Boy Scout Head^ 
quarters in Cascade, north Trinidad. Meet* 
ings are held on the first Monday of each 
month at 7:30 pm. The meetings aiterr^te 
between north and south Trlnldadt thoae 
in the south tieing helcf at Pr^ientation 
College in San Femarvlo. The Annual 
Ser^eral MeetJr^, a1 wh^ch new officers 
are electacf, is always he^d In rvorth ThnI* 
dad during the montdi of March. 

In my next column I will present part I of 
a two-part review of the activities Of the 
TTARS during 19B3, World Communtca* 
tions Year. 



CALL TOLL FREE 



s^ 



EIM\A/000 






TS930S 



TS430S 

Now a general coverage 
receiver/ham band trans- 
ceiver at on affordable 
price. 



TW400QA 

2M & 440MHz Dual-Bander 
25 watts on both bands. 



Call for YOUR Low Price! 




R2000 

Gen. Gov. Rcvr. 
W/memories 




TR 7950 

45 Watts! Multi'featured. 




TR 2500 

Full Featured 
2M Handheld 

UPS Brown Paid on 
TR 2500 



2900 N.W. VtVION RD. / KANSAS CITY. MtSSOURI 641 50 / 81 6-741 -81 1 8 



See Usi oi Aifvefti$^s oft page i^ 



73 Magazine * April, 1984 155 



RAMSEY 
ELECTRONICS 
^ 62 \nc. 



PARTS WAREHOUSE 



We now have available a bunch ofgoodtes too 
good to bypass Items, are hmited so order today 



2575 Baird Rd, 
Penfieid, NY 14526 

71 6-586-3950 



MINI KITS - YOU HAVE SEEN THESE BEFORE NOW 

HERE ARE OLD FAVORITE AND NEW ONES TOO. 

GREAT FOR THAT AFTERNOON HOBBY. 



FM 

MINI 

MIKE 




A super hig.h perlormanCe FIW WJie- 
l&ss mche kiC TransfTHls a stable 
Brgnal up tc 300 yard^ wFth excep- 
honal 3UdFO QU^Icty by m^arkS c^) itf 
buiM in electrflt mihe Kit includes 
case, mike, on-ofi swiich, antenna. 
baUery andsuper inslruciionj This 
ra the finest urni available 

FM-3Kil $14.95 

FM-3 Wired and Tested 53.95 




Fiyi WEr«l#» brike Kit 

Tr3ri3>rnrts up to 300' lo 
any FM broadcas! ra- 
dio, uses any type Ot 
mike. Runs on 3 lo 9V 
has added sensitive mike preamp 
5tag$ 

FM'I ktt $3.95 FM-2 klE t4.9S 



Type FM-2 



lirtJverEal Tinier KH 

ProvitJes. I he basic parts and PG 

board rectdired lo provide a source 
o^ prflcisiort Mmmg and puIsS 
feneration Uses 555 timer IC and 
incliji;)es a rangt? ol par1$ for moai 
limmg needs 

UT'5 Kkt $5.95 



Color Organ 

See music corns 
alive' 3 different 
lights fftcker wtTh 
music One light 
each for, high, 
mid-range and 
kows Each indi- 
\/iduaHy adjusl.- 
ableand drives Up 
to 300 W. runs on 
110 VAC 

Complete kit, 
ML-t 
SB.S5 



VlifwMAdiJlilorKIt 

Cdfivefts any TV to video monnof Siip&r 
stable fufiabse ovef en 4-6 Rung on 5- 
15V accepisstd vidfMi Signal Beslunii-on 
Ihe markeJ' Co-miileii? Ki! VD-i J?'. 95 



Led BIEnky Kit 

A great attention get- 
ter which alternately 

flasJies 2 jumbo LED^ 
Use for name badges 
buttons, warning 
panel lights, anything' 
Runs on 3 to 15 vol is 
Complete tuft. BL-1 
*2.95 



'•^'n 
* J J 




Super Sleuth 
A super sensitive amplf- 
fier wtiich will pick up a 
pin drop a< 15 feet' Great 
tor monilpririg baby's 
room or as general pur- 
pose amplifier Full 2 W 
fms output, runs on 6 to 
15 volls uses B'45 otim 
s,|>r^aker 
Complete kit, BN-9 

$5 95 




CPO-t 

Runs on 3-12 Vdd wall dut. 1 KHZ qood foi CPO. 
Ala^m. Audio OscMPatof Complele kii t2.9S 



Whkper Ugh I Kit 

An miere&ling kiL smait mike 
picks up sounds atid converts 
them to light Ttie louder the 
sound, the bfighler Ihe *ight 
Includes mike, controls up lo 
300 W. runs on IIO'VAC 
Complete kit, WLO 



Mad Blaster Kit 

f'rod'jces LOUD ear ahalteimg and 
attention getltng siren Itke sdund 
Can suppjy up to 15- walls ot 
ebr^oxirsijs audeo Runs on 6-15 VDC 

MB-1 Kit $4.95 




T&ne Decoder 

A compleEe fone deco- 
der on a single PC 
boarcJ Featur4?5. 400- 
5000 Hz . adjustable 
range vha 20 turn pot voliagetegu- 
lation S67 IC Useful for louch- 
tone burst rietectton. FSK etc 
Can also be used as a stable tone 
encoder Runs on .!? to 12 voits 
C om pS ete k H . T O ■ 1 $5^95 



Siren Kit 

Produces upward and downwa.rd 

wail characteristic ot S police 

siren, 5 Wpeak audio outpuf. runs 

on 3-1 & volts. iJSes 3-45 ohm 

speaker 

Complete kit. SM-3 $2.95 



Call ^our PtiOfie Order in Today. TERMS: 

Satisfaction gaaranteed or moriey retunded, 
C-O.D, add $2.50, Minimum order S6.00. 
Orders undes S 10.00 add $1.50. Add 6% for 
postage, insuFance. handlirig. Overseas add 
i5¥L,. N.Y. residents add 7% tax. 



CLOCK KITS 

Your Qld lBvcrt1«s are here again. Ovtr 7,O0Q Sold Id D«t« 
ee one ol the gang and ord«r your* locfayr 

Try your hand al building the finest looking clock on tine 
market Its satin finish anodized aluminum case looks great 
anywhere, while six 4" LED digits provide a highly readable 
display This Is a complete kit., no extras needed, and it only 
takes 1-2 hours to assemble Your choice of case colors 
silver, gold, black { specif y}. 

Ciock kit, 12/24 hour. DC-5 $24,95 

Clock with 10 min ID timer, 12/24 hour, DC-10 $29,95 

For wifed^nd tested docks sdd $10 00 to kit pnce. 

SPECIFY 12 OR 24 HOUR FORMAT 



SATELLITE TV KIT 




THE POPUU^R sat tec RECElVtR \\i KlT-F€ 



Irne^^ fp'^^^^ufly tunaWe audio to rKOvei 
'hldd^^^^ca^^^, divide by IwO PLL CJ&rTU>r)ci^ 
lit Of I^Bt;elle^^^E"Hha1d p&rforrnance. tigHI 

oH^k^e. rlfc'-4 cnarvnel tunable tovefage 

jlllla TV system ifounea (ha P2B, 
'Q~«1!!?Trhi;}uiiand qllier 9 already hi^vQ and naw 
liable in kit farm Bt a new law prli;t. Ord^f 
todav 




tiE\N, LCmEfi PRICES! 



60 Hm Tiffle Bit* 



PARTS PARADE 



Featured lii a RacHj^ 
slory iMay fl2t 
TeCdJver Lg fWft 
ticri^. T hF_g2 t 
plated 1^19^^ 
agsijn refill II, 
Cf(ll<?fl 

Itjf (he 





srfi' 




ff cover 
jat-tat TV 
c- i.'^^.jndi af loca- 
build, pfft-elched, 
i namparnbM la^yout 
nC placBmafit ifid Etifl 
aricl local oscillaiQr are pre- 
'jnedl All p^rls are ir>Gliicl«d 
raciive ca&A, power Bupply. 
descTipiiva oparatting manoe! a$ waif as com- 
plel« asaeiTiiily ingiructiciris. Feali^res ol I he re- 
eeivflf include; (tuai CQmej5\«yn design for tjesl 



A cflmpieto Sal9«iie TV Sy^em teamrss 
B dish ani&nng, UNA [lo* r^o^se ampli- 
iieri. Fiec«ivpr and Mchditlato', 
H2e Receiiver Ki| IME.M 

FI2BFlccewer, Wired arrtlTflfiifld (WGon 
I2D*K LfIA t29S,M 

RM3 HF Modu^alOf S^-*^ 

Prices inclLtde dafnestte LIPS ^tijpplrifl 
and insurance 



IC SPECIALS 



LJNEAR 



3C1 

555 
556 

567 
741 
U5fl 



«» 



$35 
It. SO 
SI 50 

$1.00 
t1 00 
i1.QD 

HJ/*2.00 
S -50 
S 50 
S2.95 
1295 



^Otl 

4046 

404? 
4059 
4511 
45110 



CMOS 



^flP 



.50 

.50 
SI 85 

,50 
$9,00 
S£,0O 

$1 75 



TTL 



74S00 

7447 

7475 

7iOT 

74196- 



$ 40 
t 65 
S .50 

t .50 
$1.35 



SPECIAL 



11C90 
10116 

720 7 A 

7J16D 

7107C 

5314 

S375AB/G 

7Dt)1 



$15,00 
3 125 
$17.50 
$ 5.50 

$^;,oo 

$12.50 
$ 1.95 

£ 2.95 
$ 6,50 



FERRITE BEADS 

Wii-h \i%it> anf} 5pec5 IS^'ll W 

e Hole Balui^ BBSfis S^H OO 



R^Ststar Ass't 

.Assijrtment ol Popular vfllues '-^ 

wall ■•■Cut le^ad iorPG rr^ounhnu ' 

center '/}" leads bag ol 300 or 

St .50 



Swilch'^s 

Mmp toggle arDt (I.OO 

Fl&d Pushbuttons N O a/il.OO 



Earphor>es 
Hearts -S ohrn qooa tor imall tone 
5£i-eafeeT5. alafrTi ciockfi fire: 
5 for $1 ,00 



Crystals 

.'^.579545 MHZ 
10.00000 MHZ 
5 ,?4Be[>a MHZ 



S1.5D 
$5,00 
$5,00 



AC Adaplers 

Good 'Of c:li3CH5 nicad 
charge rsjiill 110 VAC ptuq 
one enri 

&5.^dEi#30mA (t.OO 
le M-ac ^' t.BOmA t^.&fl 



Mini B atim Spfrftk^r 
Afjp*c!iM 2-' diarti Rourio 
[yp^i Ipr T'ShSiOs. rti«kft etc 
J for *2.ClO 



S<t14d Stile BuzKfi 

ftrnail QuZ2et 450 H?. 66 dB soond 
OuEpiit on 5-l5 w<3c at 10- 30 mA, Ttt, 
<:-nm^alihl*" Jt-SO 



Slug Tun«c) Coils 
Small 3/te" Hej( Sfwgs lymed coi^ 
3 turns 10 for $1,00 



AC Outlet 

F*an5l ^^Duni with Lea-cJs 
4/11.00 



READOUTS 

F*JD W7'5.<0 5-CA 1,W 

MAN ^S-'«P?r3<i iS-CA 1.AD 

HP 7641 ^^■■c A j.m 



TRANSISTORS 

swaSKie PNP c* F 1 i.f * 1 .DO 

in**^^ PNP Ct r i5,<ti .00 

2N441[}l4PNC*f IS/lIM 

£H4?1$ F€T C'f 441-W 

JW^*fli PNPC*F 5/11 W 

Zt«02«C-F 1/ltM 

?Nia77Ti NPN Siii-con J1 H 

?N& 1 79 UH F M PN 3/12.0O 

Pow«r Tib NPM *Qm Vt^M 

Pdw«i' Tib Pi^^P 4DW Sn.U 

UPr •iOtHiHb*^^ S.54 

NP*J 390-1 T^p# T<R 5II.'«3.» 

PUP 39W Typa T-fi fdlVt^.Sd 

2K3N»5 t.H 

3N»4« UJT 1^.00 



& Pin 
14 Ptn 
16 Ptn 
24 Pin 
?e Pin 
40 Pin 



SoekeH 

10/$2.00 
10/(2,00 
fo/$2,oa 

4/12.00 
4/S20O 
3/S2.0O 



DliOdea 
5 1 V Zenpf 20/*1 DO 
1M9t4Type S0/J1.00 
1KV ?Arnp S/JI.OO 

100V lAmp 15/SrOO 



L 



25 AMP 

100V Bridge 

$1.5D each 

Mini-Bridge 50V 

1 AMP 

2 for $1.00 



CAPACITORS 

TANTALUM 

1.5uF25V3y$1,00 
1.euF25V3/$1.00 
.22uF2.W3/Sl 00 



ALUMINUM 

E^e^SlrOlvlit 

10Q0 uF lev ftifli^i I.W 

SOT i>r ?(1V A ma I t.50 

1$n ifF r&V Aa^^I 5/-f 1 Hi 

10 LiF I^V RaHial tC'tl M 



{}ISK CfRAHIC 

i>t t6v oi$h ao'ti oo 

I iGV 1S;-n M 

■jOi <6v 30/t1.04 

i(»pF m>-ii.oo 

047 16V Jq.'lH.JW 



DC -DC Conwert^r 

^5 vdc input fftoa -9 vdc jp 30rria 
"■ivfjc prr>jii.C:e$-15w(lC(a::i3Sma $l.iS 



?SK 30 Turn Tnrr> Po\ 11,00 
tK 20 Turn Trim Pol J .50- 



CeramLC IF FiHi^'T-- 



IE 



Trlmmtr Capi 

Sprftgue - 3-40 pf 
Stable PolypropvJ^^rte 



Crymtal Mlcroptione 

Small 1" diameler %" thick 
crystal mihi& Carlr*dg& f.7S 



CoeK Connector 

Chassis mouoi 
BNC type $1.00 



Mini RG- 174 Coax 

to ft, rorsroo 



9 VO'ti ButltFy Cllpt 

NiM Ejua I M V c 1 1 ps 5 tof S 1 .00 

V flubbflT Gfomrne!5 10 Iw JI.OO 



PirTi B*e 
A^il 0* CF^Ohfri ■Ji»< C*OS i*i^« rftJiSlOr? 

uit'^siitofSi ^^iddfrj MICA cao* tiiHT 

sm tii.^ aOO PCI il.DO lg bag 1300 p<c) tl,H 



Connvctq-rm 
6 pun lypd [)otdconiAci^ ri^r 
mA-l003 CAt clock module 
ppice .fi B*. 



Ledt - your choice please ^pecity 

Mini Red, Jumbo Pi&d. High Intensity Red. IHuminator Red 8/t1 

M^ni. Yellow, Jun>bo Yellow Jumbo Green 6/$-l 



Mororolfl MV 2S09 30 PF Momin&> cap ^iQ-^ PF 

.^0 «»ch or 3;t1.KI 



Tijna&ie rsTige 



Audio 
Pre^caler 

Make hi;jh resolution audio 
measurments. great for m^.istcal 
instrument tuning. PL tones, etc 
Mijliiplies audio UP in frequency. 
isSlGCtable xtOor xlOO, gives 01 
^Z fesolufibn with i sec gate 
lirne' High sensitrvdyof 25 mv 1 
meg input i and huilt-m filteiring 
gives great porformance Puns 
on 9V battery alJ CMOS 
PS-3 kit $39.95 

PS-2 wired $49.95 




600 MHz 
PRESCALER^--* 



Extend the range of your 

counter to 600 f^AHi. Works 
with all counters Less than 
150 mv sensitivity specify - 
10 or -100 

Wired tested. PS-1B $59.95 
Kit PS- IB $44.95 



30 Watt 2 mtr PWR AMP 
Simple Class C power amp features 6 times power gain 1 Win 

tor 8 oul 2 W in for 15 out, 4W in for 30out Max outpurof 35 W, 
incredible value, complete with all parts, less case and T-R relay 
PA-1 . 30 W pwr amp kit $ 2A.9B 

TR-1, RF sensed T-R relay kit 6.95 



MRF'?3@ transistor as used in PA-1 
a-IOdb^aifi 150 mhz Si US 



RF actuated relay senses RF 

{1W) and closes DPDT relay 

For RF sensed T-R retay 
TR-1 Kit $6.9S 



P>ower Supply Kh 

Complete Inple rfegu-lal&d pcwer 
Supply provides V3riflble Sto 1&vo3t&at 
200 ma and *5 at i Amp Excillent load 
regulation, good hlleririg and smaM 
siie. Le5? Iran stqrmera. requires 6.3 V 
,>P 1 A and 24 VCT 
Complete Jiit PS'3LT $6-95 



Ail 



OP'AMP Spvdal 

BI-FETLF 13741 -Direct pin lor pin 741 c^ Q\i,;,tjut 500.000 MEG 

inpy3 z. super low 50 pa input cur'ijkW power dram 

50 for onjy $i.OD ^^ 10 for $2,00 



TSWtG 
79MG 

7&05 



11.25 

S1.Z& 

«,so 

$1 15 
11,00 



Rt^ulilon 



7812 


11.00 


78 IS 


$1.00 


79Q5 


$1.2S 


7S12 


$1.25 


7915 


$1,2& 



Shrlnh Tubing Nubi 

Mice prec^i ptes ot^rirrnk sue- r h. -'m" 

St^rmk to 'i" Gr^al fot splrces SOAll.M 



Mint TO-32 Heal Sinks 

Thecrndllciv Brand Stof$1.M 



Opto Isolators - 4N28 type 

Opto Reflectors - Photo diode * LED 

^ 




$.50 ea. 
$1.00 ea. 



Uoin Pint 

MqIsj already pracul m length of 7 P^acl 
for 14 p<n soe^tBti 2Q alrtp* lor tl.OO 



CDS Pholocttlla 
^CJi^lant^fi vliriA$ with Ij-ghl $$0 ohms Cv- 



156 73 Magazine • April, 1984 



John J Meshna Jr., Inc. 



\22 



19 Alkrton Street • Lynn, MA 01904 • Tel: (617) 595-2275 



SELF STANDING COMPUTER TERMINALS 

We acquired a small number of these beautifully made computer 
terminals which were made by a major U. S. manufacturer. We 
do not know all the details about them at press time, but we can 
tell you that someone lost over $2000 on each of them. They lose 
you win. The terminals feature 3 micro-processors for powerful 
capabilities, 106 key, Hall Effect ASCII keyboard, 10 user define- 
able keys, EAROMs, 16K RAM, 48K ROM, serial RS 232 asyn- 
chronous data communications, (synchronous optional), select- 
able baud rates of 75-38.4K BPS, high resolution, 12" green 
screen, composite video monitor, 80 X 25 line scrolling display, 
built-in reverse video option, self-contained, lightweight, tightly 
regulated switching power supply & more than can be fit in this 
space. The terminals were designed to be daisy chained around a 
central host computer and used as individual work stations. The 
host system could then selectively address any machine in the net- 
work for any message it may have. All units are visually inspected 
prior to shipment. An operators manual is provided w/ each unit, 
Shpg. wt, 55 lb, model no. MT 686 $289.00 
With the addition of our TP 420 dual FDD system below, you can 
create your own office system* 

We offer the following as options; schematic pac. 3 lb. $ 10.00 
USRT for synchronous data comm, w/ installation data $ 10.00 
25' RS 232 cable, 1 male & 1 female DB 25 connector $ 20.00 



TP 420 DUAL MINI-FLOPPY DISC SYSTEM 

The TP 420 is an extremely versatile mini floppy disc drive sys- 
tem. It consists of 2 Shugart SA 400 5^4'* floppy disc drives, as- 
sociated logic, controller card, power supply, cooling fan, and 
case. The TP 420 has a built in controller card which features: 
Z 80 A CPU, Z 80A DMA, Z 80A CTC, Intel 8271 controller 
chip, 6K RAM, ROM, plus other goodies. We have been told 
that the serial interface controller card within the TP 420 will 
support up to 4 8" drives from the unused port on it The con 
tr oiler card can be easily removed should you wish to use it on 
some other system. Also built in is a tightly regulated, switch" 
ing power supply which runs on 115/230 v 50/60 hz.. The TP 
420 is shipped w/ the interface cable for the MT 686, data, & 
schematics. Shpg. wt 22 lb. Stock no. TP 420 $300.00 




PDR-27 NAVY RADtATlON METER 

Just released by the US Navy, They appear to be ir excellent condition and include the 
fitted aluminum transit case. Battefies not fUmished but are available in most electronic 
supply houses. 4 ranges 0.5 to 500 mr/hr. Ramoveefel© hand probe, detection of Beta 
and Gamma radiation. With todays world conditions and perhaps proximity to a nuk« 
power station, it might provide a Httte insurance to own one of these instruments. With no 
facilities to check or test, wa offer AS IS, visually OK Schematic provided with each. We 
have some accessories and offer as an optkKi although not required for operation. 
Shipping wgt, 22 lb. PDR-27 Rad Meter $50.00 

PDft-27 phones $7.00 Approx, 1 00 page Instr, Book $1 0.00 

Hi Sensitivity GM tube $1 0,00 Low Sensitivity GM tube $5.00 

The above fisted tubes are already instafied in ttm meter 
We are offering these as spares if desired. 



PHONE ORDERS accepted on MC, VISA, orAMEX 

No COD^s. Shpg, extra on above. 

Send for free 72 page catalogue jam packed w/ bargains. 










^See List of Ad\/ert!sers on page 130 



73 Magazine • Aprtl, 1984 157 



THE MOST AFFORDABLE 

REPEATER 

ALSO HAS THE MOST IMPRESSIVE 
PERFORMANCE FEATURES 

(AND GIVES THEM TO YOU AS STANDARD £QUIPMENT!j 




JUST LOOK AT THESE PRICES! 



Band 



Kit 



10M,6M|2IVI,220 

440 



$680 
$7@0 



Wired/Tested 

$860 
$980 



BGtti kfi snd wir^ units am pompfstB with aif psrts, modules, hafdwsfB, ami crysfa/s. 



CALL OR WRITE FOR COM 



DETAILS. 



Aiso svatiAbie tor mmom sit& Unktrtg, crossb^nd, Bftd remote b&se^ 



FEATURES: 

• SENSITIVITY SECOND TO NONE; TYPICALLY 
0.15 uV ON VHF, 0.3 uV ON UHF. 

• SELECTIVITY THAT CANT BE BEAT! BOTH 

8 POLE CRYSTAL FILTER & CERAMIC FILTER FOR 
GREATER THAN 100 dB AT ± 12KH2. HELICAL 
RESONATOR FRONT ENDS. SEE R144, 8220, 
AND R451 SPECS IN RECEIVER AD BELOW. 

• OTHER GREAT RECEIVER FEATURES: FLUTTER- 
PROOF SQUELCH. AFC TO COMPENSATE FOR 
OFF-FREQ TRANSMITTERS. SEPARATE LOCAL 
SPEAKER AMPLIFIER a CONTROL. 

• CLEAN. EASY TU ME TRANSMITTER; UP TO 20 WATTS OUT 
(UP TO SOW WITH OPTIONAL PA), 



HIGH QUALITY MODULES FOR 
REPEATERS, LINKS, TELEMETRY, ETC. 



HIGH-PERFORMANCE 
RECEIVER MODULES 




R1 44/R220 FM RCVRSfor 2M or 220 MHz, 
0. 1 5uV sers.: 8 pole xtal filter ^ ceramic filter 
in H, helcat resonalor front end fof exoetDlional 
selectivity, more than -100 dB at ±12 kHz, 
best available today- Flutter-proof siiuelch. 
AFC tracks drifting xmlrs. Xtal oven avail. 
Kit only SI 38 

R451 FM RCVR Same but for uhi. Tuned line 
front end. 0.3 uV sens. KJt only $1 38, 

R76 FM RCVR for 10M, 6M, 2M. 220, or 
commercial bands. As above, but w/o AFC or 
hel, res. Kits only $li a. 
Also avail w/4 pole filter, only S98/kit. 

R1 lOVHF AM RECEIVER kitforVHFaifCf*-ft 
band or ham bands. Only $98. 

R1 10-259 SPACE SHUTTLE RECEIVER, 

kit only $98. 



amironics 



tsa 73 Magazine • ApriM9&4 



^33 



TRANSMITTERS 




TS1 VHF FM EXCITER for TOM, 6M. 2M. 
220 MHzor adjacent bands. 2 Watts contin- 
uous, up to 2Vz W intermittent, $68/kiL 




T45t UHFFM EXCITER 2 to 3 Watts on 450 
ham band or adjacent freq. Kit only S78. 

VHF&UHF LINEAR AMPLIFIERS. Use on 
either FM or SSB. Power levels from 1 to 45 
Watts to go w/lth exciters & xmtg converters. 
Several models. Kits from $7S. 



A1 6 RFTIGHT BOX Deep dravt/n alum. case 
with tigi^t cove rand no seams. 7x8x2 inches. 
Designed especially for repeaters. $20. 



ACCESSORIES 




• COR KITS With Audio mixer, speaker ampli- 
fjer, tail & time out timers. Kit only $3S. 

• CWID KITS 158 bils, field programmable, 
cfean audio, rugged TTL logic. Kit only S68. 

• OTMF DECODEft/CONTROLLER KITS. 

Control 2 separate on/off functions with 
touchtones*, e.g., repeater and autopatch. 
Use wittt main or aux. receiver or with Auio- 
patch. Only S90 

• AUTO PATCH KITS. Provide repeater auto- 
patch, reverse patch, phone line remote 
control of repeater, secondary control via 
repeater receiver. Many other features. 
Only S90. Requires DTMF Module. 



AS^^l 




% 




HELICAL RESONATOR FILTERS available 
separately on pcb w/connectors. 

H RF- 1 44 for 1 43- 1 50 MH z S38 
HRF-220 for 213-233 MHz $38 
HRF-432 for 420-450 MHz S48 



NEW LOW-NOISE PREAMPS RECEIVING CONVERTERS TRANSMIT CONVERTERS 



New low-noise microwave transistors make 
preampa in the 0.9 to 1.0 dB noise figure 
range possible without the fragility and power 
supply problems of gas-fet's. Units furnished 
wired and tuned to ham band. Can be easily 
retuned to nearby freq. 







Models LNA{ I 

P30. and P432 

shown 



Model 

LNA 28 
LNASO 
LNA 144 
LNA 220 
LNA 432 
LNA SOD 



Tunable 
Freq Range 

2040 

40-ro 

120-ieo 

190-250 
360-470 
470-960 



Noise Figure 

0.9 dB 
0.9 dB 
1.0 dB 
1.0 dB 

1.0 cfB 
1 2dB 



Gain 

20 dB 
20d8 
lSd6 
17dB 
16dB 
15dB 



Price 

$39 
S39 
$39 
$39 
$45 
$45 



ECONOMY PREAMPS 



Our traditionat preamps, proven in years of 
service. Over 20,000 in use throughout the 
world- Tuneable over narrow range. Specify 
exact freq. band needed. Gain 1 6*20 dB. NF = 
2 dB or less. \/HF units available 27 to 300 MHz. 
UHF units avaflabie 300 to 650 MHz. 



P30K, VHF Kit less cas© 
P30W, VHF Wired/Tested 
P432K UHF Kit less case 
P432W, UHF Wired/Tested 



$10 
$33 
$21 
$36 



P432 aiso available in broadband version to 
cover 20-650 MHz without tuning. Same price 
as P432; add ^'S" to model #. 



HELICAL RESONATOR 
PREAMPS 




Ff. 





Our lab has deveioped a new line of iow-noise 
receiver preamps with helical resonator filters 
burit in. The combination of a low noise amplifier 
similartothe LNA series and the sharp seiecttvity 
of a 3 or 4 section helicai resonator provides 
increased sensitivity while reducing intermod 
and cross-band interference in critical appli- 
cations. See selectivity curves at right. Noise 
figure = 1 to 1 .2 dB. Gain = 1 2 to 1 5 dB. 



Model 


Tuning Range 
143-150 MHz 


Price 


HRA-144 


$49 


HRA-220 


213-233 MHz 


$49 


HRA-432 


420-450 MHz 


$59 


HRA-{ ) 


150-174tVlHz 


$69 


HRA-( ) 


450-470 MHz 


$79 




Models to cover every practical rf & If range to 
fisten to SSB, FM. ATV. eta NF = 2 dB or less. 



VHF MODELS 

Kit with Case $49 
Less Case $39 
Wired $69 



Antenna 
Input Range 

28-32 

50-52 

50-54 
144- 14a 
145-147 
T 44' 144.4 
146-148 
f 44- 146 
220-222 
220-224 
222-226 
220-224 
222-224 



Receiver 
putput 

144-148 
28-80 

144-148 

28-30 

28-30 
27-27.4 

28-30 

50-54 

28-30 
144-148 
144-148 

50-54 

26-30 



UHF MODELS 

Kit with Case $59 
Less Case $49 
Wired S75 



432-434 
435-437 
432-438 
432-436 
439,25 



28-30 
26-30 
144-148 
50-64 
61.25 



SCANNER CONVERTERS Copy 72-76. 135- 
144, 240-270, 400-420, or 806-394 MHz bands 
on any scanner. Wired/tested Only $83. 



SAVE A BUNDLE ON 
VHF FM TRANSCEIVERS! 



FM-5 PC Board Kit - ONLY $1 78 

complete with controls, heatsink, etc* 

10 Watts, 5 Channels, for 2M or 220 MHz. 




Cabinet Kit complete 
with speaker, knobs, 
connectors, hardware. 
Only $60. 



While supply 
lasts, get $60 
cabinet kit free when 
you buy an FM-5 Transceiver kit 
Where e Ise can you get a complete transceiver 
for oniy $178 



For SSB, CW, ATV, FM. etc. Why pay big 
bucks for a multi mode rig for each band? Can 
be linkedwith receive converters f or transceive, 
2 Watts output vhf, 1 Watt uhf. 



For VHF, 
Model XV2 
Kit $79 
Wired $149 
(Specify band) 



Exciter 
Input Range 

28-30 
28-29 
26-30 

27-27,4 

28-30 

50-54 
144-146 

50-54 
144-146 



Antenna 
Output 

144-146 
145-146 

50-52 
144-144.4 
220-222* 
220-224 

50-52 

144-148 

28-30 



i 



For UHF, 
Modei XV4 
Kit S99 
Wired $169 



28-30 
26-30 
50-54 
61.25 

144-148 



432-434 

435-437 

432-436 

439.25 

432-436* 



*Add £20 for 2M Input 




VHF & UHF LINEAR AMPLIFIERS. Use with 
above. Power levels from 10 to 46 Watts. 
Several models, kits from $78. 



LOOK AT THESE 
ATTRACTIVE CURVES! 



[ 










i 


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1 
















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I 




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0-B 


-<S' 


' i 1 1 ' r 

^,itl Him +(e '%-fl* 







T^fC&t S&feGtwty Curvos 

of fi&c&ivefs and 

HBiic&i Resonators. 



IMPORTANT REASONS WHY 
YOU SHOULD BUY FROM THE 
VALUE LEADER: 

1. Largest seiectlon of vhf and uhf kits 
in the world. 

2. Exceptional quafity and low prices due 
to targe voIum&. 

3. Fast deUverf most kits shipped same da y. 

4. Complete, professional instruction 
manuals. 

5. Prompt factory service available and 
free phone consuttation, 

6. in business 21 years. 

7. Self more repeater moduteB than ait 
other mfrs. and have for years^ Can give 
quality features for much lower cost 



amironics, inc. 



Call or Write for FREE CATALOG 

(Send $1 .00 or 4 IRC'c for overseas mailing) l - - , 

Order by phone or mail • Add $3 S & H per order^sa 

(Electronic answering service evenings A weekends) 65-A MOUL RD. • HILTON NY 14468 
Use VISA, MASTERCARD, Check, or UPS COD. Phone: 716-392-9430 

Hamtronics ^ is a registered trademark 



See List of Advertisers on page 130 



73 Magazine • April, 1984 159 




■The 

HMf SHACK 



808 N. Main 
Evansville, IN 47711 l^ 

812-422-0231 
812-422'0252 




Prices ^f}<f Avatf^bitity Subieci lo Qh^rtQ^ 



I hh^ 





TEN TEC 2591 



SANTEC ST 142 



AEA 

CP. 1/C.64 or VlC-20 Eoftwafe Package 
MP-?0 or MP** Irle^fat-e Package , , , 

AMT-1 AmlOf^RTTV^CW 

ALLIANCE 

HD73 (10.7 sq. ft.] Rolator 

U110 Small Elevation RoTator . . . . . 
AMERITRON 

AL^aOQSKAmp . . . , . . . 

ASTHON 

RS7A S-7 Amp P^iwer Supply 

•RSlOA 7.5-10 Amp P&w^f Supply, . 

RSiaA 9- 12 Amp Render Supply ... 

RS2QA 16-20 Amp Power Supply , . 

RS20M 16-20 Amp w^mater . . , 

RS35A 25-35 Amp , 

RS35M 25-3.& Amp ^v^metar 

HS50A 37.50 Amp. 

RS50M 37-50 Amp w^ meter, . , . . 
AZDEM 

PCS^OOO 2M moblfe rig 

BENCH Eft 

BY-1 PaddlafB¥-2 Ctiroma 



,,. .CaiJ 

. .$129.00 
. . .449.00 

.. tst.oo 

. . .49.00 

S59900 

. . $43.00 

. . .59.00 

. . 69.00 

. 89.00 

109,00 

. 135.00 

. ^ . . 149.00 

.199.00 

525.00 

, S2S0 00 

.S39. 00^49. 00 











^ '§ i i i t « ■ ^^ 






'^^■^^^^ 





YAESU FT 757GX 



75 



BUTTERNUT 

HF6VeO-10 Meier V«rl(cai 

COIN NECT SYSTEMS 

Pfiwale Patch II 

CUSHCHAFT 

A3 Tribsnder 3EL. ■ 

A4 Tiibarrtfet 4EL 

5JflB^2l4FB Boome-rs UEL ?^^ 

32^ 19 Super Boomer t9EL 2M 

DAIWA 

CN.520 1.a.60 MHa SWR/Pwr MlP 

CN-e20B l.a-150 MHz SWFb'Pwr }AU 
CN$^0 140-45D MHf SWRiipWT Mir 

CN720e 1.fi-1&0MHzSWR/PwrMtf 

ENCDMM (SANTEC) 

ST^42. 222. 442, AI»o Slochtng KDK FM'2033 

T1i« Hpndheti^^ SI til OfNrinf^inq Mp»r Fqalur^Q: 

CaLI fox Your DCacoLint Prlca 
HAL 

Cfii 30O Compuiej' interface 

CR( 100 Comptiler irtter-tace. 
MY GAIN 

TH7 DXS 7EL Tr I bander 

TH5MK2S5ELTribander. . .■ 

ExplDFec 14 Tribander 

C045 a.5 9<i. 11 ftot&lor 

Ham tV 15 §fl. It. Rotator. 

TSX 20 sq M Hotalor. . . . , 

f r** ShlppJ^o on 6l| Cftnk-up Towert 

ICOM 

1C0EAT Now Available 

27ANewUttra-SmaliaM ., ... 

271 hf tOOW All Mode 

471 A Deluxe flaseXcvr 

7S1 Ultimate TrsnsceiveT ...... 



,1119.00 

. S42S.00 

.*2 15.00 
. 2?t.OO 
.00 each 
. . 59.00 



^3.00 
110 00 
129.00 
1 SD.OD 



?25.D0 

i37S.OO 
. .319.00 

?79.oa 

. 129.00 
. .199.00 
^ 249.00 



Call 
Call 
Call 
Can 
-Call 



€ 

*^; 




n 




e ' 


#^*^^SB[ 








^^s^^^^^^^^^^^^^^H 


ifoi^^fl 








^^^^^^^^^^^^1 


|HH|HKH 








^^^^B 


■S^S 


^%mu 


j^F^^^^lj^ 




wK^^B 







ICOM IC 27A 

25H Wllh Free Memofy Baakup 

745 Amazmg Transceiver. . 
IC-2AT ... 

3ATMAT Har^dhelflSi 

45A4flCiMHE 

R71 A New h Improved Receiver 

KLM 

Oaca^ An leu n as In Stock. Call loi Prices.. 

KANT RON ICS 

The In1«rfaci< I). Tha brand oaw c^mputeir 

CW. HTTY, ASCII. Software Available 

APPLE, ATARI, THWC.TIflfl 

Amtor SDllHrera Now Ava^labla 

KEN PRO 

KR-500 Etevation RolatOr 

LARSEN 

NLA-iSO-MMS/a Wave 2M Mag Ml. 

MFJ 

1229 M^w Computer InlerFac^ m/AM-tqr 

1224 Now Compuler Interface . . 

313 VHF Conv Tor HT 

Very LArQ«£lQckiaf MFJ Products. Call lor 
Ml RACE 

D24N 440 MHi Amp 

DIOION 440 MHi Amp 

B1016 10-1S0 Amp^Preamp 

B30i« 3i0-iS0 Amp^Pfeamp... 

SHU RE 

444D Desk Mic 

TEN TEC 

The Fantastic Corsair. . 

^5TD Oscar Transverler. . . , 

2591 2M Handheld 

TOKYO HY POWER 

HL 160V 3 Qf 10/160 W Preamp . 

HL 160V 25^160W Praamp 

HL90U 1O.f&0W yHF Amp^preamp,. ,., = = . 

HLa2V 1D/30W Preamp -.,.-.,- 

HL45U WA^m UKF Amp/Pre amp. . . . 

YAESU 

FT'990 CompUler Aided XCvf Syfilam . . . . 

FT-7S7CX Syper Buy - .^,-- ^:,-. .: . . . 

FT-20aR 2M Handheld. . 

FT-726R Trthand Xci^r . . .... 

FT-a03fl New NT . . . . , 



. , . Call 
. . Call 

1215.00 
236.00 

.3:35.00 
Call 






.J179.00 

ra&.oo 

, , Call 

Call 

jse.oo 

DIacounI Prbln)^. 



.$179.00 
. 279.00 
. 245.0D 
,.199.00 

. , $55.00 



.51020.00 
, . 425.00 
AvaiiatJia 

. .$295.00 
269.00 
. . 305.00 
. . 139.00 
, , 175.00 

. $1 259.00 

. . 740.00 

265.00 

Call 

Call 



USED EQUIPMENT 




This list was compiled 2/S/84. Our used 

equipment changes dalty. Please write or 

call for our current listing. 



AEA 

MBA-HO Reader 

A2&EN 
PCS-3<«)0 2MTFl. . 

PCS^4000 2MTR 

PCS-3W H.T, 

DENTRON 

Ciippeiton L Amp 

W3 Wellmlf 

DRAKE 

TR7fPS7, ran 

R?A Rcvf 

TR4, RV4, AC4 

TR4, AC4 

TFO, HVe, AC4el£:..6 MTR 

T4X. R4A. P.S.. MS4 

ENCOMM 

HT12W 2MTR H.T 

ST7T440fJlHrH.T.. . . . 

HAL 

ST6D00 Demodulalor w^S^^ope. 

CT2200^KB21O0 

HEATH KIT 

SA206CI 2Kw Turer. . . 

SA2040 3K* Tiirer, . . 

Se 102, P.S., CW 

SB 1D4A. GW, PS,, Sphr. 

SB 634 Consolfl. . j. . 

SB 101, CW, P.S 

HW 101, CW, P.S 

SB 630 Console 

HW2035 2MTfl 

OX 60B Xcvr. 

HG lOB Vfo. 

PS 9000 P.S. Spkr, ClOCha. 

HP 1144 20A P.S 

HWa ORP Xcvr 

I COM 

740 Xcvr 

740^Keyer 

740fP.$ 

HM'2RBmole 

2SA3MTRfled 

245 2MTR 

22S2NflTH 

2AT 2MTR H,T 

SM-5 [>esbi Mie . . . . 

SM-2Daal[Mlc 

HMeT.T. Mid 

440 MHj Preamp 

KANTRONICS 
lotarface 



*199 00 

S2 15.00 
229.00 
.5^)9.00 

545^.00 
. . .49.00 



.W99.D0 

1025.00 

349.00 

.279.00 

. . 469.00 

..339.00 



$149.00 
. 169.00 

.1469.00 
745 00 



$1.B9.00 
. 139.00 

.32S.00 
.399.00 
.100.00 

. .525-00 

.269.00 

.69.00 

. .109.00 
. .25.00 

, . .49.00 
.175.00 

, , . !i9.00 

, . . S6.00 



. $6fi9.00 

699.00 

769,00 

. . .69.00 

,,.225.00 

.149.00 

. .125.00 

, .175.00 

...29.00 

...29.00 

, . .40.00 

i . . 5S.0O 

. $79.00 



Field day Rtadei 

Oi>ai Filler. 

KENWOOD 
TS B30S, CW 

TS a.50S Xc« 

TS 12QS/P.S 

T5990/R599D 

9130 2MTH AliM&de, T.t Mic, 

?e2S 2MTR 

RM 76 Remote 

BC£ DC Chgr . . , . 

RSOORcvr 

820Vfo.. 

7200 2MTR/P.S,5 

YG 455 C 5D0HZ (B30) 

YK fteC 500 Hjz (S30) 

CW Filter j520f 

PC-1 Phone Patcft. ...... , 

MFi 

495 Super Keyboard^RTTY . . 

1??J Intersect , , . 

721 SSB^CW Filler 

CWF.2 Filler 

24 Hour Ciock 

I2t0 interlace 

SWAN 

Aairo 150 xcvr 

WM20O0 MTR 

TEN-TEC 

560 Corsatr 

263 Vfo 

OMNI-C 

OMNI Dm 

544 Xcvr 

525 Argosy 

509 Argcftaut 

252MO P.S 

25iM P.S.. . . . 

234 Speecti Proc , 

276 Xca.[ , , 

20SCWFiilaf 

1A P.S 

YAESU 

FT901 DM 

FTIOIEE.CW .. 

FT30tDFP30tD 

FT225RD 2MTH All Mode . 




99 00 

.,.&9.00 

J6fl9.00 
. 529.00 
.4*5.00 
. 450.00 
. 365.00 

180.00 
. . 50.00 
. .25.00 

149.00 
. 125.00 

115.00 
65.00 

.35.00 
. 25.00 

.29.00 

,St99.DQ 

. . .7000 

.4000 

.26-00 

. . 20.00 

.59.00 

.$399-00 
. 49.00 

.$799.00 
. .135.00 
625.00 
. . 449.00 
. . 375.QO 

.376.00 

. .225.00 

. . .99.00 

.99.00 

. .69.00 
...19.00 

. .19.00 
. . .19.00 

$625 00 

. . 425.00 

. 525.00 

470.00 



FT221 2MTR AM Mode 269.00 

YC22I Dig. Read .... ... 69.00 

YD14B Desk M<c 29,00 

FRG 77D0^Mem(jrv .... .. ..39«.00 

FRO 7000 ftCvr 299.00 

FT257R 2MTR 149.00 

FT237HA 2MTfl 169.00 

FT202R H.T 110.00 

FLttOAmp 125.00 

FTtOSR 440MHz HI .. . 219.00 

MISC' 

DiawaCNA 1001 Auloluner ... . 5239.00 

Robot 400. , 250.00 

Panasonhc Camera. S 7 5,00 

Z&om Leng, .09.00 

N^ta1^!;ni FP3030 CoJOr Camera w^Zoom Lerss & 

Color Monitor . . .Caili 

GalaKjf V MK2, P.S... 199.00 

Galaxy V Vfu. . . 69-00 

Galaxy V MK2, P-S,, Low Outpul , . , ... .1 15.0Q 

&X3D2 Rcvr , .. 239.00 

DX200 Rcvr 125.00 

RTTV Monitor 49.00 

Wilson 1^05 H.T ..100.00 

Wilson 1402 H.T. . . . .>.,.,,, 100.00 

DEMONSTRATORS 

CP't Interlace. . . $169.00 

AMT-1 Interface .. .425.00 

DRAKE 

12" Gieen S^:reen $126.00 

ENCOMM 

t44Lp H.T $239.00 

STTT 440 MHz H.T ,, -(99 00 

ICOM 

75t DflLuxe Xcvf ., ... $1139.00 

745 X.Cvr .629.00 

RTOficvr. . . .&25..00 

7072 inrerface 95.00 

720A Xcvr . S2S.00 

29CIH 2MTR Air ^rfOde 425.00 

25M/Mem BK up 295 00 

MFJ 

313 H.T, CQr>verter %Z2m 

825/830 MTR aS.OC 

CLOSE-OUT SPECIALS 

AEA 

KT-1 Keyer/Traitier, , , . .. .$69.00 

MK-1 Ke^r 49 QO 

DRAKE 

Tiieta 7000E Terminal , $569.00 

ICOM 

740/P.S. f S50 Rebate $Sl9.m 

251 A ^^ $50 Re&ate 525.00 

402 432MHz Xcw 249.00 



Send SASE for our new & used equipment 
MON-FRI 9AM>6PM * SAT dAM-SPM 



list 



ICOM, WILSON, KENWOOD 

and MAXOM Commercial 

Equipment Available 



30 DAY WARRANTY ON USED EQUIPMENT 




THE FIRST NAME 
ELECTRONIC TEST GEAR 




NEW FROM RAMSEY-20 MHz 
DUAL TRACE OSCILLOSCOPE 

Unsurpassed quatity at an unbeatable price, the Ramsey oscilloscope 
compares to others costing hundreds more. Features include a compo- 
nent testing crrcuit thatwiil allow you to easily test resistors, capacitors, 
digitai circuits and diodes • TV video sync filter * wide bandwidth & 
high sensitivity • internal graticule • highquaifty rectangular CRT 

• front panel trace rotator • Z axis • high sensitivity x-y mode • u^ery 
low power consumption • regulated power supply • built-in calibrator 

• rock solid triggermg • high quaHly hook-on probes 



$39995 



high quadly 

hook-on probes included 




RAMSEY D- If DO 
VOM-I 



Compact and re I lab te. de- 
signed to service a wide vari- 
ety ai equipment. Features in- 
clude • mtrrof back scale 
• double- jeweled precision 
rnoving coil » doubfe over- 
load protection * an ideal Jow 
cost unit for the beginner or 
as a spare back- jp unit. 

$1995 

test leads and battery 
irtctud«d 




RAMSEY D-2t00 
DIGITAL MULTITESTER 

A compact easy to use unit 
designed to oper&te like a pro. 
Featuring * 3'/^ digit LCD * low 
BAT fndicaior • ail range over- 
load' protection * overrange indi 
cation ■ auto-pol^nly • Transis- 
lor tester • duai-slope integra- 
tion * vinyi carrying case 




Kp£ lei^t leads, battery & vinyl 
carrying case mcludied 




RAMSEY 0-3100 
DIGITAL MULTIMETER 

Reliable, accurate digital 
measurements at an arnaz- 
Ingiy low cost • fn-Jine color 
coded push buttons, speeds 
range selection • abs plastic 
tilt stand » recessed input 
iacks • overload protection 
on all ranges • SV? digit LCD 
display with auto zero, auto 
polarity & low BAT. indicator 




test leads and battery 
included 




CT-70 7 DIGIT 
525 MHz COUNTER 

L^b quatity at -a breakthrough price. 
Features • 3 trequency ranges each 
with pre amp • dii^i selectable gate 
time5 ■ gate activity indicator 

• 50rT5V (<.C- 150 MH^ typical sensitivity 

• wide frequency range • 1 ppm 
accuracy 




$ii995 



wired in etudes AC adapter 

CT-70 kit 599.95 

SP-4 nicad pack 0.0S 



CT-90 9 DIGIT 
600 MHz COUNTER 

The most versatile tor less than S300. 
Features 3 seteciabEegatetimes • 9 
digils • gat^ indicator • display hoJd 

• 25mV(a'i 150 MH^ typical sensitivity 

• lOMHztimebaseforWWVcalibra- 
Ipon • t ppm accuracy 

$i4995 

wired inc lucres AC adapter 

CT-^0 kit $129.95 

OV-1 0.1 PPM oven timebase . . .59,55 
BP-^ nicad pack 8.95 





CT-125 9 DIGIT 
1.2 GHz COUNTER 

A 9 digit counter that will outperform 
units costing hundreds rnore. • gate 
indicator • 24mV@ 150 MHz typical 
sensitivity * 9 digit display • 1 ppm 
accuracy ■ display iiold • dual Inputs 
witiipreamps 

*16995 

wir«d inclucfes AC adapter 

6P-4 nicad pack B-35 



iinva ttsiiinH^ 



CT-50 8 DIGIT 
600 MHz COUNTER 

A versatile lab bench counter with 
optional receive frequency adapter, 
which turns the CT-50 into a digital 
readout for most any receiver * 25 rnV 

(ffl 150 MH2 typical sensiti^vity • B digit 
display • 1 ppm accuracy 



$169^5 



CT-50 kil $130J5 

RA-t receiver adapter kit 14.96 









^=: \\)f/t=i~ 



I B PWiit ahHII»4R 




DM-700 DIGITAL 
MULTIMETER 

Professional quality at a hobbyist 
prace, Features include 26 different 
ranges ancf 5 functions • 3'.v dig-it, Vz 
in:ch LEO display • automatic decimal 
placemenT • autornaticpoiarity 

$ii995 

wired includes AC adapter 

DM-70Q kit $99,95 

MP-1 probe sel 4.95 



PS-2 AUDIO 
MULTIPLIER 



Thie PS-2 is hancfy for high resoiiitiion 
audio resoluhon measuremenls, rnyl- 
tiplies UP.in frequency • great for PL 
tone measuremenis • multipljesby 1d 
Of 100 • O.qiHs resolution i buiEt-in 
signal preamp/condinoner 



PR-2 COUNTER 
PREAMP 

The PR -2 is ideal for measuring weak 
signiaEsfrom 10 to 1,000 MHz • flal 25 
db gam • BNC connector s • great for 
snjfling RF * ideal receiver/TV 

preamp 



PS- IB 600MHz 
PRESCALER 

Extends the range of your present 
Counter to 600 MHz • 2 stage preamp 

* divfdeby 10 circuitry * sensitivity: 
25mVp 150 MH? • BNC connectors 

• drives any cotinjer 



$4995 



$4495 




PS-2 kJl ..................... $39.95 



wired includes AC adapter 

PR-2kit ., -..,,, $34.95 



Wired includes AC adapfer 

PS"lBkht $49.95 



ACCESSORIES FOR RAMSEY COUNTERS 

Telescopic whip antenna — BMC plug .. $ 8.95 
High impedance probe, light Joading . . . 16.95 

Low pass probe, audio use 1635 

Direct probe, general purpose use 13.95 

TiU bail, for CT-70, 90. 125 3,95 



master charge] 



^^m5^^ 



iH ■! Fm«ni ~^ ind 



PHONE ORDERS CALL 

716-586-3950 

lELEX 466735 RAPVISEY CI 



TERMS: • saEisfacEftrt guarameed • eurttiJiefar 10 days; if fiflt pleased, reiurn in. 
ijrigmal iDrm for relund • add 6".! iDf sttipping and irsuraJice to a maxunum of 



Slum • nvers^Bs add 15% Ic^r surhce mail • COO add UbQ jCuD \n USA mm 
* orders under Srs.DO add Si 5Q * NY residenisadd 7--. sales ta)( • SOtiavparls 

warrafilv ofi all kits • t year parls & iabpr warFarlv or aJI wir&d i/nits 



^ = = =— ^== RAMSEY ELECTRONICS, INC, 
i#Silli!€i€¥ 2575BairdRd. 



1 Penfield.N.V. 14626 



*^Sfi6 List of Adverthers on page^ 130 



73 Magazine • ApriU984 161 



DEALER DIRECTORY 



Culver Cify CA 

Jun^s Ektrtjonks, 39I& Sepulvieda Blvd., CuJvtt 
City CA 90230. aOiKft003. Tj^^es 463-1886 San 
Diegp. &27 5733 (Reiw NV). 

Ffmtana CA 

Complert lifws ICOM, DcriTron, Ten-Toe, 
Mirage, Cublc^ Lunar, over 4000 dectritmic 
priodticts for hpbb>rist. tfichniciftn^ etperi- 
menter. Aha CD rsdio^ londmobiie- Fcmtaiu 
E1cictTrmii3n !^2S Bwtn Ave., Foatuu CA 
3233K, »32"T7ia, 

San lose CA 

Bay area's newest BmBteur radio stor*r New 
St used amaleur radio sales ic service. We 
feBturc Kenwood. ICOM, Azden^ Yaisii, T«i- 
Tec» Santec k many mdre. Shaver IR4di<i> Itw-^ 
13TS &), Bftwcnn Av«>, gan joK CA »S1£8, 
S9S-1103, 

New Castle DE 

F&etoty Authoriawl DtaJeTf Vaesu^ ICOM^ Ten- 
Tec, KDK, Aiden, AEA, KaiviKPiiks, Santec. Full 
line of ajccessorje}. No sales tax in I>eiaware, One 
mile oH 1-^5. DdawaR Antitnir Supply, 71 
Um&i^ Ruct, Htw OHlie PE 10720^ 32S-7723. 

Rocky Mountain area's newest hmn dealer. Call 
ajM fir# for AKA. A^jJcn. KDK, Ten-Tec, But- 
temut, CbkhcraR, and maref BJM Electronics, 
4204 Overlaixl. Bmae ID S37Q5. 343-4018. 

Preston ID 

Ross WB7BYZ h&s the larfSDist stock of amateur 
gear in the Intermountain W«tt ai>d t}»« best 
prkes. Call me for alt ^our ham needs. Bos 
Distribudn^, TS So. State, Fiestvci ID e33j63, 
852^0530, 

Littleton MA 

The riilinM^ ham store serving NE. Full line of 
TCOM & Kenwood. Vaesu HTs. Driike, Daiih-a, 
B^W ao«e£$f»HeA. Curtis £e Trac keyers. Larsen, 
Hustler, Tdes/Hy-Gain pnoducfa- Mitag)^ 
ampfi^, Astron P.S-, Alpha Delta protectors, 
ABRL & KantruTucs instrurtiDn aidi- Whfetitr 
radar def^iCtors. Pull line of coax fitting. 
TEL— COM EkctTDnic CammuTiJcatii)^^ 675 
Great Rd. (At. 119), Uoktan MA 014$0, 
4dti-3400/3lHO, 

Aim Arbor MI 

See us for products Like Ten-Tec^ R. L. Drake, 
D^Trtin and mSufly mcm. OpW Monday tkKHJgti 
Saturday, OftM to 1730. WBSVGR. WBBUXO, 
WDflOfcN, and WfiRP behind the eounttr, Ptir- 
thmat Radio Supply^ 337 E. Hoover Ave., Aim 
Ar^r MI 4S1Q4, 665-96^, 

Livoiiiii MI 

Complete ptuytovaJittic systems. Amateur radio^ 
repeater, satellite, and computer a[>p]!i{:ation<;1 
CfiJi Fad WDAAHO. Emkdo FliotDvoltaJcs, 
27W0 Schw>Jw*ft Rmd, Uvflnia Ml 4SL50, 
523-1 S50. 



Hudson NH 

Look!— hanis, SWLs, *r»d eirperimenters: 
parts, bfxiks, fS^t^ antennas, lowers. Call fur 
qtioie. Pokari'i ELECTRONICS CEftfTEH, 
«1 LowdL RfHfi (Route 3AK Uvdson NH QQ061, 



PROPAGATION 



Albany, New York 
UPSTATE NEW YORK 

KpTiwtJrtd;, ICOM, Tcn-T*, Bdden, Cushcraft, 
Larsen, Hustler, ARRL, Hy-Gain, BdcW, MFf, 
Mtra®P. Nc>w and tLwd ec^uipnient. Serving the 
amateur community since 1S42, Adirondack 
ElectnwUts* Ijtic.,. Ifl&l C^witral Averme^ Albany 
NY 12206, 456-0203 (one mile west of Northway 
wit 2W), 



Columbus OH 

The bigg^And b«st ham slant in the Midwest 
featuring Kenwood and other quality produces 
with wuiking displays. Wesdl only thtsb^t. Au- 
thorized Kenwood servioe. Universal Amateur 
RadHi, Inc., 1280 Aida Dr., BeymUbburg (Co- 
lumbua) OH 4306$, M&^2£7. 



Scranton PA 

ICOM, Biird, Cushcrftft, Beckman, Fluke, Lar- 
sen, Husder. Antenna Spedallsts^ Astfon, Avan- 
ti, Bdden. WiAU'WaVS. AEA, Vibroplot. 
Ham Key, Amphenol, Sony, E&W, Coas-S^, 
Cover Craft, |.W. Miller/Dal wa, ARRL. 
Ameco, Shure, LnRue: Elertroniras 1112 Crand- 
view St., Scranbm PA ISSOO, 343-2134. 



Dallas TX 

IBM PC/ Apply aftcriibflfket products^ hobbyi^' 
et^ronjcs project kits: t50.(X) complete modem 
kit, subsmptioW»tellit& TV decoder kits, 
ETROM programntef/dupLicatiOr, poptilnr 
memory IC testers, dat* sJMiels, application 
notes^ and more than 6000 parts in sbvck- S^^ni)- 
conductOTi, diWTi-'tc!, video products,, took, 
Please write for your free liteTtttiireTdftt^og. Iifc* 
deii@Klcnt t:i«cti[tmk$, 6415-06 Airline Rd., 
Dallas TX 75205. 



Baltiinore/Washtngton 

Avantek transistors, ampHfiei^. oeiC:|],lati>r<t, *nd 
LNA^. CoAid&l CAbh end connectors. Blonder 
Ton^^e dealer with Microwave laboratory. Ap- 
plied Spedaltiea, bic, 1D1(»1G Bkcon Drjvt, 
BeltsvUb MD 30705. WsA. SBS-SSBa, BalL 
732-2211. 7l30 am to 6:00 pm, Monday thru 
Friday, 



DEALERS 

Your company name and message 
can oontain up to 25 words for as 
little as $150 yearly (prepaid)^ or 
$15 per month prepaid quarterly). 
No mention of mafl-order business 
or area code permitted. Directory tejrt 
and payment must reach us 60 days in 
advance of publication. For e^jtample, 
advertising for the May '84 issue must 
be in our hands by March 1st. Mall to 
73 Magazine, Peterborou^ NH 03458- 
ATTN: Nancy Ciainpa. 



J, H. Nelson 
4 Plymouth Dr. 
Whiting NJ 08759 



EASTERN UNITED STATES TO: 



GMT: 


W 


as 


114 


oe 


flS 


io 


12 


14 


iG 


te 


^ 


22 


AUAS.KA 


14 


14 


7 


7 


7 


7 


7 


7 


7A 


14 


14 


14 


ARGE^I^TIIttA 


n 


14 


14 


14 


7B 


;e 


3:': 


21 


21A 


21A 


21A 


21 


AUSTRAUA 


2l\ 


14 


14 


7B 


7B 


7B 


7B 


i4E 


L4B 


14 ■ 


21 


21A 


CANAL ZONE 


14A 


J4 


7A 


7 


7 


7 


t4A 


:i 


21 


2\A 


aiA 


21 


£M(^LA»|? 


7 


7 


7 


7 


7 


7 


14 


14A 


L4A 


il 


14 


14 


HAWAII 


21 


U 


7E 


7B 


7B 


7 


7 


7 


14 


14A 


2\ 


^21A 


INPtA 


lA 


7B 


7E 


711 


7B 


76 


14 


14 


14 


14 


]dt 


14 


JAPAN 


14a 


14 


7E 


7B 


7R 


7B 


7 


7 


7 


14 


14 


14A 


MEKICO 


ii 


14 


7A 


7 


7 


? 


7 


14 


14A 


21 


ilA 


21 


PHILIPPINES 


lAA 


14 


7B 


7S 


IB 


7E 


7B 


]4B 


14 


J4 


]4 


14A 


PliEHTO P4CC9 


14A 


14 


7 


7 


1 


7 


14 


14A 


21 


JlA 


£1 


2] 


SOUTH AFRICA 


14 


7B 


7 


7B 


7B 


U 


21 


21 


21A 


21A 


21 


UA 


U. S. S. R. 


7B 


7 


7 


7 


7 


7B 


14 


14 


14A 


14 


14 


7B 


WEST COAST 


21 


14A 


7A 


7 


7 


7 


7 


14 


14a 


21 


21A 


21A 


.. ..-,.-. -^^.^- ^^ 



CENTRAL UNITED STATES TO; 



ALA&KA 


14 


14 


14 


7 7 


7 


7 


7 


14 


14 


14 


14A 


ARGENTINA 


11 


14 


14 


ML 


7[1 


7E 


li 


21 


21A 


21A 


21A 


2! 


AUSTRALIA 


ZlA 


14A 


14 


7S! 


7ft 


7B 


7B 


14ft 


I4n 


14 


21 


2 LA 


CANAL ZONE 


SI 


14 


7A 


7 


7 


7 


14 


14A 


21 


21A 


21A 


2U 


eNOLAN-D 


7B 


7 


7 


7 


7 


7B 


14B 


14 


14A 


14A 


14 


14 


HAWAII 


21A 


21 


14 


7 


7 


7 


7 


7 


14 


14a 


21 


ZLA 


INOIA 


14 


14 


7B 


7E 


7B 


7B 


7B 


14B' 


14 


14 


14 


14 


.JA43AN 


14A 


14 


S4B 


7B 


7B 


7B 


7 


7 


7 


14 


14 


14A 


MEXtCO 


14A 


14 


7 


7 


7 


7 


7 


14 


14 ' 


14 


21 


21 


FHILfPlflNEE 


I4A 


14 


14b 


7B 


7B 


7B 


7B 


7 


L4 


14 


14 


14a 


PUERTO RICO 


21 


14 


14 


7 


7 


7 


7A 


14A 


Zl 


2\A 


21 


21 


SOUTH AFAICA 


14 


7B 


7 


7B 


7E 


7B 


14 


Zl 


Z\ 


21A 


21 


I4A 


U.S.S, H- 


7B 


7 


7 


7 


7 7B 1 


7B 


14 


14A 


14 


14 


7B 


WESTERN UNITED STATES TO: 


ALASKA 


14 


14 


14 


14 


7 


7 


7 


7 


14 


14 


14 


14A 


ARGENTINA 


21 


14A 


14 


14 


?B 


7R 


7P 


14A 


!1A 


^lA 


21A 


21 


AI^STRALIA 


21A 


lU 


21 


14 


14 


14B 


7B 


14B 


14B 


14 


21 


21A 


CANAL ZONE 


21 


14 


lA 


7 


7 


7 


14 


14A 


21 


23a 


2iA 


2lA 


HHGt-MiO 


7B 


7B 


7 


7 


7 


7H 


7B 


7B 


14 


14A 


14 


14 


HAWAII 


21A 


Zl 


Zl 


14 


14 


7A 


7 


7 


14 


21 


21 


21A 


INDIA 


14 


14A 


14 


7B 


7B 


7B 


7B 


7B 


14 


14 


14 


14 


JAPAN 


21 


lAA 


14 


14B 


7Fi 


7 


7 


7 


7 


14 


14 


14A 


[VtEXICO 


21 


14 


14 


7 


7 


7 


7 


14 


14 


1\ 


21 


21A 


PHILIPPINES 


2] 


14A 


14 


14B 


7B 


7B 


7B 


7 


14 


14 


14 


14A 


PUERTO RICO 


21 


14 


14 


7 


7 


7 


7 


14 


14A 


21 


21A 


21 


SOUTH AFF^ICA 


14 


7B 


7 


7B 


7B 


7B 


7B 


14 


14A 


21 


21 


14A 


U. S.S.fl. 


71 


7B 


7 


7 


7 


7B 


7B 


14B 


14 


14 


14 


7B 


EAST COAST 


21 


14A 

y 


7A 


7 7 


7 


7 


14 


14A 


31 


21A 


21A 



A = Next higher frequency may also be useful. 
B = Difficult circuit this period. 

First letters night waves. Second = day waves. 
G-Good, F = Fa}n P = Poor. * = Chance of solar flares, 
#- Chance of aurora. 

NOTE THAT NIGHT WAVE LETTER NOW COMES FIRST. 



SUN 


MOM 


TUE 


April 

wtu 


THU 


HH 


SAT 


1 

F/F 


2 

F/F 


3 

F/G 


4 

G/G 


5 

G/G 


6 

G/G 


7 

F/G 


8 

F/G 


9 

G/G 


10 

G/G 


11 

F/G 


12 

F/F 


13 

F/F 


14 

F/G 


15 

G/G 


16 

G/Q 


17 

G/G 


18 

G/G 


19 

G/G 


20 

F/F 


21 

P/F 


22 

P/F 


23 

F/F 


24 

F/F 


25 

P/F 


26 

F/F 


27 

Q/G 


28 

Q/G 


29 

F/G 


30 

G/G 













162 73 Magazine * April, 1984 



NEW GALAXIES OF PERFORMANCE ON VHF AND UHF 



FULL DUPL 



TELLITES!! 



SCATTER!! 





■^TTIU'I 





1 

» 


r 


■ 


u 



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T 



YAESO WUt^ MJ. 



n /viflfloc 



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--- iD^*i 



'"Tf> 



Tn- 



iM«** 



The New Yaesu FT-726R Tribander is the world's first multiband, multimode Amateur transceiver capable of 
full duplex operation. Whether you're Interested in OSCAR, moonbounce, or terrestrial repeaters, you owe 
yourself a look at this one-of-a-kind technological wonder 1 

Myltiband Capability 

Factory eciuipped for 2 meter operation, the FT-726R Is a three-band unit capable of operation on tO meters, 6 meters, and/or two segments of 
the 70 cm band (430-440 or 440-450 MHz), using optional modules. The appropriate repeater shift is automatical fy programmed for each 
module. Other bands pending. 

Advanced Mfcroprooessor Control 

Powered by an B-btt Central Processing Unit, the ten-channel memory of the FT-726R stores both frequency and mode, with pushbutton transfer 
capabilily to either of two VFO registers. The synthesized VFO tunes in 20 Hz steps on SSB/CW. with selectable steps on FM. Scanning of the 
band or memories is provided. 

Full Duplex Option 

The optional SU-726 module provides a second, parallel IF strip, thereby altowing full duptex crossband satellite work. Either me transmrt or 
receive frequency may be varied dunng transmission, lor quick zero-beat on another station or for tracking Doppler shift. 

High RerformarK^ Features 

Borrowing heavify from Yaesu s HF transceiver expenenoe, the FT-726R comes equipped with a speech processor, variable receiver bandwidth, 
IF sbift* all-mode squelch, receiver audio tone control., and an IF noise blanker. When the optional XF-455MC CW filter is installed. CW Wide/ 
Narrow selection Is provided. Convenient rear panel connections allow quick interface to your station audio, linear amplifier, and control tines. 

Leading the way into the space age of Ham communications, Yaesu 's FT-726R is the first VHF/UHF base station 
built around modem-day requirements. If youYe tired of piecing together converters, transmitter strips, and relays, 
ask your Authorized Yaesu Dealer for a demonstration of the exciting new FT-726R, the rig that will expand your DX 
horizons! 



Price And Specifications Subject To 
Change Without Noltce Or Obligation 





The radlOm 



483 



TAfSU 
■83 



YAESU ELECTRONICS CORPORATrON 6851 Walthall Way. Paramount, CA 90723 
YAESU CINCINNATI SERVICE CENTER 9070 Gold Park Drive, Hamilton, OH 4501 1 



(213) 633-4007 
(513) 874-3100 



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PITCH -^ A F TUNE 









i 



Superior dynamic range, auto, antenna tuner, 
QSK, duai NB, 2 VFO's, general coverage receiver. 



TS-930S 

The TS-930S is a superlative, high per- 
formance. ail'SoUd state, HF transceiver 
keyed to the exacting requirements of the 
DX and contest operator. It covers aU 
Amateur bands from 160 through 10 
meters, and incorporates a 150 kHz to 
30 MHz general coverage receiver having 
an encelFcnt dynamic range. 
Among Its other Important features ard 
SSB slope tuning. CW VBT, IF notch filter, 
CW pitch control, duai digital VFO's, CW 
full break-in. automatic antenna tunefi 
and a higher voltage operated solid state 
final amplifier* It is available with or 
without the AT-930 automatic antenna 
tuner buUt-in^ 
TS-930S FEATURES: 

• 160-10 Meters, with 160 kH2-30 MHz 
general coverage receiver. 

Covers all Amateur frequencies from 160*10 
meters, including new WAKC bands, on 
SSB. CW. FSK, and AM. Features 150 kll^ 
30 MHz general coverage rec^eive^r Separate 
Amateur band access keys allow speedy 
hand selection. UP DOWN bandswitch in 
I -MHz steps* A new. innovative, quadruple 
"UP" conversion* digird PLL synthesized 
circuit provides superior frequency arcurBcy 
and stability, plus greatly enhanced 
selectivliy. " 

* ExceUent receiver dynamic range* 
Receiver two-tane dvnaniic range, 100 dB 
fyplcal (20 meters, 50-kHz sp 500 H/ 
CW bandwidth, at sensitivity ui u.zd ^v. 
S/N 10 dB]. provides the ultimate in rejec- 
tion of IM distortion. . 

* All solid state, 28 volt operated final 
amplifier. 

Tiu? tin; 1 1 jiriipiiUfr ope rates on 28 VDC for 
lowesi IM clIsLortinn. Power input rated al 
250 W r*n SSB. CW. and FSK.and at 80 W 
on AM. Fltial anipUfier protection circuits 
with eotiling fan, SWK/Power meter built-in, 

• CW full break -In. 

C:W lull break-in circuit uses CMOS logic IC 
plus reed relay for smooth* quiet operation. 
Sw^itchable to seml-bptak-in. 



• Autom&tic antenna tuner, built -in- 
Covers Amateur i^ands 80 10 meters. 
Including the new WARC bands- Tuning 
range autoniallt^illy preselected with band 
selection to minim iite tuning time. "AUTO- 
THRU" fswlirli on front panel, 

• Dual digital VFO*&. 

10-Hz step dual digital VTO's include band 
Infonnation. Each VTO tunes continuously 
from band to band. A large. heavT^% tlywl:>cel 
type knob is used for improved tuning ease. 
T.F. Set switch allifv^ ^ liisi transtnit 
frequency t^eltlng for split- frequency opera- 
tions. A=B switch for equalizing one VFO 
frequency to the other. VFO "Lt>c:k'* switch 
provided- RIT control lor ±9,9 kHz* 

• Eight memory channels. 

Stores boUa frequc^ncy and band informa- 
tion. VTO-MEMO swiich allows use of each 
memor>^ as an independent VFO. (the 
origtriai memor)' frequency can be recalled 
at ^xillt or as a fixed frequency. Internal 
Battery memor>' back-up, estimated 1 year 
life. (Batteries not Kenw'Ood supptiedl. 
■ Dt^ mode noise blanker i'^olsc'^ 
or "woodpecker"). 

NB-1. wldi Llvresihoid control, for pulsc-t^'pe 
noise. NB'2 for longer duration 
*w^oodpeckcr" type noise, 

- SSB IF slope tuning. 

AUows independtnl adjustment of the lowr 
and' or high frequency slope of the IF pass- 
band, for best tntcrference rejection. HIGH/ 
LOW cut control rotation not affected by 
selecting USB or LSB modes. 

• CW VBT an4 pitch controls, 
CW* Variable Bandwidtii Tuning 
control luncR out Interfering signals. CW^ 
pitch contrcjls shifts IT passband and simul- 
taneously eiiringes iiu* pitch of the beat 
frequency. A "Narrow/Wide " filter selector 
switch Is provided, 

• IF notch filter, 

100 kHz \V nolth drryil gives deep, 
sharp, notch, i:>cttKr than -40 dB. 

• Audio filter built-in* 
Tuneable, peyk-type audio filter for CW. 

• AC power supply built-in, 
120, 220, or 240 VAC; switch selected 
(operates on AC only). " 

Speciflcntions and prtces 



• Fluorescent tube digital dtsplaj^ 

Six digit readout to 100 1 1/ (10 H/ modi- 
fiablei, plus digitalizcd sub-st;ile v^1th 
20 kHz. steps. Separate two digit indieatkm 
of RIT frequency shtfi. In CW nmde, dis- 
play indicates the actual carrier frequency 
of received as well as transmitted signals' 
« RF speech processor. 
RF clipper type processor provides higher 
average "tafk-powerr improved irucUigiblllty, 

• One year limited warranty on parts 
and tabor. 

Other features: 

• SSD monitor clrcuil:, 3 step RF attenuator; 
VOX, and 100-kH^ marker. 

Optional accessories: 

• AT-930 autt^niciUc antenna tuner. 

• SP-930 external speaker with selectable 
audio filters. 

• VG 455C 1 (5O0 Uz\ or yG'455CN-l 1250 Hz] 
plu^ in CW filters for 455-kHz IF 

• YK >:4aC 1 (500 Hzi CW^ plu|*'in filter for 
8.83-MHz IF. 

• VK 8gA I (6 kHz) AM plug In filter for 
B,83-MH?. IR 

• SO-1 commercial stability TCXO (tempera- 
ture compensated crystal oscillatorl. 
Requires modifications. 

• MC 60A deluxe desk microphone with 
UP/DOWN switch, preamplifier. 8-pin plug. 

• Tl-r922A linear amplifier (not forCW g^Kl. 

• SM-220 station monitor (not for pan-adapter. 

• HS-6. HS-5* liS-4. headphotics. 

More information on the TS-930S Is 

available from all authorized dealers of 
Trio Kenwood Communications. 1111 West 
Wainui Street. Comptoti, California 90220, 

KENWOOD 

. pacesetter in amateur radio 




are subject to change wiihoiu notice or obfigotfon.