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Full text of "73 Magazine (October 1984)"

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Intofnatlonal Editlofi 



October 1984 Issue #289 
$2.50 USA / $3.00 Canada 



r 







Down 
With 
Towers ! 

?age 38 

ll 

Beat It! 

3age48 

Tri-Band Umbrella j 

pase-Fed 





tf 



9 



Pag>j32 




Black-ne \ffair 

=^age26 



)(- Rated A 

'age 32 

High-Rlse 
Bonanza 

^age 44 



•1 



Tiinum 





74470'65946 



Amateur Radb's 
lechnical Journal 



A CWCfl Publication 




Troubleshooting— 1 

Antennas! 
9 Articles 

Find Fault with Your Coax 

Is yoyr cable realEy doing its job? Find 
out with this elegant detective method. 



K 



K4IPV 10 



The Au^e Parasol Beam 

Kl What has twelve comers, three barnis. 
and uses 140 feet of wire? Hint if s not 

a quad ........ 



W6TYH 20 



The Incrediiile Broadband Bowtie 

El Tmfv designed for so^ id-state finals, 
J this 75nn antenna features 50 Ohms at 
the feed —and less than 1 .5:1 swr across the 

band , . , KC3HW 

R, for Ailing Antennas 

K Maximize your svstem's perfomiance 
- with this easy-to-constaict noise bridge. 



Try low and Behold 

Here s a shock: You've been wasting mooey 
on towers and poles WICV explains why 
low antennas may outperform high-altitude 

aluminum, , WICV/4 



26 



If 5 just what the doctor ordered, K4! PV 2B 



Ryan's Vertical Ecstasy 

a Warning: Graphic description of verti- 
cal antoina array patterns. Explicrt CoCb 
language May incite construction frenzy. 

., WB5LLM 



32 



38 



A No-Holes Barred Beam 



What to do when the lease says "'no 
antennas'": Tum your entire house into 
a broadside dipole , WA4WDL 



omni. 



44 



Another Eggtieater 

[^ I Don't be a VHP weakling. Pump up 
II^ your performance with this simple 2m 

WD5DNL 48 



A Tree^Mendous Vertical 

T~| Build an BOm DX-getter that really 
C^ grows on you , KS48 62 



When Darkness Calls 

On 160m, success means diligent planning. 
These tips on gray-line propagation are your 
key to Top-Band DXCC VE7BS 66 




Eggbeatdf — 48 




Never Say Die— 6 


RMlaw— ai 


73 Intematiofial— 54 


DX--S4 


Barter W Buy— 68 


Dr, DigHal-l^ 


Ham H«*p— ea, 71, BO 


Reader Service— Sa 


Social Event5^69 


New Ptioducts— 100 


Letters- 72 


Cmtests— 102 


Awranis— 75 


Fun!— 108 


FCC— 77 


Dealer 


Satellites— 80 


Dfrectory— 1t2 


RTTY Ijoop— S1 


Propagation— 112 



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160-10 MTR lOOW XCVR/ 0.1-30 MHz RCVTl 



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Th« tC<74S r»pfes«nti q 
mo|i>r brwaklt^rough in th« ham 

lnduftTy...a fufi featured HF base 
station transceiver with a com- 
bination of standard features 
found on no other transceiver Jn 
Its price fange. 



Coffipam these exceptlonol 
ttandafd f#atyjr«i: 

• lOOKHz - 30MHz Receiver 

• 14 Memories 

• 100% Tfonsmit Duty Cycle 
fransmittei witti exceptioiv 
otly low distortion 

• IF 5h»t AND Pass&and Tuning 

• Beceivef Preamp 

• 10H2/50H2/1KHZ Tuning Rotes 
with IMHl bond steps 

• Adjuslobie Noise Blonker 
(wtdth and tevef) 

• Contlnuousty Adjustable AQC 
wlfti an Off position 

• FuH hjnction Metefing with a 
buill-in 5WR Bridge 

• Optional Lnfemal AC Power 

Supply 




Other Stcmdord Feafurtt> 
Ircluded as standard ore 
nrKsny of the features rrtost asked 
fof bv experienced bom radio 
operators: duot VRJs. RF speech 
compressor, tunabte notch fitter, 
oll-rnode squeteh, program 
borvd scan, merrxyv scan 
(IrequencY and modes are 
stored), receiver and trartsmitter 
irKirenr^ental tuning orxJ VOX 
KI^OM's proven transceiver 
designs and technotagy are 
used in tt^e IC-745 all ham borvd 
fianscejver wtiich jrjcludes SSB, 
CW, RTTY. AM leceive and an 
optiorKil FM plus a 1 0OKHi to 
30MH2 genefoi coverage receiver 



ICOM Sv^em. 

The IC-745 is compatible 
with fCOM's full lir>e of standard 
hff accessories. 

Accessories ovaftoble 
inciude ttie iC-PSt5 base supply. 
lC-fS30 system povwer suppty 
(swirttchirtg). IC'PS35 inlerrxji 
pOM^r supply, the HC-2KL lir»©oi 
amplifier. AT100 outomot ic 
ontenrxa tunef. AT500 automottc 
ontenrra tunef. HP1 t>Mdphor»es. 
and HM12 har>d or SM6 Dose 
microphor>e 

CIpttont. The EX241 marker 
and EX242 FM moduie. plus a 
wide variety of filters for shofp 
audio reception are available 





'MB 


Oenter 


Fitter 


Wfditi 


Freq. MHz 


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FL54 


250 Hz 


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The IC-745 is I he only trans- 
ceiver today that has such 
features standard, .the number of 
options and occessories availo- 
ble...arkd such an affofdobiie 
price. 





ICOM 



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Manuscripts 

Contf^trtHOfts in the fomi of rnanu- 
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To subscribe, 

renew or change 

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For renewals and, changes of address, 
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4 73 Magazine • October, 1984 



The HX 1000 makes 

tuning in London 

as easy as dialing a riHHie. 




Direct access keyboard tuning 
brings a new level of simplicity 
to shortwave radio. With the 
Uniden' Bearcat' DX 1000, dialing 
in the BBC in London is as easy as 
dialing a telephone. And you can 
switch from the BBC to Fteruvian 
Huayno music from Radio Andina 
instantly Without bandswitching. 

Featuring the innovative micro- 
processor digital technology made 
famous by Uniden' Bearcat' scan- 
ner radios, the DX 1000 covers 
1 kHz to 30 MHz continuously 
with PLL synthesized accuracy But 
as easy as it is to tune, it has all 
the features even the most sophis- 
ticated "DXer" could want 10 
memory channels let you store 
favorite stations for instant recall 
—or for faster "band-scanning" 
during key openings. The digital 
display measures frequencies to 




f 



1 kHz, or at the touch of a button, 
doubles as a two time zone, 24- 
hour digital 
quartz cfock. 
A built-in timer 
wakes you to 
your favorite 
shortwave sta- 
tion. Or, it can be programmed to 
activate peripheral equipment 
like a tape recorder to record up 
to five different broadcasts— any 
frequency any mode-while you 
are asleep or at work 

The DX 1000 also includes 
independent selectivity selection 
to help you separate high-powered 
stations on adjacent frequen- 
cies. Plus a noise blanking 
system that stops Russian pulse 
radar interference. 

There's never been an 
easier way to hear what the world 



has to say With the Uniden' 
Bearcat" DX 1 000 shortwave 
radio, you have direct 
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For the name of your 
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tlvlty: 1.0 /uV AM, 5 /jV CW/SSB/FM, 1,6^30 
MHz Image and IF Rejection: 70 dB or more, 
Memory: ID frequency capacity. Frequency 
Stability: Belter than 100 Hz after wajm-up, 
Modes: AM/LSB/USB/CW/FM AGC: Select 
Bhle Fdsi .SJo\^ release limes Filler Band widths: 
2 7 kHz 6 kH7 anil 12 kHz, Filler Selection 
Independent of Mode. 



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W2MSD/1 

NEVER SAY DIE 

ec/Ztor/a/ t>y Wayne Green 




ALUMNI DINNER 

A ham friend, Bill Ashby 
K2TKh4/W8ETJ. who wrals arti- 
cles for my 73 magazine, men- 
tioned back In the early 60s that 
he was working for a firm mak^ 
ing microckcuHs. I think his firm 
was one of the first In the busi- 
ness, Wow look where w© arel 

Here I am, twenty years later, 
sitting on a plane coming back 
from Washington, writing an 
editorial on 3 picocomputer, 
Wei It perhaps things aren't all 
that different, realty. Twenty-five 
years ago, when t started 73, I 
used to carry a Hermes Rocket 
typewriter, which was not much 
bigger or heavier than my plco 
(briefcase) computer. The plco 
has word processing and an ad- 
dress file, so weVe had some 
progress, 

A lot of oceans have gone 
under my planes since then, and 
the world of microelectronics 
has gone berserk. 256K RAM 
chips indeed! Solid state was 
still just getting started twenty 
years ago, though I remember 
buying a couple tiny Sony 
BC/SW radios in Tokyo In 1959. 



They worked great, beating the 
dickens out of the little US-made 
broadcast transistor radios. 
Hiat was before integrated cir- 
cuits, so they had to use eentsy 
resistors and capacitors. 

With the 25th anniversary of 
my starting 73 coming up in a 
few months, it seemed like as 
good a time as any to throw a 
small party for Wayne Green 
alumni. I keep running across 
people in the various electronics 
industries who at one time or 
another worked for me— and 
there have t>een a couple thou- 
sand. It seemed like it would be 
fun for us to get together and 
say hello again. If you know any- 
one who has ever worked for me, 
pass along the word, okay? 

In 1960, amateur radio was 
growing at 11% per year^and 
had t>een for 17 years. There was 
an intense interest In new tech* 
nologies, so I thought that a 
ham magazine devoted to home 
building and inventing would fly. 
I had just barely enough money 
to print and mail the first issue, 
which fortunately was in the 
black. 



Thfs QSL fc^ues+ car<^ ts atso 

KMEHR 




16 iT FHftflA A TREC.An^ 
%4 cud »* wfT HAif^ 



%i»W THM 



QSL OF THE MONTH 

Tq witw ywjr QSL mail ii in an envelope to 73, 60 Pine Street, Peterbotough MM 0345B, 
Attn: QSL o4 ttve Monlti. Winoef^ f9c«jv« a one^year subscriptrcMi (or extef^ioct) to 73. ^itnes 
not In iftvakspes c^nol t» acc^itd. 

6 73 Magazine • October. 1984 



I started by doing everything: 
soliciting articles, editing them, 
proofreading the type, laying 
out the pages, selling the adver- 
tising, writing, printing, and 
mailing circulation letters, 
typing stencils for subscrit)- 
ers — everything. That*s quite a 
learning experience. I didn't 
tiave money for going to the 
movies or eating much, so I 
made do with things iike home- 
made oxtail soup, which was 
very cheap. 

A couple years later, I moved 
the one-man staff (me) to New 
Hampshire and started recruit- 
fng used hams. The early ones 
were college dropouts who 
worked for the learning experi- 
ence, room and board, and $20 a 
week. They helped with process- 
fng subscriptions, printing 
names on wrappers, editing arti- 
cles, proofreading, bookkeep- 
ing, washing dishes, and so on. I 
taught them publishing, sold ad- 
vertising, and cooked three 
meals a day for the trlt>e. We had 
up to eight living in and doing 
the work back around 1963. We 
had a ball* 

When we had a chance, we 
p[led into our \A/V wagon and 
headed out tor a picnic, visiting 
New Hampshire's Polar Caves, 
Franconia Notch, The Flume, 
Cannon Mountain, Mount 
Washington, and so on. We 
climbed Washington, swam in 
The Foot Basin— rt was fun. 

Down through the years IVe 
fed hundreds of people into the 
electronics and computer indus- 
tries. One runs a very successful 
satellite-receiving business, 
another one of the top computer 
PR firms, and several are maga- 
zine editors. A call on the PA 
system at the West Coast Com- 
puter Faire for ex^Wayne Green 

Continued on page 72 



STAFF 



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ASST. cincuucnoN manager 

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DIRECTOR OF CHEOn", SALES. 

AND COLLECTION 

Wi]iii«m U BCTf** 

CH RECTOR C^ PUBLIC RELATIONS 
Jvfies Leorna^rd 






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Find Fault with Your Coax 

/5 your cable really doing its job? 
Find out with this elegant detective method. 



Time Domain Reflectom- 
etry (TDR) is perhaps 
the most powerfuf method 
for wringing out a radio 
transmission line. Profes- 
sional TOR instruments are 
expensive and therefore be- 
yond the reach of amateurs. 
If you have access to an os- 
cilloscope, however, you 



can build an impromptu 
TDR unit that will provide at 
least elementary capability. 

TDR techniques can be 
used to locate faults on 
transmission lines, measure 
vswr, and determine the ve- 
locity factor of coaxial ca- 
ble. The fault-finding capa- 
bility is especially useful on 




systems containing very 
long transmission line, or, 
where the transmission line 
is hidden for much of its run. 

Transmission Lines - 
Simplified and Revisited 

Most amateurs have a ru- 
dimentary idea Off the na- 
ture of a transmission line, 
especially as the term is 
used in radio-antenna con- 
texts. On the naive level, we 
know that it is the cable 
which carries signals back 
and forth between the rig 
and the antenna. On a 
slightly more technical lev- 



el, we find that the trans- 
mission line can be mod- 
eled as a complex circuit 
having both distributed in- 
ductance (L) and distrib- 
uted capacitance (C). Fig. 1 
shows an equivalent circuit. 
If dimension ''A'' in Fig. 1 is 
unit length, then L is the in- 
ductance per unit of length 
and C is the capacitance 
per unit of length. There is 
also a source impedance, 
Rs, which is the transmitter 
output impedance, and a 
load impedance, Rl* which 
is the antenna radiation re- 
sistance. 





Fig. 1. Schematic representation of a trarjsmission line. 




The K4IPV home-brewed reflectometer. 
10 73 Magazine • October, 1984 



fig. 2. Coax cable with surge impedance Zq and load im- 
pedance Zi_. 



PUISE OR 

$40«ffEl|WE 

QDCRATOR 

OUTPUT 





Fig. 3. Buffer to improve rise 
time of a signal. 

Transmission lines have a 

property called either surge 
impedance or characteristic 
impedance, either of which 
is represented by the sym- 
bol Zq. In the simplest def- 
inition, surge impedance is 
the square route of the ratio 
LtoC:Zo = \/I/C. 

Let's consider what hap- 
pens on a transmission line; 
see Fig. 2. In this illustra- 
tion, we have a length of co- 
axial cable with a surge 
impedance, Zq, terminated 
with a load impedance, Zl^ 
At the input end of the 
transmission line is a pulse 
generator. So what normal- 
ly happens? 

We are told that the 
transmission line acts as if it 
were infinitely long when 
Zl = Zo. In that case, a pufse 
CVp) applied to the input end 
will disappear into the coax 
and never return. In other 
words, the load will dissi- 
pate all of the pulse's 
energy when the load im- 
pedance (Z|_) matches the 
transmission line surge im- 
pedance (Zq). This is why we 
put so much emphasis on a 
proper match between Zi 
and Zq, as indicated {hope- 
fully) by all vswr. 

But what of the case 
where 2l is not equal to Zq? 
In that case, not all of the 
energy in the forward or in- 
cident pulse fVp) is absorbed 
by the load. Some of the en- 
ergy is reflected back down 
the line in the opposite di- 
rection. Pulse Vf in Fig. 2 is 
the forward pulse that is ap- 
plied by the signal genera* 
tor. When it hits the load 
end of the fine, some of its 
energy is absorbed by Zl 
and the remainder is re- 
fleeted back towards the 
foad in the form of pulse 
Vr. (Note that the pfiase of 



I 
1 
I 
I 
I 
t 

f i-is 

I VDC 

i 
I 
I 
I 
I 



'5V0C 



LM309 



fff 



>.- 



J 



C2 



J 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
f 
I 
I 
I 

1 
I 



■ 300pF 



k 



C3 



MOTOROLA 
MC4024P 



I — I 



5 



4fon 



I 
I 
• 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
t 



1 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 

I 

■® 
I 



Jt 'SCOPE 
VERT INf*yT 




6in 



^ J2 CABL£ 



UNDER TESl 



•see text 

Fig. 4(al Square-wave signal generator. 



the Vr is reversed com- 
pared with Vf J 

Radio waves and pulses 
travel down a transmission 
line at a known velocity 
that is some fraction of the 
speed of light [c). The so- 
called velocity factor of a 
transmission line is that 
fraction. Thus, a velocity 
factor of 0.66 means that 
waves and pulses propa- 
gate in that line at 66% of 
the speed of light (i.e., 
0.66c). 

If the speed of propaga- 
tion on a line is known or 
can be measured, and if we 
have a means of timing the 
interval between the appli- 
cation of the forward pulse 
and the return of the re- 
flected pulse, then we can 
calculate the length of the 
tine. If the line is either 
open or shorted, then the 
length computed is the dis- 
tance from the input end 
and the fault In a long 
system, such information 
can save a lot of hunt 'n' 
check work. 

Signal Sources 
There are two basic TDR 




OUTPUT 



Fig. 5{al Pulse-generator cir- 
cuit (block dia^aml 



techniques available to the 
amateur; one uses a real 
pulse and the other a square 
wave. Equipment needed 
for these techniques is rath- 
er simple, except for the 
'scope. 

The oscilloscope needs a 
bandwidth of 5 MHz or 
more (preferably more). In 
addition, it must have a hor- 
izontal sweep calibrated in 
units of time (e.g., ^/cmj. 

The signal source can be 
any pulse or square-wave 
generator, either commer- 
cial or home-brew. In re- 
searching this article, I used 
a Tektronix IM-500 series 
pulse generator a Heath 
IF-18 square-wave genera- 
tor, and several home-brew 
generators (discussed in 
text). It is highly desirable 
that the signal source have 
a fast rise time. 

If your oscilloscope has a 
H-CATE output, then you 
may already have a pulse 
generator The +CATE out- 
puts a short-duration pulse 
every time the sweep is trig- 
gered. In the auto-trigger 
(i.e., free run] mode, the 






R3 



fi4 
2 2K 




Fig 4(bl Variable frequency 
modification. 

sweep is cons tan dy retrig- 
gered regardless of whether 
or not a signal is present in 
the vertical channel. Thus, 
we will see a constant pulse 
train at the +CATE output 
during auto-trigger opera- 
tion. 

If you plan to use a 

square-wave generator as 
the signal source, then it 
may be advisable to im- 
prove the rise time of the 
signal. Fig. 3 shows two buff- 
ers that can be used. The 
74H00 is a high-speed ver- 
sion of the 7400 two-input 
NAND gate. This device is 
shown connected as an in- 
verter (i.e., both inputs tied 
together). The 7400 is rec- 
ommended for TTL-compat- 
ibie outputs. 

The 7414 used in Fig. 3 is 
a Schmitt trigger As such, it 
will produce a fast rise-time 
output pulse. Like all TTL 
devices, there are limits to 
the allowable input-voltage 
swings, Note that the 
Schmitt trigger can be used 
to make square waves out 
of sine waves. The Schmitt 
output is binary, i.e., only 
two states are allowed, 
HIGH and LOW. The out- 
put will snap HIGH when 
the input passes a certain 
threshold voltage in a posi- 
tive-going direction and will 
drop LOW only when the sig- 
nal crosses another thresh- 
old in the negative^going 
direction. 



TRia^ifR fr 




put St 

OUTPUT 



Fig, 5(bl Pulse-^nerator scfiematic. 



73 Magazme • October, 1984 11 



PULSE 
GENERATOA 








OSCILLOSCOPE 


tr 


7 


)« 


^#b -yi- 


©o 









Tte-iox 



CAOLt UN&Efr tf ST 



Fig. 6faJ. lesf setup. 



Fig, 4(a) shows a home- 
brew square-wave signal 
generator based on the Mo- 
torola MC4024P voltage- 
controlled oscillator (vco) 
chip. Note: this is not the 
CMOS 4024 device. 

The MC4024P contains 
two vco's, but this project 
uses only one. The frequen- 
CY is controlled by capaci- 
tor CI and is set to approxt- 
mately the range needed 
for our application. In some 
cases we will want to vary 
the frequency, so we can 
use the circuit modification 
of Fig. 4(b), Potentiometer 
R3 changes the voltage ap^ 
plied to the vco-control in- 
put (pin 2). A 3:1 frequency 
ratio is possible. One use 
for this capability is op- 
timization of one of the 
TDR techniques given be- 
low. 

The output from the 
MC4024P device is a TTL- 
compatible square wave. 
For TDR, however, we can 
use almost any level within 
the ability of the 'scope, but 
the source must have an 
output impedance that is 
matched to the transmission 
line. Impedance matching 
is the function of R2 in Fig. 
4(a) If only one style of 
coax is being tested, then 
set R2 equal to its Zq (eg., 
50 Ohms, 75 Ohms, etc.); 
the value of 68 Ohms al- 
lows testing in 50- and 



75-Ohm systems with only a 
small effect on the system. 

The photo shows the ver- 
sion that I built. In this case 
only one BNC jack is used, 
and an external BNC "tee'' 
separates the signals to the 
oscilloscope and the cable 
under test Note that the en- 
tire system, including the 
Pomona box, represents on- 
ly a $1 5 accessory to a stan- 
dard oscilloscope. 

A pulse-generator circuit 
is shown in Figs. 5ta) and 
5(b). Here we see a mono- 
stable multivibrator (one- 
shot) driven" by a square- 
wave source such as the 
one in Figs. 4(a) and 4{b). 
The detailed circuit for the 
one-shot stage is given in 
Fig. 5Cb). 

A typical test setup is 

shown in Fig 6(a). The inter- 
connections between in* 
stfuments is accomplished 
by a special tee-box —see 
Fig. 6(b). The circuitry is 
housed in a Pomona box fit- 
ted with three BNC or [if 
older test equipment is 
used) SO-239 UHF connec- 
tors. When building the tee- 
box, keep leads as short as 
possible; use "good VHP 
layout practices/' Note that 
the tee-box is not needed if 
you build your own pulse/ 
square-wave signal source 
that incorporates similar 
elements. 

TDR Methods 

There are two methods by 



STlFLECTEO *iB/| 



41 



VEftT 




^ 



FORWARD pyLSi: 



— ®~ 



J3 

P>UL5E 



Fig. 6fbJ. Tee-box detaii 

which we can use TDR on 
simple systems. If a pulse- 
train signal source is used, 
we will get indications such 
as Fig. 7= The forward pulse, 
as applied by the signal 
source, will have a higher 
amplitude and sharper fea- 
tures than the reflected 
pulse. Coaxial code normal- 
ly attenuates signal, so one 
would expect the ampli- 
tude to decrease. The wave- 
shape also will change 
since this attenuation is dif- 
ferent for different frequen- 
cies. 

Notice that the reflected 
wave is different in (a) and 
(b) in Fig. 7. In (a) we see the 
situation existing when the 
transmission line is unter* 
minated, i.e., open-circuit' 
ed. Here the reflected pulse 
has the same polarity as the 
forward pulse. If there is a 
break in the coax line, then 
we will see this waveform. 
The situation for a terminat- 
ed or shorted line is shown 
in (b); here the reflected 
wave has a reverse polarity. 

The length of the line can 
be found from the time T re- 
quired for the reflected 
pulse to retum to the point 
of origin. The following fac- 
tors affect T: length of the 
line, velocity factor of the 
line, and constant repre- 
senting the speed of light 
Our basic equation is: 
L = 983.5VT/2 



tIEI. 



^r 



t^ 



OSCILLOSCOPE DISPIAT 



REFLECTED 
PULSC 




T— 



« 
t 
I 

t 

i 
I 




Fig. 7, TDR with a pufse-train 
signal source 

where L is the line length in 
feet V is the velocity factor 
(0-1 ), T is the round-trip time 
in microseconds, as mea- 
sured on the oscilloscope, 
983.5 is the speed of light in 
feet per microseconds [ft/ 
fAs\ and 2 represents the fact 
that T is a round-trip time. 

We can rearrange the ba- 
sic equation to also find T 
or V, as needed: 

V-2M983 5T 
T^2L/9833V 

Let's work an example of 
each. Let's say we have a 
long piece of 75-Ohm coaxi- 
al cable used as a data line 
between the computer and 
a CRT video terminal. Your 
boss knows you catch bul- 
lets in your teeth and dab- 
ble in ham radio. You, there- 
fore, are the resident expert 
and have to find out where 
the signal went. Being smart 
enough to subscribe to this 
magazine, you remember 
this article and pull it out 
You obtain a pulse wave- 
form similar to (b) in Fig. 7 
and measure T as 0.63 mi- 
croseconds. How far down 
the line is the short? First 
we must determine the ve- 
locity factor Since most 
TV-type coax is foam, we 



Vr 



T 



I- 



--^t «■•■*■ 



2t * i© 



Fig, 8. Adjust square wave to Fig. 9faJ> The adjusted wave- Fig. 9(bl Sum of the forward Fig. 9(c). Load impedance 
match "A/" form. and reverse voltages. less than surge impedance. 



12 73 Magazine • October, 1984 



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AM Aircraft and Pubiic Ssrvic^ ba/^ds • AC/ DC 
pnority Channel • Direct Channel Access • Delay 

Fr&qu&nc/ range 32-50, 11&-136AM, 144^174,420-5^2 MHz. 

Find an easy chatr. Turn on your Sea real 20/20 
and yoy're in an airplane cockpit. Listening to alJ 
the air-to-ground conversations- Maybe you'll pick 
up an exciting search and rescue mission on the 
Coast Guard channel. In a flash, you're back on the 
ground listening as news crews report a fast 
breaking story. Or hearing police and fire calls In 
your own neighborhood, in plenty of time so you 
can take precautions. You can even hear ham radio 
transmission, business phone calls and govern- 
ment intelligence agencies. Without leaving your 
easy chair. Because youVe got a Bearcat 20/20 
right beside it 

The Bearcat 20/20 monitors 40 frequencies from 
7 bands, including aircraft* A tvi/o-position switch, 
located on the front panel, allows monitoring of 20 
channels at a time. 

Bearcat® 21 OXL-E 

List price $349,95/CE price $209.00 
e-Bandf 13 Channel • Crysiallas^ • AC/DC 

Frequency rarige 32-50, 144-174, 421-512 MHz. 
The B&arcat 2A0XL scanning radio isthe second gener- 
atfon scanner that replaces the popular Bearcat 210 
and 211. It has almost tw^ce the scanning capacity of 
the Bearcat 210 with 18 channefs plus dual scanning 
speeds and a bright green fluorescent display. Auto- 
matic search finds new frequencies. Features scan 
delay, single antenna, patented track tuning and more. 

Bearcat® 260-E 

List price $399.95/CE price $249.00 
9-Banda IB Channel • Priority • AC/DC 

Frequertcy range 30-50, 138-174, 406-512 MHz. 
Keep up with potice and fire callSi ham radio operators 
and other transmission while you're on the road with a 
Se^fcaf 260 scanner Designed wEth police and tire 
department cooperatron, its unique, practical shape 
and special two-position mounting bracket makes hump 
mounted or under dash installation possible in any 
vehicle. The Bearcat 2B0 is so ruggedty built tor mobile 
use that rt meets military standard 81 Oc. curve y for 
vibration rating. Incorporated in Its rugged, all metal 
case I s a s pec iail y pos f tl o ne d speaker d e I i ve ri n g 3 watt s 
of crispt clear audio. 

M- See List of Advertisers on psge 98 



List price $279.96/CE price $1 79.00 
B-Bandf fB Channel • Crysialless • AC only 
Priority • Scan Delay • One Key Weather 

Frequenoy rang^ 30-50. if 3-1 36 AM, i46'174, 420-512 MHz. 
The Bear cat 201 performs any scanning functfon ycu 
could possibly want With push button ease, you can 
program up to 16 channels for automatic monitoring. 
Push another button and search for new frequencies, 
There are no crystals to limit what you want to hear 

NEW? Bearcat® 180-E 

List price S249.95/Ce price $1 49,00 
6'Bandf IB Channel • Priority • 4C Qnly 

Frequency rarjge: 30-50, 138-174, 406-512 MHz. 
Police and fire calls. Ham radio transmissions. Business 
andgovernmentunde rco ver ope rat i o n s. Yo u ca n hea r it 
all on a Bearcat 130 scanner radio. Imagine the thrill of 
hearing a major news event unfold even before the 
news organisations can report it. And the security of 
knowing what's happening in your neighborhood by 
hearing police and fire calls in timeto take precautioris. 
There's nothing like scanning to keep you in- 1 he- know, 
and no better way to get scan ner radio performance at a 
value price than with the Bearcat 1S0- 

Bearcat® 100-E 

The fir»trt0^cfystalprog¥Mmmatle frendhefd se^nnenr. 

List price $449.95/CE price $234.00/ SPECIAL/ 
a-Bandr fe Channel ■ Uqaid Crystal Di&ptay 
Search • Limit • Mold • LocJcouf • AC/ DC 

Frequency range: 30-50. 133-1 74, 40^-512 MHz. 
The world's first no-crystal handheld scanner has 
compressed into a 3" x ?" x ^Vi" cas^ more scanning 
power than is found in many base or mobile scanners^ 
The Bearcat 1 00 has a fulU 6 channels with frequency 
coverage that includes all public service bands (Low^ 
High, UHF and "T bands), the 2- Meter and 70 cnn. 
Amateur bands, plus Military and Federal Government 
frequencies. It has chrome- plated keys for functions 
that are user controtEed, such as lockout, manual and 
automatic scan. Even search is provtded, both manual 
and automatic. Wow.. .what a scanneii 

The SearcaM 00 produces audio power output of 300 
mtlliwatts, is track-tuned and has selectivity of better 
than 50 dB down and sensitivity of 0,6 microvolts on 
VHF and 1 .0 microvolts on UHF. Power consumption Is 
kept extremely !ow by using a liquid crystal display and 
exclusive low power integrated circuits. 

Included in our low CE price Is a sturdy carrying case, 
earphone, battery charger/ AC adapter, six A A ni-cad 
batteries and flexible antenna. The Bearcat 100 Is in 
stock for quick shipment, so order your scanner today. 

Bearcat® DX1000-E 

List price S64g.95/CE price $489,00 

Frequency range 10 kHz to 30 MHz, 
The B&arcaf DXlOOO shortwave radio makes tuning in 
London as easy as dialing a phone. It features PLL 
synthesized accuracy, two time zone 24"hour digital 
quartz clock and a built-in timer to wake you to your 
favorite shortwave station. It can be programmed to 
activate peripheral equipment like a tape recorder to 
record up to five different broadcasts, any frequency, 
any mode, whfleyouareasleeporatworK ft will receive 
AM, LSB, USB. CW and FM broadcasts. 

There's never been an easier way to hear what the 
world has to say, With the Be&rcat 0X1000 shortwave 
receiver, you now have direct access to the world, 

Uniden® PC22-E 

List price $169.95/CE price $90.00 
The Uniden PQ22 is a 40 channel AM remote mobile CB 
radio, it's the answerfortoday'ssmallercarswhicti don't 
always provide adequate space for mounting. Since all 
the controls are on ttie microphone, you can stash the 
"guts" in the trunk. The microphone has up/down 
channel selector, digltal display, TX/RX indicator and 
external speaker jack. Dimensions: 5W W x IW D x 
1 W H. 13-8 VDC, positive or negative ground. 

QUAHTITY DISCOUNTS AVAILABLE 

Order two scanners at the same time and deduct 
1 %, for three scanners deduct 2%, four scanners 
deduct 3%, five scanners deduct 4% and six or 
more scanners purchased at the same time 
earns you a 5% discount off our super low 
single unit price. 



ExtTHn'cou.i Signals 



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Both Bandit" mdar dei^cion f^aiure F.D.iT.," the 
Elect fonic Data InteTferenie Termh^aun that editi-out 
false alarm signals. 



List price $59.95/CE price $44.00 

The Unid&n PC33 Ooasts a super-compact case and 
front-panel mike connector to fit comfortat>[y in today's 
smaller cars. Controis: Power & Volume, Squelch; 
Switches: ANL Other features of the PC33 Include 
Graduated LED "S'VRF Meter^ Digital channel indicator. 
Dimensions: 6" W x 6 ' D xV/e" H. ±13.8 VDG 

Uniden® PC55-E 

List price $39.9&/CE price $59.00 

The fuEl featured Unid&n PC 5 5 front- pane J mike con- 
nector makes installation easier when space is a factor. 
It has ANU PA'CBp Channef 9 and RF Gain switches, 
LED"'S7RF meter, TXlite. PA& external speaker jacks. 
Dimensions: 6" W x 6'^ D x V/b" H, ±13.8 VDC. 

Bandir Radar Detectors 

Now that everyone efse has taken their best shot at 
radar detection, the Uniden Bardif hasdonethem 
one better,. .with E,OJ,T.r the Electronic Data 
Interference Terminator that actually edits-out 
fa^se alarm signals. 

T h e Ban d i 1 5 5 , f eat u res a c on ven f ent bright ness/ 
dimmer control for comfortable day or n ight driving, 
plus a handy highway/city control for maximum 
flexibility wherever you drive. The Bandit 95 Remote, 
is a two-piece modular unit that lets you mount the 
long-range radar antenna behind the grifl^ out of 
view. The ultra- com pact control unit can then be 
inconspicuously tucked under the dash or clipped 
to the visorOrder Bandit 55-e Jor$l 1 9.00 each or 
the Bandit 95' E Remote for $139.00 each, 

OTHER RADIOS AND ACCESSORIES 

FB-E-E Frequency Directory for Eastern U,S-A S 12.00 

FB*W'E Frequency CJirectory for Western U.S.A.. . . S12.00 

BC'WA-E Bearcat Weather Alert™. - S35.00 

AGO'E Magnet mount n^cbtle antenna S35.00 

ATO'E Base station antenna . S3S 00 

Add $3,00 shipping for all accesscir/es ordered at the same time. 
Add $3-00 shipping per scanner antenna. 

BUY WITH CONFIDENCE 

To get the f mutest delivery from CE of any 

product in this ad, send or phone your order 
directly to our Scanner Distribution Center^ 
IVlichigan residents please add 4% sales tax or 
supply your tax I.D. number. Written purchase 
orders are accepted from approved govern- 
ment agencies and most well rated firms at a 
10% surcharge for net 10 billing. All sales are 
subject to availability, acceptance and vehfica* 
tion. AM sales on accessories are final. Prices, 
terms and specifications are subject to change 
without notice. AH prices are in U.S, dollarsKOut 
of stock items wiJI be placed on backorder 
automatically unless CE is instructed differ- 
ently, A S5.00 additional handling fee will be 
charged for all orders with a merchandise total 
under$50,00. Shipments are F.O.B, Ann Arbor^ 
Micl^igan. NoCOD's. Most products that we sell 
have a manufacturer's warranty. Freecopfes of 
warranties on these products are available 
prior to purchase by writing to CE. International 
orders are invited with a $20.00 surcharge for 
special handling In addition tosh ipping chargea 
Non-certified checks require bank clearance. 
Mail orders to: Communications Electron- 
ics™ Box 1002p Ann Arbor, IS^ichigan 48106 
U.S.A. Add $7. 00 per scan ner, radar detector or 
CB or $12,00 per shortwave receiver for U.P.S. 
ground shipping and handling in the continental 
iJ.S.A. For Canada, Puerto Rico, Hawaii, Alaska, 
or APO/FPO delivery, shipping charges are 
three times continental U.S. rates. If you have a 
Visa or Master Card, you may call and place a 
credit card order Ordertoll-free in the U.S. Dial 
600-521-4414. In Canada, order toll-free by 
callfng SOO-221 -3475. WU I Telex CE anytime, 
dial 571-01 55. If you are outside the U,S. or in 
Michigan dial 313^973^8888. Order today. 

Scanner Distribution Center" and CEJogo^ are trade- 
marks of C o nn m u n i cat tons E lectro n ics? Ad # 7 1 84- E 
i^ Bearcat is a registered trademark of Uniden Corporation, 

Copyright® 1984 Communjcattons Electronics 



OrderToll Free...ca 

1-800-521-4414 




TM 



COMMUNICATIONS 
ELECTRONICS" 



?96 



Consumer Products DMsion 

eia Phoenix n Box 1002 D Ann Arbor, Michigan 48106 U.S.A, 
C*ll TOLL-FREE 300-521-4414 or auttlt^t US, A, 31 3-e73-e3S8 

73 Magazine • October, 1984 13 




The Best nctive Antenno 
COSTS L€SS1 



The new ARCOMM AP4 acHre 
luned Anlenn»/pfe5€lector h the 
most versatilef best performing 
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• Operaif* fln intrrnill "J ^/i>lf batterjf trloT inc hjtJt*d} or AC 3tJspier 
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Lewt&lown.PA 17044 

(717) 248-7739 



can assume V — 0,8, There- 
fore: 

L = 983.5VT/2 

L^(983.5X0.8X0.63)/2 
L= 495.7/2 = 248 feet 
Tracing the line on the 
building plans, y^^u find the 
area where the short should 
be found. Going to that ar- 
ea, you find a carpenter at 
work subdividing a room — 
and find the nail he drove 
through your coax! You 
hold off busting hts chops 



when you notice the ham- 
mer in his hand. 

You can use the same 
equation to find the length 
of coax needed to accom- 
plish a specified delay. Co- 
ax delay lines are used of- 
ten and are a lot cheaper 
than lumped-constant de- 
lay lines. 



/^ 



1l < Zq 



^o-Zl 



\ 



-N. 



UNE UNTEfTWtlATED 



H-^ 




CRUSHEQ C4BLE 



\. 



SHORTED CABLE 



Fig. W. A variety of traces. 



It is necessary to know 
the actual velocity factor 
(V) of a piece of coax If you 
are trying to make a quar- 
ter- or half-wavelength stub, 
then the velocity factor 
must be known. For noncrit* 
ical applications, we can 
accept the common wisdom 
factors of 0.66 for regular 
cable, 07 for Teflon® and 
0.8 for foam. But actual 
velocity factors often differ 
from these values, so they 
must be measured. 

Make the measurement 
of T using about 50 feet of 
cable. The precise length 
must be known, and the 
load end should either be 
left unterminated or ter- 
minated in a severe mis- 
matched impedance. This 
latter stipulation is needed 
to enhance the reflected 
pulse. If L and T are known, 
then V can be computed. If 
you make enough measure- 
ments on coax, you will find 
that published velocity fac- 
tors are quite nominal and 
that the range of V for sup- 
posedly identical samples 
of cable is quite large. In 
fact, you may well come to 
doubt much of the "stan- 
dard wisdom" published 
about transmission lines pop- 
ular in amateur radio. 

The alternate method 
used for amateur TDR uses 
a square wave rather than a 
pulse. Adjust the square- 
wave frequency and the os- 
cilloscope timebase to dis- 
play the top portion of the 
square wave as shown by 
dimension 'W in Fig. 8. For 
a perfectly symmetrical 
square wave, the period will 
be approximately 2 A, so the 
frequency will be 1/2A. 

In Fig. 9{al the upper 
waveform represents the ap- 
plied square wave as viewed 
on an oscilloscope adjusted 
per above instructions. The 
lower trace is the reflected 
wave. 

The display on the oscil- 
loscope will be the sum of 
forward (Vp) and reverse (V^} 
voltages, such as Fig. 9{b). 
In the case where the load 
impedance is equal to the 



coax surge impedance (i.e, 
Zl = Zo), the trace will be 
similar to the upper trace in 
(a). The trace in (b) repre- 
sents the case where the 
load impedance is greater 
than the surge impedance 
(Zl > Zq), while 9(c) is that 
obtained for Z|^ less than Zq 
(i,e., Zl < Zo). 

These traces not only tell 
us the direction of mis- 
match but also the approxi- 
mate magnitude tin the 
form of a vswr). Using the 
designations of Figs 9, we 
can compute the approxi- 
mate vswr from: 

vswr = Vp-f V^^/Vp— Vr 

The vswr measurement 
thus obtained is only ap- 
proximate because trans- 
mission line attenuation re- 
duces the reflected power 
returning to the transmitter 
end. This method, like all 
other methods, produces 
valid results only when the 
measurement is corrected 
for normal attenuation ef- 
fects and the line is a multi- 
ple of half wavelength. 

Fig, 10 shows the results 
of square-wave TDR for var- 
ious situations. Fig, 10(a) 
shows the situation where 
Z[—Zq. If the system is per- 
fect (rare!), then the upper 
horizontal line In (a) will be 
perfectly flat. If there are 
glitches in that portion, 
then it may indicate anom- 
alies on the line. I have seen 
both minor crushes or 
bends and in-line connec- 
tors splicing sections of line 
cause anomalies in an oth- 
erwise perfect trace For 
connectors, the glitch may 
be slight (especially if BNC 
connectors are used), but it 
will be present 

The traces shown in Fig. 
10 demonstrate the wide 
degree of change of the 
trace caused by line prob- 
lems. Although Time Do- 
main Reflectometers are 
complex instruments com- 
pared with our simple sys- 
tem, our system is capable 
of giving us a great deal of 
data about transmission 
lines that would otherwise 
be difficult to obtain. ■ 



14 73 Magazine • October, 1984 



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^ See List of Advertisers on page 98 



73 Magazine • October, 1984 15 



^m 



DOCTOR DX 



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BY 




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Work The World With No Antenna 




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With Doctor DX, al I you need is a Commodore-64 com puter, a key (or keyer), and a TV set. There is no 
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No more TVI or dead bands! Doctor DX Is more than the most sophisticated CW trainer ever devel- 
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ject to the country's callsign assignment rules). The prefixes are weighted according to the Amateur 
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the lower portion of the bands is much faster than those operating in the upper band segments. The 
"operators'' are also more polished in the lower portion of the bands. 

Radio propagation (programmed for each band) represents what you would expect to hear on a 
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You can learn and enhance your CW operating skills with Doctor DX. Doctor DX will not reward bad 
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The Doctor DX CW trainer is a totally new concept in Amateur Radio. See what all the excitement is 
about. Send for full details, and see your dealer for a demonstration. 



Send Us Your QSL Today And Ufe Will Rush Full Details! 

Advanced Electronic Applications, Inc. 

RO. BOX C-2160 • LYNN WOOD, WA 98036 
(206) 775-7373 • TELEX: 152571 AEA INTL 




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BY 




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Each award can be obtained by filling out a photocopy of the award application form (supplied) 
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There is no need to ever be bored with your hobby again just because the bands are dead or you are 
apartment bound. Try Amateur Radio's own version of Solitaire - DOCTOR DX. 



Advanced Electronic Applications, Inc. 

P.O. BOX C-2160 • LYNN WOOD, WA 98036 
(206) 775-7373 • TELEX: 152571 AEA INTL 




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FIRST WITH US , 

THEN THE WORLD! 

Better communications start with your subscription 

to §^ Amateur Radio's Technical Journal 



YES 



Start my no-risk subscriprion today and send me 12 issues of 73 for $19.97. 1 understand 
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73 



Amateur Radio's Technical Joumal > 
PO Box 931, Farmingdato, NY 11737 ^ 



18 72 Magazine • October. 1984 



p 









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• May be used witn antenna tuners; rated 5KW peak 

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See Lht of Adv&rtis&rs on page 98 



73 Magazine • October, t9&4 19 



Harry D. Hooton W6TYH 
1420 Shamrock Ldne 
Lincoln CA 95645 



The Aussie Parasol Beam 

What has twelve corners, three bands, and uses 
140 feet of wire? Hint: Ifs not a quad. 



The Australian ham with 
Novice-license privileges 
is limited to certain frequen* 
cies and very low antenna 
power— somewhere in the vi- 
cinity of 20 Watts PEP. Nev- 
ertheless, many of these Nov- 
ices (not necessarily begin- 
ners in electronics) produce 
outstanding signafs all over 
the globe on the 10- and 
15-meter bands. Some of 
these stations, such as 
VK7KDR (formerly VK7NDRI 
VKZNRa VK3VCW, and 
others that I have worked 
over 100 times, have spent 
many hours hand-honing 
their antenna systems close 
to perfection. 

During the years 1978 
through 1982, when I was 



on the air every day. there 
were many VK Novice sta- 
tions that consfstenlfy fa id 
down S9 + signals at 
W6TYH, My curiosity be- 
ing aroused, I contacted 
most of these hams and 
found that they were using 
the VK2ABQ ''parasol" 
beam antenna described 
by Fred VK2ABQ in the Oc- 
tober, 1973, issue of Elec- 
tronics Australia. 

1 wish to express my grat- 
itude to the many VK hams 
who mailed me photo- 
copies of the original arti- 
cle and others that showed 
more recent modifications 
of this unusual antenna 
system. 



C DIRECTOR 



jmSULATQR 




IftlSULATOH 



FlEOIVIf^ 



Fig. 1. Australian parasol beam antenna. Construction is 
similar to one frame of a cubical quad, but plane of loop is 
parallel to surface of the earth. Array is horizontally 
polarized, 

20 73 Magazme * October, 1984 



One of the features of 
the parasol array that first 
caught my attention was 

its small, compact size. I 
immediately had visions of 
a 40-meter beam using a 
parasol-type loop. It is also 
suitable for the ham who 
wants a triband antenna 
system but is cramped for 
space. Because it is very 
fight, when constructed 
with ordinary copper-wire 
conductors and bamboo or 
fibergfass spreaders, it can 
be rotated with a heavy- 
duty TV antenna rotator 

To satisfy my curiosity, f 
built and tested a dual- 
band parasol array with 
loops for the 10- and 15- 
meter bands only. Al- 
though the installation was 
not permanent, the follow- 
ing data should be of in- 
terest to all hams who de- 
sire a low-cost, simple, and 
low-weight antenna system 
for the three highest HF 
bands. 

Antenna Design 
As shown in Fig. 1, the 



parasol antenna consists 
basically of two wire con- 
ductor elements, each of 
which has its ends bent in- 
ward at right angles to the 
center section. Since most 
of the radiated field from 
an antenna element ema- 
nates from the center por- 
tion, the radiation efficien- 
cy is not noticeably poorer 
than that of a given ele- 
ment that used inductive 
traps or other shortening 
devices. As shown here, the 
parasol array is a modified 
2-element yagi, using a 
driven element and a para- 
sitic director. 

The Australian versions 
of the array are fed directly 
at the centerfs) of the driv- 
en efement(s) with 720hm 
coaxial cable. Although no 
specific swr figures were 
included in the photocopy 
material received from 
Fred VK2PHQ, I have been 
informed that the line swr 
is not greater than 2.5:1 
when the three driven-ele- 
ment feedpoints are con- 
nected in parallel and fed 
from a single 72-Ohm line. 



Frequency(MKz) 


A 




B 


C 


D 


E 


F 


7.t5 


*6'7" 


8' 


2" 


9'9" 


46' 7" 


25' 


16' 9" 


14.3 


23' 5" 


4' 


1" 


4' 10" 


23' 5" 


12' 6" 


8' 4" 


21.3 


15' 8" 


2' 


9" 


3' 3" 


15' 8" 


8'5' 


5' 8" 


28.6 


118" 


2' 




2' 5" 


irs" 


6' 3" 


4' 2" 



Table 1. Approximate dimensions of elements and spacing 
for 40-, 20-, 75-, and 10-meter parasol beam antennas. 



TRIM ASRECfJiREO TO RESONATE Et-EMENT 



FEED 
DRIVEW LJ ELEMENT 



Lh JCi«4 



tjt- 



^ 



INSULATOR 



DRIVEN ELEMEfJT 




DIRECTION OF 
MAXIMUM RAD I AT I QN 



F/g. 2. Ceneral arrangement of parasol beam antenna. 



In the W6TYH experimen- 
tal version, tHe driven ele- 
ments were fed by separate 
gam nn a- match arrange- 
ments, the coaxial line be- 
ing switched from one to 
the other by a stepping 
relay. It should be possible 
to ''match" the 72-Ohm (or 
52-Ohm) coaxial line to the 
three feedpoints at a prac- 
tical usable swr value by 
attaching a suitable coaxial 
line transformer to each feed- 
point and connecting them 
in parallel at the end of the 
main transmission line. 

The length of the folded, 
or bent, end sections will 
depend on the spacing be- 
tween the driven and para- 
sitic elements. In the 
W6TYH experimental ver- 
sion, the spacing (free 
space) between the centers 
of the driven and parasitic 
elements was made 0.11 
wavelengths to keep the 
overall size as small as pos- 
sible. Table 1 gives the di- 
mensions of the parasol ar- 
ray for one-, two-, or three- 
band operation. The ele- 
ment lengths, particularly 
in the three- band arrange- 
ment, are approximate and 
should be ''dipped'' and 
trimmed to resonance as 
described later. 

The approximate dimen- 
sions A, B, C, D, and E of 
Fig, 2 can be calculated by 
the following formulas. As- 
suming insulators II and (2 
are 4 inches long, with F be- 
ing the frequency in MHz 
and A to E dimensions are 
in feet, A = 335/F, B = 



58.3/F, C = 69.7/F, D = 
335/F, and E = 178.75/F. 

It must be emphasized 
that the above dimensions 
are approximate but will 
be close to the actual oper- 
ating values. The ends of 
the element conductors 
can be made about 3 or 4 
inches longer than the cal- 
culated values, as shown 
at B in Fig. 2, and then 
trimmed to resonate the el- 
ement at its proper fre- 
quency. In most cases, the 
director element will func- 
tion satisfactorily when cut 
to the calculated value or 
about 5 percent shorter 
than the driven-element 
length. 

Practical Construction 

To start, you will need 
one spider or X mount, 
such as those used in the 
construction of the cubical 
quad antenna. You also 
will need four crossarm 
(spreader) sections, as 
shown. Each crossarm 
should be at least 14 feet 
long if a triband 20-15-10- 
meter array is to be con- 
structed. The crossarm 
drilling data can be found 
as dimension E in Table 1. 
Ail of the wire elements 
should be strung on the 
frame before attempting 
any resonance adjust- 
ments. 

With the array at least 8 
or 10 feet above the 
ground, start with the IO- 
meter driven element and 
resonate it as described in 
the next section. Next, res- 
onate the 15-meter driven 



3/'4 i n . 



CRia-DIP 







MlNJfiTURE COPPER 

"alligator" clips 



COrJDLfCTORS 



LEAD? 

NOT OVER t/2 in EACH 



LINK 

COUPLING 
— ADJUSTABLE- 



t TURN LtffK, SOFT COPPER WIRE ^ 

OIAMETER SO THAT LfNK SLIPS 
OVER GRID'OIP OSCILLATOR COSL 



Fig. 3, How the grid-dip oscillator is coupled to the feed- 
point of the driven element (see textl 



element and recheck the 
resonant frequency of the 
10-meter driven element 
Third, resonate the 20-me- 
ter driven element and 
recheck the resonant fre- 
quencies of both the 15- 
and 10-meter elements. In 
the prototype array at 
W6TYH, the interaction be- 
tween the three driven ele- 
ments was negligible as far 
as the dip meter indication 
was concerned. However, 
when each driven element 
was being adjusted for low- 
est reflected power at its 
feedpoint, the swr reading 
changed when the match- 
ing adjustments of the 
other driven elements were 
moved. 

It is likely that the great- 
est interaction will take 
place when all three feed- 
points are connected in 
parallel and fed by a single 
coaxial transmission line. If 
the line swr is not higher 
than 2.5:1 on the element 
with the highest swr, usual- 
ly 20 meters, the perfor- 
mance of the array will not 
have deteriorated to any 
great extent and an anten- 
na tuner can be used at the 
transmitter end to present 
a 50-Ohm-resistance load 
to the transmitter output 
terminal. 



Resonance Adjustments 

As in any other parasitic 
array, the parasol antenna 
will give optimum perfor- 
mance only if the driven 
and parasitic elements are 
resonant at their proper 
frequencies. The length di- 
mensions given for the par- 
asitic director elements are 
about 5 percent shorter 
than those of the driven el- 
ement In the prototype ar- 
ray, the parasitic directors 
were calculated and cut 
according to the formula. 
The directors performed 
satisfactorily without fur- 
ther adjustment. The driv- 
en-element lengths re- 
quired adjustment howev- 
er, as outlined below. 

The preliminary driven- 
element adjustments are 
most easily made with a 
grid-dip oscillator and a 
calibrated receiver. First, 
make a 1- or 2-turn link coil 
from no. 14 soft-copper 
wire and with a diameter 
small enough to fit snugly 
over the grid-dip oscillator 
coil. As shown in Fig. 3, the 
link-coil ends are fitted 
with small copper alligator 
clips. Connect the alligator 
clips to the center ends of 
the driven-element con- 
ductors, as shown. Slip the 



Parts List 






140 feet, no. 12 copper wire, plastic 






covered household type 


@ 10q; per ft. 


$14.00 


4 bamboo spreaders 


@ 50(t ea. 


2.00 


1 marine plywood, 3/8" x 18^' x 18" 


@ $2.00 


2.00 


4 carriage bolts, 4-1/2" x 1/4'^ 


@ 30$ ea. 


1.20 


4 carriage bolts, 2-1/2" x 1/4'^ 


@ 25(5 ea. 


1.00 


4 U-bo!ts, 1-1/4^* 


@ 75(C ea. 


3.00 


MiscBllaneous (alligator clips, etc.) 




2.00 
$25.20 


Note: 52- or 720hm transmission line and insulators not tn- 


ciuded in above totai 







73 Magazine • October, 1984 21 



f 



-VIEW A 



CARRtacf aOLT 
4flE0UinED- 



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DRIVE miQ I in. HOL^ IM CEMTEFt DF BLOCK 



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U-BOLT 

■4\f^ CARRIAGE 
HOLT fliND WflSHEH 



/ 



\ 



Fig. 4. Array assembly, parasol antenna. 



link coil over the grid-dip 
coil form, and rotate the 
grid-dip oscillator dial until 
a deep null or "dip'' is in- 
dicated. 

With the calibrated re- 
ceiver, check the grid-dip 
oscillator at the point 
where the null occurs. Dur- 
ing this first check, the res- 
onant frequency of the 
driven element is almost 
certain to be very close to, 
or outside, the lower fre- 
quency limits of the ama- 
teur band. Clip off half an 
inch or so of the excess 
wire at the support insula- 



tors and repeat the pro- 
cess. Be sure that you 
check the grip-dip oscilla- 
tor frequency with the cali- 
brated receiver each time 
that a dip is indicated. Do 
not depend on the calibra- 
tions of the grid-dip oscilla- 
tor dial as the oscillator 
will be pulled off calibra- 
tion by absorption of the rf 
energy by the driven ele- 
ment at its point of reso- 
nance. This pulling effect 
can be reduced by reduc- 
ing the coupling between 
the grid-dip oscillator and 
the link coil to the point 




L-i^r 



eiin.LEMGTH^, T^ OHM COAXIAL LIKE 




UmECTOR ELEMENT CENTERS 
STAPLED TO WOODEN BOOM 
AND ELECt^CALLT aOMED 
WITH SINGLE -CONDUCTOR WIRE 



I I WOODEN BOOM 

( 1 1.5 X 1.5 iTi. K aft. 

II 




DIRECTOR 



Fig. 6. Modified version of Australian parasol antenna (said 
to improve front-to-back ratio). 

22 73 Magazine • October, 1984 




DftlVEN 
ELEMENT 



CENTER 

INSULATOR 



LIGHT 

NYLON 

LINE 



DIRECTOR 




OlRECTOft 



Fig, 5. Original Australian feed arrangennent. 



where only a very sma 
null is indicated. 



Continue to trim each 
end of the driven element 
and check the grid-dip os- 
cillator frequency at the 
null until the element is 
resonant at a frequency 
about 50 kHz lower than 
the desired operating fre- 
quency. The driven-ele- 
ment resonant frequency 
can then be ''worked in/' or 
"fine tuned/' to exact reso- 
nance at the operating fre- 
quency during the match- 
ing adjustments. 

During the adjustment 
of the driven element for 
resonance, it is possible 
that the grid-dip oscillator 
may indicate two nulls- 
one deeper than the other 
The major null will indi- 
cate the frequency at 
which the driven element is 
resonant. The minor null 
will be somewhat higher in 
frequency and will be the 
resonant frequency of the 
director. With very close 
coupling between the pick- 
up loop and the grid-dip os- 
cillator coil, the minor null 
should be pronounced. 
When the coupling be- 
tween the link coil and the 
oscillator coil is reduced, 
the minor null may not be 
apparent. The minor null 
should occur at a frequen- 
cy about 5 percent higher 
than that of the driven el- 
ement. 

Mounting the Array 

In the original Aussie 



version of the array, the 
spreaders were mounted 
on an 18" x 18'' x 3/8" 
piece of '"bond wood" (ply- 
wood) as shown in Fig. 4, If 
the plywood mount is used, 
it should be good quality 
nnarine plywood. The cen- 
ter of the board was rein- 
forced by a pair of 6" X 6'' 
X lAIT' "Oregon" blocks. 
The upper plate has a 
1-inch hole at the center 
for the 1-inch-diameter 
dowel kingpost. The king- 
post is about 24 inches high 
and is sanded to fit tightly 
when driven into the center 
hole of the upper block. In 
the VK version, the spread- 
ers were made from 1-inch 
hardwood dowels. Most 
American hams will prefer 
bamboo or fiberglass 
spreaders. Each spreader is 
supported at two points, as 
shown, by heavy-duty ny- 
lon fishing line; hence the 
name, "parasol array " 

Feed System 

The original Australian 
feed arrangement for the 
three driven elements is 
shown in Fig. 5. Here, the 
three driven elements use a 
common center insulator 
with the three feedpoints 
connected in parallel and 
fed with a single coaxial 
transmission line. A nylon 
tie cord is connected be- 
tween the driven-element 
center insulator and the 
center point on the parasit- 
ic director [or reflector, as 
the case may be) and is 
drawn taut. The center 



points of the three direc- 
tors (reflectors) are electri- 
cal [y bonded together. 

Another VK arrange- 
ment is shown in Fig, 6, 
Here, a light wooden 
boom, 1-1/2" X 1-1/2" X 
96'', is used to support the 
driven-efement center insu- 
lators. The three feed- 
points are connected to- 
gether with short lengths of 
72-Ohm coaxial cable. The 
center points of the direc- 
tor (reflector) are attached 
to the wooden boom, as 
shown, and connected to- 
gether electrically with a 
single copper conductor 

Antenna Performance 

The W6TYH parasol ar- 
ray was constructed to sat- 
isfy my own curiosity, 
more or less. Although the 
antenna was a jerry-built 
affair mechanically and 
was suspended by a rope 
and pulley attached to an 
overhanging tree limb, it 
was electrically correct. 



On the 15- and 10-meter 
bands its performance was 
compared with that of a 
"standard'' 2-elennent yagi 
similar to the one I de- 
scribed in "Rotary Beam 
for 10 or 15: the LB-2" [73 
for May, 1980X and in most 
cases there was little dif- 
ference in the strength of 
the distant signal. The ex- 
perimental model ap- 
peared to have about 5 dB 
forward gain and about 15 
dB front"to-back ratio — 
about the same as that of 
the 2-'element yagi used for 
comparison. The Austra- 
lian hams rate this antenna 
at 5 dB forward gain, 18 dB 
front-to-back ratio, and 37 
dB side rejection when 
used on the 15-meter band. 
At any rate, the parasol 
antenna is probably the 
least expensive tribander. 
It should be possible to 
build it for not over twenty 
to thirty dollars. It can be 
rotated easily with a TV an- 
tenna rotator. ■ 



TRtONYX tNC MANUFACTURER Of £LEC TRONIC TEST 

i COMPLETE SYSTEMS 




BUILT ANTENNA 
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OPERATES ON TV 
CHANNELS 2 THRU 6 



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p^ Se^ List of Advertisers on page 98 



73 Magazine * October, 1984 23 



^254 



National Communication Group 



. 10/ieOM HF TRANSCEIVER 
.15 11 15 METER MOBILE 

. 40-15-6 TRI-BANDER NEW!!! 



The New NCG Tri-Bander is now available! 

The 7-21-50 gives you the bands and quality that you want 

Discover the fun and enjoyment of operating on 50 MHz. Tlie low ' 

end of 50 MHz is reliable for local QSO*s, and when radio ducts, 
meteor showers or sporatic E and F layer reflection conditions are 
right, excellent DX QSO's are easy. ^ 



Operate the popular 40 and 15 meter bands and also have the 
surprising 6 meter band at your finger tips. The Tri-Bander has an 
excellent TVI filter built in, there is very tittle to NO TV interference 
when the SWR is 1,5 or less. 



Look At These Features! 

All Solid State Automatic 

Built In AC/DC Power Supply Top Moun 

200 Hz CW Filter Size: 9.6' 



Automatic Antenna Switching 

Top Mounted Speaker 

Size: 9.6'W x 3.9"H x 10,5^'D 



r 


r 




•; ■-;. *..:' 




naW 


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Vm^lh 



Mobile or base, the NCG Tri-Bander is low cost enjoyment. 
Priced to fit your budget. 



COMMOOORE 
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Supporting ^11 COMMODORE CDn>putafs 
• GAMES • UTILITIES * EDUCATIONAL * 

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cont B i n a 1 1 ot tha Vi-c 20 and C omirjottCM f 4 co Hec lnOns th ru thii 
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Kit w/insi $1 5,00 Board w/insl S7.50 



Pricai include US- shipping add handling only. 

CHECK, MONEY ORDERS, VISA and MASTEflCARO 

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5025 S RangeJine Rd. W, Milton. QH 45383 
10:00 a,fn. ■ 5:00 p.m. EST — Uan. thru Fn. 

(51 31 e98-563& or [5131 333-T 725 ^ ^48 



24 73 Magazine • October, 1934 



NOTE: Prices and specifications subject to change 
without notice or obligation. 



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Write or call now for full 
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top of th& hne in mobile 
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See Ust of AOveflisers on page 96 



73 Magazfne- * October, 1964 25 



The Incredible 
Broadband Bowtie 

Truly designed for solid-state finals, this 75m antenna features 
50 Ohms at the feed— and less than 7.5:7 swr across the band. 



//m Barton KUHW 
RD #2. Sox 131 
Washin^on PA 15301 



ii'^eah, I've got a tran- 
I sistorized transceiv- 



er . 



ff 



'^Do I like it? Sure, I like it 
alot . " 

'What do I think of the 
solid-state finals? Well they 
are not as great as they 
sound. The finals are really 



sensitive to swr. I ended up 
buying an antenna tuner just 
to get the thing to load up/' 

If you're the owner of 
an alf-transistor rig, you've 
probably had a Q SO like the 
above. While these rigs are 
nice, they do have their own 
set of problems. Chief 
among the problems is their 
best known feature— the sol- 
ids tate final amp. 

Transistor rigs differ sub- 
stantially from their tube- 
final cousins. Tube finals 
use an impedance-matching 




Swr mefer showing the 5wr (the tun& was bypassed], 
26 73 Magazine • Octot)er, 1984 



(pi) network to match the 
tube's impedance to the 
antenna's impedance. Tran- 
sistors do things another 
way. Power from the broad- 
banded final transistor is fed 
through a bandpass filter in- 
to a 5{K)hm load. 

This new system means 
that theoretically you can 
set the tuning dial to any fre- 
quency and generate a sig- 
nal with no further adjust- 
ment to the transmitter. This 
possibility intrigued me be- 
cause I enjoy rag-chewing 
on 75-meter phone and I op- 
erate a transistorized rig. 
However, a little experi- 
menting showed me that it 
wasn't going to be as easy as 
it sounded. There's a catch. 

White the transistor finals 
are broadbanded, they re- 
quire that the load they feed 
be 50 Ohms or very close to 



m 



^M 



^h 







1 



EaUIVALf KT CtffCtilT FOR A DJm»LE AlfTEMMA. 

RESONANT rireguciiCY oCPCuas mwi values 

Of L AMD C. 



Fig. t 



it Unfortunately, a dipole 
antenna is not broadband- 
ed. Keeping the swr low as 
you tune across the band — 
that's the catch. 

According to the theory 
books, a dipole should be 
able to cover a band equal 
to three percent of its design 
frequency. That's 100 kHz 
on 75 meters without ex- 
ceeding a 2:1 swr. Thaf s not 
much of a spread. 

1 decided that what I 
needed was a broad banded 
dipole. The design require- 
ments were: 

1. Uses no exotic or ex- 
pensive material. 

2. Easy to construct 

3. Achieves a 13:1 swr or 
less over the 75-metef phone 
band. 

Design requirement num- 
ber one eliminated double 
bazookas and folded di- 
poles. They require expen- 
sive coax and ladder line or 
an impedance-matching net- 
work, I wanted to keep it 
cheap and easy. 

As I searched, my mind 
wandered back to a short 
blurb in William Orr's Radh 



Handbook. In his descrip- 
tion of a tuned doublet an- 
tenna, he mentioned that 
the antenna could be made 
more broadbanded by fan- 
ning the ends of the anten- 
na. Could the answer to my 
search be a simple adapta- 
tion of this idea? I decided 
to find out 

To start ' cut enough wire 
for two dipoles. The two di- 
poles were tied together at 
the center insulator while 
the legs were fanned one 
foot apart. Swr measure- 
ments indicated that I was 
heading in the right direc- 
tion although there were a 
couple of problems. 

The first problem was 
that the new combined di- 
pole was too long. The old 
dipole formula just didn't 
work In this situation. This 
change was an unexpected 
confirmation of a lot of 
the antenna theory I had 
learned. 

Remember that an ante^^ 
na b equivalent to a series- 
resonant circuit. In fact we 
could substitute a series-LC 
circuit for an antenna as in 
Fig. 1 . The resonant frequen- 
cy depends upon the values 
of L and C. If either L or C 
changes, the resonant fre- 
quency shifts. 

Now lefs go back to a 
real antenna. The LC rela- 
tionship still applies. By 
spreading the ends, we have 
increased the antenna's ca- 
pacitance. This, of course, 
shifts its resonant frequen- 
cy. The only way to bring the 
frequency back is to com- 
pensate by changing the in- 
ductance, too. 

Inductance is changed by 
shortening the antenna. In 
this case, the antenna had to 

be shortened a total of ten 
feet to bring the frequency 
back. It's the reduction of in- 
ductance, incidentally, which 
increases an antenna's broad- 
bandedness. 

The second problem was 
mechanical — how to keep 
the antenna in its proper po- 
sition. On my first attempt I 
used strips of wood to 

^ See Ust ot Advert fs^rs on page 98 



spread the antenna ends 
apart by about one foot 
with a halyard attached at 
the center. This worked, but 
when hoisted into the air, 
the ends wanted to wind- 
milt twisting the wires to- 
gether and reducing capaci- 
tance. 

No sweat. I just hung a 
brick to the bottom of each 
spreader. That solved that 
problem but created anoth- 
er. The whole thing took on 
a Rube Goldberg appear- 
ance; it was a visual embar- 
rassment Besides, there was 
the practical problem of 
having these two bricks 
suspended forty feet in the 
air on the ends of some 
rope. Needless to say, the 
XYL was quick to point out 
these problems, too 

Eventually both problems 

were resolved with the de- 
velopment of the "Broad- 
band Bowtie Dipole" seen in 
Fig, 2, One look at the draw- 
ing should explain how the 
antenna got its name. 

After numerous cuts and 
tries, I found that one-hun- 
dred-ten feet seemed to 
make the antenna resonant 
about the middle of the 
7 5- meter phone band. Ex- 
periments also showed that 
fanning the ends more than 
three feet offered little or no 
advantage. With the ends 
fanned three feet rtiy swr 
was less than 1 5:1 on the 
edges of the phone band 
(see Fig. 3). Now my tran- 
sistor finals perk happily 
along with no need to tune. 

Length of the transmis- 
sion line is also important 
To have your transistor 
transceiver see the same im- 
pedance as the antenna of- 
fers, the transmission line 
must be some multiple of 
one half wave. For solid di- 
electric RC-58, this is a mul- 
tiple of eighty-three feet 

Mounting problems were 
solved with the double-hal- 
yard system also shown in 
Fig 2. Rope spreaders re- 
place the original wood 
spreaders. Be careful not to 
put too much tension on the 



HOPE SPREAOeA 

muMTAiitiNe 




^Ff^n MAtYJtRD 



Uim£ft HM.vt*sm 



COAX TO ttUHSIilTT^n & 9311 



Fig. 2, 



J.6 



I 



yj^OiAHi 



4 OOOMHI 



S*H REMHtMS eCLOW l^i OVEfl THE ENTIRE 
SEVEIVTf FIVE METEfl PHONE BAND. 



Fig. 3. 



lower halyard or the whole 
system will be dragged 
closer to the ground. 

Incidentally, those inter- 
ested in antennas might like 
to know that all antennas at 
station KC3HW are made 
from electric-fence wire. This 
18-gauge steel wire comes on 
quarter-mile spools and is 
long-lasting. Ifs available 
through farm-supply stores 



and Sears for about ten 
dollars a roll. 

More avenues of experi- 
menting are open to you, 
the reader. How about a 
higher band? While Tve not 
attempted to try the Bowtie 
on forty meters, it should 
have a flatter swr than on 
seventy-five 

Best of luck, and enjoy 
your newfound freedom, ■ 



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73 Magazine • October, 1984 27 



Joseph I Can K41PV 
S440 So. 8th Road 
Arlmgton VA 22204 



1^ for Ailing Antennas 

Maximize your system's performance with this 
easy-to-construct noise bridge. It's just what the doctor ordered. 



The antenna noise bridge 
is an instrument which 
most amateur-radio enthusi- 
asts have seen advertised 
but only a few know how to 
use Several different mod- 
els are offered by Palomar, 
Omega-T, and MFJ (see 
photos). When used with a 
receiver (preferably a gener- 
al-coverage shortwave re- 
ceiver), the noise bridge 
makes it easy to "wring out" 
antennas, transmission lines, 
and other tuned circuits. 

The heart of any bridge, 
perhaps, is the signal source. 
In the noise bridge, the sig- 
nal source is a noise gener- 
ator such as shown in Fig, 1 . 
The actual noise source is 
the zener diode connected 
to the base of transistor Q1. 
A zener diode operating in 



the avalanche mode pro- 
duces large amounts of 
semi-white noise. If you con- 
nect it to an audio-amplifier 
input, then the output is per- 
ceived as hiss. Some people 
call this circuit a Gaussian 
noise source, but that desig- 
nation is a little off the mark. 
True Gaussian noise con- 
tains all phases and ampli- 
tudes of all frequencies. The 
noise produced by the cir- 
cuit in Fig. 1 is bandwidth lim- 
ited to less than 300 MHz, or 
so. If Q1 through Q3 are se- 
lected with care, this genera- 
tor produces results through- 
out the HP spectrum and in 
the VHP spectrum at least to 
2 meters. 

The stages following the 
noise-generating diode form 
a wideband amplifier. If the 




transistors are selected for 
UHF frequency characteris- 
tics, then the frequency re- 
sponse will be well into the 
VHF range. Good selections 
from the replacement lines 
are ECC-107 and ECG-108 or 
their equivalents. 

Fig. 2 shows the actual 
bridge circuit. The block 
marked ''noise-generator cir- 
cuit" is a circuit such as in 
Fig, 1. 

The heart of the noise 
bridge is transformer T1. 
There are three windings on 
the toroidal core of T1, and 
these windings are trifilar- 
wound. A toroidal core ca- 
pable of 1- through 150-MHz 
operation, about 3/4 to 1 
inch in diameter, should be 
sufficient. The wire is #28, 
either enameled or with the 
sort of synthetic materfal 
that covers wire used in 
wire-wrap systems. Ten to 1 5 
turns are appropriate. 



OliiF 



i»m 



€ an 



C* 



Coficeptually, this bridge 
is similar to the simple 

Wheatstone bridge. Recall 
that that bridge contains 
four arms (each a resistor) 
formed into a diamond- 
shaped circuit. Excitation is 
applied between two of the 
resistor junctions while out- 
put signal is taken from the 
other junctions. In the noise 
bridge, coils LI and L2 form 
two of the arms, the antenna 
impedance forms the third 
arm, and impedance R1/C2 
forms the fourth arm. Excita- 
tion is through coil L3. Since 
11 /L2 are trifilar-wound, 
these two coils form iden- 
tical impedances. Thus, the 
bridge will be in balance 
when the antenna imped- 
ance matches R1/C2. 

Capacitor CI has a value 
half that of C2. Thus, C2 will 
have to be exactly in the 
middle of its range to bal- 
ance (i.e., null) the circuit. 
The purpose of this scheme 



r — V*» # 



T77 



e «m' 



lOK 



9- il^rfDC 






^^ 



© 



m 






^ fir 



Noise bridge from Omega-T. 
73 Magazine • Octobef, 1984 



fig. h Noise generator as the signal source. 







Palomar Engineers^ noise bridge. 



MFl ri noise bridga 



is to allow measurement of 
inductive reactance compo- 
nents of antenna impedance 
as well as capacitive. Exact- 
ly at resonance, the antenna 
impedance reactances are 
equal (Xl = X^2X so they 
cancel each other In that 
case, the value of C2 equals 
CI, If the antenna is capaci- 
tive (X^- greater than X^^), 
then the null is found on C2 
at a capacitance fess than 
O. If, on the other hand the 
antenna is inductive (X^ less 
than X^i then the null will 
be found when C2 is greater 
than CI , 

Null occurs when the im- 
pedance of R1/C2 is equal to 
the antenna impedance (tak~ 
ing into consideration CI). 
This null is indicated by a 
sudden decrease in the 
noise level coming from the 
receiver (or by a dip on the 
receiver S-meter). This re- 
sponse is shown in Frg 3. 
There is usually a fot of in- 
teraction between Rl and 
C2, so these controls must 
be adjusted several times to 
find true null. 

The null indicator is a re- 
ceiver The best type of re- 
ceiver is a general-coverage 
shortwave receiver with an 
envelope [i.e., AM) detector 
and, preferably, an S-meter. 
Ham-band-only receivers re- 
quire the null be inside the 
ham bands (often not the 
case!). I have found it dif- 
ficult to use the bridge with 
SSB/CW modes. Tune very 
slowly white searching for 



the null- Perhaps the most 
common mistake made 
when using a noise bridge is 
tuning the receiver too fast 
The null tends to be sharp, 
and is easily missed if tuning 
rate is high. 

Finding Antenna Length 

The arithmetic equations 
which we use to find anten- 
na lengths are ''ball park'' 
only, except in someplace 
called "free space" The real 
physical length will be lon- 
ger or shorter than the cal- 
culated length. Part of the 
job in setting up an antenna 
is cutting (or lengthening) to 
size. In the usual scenario, 
one takes a vswr bridge and 
measures the swr at several 
points within the band in 
order to find where the mini- 
ma is located From that in- 
formation we can tell wheth- 
er to lengthen or shorten the 
antenna. 

The noise bridge gives us 
another method. We con- 
nect the general-coverage 
receiver via a short length of 
coax to the RCVR port of the 
noise bridge, and the anten- 
na coax to the ANTENNA 
port of the noise bridge. Set 
the X control on the bridge 
to mid-range (i.e., C2 at half* 
scale) and the R control to 
some value between 5 and 
20 Ohms (will be readjusted 
later). The receiver is tuned 
to the antenna design fre- 
quency. The procedure is as 
follows: 

I.Vary X for a null; this 



null will be broad, so listen 

carefully and tune slowly. 

2. Observe whether the X 
nulls are on the Xl or X^ side 
of zero. If the null is on the 
Xj^ side, then the antenna is 
too long and the actual reso- 
nant is below the design res- 
onant frequency. If the null 
is on the X^ side of zero, 
then the antenna is too short 
and its actual resonant fre- 
quency is above the design 
resonant frequency. 

3. Retum the X control to 
zero. 

4. Tune the receiver slow- 
ly in the direction indicated 
by the result of step 2. 

5- Look for a null as you 
tune the receiver When you 
find the apparent null ad- 
just R, X, and the receiver for 
deepest null (except interac- 
tion). This deepest null is the 
resonant frequency of the 
antenna, 

6. Adjust the length of the 
antenna as indicated by the 
null: (a) if Fr is above the de- 
sign frequency, then length- 
en the antenna, or (b) if f^ is 
below the design frequency, 
shorten the antenna. Occa- 
sionally Fg will be so close 






HDfS£ 
SEHEWaTOW 



T> 



1 



L3 



» 






U 



^ — ♦ 



to the design frequency that 
no action is needed. 

The noise bridge is espe- 
cially useful where the reso- 
nant frequency is out of the 
amateur bands. It also is 
useful inside the band, but 
so is a vswr bridge. We can- 
not however, excite an an- 
tenna outside the band! 

Half^^ave Transirassion lines 

It is frequently the case 
that we must excite anten- 
nas through transmission 
tines which are integer mul- 
tiples of half-wavelength. 
Antenna impedance mea- 
surements, vswr or iswr, and 
similar measurements must 
be made either at the anten- 
na terminals or through 
matching transmission lines 
which are integer multiples 
of half-wavelength. The rea- 
son for this is that the im- 
pedance is at the load and is 
repeated every half-wave- 
length down the line. Thus, 
if we measure the imped- 
ance (or vswr/iswr) through 
0-5, 1.0, or 1 .5 wavelength of 
coax, it is equivalent to mak- 
ing the measurement at the 
load (antenna) end. 



^' §) AhfTC(t«tVA 



r5pF 



ffj 



> 



T' 



ncvm 



dr 



/rr 



Fig. 2. Actual bridge circuit 

73 Magazine • October, 1984 29 



So how do we find half- 
wavelength? Some people 
might tell us that the length 
in feet is ^^2IF^^^, but that 
equation does not account 
for velocity factor. Since the 
wave velocity in the cable is 
a fraction {0 to 1) of the ve- 
locity in space, we must use 
the vefocfty factor (V) to 
reduce the physical length 
The corrected length is 
found in Equation 1: 

Lft=492V/F„Hz 
We normally use figures 
for V that are glibly quoted 
in spec sheets and antenna 
books (e.g., 0.66 for "regulaK' 
coax, 0.70 for Tefion^^ di- 
electric, and 080 for foam 
dielectric), Bui when we 
actual IV measure velocity 
factor, we find these figures 
often are incorrect by as 
much as 25 percent— a fac- 
tor that seriously affects 
Equation 1 ! 

Fortunately, we can use 
the noise bridge to find half- 
wavelength; Fig. 4 shows 
how. If the coax is shorted at 
a point exactly one half- 
wavelength from the drive 
end, then there wilt be a 
sharp null in the noise at 
that frequency. 

Normally, we would start 
with a physical length 10 
percent or so longer than es- 
timated from the equation 
length. We then begin short- 
ening the coax, reestablish- 
ing the short circuit each 
time, until the null moves to 
the correct frequency. This 
method involves the sacri- 
fice of a small amount of 
coax but yields a length that 
has an electrical length of 
exactly one half wave at the 
desired frequency. Some peo- 




F||EQ4»te«CT 



pie use heavy pins or wire 
nails pulsed through the 
coax insulation to achieve 
the short circuit 

An alternative to the short 
method, as well as a check 
on the valtdity of the short 
method, is to use a 50-200- 
Ohm carbon-composition (or 
other non inductive) resistor 
in place of the short. The R 
dial on the noise bridge 
should read the same as the 
resistor value at half -wave- 
length. 

Finding Coax 
Velocity Factor 

The published velocity 
factor for coaxial cable is 
frequently in error. If we rely 
on this standard wisdom it is 
likely that we will at one 
time or another get into 
trouble. But it also is true 
that the velocity factor of 
any given lot of coax will 
have a uniform velocity fac- 
tor even though it differs 
from the standard. Thus, if 
we buy a roll of cable (500 or 
1000 ft, for example) and 
measure the actual velocity 
factor, then we can depend 
on that figure for the entire 
roll. From Equation 1 we 
know that velocity factor V 
is found in Equation 2: 

V = LFN/492 
where V is the velocity fac- 
tor (0 to 1), L is the cable 
length in feet, F is the fre- 
quency in megahertz, and N 
is an integer (1. 2. 3, . .etc.). 

We can use our noise 
bridge to find V if we know L 
and can determine F on the 
receiver dial. A setup such 
as Fig. 4 is used. Measure a 
convenient length of coaxial 
cable (around 40' will yield 
good results). Know (by 
measurement) the exact 
length of the cable to within 
an inch or two. If we assume 
a value for V of about OJ, 
then we can calculate an ap- 
proximate value for F at 
which N=1 (simplifies 



BtCEIVEf! 






things). For example, for 
N=l, V=:0.7, and 1^40 ft, 
F will be approximately 8.6 
MHz. We can start search- 
ing for the null at that fre- 
quency. The test procedure 
is as follows; 

I.Set X at zero and R at 
just a little above zero. 

2. Short the load end of 
the coax. 

3, Adjust the receiver 
above and below the design 
frequency until a deep null 
is found. Record the fre- 
quency at which this null is 
found, 

4- Using the premeasured 
length and the frequency 
found in step 3, calculate 
the velocity factor V using 
Equation 2 

You can repeat this ex- 
periment at different values 
of length (L) and average the 
results to find the "best" 
value of V, Once a value is 
determined, it can be used 
safely for the entire rolL You 
will be surprised how far re- 
moved the values actually 
measured are from the stan^ 
dard published values! 

Measuring 
Antenna Impedance 

Measuring antenna im- 
pedance with a noise bridge 
is very similar to the method 
used for finding the correct 
antenna length. We are as- 
suming that the antenna is 
properly cut and the null is 
found at the correct fre- 
quency. Despite the fact 
that the null is on the cor- 
rect frequency, it does not 
mean that the impedance is 
correct. Of course, incorrect 
impedance means a vswr 
problem 

To measure antenna im- 
pedance, we should connect 
the antenna to the noise 
bridge through a piece of 
coaxial cable that is electri- 
cally one half-wavelength 
That way, the antenna im- 
pedance will be reflected to 



Fig, 3. Response when there 
is a sudden decrease in the 
noise level conning from the 
receiver. 

30 73 Magazine • October, 1984 




i" 




f qg. 4. Using the noise brid^ to find half-wave!engtk 



the input end of the trans- 
mission line where the 
bridge is connected. The 
deepest null will occur when 
the R control is set to the ra- 
diation resistance of the an- 
tenna Again we are as- 
suming that null occurs at 
the correct frequency. If the 
antenna is truly resonant* 
then the X control will be at 
zero (indicating that X^ — 
X^) Once the impedance is 
known, we can determine 
whether or not any match- 
ing strategies are needed 

Other Circuits 

The noise bridge can be 

used to measure the input 
impedance of any tuned res- 
onant circuit provided that 
the impedance is within the 
range of the bridge. One 
would not want to use the 
bridge on any device that is 
supplying power, but on 
passive circuits it should 
work nicely. 

Untuned amplifiers and 
networks can also be tested 
with white noise. In those 
tests, one would not use the 
bridge portion of the instru- 
ment; only the noise-gener- 
ator section is used. The cir- 
cuit of Fig. 2 must be fitted 
with a BNC or 50-239 out- 
put connector that brings 
the noise signal to the out- 
side world. 

One unusual application 
for noise generators is in 
testing of signal-averaging 
instruments used in commu- 
nications laboratories (as 
well as in physiology/neurol- 
ogy). In those applications, 
the noise signal and a low- 
amplitude sine wave are 
mixed in a linear summation 
network before being ap- 
plied to the averager If the 
instrument is working prop- 
erly, then the noise will aver- 
age to near zero while the 
periodic sine wave is en- 
hanced. 

The R-X noise bridge is a 
lovv<:ost instnjment yet it can 
provide amazing results. Few 
items of amateur test equip- 
ment work as well or are as 
useful as this unfortunately 
neglected instrument ■ 




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losGph A. Ryan WB5iLM 
414 Church St. PO Box 622 
Florence M5 ^907.3-0622 



Ryan's Vertical Ecstasy 

Warning: Graphic depiction of vertical antenna array patterns. 
Explicit CoCo language. May incite construction frenzy. 



Well now, this program 
is ideal for those de- 
siring to experiment with 
designing quarter-wave ver- 
tical antenna arrays (multi- 
element). Formerly, unless 
you had the facilities of an 
antenna-testing laboratory 
available or some rather ex- 
tensive equipment on hand, 
you had to go the old build 
'n' try method. 

With this program (and 
your trusty CoCo — see be- 
low), you can design multi- 
element quarter-wave verti- 
cal arrays in the comfort of 
your shack and construct 
only the final selected re- 
sult It allows you to insert 



up to ten elements in any 
layout with either -h or — 
phasing, with any power level 
to any element (all refer- 
enced to a reference ele- 
ment], see the result dis- 
played on a simplified Smith 
chart, and then call up the 
front-to-back ratio and gain 
data for the array. 

This is not completely 
original. The original version 
of this program was pub- 
lished in the May, 1980, 
issue of 73, in an article by 
Dennis Mitchell K8UR. !t 
was written for the TRS-80 
Model I and, to use it with 
the TRS-80[C)-CoCo-l 
found that I had to exten- 



*-+n, OF ELEMENT S= _ 



fr/p RAT 10= ^9.25D>Ej 




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TOP 



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SVINJOF'S J: S OF- m^ t rM Op^-Tft 



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lit';* 

12m 

ISO 
190 

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POWER GAIN 



DBil} &A1KI 



1"^ ". I . . i ;. ! I ~' 



1.93 


2, a*? 


2.Gf3 


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.2.00 


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1*95 


2.39 


't*&7. 


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uia 


0.41 


Cf.46 


-3-41 


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4>^05 


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0,46 


-3. 41 


t»t6 


0.4i 


1.A7 


2.-23 


t.'SS 


2.a'^ 



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PHASE 



ANGLE 



AMPL 
1 



SPftCTNG 
90 



DIST[5|NCE IN FEET ^^tHEEU ELEMENTS- 1 i 2 ftT t4»23 ftHI. IB 

D19TAMCE m FCer FOR PHfliSE ANGLE DF 9*:^ tS Ifr»-^2 FT, 

DISTANCE fN FE:et &etltHtEN ELEMENTE 1 '.; I! AT 7. ;?4 riHZ. 15 

DISTANCE m FEHT FCK PHASE ANGLE DF 9c> IS t2*^t FT. 



16.4^ FT. 



52 FT. 



Fig, 1. Typical printout of Iwchelement quarter-wave vertical 
array. 

32 73 Magazine • October, 1984 



sively revise and modify It 
Eventually, I wound up re- 
doing the graphics com- 
pletely in order to take ad- 
vantage of the CoCo's hi-res- 
olution capabilities. Along 
the way, several features 
were added, like output-to- 
printer and distance-mea- 
syrement capabilities (for 
converting degrees of wave- 
length to feet for any given 
frequency). 

The program, as written, 
requires the full 32 K Ex- 
tended Basic version of the 
TRS-80(C) that^s apparently 
in use by many hams today. 
However, by removing the 
printer option, the rather 
long program-operating in- 
structions (roughly tines 960 
through 1120), and several 
other lines (see the REM 
statements), you could 
squeeze this into a 16K Ex- 
tended Basic CoCo and still 
have the graphic output as 
well as the generated data. 

Program Restrictions 
and Capabilities 

Now first of ail, this is for 
quarter-wave vertical ele- 
ments only, No multijDand 
verticals count, as this pro- 
gram calculates for distance 
between elements and length 
of feed line between ele- 
ments, which, obviously, 
change with frequency 
changes. However, if you're 
willing to build the result 
keeping in mind that you'd 
have to move the elements 
and lengthen (or shorten) the 
inter-element feedlines, 1 
suppose they could be used. 
To be sensible, just plan on 



using straight quarter-wave 
elements (made out of TV- 
mast tubing and mounted 
on a soda bottle, if neces- 
sary). 

Note that this program 
will calculate and display 
only the array's horizontal- 
angle radiation pattern. The 
vertical-angle radiation pat- 
tern is determined by your 
local effective ground {see 
references) and no provision 
has been made herein for 
that for two reasons: It prob- 
ably would drastically 
increase the size of the pro- 
gram, and your effective- 
ground value changes daily 
(again, see the referenced ar- 
ticle on ground effects). 

This program will, how- 
ever, calculate and display 
the array radiation pattern 
(horizontal), the F/B ratio, dB 
of gain, etc., for any arrange- 
ment of elements, spacing, 
and phasing. 

Program Operation 

A little about the program 
operation. Briefly, the vari- 
ous inputs requested are: 

1. Number of elements: 
Anywhere from two to ten 
(this can be increased by 
changing the value 10 in line 
80). 

2. Input relative phase: In 
degrees from to 360 (+ for 
leading arid — for lagging). 
360 degrees represents one 
wavelength, obviously. Two 
wavelengths would be 720, 

3. Input angle of ei: The 
direction, in degrees, from 
the reference element (0 to 
360). 



4. Rel. amplitude of eL: 
The power, in Watts, going 
to the element in question. 
(If equal to that going to the 
reference element from the 
transmitter, then the answer 
is 1; if less, because you're 
inserting an rf attenuator in 
the line, then a decimal 
valuej 

5. Input spacing of et.: 
This is the distance from the 
reference element in de- 
grees (i.e., 90 = Va wave}, to 
the element in question. 

Finally, at each element 
step you're asked if the data 
you have input is correct. If 
not, you can answer with an 
N and enter the data for 
that element again. If your 
answer to the final element 
input is Y, then the program 
will go into the calculate 
mode. 

While calculating, the 
program will go into the 
graphics mode and show the 
simplified Smith chart, dis- 
playing the elements as you 
have called for them to be 
assembled into an array. 
The view is ''bird's-eye" (see 
the printout example. Fig. 1). 
Be pat/ent— Basic takes time, 
and a full array of 10 ele- 
ments could take 10-12 
minutes to calculate. 

Of course, you can insert 
the old ''Vitamin E" poke — 
POKE 65495,0 -at the be- 
ginning of the program 
listing, but I left it out 
because I run this program 
from disk, and without mak- 
ing internal modifications to 
the CoCo, the disk controller 
doesn't like this speed-up 
poke. If you're not running 
this with a disk system, you 
probably could use this 
poke, but, be sure to also in- 
sert the slow-down poke 
(POKE 65494,0) prior to any 
line calling for a printer out- 
put (if you use the printer 
option]. This would speed 
up the calculating time by a 
factor of approximately 2, 
but for smaller numbers of 
elements it really isn't nec- 
essary. 

When the calculations 
are complete, the screen 
will erase and then replay 
the Smith chart with the 



elements displayed and 
begin plotting the radiation 
pattern, one degree at a 
time, before your eyes 
(sound included). When 
finished, follow the prompt 
and hit ENTER for the 
display of power-gain and 
F/B ratio figures. Follow the 
prompt to display the menu 
of optional features. 

The menu has eight 
choices. Item one will re-dis- 
play the Smith-chart plot 
Items two and three will 
display the power gain and 
gain in dB either every two 
degrees or (in item three) ev- 
ery 30 degrees. The latter is 
best for one screen display. 

item four is for a restart to 
calculate a new array. Item 
five will re-display only the 
Smith chart with the ele- 
ment placement, but no plot 
Item six goes to a subroutine 
for calculating the actual 
physical distances between 
elements and the physical 
lengths of the feedlines be- 
tween elements for a given 
frequency. This same sub- 
routine is offered as part of 
item eight, which is the 
printout selection. Item 
seven simply re-displays the 
original display showing your 
input values for the original 
calculation. Item eight, 
should you elect to include 
it needs several comments. 

Printout Routine 

Some of you may not 
elect to include this feature 
as its main purpose is to 
create a file of plotted 
antenna arrays in notebook 
or loose-leaf form. The sam- 
ple printouts included here- 
in (Figs. 1 and 2) show the 
results of the printout rou- 
tine itself. If you choose to 
incorporate this system, 
you'll be prompted, after 
the majority of the data is 
printed out for the distance 
calculations. The printout 
routine allows as many as 
you desire for as many fre- 
quencies as you want Just 
remember that for a given 
array design, the pattern will 
not vary because of fre- 
quency because the calcula- 
tions do not require frequen- 



Np, OF ELEMEMTS* 4 



GftIW= 
F/B' RAT 10= 



4.7lDb.. 
7.45D/B 



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15 0. 




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FOR 
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-100 
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90 




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3.37 
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3.B2 

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2.50 



fiHPL 

1 
1 

1 



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i^. 5 
U2.S 



DIStfiMCE IN FEGT BETWEEN ELE^fENTS ] t 2 AT 14.25 MHZ. IB 
DISTANCE IN FEET BETWEEN ELEMENTS 1 t 3 AT 14. ?& MH2. IS 
DISTANCE IN FEET BETWEEN ELEMENTS 1 ^ 4 AT 1:4.25 MHZ, IS 



16.42 FT, 
I?. 32 FT. 
20i.S3 FT. 



DISTAMDE IN FEET FOR Pl-hH.SE ftNGLE OF 90 
DISTANCE IH FEET FOR PHASE ANGLE DF 1 BO 
DISTRNCE TN FEET FOR PHASE FiNSLfe OF Ij*] 



IS 141.42 FT. 
IS 3:;. 04 FT, 
(£ 34. &3 FT. 



DISTANCE m FEET BETWEEN ELEMENTS 1 He 2 AT 
DISTANCE IN FEET BETWEEN ELEMENTS 1 *i 3 AT 
DISTANCE IH FEETT SeTW^EN ELEMENTB 1 .& 4 AT 



.21.32 MHZ. IS 
21.32 WHZ, IS 
21.32 MHI. IS 



10.«?e FT, 

fi.23 FT. 

13.72 FT. 



DISTAMCE IN FEET FDP PHASE AN5LE DF 
DISTANCE IW FEET FOR PHftSE f^NSt-E OF 
UlETAMCE lU Feet POP PHASE ANSLE OF 



90 IS 10. 9B FT. 
leo m :*^i,93 FT. 
135 IS lA.4di FT. 



Fig. 2. Printout of a four-element quarter-wave vertical array 
showing add pattern. 



cy as an input. The whole 
program assumes that you 
know how to calculate the 
length of a quarter-wave an- 
tenna. This distance calcula- 
tion is a final touch, and 
allows the calculation of 
oddball inter-element and 
feedline lengths. 

In order to use the print- 
out routine, some hardware 
consideration must be taken. 
This program, as listed here- 
in, is designed to work with a 
Star Gemini 10 (or lOX) dot- 
matrix printer. The screen- 
dump routine, which is not 
part of this program, is a 
commercial software prod- 
uct (probably sold by sever- 
al companies). You may 
have written your own for 
this or have a different 
brand of printer (i.e., Epson, 
Okidata, Radio Shack, etc.), 
Ef so, the DEFUSR and 
USRO calls in line 1390 will 
most certainly be different. 
Use your own. 

if you are using a Radio 
Shack LP-VII/DMP-100 print- 
er, you can use their 



SCRNPRT program, but in- 
sert the correct CHR$() 
figures for expanded print 
etc. (see the REM state- 
ments in the listing). In all 
cases, load and execute the 
screen-dump program prior 
to loading and running this 
one. All of this, of course, 
only if you plan to use the 
printer output 

Terminology Definitions 

Wavelength: !n this case, 
the distance in degrees [0 to 
360, as in a circle) from the 
beginning of a wave to the 
end. All measurements in 
this program are converted 
into feet and inches already. 
If you are planning a rather 
gigantic array with element 
separations greater that one 
wavelength, then simply add 
the degrees on [i,e,, 1 Va 
wavelengths = 540 degrees). 
The distance-calculation op- 
tion allows the calculation 
of the linear distance be^ 
tween elements, etc. 

Angle of elennent: In this 
case, the location of the ele- 
ment in question with refer- 



73 Magazine • October. 19S4 33 



Input Listing 



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110 PRINTICU. ^INP.REL^PMASI OF E 

120 II4PUT AiNViGOSUB 7e0tFt%tNT#i 
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130 pfiiMTicu, -rrtfin awste of ele 

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210 IF L£Ft»lA«»* 1I--V" TH^W ICl 

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220 l^09U9 7eOl6O3U»900 
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270 MO^GO£<Ct •*!IN>'i+«tVT»'SIN(C>* 
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390 LiNe(i2a,i5J-(i2e, weuPSET 

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J510 END 



ence to tiie center of the 
chart and the reference ele- 
ment, in degrees around the 
compass [i.e., 45 degrees 
would be northeast). 

Relative phase: Refers to 
the measurements, again as 

3* 7BMagazm& • October, 1964 



described above, except here 
it refers to the length of the 
feedline between the refer- 
ence element and the ele- 
ment in question (or the pri- 
or element if the elements 
are in series). 



REUative) AMPWtude) of 
element: Refers to the 
amount of power this ele- 
ment receives (in the trans- 
mit mode) with respect to 
the reference element. If the 
power to the element in 



question is the same as that 
of the reference element 
then the answer would be 1. 
If it is twice as much, the an- 
swer would be 2, and if half 
as much, .5 (here using an at- 
tenuator). In receiving-only 



THE N2NY HAM RADIO COURSE ON VIDEOTAPE 



1983 f4^'Hf Pfoojcltons; i*%. 




INT 






imM i^pi® ©mm 

©H ¥9Pi®mP 





Ham MasterTapes brings the best 
possible personalized Ham Radio 
icense preparation right into your own 
iving room. If you, a friend or family 
member wants the best help available to 
get past the FCC test hurdle, it's 
available now in Beta or VHS home 
*/ideo format. 

Larry Home. N2NY brings his 33 
;ears of Ham Radio teaching experience 
right to your home. Each of the 26 video 
essons has close-up details of com- 
ponents and systems along with superb 
graphic drawings. Each lesson has 
,mpoTtant points superimposed over the 
action and reviewed at the end of each 
section. This makes note-taking a snap! 
Miss something? Didn't get it the first 
!ime? Just back up the tape and run it 
again or freeze- frame it for detailed 
:ios€up studyl 

Larry's classroom is a real ham shack, 
Lee, a ISyear-old boy, and Virginia are 
ed through the learning process. The 
questions that they ask are the ones 
Larry knows you would ask i f you were 
rhere in person. You soon feel like youVe 
Dart of an ideal small class. 

The topics covered will not only get 
^^ou through the Novice test^ — General 
ziass theory is covered also. By the time 
^ou get your Novice license, you will be 
able to upgrade to General or 
Fechnician! 

Larry^s technique of involving the 
/iewer with the demonstrations makes 



the most difficult topics easy to un- 
derstand. Understanding — not mere 
memorization — is what makes Ham 
MasterTapes so effective. When you 
study the 700 possible FCC questions, 
the answers wili be obvious, 

Larry doesn't stop with just test- 
passing. All the proper techniques of 
operating practices and courtesy are 
demonstrated. The instruction manual 
for that new rig won't be a mystery! Larry 
becomes your own personal instructor 
to help you on that first set-up and 
contactf 

The Ham MasterTapes series is 
produced in one of New York City*s top 
commercial studios. Not only is the 
production crew made up of real 
professionals but many of them are also 
licensed amateurs. Everybody puts in 
obvious extra effort to make the 
production a classic. 

The 6-hour course is available on three 
2-hour Beta D or VHS-SP cartridges for 
$199 .95, for individual ,home or nonprofit 
Ham Club use. (High schools or colleges 
must order our Scholastic licensed 
version, $499.95 for Beta or VHS and 
$750for3/rU'matic.) 

To order, call or write Larry Home, 
N2NY at Ham MasterTapes, 136 East 
31st Street, New York NY 10016, Phone 
212-685-7844 or 673-0680. MasterCard 
and Visa accepted. New York state 
residents add appropriate sales tax. 



1^271 



Til. 



Ham MasterTapes 



THE N2lfY lUM RADIO COURSE ON VIDEOTAPE 



136 East 31st Street 

;;ew York. New York 10016 

(212)685-7844 •673-0680 



1^.1 M^si*- rrotJujC'"!^'! Ji '■ "L 



SOME OF THE 
TOPICS 
COVERED INCLUDE 



AMPLITtTOE HOOULATIOK 
DOUBLE SlDZBJMD 
SINGLE SIDEBAND 
rBEOUEKCY JSODULATION 
fUASE MDDOLATIQM 
StDEHANDS 
BANDWIDTH LlHlfS 

DEVIATION 

OVEHHOIXTtJkTlOif 

SCATTER 

FSEQUEMCT TRMiBLhTIOH 

ASTENtfkS MftB PZtHVlSt^S 

IfAGI AlTTESr^AS 

QUAD ANTEWIAS 

POLARIZATION 

FEEDPOINT IMPEDANCE 

HALF-WAVE D I POLE 

QUARTER-WAVE VERTICAL 

RAUIATION PATTEHNS 

DIRECTIVITY 

MAJOE LOBES 

CHARACTERISTIC IMPEDANCE 

STA.**T3rNG WAVES 

ArrrE^iT.'A-fEEDlNC JtlSMATCK 

STATION ID 

CALL SIGNS 

LOOGI7IG REQUIREMENTS 

PVUES. LIMITATION 

COMTSOL OF fiEQUlHEMEIiTS 

P-S-T REPORTING SYSTEM 

TELEGRAPHY SPEED 

;2ERO-0EAT1MG SIGNAL 

THAfJSHITTEIt TUNE-UP 

TELEGSAPHV ABBREVIATIOWS 

RADIO WAVE PROPAGATION 

SKY WAVE AND SKIP 

CHOU?^ WAVE 

HARMONIC INTERFERENCE 

SVm HEADINGS 

SIGNALS AND EMISSIONS 

BiACKWAVE 

KEt CLI efts -CHIRPS 

SUPERIMPOSED mm 
sptmioos Diissio^is 

CGffPOTEHS 
OSCAR 
ATV-SSTV 

OPERATING COURTESlf 
HLTLES ANP REGULATIONS 
OPEP^TING PROCEDtJRES 
RADIO WAVE PROPAGATION 
AJ^TEUR RADIO PRACTICE 
ELECTRICAL PRINCIPLES 
CIRCUIT COMPONjENTS 
PRACTICAL CIRCUITS 
SIGNALS AND EMISSIONS 
SAD 10 WAVE PROP AG AT I QN 
EMERGENCY COHKlfNI CATIONS 
TRANSMITTES POWER LIMITS 
STATION-ID REOLflRE^[E^^TS 
iH IHD^P AItTr PAimciPATION 
F&EtltJiENCY HANDS 

sEi^imoN OF nazcitiEiierEs 

R.C. MODELS 

PRQKiaiTEp PHACtlCES 

aADIOTELEPHONTf 

RADIO TEL£PfiINTI3«G 

REPEATERS 

VOX TRANSMITTER CONTROL 

BREAK- IN TELEGRAPHY 

AKTENNA LlRIEJjTATION 

INTERNATIONAL COMMUNICATION 

EMERGEWCY-PREP MILLS 

IONOSPHERIC LAYERS D-E-F 

MAXIMUH USEABLE FREQUENCY 

IONOSPHERIC DISTLIRBAKCES 

SUNSPOTS 

SCATTER, DUCTING 

LINF-OF -SIGHT 

t1?OPOSPHEHIC BEHDIND 

SAFETY PRECAUTIONS 

TRANSKITTtR PERFOHkANCE 

Tw<>'TONE TEST 

NEUTHALISI«i AMPLIFIEHS 

POWER HEASUREMETIT 

TEST EQUIPMENT 

OSCILLOSCOPES 

ML1.TIMETERS 

SIGNAL asr^ERATORS 

SIGNAL TRACERS 

AUDIO RECTIFICATION 

REFLECTOMETERS - SWR 

SPEECH PROCESSORS 

ANTENNA-TUNING UNITS 

S-METERS 

WATTMETERS 

IMPEDAJJCE 

RESISTANCE 

REACTANCE 

I34DDCTANCE 

capacita:^ce 

1MPEDA?;CE *tATCHtNG 

OHM^S LAW 

A?fPS AND VOLTS DIVIDERS 

POWER ^.^ALCULAttONS 

SERIES Ai;0 PARALLEL 

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conditions, the answer would 
always be 1. 

!nput spacing of ELE- 
(ment): Refers to the dis- 
tance between the reference 
element and the element in 
question. This is not neces- 
sarity the same as relative 



phase, above. 

That's it! Experiment with 
it. You1f get some surprises 
when it comes to various 
values you pump into the 
phase-angle and distance in- 
puts as well as the layout of 
the array. A typical two^te- 
ment an^ay with the ele- 



ments and phase angle set 
at 90 (and -90) degrees (a 
quarter-wave) will give a 
heart-shaped radiation pat- 
tern with a 3.0-dB gain and a 
32-dB F/B ratio. Try others, 
including situations where 
the distances are less than 
the phase^angle figure. 



Type carefully, especially 
from line 860 to line 950. ■ 

References 

Oennts Mitchell K8Ua ^^Anlenna 
Engineer," 73, May, 1960. 
Joe Hypnarowski WA6VNR, "Ef- 
fective Grounds." CO, August, 
1982 



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Hours— M-W-F: Noon-8 p.m.; T-Th-Sal: 10 a.m. -4 p.m. 






The word amateur is a little misleading. There's 
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It takes a unique blend of human skill and product 
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That's why so many amateurs gravitate toward 
Larsen amateur antennas. 

^ Larsen antennas are designed by engineers who 
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orsen Hntennos 

The Amateur's Professional 



^322* 



m USA LARSEN ELECTRONICS. INC. 

neii N-E aoiH AVE RO box 1799 

VANCOUVER, WA 98668 
206-573-2722 



IN CANADA CANADIAN LARSEN ELECTRONICS. LTD 
283 E 11THAVE-UNJT W 
VANCOUVER. B.C. V5T2C4 
604^72-8517 



Larsen* Kulrod^ ar^ KOkjucf^ie* are registered trademarks of Larsen EiecifOfiies. Ir^c Teflon* is a registered trademark of Et Duponl de Nemours. 



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Here's a shock: You've been wasting money on towers 

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may outperform high-altitude aluminum. 



St^ Cibitkco W1CV/4 
FO Box 5616S2 
Miami ft 33156 



ttJ 



LAYER 




^/ 




Fig. 1. During the hours of dayHght, the /onospher/c F layer 
sometimes splits mto two parts, as showri at (al These re- 
gions occur at altitudes of about 100 miles (the Fl -layer] and 
150 to 250 miles (the Fl-layer). During the hours of darkness 
and occasionally during the day, the F layer consists of a 
single ionized region at an altitude of 150 to 250 miles. 

38 73 Magazine * October* 1984 



We all have heard that 
the higher we put an 
antenna the better it wilt 
work. But this rs not always 
true! Especially if you are a 
contester, you can benefit 
from a knowledge of how 
antenna height affects 
propagation distance. 

You have just gone to a 
tremendous amount of 
trouble — not to mention 
expense — to put your tri* 
bander up another 40 feet 
The new 90-foot tower 
graces your neighborhood. 
You drive up the street with 
pride Lay persons gape at 
the structure with awe A 
space-age communicator 
genius, that's you! 

Finally, everything is 
hooked up and ready to go. 
You anxiously switch on the 
rig and tune to 14.225 MHz, 
getting 'ready for some DX. 
Sure enough, there's a CX3. 
You call him with the linear 
off, just for fun. A dozen 
others call him at the same 
time. You win. 

A I A station calls you 
and tells you that you are 
the strongest signtil he has 
heard so far that morning. 
Morning? It's 7:00 pm! Oh, 
yes jet lag. 



It works! 

Now for a little domestic 
chatter. You tune further up 
the band, Strange all of 
the stateside stations seem 
weak. Well, you guess, it 
must just be the conditions- 
Twenty meters can be a 
fickle band. You call CQ. 
No answer- Again. No 
answer. 

A moderately strong W5 
station is calling CQ, You 
answer He comes back to 
someone else. 

Several more failures 
transpire before you make 
a stateside contact. But he 
tells you that your signal is 
just S3. Imagine! What an 
insult! 

Several evenings pass 
and half a Saturday before 
you allow yourself to won- 
der what's happening. DX 
seems great, but you'll get 
creamed in the sweep- 
stakes. 

No Coincidence 

There's an old saying that 
something isn't a coinci- 
dence if it keeps on happen- 
ing. Your new skyscraper 
antenna system just doesn't 
seem to work that well un- 



so 



80 



TO 



^ £0 

u 
a 

M SO 

Z 
"•I 

^ 40 



or 



20 



IQ 



1 




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1 1 1 1 







VOOQ 2O0O 

SIMGLE-«IQf> DISTAMC^, WILES 



SOW 



Fig. 2. The single-hop distance is related to the angle of ra- 
diation from the antenna, and also to the altitude of the ion- 
ized layer. The solid line shows the relation tor the F2 region 
for the average altitude of 200 miles. The dotted line shows 
the relation for the Fl-layer, for the average altitude of 100 
miles. 



less the other station is at 
least a coople of thousand 
miles away. As the weeks 
pass, you begin to notice 
that this effect is even more 
pronounced on 15 meters 
than on 20. And on 10 me- 
ters, it is still more vivid al- 
though it could well be the 
large skip zone that is re- 
sponsible for the phenome- 
non on that band. 

What causes this? 

For horizontal antennas, 
the angle of radiation de- 
pends on the height of the 
antenna above the effec- 
tive ground The higher the 
antenna above effective 
ground, the lower the angle 
of radiation. Your antenna 
is high. Therefore, you can 
be pretty certain that the 
angle of radiation is low 
But is that good? For DX, 
yes, It is good. But for con- 
tacting stations closer in, it 
may not be so good. Your 
signal might be going "over 
their heads/' 

If you are primarily a do- 
mestic contester, you can 
benefit from a knowledge 
of the way in which antenna 
height affects the single* 
hop propagation distance. 
By placing your antenna at 
just the right height so the 
strongest part of your signal 
will land in a densely popu- 
lated area, you can gain an 



advantage over a competi- 
tor who ignores the physics 
of antenna height versus 
performance. 

Single-Hop Distance 

How far from your sta- 
tion will the strongest part 
of your signal come back to 
Earth? That depends on the 
altitude of the ionosphere 
at the time and also on the 
angle of radiation from 
your antenna, 

Most propagation in the 
high-frequency bands takes 
place via the F layer of the 
ionosphere. This layer often 
breaks into two levels dur- 
ing the daytime; signals are 
then returned by a region 
that is about 100 miles high. 
At nrght, the F layer ranges 
from approximately 150 to 
250 mites altitude, with the 
average being about 200 
miles. This is shown in Fig. 1 . 

Since the ionized layer is 
usually higher at night than 
during the day, signal range 
can be expected to increase 
during the hours of dark- 
ness. And this is generally 
what does happen. If your 
antenna radiates most of its 
energy right along the hori- 
zon — that is, if the eleva- 
tion angle is zero degrees — 
the signal will "land'' about 
1,600 miles away during the 
daytime and about 3,000 



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10203040506070 

AUMATKM UIGL£ OF LOifEST L,0^. DEGREES 



90 



Fig. 3. The lowest lobe of radiation in the yerticaf plane oc- 
curs at an angle that is a function of the height of the anten- 
na above effective ground. The lowest radiated lobe is of 
primary interest in most cases. 



miles away at night. That's 
the maximum possible 
single-hop distance. The 
limiting factor is the cur- 
vature of the Earth.^ 

Of course, multiple-hop 
propagation makes it possi- 
ble to talk with hams all 
over the world, In general, 
the lower your angle of ra- 
diation, the fewer hops are 
required for global propa- 
gation. That's why a low an- 
gle of radiation is favored 
for DX. The fewer hops your 
signal must take to get to 
the opposite side of the 
world, the lower the attenu- 
ation will be. 

But suppose you live in 
Washington, DC. and want 
to talk with someone in 
New York City. If your angle 
of radiation is ver\' low, 
most of your signal will 
overshoot its goal. You1l be 
heard very well in Green- 
land, perhaps, but not in the 
Big Apple. 

The distance at which 
your signal 'lands" after a 
single hop is a direct func- 
tion of the angle of radia- 
tion The lower the radia- 
tion angle with respect to 
the horizon, the greater the 
propagation distance. Fig. 2 
is a graph illustrating the 
function of one-hop dis- 
tance versus radiation an- 
gle, based on the average 
F1 -layer (daytime) height of 



100 miles and the average 
F2-layer [nighttime) height 
of 200 miles. 

What Affects the 
Angle of Radiation? 

So, you ask. how does 
one control the angle of ra- 
diation from an antenna at 
the high frequencies? The 
answer is that a horizontal- 
ly-polarized antenna, such 
as a dipole or yagi, exhibits 
an optimum angle of radia- 
tion that varies directly 
with the antenna height 
above the effective ground 
plane. (A vertical antenna, 
assuming it has a good 
ground system, always ra- 
diates best at relatively low 
angles.) 

The higher you put your 
antenna, the lower the 
angle of radiation will be, 
as a genera! rule. 

We should take note 
that at 160 meters, it's prac- 
tically impossible to con- 
trol the angle of radiation 
from a horizontal antenna. 
Unless you live in the wide- 
open country and still have 
to register your tower with 
the Federal Aviation Ad- 
ministration, you can stop 
worrying about the prob- 
lem on that band. A hori- 
zontal antenna for 160 
meters radiates most of its 
energy at very high angles, 
unless you put it at least 

73 Magazine • October, 1964 39 



250 to 300 feet above the 
ground. That's not easy! A 
vertical antenna radiates at 
somewhat lower angles — 
provided a good radial sys- 
tem is installed. At 160 me* 
ters the installation of an 
excellent radial system is 
no small task, either. 

At 80 meters, the prob- 
lem still will not concern 
most of us. An 80-meter di- 
pole must be at least 125 to 
150 feet up for the angle of 
radiation to drop much from 
the zenith. 

At 40 meters, the situa- 
tion becomes different. For 
short-range communica- 
tion, a height of 30 to 40 
feet is best; for intermedi- 
ate-range, 50 to 75 feet is 
optimum. That is not unrea- 
sonable for many hams (al- 
though for some it's an utter 
impossibility). For long-dis- 
tance work, the old DXer's 
rule applies: Put the anten- 
na up as high as you can, 

At 30 meters and above, 
modest antenna height can 
result in an angle of radia- 
tion that might be lower 
than you want it. 

How do we determine 
the maximum angle of ra- 
diation from a horizontal 
antenna, in terms of its 
height? 

First, we must realize 
that the effective ground 
plane for radio-frequency 
energy usually doesn't coin- 
cide with the actual Earth 
surface. For flat, level 
ground without man-made 
structures, the effective 
radio-frequency ground 
plane lies several feet 
below the surface. ^ Ob- 
structions such as trees, 
utility wires, house wiring 
and roofing, and steel- 
frame buildings can raise 
the effective ground plane. 
In an area congested with 
steel -frame buildings, the 
effective radio-frequency 
grpund plane may be well 
above the level of the 
Earth's surface. 

For the average residen- 
tial dweller, the effective 
ground plane is probably a 
little bit below the actual 
surface. In the city where 

40 73 Magazine • October, 1984 



aj 




REFLECTED 
WAVE 



EFFeCttVE ■SROUND 



if/ 




AHJEtiHtK 



Fig. 4, The direct wave and the ground-reflected wave com- 
bine, at a distant point in the sky, in varying phase, depend- 
ing on the takeoff angle. At (a) an example is shown of how 
these waves are emitted from a yagi antenna, At(b)a typical 
vertical-plane radiation pattern is illustrated for a yagi an- 
tenna at a height of a little less than 7 wavelength. (The low- 
er lobe is of primary interest in most cases.] 



there are many tall build- 
ings of widely varying stat- 
ure, it can be difficult to 
estimate the level of the ef- 
fective ground plane be- 
cause of the irregular distri- 
bution of obstructions and 
because the effect of such 
obstructions varies with the 
wavelength. If your QTH is 
in the downtown area of a 
sizable metropolis, yo^J''! 
probably have to resort to 
trial and error to find out 
how your antenna height af- 
fects the angle of radia- 
tion—if you have any con- 
trol over the situation at alL 

The effective height of 
an antenna is, in general, a 
little greater than its actual 
height in most suburban or 
rural locations. To obtain 
the effective height, add 
about 5 feet to the actual 
height. 

Once you have deter- 
mined the angle of radia- 
tion that you want, using 
Fig. 2, you can determine 
the optimum height for 
your antenna, in wave- 
lengths, from Fig. 3. Where 
do we get Fig. 3? The signal 



from your yagi antenna 
goes out in all directions. 
Although much of the ener- 
gy is propagated horizon- 
tally because of the direc- 
tional nature of the anten- 
na, some goes straight up 
and some goes straight 
down; some goes up and 
down at 30-degree angles 
with respect to the horizon. 
Overall, haff of the energy 
is emitted toward points 
above the horizon and half 
is sent out toward points be- 
low the horizon— that is, to- 
ward the ground. The ground 
signal is reflected at the ef- 
fective ground plane and is 
reversed in phase. It then 
heads back up into the sky, 
toward the ionosphere. 

The familiar rule of op- 
tics applies to radio waves 
just as it applies to rays of 
light: The angle of reflec- 
tion is equal to the angle of 
incidence. Ground reflec- 
tion occurs at all possible 
angles of incidence; energy 
sent straight down from 
your antenna gets sent 
straight up, energy sent 
down at a 30-degree angle 



gets reflected back up at a 
30-degree angle. Ground re- 
flections occur over a large 
area surrounding your an- 
tenna* 

At great distances and al- 
titudes, the direct wave and 
the ground-reflected wave 
combine in varying phase, 
depending on the angle 
above the horizon. Fig. 4(a) 
illustrates the geometry 
of the situation. Fig. 4(b) 
shows an example of the 
sort of radiation pattern 
that occurs. This phase pat- 
tern is quite complicated, 
but It can be determined by 
simple plane geometry. The 
lowest lobe — the one that 
occurs nearest the hori- 
zon—contains the most sig- 
nal energy of any lobe. The 
angle at which this lobe oc- 
curs, as a function of the 
height in wavelengths, is 
the lowest angle at which 
the direct and ground-re- 
flected waves add in phase. 
It is this angle, as a function 
of the antenna height in 
wavelengths, that is shown 
in the graph of Fig, 3, 

Optimum Angle Versus 
Height in Feet 

Most of us have antennas 
that stay at the same height 
all of the time. Variable- 
height towers exist (but 
those of us who have 
'"crankups'" generally think 
of such towers more as 
'^crankdowns'' —to keep 
the neighbors from suing 
for half the gross national 
product because of the eye- 
sore), and from the above 
discussion it should be evi- 
dent that they can be used 
to advantage in medium- 
range operation. 

Your antenna height in 
wavelengths can be deter- 
mined by a simple formula, 
assuming you know the fre- 
quency or wavelength and 
the height of your antenna 
in feet The following for- 
mula applies, letting h rep- 
resent the height in feet 
above the actual ground 
surface, f the frequency in 
megahertz, and y the effec- 
tive antenna height in wave- 
lengths; y - [h -F 5)f/984. 




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Prices subject to change without notice, subject to 
prbr sale Used gear sale price refunded if not 
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Texas residents add sales ta?£. 



ANTENNAS 

ARX2a V2S. 2MCV-5. ISOPOLE S39.95 

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HF2V....&0 and 40 vertical 125,00 

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AS160 (160-80-40-20) 137' 115.00 

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D0N3 CORNER 

Well. It seems like the contest season just ended yet here 
It Es again. Tt>ot mecins Ifs time to check out all tho equip- 
inent OTicf ftve antennas. Coax se^ms to be the biggest 
problern down here rhi$ year. So be sure that you check out 
the coax so you can get ttie Ja^i bit of gain irom the anten- 
na, BELDEN J^os o nevj affordable profess ionai cook ttiat 
Is very popular w^ith the guys in ttiis area; it is the 9913 low 
loss RQ-S type coax. It Is very low loss up to 1.2 Ghz. Loss 
betow 50 Mh?. is fess than .9 dt^lOO feet. At S.45/foot it Is a 
real bargain. It uses the normal connectors and as always, 
be sure to use COM\X-SEAI on all ttie expo$sed connecttons. 
TJI next months 73, 



For example, suppose your 
antenna is 50 feet above the 
ground surface. Then the 
height in wavelengths 
above effective ground, at 
14 MHz. is (50 + 5) X 
14/984, or 078 wavelengths. 
At this height the optimum 
angle of radiation from 
your antenna can be deter- 
mined, from Fig. 3, as ap- 
proximately 20 degrees. 

Now, using Fig. 2 you can 
find the one-hop distance 
for F1 -layer or F2~layer 
propagation. During the 
day you should expect a 
distance of pretty close to 
500 miles via the F1 -layer, 
assuming this layer is ionized 
at that time. (If not— and 
the F1 -layer is not always 
ionized during the daylight 
hours "the propagation 
will occur via the F2-layer.) 
At night or if the F1 -layer is 
not ionized, you can expect 
the propagation distance to 
be about 1400 miles. 

Let's try this in reverse. 
Suppose you want to keep a 
schedule with a friend 
whom, after yoy have 
checked on a map with a 



ruler against the mileage 
scale, you have determined 
is 1640 miles away, You de- 
cide to try 14 MHz, since 
that band has been pretty 
good lately. How high 
should your antenna be, as- 
suming you want to have 
the sked at 9;00 pm? 

Look at Fig. 2, at the 
F2-layer (nighttime) line, 
and you can see that the op- 
timum angle of radiation is 
about 15 degrees. How high 
should your antenna be? 
Checking Fig. 3, you can see 
that the height should be 
just about 1 wavelength 
above effective ground. 

Now, we must convert this 
value to feet. The ''inside- 
out" version of the above for- 
mula can be used for this 
purpose: h = 984y/f — 5. 
At 14 MHz, with y = 1, we 
have h = 984 X 1/14 - 5, 
or h = 65 feet This isn't ter- 
ribly high. If your tower is 
90 feet high, you may well 
overshoot your target. 

Conclusion 

Neither the ground nor 
the ionosphere is perfectly 



predictable. Certainly there 
will be exceptions, in prac- 
tice, to the guidelines given 
here. The most notable ex- 
ception is that the F1 -layer 
may fail to ionize during 
the daytime and you can- 
not tell until you find out by 
trial and error The ionized 
layers vary somewhat in 
height, sis well, and thus the 
above formulas are not ex- 
act. The effective ground 
plane in your location may 
not be exactly 5 feet below 
the actual surface. 

We are deaf in g with vari- 
ables. But it is certainly bet- 
ter to have some idea of 
how high you should put 
your antenna, instead of no 
idea whatever, or a grossly 
erroneous notion. The 
above information should 
give you a very good idea! 

Probably the best ap- 
proach for optimizing an- 
tenna height is the crankup 
tower or, better still, a mast 
or tower with an electric 
motor so you can raise or 
lower your antenna by re- 
mote control from th^ stai- 
tion. This would allow you 



to actually listen to the sig- 
nals from a certain area, 
and thereby optimize your 
antenna height empirically 
(after getting the general 
idea by using the graphs 
and formulas given here). 

Antenna height is, at the 
high frequencies, only 
slightly less important than 
the direction in which it is 
pointed. We would not 
think of pointing a yagi 
west if we wanted to work a 
station to the south of us. 
Similarly, an antenna that is 
far too high (or, less fre- 
quently, not high enough) 
can detract from the signal 
strength. The contest opera- 
tor, especially, should at- 
tempt to optimize the an- 
tenna height as well as its 
direction. A slight edge can, 
as we know, make a big dif- 
ference. Number 2 differs 
from 1 by 100 percent! ■ 

References 

1. The ARRL Antenna Book, 13th 
Edition, 4th Printing/The Ameri- 
can Radio Relay League, Inc., 
Newington CT, 1977, page 17. 

2. Ibid., page 46. 



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All Mode Optration with Rjc Preamp 



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10 Watts In— 60 Watts Ou^ 

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2 Watts In— 1 10 Watt6 Out 

high Power H/T Amplifier 

All Mode Operation with Rk PreoTiip 

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10 Watts In— 120 Watts Out 

2 Watu In— ^0 Watts Out 

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1 Watt* In— 40 Wfltts Out 

All Mode Operation wuh R>f Freamp 

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01010^430-450 MHj Dual 

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42 73 Magazine • October, 1984 




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The simple, uncomplicated design and ease of 
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MICROLOG 



^51 



iNNOVATORS /N DiGtTAL COMMUNICATION 

Nolf: VlC-20 is a triidcmnrk of Coflfiinqdcire Eiectrtmics* Ltd. 
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John M. fr&nke WA4WDi 
1310 Boiling Avenue 
Norfolk VA 2,m}8 



A No-Holes Barred Beam 

What to do when the lease says ''no antennas'': 
Turn your entire house into a broadside dipole. 



Problems common to am- 
ateur-radio operators 
who rent homes or apart- 
ments or live in condomini- 
ums or town houses are re- 
strictions on antennas, I 
rent the house that I pres- 
ently live in and miss the 
freedom to put up towers or 
antennas indiscriminately. 
Howiey>&r, I have not given 
up. Examples of my past so- 
lutions to this antenna 
problem (for the microwave 
spectrum) have been re- 
ported in this journal.! 

A more recent antenna 
project was to improve re- 
ception of a distant channel 
2 television station. The sta- 



tion, in North Carolina, is 
the only station within 150 
miles that carries "Monty 
Python's Flying Circus'' — a 
program to which my wife 
and I are thoroughly addict- 
ed. Our landlord, who has a 
strong distaste for Monty 
Python humor, will not per- 
mit a three-element beam 
for channel 2 to be mount- 
ed on the chimney. What 
does this have to do with 
amateur radio? Channel 2 is 
close in frequency to six 
meters, and the antenna 
presented here can easily 
be scaled for six-meter, 
IOmeter, and I.S-meter op- 
eration or scaled up in fre- 



quency for 2-meter or IVa- tion is used, omit the 0.82 
meter operation. factor. 




The window-mounted VHF antenna. 
44 73 Magazine • October, 1984 



An essential element of 
the design of this antenna is 
the design of the house. My 
house meets the two design 
requirements. First, one 
side faces the television sta- 
tion that I wanted to re- 
ceive. Second, the house 
has aluminum siding. Up to 
this time, I had considered 
the aluminum siding to be a 
drawback. What amateur- 
radio operator wants to live 
in a shielded box? But now I 
had a use for the siding; it 
forms a reflector screen for 
a single-element broadside 
antenna — se^ Fig. 1. 

The driven element is a 
half-wave folded dipole; 
[Even though the antenna is 
used only for reception, the 
active element is called the 
driven element.] The folded 
dipole is made from 300- 
Ohm twin lead. The length of 
the folded dipole is found 
by: L (ft.) = 492/f(MHz) 
X .95 X ,82. The factor 492 
accounts for the speed of 
light in English units, fring- 
ing effects are represented 
by the factor 0.95, and 0.82 
is the velocity factor of 
common television twin- 
lead. If open-wire cons try c- 



The driven element is fed 
with twinlead although the 
feed impedance is probably 
closer to 200 Ohms. A 4-to-1 
coaxial balun would prob- 
ably result in a good imped- 
ance match to 50Ohm cable. 
The driven element is spaced 
0.2 wavelengths in front of 
the siding; S (ft.) = 984/ 
f(MH2) X 02. 

Simple enough? Yes, but 
the hard part is how to con- 
struct and mount the anten- 
na without drilling holes, 
and still be able to rapidfy 
erect or remove it. The solu- 
tion I found is shown in 
Fig. 2. 

A frame is constructed 
using PVC plumbing tubing. 
This modern synthetic ma- 
terial is cut easily with a 
hacksaw and spliced with a 
fast-curing cement. Re- 
member when glue and 
paint would dry? Now it 
cures, hardens, fuses, or 
passes through some chem- 
ical metamorphosis! Any- 
way, T fittings, elbows, 
45-degree bends, and end 
caps are readily available 
at most hardware stores. 

The frame hooks onto 




-The 



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ON USED 



the windowsfll and is 
spaced away from the 
house by two legs. The legs 
have end caps to prevent 
them from marking the sid- 
ing. The folded dipole is in- 
side the long horizontal 
piece. The feedline is inside 
the center leg. The antenna 
shown was constructed 
from y?-inch (inside diame* 
ter) white tubing. The white 
tubing is almost invisible 
against the white siding. For 
ten-meter or longer wave* 
length bands, I would rec- 
ommend one-inch or larger 
tubing, For six-meter and 
higher frequencies, 1 would 
stay with the cheaper V2- 
inch tubing. 

The central leg was fabri* 
cated first. After the ii-i'ti 
line was threaded down tliu 
tubing, the driven element 
was soldered to the feed- 
line. The driven element 
was laced to a long, thin 
wooden stick to prevent it 
from twisting. Then short 
sections were added to 
each side, the spacer legs 




SCftEEM 



. CftlVf^ ElCUEIiT 



^^'*',7sir**^^ 



40? 



Fig. 1. S/ng/eHe/ement broad- 
side antenna. 

added, and finally the end 
sections cemented on, com- 
plete with end caps. The 
completed antenna quickly 
hooks in place. When not 
being used, it is lowered 
with a cord down behind 
the bushes. 

The antenna has been a 
complete success and is 
still in use. The total cost in- 
cluding cement, tubing, 
and twinlead was less than 
fifteen dollars. The design 
can readily be scaled to am- 
ateur frequencies. One 
could be mounted on each 




Fig. 2. PVC window mounting 



of four walls to achieve om- 
nidirectional coverage. The 
beam pattern can be wid- 
ened by increasing the di- 
pote-to-wall spacing to three- 
eighths wavelength. The 
center and spacer legs 
could be left uncemented 
and assembled with a lock 
pin or screw to allow the an* 
tenna to be collapsed 
enough to pass through the 
window and eliminate low- 



ering it down after use. [Be- 
cause of the way siding is 
mounted, this method is us- 
able only for horizontally- 
polarized antennas.) Build 
one and let me know how 
you like it ■ 

Reference 

1. ''Try the GHz Getter," 73. Oc- 
tober. 1982. pp. 50-52, and 'The 
Amazing Cylindrabola," 73, Sep- 
tember, 1383, pp. 54-55, 



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$99. 95 

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Display* Message Ports * Type- 
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compatibility, 

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of Hamsoft plus Text 

Specifications 



Editing* Receive Message 
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sizes * Diddle * Word 
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Transmission. 

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CO nibi nation. 

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RTTY, ASCII, AMTOR * Decode 
inverted, bit inverted, and 
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display * "SCOPE" feature for 
baud rate measure. 



Input Filter — Pour pole Switched Capacitance Filter 
with l7UHz Shift RTTY bandwidth of 260Hz nominal. 
Copies any shift* 

Audio Input — Minimum level SmvRMS. input 
impedance is 600 ohm.s unbalanced. Accepts baudot or 
ASCII code up to 300 baud, Miix input level is 12VRMS. 

AFSK Output — Crystal controlled, IV!ark-2125Hz; Space- 
2295H2 (170 shift). Level lOOmvpp (35nivRMS) standard. 
Optional 500mvpp (175mvRMS). Output impedance 600 
ohm unbalanced. 

FSK Output — Open Collector *40 VDC Max. Polarity can 
be reversed. 

Scape Output — lOK ohm output impedance. 



PTT Output — Open Collector *40 VDC Max, 

Computer Connection — TTL Compatible. Inputs also 
R8232 level compatible. 

Power Requirements — 11 to 15 VDC (12VDC nominal) 
75ma 

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Case 

Dimensions — l.9"H x 5.&"W x T'D 

Weight — VVa lbs. 



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1202 E. 23rd street 
Lawrence, Kansas 66044 



Another Eggbeater 

Don't be a VHF weakling. Punnp up your performance 

with this simple 2m omni 



John Stddley WD5DNL 
Rl X Box ^56 
McMesier OK 74501 



Many two-meter anten- 
na construction arti- 
cles have appeared in the 
past, probably more than 
necessary. Even so, here is 
my adaptation of an anten- 
na from the April, 1971, issue 
of QST. The antenna was 
called an eggbeater. It is two 
full-wave loops mounted at 



6Tf. 

OVERALL 
LENGTH 




20 in, 



right angles and fed 90 de- 
grees out of phase to pro- 
duce an omnidirectionai, 
horizontally-polarized an- 
tenna. The round loops were 
changed to the more famil- 
iar square configuration. 
The feed line is attached to 
the side to produce vertical 
polarization. The phasing 
and feedlines are twinlead 
(300 Ohms). The balanced 
line is brought into the 
shack where a tuner is used 
to match to 50 Ohms. 

Construction 

The antenna uses a six- 
foot piece of wood (V x 1 ''] 
as its center support. Two 
twenty-inch cross pieces are 



METHOD OF MOUNTING CROSS 

BOOMS. USE WASHERS ON BOTH 
SlOrS OF BOLTS TO PREVENT 
DAMAGE TO WOODEN W^ST AND 
BOOMS. 



used (I used scrap pieces of 
molding, buti" X 1'^ wood 
will work just as well). 

In preparing the center 
support for mounting the 
elements, it will be neces- 
sary to drill two holes at the 
top at right angles to each 
other. See Fig, 1. The exact 
size will depend on the type 
of wire used for the ele- 
ments; just make the holes 
large enough for a snug fit 
Measure twenty inches 
down from each of the top 
holes and drill two more 
holes for the bottom of the 
wire elements. See Fig. 1. 
Mount the twenty-inch cross 
pieces ten inches from the 
top holes. Use two small 



fig. 1. Center-support drilting 
guide. 

48 73 Magazine • October, 1984 




F/g 2. Cross-boom mounting method. 



screws to fasten each boom 
to the center support. See 
Fig. 2. 

Feedpoint insulators are 
PlexiglasTM^ three inches 
long and one and a half inches 
wide. These ar^ attached to 
the cross booms with small 
screws. Holes are drilled one 
inch from each end of the 
Plexiglas insulators, and the 
feedline and wire elements 
are attached here. See Fig. 3. 
You can use solder lugs and 
screws to hold these wires to 
the insulator (or washers and 
screws). The first method 
with soldered connections is 
recommended. 

Insert the wire for the ele^ 
ments in the holes and bend 
them into a square shape 
twenty inches on a side. See 
Fig. 4. Use #12 copper, either 
bare or insulated. You can 
use a larger size of alumi- 
num wire, but this will make 
it necessary to experiment 
with the length to achieve 
resonance. The wire used in 
this model is #12 copper 
that is 81 inches long and 
was salvaged from a piece 
of electrical service wire. 

The feedpoints for the an- 
tenna are attached to the in- 
sulators and the opposite 
sides of the loop are held to 
the cross booms with fishing 
line. See Fig. 4. Two small 
holes are drilled and the 
fishing line is wrapped 
around the element and the 




3 in 



I 



.-^M, yj 



IrE in-- 



ATTACH AhUENNft WIRE. BALANCED FEED 
AND PHAStNQ LIME HERE. SOLDER TO UU<3S 
FOR fl 500D ELeCTRlCAL COHN£CTION-, 



F/g. 3. A P/ex/g/as™ insulator 



boom about ten times at 
each hole. A dab of epoxy 
glue covers the wire and 
fishing line. 

Attach the phasing line 
between the two feedpoints. 
1 use hviniead sixteen inches 
long. The main feedline is 
also 300-Ohm twinlead and 
is connected to either ele- 
ment The feedline is then 
taped to the wooden center 



support. See Fig. 4. Electri- 
cal tape is used to secure the 
phasing line also. Standoff 
insulators are used on the 
metal parts of the mast 

Conclusion 

Use a good grade of twin- 
lead and plenty of standoffs 
to preserve the balance of 
the line. Weatherproof the 
wood used (several coats of 



THIS EftD OF THE ELEMEMTS 

SECURED W^TH fJSHIMG UI^E 
WRAPPED SEVERAL TIMES 
THROUt^M BOOM AND AROUND 
ei_|ME NTS. THEN COVERED 
rtJTH EPOXY GUUE- 



ATTftCM TO METAL MAST 
Oft TOWER WITH U-eOLTS 




PHASIMC LINE 16 INCHES 
LONG MAOE OF TWIN 
LEAD AND SECURED 
WITH ELECTRICAL TAPE 



TWINLEAD TO SHACK 



Fig. 4. The finished product 



Parts List 

2 #12 copper wire— 81 inciies long 

1 V X 1" wood— six feet Jong 

2 1" X 1" wood— 20 inches Jong 

2 PlexigJas™ for insulators— 1,5" x 3"— use the thickest 
type you can find. 

Screws, nuts, and washers to mount the insulators and 
booms 

Solder tugs and standoff insulators (if balanced line is used) 
U'boJts to mount center support to mast 




The vertical eggbeater for two meters. 



paint or spar varnish will do). 
Let me point out that it isn't 
necessary to use wood. One 
model of this antenna used 
PVC for the center support 
and cross booms. \ use ten 
Watts of power and have en- 
countered no problems. 
With higher power you may 
need to use the transmitting 
type of twinlead or open- 
wire line. 

While the antenna won't 
outperform even a small 



yagi, it doesn't require a 
rotor to aim the antenna; it 
has been a great improve- 
ment over the various 
ground planes and vertical 
dipoles Tve used in the past 
I haven't tried stacking 
the vertical eggbeater, but it 
should give some gain and a 
lower angle of radiation. 
Yotj've got to admit the 
price is right, so build one or 
even stack two or more, and 
enjoy. ■ 




RTTY TODAY 






MODERN GUIDE TO AMATEUR RADIOTELETYPE 




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Autliored by Dave Ingram, K4TWJ, a 

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"RTTY TODAY'^— Table of Contents 

Chap. 1 The EJccttmg World of Amateur 
RTTY 

Chap. 2 Operating Parameters and 
Concepts of RTTY 

Chap. 3 Straight Talk on Home Com- 
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Ctiap- 4 RTTY Systems for Home Com- 
puters 

Chap, 5 RTTY Converters You Can 
Build 

Chap- 6 Dedicated RTTY Terminals and 
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Chap, 7 N ew IVI i n i-RTTY S y stems 

Chap. B Fascinating RTTY Outside the 
Amateur Bands Press— Military 
—Weather, Etc, 

Chap. 9 Frequency List of Commercial 
Press Services 

Chap. 10 Secrecy and Other Codes 
Used in Radioteletype 

Chap. 11 Tables of Abbreviations Used 
in RTTY 



(^ See List of Advertisers on p^ge 98 



73 Magazine * October, 1984 49 



mm 




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G' banri "trfip" verticals o1 comparijbkj si /e-? TIkjussik^s 
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g^m vorntal fqr 2 meters having the s^rrks gatn as 
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phsSimgigj^Hiitioh alkivvs the redtatOr tOfem-ain unhiolten 
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gRmnrriEi matph foV icorhplete D'.d grcjuricJing and 
tovuest pos&ible SWR Haight; 9 -B ft,''2 98 imetei'& 



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S ¥* ^■^■■Truriibfjru*'" phasing fi^Hition tcr aclditianal 
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P,0, BOX 211 45 WACO. TEXAS 76702 • 81 rifi46-443& 



CALL LONG DISTANCE ON YOUR HANDHELD 



The Model 335A will deliver 35 watts of 
power using the latest state-of-the-art cir- 
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Maximum input drive level 
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Our products are backed by prompt fac- 
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Model 335A 

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Repairs many shorted cells 

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Control Products Unlimited, Inc. has responded to our proJessionaJ market by introducmg the Model 
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50 73 Magazine * October, 1984 



Give your ham friends tlie World! 



^^^'h 




GIFT V/RftPPING 




(. .there is an easier way J 




A subscription to 73 is a special holiday gift, a gift that lets readers communicate 
with the world. 

You can give a gift subscription to introduce a friend to 73. Or you can renew 
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For hams everywhere, 73 has the most complete amateur radio information 
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evaluates them. To keep hains up-to-date with che latest technology. '73 International — Arnateur radio is worldwidel 73*5 
international correspondents keep hams -everywhere informed of amateur radio happenings around the world • Ham Help — Fellow hams 
are the best source of help* Every months 73 publishes readers' requests for technical advice j compucer programs^ help in locating equipment 
and parts, and more. ' ■* 

And 73 always has the latest on DXing» contests, satellites, and computers in the hamshack. 

You can give a gift subscription to 73 for just $19,97* That's 20% off the basic subscription price. (Foreign 

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Give 73 and spread the exatement and enthusiasm of amateur radio all over the world. 




Yes! I want to give ttie world with 73. 

Send a 12 issue subscription to 73 for $19.97. □ Paynient Enclosed DMC DVISA DAE 

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/^.'Amateur Radio's Technical Joumal • PO Box 931 • Farmingdale, h4Y 11737 






Free MFJ RTTY/ ASCII /CW software for VIC-20 or C-64 with purchase of 
MFJ-1224, MFJ-1225 or MFJ-1228 from MFJ. Send/receive Baudot, 
ASCII, CW. Type ahead buffer. 24 hour clock. Supports VIC printer. Menu 
Driven. MFJ-1224/1225 cable. On tape. Available separately for $29.95. 



£J;**i?;«?sS;.'rf 




■ ■A ■•;'^^ ^'KiC ji-".'--'--:^'^. 



irrTY/Asai/ 
Imtqr/cw 
interface 



FOR 

'•20/ C-64 MFJ-122& 




^MfeCUDES MFJ-1228, SOFTWARE OR TAPE AOO 
VlC-r2tt mom AND RIG TO ENJOY COMPUTER^ 

IZEO RTTY/ASCH/CW. OROEI! MFJ-122a/MFJ- 
1264 FOR VJC^ai: MFJ-122B/MFJ-1265 FOR G-64.: 



Most versatllt RTTY/. ASC»/AMTOR/C W Jntar 
ctrtfidge Mliable for V iC 20 and Commodore 
$4, Gim you more features, more perfofrtiance, 
more valua top your mgosy than any 0^ 
• cartridge available. ' " ' ;' 

Safne tnttrftw wrtrldgft works for both ViC-20 and 

Commodore 64. Plogs into user's port : ■ 

-■ Ctioo«« from wide varlt^ of RTTY/ASeil/CW, 

even AMTGR SQttware. ^iot married to one onboard 

software package Use MF^. kantronia. AEA plus 

•;oWier software caftfidg&/^pe.ordisJc 

860 Ki and TTO Hi shifts on receive i|td transmit. 
; Hti tfiark and tp8M outputi tor s^pe tuning: 

Nfirmatjfflfverte twitch eliminates retuniiig. 

TniQ duil thannel mark and ipace acUvi IHtin and 
automatic thresnofd correction gives good copy when 
dne tone 1s obliterated by QRM or select)^ fading. 

Eaty, poilj^vt tuning with twin LED Indicators. 
;y:Nam»«^ Hi active CW filter. Automatic P^T^ 
- Exar 2206 sfrte generator for AFSK output, 
:: -SiHeidefl XtVR AFSK/PTT Interfwt caUa provide 
:ed: Piut or minus CW keyed output. FSK out. 

Pewaraif liy ootnpittaf (few ma.}, no pomr adapter 
to buy or extra wfre to dangEe or pick up/radiate RFL 

0{8step«xy PCS. Aluminum enclosure. 4y2x4ysiXl". 

UNIVERSAL SWL RECEIVE 
ONLY COMPUTER INTERFACE 
FOR RTTY/ ASCII /AMTOR/CW 

MFJ-12a5 

$C0 95 



69 







h^. * P 



* « * 



^WfMVWri^iWf..^ 



TAPE AND CABU FDR VIC-H) OR C M.OROER WlFJ'lS2S/ 
MFJ-1264 FOR ViC-a OR fiftFJ-1225/MFJ-lZS5 FOR C-B4 



Use your personal computer and communicatJons 
receiver to receive commercial, military and amateur 
RTTY/ASCII/AMTOR/CW traffic. 

Plugi Mwvtn ra^lvar and VIC''20, Apple, TRS- 
80C, Atari, TI-&9, Commodore 64 and most other 
personal computers. Requires appropriate software. 

Use MFJ, Kantronics, AEA and other RTTY/ 
ASCI I /AMTOR/CW software. 

Capiat ii^hlfti and iti ipatdtJwIn LED Indicators 
makes tuning easy, positive. Normal/Reverse switch 
eliminates tuning tor Inverted RTTY. Speal^er out 
lack. Includes cable to interface MFJ-1224 to VIC-20 



UNIVERSAL RTTY/ASCII/AMTOR/ 
CW COMPUTER INTERFACE 

Lets Y^u send and receive computerized RTTY/ASCII/AMTOR/CW. Copies 
alt shifts and all speeds. Copies on both mark and space. Sharp 8 poke active 
filter for 170 Hz shift and CW. Plugs between your rig and VIC-20, Apple, 
TRS-80C, Atari, TI-99, Commodore 64 or other personal computers. Uses 
MFJ, Kantronics, AEA software and other RTTY/CW software. 



MFI BTTV^^W 



# 



*. .ny. , m. •« -- *»»« » rOMPUTER BtTEmFACE 




S^ 



ytKh-^W^ 



WMII LOOti. CMtTA XKHt 

• mm 




■^tf 



»;-^ ^ ^- , S- 



JiL«iip ML. 



m 



M:S^Btl «*|'-*«is« 




COMPLETE PACKAiSe INCLUDES MFJ.lS24,$0FrWWflE OS tape; 
CABLES. YOU NEED QHLV VIC-2&0B G-64 AND RIG TO £|UaY COM- 
PUTERIZEtJ RTTV/AScnyCW. 0ftfiifrttFJ-l224/MFJ'iaS4 FfllS IME^. 

WMtzumMzm FOR C4L . .. ^:^"v:•;7;v^^;^^; :;vi:i-:tv:2:;:^:^ 



New MFJ-12Z4 RTTY/ASCII/AMTOR/CW Com- 
puter InterftCB lets you use your personal computer 
as a computerised full featured RTTY/ASCII/ 
AMTOR/CW station for sending and receiving. Plugs 
between rig and VIC-20, Apple. TRS-80C, Atari, 
Th99, Commodore 64 and most others. 

Use fi/IFJ software tor VIC-20. Commodore 64 and 
Kantronics tor Apple, TRS-80C, Alan, TI-99 and 
most other software for RTTY/ASCII/AMTOR/CW. 

€iiy, potltlvi tuning with twin LED Indicators. 

Copy iny »hltt (170^425^S50 Hz and all ather shifts) 
and any speed (5-100 WPM RHY/CWand up to 300 
baud ASCII). 

CoplBt on both mirfc ind tp»a, not mark only or 
space only, to Improve copy under adverse conditions. 

Sharp S pole 17D Hz thIft/CW acttve filter gives 
good copy under crowded, fading and weak signal 
conditions. Automatic noise llmlter suppress static 
crashes for t)etter copy. 

Normtt/RflVBni iwlfch eliminates retunlng. -i-^ 
VDC loop output drives RTTY machine. Speaker jack. 



MFJ-1224 

Autemttlc tracking copies drifting signal. 

Exir 22S$ line ganentor gives phase continuous 
AFSK tones, Standard 2125 Hi mark and 2295/2975 
Hz space. Microphone line: AFSK out, AFSK ground, 
PTToutand PTT ground. 

FSK keying output Plus and minus CW keying. 
CW transmit LED. External CW key jack, 

Kantronlct compatible lOcket 

Extluilve general purpoia lockit allows interfac- 
ing to nearly any personal computer with most appro- 
priate software. Available TTL lines: RTTY demod 
out, CW demod out. CW-l D Input, +5 VDC. ground. 
All signal lines are buffered and can be Inverted 
using an Internal DIP switch. 

Use Galfo software with Apple, RAK with VIC-20, 
Kantronics with TRS-80C, TI-99, N4EU with TRS-80 
III, IV. Some computers with some software may re- 
quire some external components. 

Metal calimeL Brushed alum, front 8x1Vjx6 in, 
12-15 VDC or 110VAC with adapter, MFJ-1312,$9.95. 

MFJ-1223. S29.8i, R]^23l tdtpttr for MFJ-IW. 



SUPER RTTY FILTER 



CW INTERFACE CARTRIDGE 

FOR VIC-20/ C-G4 



MFJ-725 

$ on 95 



39 






ffff 





1ft*** 



Super RTTY 

fIFter greatly 
improves copy under 

crowded, fading and weak signal conditions. Improves 
any RTTY receiving system, a pole bandpass active 
filter for 170 Hz shift (2125/2295 Hz mark/space), 200 
or 400 Hz bandwidths. Automatic noise llmlter. Audio 
in, speaker out jacks. On/off/t>ypass switch. "ON" 
LEO, 12 VDC or 110 VAC with optional AC adapter, 
MFJ-1312, $9,95. 3x4x1 inch aluminum cabinet. 



or Commodore 64. 4^2x1 VixAV* Inches. 12-15 VDC or 
110 VAC with optional adapter, MFJ-1312, $9,95. 



HlghparfofmanceCW 
Intirfaci cartridge. Gives 
^Q 95 ^^^li^ excellent performance 

v9 MFJ-1226 under weak, crowded, noisy 
conditions. Works for both VIC-20 and Commodore 
64. Plugs Into user's port. 

4 polft lOD Hz bandwidtti actlvt flUtr. 600 Hz 
center frequency. 3 pole active lowpass post detection 
filter. Exclusive automatic tracking comparator. 

Plut and rntnu* CW keying. Audio In, speaker out 
jacks. Powered by computer. 

Includes Basic listing of CW transmit/receive pro- 
gram. Avattabte on cassette tape, MFJ-1252(VtC~20) 
or MFJ-1253(C'64),$4.95and on software cartridge. 
fvlFJ-1 254 (VIC-20) or MFJ-1 255 (C-64), $19.95. 
You can also use Kantronics, AEA ather software. 
Also copy RTTY with single tone detection. 



ORDER A«Y PRODUCT FROM MFJ AND TRY tT-HO 
QBUQATION. IF NOT DELIGHTED, RETORK WITH- 
IN30DAYS FOR PROMPT REFUND (LESS SHIPPING) 

• One year uncandltloital guarantee • Made In USA. 

• Add $4,00 each shipping/handling * CillDrwrtta 
for frti catling , mf 100 pitiductt. 




MFJ ENTERPRISES, INC. .-9 
6ax 494, Mississippi State. MS 39762 



TO ORDER Oft FDR YOUR NEAREST 
DEALER, CALL TOLL-FREE 

aO0-647'iaO0. ca i eoi 323 sees 

in Miss, and outside cont nental USA 
Tefex 53-4590 MFJ STKV 


^ff 




\^ 











52 73 Magazine • October, 1984 




MTI VEBSA TVmJt B 



tmtwmmA 



''SmS?' Sg?8S 






300 WATT ANTENNA TUNER HAS SWR/WATTMETER, ANTENNA SWITCH, BALUN. 
MATCHES VIRTUALLY EVERYTHING FROM 1.8 TO 30 MHz. 

MFJ't fsitest sailing tuntr jitckt in pltnty of new t&alur»tl 

• Mew Styling! B-^usned aluminum front. Ail metal cabinet 

• Mew SWR/Wattmetif! More acctirate Switcli selectatHe 
300/30 watt ranges Read forward/reftected p<]wer 

• Mew Antenna Switch! From panel mounts. Select 2 eoax 
Hnes, direct or llirough tyncf , random wire/balanced line or 
tuner bypass for dymmy load. 

y * Mew airwetintf (nductorf Larger more efticiefit 12 position air- 
w wOLfnd inductor gives lower losses and more watts out, Run up 
to 3CX) watts RF power output Matches everything from 1 B to 
30 MHz: dipoles, inverted vea. random wires, verticals, mobile 
whfps. beams, balanced and coax lines. Burlt-in 4:1 balun for 
balanced lines. 1000V capacitor spacing. Bfack. 11)c3x? inches. 
Works with aH solid state or lube rigs, Easy to use, anywhere 



mr 






MOOiL Mf J.t4f0 



«^«#!I.9U 



MFJ-941D 



NEW 

FEA TURES 



I 



RTTY/ASCII/CW COMPUTER 
INTERFACE mfj.i224 $99.95 






•.•5iy;.ffff. ^-J 



-.^ I 




Send ind rscslve compytflrfzid ^TTY/ASCJl/ 
CM witfi noarly tny personal contputflr (VIC'20. 
Apple, TRS-fiOC, Alan. 71-99. Commodore 64, 
etc ). Use Kantronics or most otfwr RTTY/CW 
software Copies both mark and space, any shift 
(including 170. 425. 850 Hz) and any speed (5-1Q0 
WPM flTTY/CW. 300 baud ASCII). Sharp 3 pole 
active filter for CW and 170 Hi shm. Sends 170, 
350 Hz shift. Normal/Reverse switch eliminates 
retuning. Automatic noise li miter. Kantronrcs 
cempatibfe socket plus exclusive generaJ purpose 
socicet. Bxr/ix6 in. 12-15 V DC or 110 VAC with 
adapter, MFJ'1312. $9,95. 

RX NOISE 
BRIDGE 

Maximize 

your antenna 

porfarmantal $59,95 mfj-202B 
Tells wheiher to shonen or iengthen antenna for 
minimum SWR, Measure resonant frequency, 
radiation resistance and reactance. 
New Featurei: individually caiibrated resistance 
scale, expanded capacitance range {t150 pf). 
Built-in range extender tor measurements be* 
yond scale readings MOO MHz, Comprehefisive 
manual Use 9 V battery. 2x4x4 in. 

INDOORTUNEDACTIVE 
ANTENNA 

"World Gribber^' hvilt or exceed! rMeptJen 
ol outtlde long wlrssf Unique tunad Active 
Antenna minimizes intermod, improves select- 
ivity, reduces noise outside tuned band, even 
functions as preselector with external antennas. 
Covers 0.3-30 MHz. Telescoping antenna. 
Tune. Band, Gain, 
On-off bypass controls, 
6x2x6 i n. Uses 9V 
banery.9-18VDC or 
110 VAC with adapter, 

MFJ-1312, $9.95, 



$79.95 MFJ1020 




POLICE/FIRE/WEATHER 
2M HANDHELD CONVERTER 

Turn your tynthoiized scanning $39.95 
2 meter handheld into a hot Police/ ^ • mFJ 
FIreyWeatlier band scanner! 
144'14fi MHz handhelds 
receive PoNce/Fire on 154- 
158 MHz wittT direct fre- 
quency readout Hear 
f^iOAA maritime coastal 
plus more on 160-164 MHz, 
Convener mounts t>etween 
tyndheld and rutiber ducky 
Feadthru allows simultaneous 
scanning of botli 2 meters 
and Pol ice/ Fire bands Mo 
missed calls. Crystal conirolfed Bypass/Oti 
switch allows transmitiing (up in 5 watts). Use 
AAA battery. 2y4KV/2%XV2 in. BNC connectors, 

MFJ/BENCHERKEYER 
COMBO 

MFJ-422 

$104.95 

The best of 
an CW worlds- 

a deluxe MFJ Keyer in a compacfTonfiguration 
that fits right on tlie Bencher iambic paddle! 
MFJ Keyer - small in size, big in features. Curtis 
8044'B IC, adjustable weight and tone, front panel 
volume and speed controls (B-50 WPM). Built- 
in dot -dash memories Speaker, sidetone, and 
piish button selection of semi-auiomatic/tune 
Of automatic modes. Solid state keying Bencher 
paddle is fuMy adjustable: heav^ steel base with 
non-skid f^t Uses 9 V battery or 110 VAC with 
optional adapter, MFJ-1305, $9 95. 

VHF SWR/WATTMETER 

L0WCl»t MFJ-812 S29.95 

VHF SWR/ 

Wittmeteri 
Read SWR 

(r4tOl70MHzj _ 

and forward/ I - - . * * If 

reflected power 





m. i 



fff^ 



*• 



fS 



at 2 meters Has 30 and 300 v^atts scales. Also 
read relative field strength. 4x2x3 in. 



.95 



itfj "^'il!* I ? 



1 KW DUMMY LOAD ^^, 

MFJ-25Q $34 

Tune up fait, extend 

life of finals, reduce 

QRM! Rated IKWCW 

or 2KW ^£? for 10 min 

utes. Haff rating 1or 20 

minutes, continujus ai 

200WCW. 400WPEP 

VSWfl under 1.2 to 30 

MHz. 15 to 300 MHz. 

Oil contains no PCB 

50 oftm non*indoctive resrsiof Safety vent 

Carrying handle Th%^^ in, 

24/12 HOUR CLOCK/ ID TIMER 

MF4-103 

S34J5 

Sivitch to 24 

tiour GMT or 
12 hour format! 
Battery backup 

maintains time during power outage. ID timer 
alerts every 9 minutes after reset. Switchable 
seconds readout. Elapsed timer. Just start clock 
from zero and note time of event up to 24 hours. 
Bright blue .6'' digits. Alarm with snooze 
function. Synchronizable with VWVV Lock 
function prevents mis-setting. Power out, alarm 
on indicators. Black. 5x2x3 in, 110 VAC. 60 Hz. 

DUAL TUNABLE SSB/CW 
FILTER MFJ-762B $89.95 



* "P3:53« 



Dual flltars give unmatched performance! 
The primary filler lets you peak notct^ low 
pass or high pass with extra sleep skirts. 
Auxiliary fitter gives 70 db notcft. 40 H? peak. 
Both filters tune from 300 to 3000 Hz with 
variable bandwidth from 40 Hz to nearly flat. 
Constant output as bandwidth is varied; linear 
frequency control Switchable noise fimiter for 
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lets ears and mmd reject ORM inputs for 2 rigs. 
Ptugs into phone jack Two watts for speaker 
Off bypasses filter. 9-1S VDC or 110 VAC with 
optionaf adapter. MFJ-1312, $9.95. 



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73 Magazf'ne • October, 1984 53 



international) 




Each month, 73 brings you 
ham-radfo news from around the 
world, in this coffection of re- 
ports from our foreign corre- 
spondents, we present the fat- 
BSt news in OX, contests, and 
events, as weft as keep you 
abreast of the technical 
achievements of hams in other 
countries. 

li you woutd tike to coatnbufe 
to your country's column, write 
to your country's correspondent 
or to 73: Amateur Radioes 
Technical Journal, Pine Street, 
Peterborough NH 03468, USA 
Attn: Perry Donham KK2Y. 




AUSTRALIA 



44 Wwn Streoi 
AitQn& 301S 
Victoria 
Ausiraiia 

Mo^t amateur? accept "plratai!"' aa a 
fact of life on the amataur bands, and 
5ome pirates fiave eventually become 
well-known amateurs alter thay have real- 
ized what they are misafing by running un- 
licensed operations. 

But when a well -organized pkate opera- 
tion si arts 10 put pressure on the powers 
thai be lor a slice of I he iwenty-metaf 
band lust above the amateur allocation, 
ypu start lo wonder what's gofng on, and 
why. 

I am speaking, of courae, about that ev- 
er-growing band of yachtsmen and -wo- 
men who are usin§ amateur transceivers 
Instead o! (or with) their commercial gear. 
II has become so bad m the Pacific that 
they even have their own trequancies set 
up on twanty meters for rag-chewtng, with 
fiome of them uamg false callsigna for 
contacts within the amateur Ciands, 

tl has cofrte to the stage Ihat the WIA 
and r^ZART ha\rt issued a joint atatemefit, 
with the t^ack^ng ot both ttie Australian 
and H&a Zealand Government Commurti- 
cadons Departments, eondefnn^ng this 
practice 

Ttlftfe have tjeert many limes, ot course, 
that an^teur rad<o l^as come to I he aid of 
yachtsmefi in distress, and th^s may be 
one of the reasons why some are ^ying 
amateur geat as backup equipment tof 
Tt>eir boats. But if. as lound just recently in 
Austraria, they ate buying amateur geaf 
iii&tead of Ihe type ol approved ccHmmer- 
cial gear tttat they s^iould have on board, 
boeauae it is ctieaper. it is not only cents 
wise and dollar tooitsh bui downright dan^ 
gefotis, as amateur geftr is not designed 
fo« this type of opwat^on— sucn as being 
caugni In a howling gam and do^ng a cou- 
ple of 360-degfee loops with sail water fly 
ing evervwhem. OommerctaNypit, approved 
ysc^t radios are tiuilt (o star^ (his. bu) 
amaieur gear is not; that is why ifie com- 
mercial marine radios cost rnofe, 

Hammm. as with any occupalkm of en- 

54 73 Magazine * October, 1984 



deavor, there is always the shady chai^ac- 
ter out to make a fast dollar regardless of 
I he risi< to ott^er people or the cost to the 
community. 

One such unscruputous dealer in isievi 
South Wales (VK2y found a good market in 
selling general-covefage transceivers de- 
signed for amateur use (but also con- 
verted to cover yachting frequencies) 10 
some memibefS oF the yachting fraternity 
at a lot cfMaper price^ due to an Import I9x 
of only 2% on this rype of ger>efal cover- 
age gear. This practice was soon noticed 
Uf a locat manufacturer of radios de- 
siipied for cominercial application, and he 
compiarrwd to the Government^ to protSd 
hjs own bysiness. 

Tfve reason amateur gear drew an im- 
poit tariff of only 2^ a was mat there was 
no manufaciuref of amateur gear of this 
type in Atistraiia^ so it did not compete 
with lDc:ai firms. In this case it did, and the 
result was Mtat our govemrr»nl imme- 
diately put a 30% import duty on ait ama- 
leur transceivers being Imported into ttv^s 
country. 

Or>e sure way to get ^nytXMly to sit up 
and take notice is to hit htm where it hurts, 
and with most people, rr>ctuding a ma 
leufB, that IS rn ttie hip pocket. Talking ail 
the extras mto account, the fmal price to 
the amateurs would have nsen around 
45% Oh all imported transceivers. 

On July G, 1983, the WiA. plus represent 
tatives of the major importers and distritl* 
utoi^s o1 annateur gear, a customs agent, 
and an editor of a locai commercial ama- 
teur-fadio publication heJd a meeting to 
seiek tacts and advice on how to handle 
this tariff rise. The WIA, after many sub- 
missions plus worit on their members' be- 



half, came up with a solution agreeable to 
the government. The whole issoe hinged 
on 9 tariff bylaw that contained the words 
"without substantiaJ modification." 

The submission to the government by 
the WIA was that ihey would set up a 
pinef of paid memt>ers who have a radio 
angJneer's background to lypo-appfove 
amaieur transceivers enterir^g this courv 
try and issue compliance certificates^ to 
enable retention of I tie 2% Impoit tariff 
for amateur gear. 

As you can imagine, this was no easy 
decision by the WIA, on tiehalf of lis rnenv- 
befs, with a lot of on- and off-air discus- 
sions both fof and against ttvs WIA being 
involved in this type oi endeavor. How- 
ever, the WfA will remain impafttal at alt 
times tefardirvg any decision made by ttiis 
pNsnel. and will not only accept t>ut tiack 
its recommendations. 

An excellent article tyf Bruce R Bathots 
VK34JV. the Federal President of the WIA, 
in the February. tgS4, Amateur Hadio (the 
official publication of the WIA) gives tfie 
definition oi what is required to cover the 
bylaw that states "witrvout substantial 
modification. " and expfair^ how lh& WIA 
arrived at the criteria needed^ 

Excerpts: 

1. We recooniie that any piece of radio 
equipment can (» made to operate on any 
frequency providing tfve person attempt- 
ing the modification has the correct toots 
and equipment, and the knowledge of per- 
(ormlrtg same. As a yardstick in this re- 
gard, we ac^ipl that an amateur of at 
least ten years' standing would have the 
r>ecessary eKperience to analyze circuits 
ar>d equipment, and pert Of m art actual 
con version. 

2. Therefore, a "Difficulty Factor" can 
be determined m conversions. An experi- 
enced amateur, as noted atwve. would be 
expected lo relate his efforts directly to 
the costs of the components required. 
lime, and effort. A monetary figure would 
have to t>e placed on the Lime element, 
therefore commercial costs of repair rates 




and time would of necessity be applicable 
in this case. 

3. As far as the WiA Is concerned, our 
only requirement is to detefmine in the 
"Amateur Sense/' what a substantial 
modification is. We are NOT corKerned 
with commercial conversions or sales out^ 
side the Amateur Servica. (We canriot stop 
them anyway. I A highly-experienced pro- 
fess iona J engineer would, no doubt, be 
able to convert any piece of equlpmant to 
be used on other t^ands in a very short 
time. As we are only responsible to the 
Amateur Servincer only normal amateur^ 
type methods fi\lt he used by our techni« 
cat committ^ in determining a cohver* 
s^on difficulty factor. 

4. Ttie objective, therefore, is to estilv 
(ish wtmttmt or not a conversion by an ex- 
p^enced radio amateur is able to tw per- 
fomied at a rejaiively cheaper cost than 
the payment of the actual tariff duty on 
the FOB cost of ttw equipment urxfer con- 
sideration. A ratio between the^e costs 
can then tm determtned^ 

5,TfTe ratio (a "Dilficully Factor ratio! 
will enable the WIA to decide wheih»er or 
not a certain transceivef comes within 1 tie 
scope of {tie bylaw provisions. In this re- 
spect, only iranscslyers and transmitters 
designed for use try the Amaieur Sefvice 
and being imported try a recognijted retail 
er or deaier of amateur equlprrient will tx 
eligible iw a WIA evaluation. Bona fide 
travefters bri raging equipment into Austra^ 
lla pu refused from overseas for tlwlr own 
persona] use, witf also t>e at>ie to be in- 
cluded in the above. 

It can be seen by the atjove just how 
much w€Kkt plus money, is involved by a 
national t>ody representing its rnembers 
in fighting repressive laws, whether they 
be added taxes, antenna-tower legisla- 
tion, or loss of amaieur frequencies This 
is why H is imperative that those amateurs 
who sit on the sidelines as nonmemt^rs 
of a united national amateur body rapre- 
sending ALL amateurs get their prioritl^ 
right or they could be peylng ah extra 
S800 lor a FTI-type transceiver — as we 
nearly were. A small annual subscription 
is Small price to pay to present a united 
front against anything detrimental to am- 
ateur radio. 

How would It be If we all sat back and 
did nothing? I doubt If we would, with to- 
day's commercial pressure, have an ama^ 
teur-radio service. 




Adilson mbeiro PYiAKM fleffA Paufo Maiavota PYIOZ ilABHE RJ Dtr^r&rl and Paulo 
f^o&eno Dommgos PY1ZT. 



BRAZIL 

Car!os Viaffrte Camein} PYtCC 
fli/a AtonsD Pena 4§. Apt. TO J 
20270 Rro de Janeiro. fU 
BraiH 

FlADtO AMATEURS OPEf^ATlHa 
THE HALF MARATHON 

For first time in Brazil ^and we never 
tteafd aJXHjt this anywhere else t>etotei 
two radio amateurs joined the "Race of 
tr>e Bridge' ' and put il on ttie amatetir' 
radio air. 

Ihe Race of tt>e Bridge is a yearty corrv 
petition, a cross-country "half rnarathon." 
orgianized by ttte CORJA (Rio de Janeiro 
^rvners Associationf and sponsored by 
the Brad^conAtlantica Ofganteation, a 
bank and Insurance company helping arn- 
ateur sports. 

This 22,4iX^m6ter4or\g race (a "t%alf 
maratt>orv" as It's Called h^ei} crosses the 
kmgesi concrete-bull! bf »doe in the world, 
The President Costa e Siiva Bridge, \4 ki- 
lomefters long, joining NIteroi City to Ftio 



dfi Janeiro City. It b 75 meiers high at its 
highest point over wonderful Guanabara 
Bay, a dream scenary never to ba for* 
gotten. 

Starting from The "Boat Station" in NU 
teroi and finishing at the f^odern Art Mu- 
seum, rigni Jn the heart of Rio de Janeiro 
City, \hh year'a Race oi The Bridge involved 
^00 participants. There were 5 age caie- 
gofffts: IS to 19 years, 20 to 29, 30 to 39. 40 
to 49, ar>d 50 /ears on. 

Two 0nthuBl«3llc runners, Adi^son 
Rtbeira inriAKM ahd Paulo Roberto Do- 
mlngoe PYtZT, tMtHjght the ^de« to our 
radio amateur league^ LABR£ RJ (Rio de 
Jan^ro brafKh), and \l had the Immediate 
sppro^fal From Pauhs Maiavoti PYlOZ, 
SectJonal Director, so plans and action 
made it come true; e<]uipfrkent, land sup- 
port. an4 instructions were settled Ofi lo 
do the best. 

Running together, sid« by side, ustn^ a 
poftab^e I02AT perfectly testod. with 
o^mplete^y charged batteries, operating 
by turns. Ad i I son and Paulo Roberto e«r> 
ried out this so-auco^aful operation, the 
first m Brazil! 

Land-based siation PY1AA (LABRg FU 
official station} was responsible for all 
QSO appointments and QSL n^anaglng, 
runnefs Aditson and Paulo answering only 
to VHF contacts during the whole race. 

PrDffnotion for the Race ot The Bridge 
among radio amateurs, trying to have 
more ot ttvem ai next year's race, and prch 
moticm for radio amateurism among ttie 
thousands of people accompanying the 
event, ar»d through p/ess and ma^jaztne 
publications, was the goal for this 
unusual initiative. 

Of course runners could not worry 
about technical results, due (o equipment 
care, lack of concentration at the race^ 
and special attention to rad^o calls and lo 
base-controller Information, but final re- 
sults were very interesting. LABRE's sta- 
tjcn PY1AA, under control of Macial 
PYIZH, joined HF caffa to VHF, and many 
a EcngKJ I stance QSO was a 'W0W1" 3. 
PauJo, Parana, and Mines States were 
contacted, and even an "Air f^oblle" from 
a Boeing flying over Male Groaso. The 
Idea Is very promising tor years to come at 
the Races of The Bridge I 

The race's scheduled time coincided 
with tl^e "Patrulha Verde Amarelo" Net 
(Green and Yellow Patrol), a sweeping 
40-meter net covering all Brazilian states, 
so some very interesting Q&Ds were real- 
ized, now and then, as PYIZH joined 40 
meters to VHP t As runners were using the 
PYtAA call, special Interest was raised 
due to the possibility of GSO points for 
ihe PY1AA On-The-AIr Award, sponsored 
by our LABRE RJ, 

Well, we've read about races being de- 
scribed and accompanied by radio ams- 
ejrs from the outside, but coming from 
Ihe inside, from runners of the race them- 
iselves, it's really a lir^t time! Speciat 
awards were presented to Paulo Roberto 
and Adjison — and triey sure deserved ill 




■■•■in 




CYPRUS 

Aris Kaponid0S SB4JE 
FOBox t723 
Umassoi 
Cyprus 

NEWS FflOli CYPRUS 

Summertime in Cyprus usually mearm. 
for local radio amateurs, fewer voices on 
true air. Most arr^teurs over f^fe enjoy Ihe 
sea or the mount ains during their summef 




Adtisoft and Psuia Bob&rto rt^SF tAe finisti fine in Paris Squam, Rio d9 JBrmiro^ 



holidays and the HF rigs are set asidOL 
Howavfif^ ttve VHF rigs ^re used quite a lot 
from the holiday or portable locations, 
hdosi of the 2m contacts are between lo- 
cal hama, but some OX is also done with 
4X* or OD-lands. During the first week of 
June, a lot of e^rcitement was created by 
spOfadlic-E openings on 2m where a few 
&B4 DXers made contact with HA-, Y0-< 
and YU^Jands, A few of the lucky ones who 
managed to work on sporac^ic-E were 
6B4MC, 6e4LP. 5B40K, 5B4MD. 5B4IT, 
5B4IE» and 5e4JE. 

Many interesting contacts can be made 
from central and westerrf Cyprus with 
SVS- and SV8- lands and some of the 
Greek islands In the Aegean Sea. Fellows 
talking sImpFex on £m with SVS and SV9 
were 5B4JR, 564JX, 504JZ, and 6Q4MG in 
Paphos (western Cyprus), 3nd from the 
Nicosia area (central Cyprus) were 5B40A, 
5&41E, 504MC, 5B4MD, 5B4LP. 5B4IT, and 
others. 

A very interesting experiment was done 
successfully In Paphos by 5B4nJX, who 
constructed a VOX system whereby he 
can connect the R3 repeater in Heraklion 
In Crete with R5 in Cyprus, or the R4 re- 
peater in the Paphos area with R5, which 
Is on the highest mountain peai^ in 
Cyprus. In this way, amateurs in Crete. 
Rhodes, Santoilni^ and other Greek 
islands in the Aegean can be linked with 
Cyprus. Also contacts were made with 
amateurs in Athens (via this system) wfio 
could open the R3 repeater in Crete. II is 
hoped that ihe system will op<efate on a 
permanent basis during the summertinre. 
Many thanks to Sotos 5B4JX for this ser- 
vice on tKlialf ot aH amateurs in SV- and 
5&4^and, 

Recently an enthusiastic group of 
yourvg men passed their redio-amateur ex- 
aminations. Arnongst itKJse were some 
fiarTT>onics of wetl -known amateurs, such 
as the daughter of 5Q4JX. YL Florentia, 
the son of 5B4Elp lacovos, arxj my own 
aon. Georoe, age 16, wtto has tt>e cat I sign 
SB40V. We are sure that atl the newcofrv 
ers will do wefl and we welcome Itiem to 
ifiehoDlTy. 

In Cyprus there are five active club sta- 
tions in Nicosia, Lamaca, Umassoi, and 
Papm^, TTiese ^t^ operated for Z to 3 
houia pe< week. From what I know, not 
many people are operating trom there, tKJt 



the ciub committees are trying their best 
to attract more young people to the club 
stations. An effort ^s made by CAl^ that 
this be a stage of practice arvd eitperience 
before the written radioamateur ex ami na- 
tron. Our club stations are still very poorly 
equipped, and any he^p coming locally or 
from ^£}road will be appreciated. Please 
send all donations to Cyprus Amateur 
Radio Society, PO Boj( 1267, Li mas sot, 
Cyprus, 




CZECHOSLOVAKIA 

Rudoif Karaba fOKSKFQ ARC} 
KomenskGhQ J 477 
956 01 Topoic^ny 
Ciecnosfavakia 

SATELirrE f1S« (RADIO SOVfTT 6) 

MIchal 0K2axF from Brno was In- 
terested in satellites already as 0L6BDK, 
He established the first contact via the 
satellite RS6 on February 12, 1^84. with 
the transistor output of 5 Watts (Ihe tran- 
sistor exciter 200 mW and a power ampll^ 
tier with QQE 03/12) and with grounij 
plane and HB9CV antennas. The receiver 
antenna is a dipole and it Js on the recelv- 
ef rnput KFWieA. With such a transmitter, 
QRP— 5 Watts ERP, he established even 5 
<^>ntacts durirvg the one orbit. 

Accordmg to 0K3AU, there are further 
new stations on the RS satellite carriers 
These are the stations OK3LW and 
OK3WA0 from the region of East 
SloiwXta. 

WINNERS FROM 1dft3 OK DX CONTEST 

Top live stations worldwide and points 
earned: 





SfngleMuitJband 




t22PP 






209664 


UA1DZ 






17B630 


UQ2GDQ 






1672Sa 


OK2FD 






120175 


QIOZWA 






110545 




Single* 


-1.0 MHz 





L22BE 






3700 


IJA3PFN 






2079 


UP2BLF 






2016 


Y38XO 






19^ 




SJngte- 


-^3.5 MHk 




HASBY 






8664 


HA6NL 






8625 


Y51XE 






7098 


UA3QBP 






6665 


UB5INQ 






eooo 




Single- 


-7 MHz 




LZ2SC 






2O01Q 


LZ1GC 






1fi33€ 


U1SS 






14950 


17PRS 






13606 


0K2BFN 






11544 




Sinsle- 


-14 MHz 




yA9YAN 






2S105 


HA«MM 






S30SO 


UHSEAA 






22152 


I2VXJ 






20490 


UA3IUK 






19136 




Single- 


-21 MHz 




UAISAU 






14476 


UA3AMB 






1T136 


UA9MAF 






10955 


UW3UO 






105QQ 


0K2B£W 






10430 




Single - 


-ZCMH^ 




m&AKM 






2940 


UG6GAF 




* 


2310 


HA4XX 






z»s 


RA9UA0 






2072 


RA9SUV 






1872 




HuJtJ-O^rfBbawi 




LZ2KZA 






1S57S0 


121 K02 






178C»7 


UK2BBK 






1624^6 


OK1KRQ 






1570SO 


HA5KDQ 






145636 



^1^ 



1^ 



DL1YD 



epB4 



GREAT BRITAJhi 

Jaff Maynard Q4EJA 
W Churehff^ids 
Wind&s WAS QRP 
Ch&shirB 
England 

I was pleased to note that the recent 
D-Day Anniversary celebrations included 
a tribute to the role of the amateur in pro- 
viding operating skills and development 
expertise In the field of radio during World 
War II. As you no doubt saw in the teievi- 
sion coverage of the event, the beaches 
were visJied by The Queen and Prince 
Philip, 

The latter is the patron of ihe R5GB and 
was the recipient olf a message of greeting 
originated by a 0-Oay special nevent sta- 
tion, GB40D, al the Lomk^n Air Traffic 
Control Center. RAF, West Drayton, and 
sent Id a French special station, FV6PAX. 
The received messBige, asking tt>e Prince 
to convey greetings from aJI radio ama- 
teurs to tffe assembled Heads of State, was 
handed by FV6PAX to the Mayor for on- 
ward transmission to ttfe Royal parry. 

Sometime later. GS40D received a mee> 
sage, again via FV&PAX, from TT>e Queen 
expressing manks fcr the original mes- 
sage and wish ir>gi all ttie twst to all radio 
amateurs in ttie nations Involved, hteed- 
less to say, everyone cor¥cerr>ed with 
G84DD was delighted at ttie receipt of the 
rT>essage, 

PRMCTKAL WiREi£SS 

t will now digress somewhat from the 
general type of news ar>d information ttiat 
makes up ttie bulk of this column. This is 
because I have just come into possession 

73 Magazine * October, 1984 S§ 



of three books receiiEly published In the 
UK of wNch two are dif&ctly related to am- 
ateur radio and Ihe third of wtiich will be 
useful In most sHacks. All ihre@ booh a are 
reprints of a number of ertlcles originally 
published ir\ Pracifcvi Wimiess, tt>e month- 
ty UK publication dealing with all aspects 
of radio (and not necessarily of direct in- 
leresi 10 active hams). TTie three books are 
lined Wims and Waras. tnimatjcing RTTY, 
arMf Are the Voitages Coff9cf} 

Wires and Way^s is subtMleil "a gyide 
to antennas, accessor hes« and pfCfiaga- 
tlon" arxt contalrta no less than 42 articles 
In 160 pages. The lopics covered range 
frorrt theorv through antenna construction 
to swr bridge and other accessory cor** 
strucliofl This Is rrwitly a practical book, 
with the thoory section limited to only hvc 
itii!^S, of wtilch one is yag* de&kgn 
principles, anyway. The practical ctKtff- 
mg/i of the book it aimed at the trartsnnM- 
tlng ar>d receiving amateur alike ai^d corv 
cent rates on the co^structlqrial aspects 
of low-coat antennas for HF and VHF 
bend^. Most of th« designs use readUy- 
avajlat>ie Ai%si Ctmap matetials- 

Most of the antennas lor const ruci Ion 
seem to be teased Ofi much practical ex- 
periem^e ar\d not just llwory. For example, 
a 2-n>eter beam Is dedcritied fw construe- 
lion from a broom nartdle. car tKaHe pipe, 
ar^ aluminum tutNng. Ir^ similar vein is the 
construction of a pseudo beam antenna 
suitable for Installation on lt>e balcony of 
a tiighfise apartment btoclK and based on 
two mob^te wtiip antennas and an inge- 
nious plxasirig aftangement 

Accessories describ^id, In addition to 
the swt bridge already mentiorved. include 
an ATU. an audlbia field strength metef» 
and a couple of pfeannps togetfi^er witti 
aome note« on (nierferanca, suppfesslofl« 
and riltering, I found the low-pass SW-Hs- 
tefier filter parllcuiaftv useful and easy to 
reproduce- 

Each construcllonsi article Includes a 
full Mat of components together wilh $ 
cost estimate (In pounds sterling, but yoit 
would, no doubt, find It Indicative) and a 
constructlor\ rating. This tatter guide Is 
Beginner, Intermediate, or Experienced. 
It's always nice to hav^e an indication of 
cost and compl entity before embarking on 
a project. 

Wires and Wa^es Is aimilar to but com- 
plementary to ffte ARRL Antenna An- 
thoiogy, 

I rnii8t cor^fess ar\ Interest before 6b- 
scrlbing introducing RTTY because it is 
based largely an a series of articles of the 
same name which I wrote a yeaf o^' two 
back and wtilch were seriaMzed in Prac- 
Ucai Wiratess. In addition 10 my articles 
iniroducir^g RTTY are some software and 
a number of equlpmeni reviews. 

My original aim was to explain ttie tjacle- 
ground of RTTY and follow that with a cot- 
lection o( modules Ihat the reader coiild 
asseiTibte in any suitable configuration ha 
wished to form I he basia of his BTTY sia- 
HofL HTTY Is a form of data tfans mission 
b»ed on Mr. BaiMSot's S-unit code trans- 
mitted at 45.45 ttaud (60 wpmK Ttm Initial 
article illustrates the development of 
RTTY ligi^als (from terrestrial TTY) and 
shows tK>w FSK and AF5i( Signals are 
produced with modern transceivefS. 

Rather ttian describe ■ complete lermi^ 
nal ur^it {TU), the remamir^ sections de- 
scribe a varieiY ot circuit building blocks 
wtiich may be put togettier as desired. 
Tbese include, for sxajTipie. interfaces be^ 
tween TTL ajnd ± 12 vo^ts and single^and 
doubl&HCLtrrefit 80 volts, filters, tOfte gerv 
orators jir>cloding a crysta^^cont rolled ver- 
sion), and irarioos demodulators, 

Using these building iHocKs, ttte reader 
can put together a basic TU for reception 
onty Qt reception and transmission de- 
pending on his racruirements* Having 

56 73 Magazine • October, 1984 



whetted hi^ appetite, a more sophisticat- 
ed TU will no doubt follow (personally I 
now use Dovetron, which Is first class but 
e)( pensive^. 

Ttie third of the PrscHcai Wiratass 
books is subtitled "a guide to fault-flnt^lng 
with yoijr mult I meter" and provides 44 
pages of detailed theory afid practice re- 
garding cif cult- voltage measuremer^ts. 
Basic prjniciples are explained from sim- 
ple voltage dividers through the effects of 
meter fesistancfi to the influence of in<tuc- 
tance and capacitarvce ^n ac circuits. 

The reaJ benefit of the book, ttioijgh. 
conies with tf>e sections on applYing a 
Tnultlmeter to fault-ffnding in real circuits. 
A$, fc>r example, a number of popular 
railJO circuits are discussed wilh the voll- 
aoes one can expect in ixHh wocking and 
failed equipment. 

The tfires books are obtainable directly 
from the publishers: IPC Magazines Ltd,, 
Westover House, West Quay Road, Poole. 
Dorset BHt& UG, Er>9t^id. Prices (irvcJud- 
ing airmail postage) are: Wirws and 
Wive5— S6-2Z; Introdi/cing RTTY— $2.13; 
and Are tfte Voitag&s Correcf?— $306, 

Alrrttaii sut^criptions to Practical W/rp- 
fess magazme are S40.00 per annum (12 
Issues), AU conversions are at S't,40 to 
each pound stealing. 

OrKe aga>n I mu^t say that aitt^iougtr I 
love to hear from re^jers, please do not 
write to me atxxit th^^e tKXJks. i have no 
easy means of shipping them, so please 
contact the publist>ers directly. 




ISFIAEL 

fton Gang 4Z4MK 

Kibbutz Ufim 

Negav Mobffe Post Office BS5^ 

fsraet 

PfiOPAGATlON 
As these lines are being written, the 



long hot summer Is upon us. VHP condi- 
tions vary from good to excellent with the 
typical eastern Mediterranean tropo- 
spheric ducting laciiitaMng dally two- 
meter contacts between Is^^el and Cy- 
prus and sornetlmes the Greek islands. 
On HF. ten meters Is all but dead, but 
twenty meters Is the star with the band 
wide open to Korth America during the 
late night ptus long path propagation to 
AusiraliaJNew Zealand ^n the early morn- 
ing. Fir teen meters often comes alive at 
night with openir^ to North and South 
Arrterica, altho^h generally to certain 
areas a^or^e arx) not wlctenopen condi- 
tions. 

MOUNT CARMEL RTTY REPEATER 

The riewrest addlHon to ttve chain of re- 
pMltrs in Israel, WAfQMJAX HPl, was ac- 
tivated In the spring. Located on Mt. Oar- 
mel overlookir^ the Mediiefrariean Sea 
from a height of 350 metats. this repeater 
ts a unique phenofnenon in out reigion pre- 
aenllrvg the amateurs with almost endless 
poi^ibilities for use. It was built, shipped 
over, set up, and dk>nated to the tsiael Am- 
atetjr Radio Club by Ed Wobb W4FQM. It 
is a near duplicate of a machme built ajxl 
operated by E.d In Florida, and the nams 
hata are lust beginnirvg 10 discover its vari- 
ous uses. 

The Ir^MJt frequerkcy k% t44J0Q, the cod- 
ing frequency lor radiotetetype in lARU 
Region One. The output frequervcy is 
145-300. making the repeater compatible 
with standard twOHnetef gear using a 
QOCMcH£ spilt. Maik frequency is 2125 H2 
and space Is 2295 Hz. To activate the re- 
peater, you must trequency-imodulate 
your siginal with the mark frequency for 
two seconds, and the repeater will open, 
leaving a talt of 15 seconds at the end ot 
each transmission. Should the repeater 
fall, you reactivate it with the mark fre- 
quency. 

In the RTTY mode, the machine does 
not operate as a typical FM repealer. 
Rather, It digitally encodes the signal r^ 
calved and reconstitutes 11 with a vastly- 
Improved sjgnahlo-noise ratio- Thus^ a 




Aon Qang 4Z4Mit 



RTTY signal under the noise and not clear 
to the human ear la turned into a clean, 
readable signal making possible solid 
long-range contacts where ail else might 
falL 

Technically speaking, the heart of the 
repeater is a 20'Watf Hamtronlcs unit with 
a 70'WatL amplifier, with a Wacom duplex- 
ef consisting of four cavities ahea4 of the 
antenna. At the tfme oi writing, the repeat- 
er also functions on standard FM, ai^ 
though a transmission of the martt fre^ 
quency will shift it over to the RTTY SKClu- 
sive mode, so thai the machine may tM 
used on voice on a secor^ry basis. From 
my QTH. 200 km south of Mt. Carmel, I 
htave succeef^ed under ducting conditions 
to make contact through the machine us- 
m<g an indoor hand-held hg with its rubtMr^ 
duckie antenna. This testifies for me su- 
perti sensitivity of this repeateff 

Lately, Israel 4X4UF has begun trans- 
mitting a nightly bulletin at 10:00 pin local 
time, on RTTY. of course The bulletin is a 
sumn^ary of the weekly HaQat Oft tfm Air, 
I ARC news magazine, edited by 424 RM 
arvl 4X4UF. It consists of tocal and mter- 
national amateur new$, buyers' ar\d salt- 
ers' announcements, technical news. elc. 
Tlie bullelln is updated every Wednesday, 
and Israel will uansmU it at other t^mes 
uiiofi request. 

Reportedly. Ed W4FOM Is tmilding a 
mailbox for trte storage and retrieval of 
m^sages on If^ repeal ef With the proltl- 
aiatton of home computers and amateurs 
using them to get on radloteletype, inter- 
asi Is running higri We are all grateful to 
Ed For his gilt, and without doubt It has al- 
ready made a great coniribullon to the 
technical advancement of Israeli ama- 
teurs. Amateurs in the Mediterranean 
basin are Invited to try to work through the 
repeater, and it will tie interesting to see 
what kind of DX will be possible. 

Q&CAR MEWS 

Ya'lr 4X4GI reports that at this time 
there are five Israeli stations making con^ 
tact through the OSCAR 10 satellite: 
4X4FQ. 4X4GI, 4X41 K. 4X4MH, and 4Z4Aa 
Ya'lr has contacted stations in Hawaii, 
New Hebrides, and other "rare" Islands In 
the Pacific through the blrd^ accomplish- 
ments normally quite difficult from tiere 
on the HF bends. 

Steve 4X6MF, who by the time you are 
reading this should be active on the satel* 
lite along with the other new Israeli ste- 
tions, is beginning to organize a local 
chapter of AM SAT. Reports are that there 
are more satellites in the offing, and with 
the decreasing suns pots and poorer HF 
conditions. Interest Is mounting In the 
country in satellite communications. 

IhilERFERENCE ON TWO METEBS 

II is a well-known fact that the Iwo-me- 
ter transceivers manufactured for ama- 
teurs sell for a fraction ol tfie price of sets 
produced for the commercial two-way 
radio market. For this reason, many clarv 
destlr>e organizations around tfve world 
use amateur gear for their nefarious pur- 
poses, and certain dealefs are more thiart 
happy at thi^s opportunity to turn a profit. 
rKi questions asketl 

For many years, until the PLO terrorists 
wei^ expeifed from Soutbefii Labanon In 
June. 1982. two rneters In Nortt^efn tsfa«i 
especJaiiy was plagued by interlefenca 
from ttiese quasi-military groups. Espe^ 
cialty hard hit was ttie Haifa repeater, with 
lis input Frequency of 145.000 Mhiz appar- 
ently b»e4ng a calling rrequer^cy for Itme 
outtits. As a result, a tone access was 
added to the rBf»ater to prevent its being 
triggered by non-amateur signals. This 
feature was deleted after the 1982 war ti* 
lericed the source of this QRM. 

Two-meter non-amateur actively is 



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IT IN TIME?(Kst)" 

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The above exanriple assumes a transceiver T/R time of about 150 mS (typical) 



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The performance of a sampling patch is totally dependent on 
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PATCH IL PRIVATE PATCH II will give excellent results with 
any radio. Synthesized and relay switched types included. 

PRIVATE PATCH U requires only three connections to your 
radio (MiC, PTT and SPKR audio). If these connections are 
made inside your radio PRIVATE PATCH II does not interfere 
with the normal use of your radio. Otherwise for a quick and 
easy interface you may plug PRIVATE PATCH II Into the MIC 
and SPKR jacks. A 10 minute job! Unlike sampling patches, 
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power. And best of all, modifications are never required. 

Controlling and talking through PRIVATE PATCH II is almost 
always quicker and easier than using a sampling patch. This 
is because you may talk or send control commands the instant 
you press the PTT button. The ability to break in or take con- 
trol is assured by interrupt control logic. The interrupt con- 
troller creates a window (similar to samplmg) but is seldom 
heard in normal quick back and forth communication. With 
a sampling patch you press the MIC button for one to five 
seconds before talking on each and every transmission. This 
is very frustrating for the mobile, and causes confusion for 
each party. 

The sampling process reduces the effective range of your base 
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the sampling patch thinks the mobile is not transmitting. This 
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7$ Magazine • October, 1984 57 



mn 



asain on the rise in Lebanon by the vari- 
ous organizations operating there. Now 
with the suinmer ut>on us and long-range 
tropospheric^ propagation present, these 
stations are be^ng heard all across the 
two-meter band. This time, strangely 
enough, the main victims are the repeat- 
ers in Cyprus J especialEy on R2 and R5. At 
some times of the day. say our Cypriot 
oounterparts, these repeaters become vir- 
luaily Unusable because of the clandes- 
tine operations on their input frequencies. 
This time, no Immediate solution Is In 
^jght. This curiosity Is simply one of the 
by-producls of polittoal instabllty In our 
area, and we'll have to le^rn to live with it. 




LIBERIA 

Brother Donard SWtf^s. C.S.C. 

EL2AUWB8HFY 

Brothers of ti^G Hoiy Cross 

St. Patrick High Scttoot 

PO Box 1005 

Monrovia 

Hepubiic of Ut&m 

CQ NO PROBLEM IN LIBERIA 

Our amateurs are aware of the evils as- 
sociated with CB radio and are determined 
that it wilt not get out of hand here. It is 
legal, but at the present time a CB license 
is very difficult to obtain. There are those 
who want Xq get on the air without doing 
ail the work of learning the code or of 
passing theory tests. They are working at 
it here as they are in the US and other 
places. To date they are losing the battle. 

in the commercial broadcast band 
there Is a lot of empty space. We have only 
three stations. One is really commercial 
and the other two are mission stations 
which are commercially licensed but 
which exES^t primarily to bring the good 
news of the gospel to the people they can 
reach. With all this empty airspace, the Li- 
t>eria Radio Amateur Association has the 
bright idea of obtaining a spot on whEch to 
broadcast code much as is done by 
WtAW. It is not practical to do that on the 
amateur bands because so many of the 
people for whom this service is intended 
do not have and will not easily get an ama- 
teur radio. The Association has been 
worsting on this idea for more than a year. 
Things move sfowly In Liberia. 

In Holland, there Is a great problem of 
unlicensed broadcasting to and for the 
general public on the regular commercial 
bands. The problem is completel^y out of 
control, much as is CB In the States. 
Some of our outlying mission stations are 
looking at that situation with interest. In 
one case it has gone beyond the looking 
stage and there is a five- or ten-Watt 
stereo station jn operation. Everyone is 
happy. The station operates three or four 
hours a day with music and news reports 
and is the only thing that is available to 
that community. This littie station, though 
not tormally licensed, operates with the 
Knowledge and consent of the Ministry of 
Tel ecom mun I oat Eons. 

Another misslor^ station Is considering 
the possibility of a like operation. This is 
very interesting, and from where we sit tt 
seems that there is nothing to lose and ev 
erything to gain. Certainly the people In 
those outiyjng communities appreciate 
what is being done. It is a credit to the 
Ministry that I hey do make an exception 
In this instance, and so long as these littie 
outpost stations operate with proper au- 
thorization, there is little likelihood that 
things will get out of controk 



That IS a little aside. The immediate 
probiem is that everyone wants to take a 
shortcut into the world of amateur radio. 
"No-code licensing," CB space in the am- 
aieur bands, just anything to get in with- 
out dotng the work. Over and over again 
we find that I he results are counter-pro- 
ductive, Japan has no-code licensing. For 
an evaluation of the result read 73^ Au- 
gust, 1983, page 73, The amateurs must be 
alert and they must make every effort to 
preserve the great hobby that is theirs. In 
the States they have won another round, 
and that Is ati that it is— another round. 
See 73, March, 1984, page 104. When the 
amateurs gfve In or simply lose the fight, 
amateur radio as we know it will just fade 
away. 

In Liberia, the 1=ladlo Amateur Associa- 
tion works very closely with the Ministry 
of Post and Telecommunications, which 
is the department of government under 
whose Jurisdiction amateur radio oper- 
ates. The Ministry scans the amateur 
bands and checi^s for vioiators. The ama- 
teurs themselves do the same in a some- 
what less organized b^ut nonetheless ef- 
fective way. 

Amateurs In Liberia do folEow the rules 
and they take pride in maintaining a high 
standard of courtesy and technical effi- 
ciency. The same can be said of most of 
the amateurs of the world, but not aiL I, as 
an outsider living in Liberia, am impressed, 
} think it is a great credit to this I Ittle coun- 
try, and as amateurs around the world 
make their contacts with Liberia, they will 
meet with courtesy and respect. 



^\^ 
^1^ 



MONTSERRAT 

Errof *'Bobbi&" Martin VP2M0 

POBox U3 

Piymouth 

Montserrat 

Bfitfsh West fftdies 

SCANNING FROM MARS 

Well it's the official Annual Hurricane 
Season once more in the Caribbean area. 
This comes Into effect on June 1st each 
year, and with 22 hurricane names listed 
for this season. It's small wonder that am- 
ateurradio operators throughout the re- 
gion are keeping a watchful eye on weath- 
er conditions as a measure of disaster 
preparedness- 

The Island of Mont serrate a British colo- 
ny located in the eastern Caribbean about 
268 miles southeast of Puerto Rico and 
only 39-1/2 miles square, has |ust held a 
three-day Pisaster Preparedness and 
Emergency Management Workshop. This 
was jolntiy sponsored by the PanCarlb- 
bean Disaster Preparedness and Preven- 
tion Project Commit lee (PCDPPP) and the 
government of Montserrat. which was de- 
signed to correlate plans and actions to 
be taken by the variou'S groups and organi- 
zations that are usually involved in the 
education and protection of the general 
public in times of national emergencies 
and disasters. 

This workshop was held at the Govern- 
ment Training Center iocated In Ply- 
mouth, the capital, beginning on Wednes- 
day, June 20, and ending on Friday, June 
22. Lecturers were Mr, Jerome Lloyd- 
Consultant, PCDPPP, Dr. Oeryck W^ 
He Inemann— Project Manager, PCDPPP, 
Lt. Col. Gtenn A. M I gnon— Disaster Pre- 
paredness Advisor {UNOFIO), PCDPPP 
Course Director and Miss Eizabeth 
Twlnch^Brittsh Red Cross Advisor, 
PCDPPP. 



The workshop was attended by senior 
officials of the EKecutive Committee (Di- 
saster), officials of government, statutory 
boards and companies^ and voluntary or- 
ganizations, also district and deputy 
chairmen, Some of the topics discussed 
at the workshop were: 

• Preparing the community for disasters 

• Role of the security forces in a disaster 

• Role of the Red Cross during these 
times 

• Roie of communications, with a pre- 
sentation given by the president of the 
Montserrat Amateur Radio Society, and 
role of the media 

• Role and functions of the disaster man- 
agement organisations 

• Managing mass casualties 

Many other aspects of disaster and 
emergency preparedness were covered, 
all of which incorporated the use of radio 
communications for efficiency because 
of the terrain of the island. Thus the Mont- 
serrat Amateur Radio Society pSays a vital 
roie as the organization most readily 
equipped to provide this service. 

As previously stated {see 73, May, 1984), 
the Montserrat Amateur Radio Society 
has a team of operators assigned the task 
of manning various police stations, the 
airport, the hospital, and the local govern- 
ment public broadcasting station {ZJB), 
thereby providing a continuous link with 
the Central Control which is located wittv 
in the confines of the Piymouth Police 
{Headquarters. 

In addition to these stations, v^hich will 
be operating via the 2-meter repeater (but 
with capabilities of reliable simplex oper- 
ation}, there are at least tvi^o additional 
stations delegated to operate on the Hf 
bands with the objective of maintaining 
contact with the outside world in the 
event that all other means of communica- 
tions become unavailabie. 

T^ese stations are readily equipped 
with standby generators, batter I eSj dl- 
poles, and verticals should the main an- 
tennas be lost in the expected gale-force 
winds usual with hurricanes. These are 
the stations of Dr. Konrad Hollati VP2MF 
and VP2MO; the iatter will be operated by 
Mae Martin VP2MN. Both these stations 
were very active during the 1979 Dominica 
crisis caused by Hurricane David and pro- 
vided the necessary Information to one of 
our local radio stations {Radio Antiiies, a 
200,OOOWatt system that covers the en- 
tire Caribbean Area and beyond) and the 
Government Broadcast Station which 
covers the neighboring islands. 

At this time, as has been the practice of 
the past years, all memtaers of the Mont- 
serrat Amateur Radio Society's Disaster 
Team are maintaining a close link with 
each other just in case. . . 

On the HF band, the designated stand- 
by, weather watch, and coordinating fre- 
quencies for the Caribbean area are the 
same as those of the Antilles Emergency 
and Weather Net. These frequencies are 
3-815 MHz in the evenings and mornings 
and 7. 168 MHz during the day. 

This net operates twice daily, 365 days 
a year at 1030Z and 2230Z, normally on 
3.S15 MHz, and reverts to the 40-meter 
band only for exercises or in times of 
disasters. During normal nonemergency 
times, the net operates as follows. 

Two Islands are responsible to provide 
NCOS on a vifeekly rotational basis, one 
Island doing the morning session and the 
other the evening session. There Is a roll 
call for isiand^y-island check-ins, begin- 
ning with Venezuela In the far south to 
Jamaica and beyond in the north. 

Weather fnformation is provided from 
the Netherland Antilles, Trinidad and 
Tobago, Barbados, the French AntilleSi 
Antigua and Barbuda, and The US Virgin 
Isiands, obtained from their respective 



net offices, thus providing a concise 
weather picture throughout the Caribbean 

area. 

The Montserrat Amateur Radio Society 
recently met for its annual generai meet- 
ing, during which the foi lowing officers 
were elected for a term of one year. Presi- 
dent: Errol "Bobble" Martin VP2MO. Vice- 
president: Sydney St. C. Meade VpaMC, 
Secretaryrrreasurer; Mrs. Ursula Sadler 
VP2MDY, Equipment Officer Victor 
James VP2MQ, Activities Manager: Tony 
G laser VP2MIK, and Executive Member-at* 
Large: Dr. Vernon Buffonge VP2MV. 

The following persons have been reap- 
pointed to these respective positions: 
Awards Manager: Errol "Bobbie'* Martin 
VP2M0, and QSi_ Manager: Mr. Qene Ege, 
Sr. WB2LCH. 

Please note that Gene W82LCH Is QSL 
Manager for these stations on Montserrat 
oniyi VP2M (Speclai Events Station), 
VP2MN iJoanna "Mae" Martin), VP2M0 
(Errol "Bobbie ■ Martin), and VP2MLD (Law- 
ton Daley). All other QSL cards should be 
sent to their respective owners and not to 
WB2LCH. 

QSL PROBLEIilS 

One of the ma|or problems that the 
Society (a^c^ VP2M0) is faced with is that 
of being used as a QSL Bureau, and aa? 
such we are being clobbered with cards 
from all over the globe. The strangest part 
of it is the tact that cards are coming here 
for countries as far away as J2CB and the 
rest of the Caribbean area. 

Please be informed that no QSL Bureau 
exists on Montsen'at, for we are not equipped 
to handle this service — neither finan- 
cially or otherwise. This matter is of t times 
discussed at our club meetings, and the 
only persons being catered to by the 
Society are its members and others who 
have made the proper arrangements with 
the Society. Please aiso note that the 
more active resider^t operators here each 
have a QSL Manager, and anyone needing 
a response should utilize the managers' 
services as much as possible, unless the 
operator states otherwise. TTtis method 
would make things much better for all 
concerned. 

Guest operators usually give their re^ 
spectlve QSL route, and one has only to 
listen. Another situation which exists and 
needs to be rectified is the direct QSLer. 
These fall into three basic categories: 
(t}An enclosed SAE wfith return postage, 
(2) An enclosed SAE with no enclosed 
postage (sometimes no enclosed enve- 
lope), and (3) a QSL card, stamped, mailed 
with a request PS£ QSL TNX. 

My response to these types are as 
follows: 

The first person does the proper thing^ 
for even if the enclosed postage is inade^ 
quate, he deserves an Immediate re- 
sponse with a card via first-class mail. 

The second type of person has got to rs* 
ali^e that ttre OX station must have worked 
many stations, thus if he were to send a 
card to everyone without the necessary 
postage, he would not be able to slay on 
the air for very long, and even were he to 
be able to respond to 50%, who would 
deserve to be that lucky half? 

Fiegarding type 3, 1 think that anyone 
who would pay (?) to have his cards 
printed and then )gst throw them Into the 
mails caring nothing about defacing his 
cailsign and any other Info that was so 
carefully put together doesn't deserve one 
of mine, for to me a QSL card represents 
something, so I thtnh that that kind of per- 
son has no respect for his card, his call, 
nor the operator at the other end, for why 
do they maite envelopes anyway? Proud 
of your call? Proud of your card? Then 
prove It! 

Until we meet again, my feliow hams 



56 73 Magazine • October, 1984 




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66 



SPECTRVIU COMlHIVNIC/kTIONS 



105 



rmantown Pk,S10 •Norristown, PA 19401 •(215) 631-1710* Telex: 846-211 



out there^ Ifs always very pleasant to 
mset operators {VP2MO) saying catch me 
on RTTY daily from about 1700Zon or near 
14.084 MHz, and it you're lucky you might 
even run Into Joe VP2MJL or Tony 
VP2MIX, and very soon, too, "Doc" 
VP2MF. 

73 and gud DX a& I'M be scanning from 
iVIARS, 




NEW ZEALAND 

D. J. {D&sj Chapman ZL2VR 
459 Kennedy Road 
Napier 
New Zealand 

This month \ shafi give readers a couple 
of examples of the close liaison between 
the ZL regulatory body, the New Zealarhd 
Post Office, and NZART, our amateur- 
radio national association. 

In 1982. the HZPO decFded to conduct a 
review of the Amateur Service as a whole 
in view of changes it had observed in other 
countries and because of submissions 
from isiZART. The last major chartQe to the 
ArnateuT Service was fn the mid-60& when 
the Grade Hi Technician class was intro- 
duced. Since that date only minor 
changes have been introduced with the in- 
troduction oftiie New Zeatand Radio Reg- 
ulation-s 1970 (an update on the previous 
radio regu tat ions), 

Accordingly, N2ART was invited to put 
forward submissions for a review of the 
Amateur Service as a v^^hole Vifhich could 
be considered in conjunction wi;th 
changes the Post Office l-tseif saw as be- 
i;ng advantageous. Gerterally, the propos- 
als submitted had to confofm wfth the 
conditions laid down by the International 
Radio Regulations. 

In response to the invitation, our asso- 
clatfon, after several top-level discus- 
sions, submitted a 37'page doc u mem, 
and some discussion on the proposals 
took place between the Post Office and a 
team of NZART council m ember S- 

Tlie Post Office then drew up a paper on 
the outline of a proposed structure for the 
Amateur Service tn ZL, which Included a 
number of proposals from remits placed 
before the Post Office by M2ART from an- 
nual conferences over a period of time, 
This "paper" was then distributed to all 
ZL licensed amateur operators, who were 
given the opportunity to comment on the 
proposals before the regulations were 
amended or changed to give effect to any 
or all of proposed changes. At the same 
time, the Post Office asked all amateurs 
for suggestions other than those put tor- 
ward in the paper, provided such sugges- 
tions conformed with the general parame- 
ters for the Amateur Service as laid down 
In the International Radio Regulations. 

It Is the Intent ot the Post Office that, 
within those constratnts, ihe conditions 
under which the Amateur Service In New 
Zealand operates reflect the wishes of the 
majority of the users. It is Interesting to 
note here that the submissions were 
made by MZART on behalf of its members 
as the 'Voice" for the Amateur Service In 
ZL, but the Post Office saw tit to circular- 
ize ALL amateurs and allow them to indi- 
vidually suggest changes, thus providing 
for the 27 V& of licensed amateurs who are 
not association members to be heard on 
this Important subjecK 

A summary of the proposals follow/s; 
readers are reminded thai the changes 
are only suggested at this stage, but as 
they are the result of joint consultation, it 

60 73 Magazine • October, 1984 



Is probable the final draft wFII be very 

similar to the foHowEng, 

Qualifications: 3 levels of qualified op- 
erators: Novice, IMon-Morse, and General. 
(The littles are merely descriptive at this 
stage.) 

Entry may tae made at any one of the lev- 
els, and the Novice grade will tie non 'ter- 
minating. It will be possible to hold botii 
the Novice grade and Non-Morse grade of 
(^uaiification simultaneoiJSly- 

The Non-Morse grade is unchanged 
from the present Grade III, and the Gener- 
al grade will replace the existing Grade il 
and Grade I certificates. 

Examinations: Examinations will be 
held twice yearly and wiH consist of a writ- 
ten examination in two parts, a technical 
paper and a regulations and procedures 
paper. (Basically the same as at present.) 
The Morse test will remain an essential 
part of the Novice and General qualifica- 
tion, examinations, the scope of the test 
being widened to include a Knowledge of 
figures and common punctuation marks. 
It will be possible to obtain a partial pass, 
but credits for part passes will remain 
valid only for two further scheduled exam- 
ination dates- 

Privileges: The General qualification 
will attract the privileges currently 
granted to the hoEders of Grade i certifi- 
cates, e.g., ail bands, all modes. The Non- 
Morse qualification will have the same 
privileges as are currently available to 
Grade III certificate holders, e.g,, 27.12 
MHz, 51-53 MHz, and all bands above 144 
MHz, 

The Novice qualification will be non ter- 
minating, l,e,| it may be held indefinitely with- 
out a need to upgrade, and will carry the 
following special conditions and freguen- 
cies: Power restricted to 10 Watts do input 
to the final rf stage, and operations re- 
stricted to CW and AM {including $SB) in 
the bands 3525-3575 KHz and 2110O- 
21200 kHz, 

Log keeping: Consideration will be 
given to waive the recfuirement that ama- 
teur operators keep a station log in accor- 
dance with regulation 53. However, ama- 
teurs will be encouraged to Keep a log, 
recognizing that the document plays an 
Important part in some amateur activities. 

These proposals were sent to ail ama- 
teurs in ZL In April this year, and we had 
until May 31st to forward our submissions 
to the Post Office. On that date, several 
hundred amateurs had taKen the opportu- 
nity to reply to the Post Office on the 
paper, and to this date there have not 
been many ob|ections to the document, in 
the main. We now await the decision of 
our regulatory body with Interest. 

The second example ot cooperation and 
liaison res u fled from two remits passed at 
our recent annual conference in early 
June this year In Just under one month 
from the date of the passing of the resolu- 
tions, the Post Office implemented both 
proposals. They concern visiting ama- 
teurs and our Grade II! certificate holders. 

The ZLO visitors" call holders will not 
have to suffix their ZLO call with their 
home call sign as was required previously; 
now visiting hams will not have such an 
awfuf mouthful to say when working on 
the bands here in ZL, they will merely use 
their aMotle<i ZL® callsign. The otiier remit 
requested the Post Office to permit Grade 
III operators to use CW on their allotted 
frequencies. Previously, Grade III could 
not use the CW mode but were permitted 
to use all other modes. 

mT& 'N' PIECES 

Sllenl Keys recorded recently were D. 
{Dan) McMahon, ex ZL1CIVI, aged 88 years, 
a respected, retired Auckland Radio In- 
spector and long-time amateur and 

marine operator; and M. H. (Mark) Chyrton 



ZL1T3, another old-timer and well-re- 
spected amateur operator we li -Known to 
many overseas hams. 

Old -Timers Club 50 year certificates 
were recently presented to R. A. {Ray) An- 
derson ZL3JV and T. E. (Tom) Rowlands 
ZL3iX, and 60-year certificates went to T. 
R. (Tom) Glarkson ZL.2AZ, ex ZL2AR and 
ZL1F0, and H. N, (Nev) Shrimpton ZL2AUM. 
ex ZL4AO and ZL2BJ. Congratulations to 
these operators for their long and active 
career in amateur radio. 

Over recent columns I have been report- 
ing on ZL offshore islands and their re- 
spective amateur activities. This month i 
shall briefly tell you about another ZL off- 
shore island, but unfortunately the ama- 
teur activity would noi have been of any 
use to overseas amateurs as the operator 
was confined to VHF activities. 

Snares Islands, a small group of unin- 
habited islands 209 i<m southwest of Bluff 
(the southernmost port of ZL) at 48*3 
166^36'E. were discovered independently 
on the same day. November 23, 1791, by 
Vancouver in the Di^covefy, and B rough- 
ton in the Chatham. The group covers an 
area of approximately 360 hectares and 
consists of coarse granite with a covering 
of peaty soil. The soil is densely vege- 
tated, mainly by tupari (Olearia lyallli}, 
which creates an almost closed canopy to 
6 meters high. 

The Snares Islands are administered as 
a nature reserve under the Reserves Act 
by the Lands and Survey Dept., and entry 
is by permit only. This is due to the 
absence of introduced mammals and vir- 
tually unchanged vegetation and animal 
life. Their pristine state gives these 
Islands world recognition as important 
sanctuaries. 

During the three-month period Decem- 
ber, 1983, to February, 1964, P, J. Wilson 
ZL3TJD/A, ZL9TJ0 operated an amateur 
station on VHF from Snares Island. He op- 
erated on 2 and 6m with an Icom 260A into 
a 10 element yagi, and an Icom 505 into a 
5-element yagi. Both rigs were powered by 
gel batteries, ciiarged using a Honda 
generator. 

Contacts on 6 during the three-month 
period included VKs 1, 2, 3, 5, and 7, and 
ZLs 1,2, and 3, and ZL70Y; Chathams was 
heard, but unfortunately not worked; 2m 
contacts through repeaters at JnvercargitI 
and QueenStown were made as were five 
simplex contacts with ZL4 stations from 
the high part of the island. Signpost HiiJ, 
B2m above sea level. 

The trip to Snares Islands was made by 
a University of Canterbury field party, 
ZL3TJ0 being employed as a technician 
to assist with the penguin census and 
banding, as well as with some entomolog- 
ical collecting;. The visit was made possi- 
ble through a research grant provided by 
the Lands and Survey Department. (Infor- 
mation for this item was supplied through 
the courtesy of Break-in, the NZART montfv 
ly official journal.) 

The 24-GH2 record for ZLs was broken 
on April 7, 1984, when Tony ZLIBHX and 
Russeli ZL1BQK extended the communi- 
cation distance to 33 km, In the Ninety 
Mile Beach area in the North Auckland 
area. They used 25-mW Gunplexers^^^ in- 
to 17-dB gain horns and 30-iMH2 home^ 
brew (DJ7O0-deslgned) i-fs. Their report 
states the first contact was from Ah i para 
Lookout to Hakatere Forestry Observa- 
tion Post Then once they had established 
contact, Tony 2L1BHX moved up the 
beach, but after the distance was extended 
further, the salt-spray haze increased and 
copy was in and out quite rapidly^ so they 
decided to quit while still ahead of the old 
record. 

A "contest with a difference" Is held an- 
nually in ZL that always causes a lot of 
laughs — It is the QLF activity, this year 



held on Wednesday, August 15, 080OZ to 
100OZ. Its main object was to have a pack 
et of fun on SO meters. The rules are very 
simple, the execution a little difficult for 
some. The mode is CW, a straight hand 
key must be used, and operators use the 
hand not normally used, e.g., right-handed 
ops use their left hand and vice versa, if by 
chance you're ambidextrous, you must 
operate the key with your foot. Scoring is 
one point for each contact, with a bonus 
of one extra point for each contact where 
either operator is using "foot keying/' In 
the case where troth operators use foot key- 
ing, they score three points each for the 
contact. There's no prize, but the contes- 
tants sutmrilt their own score sheets and a 
winner is declared for this fun activity. 




PERU 

Luis E, Sifarez OA4f^O/yV5 
Apartado 669Q4 
Caracas J 061 -A 
S/enezuafa 

I have resided in Venezuela since 1973 
and have written several columns here 
about that country^ but as a Peruvian 
I miss the flag of my own country in "73 In- 
ternational" and that's the reason I'm now 
at my computer, writing about amateur 
radio in Peru. I hope that somebody down 
there in OA land feels motivated to tse- 
come a correspondent for "73 Interna- 
tional.*" 

I wish you readers to Know that I have 
little material since I left my country 11 
years ago, and certainly many things 
must be quite different. I have tried to get 
some news but really have not received 
much. In fact. It is very difficult to receive 
support from readers and from radio 
clubs, no matter their whereabouts. Pe<5- 
ple like to see their names printed and 
club members are delighted to see their 
clubs' activities published^ but when you 
try to get Information for publishing every- 
t)Ody says "I'll call you,.. I" Actually, 
nobody calls you back. The same with re- 
questing pictures or any printed material. 

Peru, the land of the IncaSi is located in 
South America facing the Pacific Ocean > 
between Ecuador and Chile. The territory 
has four natural regions: the Coast, the 
Sierra {AndesK the Selva (jungle), and the 
fourth, which is the territorial sea that ex- 
tends 200 miles from the coast. The 
Coasta Is almost only a strip of sandy land 
(almost never rains) but it has 23 valleys, 
one for each river, where most coastal 
cities are located. 

The Sierra Is ail the central region 
crossed by the Andes from north to south. 
In this territory is located the highest rail- 
road and one of the highest cities of the 
world. Here also Is located the highest 
lake in the world (Titicaca) and also the 
third highest mountain in the Americas. 

Peru, for communications purpose s^ is 
divided in 9 zones (call areas) as shown on 
the map. I remember that the OAii prefix 
was for maritime mobiles, but now the 
Radio Amaieur Caitbook lists several 
Peruvian warships with the OA4 prefix 
and the designation^ Radio Club Naval 
BAP (Ship name). I don't isnow the reason 
for this. There are no inhabited islands in 
the Peruvian sea, except those with navy 
installations. Thus I assume that the 0A8 
prefix should still be devoted to maritime 
mobiles. 

RadiChamateur licenses are of three 

Continued on page W4 



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DENTRON 



*^287 



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S^6 Unt of Atfy^ffi^Bfs on page S& 



73 Magazine • October, 1964 61 



}ohn S. Wikox KS4B 
640 Breton Bay Drive 
Leo/1 arc/tt>wn MD 20650 



A Tree-Mendous Vertical 

Build an 80m DX-getter that really grows on you. 



Eighty meters is a fun 
band. Something for ev- 
eryone is the byword. From 
the diverse nets entangling 
the top end, through the ca- 
sual groups and rag-chews 
in the spectrum, to the well- 
populated CW band, you 
are challenged not to find 
an entertaining operation. 
DX, especially in the winter 
months, is surprisingly 
good. With the sun^pot cy- 
cle approaching its mini- 
mum, we'll see it get even 
better. 

For you uninitiated, tune 



through the 3790-3800-kHz 
DX window some evening 
from sunset until a few 
hours after. For the most 
part, I guarantee you'll hear 
stateside stations working 
DX, What I can't guarantee, 
with your 30-foot-high load- 
ed dipole or ground-mount- 
ed trap vertical working 
against 3 radials, is whether 
you1l hear the DX stations. 
80 meters is no different 
in its antenna requirements 
than the other HF bands, A 
dipole or inverted-V hung a 
half-wave above ground is 




*0 f-1, 



£5 n. 



-£> 



~nr" 

TAPE 
TAG 




NYLON 
COftO 



LOOP 



Fig. 1. 
62 73 Magazine • October, 1984 



a good performer, as is a 
quarter-wave vertical work- 
ing against a good ground 
system. The only problem is 
that a half-wave at 3.8 MHz 
is over 120 feet. The oppor- 
tunity to construct such an- 
tennas eludes most of us 
because of space restric- 
tions or lack of green 
stamps to buy and plant 
large support structures. A 
forty-foot-high i n verted- V 
might bag WAS on the 3787- 
kHz CERATOL net during a 
winter season, but it lacks 
the zing needed for DX 
competitiveness. 

All is not lost! Described 
here is a low-angle radiator 
that anyone with a 40-foot- 
high tree in the vicinity of 
the ham shack can con- 
struct and use to gain that 
competitiveness on 80 
meters. 

Design of this antenna is 
an adaptation of the folded 
umbrella described by John 
Haerle WB5IIR.1 I suggest 
you obtain John's article for 
further information on this 
superior design. Construc- 
tion is simple, straightfor- 
ward^ and noncritical. No 
ground radials, base insula- 
tors, loading coils, or high- 
cost items are required. Ap- 
proximately 100 feet of 
small nylon line, some as- 
sorted TV hardware, a few 
ground rods, and four 90- 
foot lengths of any wire are 
all that's required. I recom- 



mend no. 14 insulated 
house wire, but Tve used 
no. 17 galvanized-steel 
electric-fence wire in one 
installation. 

Observing Fig, 1, you can 
see the idea is to cage the 
tree with wire. I use 4 wires, 
but I have the feeling more 
vertical wires along the 
trunk would be an improve- 
ment Sure, I know. Every- 
one says trees are great rf 
absorbers, but Til say this 
antenna plays as well as 
John's folded umbrella in 
my backyard. 

Attach four TV-standoff 
eyes at equal spacing 
around the base of the tree 
about a foot off the ground. 
Form a loop of wire through 
the eyes. Hammer in 
ground stakes by each eye 
and connect wire to the 
stake and loop by soldering 
or using small Servit^^^ con- 
nectors. This completes the 
ground system! A few radi- 
als will help if you have the 
room but are not neces- 
sary. 

Place four more eyes into 
the tree an inch or two 
above the ground-ring eyes. 
Form a wire loop through 
these eyes. Roughly mea- 
sure 90 feet of wire and at- 
tach an end to one of the 
eyes. Measure 40 feet from 
the eye and tag the wire, 
with some tape. Measure 25 
more feet and twist a loop 



r 






o -" o o o ■' 



* y<. tn. % ^vj -a; Jt^ 



Hf Equipment Regular SALE 

IC-740* 9-bard 200w PEP xcvr w/mic$ 1099.00 S99" 

*FREE PS-740 Internal Power Supply & 

$50 Factory Rebate * until gone! 



PS'740 Internal power supply...... 159 

*E)(-241 Martoumt 20 

*EX-242 FM unit , 39. 

*EX-243 Electronic keyer unit,. „„ 50. 



*FL-45 500HzCW(FJter(lstlF). 
*FL-54 270HzCWfflter(lstlF).... 

*FL-52A 500 Hz CW filter (2nd If] 
*FL^53A 250 Hz CW filter (2nd IF) 
*FM4A SSB filter {2nd IF) ........ 

SM-5 Spin electret desk microphone 
HM-10 Scanning mobile microphone 

liB-12 Mobile mount. ., 

*Optiom a/io for IC-745 fisted bef ow 

lC'73a 8-b3nd 200w PEP ncvr w/mic$e29. 

FL-30 SSB filter (passband tuning) 59, 

FL-44A SSB filter (2nd If) 159, 



59. 
47. 
96. 
96. 
159. 
39. 
39, 
19 



00 149^^ 

00 

00 

00 

50 

50 

50 89*^ 

SO 89'= 

00 144" 

00 

50 

50 

00 599*= 

50 

00 144»5 

50 

00 

50 

00 

00 

00 

50 

50 

00 ^BS^^ 

50 

50 

00 

50 

IC-745 9-band xcvr w/.l-SO Mhz re vr $999.00 769" 

PS-35 Internal power supply . 160.00 144" 

CFJ-455K5 2.8 kHz wide SSB filter 4.00 

HHi'il Hand microphone . , . , 39.50 

SH-fi Desk micropfione 39.00 

*See IC-740 Ikt above for other options (*) 



FL-45 500HzCWfiHer.,. ,.„. 

EX-195 Marker unit... ............ 

EX-202 LOA interface; 730/2KL/AH-1 

EX-203 150 Hz CW audio filter 

EX-205 Transverter switching unit 
SM-5 Spin electret desk microphone 
KM- 10 Scanning mobile microphone 

MB-5 Mobile mount.. 

IC-720A 9 band xcvr/. 1-30 MHz rcvr $ 1349. 

FL-32 500 Hz CW filter..... 59. 

FL-34 5.Z kHz AM filter 49. 

SI*-5 8'Pin electret desk microphone 39. 
116-5 Mobile mount.,.,.,*... 19. 



59. 
39. 
27. 
39, 
29. 
39. 
39, 
19. 




IC-751 9-bandKcvr/.l'30MHzrcvr $1399.00 

PS-35 Internal power supply,.,.,.. 160.00 

FL-32 500 Hz CW fiiter (1st IF) 59.50 

FL-S3 250 Hz CW filter (1st IF) 48,50 

FL-52A 500 Hz CW filter (2nd IF)... 96.50 

FL-53A 250 H2 CW filler (2nd IF),.. 96.50 

FL-33 AM filter .., ,.,.. 31.50 

FL-70 2.8 Khz wide SSB filter 46.50 

HII-12 Hand microphone 39.50 

SII-6 Desk microptione 39.00 

CR-G4 High stability reference xtal 56.00 

RC-10 External frequency controller 35.00 

MI48 Mobile mount... 19.50 

Options: 720/730/740/745/751 Regular 

PS-15 20A external power supply...,. 1149.00 

EX- 144 Adaptor f or GF4/PSvl 5 . . , . 6.50 



1199 
144" 



89« 
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SALE 

134" 




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CF-1 Cooling fan for PS-15 
PS- 20 20A switching psw/speaker... 
CC-1 Adapt, cable; HF r3dio/PS-20 

CF-1 CoolingfanforP$-2G.,... 

EX-310 Voice synth for 751, R-llk 
SP-3 External base station speaker ... 
Speaker/Phone patch - specify radio 

BC-lOA Memory back-up 

EX-2 Relay boK with marker ..,.,..._ 
AT- 100 lOOw 3-band aytomatic ant tuner 
AT- 500 500w 9^ ba nd a li tomatic a nt tu ne r 
MT-lOO Manual antenna tuner........ 

AH-1 5-band mobile antenna w/tuner 
PS- 30 Systems p/s w/cord, S-pin plug 

GC-4 World clock ...„....., 

HF it near amplifier 

IC-2KL w/ps 160- 15m solid state amp 

VHF/UHf base mutti-modes 
IC-251A* 2m FM/SSB/CW transceiver 

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10.00 
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39,95 

49,50 

139.00 129" 
850 

34.00 
349.00 314*5 

449,00 399" 
249.00 224" 
289.00 259" 
259.95 233" 
99,95 94" 
Regular SALE 
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Regular SALE 
$749.00 549" 

until gone! 



I C- 55 ID 30 Watt 6m transceiver..... 

PS-20 20A switching ps w/speaker 

EX'106 FM option... 

BC-lOA Memory back-up ,.,. 

SM-2 Elect ret desk microphone .... 
IC-271H lOOw 2m FM/SSB/CW xcvr 
IC-471H 75w 430-450 SSB/CW/FM xcvr 

PS-35 Internal power sjpply ....,,. 

PS-15 20A power supply 

IC'271A 25w 2m FM/SSB/CW xcvr... 

AG-20/EX-338 2m preamplifier.... 
rC-471A 25w 430450 SSS/CW/FMKcvr 

PS-25 Internaf power supply 

EX-310 Voice synthesizer 

Hlll~12 Hand microphone 

SM-6 Desk microphone ............ 

VHF/UHF mobile mukt-modes 
IC-290H 25w2mSSB/FMxcvr,TTPmic 
IC-490A lOw 430-440 SSB/FM/CW xcvr 
VHf/UHF/1.2 GHz FM 
1C-22U lOw 2m FM non-digital xcvr 

EX- 199 Remote frequency selector 



$699.00 599" 
229.00 199" 
125.00 112" 
8.50 

39 00 
899.00 799" 
1099.00 Call 
160.00 144" 
149.00 134" 
699 00 619" 

56.95 
799.00 699" 

99.00 89" 

39,95 

39,50 

39,00 

549,00 489" 
649,00 579" 
Regular SALE 
239,00 249" 
35,00 




Closeout Item Regular NOW 

IC-25H 45w. 2m FM w/up-dn TTP mic 389.00 299" 

BU'IH Memory back-up .......... 38.50tlO"° 

t BU IH SIO purciiased with iC'25H, otherwise S38.50 



IC-27A Compact 25w 2m FMw/TTP mic 
IC-27H Compact 45w 2m FM w/TTP mic 
IC-37A Compact 25w 220 FM, HP mic 
IC-47A Compact 25w 440 FM, HP mic 

LIM6/EX-388 Voice synthesizer... 
IC-120 Iw 1.2 GHz FM transceiver.... 
6m portable 
IC-505 3/lOw 6m port. SSB/CW jccvr 

BP-10 Internal f^icad battery pack 

BP-15 AC charger............. 

EX-Z48 FMunit. 

LC-IO Leather case 



«■■■ + ■ + ■■ p 



369.00 

409.00 

449.00 

469.00 

29.95 

499.00 

Regular 

$449.00 

79.50 

12.50 

49,50 

34,95 



329" 
369" 
399" 
419" 

449" 
SALE 

399" 




Ft and- held Transceivers 
Deluxe models Regular SALE 

IC-02A for 2 meters $ 319.00 289" 
IC-02AT w/DTMF 349.00 314" 

IC 04A for 440 MHz TBA 
1C-04AT w/DTMF..... 379,00 339" 

Starfdard models Regular SALE 
fC-2A for 2 meters $ 239.50 2W^ 
IC-2AT with TTP..,.., 269.50 21 9»= 

IC-3A for 220 MHz... 269,95 234" 
1C-3AT with TTP 299.95 239" 

IC-4A for440MHz.., 269.95 234" 
IC-4AT with TTP 299.95 239" 

/\cce55orre5 for Deluxe rrtodeh Regular 

BP-7 aoOmah/ 13.2V Nicad Pak - use BC'35 67,50 
BP-8 800mah/3,4V Nicad Pak - use BC-35... 62.50 
BC-35 Drop in desk charger -all batteries.... 69.00 

BC-16A Wall charger ' BP7/BPB 10.00 

Accessories for both models Regular 

BP-2 425mah/7.2V Nicad Pak - use 8C35.... 39.50 
BP-3 Extra Std 250 mah/8.4V J^icad Pak .... 29,50 

BP-4 Alkaline battery case 12,50 

BP-5 425mah/10.8V Nicad Pak - use BC35 49.50 

CP-1 Cig, lighter plug/cord - BP3 or DIx. 9.50 

DC-1 DC operation pak for standard models 17.50 
LC-2AT Leather case for standard models..... 34.95 

LC-14 Soft case for Deluxe models 17.95 

HM-9 Speaker microphone, .., 34.50 

HSIO Boom microphone/headset 19.50 

HS-IOSA Vo)t unit for HS-10(dk only] 19.50 

HS-IOSB PTTunitforHS-lO 19,50 

HL-1 2m 2.3w in/lOw out ampiifier SALE 79.95 

Ml-25 2m 2.3w in 20w out amplifier.... SALE 179.95 

3A-nN Optional TT Pad -2A/3A/4A..,. 39.50 

SS-32M Commspec 32 -tone encoder 29,95 






latM*:^™-- 



i$.ll^l . 



/^^N: 



UK f^ 9» tm 






W «r S^ «i^ 



- -WMt-SSHK 



Shortwave r (reivers 

R-71A 100 Khz 30 Mhz digital receiver 

FL-32 500 Hz CW filter 

EX-310 Voice synthesizer 

RC-11 Wireless remote controller... 

CR'64 High stability oscillator xtal 
R-70 100 KhZ'30 Mhz digitai receiver 

EX' 257 FM unit . .^ . i . . , . , 

iC-7072 Transceive interface. 720A 

FL-44A SSB filter (2nd IF).,., 

FL^63 250 Hz CW filter (1st IF) 

SP-3 External speaker ..,.. 

CK-70(EX-299) 12u DC option 

MB-12 Mobile mount 



f i « 4- P 



H ■ ^ P -F 1 « I 



Regular SALE 
$799.00 689" 

59.50 

39.95 

59.95 

56.00 
749,00 599" 

38.00 
112.50 
159.00 144" 

48.50 

49,50 
9.95 

19,50 




JiSAm 



Order Toll Free: 1-800-558-0411 



HOURS: Mon. thru Fri. 9-5:30; Sat 9-3 

Milwaukee WATS line 1-800-558-0411 answered 
evenings uniil 8:00 pm, Monday thru Thursday. 

Please use WATS line for Placing Orifers. 

For other information, etc. please use Regular line 



In Wisconsin (outside Mitwaukee Metro Area) 

1-800-242-5195 



1 ^i h\ I lU ;i 4 llilllliJM*llIU 



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Ohio WATS 1800-3620290 



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Phone (312} 631-5181 



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73 Magazine * October, 1984 63 



state of the Art Kits by Hal-Tronix, Inc. 



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in the wire. Attach about 30 
feet of nylon cord to the 
loop. This is shown in Fig, 1. 
Now climb the tree with the 
loose end of the wire, mak- 
ing sure it lays close along 
the trunk. When you reach 
the tag height, screw in four 
more eyes. Again, form a 
loop of wire through them. 
Thread the loose end of the 
wire through one eye and 
throw the remaining wire 
and nylon cord out through 
the branches, A weight will 
help. Bring up three nriore 
wires using the respective 
eyes. I did these one at a 
time to keep them from tan- 
gling. The branches of my 
oak tree were enough to 
contend with! 

At the top standoff eyes, 
attach a 10- to 15-foot wire 
to each. Either continue up 
the tree with them to anoth- 
er eye and wire-loop ar- 
rangement, or if youVe mn 
out of tree, lay them out on 
limbs to form a semblance 
of a top hat 

When you're back on the 



ground, pull the four loose 
wire ends in to the tree 
trunk and connect them to 
their respective eyes as 
shown in Fig. 1. All con- 
nections should be sol- 
dered or connected with 
Servits, 

Open-wire feed from an 
unbalanced matchbox will 
net you all bands from 160 
through 10 meters. If you 
desire coax feed, you might 
have to adjust the top-hat 
length to resonate the an- 
tenna to your preferred 80- 
meter frequency, although 
you'll find if s quite broad- 
banded. 

Now try 3790-3800 kHz 
some evening and enjoy 
working DX. I know it 
doesn't outperform WICF^s 
phased array, but then I 
haven't wired the other 
three trees ?■ 

Reference 

1- John M. Haerle WB511R, 
"Folded Umbrella Antenna" 
Ham Radio, May, 1979. 



AMATEUR TELEVISION 




KPA51 WATT 70 CMATV TRANSMITTER BOARD 

• APPLJCATtQiNS: Cordless portable TV camera for races & ofher pybllc service 
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WHAT J$ neOUIRED FOR A COMPLETE OPERATING SYST^NT? A TV ^t wUh a 
TVC-2o*TvC -i ^20 4^ mHz (o channel 3 downcofiifertef, /Ocmantenn^^ai^dcoajt 
CAbte to recerwfi Padi^ge up tr»e KPA5, add 12 to 14 vdc antenna, an-d any tv 
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P/C. ELECTRONICS 

Tom W60RG Maryann WB6Y5S 





2522 Paxson Lane 
Arcadia CA 91006 



64 73 Magazine * October. 1984 




Announces: 

A User-Friendly Software Package 
Designed For Easy Operation of Morse. 
Baudot, ASCII, and AMTOR. A Feature- 
Packed Program 

MAIN MENU SCREEN 



hti:niin:ss 



MBA-TORT" 
COPYRIGHT 1984 BY AEA 

SELECT: 
M. MORSE 
A. ASCII 
R. RTTY 
T. AMTOR 
U. AUTO AMTOR 
X. AUTOCALL 
C. COMMANDS 
0, OPTIONS 




Now Avaiiat}le for the Commodore 64 Computer in Two Versions. 
MBA-TOR 64 Software Package Only, at $119.95 Suggested Retail. 
MAP-64/2 Software with Self-Confained Interface $239.95 Retail. 

Just Look At Some Of The Features: 



OPTIONS MENU SCREEN 



*- CW receive and transmit at 5 to 99 wpm, auto speed track on receive. 
*- 7 bit ASCII, receive and transmit at 110, 150 or 300 bauds. 
*~ 5 bit Baudot, receive and transmit at 60, 67, 75, 100 or 132 wpm. 
*^ TOR, receive and transmit ARQ (Mode A) or PEC (Mode B) and listen, 
*^ Beacon and WRU system, includes ORG check before XMT, won't QRM. 

Message forwarding system, AUTO-AMTOR still functions in this mode. 

Selects command menu. 
*- Selects options menu. 

+ Complete precompose sptft-screen display wfth status information. 
+ Complete printer control including SELCALL/WRU printer control. 





hh;mm 


1. CALLSIGN ?????? 


S. SELCALL 


7777 

* * * HP 


T. ARQTIMEOUT 


30 


U. USDS 


ON 


M.MORSE FILL (BT) 


OFF 


R. RTTY SYNC (NUL) 


OFF 


A. AUDIO FEEDBACK 


OFF 


C. AUTOCR 


ON 


L. AUTOLF 


ON 


B. BEACON RECORD 


OFF 


W. WRAP-AROUND 


ON 


K. CW BREAK-IN 


OFF 



ss 



0. OUTPUT MODE WORD 



COMMAND MENU SCREEN 



hliimmiss 



L LOAD 

E, EDIT 

W. MOVE 

S. SAVE 

X. SET XMT BUFFER SIZE 

C. SET COLOR 

T. SET TIME 



24-hDur clock, shows time in hours, minutes and seconils. 

Allows entry of your cillsign for auto operations. 

Derived from your eallsign automaticaily, can be changed. 

Sets ARQ phasing calls from 1 to 99 seconds. 

Unshift on space, toggles on or off. 

Transmits Morse Idle character during breaks in KBD actfvtty; 

Transmits RTTY idle character during breaks in KBD activity. 

Produces click in monitor audio when any key is pressed. 

Sends cdfriage return the first space after 65 characters. 

Sends a line feed after each carriage return. 

Allows the beacon to be recorded to the QSO buffer for logging. 
'^ Sends CR/LF if there is a space in the last 5 positions on the line. 
-^ Automatic transmit/receive switching during QSO. 

Transmit In word mode (text sent on space) or character mode. 

+ Break-in buffer on all modes, toggle QSO buffer on or off. 

+ CW speed lock and Farns worth low-speed CW. 

+ 10 soft-partitioned^^ message buffers pius direct from disk or tape 



-^ Allows loading of message or QSO buffers from disk or cassette. 
^^ Word processor type edit functions on message and QSO buffers. 

Allows transmission of QSO buffer without disk or cassette systems 
•*- Allows you to save message and QSO buffers to disk or cassette. 
-^ Set the transmit pre-type buffer to any size you like. 
'^Choose among any of 16 colors for character, screen or border, 
*- Lets you set the time of day clock. 



+ Insert QSO station's call into any buffer while stiti copying. 
+ Includes a complete manual, keyboard overlays and cables for 

the AEA Computer Patch™ or Micropatch^^ Interface. 
+ For more information call AEA, or see your AEA Dealer. 



Advanced Electronic Applications, Inc. 



P.O. BOX C-2160 • LYNNWOOD, WA 9d036 • (206) 775-7373 



TELEX: 152571 AEA INTL 

73 Magazine • October, 1984 6S 



Bob Eidndge VE7BS 
Erickson Road 
PembGfton BC VON 2L0 
Canada 



When Darkness Calls 

On 160m, success means diligent planning. These tips 
on gray-line propagation are your key to Top-Band DXCC. 



Anyone who works Top 
Band knows that strange 
and wonderful things hap- 
pen around sunset and sun- 
rise (twilight at your end of 
the QSO, at the other end, or 
at both). There are some in- 
teresting reasons for this, 
and if you have a better un- 
derstanding of what causes 
the DX to emerge at these 
special times, you have a 
head start in the drive for 
WAC or DXCC 1 60. 

"Sunrise" in this context 
may last quite a while, from 
sometinne before the sun ac- 
tuary appears until some- 
time after it has cleared the 
horizon. The duration of the 
effect depends on the lati- 
tude of the focation and the 
time of year. For example, in 
midwinter at the equator the 
time window is very narrow, 
about ±5 minutes; at 50^ 
about ±45 minutes; at 60^ 
about ±90 minutes. If you 
have watched the sun rise in 



the tropics, you will have no- 
ticed that it rises almost due 
east and zooms straight up 
into the sky very quickly. In 
polar regions it creeps out of 
the SSE horizon and travels 
almost horizontally, so it is 
not easy to decide just when 
it has actually arrived. 

Finding the Times of 
Sunrise and Sunset 

There is no problem in 
knowing when to expect 
your own sunrise and sunset, 
but how can you find the 
times for a particular DX lo- 
cation? Here are some of the 
ways: 

1)The "DX Edge'^ is a 
slide-rule-type operating aid 
made especially for this pur- 
pose and has information on 
zones, prefixes, etc., as well. 
It is simple to use and is 
available for $14.95 post- 
paid from: The DX Edge, PO 
Box 384, Madison Square 
Station, New York NY 101 59. 



^ . _ longitude W cos-^(tan a x tan latitude N) 

15 15 

gj . longitude W cos -"'(tan a x tan latitude N) 

15 15 

Fig, 1 Formulas to calculate sunrise and sunset in decimal 
UTC where "a'' is the inclination of Earth's axis with respect 
to the direction of the sun at that particular time of year. 

66 73 Magazine • October, 1984 



2) If you have a calculator 
which handles trigono- 
metric functions (and you 
know how to use it), the 
times can be calculated us- 
ing the formulas in Fig. 1 . To 
use these formulas you have 
to know the inclination of 
Earth's axis with respect to 
the direction of the sun at 
that particular time of year. 
John Devoldere ON4UN has 
a table showing this in his 
book, 80-Meter DXing, and 
can also supply a computer 
printout of times by prefix. 
An inclination table can also 
be found in K6UA's ''Cray 
Line'' article in CQ, Septem- 
ber/1975, p. 30. 

3) If you have a Commo- 
dore computer, you can buy 
a collection of programs 
(which includes an excellent 
sunrise/sunset program by 
David Williams) for only 
$10.00 from Public Domain, 
5025 Rangeline Road, West 
Milton OH 45383. If you 
own a Commodore 64, ask 
for Collection #4 and you'll 
get 37 other programs as 
well for your ten bucks — 
can't beat 25<F a program! 
You enter the latitude and 
longitude of the location 
and the date; if you wish, it 
will automatically convert 
to UTC (GMT for the old- 



fashioned or Zulu for some). 
The computer also asks for 
the angle of the sun over the 
horizon. 1 enter 0°. The au- 
thor of the program put in 
^J5^ as "a widely-used fig- 
ure," It makes only a few 
minutes difference in the 
calculation, but if anyon!| 
out there in 73-land knows 
what this is all about, write a 
letter to 73 and let the rest 
of us know. 

4) Finally, you can use Fig. 
2, which is taken from a 
CCIR Report and is good for 
anywhere in the world at 
any time of the year The 
time scale is in local stan- 
dard time, so uSe the longi- 
tude of the station concerned 
to convert to Universal Time. 

On the month axis, esti- 
mate the position of the spe- 
cif ic day on the scale. This is 
very important in spring and 
fall; for example, you will 
see from the chart that at 
50^S on the 1st of February, 
sunrise is about 4:40, but by 
the end of the month it is 
5:25. 

The Cray Line 

The great circle line 
around Earth dividing the 
dark side and the sunlit side 
of the planet is called the 
"terminator." It is not a very 



sharp division except near 
the equdtui, dnd radio ama- 
teurs call it the gray line, a 
descriptor brought into 
radio term inology by KbUA 

On the daylight side of 
Earth, the D-layer of the ion- 
osphere IS heavily ioni/.ed 
and absorbs most of the 160- 
and SO-meter signals, pre- 
venting them from reaching 
the reflecting layers above 
At night the Delayer has de- 
cayed and these signals can 
easily go through to the 
upper layers and be reflect- 
ed down to more distant lo- 
cations. 

At the tenninator, a spe- 
cial condition exists Fig J 
shows the conditions in the 
ionosphere which help the 
DXer at the eastern end of 
the darkness path at sunrise 
(turopean working into W, 
or W working into )A, for ex- 
ample). 

Ionization builds up first 
in the upper layers, and in 
fact never entirely disap- 
pears from them in the mid- 
dle of the night At twilight 
the D-layer is only partially 
ionized too little to absorb 
the IbO-nieter signal, and 
too much to allow the 
signal to pass straight 
through to the upper layer 
and be reflected down to 
medium distances (as it 
does during the night) 

The partial ionization 
causes the signal to be re- 
fracted (bent) in the D~ 
layer and it may travel hun 
dreds or thousands of miles 
within the layer before go- 
ing on its way to the upper 
layer. Nut only does it go 
further before hitting that 
layer, but it also arrives at a 
narrower angle, making for 
both better reflection and a 
longer hop. 

You can see that for a sta- 
tion nghi nvdi the termi- 
nator, an antenna with a 
highangle vertical takeoff 
lobe may sometimes reach 
out further than one with an 
antenna which concentrates 
the signal closer to the hori- 
zon, but the low-angle an- 
tenna will stay in contact for 
a longer period after sunrise 



Sunrise 



Sunset 





50*S4i* 20=^ 0* Ifl^ #0* SO* ii*M 



02 



oa 



04 



•S 



Of 



07 



01 



09 




Local Standard Tinne 



Fig. L Times of sunrhe and sunset anywhere in the world (in local standard i/mej. 



There is another phenom- 
enon which helps the Top 
Bander at sunrise. On the 
dark side of Earth, the Flay- 
er is higher than it is on the 
sunlit side At the termina- 
tor, where the transition 
from one height to the other 
occurs, the layer is tilted and 
signals reflected from it 
come down at a more useful 
angle for DX working Fig 3 
illustrates this effect which 
was explained in 1979 by 
Hortenbach and Rogler^ 

So what do we do about it? 

• At your sunrise, look for 
signals from the west of you 

• At your sunset look tor 
signals from the south and 
southeast (along the termi- 
nator] and then from the 
east 

• If you are in darkness, 
look for signals from the 
east at the distant station's 
sunrise or before iL 

• If both you and the dis- 
tant station are on the edge 
of the darkness path, there ts 
an especially good chance 
of propagation between 
you ■ 



References 

1 John Devoldere 0N4UN, 80- 
Meter DXing^ Communications 
Technology, Greenville NH 
03048, 

2 K6UA, W6NLa, and K6SSS, 



FUYER 



"The Gray Line Method of DX- 
ing/* CO, September, 1975. 
3. K. J. Hortenbach and F. Rog- 
ler, "On the propagation of 
short waves over very long dis- 
tances. . /\ T&lecommunica' 
tfon Journal, June, 1979. 



D LAYER 




k 



^ X Sunrise in Europe. 

73 Magazine * October, 1984 67 



I 



/..I 



BmERN BUY 



73 CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING 



Individual (nDncomn>tfcial^ 
Cofnmerc^al . 



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15< pel woi6 

. 50< p^r word 

Prapaymenl by check or mon^y order \s required with your ad. No discounts 01 
commissions are avaitabte. Please m»M.e your payment to ?3 Rales tor multiple 
tnsertioris are available on request 

ADVERTISING COPV 

AidTveriiismg musi perfain to amateur radto protiucts or servECes. No special 
layouts Of positior^s are possible- All adveritsing copy itiust be su&nnitted type^ 
written {doubl^spac«d]i ar^J m^ist include lull name and address Copy hmtied to 
100 wordSn maiimuni Count only words in text AtSdress, Uee, 

73 canfKrt vef »f y advertising ciatms and oannoi tw rield fesponsibte for cfaim^ 
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Copy must be receive<j m Petertxirough by the 51 h 0I I he second month pre- 
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MATERIALS 
Send lo Advertising Deparlmeni, 73, Elm Street, Peierbofough NH 0345B. 



MOBILE IGNITION SHIELDING. Free Htera^ 
tyre. Estes Engineering, 930 Marine Drive. 
Port Angeies WA 36362. BNBOOe 

WANTED: Cash paid fo* Vim SPEED RA^ 
DAR EQUIPMENT Wnte or call Brian R 
E^ierman, PO Bq% 8141, Norfhfield IL 
6Q0da:{3lZ]h2&l-@WV BNB03Q 

MILITARY TECHNICAL MANUALS lor old 
jUYd oli&otete equipment 60-page tataiog. 
$3.00. Military Technical Manual Service. 
22^ Senasac Ave.. Lone Beach CA 90615. 
BNe045 

MAGICOM RP SPEECH PROCESSORS- 
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speech quahty, simple mstalfation. af- 
focdable prices! SASt for daia and cost. 
Mag^com, PO Bo* 655^, flellewue WA 
96007 &NB101 

RCPAtft alignment, calibratirm. Collins 
written e^iimate^. $25. nor^Coliins, S50- 
KlMAN.<Z07H9&-22tS. aN&1|7 



IMBA— International Mission Radbo A^so- 
elation helps re^issionarles by supplying 
equipfnent and running a net for I^efh dalty 
eMcept Sunday. 14 280 MHz. ^900-2000 
GMT. Br. Bernard Frey. 1 Pryef Manor FkL. 
Larchmoni NY 1053B aNei23 

ELECTRON TUBES: Receiving, transmu- 
ting, microwavo. . .all types available. 
Laroe stock. Next -day deli^r«fy m niost 
cases. Daily Electronics, t4t26 WIHow 
Lane, Westminster CA 926^3; (Fl4hS94 
136a. 6NS150 

SCIENCE SOFTWARE for ViC'20 and 
PC-2 Radio astronomy, moon bounce, 

amateur sateNlti^s, etc. David Eagle. 7952 
W. Quarto Dr., Littleton CO fl0123; [303)- 
972 4020 BNBI S3 

FREE CATALOG— computer supplier. 
Control Oaia SS/DD. $^^. DS^D. $3T. Dy- 
san SS/00. S3CI; DaOO S40 Ribbons: 
MXaO. 17.60. MXIOO. St4. Okidata B2-9Z 
t5 50; Ofcidaia 84, $5{J0, Diatrfo Hytype II 
nvs. £4 40; Diablo Hylype 11 fiyton. S4.80: 
NEC Spinwriter m/:&. $4.7^; &ou1let surge 
and spike power strip, $49 J5, Stiipping, 



HAt/i HELP 



I need someone to ad|LJS( a Mite tele- 
typewriter, i Will pay all repair costs and 
shipping. 

Harold Parlis WB2BNH 

24 Caryl Avenue 6-C 

Vonkers NY 10705 

tB14V963^}6a9 



Telegraph or wirelBss key, made in 
South America Tof use in South America, 
wanted for a private collection. 

Dick Randall K&ARi 

1263 Lakehursl Rd. 

Llvermofe CA 9455Q 

68 73 Magazine * October, 1984 



I need help locating design data and 
wiring Information for wiring power I fans- 
formers. 

Howard Muften N7FOA 

1^ esi.se 

Eptirati WA ddS23 



I need sc Hematic diagrams arid align- 
ment in^trucUons for Hallicfafters SXlt7 
and HT44, i will pay copying cost ar>d 
postage or copy and return. 

William Hartley H2RDS 

1201 Paul Ave. 

Sdienectady NY 12306 



£3.00, Ma St efcardA/isa— include number 
and expiration dala OUTPRINT. 44 For* 
rest Road. Bandoipb NJ 07969. BNB1S9 

SWL REPORT FORMS designed for maxi- 
mum information at your listening post. 
Give real rrw^anmg to your DK report s. De- 
tails 2 iPtCs Roul. 3/137 Cttamplon St, 
Cliristchurch. NewZeatafid. BNB180 

DIGITAL AUTOMATIC DISPLAYS for 
FT- Ids, TS-520fi, ColHns. Drake. Swan. 
Heath, and others. Six 1/2 ' digits. Write 
for information Grand Systems Dept. A^ 
PO Box 3377. Blaine WA 98230: 
(604)'5304551. BNBie3 

VlC-20/C'64 budget priced intertace^soft- 
ware for lull CW icv/xml. Features LED 
tuning, programmable messa9e buffers, 
large type-anead buffer, and rf>ore Works 
with any rig. Specify computer and dish or 
cassette; $39,60. Paul Ros^Aran; N5FQN 
Route 4. BoJi 24D. Taylor TX 76574 aNei9l 

ANTENNAS WANTED: ^e pay casli lor 
surplus amateur ar^d CB antennas. Musi 
be m original boxes and in reasonably 
900d coridilYOn S^nd a l^st or calt H C 
Van Valifah Co.. n40 Hickory Trail, Down- 
ers Grove IL 60515 RNBI95 

NEW HAfWSWL SOCIETY for unity of 
thought ^ learning Open to alt, Many top- 
ics, awards, free ad space in periodical, 
society net. museum participation Shack 
pics & QSL^ welcome. Writers needed. 
SAS£ tor info to RCSW. 32 Appleg.ale. 
Bennington VT 06201. BNB197 

KT5S SUPER DX SLOPER 80- 10m only 
S59 95. KT5B mulliband dipde 160- 10m 
only 15995 2 kW roiter inductor ^28 uHj 
£47.50 Wealhw-boot fcit tPL259> SBSS 
p.p, Much rrvofe! Info aYaitable. Kilo Tec. 
PO Box 1001. Oak View CA 93022. (SOSf 
646^9645. BNBISO 

YOU (CAN BE1 VERSUS CRtME. Security 
alarm systems easily ] earned, Employ- 
ment business teTrltlc. Age no barrier Get 
in now. Don't delay, information package 
$2.Q0. Security Electronics International, 
PO BoK 1456 RK, Grand Rapids Ml 49501. 
BNB203 

WANTED-fytlUTARY SURPLUS RADIOS. 
We need Collins 54fiL-4, 54au 1. 5487 V, 
4260-2, yHF7t&A. etST. Af*C-S4. ARC t02. 
RT.7I2^ARD10S. AflOlt4, ARC*115, ARC- 
tte, RT.823/AR&l3t w FM62a WikoK a07A 
or HT-B57^AROl34, ARC- 1 59. RTH67 Of 
RT-t15&AfC-l64, ARC-174, RT-I29i/ARC 
186, APX-F6, APN 171. MRC-98. 7%%F At2 
HF 405. Collins antenna couplers 490T-1. 
49IIT'2, 490T9, CU-l65aA/ARC, CU 1669/ 
GRC- CU l402fARG, 4903-1, CUt23S^ARC 
105. Top dollar paid or trade for new ama 
teur gear Write or phone Bill Slep, Slop 
Electronics Company. Highway 441, Otto 
NG 287S3; (r04)'524 7519, 8NB204 

COMMODORE 04 CW INSTRUCTOR PRO 
GRAM. Genera I es CW on TV speaKtir R.-jn 
dom code, keyboard input, or prerecorded 
CW tesis. Character speed and spacing 
set Independently, Designed for classes 
arkd increasing code speed. S 15.00 ^disk- 
ette or cassette (specify}. Dennis Olvef 
N7BCU. 2200O S Tonya CI . Oregon City 
OR 97045. BNB205 

FOR SAL& LNW System ExpafBion 2 S250. 
Holmes Sprinter |45, Langley amber CRT 
$50, TEK'535A manual S30. rnint 5iJ4 S2O0. 
TEK-585A on cart wfmanual & 3 plug in 
units $425, 4-lOOOA used/tested $50. Rus 
sell L Lawson, 124 Soutn Grand St,. West 
SuTfield GT 06093; {203>668-2B7l. BlSfB206 



CHESS PLAYERS— RacJio<hess sched- 
ules, match^. tournaments. Details: K2ViJ* 
Box 682^ CdIo{^ NJ 06211 BNe207 

COMlitODORE 64 OWNERS: Now a ci^tom 
CW cartridge wiih yout name aiKf call. 
Seivd aitd receive up to 30 wpm with split- 
screen display Complete with rnstruc- 
tlons and schematics fof home-brew inter- 
face only $3895 Cusiom CW 2.0 from ALC 
Electronics, 718 W. Coral Ave.. Rtdgecrest 
CA 93555; (619K375-7203. BNB20a 

TWO METER QUAD— two-element plastic 
construction. Asseriibly (equlred. S21,50 
+ $4.00 s&h. Michigan residents add .86 
state tax. Mercury Products. Box 596. Sau- 
gatuck Ml 49453 BNB209 

EtMAC 6874s— New, (ale manufacture^ 
ilBO. W9ZH, (414H34'293fl 8NB210 

SES receivers & dOfwnconv. w/lnstr.. capa- 
ble of receivtng between 2 GHz & 4 GHz. 
limabie audio, as is- flOOOO^I. Call VI, 
18181-705-2422 BNB211 

2000 -t^ new cofnponent parts: capacitors, 
resistors, duod^. transtonners, etc. St. 200 
or best Offer Call VI, ^%8y7^2^2. BNB212 

CK7 REPAIRS. Mark Mandelkern, 2315 
Derby St., Berkeley CA 94705; (415)549' 
9210. BIMB213 

SCHiMATtCS: Radio receivers I920si60s. 
Send name, brand, model oo„ SASE Scara- 
nvelia. PO Bo* r. Woonsocket HI 02895- 
0001 6NB2t4 

BACK ISSUES Of 7J: January 1969 
ttuough February 1962 complete except 
lot March 1980. Prefer pickup or yuu pay 
Shipping 13 year^ of articles' $130.00. 
Steve Gufdstein. 99 Chartes St., Reading 
MA 01867, ^6^7^944-71(K eves before 11 
EOT. BNB2t5 

ENGINEERING SOFTWARE-Free flyer and 
money bacl>( guarantee CP/M, MSD05, 
TRSDOS. PL OTPRO— graph printing pro- 
gram, Lmear^logarithniic, multiple plots. 
grid Vines, labeling, S52.95. ACNAP— ana- 
lyzes actlve^passlve elec Ironic circuits, 
Monte Carlo, worst'Case, sensitivities 
$52,95. SPP— signal processing. FFT. iin* 
earrnonitr>ear, La Pi ace, transient analy- 
sis, more. $£2 95, BV Engineering. 2200 
Business Way. Suite 207, Riverside CA 
3250T; {7141-781^252 BNB216 

MAKE PRINTED CIRCUITS BOARDS With- 
out messy chemicals Cofnp^ete instruc- 
tions, $2,00 postpaid Kenneth Hand 
WB2EyF. PO Box 70ft, East Hampton HY 
11937 BNB217 

QSLS 4 RUBBER STAMPS. Top quality. 
OSL samples and stamp information 50<c. 
Ebbert Graphics D?. Box 70, Westerville 
OH J30B1 BTsiB?l8 

HAM RADIO REPAIR, lube through solid 
state. Roberl Hall Electronics. PO Qox 
8363, San Francisco CA 94128; {4061-729 
8200 BN8219 

HAM TRADER YELLOW SHEETS, m our 
23rd year. Buy, swap, sen ham^'ad^o geaf, 
Publistied twice a month. Adsqui^kty elf- 
cutate— no loofl wail Iw results SASE for 
sample copy. $9 for orw year (24 issues}, 
ROB 356 Wheaton I L 60189 BNB220 

DX HEAtKNG MAPS foi Bostm. NYC. Pt^iLa^ 
Baltimore, Dei roil. Atlanta. Chicago, Heitt 
Orleans^ Samt Louis^ Dallas. LA. t1 x 17 
$1 75 pp 22 ^ 34 $5.95 pp. Specify city. Bill 
Massey W2H0J, PO Box 397, Haines port 
NJ 0&036. BNB221 



SOCIAL EVENTS 



Listings in this ct^urnn am provit^Ki t/w* oi 
chafgs on a spsce-svaitabf^ basts The fot" 
lowing mformauofi sfjouid i>e inctuded in 
every snrroxjncemem: sponsor, event, date, 
time, piMce, ctfy^ state, admission charge (if 
anyl features, tAlk-in frequencies, and the 
name of whom to contact for further mtorma- 
tiof}. Announcements must be received by 73 
Magazine by the first of the month, two 
months prior to the month in which the event 
t^kBs piece. Mail to Editoriaf Offices. 73 MaQ- 
aiine^ Pine $t, Peterboroi/gh NH Q345B. 



OTTAWA ONT CAM 

cx;t 5-T 

The Ottawa Amateur Radio Club will 
ho^t thQ I6ihi annual Badio Society of Qtv 
larlo Convdntioo on Octobef 5-7, 1964, at 
Ihfi naw Wdstiri Hqt^ ifi Ottawa. Registra- 
tion Is SHOO. Ihe non-amateur progr^^ ps 
i4.S0, I he Friday -night eyeball and dance 
is $6-00, and rhe Saturday l^anqu^l and 
dance (i4-pieGe orchestra) is $27,00, Other 
features Include forums, papers, commer^ 
clal dlsplay^B all day Saturday, and a Sun- 
day-morning program. Talk-in on 146.34/ 
.94. For more information, contaci RSO 
Convention Committee, PO Box 15806, 
Station "F'\, Ottawa, Ont., Canada K2C 
3S7. 

WARRIKGTON PA 
OCT 6-7 

The Pack Bats (Mt, Airy VHF ARQ cor- 
tfelly invite a)l amateurs arvj tf^etr friends to 



the dtti annual Mid-AHantic VHF Confer- 
ence whjct^ wilt t>e held on Saturday, Octo- 
ber 6, 1984. from i:00 am to 5:00 pm. at the 
Warrfr\gton Motof Lodge, Route 6i1, War- 
rington PA, and to their 13th Pack Rat Hrnn- 
arama on Sunday, Octot^er 7. 1984, from 
7:00 am to 4:00 pm, rain or shine, at the 
Bucks County Drive-In Theater, Route 61 1^ 
Warrington PA. The conference will fealure 
an aH<lay VKF program, a cocktail hour 
and get-together al 6:30 pm, and a buffet 
dinr>er (SI 3.00 each) at 7:^ pm. Conference 
registration is i4 00 in advarvce ^before Sep- 
tember 23rd), $5.00 at the door, and irv> 
clud^ admistioci (o Ihe Hamarama. Ad- 
mission to ihe Hamarama flea market on 
Sunday is S3.00 arxS selling spaces are 
S5.0Q eactt The gate wiJI open at 6:00 am for 
seil^^ (bring your own tabiesl. Food and 
drinit will be available. TaikHn on 146.52 
MHz (W3CCX). For more irrformation. con- 
tact Hannarama '84, Po$t Office Box 311, 
Southampton PA 18966. or phone Lee A. 
Cohefi K3MXM at {2^5}^^5^4Q42. 



DEEAFfELO NH 

OCTB 

The Hoss trader 5' Fall Tailgate Swap- 
fest will be held on Saturday, October 6, 
1984, sunrise to aunsei, at the fairgrourids. 
Daerfieid UH. A^jmi^ion is S2.{30, which in^ 
taiigaters. For a tKsminal fee. camp- 



ir^ will be avaiiaible aft&r 4:00 pm on Friday 
(no reserved spaces). Profits benefit the 
S^rir>ers' Burn tnstllute and fast spring's 
donatfon was 55,@13. For a map or rrvore 
infofmatj^on, send an SASE to Joe Dema- 
so K1ROG, Stai Route, Box 5a, Bucksi>on 
ME 04416. 

HAMILTON ONT CAN 
OCT 6 

The Hamilton Amateur Radio Ciub. Inc., 
will hbold its 2nd annual flea market on Sat- 
urday, Ck^tober 6, 1§34, beginning at 8:30 
am, at Marritt Hail, Ancaster Fairgrounds, 
625 Highway 53 East. Admission is $2.00. 
Flea-market vendors' 8- foot tables are S4.00 
plus admission and commercial venciors' 
S-lool tables are $10.00 with admission in- 
cluded. There will be room for 150 vendors 
and setup will l;ke from 7:00 am to 8:30 am. 
Colf^, soft drinks, ami sandwiches will De 
avajlable, TalkHh on 14&1&146,76 IVE3NCF). 
For gpace reservations, contact HARC 
F^eaMarket Committee, PO Box 253, 
Hamilton, Gnu Canada LBH 3C& For 
more Information, contaci Stan VE3GF£ 
on VE3NCF. 

BALTIMORE MD 
OCT 7 

Ttre Columbia Amateur Radio Associa- 
tion will hold its Qth annual hamfest on 
Sunday, Octobef 7. 1964, from 8:00 am to 
3:30 pm, at the Howard County Fair- 
grounds (15 miles west of Ball I more, just 
off 1-70 on Route 144, 1 mile west of Route 
32). Admission is &3.00 and XYLs and chll- 
dren will be a dm! tied free. Tables are 
S6,00 additional if paid by September 30th 
and $8.00 additional after that date. Out- 



door tailgatir^ is £3 .00 additional and Irv 
door taltgatifig is $6.00 additional. Food 
wilt be available. Talk ih on 147.735/.135 
and 14632^,52. For table lesenrations and 
more informatJon. write Mike Vore W3CCV, 
9098 Lambskin L^ne, Columbia MD 21045, 
or phone i30lh992-4953. 



flOMEGA 
OCT 7 

The Rome Hamfesf will be held on Sun- 
day, October 7, 1984. beginning at 8:00 
am, at the Ctvic Center In Rome GA. Talk- 
In on 147.&O/,30, For more Information, 
phone T, J. Freeman a I (404)232 2B30. 



BENTON HARdOR Ml 
OCT 7 

The Blossom! and Amateur Radio A350- 
cJation will hmd its i9&4 Blossomland 
Bia$t on Sunday^ October 7. 1964, from 
8iM) am to 3:00 pm EDT, at Ihe Lake Michr- 
gan College Community Center. 1-94 Beit 
30, just west of Benton Kart)or Ml Admis- 
sion is $3.00 per person artd tabi^ are $5.00 
each. Special features wtt! include an Air 
Force MARS display, a Skywarn training 
program, and a radio-controtfed a^ri^lane 
display. Talk^in on .221. B2 and .52 simpteK, 
For more information, contact BARA, PO 
Box 175, St. Joseph Ml 49066, or phone 
Paul WD8MWT at {6ie)-e83-l7lO. 



SANTA FE NM 
OCT 7 

The Northern New Mexico Hamfest will 
be t>eid on October 7, 1984, (rom SIX) am 



Amaleui RaJo^ 
lechnfcalJoufnaf 



fliMJIlllTI 



2300 MHZ MICBOWAVE DOWNCONVERTER 



BACK ISSUES 



19^ to June 1980 . 
July 1960 to present 



.$S.OO 



* CbmpJete Downconverter 

* One year Warranty 

* Surge voltage protected 

* Choice of two RF Preamps 

* Model RP . . . $65 ( 15 miles) 

* Model HP + . . t75 (25 miles) 





Send check or money order to; 
K&S ENTERPRISES 
Box 741 -^«^ 

Mansfield. MA 02048 



Add $1,00 per maga2lne for 
shipping. 10 or more back is- 
sues add $7,60 per order for 
shipping. 

Write for your copy today! 

7S: Amateur Badio*8 
leclinical Journal 

Back iMue Order Dept* 
80 Fine Street 
Peterboroueii, NH 0S4S8 




MATCH MOST ANTENNAFEEDUNE 
COMBINATIONS TO YOUR RIG 

MATCHES: djpoles. inverted vees, beams Quads, 

verticals, mobile whips, random wire. etc. that are fed by 

coa?(. balanced line or singie wire 

MAXIMUM POWER: 300 watts RF 

INPUTS {selectable from TronI panel): 
3'C03x: 1-difecl. 2-direcl or tt^fu lyner 
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IN-LINE CALIBRATED WATTMETER INCLUDED 



ANTENNA TUNER 
Viewstar — Mod, VS300A 



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(^ See List of Advertisers on page 98 



73 Magazine • October, 1984 69 



,ki 





to 3:00 pm^ at the Terrero Group ShaJter, 
along the Pecos HW&r, east of Santa Fe, 
Admission is $3.00 for adults and $1 .50 for 
chUdren. Activities vvlEt include a taEEgate 
flea market, yroup me&ting&i family 
games, fishing, and pIcnicKing. There will 
be hot dcgs, chips, soft drinks, and coffee 
availabte, as well as free Saturday-nlghl 
camping. Talk-in or local mpeaters and 
52 simplex,. For further information 
pEease send an SASE to Northern New 
Mexico ARC, do Bob Norton N5£PA^ 
Route 3, Box 95-15. Santa Fe NM B7&01, or 
call on 3,939 MHi at 0100 UTC 

yONKERS NY 
OCT 7 

The Yonkera Amateur Radio Club will 
sportsor the Yonkers Electronics Fair and 
Giant Fiea Market on Sunday, October 7, 
1984, from 9:00 am to 4:00 pm, ram or 
Shine; at the Yonkers Municipal Parking 
Garage, corner oi Nepperhan Avenue and 
New Main Street, Yonkers NY. Admission 
is S2.00 each and children under 12 will be 
admitted free. Gates will be open to sell- 
ers at 8:00 am and there will be a $6.00 ad- 
mission per parking space whrch will also 
admit one (bring ^our own tables). Refresh- 
ments, free parking^ aod sanitary taciiities 
will be available, as well as uniimited free 
coffee. There will be live demonstrations 
all day and a giant auction at 3:00 pm. 
Talk-in on 1 46.2651/ 146.a65R of .52 direct. 
For more information, write Y ARC, 53 Hay- 
ward Street, Yonkers NY 10704, or phone 
)969'1053. 



^^ 



SOUTH SIOUX CJTY NE 
OCT 12-13 

The 3900 Club and the Sioujdand Ama- 
teur Radio Repealer Association will 
sponsor the 8th annual 3900 Club Hambo- 
ree and lowa State Convention on October 
12-13, 1984, aii indoors at the Marina inn, 
South SiouK City NE. Admission to the 
fiea market and convention is $e.00 each. 
Tickets for the Saturday-night banquet 
(featuring spsaker Dr, Beverly Mesd of 
Creighton University) are $10.00 in ad- 
vance and $12,00 at the door. Other activi- 
ties will ir^cEude exhibitions, ladies' prcn 
grams, forums (QflP, Air Force MAf=iS, 
QCWA, UHFA/HF, ARRU OX session, Nov- 
Ice session, and a ^ QSL bureau], and a Fri- 
day-night get-together. Talk-in on 146.37/ 
146:97. For advance flea-market reserva- 
tions, write Ai Smith, 3529 Douglas, Sioux 
City iAr and for other reservations, write 
Dtck Pitner, 2931 Pierce, Sioux City lA. 

SYRACUSE NY 
OCT 13 

The Radio Amateurs of Greater Syracuse 
1984 i4amfest will he held on Saturday. Oc- 
tober 13, 1984, beginning at 9:00 am. at thte 
Art and Home Center Building, New York 
State Fairgrounds, Syracuse NY (.adjacent 
to Interstate 690^ [ust 3 miles southeast of 
the NYS Thru way, Exit 39, and one mile 
northwest of Syracuse and Route 81). The 
hamfest will have complete indoor facilities 
and, weather permitting, there will be an 
outdoor fiea market In the front courtyard. 
Volunteer exams will be given for Novice, 
Technician, and General classes. Breakfast 
and lunch service will be available. Com- 
merclai exhibitors may begin their setup on 
Friday from 7:30 pm to 10:00 pm and on Sat- 
urday from 7:00 am to 9:00 am. 



MEMPHIS TN 
OCT 13-14 

The Mid South Amateur Radio Associa- 
tion, the Delta Radio Ctub, and the Mem- 
phis Radio F^el ay Club will hold the annual 
Memphis Hamfest or\ October 13-14, 1984, 
in the air-conditioned Pipkfn Building at 

TO 73 Magazine * October, 1984 



the Memphis Falrgrpunds. The hours on 
Saturday are 6:00 am to 4:00 pm and on 
Sunday, 3:00 am to 2:00 pm. All activities 
will he held Inside and will include forums, 
ladies' programs, and a large flea market. 
Dealers' booths are S60.00 each for the 
weekend and flea-market tables are $5.00 
each per day (there are two drive-in doors 
for unloading). Trailer hookups are avail- 
able. For special rates at nearby hoteis or 
for more information, write Clayton Elam 
K4FZJ, 28 N. Cooper, Memphis TN SSI 04, 
or phone {901)-274 4418 days, or {901)743 
6714 evenings. 

FALLS CHURCH VA 
OCT 13^14 

Tha National Capitol DX Association 
will sponsor ARRL-approved DXPO '84 on 
October 13-14, 1984, beginning at 1:00 pm 
on Saturday and ending at 1:00 pmon Sun- 
day, at the Best Western Falls Church Inn, 
8633 Arlington Boulevard (Route 50), Falls 
Church VA. A broad variety of DX subjects 
will be Included in the program. A banquet 
with speaker Father Moran 3N1MM wilt be 
held Saturday evening. For further details, 
contact Stuart Meyer W2GHK, DXPO 
Chairman, 2417 Newton Street, Vienna VA 
221B0, or phone (703)-525-6286 (office) or 
(703)28 1-3806 (home). 

LIMA OH 
OCT 14 

The Lima Hamfest wtll be held on Octo- 
ber 14, 1984, at the Allen Country Fair- 
grounds, at the intersection of t-75 and 
Routes 309 and 117, Lima OH. Tickets are 
$3.00 in advance and £3.50 at the door; full 
tables are $6.00 and half tables are $3,50. 
For more Information, tici<ets, or tables, 
send an SASE to KBTCF, c/o NOARC, Box 
211, Lima OH 45802. 

PAf^AMUS m 
OCT 14 

The Bergen ara will hold a Ham Swap 
'n* Sell on October 14, 1984. from 8 '00 am 
to 4;00 pm^ at Bergen Community College, 
400 Paramus Road, Paramus NJ. There 
will be tallgating only; bring your own ta- 
bie. Admission for sellers is $4,00; buyers 
will be admitted free Thousands of 
spaces will be available. Taik-in on .79/19 
and .52. For more information, write Jim 
Greer KK2U, 444 Berkshire Hoad, Ridge- 
wood NJ 07450, or phone (201)'445'2&56, 
evenings only, 

WAUKESHA Wl 
OCT 14 

The Kettle Moraine Radio Amateur Club 
will hold Its annual Ham, Computer, Video 
Fest on Sunday, October 14, 1984, at the 
Waukesha County Expo Center, Highways 
F and FT, Waukesha Wl. Tickets are 12.50 in 
advance and $3.00 at the door. Tables are 
$3.00 for each 4'foot length and reserva- 
tions will be accepted until September 
24th. Since all facliities will be Indoors, the 
hamfest will be open rain or shine, begin- 
ning at B:00 am. There will t>e food avail abie 
and commercial exhibitors. For reserva- 
tions, send a check (payable) to KMRA 
Ciub, PO Box 41 1, Waukesha Wl 53187- 

DOVER MA 
OCT 20 

e Middlesex Amateur Radio Club wHI 
hold its annuat Amateur Flea ^^ari<et on Oc- 
tober 20, 1964, from 9:00 am to 3:00 pm, at 
Dover Town Hall, Dover MA. Admission is 
$1.00 and tables are $8.00 each. Refresh- 
ments and ample free parking wili be avail- 
able. For furthter Information, send an SASE 
to Irv Gelier K01N, 1450 Worcester Road, 
#422 A. Framingham MA 01701. 





CIRCLEVILLE PA 
OCT 20 

The Irwin Area ARA will sponsor a Swap 
and Shop on Saturday, October 20, 1984, 
at the CirclevilSe VFD. just off Ht. 30, 3.5 
miles west of the Pennsylvania Turnpike, 
£xh 7. Talk- in on .325/.925and .52. For fur- 
ther information, write Don Myslewski 
K3CHD, 359 McMahon Road, North Hun- 
tingdon PA 15642. or phone (412^^8S0570. 

TAMPA FL 
OCT 20 

The Hiiisborough Amateur Radio Soci- 
ety (HARS) will hold its annual one-day 
Amateur Radio and Computer Hamfest on 
Saturday, October 20, 1984, from 8:00 am 
to BrOO pm, at the Ft. Hesterly Armory, cor- 
ner of Cass and Howard Streets, Tampa 
FL (Just south of 1-275 exit for Howard and 
Armenia). Donations are $3.00 in advance 
and $4.00 at the door. Swap4abte dona- 
tions are $7.00 and commercial booths 
are $3000 (advance registration is re- 
quested). Taik-in on 147.075. For advance 
tickets, booths, and tables, write Conrad 
Kibler WB4AHS, 10102 Ciiff Circle, Tampa 
FL 33612, or HARS, PO Box 24602, Tampa 
FL 33623, Or call Ralph Larkin AA4PM at 
(813}'Sfl4-4126. 

GRAY TN 
OCT 20 

The fourth annual Tri-Cities Hamfest 
will be held on Saturday, October 20, 1984, 
at the Appalachian Fairgrounds^ located 
five miles south of 1-81 on Highway 23, 
Gray TN. Regis I rat ton fee is $2.00. Fea- 
tures include a flea market, forums, and 
dealers. RV hookups will be available. 
Taik-in on 146,37/97 and 147 .87/27. For 
further Information, write Tri-Cities Ham- 
fest, PO Box 3648 CRS, Johnson City TH 
37601. 



CHICAGO IL 
OCT 21 

The 3rd annual CCRL Hamfest will be 
held on Sunday, October 21, 1964, from 7:00 
am to 2:00 pm, at American Legion Post #21 , 
S040 N. Clark Street, Chicago IL 60660, Ad- 
mission is $1.00 in advance and $i .50 at the 
door. Tables are $2.00 each. Tall<-in on 
145.030 simplex. For more information, 
write f4orman Geuder KA9EZA. 6345 N. 
Magnolia, Apt. 1-1, Chicago iL 60660, John 
ibes KAOFUI, 2934 M. Mobile. Chicago IL 
60634, or Frank Sonneli WB90HN. 1674 W, 
Hoilywood, Chicago I L 60660. 

CHATTANOOGA TN 
OCT 27-2a 

Hamfest Chattanooga and the Tennes- 
see State AR1=?L Convention wlil be held 
on October 27-28, 1984^ at a new locationi 
Memorial Auditorium, Oak Street, Chatta- 
nooga TN, Inside space will be available 
for dealers and flea-market vendors and 
e-foot tables will rent for S6,00 per day or 
S10.O0 for tx>th days. There wiil be new, used, 
and peripheral equipment, computers, 
hardware and software, and genuine junk 
in 27,000 square feet of indoor space. Ac- 
tivities will include forums, contests, and 
non-ham programs^ Amateur exams (Nov- 
ice through Extra) will be given on Satur- 
day in the West Assembly Room of the 
Memorial Auditorium at 8:00 am. Please 
send a completed 610 form with a copy of 
your ii cense and a check or money order 
for S4.00 payable to WCARS/VEC by Octo- 
ber 16, 1984, to: Hamfest Chattanooga, 
PO Box 22161. Chattanooga TN 37422. For 
more Information, write Hamfest Chatta- 
nooQa^ PO Box 3377, Chattanooga TN 
37404, or phone Nila Morgan N4D0N at 
(404)-e20-206S. 



MARION OH 
OCT 28 

The Marlon Amateur Radio Club wlil 
hold its 10th annual Heart ol Ohio Ham 
Fiesta on Sunday, October 28, 19B4, from 
0800 to 1600, at the Marlon County Fair- 
grounds Coliseum. Tickets are S3.00 tn ad- 
vance and S4.0Q at Ihe door; tabies are 
$5.00. Food and ptenty of parking will be 
available. Talk-in on 146.52 and 147.9D/.3G. 
For more information, tickets, or tables, 
contact Paul KUzer W8GAX. 393 Pole Lane 
Boad, Marion OH 43302. 

KALAMAZOO Ml 
OCT 2a 

The 2nd annual hamfest/electronic flea 
market will be held on October 28, 1984, 
from 9:00 am to 4:00 pm, at the Kalamazoo 
County Fairgrounds, Kalamazoo Mi. Ad- 
mission is S2 00 in advance and $2,50 at 
the door. Four-foot tabte spaces and table 
rentais are $2.50 in advance and $300 at 
the door (spaces with power must be re- 
served and paid for in advance). There are 
400 spaces available and dealer setup is 
at 8:30 am. For more information, contact 
Ham 10 FM Club of Kazoo^ Ken Losey 
KA8RUA, 2825 Lake Street, Kalamazoo Ml 
49001, 



FRAMINGHAM MA 
OCT 28 



l^ 




The Framingham Amateur I=<adlo Asso- 
ciation, inc., will hold its annual fall flea 
market on Sunday, October 28, 1984, be- 
ginning at 10:00 am, in the Framingham 
Civic League Building, 21 4 Concord Street 
(fite. 126), downtown Framingham. Ad- 
mis s i on i s $2.00 a nd tab I es are $ 1 0.00 (p re- 
registration is required). Seller setups be- 
gin at 8:30 am. Radio and computer gear 
will be featured and food wiil be available. 
Talii'in on .75/. 15 and .52. For more Infor- 
mation, contact Jon Welner K1VVC, 52 
Overlook Drive, Framingham MA 01701, or 
phone (61 7)-877'7 166. 

ALBUQUEROUE NM 
NOV 3 

The UNM ARC and the Westslde ARC 
will jointly sponsor a tailgate swapfest on 
November 3, 1984, from 10:00 am to 2:00 
pm M3T, on the UNM North Campus park 
ing lot, corner of University Boulevard and 
Tucker Avenue, Albuquerque NM. Admis- 
sion is free: bring your own tables as none 
will be furnished. Talk-in on 147.75^147. 15 
MHz and 449.3M44 3 repeaters. For further 
information, send an SASE to Gary Bone- 
brake K3BI, 974 Arkansas SE, Rio Raneho 
MM 87124, Robert Scupp WB5YYX, 648 
Marquis Drive NE, Albuquerque NM 
67123. or Jay Miller WA5WHN, 4613 Jupi- 
ter NW, Albuquerque NM 87107, or via 
3.939 MH^, 01 OOUTC daily. 

WEST MOKROE LA 
NOV 10 

Ttie Twin City Hams wiil sponsor an all- 
indoor hamfest on Saturday. November 10, 
1984, from 9:00 am to 3:00 pm, at the Con- 
vention Center, N, 7th Street, West Mon- 
roe \-A. Features will include exams, swap 
tables, new-equipment dealers » and a 
iadies' program. Talk-in on 146.25/.&5, For 
more information, contact Benson Scott 
AE5V, 107 Con tempo, West Monroe LA 
71291. 

NEWMARKET ONT CAN 
fiOV 10 

The York Region ARC will present the 
8th annual Newmarket Flea Market on 
Saturday, November 10, 1984. tjeg inning 
at 0800, at the Newmarket Community 



\ 




Center, CSvfc Drive, Newmarket (just north 
of Toronto). Admission ts S2,0D per person 
and chJJdren under 12 will be adrnitted 
free. Tabie rentals are S3.00 each pJus 
general admission and will be held only 
until 0800 unless payment is made in ad- 
vance (setup Is at 0630), Refreshments 
vifill be available. For table reservations 
(include a ctieck or money order made out 
to the York Region ARC^ or more informa- 
tion, contact Geoffrey Smith VE3KCE, 7 
Johnson Road, Aurora, Ont .^ Canada LAG 
2 A3, or phone (41 6)-727-6672 (evenings). 



NOfiTH HAVEN CT 
NOV 11 



The SoutTicentral Connecticut Amateur 
Radio Association [SCAR A) will hold its 
SIh annual Electronics Show and Flea 
Market or Sunday. November 11, 19S4, 
from 9:00 am to 3:00 pm, at the North 
Haven Recreation Center, Linsley Street^ 
North Haven CT. Admission is E1.50 and 
children under 12 accompanied by an 
adLfIt wi[l be admitted free. Tables are 
$10.00 fn advance for the main hall and 
$12.00 at the door. (Reservations are 
strongly advised.) Setup will be at 8:00 am, 
and for new equipment vendors, a special 
exhibit area with setup security arrange- 
men is will be made avallabfe. There will 
be food both at the food booth and hom a 
mobile cart. Features will include the 
latest in ham radio, computers, and elec- 
ironies. Talk-in on 146.01^46.61 (W1GB). 
For more information, directions, and res- 
ervations (make checks payable to 
SCARA), send an SASE to Tony Vanacore 
AK10. PO Box 81. North Haven CT 06473, 
or phone (203}-484-4175 (home) or (203)^ 
239-5321, ejttension 31 1 (days). 

7\ 



PENANG, MALAYSIA 
NOV 16-18 

The Malaysian Amateur Radio Trans- 
mitters Society (MARTS) wil I host the 1 4th 
SEA NET Convention on Friday. Saturday, 
and Sunday, November 16-18. 1984, at the 
Eastern and Oriental Hotel, Penang, Ma 
I ay si a. Features wiii include symposiums, 
luncheans, tours, and rag-chewing. For 
more details, contact IVlalcolm West- 
wood, Organizing Secretary, SEANETj PO 
Box 13, Penang, West Malaysia. 



Him HELP 



# 



GREFNSBOflO NC 
NOV 24-25 



The 41?! annual Greater Greensboro Ham- 
test will be heid on November 24-25, 1984, 
from 9:00 am to 5:00 pm, at tJie National 
Guard Armory, 1100 Franklin Boulevard, 
Greensboro NO. For advance tickets, send 
an SASe to Fred Redmon M4GGD, 2305 
Sherwood Street, Greensboro NC 27403. 
For dealers' space, tables, and flea market 
information, contact Coy Hennfs WD4NHL 
at 1919^294-2641. 

OAK PARK Ml 
NOV 25 

The Oak Park High School Electronics 
Ciiib will hold its 15th annual Swap M 
Shop on Thanksgiving Sunday, November 
25, 1&84, from 6:00 am to 4:00 pm, at the 
Oak Park High School, Oak Park Mi. The 
doors will open at 6:00 am. Admission is 
S2.00 and 8-foot tables are S6.00. Refresh- 
ments wlil be availabie. For more informa- 
tion, send an SASE to Herman Gardner, 
Oak Park High School, 13701 Oak Park 
Boulevard, Oak Park Ml 48237, or phone 
(3l3)-96a-2675. 




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Would someone please help me find a 
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B66 Yolo Way 

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244 Fitzwater Street 

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j need to borrow Sam's Photofacts num- 
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73 Magazine • Octoben 1984 71 



W2NSD/1 

NEVER SAY DIE 

eof/tor/a/ by Wayne Green 



from page 6 

employees brought a mass of 
them* 

Between the people at Byte, 
WGI, and WGE in Peterboroughp 
111 bet there are over 500 Wayne 
Green people In this town of 
5,000. It seems as if I get waved 
at and greeted by almost every 
other car as I putt around on my 
new Yamaha. 

By passing along the things I 
have learned through the years, 
IVe helped at least a couple 
thousand people learn about 
publishing, electronics, and 
computers— and that doesn't 
count the readers I've influ- 
enced. I visited one of the com- 
puter publishers a few days ago 
only to find a solid fan who got 
hooked while reading 73. He 
claimed that my editorials pushed 
him to get into business— drove 



hfm to it. He's worth millions 
today. 

We're moving along to start a 
magazine publishing Institute 
as soon as we can get a building 
large enough to handle the proj- 
ect. This will be even better than 
the system I've used in the past, 
for every student will not only 
work at every job on a magazine 
(from proofreading to collecting 
for advertising), but will be paid 
for the work. They'll be working 
on real live publications, too, not 
just school stuff. No more of 
this Catch-22 nonsense of hav- 
ing to have practical experience 
before you can get a job that will 
let you get practical experience. 
Graduates will have a resume 
citing plenty of good practical 
professional experience. 

I'm hoping to start a yearly 
alumni meeting at Comdex. So, 
if you kr^ow of anyone who has 
worked for me during the last 33 




.VflC-ATLANJTIC AMATEUR RACiQ CLUS 



NEWSLETTER OF THE MONTH 



REMARCS 



"AIM he news that fits, we prtnt^' sesfne an approprrate motto for REMARCS, 
chronicle of the MEd-Atlantic Amatejr Radio Cfub. Editor Kay Craigie KC3LM re- 
al (zes that no one wants to read endless minutes and committee reports month 
after month. After all, those who are interested in that brand of tedium can htear 
It all at the club meeting. In steady Kay draws upon outside sources such as 
Westiink, Worfdrsdio, and the W5Yt Report to fill REMARCS with truly interest- 
ing Information. For the purist, there are still plenty of club- and member-related 
articles, and Kay's subtde humor makes even the dreaded meeting announce- 
ment 3 pFeasure to read. 

On the mechanical side, 'immaculate" sums ttitngs up. The printing is of pro- 
fessional quality, the pages are nicely composed, and there are no typographi- 
cal errors to be found. Can you say the same for your group's publication? 

To enter your club's newsletter in 73's Nevs/s letter of the Month Contest, send 
It to 73, Pine Street, Peterborough NH 03458, Attn: Newsletter of the Month. 



LETTERS 



BE A VE 



The American Radio Relay League Is 
preparing to serve as a Volunteer Ex- 
aminer Coordinator (VEC) In each of the 
13 FCC call areas (more than one VEC 
may serve I n a particular area). In anticipa- 
tion of becoming a VEC very soon, the 
ARRL Is recruiting licensed Advanced- 

72 73 Magazine • October, 1984 



and Extra-class radio amateurs to serve 
as; Volunteer Examiners. Applicants are 
not required to be AflRL members to par- 
ticipate. Applicants must, however, hold a 
current Advanced- or Extra-class license^ 
have no history of iicense suspension or 
revocation, and be at ieast 18 years of age. 
The Volunteer Examiner Program 
covers testing for Technician-, General-, 
Advanced-, and Extra-class iicenses. 
Novice exams wlii continue to be given by 



years, have ttiem get in touch. 
I'm having some special coffee 
mugs made with the logos of all 
our magazines as souvenirs. 
Who knows, I may spring for tee- 
shirts next year! There are 
lapses in my usual Yankee thrrft 
approach to life. 

The dinner will be November 
t&th in Las Ve^as and I want 
every Wayne Green alumni who 
can make it to be there. As far as 
I know, with the exception of 
two people who betrayed me, 
one of whom is dead and the 
other who has completely disap- 
peared from the publishing and 
computer scene, every alumni is 
still a darned good friend. 



And, with the Green Publish- 
mg Institute opening soon, think 
how many we'll be seeing next 
year! The whole computer in- 
dustry IS desperately in need of 
people with publishing experi- 
ence. This could help enormous- 
ly to improve the output of spec 
sheets and instruction books, 
give the industry much better 
advertising and catalogs, and 
so on. 

So, alumni, let's get together 
at Comdex and celebrate! Drop 
me a note so I can give you de- 
tails. I'm looking forward to see- 
ing you again, even if you're 
working for (sob) Byte or Ziff- 
Davis. 



$$ HOME-BREW III $$ 

Turn your hot solder into cofd cash! Once again, 73 is search- 
ing for the greatest home-brewer in the land. Ail projects have 
a chance to appear in 73, and the best of the best will be show- 
ered with fame and forty ne. 

Top prize is $250. Second place is worth $100, and three 
runners-up will each earn $50. Of course, this is in addition to 
the payment every author receives for publishing in 73. 

Contest Rules 

1, Entries must be received by November 1, 1984. 

2. To enter, write an article describing your best home-brew 
construction project and submit it to 73. If you haven't written 
for 73 before, please send an SASE for a copy of our author's 



3. Here's the catch: The total cost of your project mtist be $73 
or less, even if all parts were bought new. Be sure to include a 
detailed parts list with prices and sources. 

4. Our technical staff will evaluate each project on the basis 
of originality, usefulness, reproduciblity, economy of design, 
and clarity of presentation. The decision of the judges is final. 

5. All projects must be original, that is, not previously published 
elsewhere. There is no limit to the numt>er of projects you may 
enter. 

6. All rights to articles purchased for publication tjecome the 
property of 73. 

7. Mail your entries to: 

73 Magazine 
Editorial Offices 
80 Pine Street 
Peterborough NH 03458 
Attn: Home-Brew III 



Novice Examiners under the new Novice 
rules (97,27 (a) and (c); 97.23 (b): et ai); 

Novice ffcense testing Is entjrefy separate 
from the Volunteer Exam^iner Program. 

Under the Volunteer Examiner Rules 
adopted by the Commission, only Ad- 
vanced- and Extra-c^lass licensees may 
administer exam elements above the Nov- 
Ece level (97. 2Q (a)). Extra-ciass licensees 
may administer ait vk^ritten and Morse- 
code elements; Advanced-cJass licensees 
may admlr^ister only exam Etements 1A, 2, 
and 3 (Elements required for the Techni- 
cian license). And, of course, you must Ise 
accredited as a Volunteer Examinef by a 
VEC tsetore you are authcrtzed to ad- 
minister any upgrade examinations. 

If you qualify and are mterested in par- 
tieipatir^g as a Volunteer Examiner with 



ARRL's VE Program, please request an 
application by writing to Volunteer £k- 

aminer Accreditation, American Radio 
Relay League. 225 Main Street, New- 
ingtonCT 06111, 

Steve Place 

ARRL 

Newlngton CT 



EARN IT 

I agree with the editorial comment in 
June, 1964, that ham radio is in trouble. 
Ttiere are so many hams like my friend 
who upgraded a desfre to tise oiir desig- 
nated frequencies to a "right" to those 
frequencies. Ttier© is no such thing as a 
right. W© have to earn the use of the bands 



we ooGupy. The only way I can 8M to earn 
them Is thrdugh the emergency service 
ri»jle. I can't ^oe how we can do it ihraugh 
our advances In technolof^y like we have 
dorve in the past. Some hams claim to t>e 
achrar>cing tachnoiogy through their use 
M ciomputerfi attached to f>eripherals for 
RTTY^ QW, packet, AMTOR, and whatever. 
In my mind those a rani advances. Any 
Bash graduate vvho doesn't own a solder- 
ing Iron can plug Ihosa &tore-t>ought 
boK^ togelh&f and claim he's a great in- 
r>ovator. 

But how in the world do we start from 
scratch ar>d truly do some real ham-style 
developir^? To me Ihai is a serious ques- 

tiOTL 

Wtat*S the differenca t>6rween my sU* 
ting hkere in my shiack running my key- 
board on AMTOR or packet? I dtdn'l ttuild 
th^ss ttiin^s. f bought tham. \ feet this 
keytxiard operating lA not one step above 
gjbbenrbg on SSB. In factn I th^nX i<eyt>oard 
is beneath CW. particularty o<n a har>d key 
or my 1939 McElroy Bug! So where do I go 
technically on the HF bands? (Moon- 
bounce is sorrwthing else.) 

I grant you that traffic by keytx>ard and 
pffntar is a gcpod ernefgency mode But 
damn, I can't see ^t even after I bought the 
Junk 10 do it. AMTOR? It's as dull as key- 
tM>ajd CW. Same for packet. No skill. 

I'd Nhe to experiment with digital voice. 
I know how AT&Ts 'T Carrier'" works and 
their dtgitat railio works, bitt I don't krNOw 
how to buitd an experimefital system or 
where I can get parts ii I knew how to do i I, 
So much for my inrwvating. 

Let's iesl for CW proficiency- Qoq4 
idea. Let's periodically eKamme state<»f^ 
the-arl knowledge as well Forget this 
grandfather business and let's make all 
ticket-holders prove they deserve the^r 
operating ^'rights " and station license. 

By definition^ Vm not a curmudgeon, 
but I'm In the retired bracket that you so 
labeled. I've had a ticket since 1940 and an 
Extra class since the days when the Rl 
made me send the 20-wpm teet on a hand 
key. I fike to e»eperlmantt but I do use the 
KISS approach. 

Enough of this laHltiering. We have to 
protect the frequencies that we are per* 
mitted to use. We need the energy of the 
young, But 3 don't Know how to attract 
them. I loaned receivers to two teenagers 
and about three months later they gave 
them back and told me thai hams are no 
different from the CBers they talk to, Now 
what? 

I hate to see the uiUmate loss of trie 
ham bands, but unless we start earning 
them, no equipment manufacturers' tol>by 
wilt save us. 

Keep whting and Til try to stir up some 
ARES type of action out here. 

K«i Uthufi f(T7E 
NbltMltFillaWA 



SUPER 



Wei J , once again I am impressed tty 73. 1 
took a while to type itve code program in 
*'Sour^ Good to Me," June, 1984. M^ke 
W5VXC/1 and Rick WB5AYD did a fpreat 
fob or putting It togeihSf . Cof^ratulattorra 
to them for it They at least took the trou- 
ble to translate it for &otli tne Vl&2d and 
ttw C-64. That is not done in some maga- 
zine 

As p«f usual my typing contained a 
multitude of mistakes. I listed the resutts 
to my printer, proofread h (I thought K and 
ser^t Mike a copy and asked him to tell me 
wttat happened. I was expecting a letter In 
aliout a month, t was surprised to receive 
a personai phone eail from Mike (and It 
was not even collect !^. He straightened 
me out on tt>e mistakes that I hAd typed in 

^ See Ust t>f A^ertlsers onpBge9S 



and one that I missed in the translation In 
hie printer When I corrected my mistakes, 
the program worked! 

Today in the mail I received an MCI MaJI 
ffCMH Mike telling me what we discussed 
over the phone. What serviceJ 

Keep bjp the good work, f have 73s 
dated to Septeml>er, 1968 (73 cents yet). 
The collection is not complete but rt is 
rarge. I rt^i wHh delight your petition to 
the FCC a> Jl Itie code, i agree wUh you 
on your sti ■ J On the no-code iicense and 
the stiffer in^^ory nequiremenl. 

Yoiir RUN magazirve Js on my computer 
Sheif . I have a Commodore 64 and a VIO20 
Ihat I use (or RTTY on the HF bands. I am 
not active on HF now because I need to 
work over my HF rig, tt woet'f cooperate 
with me wtwn I send FTTTY tones through 
it I have ttie C^64 capable of RTTY through 
Itte Santa Fe 147,BV^ repeater. Not 



much adivMy except me right now. Hope T 
can have someone to taik to soon. 

Another of your writers deserves a large 
pat on the back --Jim Grubbs- I followed 
his articles in CotnntBnd&r Magazine. I 
corresponded with him via word pro- 
cessor and he was a great help. 

Thanks for tending me youf ear (eye? J, 
Wayr^. Once again keep up the good 
work. Your people are Super. 

Alan F. Kill NSBOC 

Sania Fe NM 



would be very helpfuL I have placed the 
beacon high tn the six-meter band SO a$ 
not to Interfere with local activity and thus 
It is not easily foun<J. The frequency is 
50.440 and the location is Burlington, Con- 
necticut. QSL to K1NFE at PO Drawer M, 
Plainvi;ieCT0606£, 

A.DePascaEeKlNFE 
Plainville CT 



i 



BECKONING BEACON 



J 



[ 



THANKS, FRANK 



I have had a t>eia€on opera tionai lor over 
a year. The beacon is on 24 hours a day. 
aevefi days a week Afthough f have received 
many 05Ls from around the country, a lit- 
tie publicity of the beacoA'a freQu^tcy 



I noted in your July, 1964, editorial that 
you have sold a tMjnch of your magazines. 
I sincerely hope this did not include 73, Ot 
at least that you will si ill retain edKorial 
control ovef this magazine, 

I heJd a ham ticket ffom 1948 to 197&, 
when I let my licer^se lapse, beginning as 



Improving the Kenwood TS830/930S 



AsViei ctts 




The above letter Is only one of many unsohcited reports pfoising the performance of 
Fox Tango filters in both the TS830S and the TS930S. Ifi addition our filters received 
faiworabJe Product Reviews m QST (9/83 and 4/S2J; were subject of major article in 73 
Magazine: Stfanglg QRM wiih your TS830S (6/831; and many reports in other national 
publicaiions. One of the major advantages of these SS8 fillers is thai ihey so improve VBT 
operation as to eliminate the need (and expense) of CW filters for all but the most dedicated 
CW operators! 

Complete tvyo-f l i t cr Kits with all n e eded parts „„.$l70each 

ORDER: FTK830 or FTK930 t2/lkH; Bandwidth for SSB and CW) 
FTK830 or FTK930 (400 Hi Bandwidth for CW Only! 
SPECIFY Rig and Bandwidth desired when ordering [fWaiJ or Phone] 
SHIPPING: Surface $3, Air $5 [COD and Si], Overseas SIO. FL Residents 5% Sales Taac 




FOX TANGO CORPORATION, 



TELEPHONE 
(305^683-9587 

Box 15944, W. Palm Beach, FL 33416 "^ 



73 Magazine • October, 1984 73 



Chief Operator of XAFQ/Trieste, than 
W5PVE, W2MJF, WaWUN, and W4U0. I 
intend to get my code spe#d back up a 
bit— I once could copy 35 wpm soJJd with 
a stick, but righl novi^ 10 wpm poses a bit 
of difficulty. V\\ brush up on theory and 
take the exam again tor a Generai-class 
ticket. Then t shall be QRP on CW from 40 
through 10. In 1949, I put K4WAR^A4WAR 
on the air with separate kWs on aU band^ 
and a nice antenna farm at Camp (now 
Fort) Gordon GA. I had some patents 
Issued during the 1950s resulting from 
electronics design for missile guidance in 
the t950s, and from 1955 to mid-t959, I 
was first a Project Engineer and then a Se- 
nior Engineer with Heath Company, Ben- 
ton Harbor Ml, 

in fact, I once sold you a short story, 
"Ed McGurk Makes WAS on Two Meters," 
which appeared in CQ in Decemt>er, 1955, 
when you had that magazine—and It was 
&■ good tnagazine then, too. Incidentaiiy. I 
received $35.00 for the stofy and Pappy 
Lynn got S50.00 for the cartoon IHustrat- 
\nQit\ Maybe I should have been an artist! 

Sorry about the reminiscing. What I 
really started to say was thai some 
months ago I subscribed to QST, CQ. and 
73i t am letting my subscriptions to QST 
and CQ run out, but I'm definitely keeping 
7$ because it seems to be the best ham 
magazine among the three at present. I 
particularly like the constrijction articles, 
but then, I like most everything else In the 
magazine, too. CO isn't totally a loss, but 
OST Is a far cry from the great magazine it 
was in the MOs "SOs, and '60s, and def inhte- 
ly not worth the price anymore^ to my way 
of thinking. 

I was unaware that you were a Mensan 
until I noted your name In the Register a 
tew years ago. I finaEfy got around to Joifii- 
fng She group In 1973 and am stHI a 
member. 

Anyway, whatever you do, don t let 73 
go the way of the other ham rags— I sill I 
have about a year to go on my subscrip- 
tion, and intend to renew. 

J, jFrank Brumbaugh 
fifadenton FL 



CRISIS 

I enjoyed your editoria( in the June 
Issue of 73 very much, Like your other edi- 
torials, it was a breath of fresh air com- 
pared to the usual vapid commentaries 
found in other publications. I completely 
agree with your comments about Morse 
code, I have on occasion "road the mail'* 
(a most curious expression) on traffic nets 
on 3 meters and HF (more on the former) 
and have been totally ams^ed at how com- 
pletely useless and boring It ail sounds. In 
short, your conclusions about the present 
state of amateur radio are correct, in my 
opinion. 

With the essentials of your argument 
granted, what can be done to correct the 
problem? I think \t would be useless to go 
to the ARRL about upgrading the current 
state of radio technology since they ap- 
pear to be the bastion of outmoded tech- 
nology. Wiiat other groups in ham radio 
exist that are interested along these lines, 
and which coufd be used to bypass the in- 
tellectuai ballast residing at the ARRL? 
[This Is ciearfy, in my opinion, the only 
course open,) 

Finally, are the normal emergency ser- 
vices (i.e., police, fire, civil defense, Red 
Cross, and National Guard} willing to in^ 
terconnect with amateur radio? Or do they 
view amateur radio as compietely useless 
{perhaps with Justification)? These are 
just some of the questions that need to be 
answered. Can you suggest where I might 
look? 

74 73 Magazine • October, 1 984 



There Is one point that you made which 
Is in error I do not tteiieve that there are 
more technical graduates In Japan be- 
cause they have a no-code license. What 
motivates an indivldoal to go into a partic- 
ular work? Interest in that f ieid and the be- 
lief that it Is worthwhile. If a person is 
taught that scientific and industrial prog- 
ress (or progress alone for that matter) is 
good, then, If he has the interest, he'll 
choose such a career. But if (as he is 
taught in the US today) he Is taught that 
scientific and industrial progress is evil, 
that reason Is impotent, etc., then he will 
not go into those areas, even if he has the 
interest! After all, why become an engi- 
near when objectivity is impossible and 
there are more important social concerns 
(I don*t agree with either idea). Thus^ this 
crisis (i.e., lack ot young technical people) 
Is Just the tip of a larger philosophical cri- 
sis, in my opmion! It is a mistake to view it 
in any other way. 

Jap^n, for the most part (as witness 
their expansion In reason oriented areas), 
does not suffer to the same e;ctent from 
this philosophical crisis, i believe that the 
Japanese have a better grasp of the es- 
sentials of this issue and are doing better, 
which is why they have a no-code license 
(i.e., the no-code ilceose is a result and not 
a cause). 

Thank you and keep up the good work! 

Chris O'Hara NICI^A 
Fairfiefd CT 0B432 

The bankruptcy of amateur radio is stftf a 
weif-k^pt secret. Having worked on NfAC 
With representatives of the oitjer commu- 
nications setvic&s, f Can assure you that 
word has not yet feaked out as to the di- 
saster we've generated and we wilt stiii 
g&t fuii cooperation. — Wayne. 



SOFTWARE PIRACY 

There Is a problem in the amateur-radio 
fraternity. ..software piracy; Whether by 
Ignorance or simple disregard for the law, 
many amateurs are stealing copyrighted 
programs. Most do not consider their theft 
a crime or a serious probiem^ but unless 
this practice is discontinued, amateur 
radio will suffer. 

With the influx of computers into I he 
hobby, a degree of software piracy was in- 
evitable. UnfortLfnately, the problem has 
become a blemish on amateur radio. 
Thousands of dollars have been spent in 
litigation involving software piracy out- 
side the hobby, and 1 had hoped amateur 
radio would police the problem internaHy 
and not require legal action. Sadly this Is 
not the case. 

I recently confronted two hamfest exhibi- 
tors who were selling copies of a Kantron- 
ics program. These people were copying 
and selling our programs to any amateur 
wiliing to pay the price, I bought one of the 
programs for evidence and informed the 
seller that legal action would be taken, 
This person was not a ham^ but those buy- 
ing the programs were. We have several 
other examples of programs copied and 
sold. 

There are a few simple steps we can all 
take as those interested in seeing the 
problem solved: 

1. Never buy copied software. 

2. Report pirates to the software manu- 
facturer. 

3. Don't allow illegal sales at your local 
hamfest. 

KantroniGS plans to prosecute those 
who steal our programs, as we have In the 
past. But without the assistance of the en- 
tire amateur community, the manufactur- 
ers will not be able to stop pirates from 
stealing their profits. If manufacturers are 



not able to sell enough product to make a 

profits other new and improved programs 
will not be written. Don't let the greed of a 
few deny the hobby of future expansion. 
Let's throw the bad apples out before they 
ruin the whole barrel. 

Mike Forsyth 

Marketing Directoi^ 

Kantronics, Inc. 



SHARING [DEAS 



] 



"Per f board and BofdertsV?'\ which ap- 
peared to the Juiy, 1984, issue of 73, has 
brought some wefcome correspor^denoe. 
The ietters below add some impori^nt 
Ideas to those tn the article. More impor- 
tantfY, they illustrate one of the most im- 
portant /deas in ham radio: the wHfing- 
ness to share freely experience and ideas 
that might help other hams. I want to thank 
both gentlemen for writing and for adding 
to my own stock of constwctlon Ideas. No 
one knows everything, and perhaps it is 
even true that none ot us knows very 
much. But together, we know a lot of very 
usefitl things about many matters.— L fl. 
Cebik W4FiNL 



I read your article In 73 for July, 1984, 
" Pe rf board and SoidertatI?"', with Inter- 
est. I have been a ham for over 40 years 
and have constructed countless projects. 
The ideas you described are good, and I 
pici^ed up a few new thoughts from your 
text. I*w1any thanks! 

Vm writing to pass along a few tips that 
1 have found helpful, in the hopes that you 
can use them, too. Here they a re I 

Cutting perf board and PC material Is 
easy to do without sawing. If you score 
both sides heavily (1 take a couple of 
passes per side with the board held flat on 
an old magazine, using a heavy razor knife 
from the hardware store— the kind of 
knife that has replaceable blades— f use 
one made by Millers Falls that stores the 
blades irr the heavy aluminum handle), it 
will break cleanly along the score. It hard- 
ly even needs touch up with a file for neat- 
ness, but that is a good finishing touch. I 
find it much easier than sawing^ and I 
have never had a split or chip. 

You are rtghE about pencEl marks oays- 
Ing leakage paths with CMOS circuits. 
Another maddening cause ot the same 
thing Is solder flux, which causes a prob- 
lem when the humidity is high. The only 
cure I have found is to use a commercial 
flux remover on the board (Radio Shack's 
is OK). Isopropyi alcohol does not work 
well and sometimes makes the problem 
worse due to Its water conient. 

Forming leads on small parts can be 
done beautifully with a small pair of 
"Chain-nose" pliers. Available in good 
hardware stores and hobby shops, the 
jaws have circular cross section. They are 
not really as suited for gripping as regular 
pliers, but they do a swell job of forming 
nicely rounded bends, I think they were 
originally designed to make small chain 
links. 

I also find it very helpful to keep one of 
those tapered red-plastic lead formers 
handy, to get the exact lead spacing on re- 
sistors, etc. I think you can get them from 
Radio Shack, but I have had mine so long, 
I am not sure. 

I have had problems drilling large holes, 
say, over about 3/16 inch. I find the board 
often cracks It the hole is near an edge. I 
have been using two reamers instead. 
One is a regular T-handle 1/S-to-1 /2-inch 
si2e, and the other is a mod el -maker's 
reamer (from Brook stone) (hat goes from 
almost nothing to about 1/8 Inch, Pert- 
t>oard materiail is so soft that you can 



often ream a super quality hole Taster 

than setting up to drill it. It also is a good 
solution for that hole size tor which you 
don't have a drill. 

When mounting a PC or perf board par- 
allel to the chassis surface, 1 always have 
(It seems) minor problems getting all 
holes to line up. it seems to work tjetter for 
me to not use4-point mounting (mounts in 
the corners), but to use 3-point mounting 
instead. Generally, when things don't 
quite line up, only one hole need be moved. 
Three points determine a plane, and it 
works well for me, 

A really neat way to mount boards, 
when you are pretty sure the debugging 
phase Is over, is to mount them parallel to 
the front panel, supported on the front- 
panel controls. For example ^ if you have a 
couple of switches and a pot it usually is 
possible to arrange the parts so that se- 
lee ted surfaces are equidistant from the 
panel surface. You can either epoxy (if you 
are really suref) the board to the controls 
(such as to the back surface of a pot) or 
(better) solder the lugs of the switches to 
pads on the PC board through small ac- 
cess holes. It sounds cumbersome, but it 
often can be done and leads to a reaily 
nice looking arrangement. On oocasi on ^ I 
have used this technique by soldering 
heavier-than-usual leads on the panel 
controls (#16 or #18 wire) and passing 
these leads through the perf- or PC board, 
soldering them to pads. etc. With several 
such leads, the whole thing Is surprisingly 
sturdy. The rest of the chassis is yours to 
do with as you like — it is like free addition- 
al space! 

When using quite thin wire (such as 
wire- wrap wire), if the long runs are left 
quite loose, after the job ^s done, It can be 
made to look neater by pulling a loop of 
the long lead through an unused hole on 
the perf board, just to tighten up the lead. 
Judicious selection of the "stitch" hole 
can also restore those right-angle bends 
to otherwise diagonal runs. 

A super easy way to make PC boards 
from articles when you wish to etch the 
board conductors Is to do the job back- 
wards. Instead of etching and then drill- 
ing, make a photocopy of the t>oafd from 
the magazine and scotch tape it to the PC- 
board. Using a small drill (I really prefer 
the hand-held battery powered jobs; they 
are easier to control and more convenient 
than a big drr 1 1 or a Dremet tool, unless you 
have a permanent shop setup), drill right 
through the photocopy and your PCi 
boards until all holes are in place. Then re- 
move Ehe photocopy, deburr as neces- 
sary, and scrub the copper surface in the 
kitcl^en sink using SOS scouring wool. 
When the copper Is bright, rinse It and 
l^eave the tiniest trace of regular dish- 
washing detergent on the surface. It will 
cause etch-resist pens to write beautiful- 
ly. With little effort and practice, you can 
draw the conductors; you can even make 
a hybrid arrangement with some prepared 
wax patterns. IC pads, If you wish. It is 
also your golden opportunity to add your 
name, call, date, revision number, or what- 
ever. After the board is etched, a little 
cleaning Is all you need before stuffing. 
Try It, you1l like 111 

As I said, I enjoyed your article and 
hope you find one or more of my ideas to 
be helpful, too- 

Warren Oftutt AF9Q 
Geneva IL 



I read your article in 73 on perfboard 
construction practice. Very thorough, but 
I would like to add my two cents: 

I have gravitated away from using phe- 
nolic perfboard because it is so fragife 
and doesn't have a high enough insula- 
tion resistance for ^ome high-impedance 



circuits. The same goes for epo)(y paper. 
The'^ are mcristure sensfttve. 

f prefer to use GlO or Ffl4 (or sfmflar) 
epoxyfibergfass pedboard. One source is 
Vector P pattern, available from industrial 
electrorrjcs parts houses. It ts easily cut 
by scoring it on both sides with a utility 
l^nife held against a straightedge, oi amp- 
in g the part rn a vise or between a tabletop 
edge and a rigid sheet of metal, etc., and 
then giving it a "karate chop" to get a 
dean break. The extra expense of the pre- 
mium pert board is weN woftti it in avoid- 
ing duplication of effort if the circuit is 
dropped or doesn't work right. 

I have even used G10 perf board for rf 



circuits. Vector seKs a version with con- 
tinuous copper on both sides, isoi^tted 
pad "cool^ie cutters'' are then used to de- 
velop a drcuit^ These tools are available 
from Vector or A, F. Stahisr (if they &te still 
Jfi business^. Stabler parts were carried by 

TrumbLjii (if he is stilj In business), i be- 
lieve I bought a "bubbie etcher" from 
Trumbuii a while ago, but i have mistald It 
because [ have moved several limes 
sinoe^ i would iike to locate Trumbuii 
again or someone who has taken over the 
line, i use perf board for breadtKiards and 
prototypes, and PC for Mnished models if 
it is worth the effort. 
Two usefui tools for working epoxy- 



glass perf board are a "nibbfing tool" (to 
cut irregularly shaped hoies) and a ''ta- 
pered reamer" (to enlarge round holes 
drilled with a hand-twist driiJ ohuok|. 
These are available from Sears, Radio 
Shack, etc. 

I agree that it is wise to socket all semf- 
conductors in a breadboard. AJsOh those 
threaded metal spacers fMouser? et aij 
are very useful to aid in mounting. Mask- 
ing tape and a bati-point pen can provide 
labels of important circuit tap points. Wir- 
ing going off the perfboard should be 
stranded/insulated, but solid insulated 
will work onboard. 

Vtfell, thaf 3 alM have to rebate, now. I am 



not a ham yet but am an efectrical engi- 
neer in telecommunications circuit de- 
sign. I am working towards a Technician's 
ficense because I got interested in home- 
brew microwave and satellite TV linlis and 
need a ticket to transmit. MDS downcon- 
verters can be used on 2304 UHz. 

Keep up the good work. With much of 
eiectronic technology going to Japan, it is 
difficult for a new engineer to gain practi- 
cal experience. Ham radio is a usefui 
thing to an American technician or engi- 
neer wishing to hone his skills. 

Raymontd Barcklow, Jr. 
Coiumbta SC 



AWARDS 



am Gosney KE7C 
MIcro-dO, inc. 
2865 Nofth Busb^ Road 
Oak Harbor WA 98277 

WORLDWIDE AWARDS 
OmECTORY 

If you like to go after awards or win con- 
tests, this directory is a must! Volume 1 
lists over ^^t) awards from ail over the 
world with names and addresses, costs,^ 
and descriptions. $9-95 brings Volume 1 
to your doorstep. Volume 2 is in produc- 
tion now and wiii cost $5.95 for an addi 
tional 13C awards. Why not order Volumes 
1 and 2 for a combined price of $12.75? 
The Wortdwide Awards Diwotory is for the 
amateur radio operator who is interested 
in showing his proficiency at radio com- 
munications to others throughout the 
world. Vou will never know how easy it Is 
uniess you know how to go about it. You 
probably already have enough QSLs in 
your files for some of the awards. S9.95 in- 
cludes all postage and handling. COD ex- 
tra. Quantity discounts available. 

A)sOt if you know some awards that you 
would iike ilsted, please Eet Larry know 
and they will appear in the next volume, 
Write to; Larry Kebel KB^ZP, 736 39th 
Street, West Des Moines lA 50265. 

INLAND STEEL ARA 

The Inland Steel Amateur Radio Asso- 
ciation will operate speciaE-event station 
K9DWL to commemorate The Lit tie Red 
School House and Hammond, Indiana's 
centennial year, from 1400Z to WOOZ on 
Saturday, October 6, 1&B4. Frequencies: 
phone— General-class portions of 10, 15. 
40, and 80 meters; CW— Novice-class por- 
tions of 10, 15, 40, and BO meters; 2 meter 
FM— 146.42 simpJex, Send tegai-size 
SASE for certificate to Lucy Schendera 
N9DTG, 812 E. 40th Place, Griffith IN 
46319. 

ST. PETERS ARC 

The St. Peters Amateur Radio Club will 
operate a special -event station from 1700 
UTC. Saturday, October 6, to 1700 UTC, 
October 7, at the Daniei Boone Home, 
Fernme Osage Valley, St. Charles County, 
Missouri. The event is to commemorate 
the place where Daniel Boone; frontiers- 
man, judge, trapper, surveyor, builder, and 
family man, spent the last twenty years of 
his life. The weekend ceiet>ration features 
a biack powder marksman contest for lo- 
cal participants. One compiete 2- way con- 
tact is needed to obtain a presentation- 



quality certificate on aged parchment fea- 
turina a picture of the Boone Estate and 
an Information brochure of Boone facts. 
SPARC will operate KB«J on plus or mi- 
nus 3.915, 7,240, 14,280^ 21.420 depending 
on conditions and band activities. A coon- 
sitin cap will aJso be awarded to the first 
operator making contact on all four 
bands. One dollar or 3 iRCs with calls and 
time of contact should be sent to Tfm 
Haake WAOTSY, 128 Lake Point Drive. St, 
Peters MO 6337e, 




CENTER OF THE US 

The Centrai Kansas ARC of Salina KS 

wiii operate WaKQU from the marker of 
the geographical center of the US in Leba^^ 
non KS. Operation will be from 1700Z Cto- 
tober 6 till 1900Z October 7, 10 kHz up 
from the lower end of the Generai-cfass 
10-80-meter bands. Certificate via KB®BH, 
2358 Aurora Ave.^ Sailna KS 67401. 



:?? 



COLUMBUS DAY 

The Columbus Amateur Radio Associa- 
tion will be holding its second annual Co- 
lumbus Day Special Event to provide a tr i^ 
pie salute to Christopher Coiombus, the 
City of Columbus, and amateur radio 
worldwide, on October 6-7, 1964. CARA's 
c^ub static n^ WSTO, located at the Center 
of Science and industry, will try to contact 
as many stations as possibie around the 
world. 

EUgiblHty 

Open to all amateur-radio operators 
worldwide, to be divided into two groups: 
Columbus OH (and suburbs) amateurs; all 
other amateurs. 

Bands 

Saturday. October 6, I9fi4— 1400Z to 
24002—15 meters phone at 21.375 MHz 
±10kHZ- 

Sunday, October 7, 1984— 1400Z to 
2400Z— 40 meters phone at 7.240 IV* Hz 
±10 kHz. 

Exchange 

Name, QTH, and HST. 

Scoring 

One point for each contact (excluding 
WSTO), ^ix points for a W8TO contact. A 
final score of 10 must be submitted to be 
eiigible for a certificate. Scores must be 
sut)mitted within 120 days to be valid. Cer- 
tificates will be issued to ail qualifying 
amateurs who Include an SASE {SAE and 
3 IRCs for DX). SWLs may receive the cer- 
tificate on a St at ion- heard basis. 

A mini contest will be in operation dur* 



Ing the event period; the highest score 
from a Columbus amateur will receive a 
plaque. 

Ail requests for certificates and corre- 
spondence should be sent to Amateur 
Radio Station W8T0, Attn. SpeciahEvent 
Coordinator^ 2&0 East Broad St., Colum- 
bus OH 42^15. f / 

CENTER OF US POPULATION 

The Jefferson County Amateur Radio 
Club will be operating special-event sta^ 
tion KAOIAR from De Soto MO, the center 
of US population^ on jQiiitob^ J5i^9Q4, 
from 1500Zto240OZ,'^ 

Operation will be in the lower ends of 
the 40-, 20-, and 15-meter General bands. 
There will be some CW in the Novice por- 
tion oM he same bands. 

For a certificate, send an SASE and 
OSL to KAQIAR, aOCfd High Ridge Boule- 
vard, High Ridge WO 63049. 

/^ HAT ROCK 

The Hermiston Amateur Radio Club will 
operate KC7LK from Hat Rock State Park 
from laOO GMT. October 13th, to 0100 
GMT, October I4th, and between 1800 and 
2200 GMT on October 14th. The station is 
commemorating the 179th anniversary of 
Lewis and Clark's visit to Hat Rock and 
wiii be operating in coniunotlon with the 
Oregon OSO party. 

Operation will be on the General phone 
and Novice CW bands. There will also be 
some 2-meter and 440'MHz operation. For 
a certificate, send on SASE and your con- 
tact number to the Hermiston Amateur 
Radio Giub, PC Box 962, Hermiston OR 
97838. 

QUEEN CITY 

The Clarksville Amateur Transmitting 
Society will be operating a special -event 
station celebrating the aooth anniversary 
ot Clarksviite TN, the Queen City on the 
Cumberland River, The dates and times 
are as follows: October 13, 1984, from 
14CK)Z to 2400Z and October 14, 1984, from 
ie00Zto2200Z The call of this station will 
be N4GMT, Modes of operation will be 
SSB^ CW, and RTFY. Frequencies of oper- 
ation will be around 21,37& MH^;, 14 280 
MHz, and 7.240 MHz. A commemorative 
QSL certificate will be sent for every SASE 
received. QSL via KB4EFW, Rt. 1 Bo3< 162A, 
Indian Mound TN 37079. 

SUNBELT 
AGRICULTURAL EXPO 

The Colquitt County Ham Radio Society 
win be operating club station WD4K0W 
trom the site of the seventh annual Sun- 
belt Agricultural Exposition on October 
16, 17, and 16, 1984. The hours of opera- 
tion will be 0900 to 1700 EDST each day. 

This annual Sunbelt Expo is held each 
year at Spence Field Airbase, located near 
MouEtrie, Georgia, and is the largest agri- 
cultural show In the South. This event 




draws over 200,000 visitors from all over 
the United States and foreign countries. 

Operations will be in the General por- 
tion of the HF bands. The members will al- 
so be listening for visiting hams on the lo- 
cal repeater 146. 19/. 79. Visiting hams are 
invited to visit the amateur booth at the 
Expo and operate the amateur station. 

A special OSL card is available for 
those making contact during this event 
and submitting an SASE. 

J. GORDON COOGLER 
POETRY FESTIVAL 

On Saturday, Novembers. 1984, K4MJN 
will operate a spec iai-e vent station in 
Biythewood SC to commemorate the birth- 
place of J. Gordon Coogler [1865-1901). 

J. Gordon Coogier has been acclaimed 
by literary critics as the WORST practic- 
ing poet in US literary history' His verses 
are now known as Cooglerisms, as is any 
other worl< since that falls into that same 
critical disdain. Many literary societies of 
today award the Coogier Award for the 
worst published works of the year. But 
here in Biythewood ^Population 93J we're 
very proud of our native son and celebrate 
his accomplishments with a festival and 
poetry contest, 

K4MJN Will operate on or around 14.290 
MHz from 1 400Z to 1 BOtJZ a n d on or arou n d 
21.390 MHz from 1800Z to 2200Z Join usi 

Alt stations world ng K4MJN during this 
second annual festival will receive ahand- 
sorne certificate with a photo of The Bard 
of Biythewood and some of his poetry. 
Send a large business-size SASE with 
your QSL and contact number to J. David 
Suggs K4MJN, Rf. 3, Sox 164, Biythewood 
SC 29016. 






BOMB SQUAD 



The BOMB Squad |Best of Mt. Baidy) 
win operate W6HCP (HoHywood Christ- 
mas Parade) from 16002 on November 25 
to 0400Z on November 26, 19&4. Operation 
from the parade communications center 
of the 1934 Hollywood Christmas Parade 
will be on 7.284, 14.284, and 2T284 MHi. 
SSB. SASE to W6GVH for special com^ 
memorative QSL. 

WORKED ALL ZONES 

The WAZ Award is issued to any licensed 
amateur station presenting proof of con- 
tact with the forty zones of the world. This 
proof shall consist of proper QSL cards j 
which may be checked by any of the au- 
thori^d CO checkpoints or sent directly 
to Mr. Leo Haijsman W4KA, WAZ Award 
Manager, 1044 Southeast 43rd St., Cape 
Coral FL 33904. Many of the major DX 
clubs in the US and Canada and most na- 
tional amateur radio societies abroad are 
authorized CQ checkpoints. If In doubts 
consult the WAZ Award Manager. Any 
legal type of emission may be used, pro- 
viding communication was established 
after November 15, 1945. 

73 Magazine * October, 1984 75 



The off^ciat CQ WAZ zone map and zone 
Kst will be used in determining the zone in 
which a station is localgd. 

Confirmatfon must be accompanied by 
a fist of claimed zones using CQ form 
1479, showing the cail letter's of the sta- 
tion Contacted within ^ach zone. The list 
should aiso deafly stiow tiie applicant's 
name, call letters, and the complete mail- 
ing address. Tlie applicant should indi- 
cate the type of award for which he is ap- 
plying, such as all-SSB, all-CW, or mixed, 
fn remote locations and in foreign coun- 
tries, a handwritten list may be submitted 
and will be accepted for process log, pro- 
vided the above information is shown, 

All contacts must be made with licensed^ 
Fan d based, amateur stations operating in 
authorised amateur bands. 

All contacts submitted by the applicant 
myst be made from within the same coun- 
try. l\ IS recommended that each QSL 
clearly show the station's sone number, 
When the applicant submits cards for 
muJtiple calistgns, evidence should be 
provided to show that he or she also held 
those call letters. 

Any altered or forged confirmations wfH 
result in permanent disqualification of the 
applicant. 

Inctude with the appilcatfon the pro- 
cessing fee {CO subscribers — S4.0O; non- 
Subscribers— $10.00) and a self -addressed 
envelope with sufficient postage stamps 
or IRCs to return the QSL cards by the 
class of maii desired and indicated. CQ 
subscribers should include a recent mail- 
ing 1al>el (or copy) with appiicatfon. IRCs 
equal In redemption value to the process- 
ing tee are acceptable^ Checks should be 
made out to Mr. Leo Hai|sman, WAZ 
Award Manager. 

In addition to the conventional certifi- 



cate for which any and all bands and modes 
may be used, specially endorsed and 
numbered certificates are available for 
phone and single-sideband operation. The 
phone certificate requires that all con- 
tacts be two-way phone; the SSB certifi- 
cate requires that all contacts be two-way 
SSB. 

If, at the time of the original application^ 
a note Is made pertaining to the possibili- 
ty of a subsequent application for an en- 
dorsement or special certificate, only the 
missing confirmations recfuired for that 
endorsement need be submitted with the 
later application (provided a copy of the 
original authorization signed by the WAZ 
manager is enclosed). 

Decisions of the CQ DX Awards Adviso- 
ry Committee on any matter pertaining to 
the administration of this award will be 
final. 

Ail appfications should be sent to the 
WAZ Award Manager after the QSL cards 
have been checked by an authorised CO 
checkpoint. 

Zone maps, printed ruies, and applica- 
tion forms are available from the WAZ 
Award Manager: Send a self-addressed 
envelope (4" x 9-1/2") with 28 cents post- 
age, or a self-addressed envelope and 2 
IRCs. For rulings on borderline areaSn con- 
sult the WAZ Award Manager, 

Single Band WAZ 

Since January 1, 1973, WAZ Awards 
have been issued to licensed amateur sta- 
tions presenting proof ot contact with the 
40 zones of the world on one of the tlve 
high-frequency bands, 30-10 rneters. Con- 
tacts tor a single-band WAZ award must 
have been made after QQQQ hours GMT, 
January 1, 1973, Proof of contact shall 
consist of proper QSL cards checked by 



the DX Editor, the WAZ Manager, or an au 
thorlzed CO checkpoint. Single-band cer- 
tificates will be awarded For both two-way 
phone (Including SSB) and two-way CW. 
The single-band WAZ program is governed 
by the same rules and uses the same zone 
boundaries as the regular WAZ Award- 

5 BarnJ WAZ 

On January 1, 1979. the CQ DX Depart- 
ment, In cooperation wEth the CQ DX Advi- 
sory Committee, announced the 5 band 
WA21 

Applicants who succeed in presenting 
proof of contact with the 40 zones of the 
world on the five high-frequency bands — 
SO, 40, 20, 15, and 10 meters |for a tot a! of 
200) — win receive a special certiificate in 
recognition of this achievement. 

These rufes were in effect as of July i^ 
1979, and supercede all other rutes. Five- 
band WAZ will be offered for any combina- 
tion of CW, SSB. phone, or RTTY contacts, 
mixed mode only. Separate awards wiEl 
not be offered for the different modes. 
Contacts mifst have been made after 0000 
hours GMT, January 1, 1979- Proof of con- 
tact shall consist only of proper OSL 
cards checked by the WAZ Award Manag- 
er. The first pEateau wiM be a total of 150 
zones on a combination of the five bands. 
Applicants should use a separate sheet 
for each frequency band, using CQ form 
1479. 

A regular WAZ or single-band WAZ wfll 
not be a prerequisite for a 5-band WAZ cer 
tificate. All applications should show the 
applicant's WAZ number. 

After the ISO-zone certificate is earned, 
the final ob|ective is 200 zones for a com- 
plete 5-band WAZ. CQ is donati ng plaques 
for the first 5 winners, after which the ap- 
plicant will have a choice of paying a fee 





ISLAND DX COUNTRY immO 




A3 


HK9 (Bajo) 


PYO (Vfm\) 


VS6 


A9X 


HK0 (Maip^ 


S7 


VS9 (See 8Q) 


BV 


HKtS (San An) 


S9, cm 


VS9K 


C2 


IS 


SV Crete) 


VU7 (Andaman) 


C6 


J3, VP2G 


SV (Dodecan) 


VU7 (Ucca) 


ce^A 


J6, VP2L 


T3, VR1 (Central Kiribati) 


XF4 


CEtBX 


J7,VP2D 


T3,VR1 (East Kiflbeti) 


XP(SeeO>q 


CEfflZ 


JA-JR, KA 


T3,VR1 (West Kiribati) 


YB, YC, YD 


CO, CM, KG4 


JO. KA1 (f^ina) 


IF 


YJ 


CT2 


JO, KA1 (Ogasa) 


TI9 


YVO 


CT3 


JD, 7J1 (Okino) 


UAI.kiKI (Franz Jos) 


ZD? 


D4 


JW 


VE1 (Sabte) 


ZD8 


D6 


JX 


VE1 (St Paul) 


ZD9 


DO 


KG4 (See CO, CM) 


VK(LordHowel 


ZF 


EA6 


KHI.KB 


VK9 (Willis) 


ZK1 (North) 


EA8 


KH2, KG6 


VKfl (Christmas) 


ZK1 (South) 


EL Gl 


KH3. KJ 


VK9 (Cocos) 


2K2 


FB8W 


KH4p KM 


VK9 (Mellish) 


ZL(New Zealand) 


F8&X 


KH5, KP6 (King) 


VK9 {Norfolk) 


ZL(Auck-Camp) 


FB8Z 


KH5, KP6 (Paimyfa) 


VK0 (Heard) 


71 (Chatham) 


FC 


KH6,AH6,WH6, NH6(Haw) 


VKQ) (^flacquarie) 


ZL (Kerm) 


FG fGuad) 


nm. KH7 (Kure) 


VP2A 


ZM7 


FG, FS 


KH8, KS6 


VP20 (See J7) 


ZS2 (Mari-Pr Ed) 


FH8 


KH9, KW 


VP2E 


IS 


FK 


KHffl, KH2, KG6 (Mari) 


VP2G(SeeJ3) 


3B6/3a7 


FM 


KC6 (West) 


VP2K 


3B8 


FO(Clipperton) 


KCe(East) 


VP2L (See J6) 


3B9 


FO(Tahhtij 


KP (Desoth) 


VP2M 


3C(S 


FP 


KP1, KC4 (Navassa) 


VP2S 


3D2 i 


FR^GIor.) 


KP2, KV 


VP2V 


3Y 


FR (Juan) 


KP3, KS4, HKa (RanSer) 


VPS 


4S 


FR (Reunton) 


KP4, NP4 (Puerto RIco) 


VPB (Falkland) 


5B.ZC 


FR (TromlEn) 


KX 


VPa, LU (Orkney) 


SR 


FW 


om 


Vpe, LU (Sandw(ch) 


SW 


G, QM, GW [G Brit) 


oja 


VPS, LU (Shetland) 


fiV 


GC. GU (Guern) 


OX,XP 


VPB, LU (Georgia) 


80. VS9 


GC. GJ (Jerseyl 


ov 


VP9 


BP 


CD 


P29 


VQ9 


9H 


Gl, El 


PJ (Neth Ant) 


VR1 (See T3) 


OMB, gMS (See VS5) 


H4, VR4 


PJ (St Maarten) 


VR4 (See H4) 


9V 


HCS 


PY® (Fern) 


VR7 


9Y 


HH, HI 


PYa fPetef-Paul) 


VS5, 9M6, 9M8 





for his plaque and/or applying for an en- 
dorse men I commemo rating this achieve- 
ment. 

The applications should be sent to the 
WAZ Aw^ard }^anager. The 5-band Award 
Is governed by the same basic rules as the 
regular WAZ and uses the same zone 
boundaries. 

PETERBOROUGH ARC 

The Peterborough (Ontario) Amateur 

Radio Club is offering a distinctive bicen- 
tennial certificate to amateurs contacting 
Peterborough amateur stations during 
1984. Ontario stations must contact five 
Peterborough amateurs, North American 
stations must contact two^ and DX sta- 
tions must contact one. Use any Ijand, any 
mode. 

Send 51 and a list ot contacts as well as 
date and time of contact (no QSLs re- 
quired) to: Peterborough Amateuf Radio 
Club, PO Box 1205, Peterborough, Ontario 
K9J 7H4, 

ISLAND DX AWARD 

The iDX Award, sponsored by the Whid- 
bey Island DX Club, Is one of the most 
sought after awards in the DX communKy. 
Thfs award is available to licensed ama- 
teurs and shortwave listeners woridwide. 

The IDX Award is issued for SSB, CW, 
RTTY, SQTV, and mixed mode, as well: as 
for mixed- and single-band accomplish- 
menls. Applicants must work fifty (50) IDX 
Islands for ^he basic award. Endorse- 
ments are given in increments of 50 is- 
lands^ up to and Including the maximum 
number of islands possible. 

Only DXCC countrtes which are bona 
fi:de "islands" are qualifying contacts. A 
special IDX listEng appears wilhin this col- 
umn. To be valid, all contacts must have 
been made after October l, 1977, 

To apply, prepare a list of qualifying 
oontacts in prefix order. Please r^umber 
your contacts 1 through 50, etc. Include 
the call of the station worked, IDX island 
name, band, mode, date, and CMT. 

Do not send QSL cards! Have your lis! 
verified by two amateurs or local radio- 
club officials. Confirmation of each con- 
tact must be in the applicant's posses- 
sion al the time it is being verified. Send 
list of contacts along with $4 in US funds 
only and a business-size SASE to the fol- 
lowing address (foreign stations may sub- 
stitute £D IRCs for the fee): Whrdbey is- 
land DX Club, Attn: IDX Award, 2665 North 
Busby Road, Oak Harbof WA 98277. 

Rules governing this award program are 
rev le wed annually in the month of Sep- 
tember, Please enclose an SASE with any 
enquiries regarding this award program. 

Ttie IDX Awards Program uses DXCC 
countries which are bona fide "isiands" 
as recognized by the National Geographic 
Society. The first criterion is !hat each 
must have been a DXCC country on or af- 
ter October 1, 1977, as stated on the DXCC 
List of the ARRL Any 'qualifying'^ DXCC 
country omitted from this list by error or 
Vi/hich has been recognized for DXGC after 
the release of this listing will be added the 
next lime it goes to press, in the mean- 
time, appilcanls may count the new coun- 
tries In their taiiy. 

HAROAA AWARDS 

These awards are of high quality and 
will make a very nice addition to any radio 
room. The awards are available to all 11* 
censed amateurs and amateur stations;^ 
Please do not send QSL cards. A list 
Showing full details oi the contacts (log 
information) should be certified by one 
other amateur or radio-club officer. Photo- 
copies of your QSL cards or original log 
wfll also be permitted. At your request. 



76 7S Magazine • October, 1984 



special endorsements wifT be added such 
as: CW, SSB, ail YL, QRP, RTTY, SSTV, 
one bandf etc. If you so desire^ you may re- 
Quest separate awards for each spec fat 
endorsement Contacts may be made over 
any period of years. Contacts made 
through repealers cannot be used. Satel- 
lites are permitted. Please pass this 
award infofmatton along to another ama- 
teuf or post it at your local c tub. All corre- 
spondence or appFtcatlons should be ^ent 
to: HAROAA, PO Box 341, HinckJey OH 
44233, Attn: Awards Manager Gary Zim- 
merman WB8RTR. 

Applica^lion for each award must be ac- 
companied by three US dollars to cover 
handJing and award costs. Payment may 
be made by cash, personal check, money 
order, ten IPCs, or first-class-rate US post- 
age stamps. DX applicants may send a 
money order made out in US funds, ten 
IRCSf or any of the above. 

If at any tJme your award is fost, mis- 
placed, or damaged in any way, send the 
•date, award number, and pertinent infor- 
mat I on and we will replace it free of 
charge. Alii awards Include the speci^at 
HAROAA gold seal. 

Great Lakes Award 

This requires one contact with each 
Stat© bordering the Great Lakes: New 
York, Pennsylvania, Ohio, Michigan, In- 
diana, Illinois, Wisconsin, and Minnesota, 

Sup^r Certificate Hunter Award 

This HAROAA award is designed for the 
serious certificate hunter. To earn this 
award, you must have a mtnrmum of tenj 
amateur-radjo operattng awards. Simply 
list the awards that have been Issued to 
you. Special endorsements are 10^ 25, 50, 
75, and lOOpius. 

HAROAA DX Award 

This is obtained by working DX sta- 
tions, tt is the number of stahons worked 
that is important. Each DX station counts 
as one, even If several are from the same 
country or area. Special endorsements for 
this awand are 10. 25, 50, 75, 100, 200, and 
500 DX contacts- 

KAROAA Insomnia Awerd 

This award is earned by communicating 
with one other amateur-radio station tor a 



minimum of one hour between the hours 
of 1:00 and 5:00 am. A super conversation 

piece for your shack,. 

HAflOAA Super Operator Award 

This certificate Is rendered for those 
providing a service on behalf of amateur 
radio such as weather otiservation, pubftc 
service, emergency work, helping a new 
ham, providing communications for a 
community function, etc. The require- 
ments are for the applicant to briefly de- 
scribe the event or service. The officials of 
HAROAA will determine whether it de- 
serves this special recognition. 

HAROAA OHicial Traffic Handler Award 

This award Is a selMssued achFeve- 
ment, allowing you to display the fact that 
you are indeed an official handler of radto 

traffic. 



WORKED TRUMBULL COUNTY 
AWARDS 

The Warren [Ohio} Amateur Radio Asso- 
ciation, Inc.f announces its Worked Trunv 
bull County fWTC), Worked Trumbull 
County Mobile (WTC-IVf), and Worked 
Trumbuli County YL (WTC-YL) awards. 
These programs are designed to promote 
increased amateur radio activity among 
and with Trumbull County amateur-radio 
operators. The awards afso reward operat- 
ing achievements. 

Application: Send applications and all 
correspondence to; Don Lovett KasXT, 
Awards Chairman, WAR A, PO Box 809, 
Warren OH. One doitar must accompany 
applications from W^ K, and VE amateurs; 
all others should send three IPCs with ap- 
piication^ Oniy Trumbuii County appli- 
cants must submit actual QSL cards. All 
others should have certification letters 
from two other radio amateurs which veri- 
fy that they have seen and chec>^ed the ap- 
plicant s OSLs. Each application must 
also be accompanied by a list of the calls 
worked, with full log data for each 
contact. 

Requirements 

WTC— For each certificate or endorse- 
ment, Trumbull County applicants must 
have 20 contacts with other Trumbull 
County amateurs. Other W, K, and VE sta- 



tfons must contact 10 Trumbull County 
amateurs, while DX applicants must have 
five contacts. 

WTC-M — For each certificate or en- 
dorsement, Trumbull County applicants 
must have 20 contacts with other Trum- 
bull County amateurs operating mobile in 
Trumbull County. Other W, K, and VE sta- 
tions must contact 10 Tfumbull County 
amateurs operating mobile In Trumt^ull 
County, whife DX applicants must have 
five contacts. 

WTC-YL — For each certi^fiicate or en- 
dorsement, W, K, and VE stations must 
contact 10 Trumbuii County YL or XYL am- 
ateurs, while DX applicants must have 
three contacts. 

Award: A certificate will be issued on 
each approved application but in order to 
appear on the certificate, special endorse- 
ments must be filed with the initial filing, 
each containing at least 25 percent new 
contacts, initial endorsements are free of 
charge^ but endorsements made on later 
dates will take the form of WTC certifi- 
cates. Appii cat ions for these must con- 
tain proper fitting fees. Endorsements may 
be ail one mode, all one band, all mobite- 
to mobile, or all memi^ers of the Warren 
Amateur Radio Association. Inc. 

Net contacts, contacts made through 
repeaters, and contacts made before Jan- 
uary 1. 1959f cannot be counted. 



A FAR NET AWARD 

The Armored Force Amateur Radio Net 
is a nonprofit and informal group of ama- 
teur-radio operators who are veterans or 
active-duty service personnel who have 
been assigned or attached to an armored 
unit of the United States Armed Forces or 
their allies at some time in their military 
careers. 

The A FAR NET offers its A FAF NET 
Award certificate to amateur-radio oper- 
ators of any nation. The 8 Va" X 11" certifi- 
cate is printed in four coiors on white on 
heavy stock and is intended for framing. 
Endorsements are avaiiabie for malting 
additional contacts and for making con- 
tacts in one mode or on one band. Appli- 
cation may be made for any award level, 
mode, or band operation at any time. 

To quaiify for the basic award, non- 
member stations must establish two-way 



contact with a minimum of fifteen differ- 
ent A FAR NET member stations. To quail- 
fy for endorsements, non-member sta- 
tions must make contact with ten or thirty- 
five additional members on any band or Jn 
any mode. Confirmation of the required 
contacts must be through a copy of the 
non-member's log that has been certified 
by two other amateur-radio ope rate fs. 

Appticants for the basic award certifi- 
cate must submit a minimum of fifty cents 
along with their application to cover post- 
age, envelopes, etc. Endorsements not 
mailed atong with the basic certificate 
will require only a normal 4W' x 6" 
SASE. Applications for the basic award or 
endorsements should be sent to: Alfred G. 
Beutier K2DWI, A FAR NET Certificate 
Manager, 36 Manchester Road, East Auro- 
ra, New York 14052, Please allow from two 
to four weeks for mailmg of the certifi- 
cates or endorsements. 



HONG KONG AWARDS 

HARTS meets every Tuesday at 1700 
locals excluding public holidays, at the 
China Fleet Ciub^ Arsenal Street, Wan- 
chaii Hong Kong Istand. 

Nine Dragons Award 

This award is given for one contact with 
a country In each of the following 9 zones l 
ie, 19, and 24 to 30. Contact for zone 24 
must be a VS6. Stations within the 9 zones 
require 2 contacts in each zone, with 2 
VS6 contacts. Cnly contacts after Janu- 
ary 1, 1979; are valid. Fees are US $3, Aus- 
tralia $3, 1 pound 50 pence England postal 
order, or 24 IRCs. 

Firecracker Award 

This award Is given for six contacts with 
different VS6 stations. Stations In zones 
18, 19, and 24 to 28 require 10 contacts 
with different VS6 stations. Only contacts 
after January 1, 1964, are valid. Fees are 
US $2. Australia $2, 1 pound England post- 
al order, or 10 IRCs. 

Usual Conditions 

Certified log extracts only — no OSL 
cards are required. Payment to be made in 
cash— no bank drafts. Postal orders to be 
left blank. Claims to: Awards Manager, 
HARTS. GPO Box 541, Hong Kong. 



I 




Reprinted from the Federal Reqhief 



FEDERAL GOMMUNICATI0I4S 
COMMISSIOM 

47 CFR Parts 1 and 97 

[PR Docket Ho. 93^2?: EIM-42M; FC€ 84- 

324J 

Use of Volunteera To Prepare arid 
Adrnlnlster Operator Examlrtstions In 
the Amateur Radio Service 

AOENCV; Federa] Communicationa 
Commission. 

action: Final rule. 

SUMMARY^ This document amends the 
FCC rules regarding the preparation and 
administration of amateur radio 
operator examinations above the Novice 
Class to permit Volunteer-Examiner 
Coordinators (VEC'aJ and volunteer 
examiners to design the examinations 
instead of the FCC. This amendment 
VQill relieve the FCC of the 



administrative burden ofdestgnirrg the 
eitaminationa and permit VEC'a and 
examiners more latitude in preparing 
and administering examinattona. Thia 
dcn;umenl also amends certain other 
FCC rules regarding the Amateur Radio 
Service volunteer examiner progjam to 
clarify them. 

EFFECTIVE oaTe: August 31. 19S4. 

POn FUftTHfrt lltFOftMATION CONTACT: 
John J. Borkowski^ Private Radio Bureau, 
Washington, D.C 20554. [202) 632^964. 

Appendix 

Parts 1 and d7 of the Commission's 
Rules (47 CFR Part* 1 and 97] are 
amended as follows; 

PART 1— [AUENOEDl 

1. Paragraph (e) qf 1 1.925 is revrsed to 
read: 

§ 1.925 AppMcatkm for ■fi«cM l«fTkpor«ry 



authorlzatlorv lemporary (MHinlt or 
teJ^porary operating authoiity- 

« t * * # 

[e) Unless the FCC otherwise 
prescribes, an ai^plicant already 
Licensed in the Amateur Radio Service, 
upon BucceasfuJly completing the 
amateur radio operator examination [a) 
required for a higher clasii, may operate 
his/her amateur radio alation consistent 
wiih th« rights end privileges of that 
higher class for a period of one year 
from the date of the most recently 
completed examinalion(s] for that 
operator classr in accord with the 
provisiona of § 97.35. 



PART &7— [AMENOEOl 

2. The Table of Contents for Part 97 is 
amended as fotlowsr 

a. The heading of | S7 J17 is revised 
to read "Examinatiana." 

b. The heading of 5 97.523 is removed. 

3. Paragraphs [&]y (bj> and [d] of 
§ 97,27 «re revised to read: 

$ 97.27 Examination prepvatlon. 

[a} Element 1(A) shall be prepared by 
the examiner. The preparer miL&t hold an 
Amateur Extra . Advanced or General 
Class operator Hcense. The test shiill be 
such aa to prov^ the applicants ability 



to transmit correctly by hand (key, 
straight key. or, U fiupplied by the 
applicant* any other type of hand 
operated key such as a semi-automatic 
or electronic key, but not a keyboard 
keyerj and to receive correctly by ear 
texts in the intemational Morse code at 
a rate of not less than fiv« {5] words per 
minute during a five-minute lest period. 
Special procedures may be employed in 
cases of physical disabihty. (See 
I 97.Z6(g).] The applicant is reaponsible 
for knowing and may b« tested upon the 
twenty-six letters of the alphabet, the 
numerals Q-9, theperiodj^he co mme . the 
question mark Ak» SK^ BT, and DN. 
(See I 97.29[c].] 

(b] Elements 1[B} and l(c} shall be 
prepared by the examiners or be 
obtained by the exatniners from the 
VEC. The preparer must hold an 
Amateur Extra Class license. The teat 
shall be such as to prove: the applicant's 
ability to transmit correcUy by hand 
(key, straight key^ or, if supplied by the 
applicant, any other type of hand 
operated key such aa a Bemi-automatlc 
or electronic key. but not a keyboard 
keyer} and to receive correctly by ear 
texts in the international Morse code at 
not leSB than ibe prescribed speed 
during a five-minute tesi period. Special 
procedures may be employed in cases of 
physical disability. [See S 97.2tJ(E).) The 
applicant is respongtble for knuwing and 

73 Magazine • October, 1984 77 



may be lesled upqn the twenty-six 
letters of the alphabet, the rmmerals 0-9. 
the period, the com mas the queation 
mark, AR, SK, BT ai)d DN, {See 
I 97.23(c).) 

(d) Elements :). 4(A) end 4(B) will be 
designed by the VEC. The VEC will 
select questions for €ach test from the 
eppropriate list of questions approved 
by the Commtssion (eilher PR BuJIeltn 
1035 B, C or D. latest date of iasuej. The 
VEC must select the appropriate number 
of questions from each category of the 
syllabua (PR Bulletin 1^5] us specified 
in PR Bulletin 1035 a C or D, These 
quejitiniis must be taken verbatim from 
the appropriate PR Bulletin tn the farm 
in which they have been approved by 
the Commis^aion. Beginning Janusry 1, 
1987, volunteer examiners may also 
design Elements 3, 4[A) and 4(B) in 
accord with the provisiong of this 
paragraph. Each VEC and each 
volunteer examiner is required to hold 
current examination designs in 
confidence- 

± * It t i 

4. Paragraphs [a) and [e] of £ 97.26 are 
revised to read: 

1 97^ ExamlnBthm oftmlnlstnitforL 

(a] Unless otherwise prescribed by the 
Commisaloni each examination for an 
amateiif radio operator license (except 
the Novice Class operator license) shall 
be administered by three accredited (see 
5 97.515] volunteer examiners. An 
examiner administering telegraphy 
examination element 1(A} or written 
examination element Z (in conjunction 
with an exiiminalion other than b 
Novice Class examination} nr written 
examination element % must hold an 
Amateur Extra Classi or Advanced Class 
radio oper^jitor license. An examiner 
administering telegraphy examination 
element 1(6) or 1(C) or written 
examination element 4(A) or 4(B1 must 



hold an Amateur Extra Class radLo 

operator UcenBe. 

• t * * ♦ 

(e) When the candidate scores a 
pdi^sing grade on an examination 
element, the examiners (except for 
examinations for the Novice Clasa 
operator license) must issue a certificate 
of successful completion of the 
examination. This certificate may be 
used for a period of one year for 
examination credit for telegraphy 
elements l(A]. 1(B) or 1(CJ. (See 
§ 97.25(b),) 

5p Paragraph (b) of I 97.31 is revised to 
read: 

I 97.31 Volunteof examiner r*q<jlr«m<Nitft. 

(b) Any person who owns a 
significant interest in, or is an employe 
of, any company or other entity which is 
engaged in the manufacture or 
distnbutjon of equipment used in 
connection with amateur radio 
transmissions, or in the preparation or 
distribution of any publication used in 
preparation for obtaining amateur 
station operator licenses, is inE^igible to 
be a volunteer e5<an*iner for purposes oi 
administering an amateur radio operator 
eXHminatian. However, a pf?rson who 
dv^9 not normally communicate with 
thai pHrt of an entity engaged in the 
eit^ouf^cture or distribution of such 
equipment, or in the preparation or 
distribution of any publication used m 
preparation for obtaining amateur 
operator licenses, is eligible to be a 
volunteer examiner. 

d <■ ■ < M 

e. Section 97.35 i* revised I o read: 
^ 97.35 Temporwy oparaUni) suttwdly. 

Unless the FCC otherwise prescribes 
mn applicant already licensed in the 
Amateur Radio Service, upon 



successfully completing the amateur 
rttdio examinfltion{s) required for a 
higher claas, may operate an am^iteur 
radio station coosisierit with the rights 
and provi leges of that higher ctass for a 
period of one year from the dete of the 
most recently completed examination 
for that operator class provided that the 
applicant reta]n& the certiFicateis) for 
successful completion of the 
examination(9) {see § g7.ZB(e]] a I the 
station location, provided that the 
applicant uses the identifier code of the 
new class of license for which the 
applicant has qualified (KT for 
Tenhmcian Class, AC for General Clasa. 
A A for Advanced Class and AE for 
Amateur Extra Class) as a suffix to the 
present call sign {see § 9? .84), and 
provided that the FCC has not yet acted 
upon the application for a higher class of 
license. 

7, Paragraph [f) of S 97.84 is revised to 
read: 



$ 97^4 Station Idsnltffcatlon, 



[f] When operating under the 
lemporary operftUng authority permitted 
by g 97.35 with privileges which exceed 
the privileges for the daset of operator 
license currently held by the licensee, a 
licensee must Identify in the Following 
mannen 

(1) On radioteiephony, by the 
transmission of the station call sigfi, 
followed by the word **temporary", 
followed by the identifier code for the 
new class of license for whEch the 
licensee has qualified [see § 97.35). 

(2) On radiotelegraphy, by the 
transmission of the station callsign, 
followed b5f Ehe Fraction bar DN. 
followed by the idem tf fie r cocfe for the 
new class of license for which the 
licensee has qualiTted (see § 97.35). 



R, Paragraph |a] of I 97.503 is revised 
to read: 

§97.503 Definitions. 

(a I VotUiiteer-exaniiner coordinator 
(VECJ, An oiTiaoiiation which has 
entered into an agreement with the 
Federal Communications Commission to 
coordinate the efforts of volunteer 
ejcamineis in preparing and 
admmistering examinations for amateur 
radio operator license. 

& Se-cLion 97.505 is revised to reed: 



f 97.505 ApptlcabUtty Qt ruteL 

These rules apply to each 
organization that serves as a volunteer 
examiner coordinator. 

10. Section 97.5I}9 is revised to read; 

§ V7.50a Confltcl* Hi U)tvr*«t 

An organization engaged in the 
mannfadure or distribution of 
equipment used in connection with 
amateur radio transmissions, or in the 
preparation or distribution, of any 
publicatiDo used in preparation for 
obtaining amateur radio station operator 
licenses may be a VEC only upon a 
persuasive showing to the Commission 
that preveiiiative measures have been 
taken to preclude any possible con flic t 
of i merest. 

n. Section 97.511 is revised to read; 

§ f T J1 \ Aorewnefit rvqutrtd. 

No orgarTizatJon may serve as a VEC 
until that orgaoi^tion has entered into b 
written agreement with the Fedt^ral 
Communications Commission to do so. 
The VEC must abide by the terms of the 
agreement. 

12, Section 97.517 is revised to read 





"Xr^rr v:: :W:M;:::S^li*!^ 



%bit 



%rbltt> 



i t-^f -^^ 


liff 




ORBIT Is the Official Journal for the 
Radio Amateur satellite corporation. 

For a SAMPLE COPY please 

send $2 to: 



(AMSAT), P.O. Box 27, Washington, DC 

20047. 




I 

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I 



MOVING? 

Let US know 8 weeks in advance so that you won't 
miss a single issue of 73. 

Attach old label where indicated and print new ad- 
dress in space provided. Also include your mailing 
label whenever you write concerning your sub- 
scription. It helps us serve you promptly. Write to: 
^m^^ Subscription Department 

/^ Amateur Radio's P,0. Box 931 

m *^ ® lechnicalJournaf Farmingdale NY 1 1737 

D Extend my subscription one additional year for only $17.97 
D Payment enclosed D Btll me 



Canada & Mexico ^IC^^lfS year onEy US Funds drawn on US bar}k. Foreign Surface 
525.00/1 year only US Funds dr^wn or> LfS bank FoFt^tgn AErmaJl, plea.se inquire. 



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I If you have no label hundy, pnm OLD uddres:^ here. 

I 
I 






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City 



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Zip. 



pn'ni A/f K^f/Afe'^3 Iicw: 




Name _ 
Address. 
City 



State. 



Zip. 



I 



^ZZJ 



78 73 Magazine • October, 1984 



A VEC will design {see § 97 2?[d)j, 
afi&c;iiLb}«, print and distribute written 
examinBtion EtenientB 3, 4(A]^ and 4fBJ. 
A VECmay design, assemble, print and 
distrihnte examinalioTi Elements 1[BJ 
and IfC). A VEC ia required to hold 
examination designs in confidence. 

|97.5» rHarnouadT 

13. Section 97.523 ia removed and 
reserved. 

47CFRPBrt97 

IPn Doc«(«t No. «^-«^; nU Nos. 370S, 3724« 
3734, 377B, 3831, 3633, 3060; FCC 84-345 1 

Radlotetepliony ExpansFon HlgTi 
Frequency Amateur Bands; RM-A22B 
Petition for Telephorvy Operatlant on 
Frequencteft Between 7075-7100 kHz 
In HftwaM and In Areas Near fteglon 3 

AOiHCv: Federal Communications 

Commission. 

ACTION: Final rule' 

SUMMAAVr This docuinent amends the 
mlea by expanding t&Iephony privileges 
on frequencies 375CMOO0 kHz. 21200- 
21450 kHi^ Za300-29700 kHz. and 7075- 
7100 kHz [Hawaii and in areas near 
Region 3), Ht^se ajuendmenta are 
necessary ao that amateur rudio 
operators will have additioEial. 
radiotelephone frequenciea on which to 
operate. The result of this action 'm to 
relieve the overcrowding on Ihe 
preaently-ailocated frequencies for 
radiotelephony in the Amateur Radio 
Service. 

EPFlcnvc date: OODI. Universal 
Coordinated Time (UTCJi September 1, 

ADDRCSS: Federal CommunicationB 
Commiaaion. Washington. D,C. 20554. 
FOR INFOftMATtON CONTACT; 

Maurice [, DePont« Private Radio 
Bureau, Washington, D.C 205^, [202] 
632-4964. 

Appendix 

Part 97 of Chapter I of Titl^ 47 of the 
Code of Federal Regulations is 
emended, as follows: 

1. Section a7.7ta) is revised a& follows! 

§ 97x7 Privilege* of operator Hcenses. 

(a) Amateur Extra and Advanced 
Class. All authorized amateur privileges 
Including excluaive frequency operating 
authority in accordance with the 
foilowing table: 



FrutfucAdiH 


Cim. oi iit«nH auinonrad 


3750-3776 fcMi ....... ..ti^^-U-... 


Do, 


7000-7026 kHt...... 

14.000- U.Gi2S kMt ^ 

14i1 50-14. t7S kHz.,......^.^.... 

!iOOO-?l .025 iiHi..........-.,.,.,... 

iijxiChii.sis id-ii...._„ 


Do, 
Dq. 
Da. 
DO 
Dq. 


a775-MSO kHz .... 

7 T$0- T^iB khir „ 

14 17^14.225 hHi _ _. 

5^.225-21,300 IHa 


Do 
Do 
Do 



2, In I 97.61fa)^ that portion of the 
table under the heading ''kHi" is revised 
to read as follows. The entries in the 
table under die headings "MHz" and 
"GHz" remain the aame* 

5 »7.ft1 Authorised !tequ«ficle» ind 
emisfllona. 

(a}* ' • 



Fr«C)uftDCy tiimj 



i$ao to 3000 

3SO0 to 4000.. -. 

350ciroa?50 _. 

3750 10 4MlO ... 

700C 10 7300,. . 

7000 b 7lW,.,™^„. 
7075 10 7100 . — \,...„ 
7150 10 7300 _„. 

14000 ta 143»....„. 
1*000 to 14150..^.„ 

H1&0 1O 143S0 

2100CI to?t*&0, 

21000 to ?t2O0.._„.. 

Z1£00 to 21450 

28000 (0 29700..„_. 

2tt)oo ID aasoo—^.., 

2fr30O ID 2d700........ 



Efntiaio^s 



.^^ P I ^^iJ U IBblBllddll ■ L^BI^U IBIHl <■■■ 
r I ._._. .._iJ._. .LILIb.l ILJBII.IEIBILIBII 

A3, M. AS. f 3, f 4. F5,. 

At - -... 

F1._ 

AaF3 

Aa A4. A5. Fa F4. F5.. 
A^ . 

^~^~---" 
F1 .-.,.,...-, .^ ._...;___ 

A3, M. M. F3, F4. F5.. 

^^ I ■ KAM ■ I ■'■ ■ I ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ rq i':i ■ ■ r^i m r^ r'r- — ii— • r | 
r T I ii.iiJiJiiBii.iFiiiiiiKii^piriiiir^''-'^ 

A3, A4, AS, n, F4, PS.. 



pafo- 



4 

13 
3.4 

11 

a4 



3. Secton 97.61(b) (11) is revised to 
read as foilows: 

$ 97,St Authorized fT«<)u«ricl» and 
•mitsJorfS. 



m* 



* • 



fll) The use of A3 and F3 in this band 
is limited to amateur radio stations 
located outside Region 2 and amateur 
radio stations located within Region 2 
which ^re west of 130 degrees West 

longitude. 

• ' -* • » A 

47 CFR Part 97 

[PR Dock«i No. a4-2«e; FCC 04-^221 



Reimbursement of Out-of-Pocket 
Costs for Vofunteer Administered 
Amateuf Radio Examine tkHis 

agency: Federal Communications 

Commission. 

action: Final rule. 

summary; Thia document amends the 
rules to provide for reimbursiement of 
out-of-pocket costs incurred by 
volunteer examiners and volunteer 
examiner coordinators in connection 
with adminiBtering or coordinating 
amateur operator license examinations. 
The rules are necessary so that the 
volunteers can recover their prudently- 



incurred expenditures. The effect of this 
action is to establish reguJationa which 
permit reimbursement to volunteers far 
their necessary expenses. 
EFFECTIVE date: August 31. ldS4. 

address: Federal Communications 
Commission, Washington, DC 20554. 
FOR FURTHCR INFOAMATiDN CONTACT: 
Maurice J< DePont, Private Radio 
Bureau. Washington. D.C. 20SS4. (2D2J 
B3S-4964, 

Appendix 

Part 97 of Chapter I of Title 47 of the 
Code of Federal Regulations is amended 
as follows: 



.^•^ 



.4. 



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Se^ List of Adverti&er^ on p^ge 98 



For Quick Pleas# allow 3-4 weeki for delivery. H 

TOLL'FREt CREDIT CARD ORDERS-Ciill TODAY' National T -800-82 1-6e42jn Calif l-aOO-42 1-1061 

™™™™™™ CUSTOMER SERVICE ONLY 1213) 478-5048*™""™"" J 

73 Magazine ♦ October J 984 79 



1. Section 37.3l(c:) 19 revised to read b.3 
foJlowa: 

I §7.31 Vohim««r «)tamlner requirements. 
***** 

[c) Volunteer examiners may not be 
compenaated for serviceB. They may be 
reimbuTBed for out-of-pockel expenses, 
except for Novice class examinationa 
fsee ! 97.36). 

2. Section 37.33 is revised to read aa 
follows: 

S '^7.33 Volunteer examiner conduct 

No volunteer examiner Ghall give or 
certify any exammation by frauduleni 
meatia or for monetary or other 
consideratjon. Violation of this 
provision may result in the revocation of 
the amateur radio station license and 
the suspe^nsion of the amateur radio 
operator license of the volunteer 
examiner. This does not preclude a 
volunteer examiner front accepting 
reimbursement for out-of-pocket 
expenses under § 97,3^. Reimbur&eirfenl 
in any amount in excess of that 
permitted may result in the sanctions 
EpcGJfied hereiti^ 

3. New I 97.36 is added as follows: 

§97.36 Reimbursement for eipetises» 

(a] Each volunteer examiner 
coordinator and each volunteer 
examiner may be reimbursed by 
examinees for out-of-pocket expenses 
incurred in preparinj^, processing or 
administering examinations For amateur 
station operator licenses above the 
Novice class. The volunteer examiner 
coordinator or the volunteer examiners 
must collect the reimbttrsement feCt l\ 
any, from the examinees. No 
reimbursement may be accepted for 
preparing, processing or administering 
Novice daa» examinations, 

[b) The maximum amount of * 
reimbursement is S4,()0 for 1984 and will 
be adjusted annually each January 1 
thereafter for changes in the Department 
of Labor Consumer Price Index. Changes 
In the maximum amount of 
reimbursement will be announced by 
the Commission in a Public Notice. The 
amount of such reimbursement fee from 
any examinee for any one examination 



at a particular session regard I e8.3 of the 
number or examination elements I a ken 
must not exceed the published 
maximum.^ 

{o\ Each volunteer examiner 
coordinator end each volunteer 
examiner who accepts reimbursement 
must maintaia records of out-of-pocket 
expenses- and reimburseinents for each 
examination session. They must certify 
on or before January 31 of each year to 
the Commission's office in Gettysburg, 
PA 17325 that all expenses for the period 
from January 1 to December 31 of the 
preceding year for which reimbursement 
was obtained were necessarily and 
prudently incurred, 

[d) The expense and reimbursement 
records must be retained by each 
volunteer examiner coordinator and 
each volunteer ex £t miner for 3 years and 
made available to the FCC upon request. 

[e\ Each volunteer examiner must 
forward on or before January 15 of each 
year the certification concerning 
expenses to the volunteer examiner 
coordinator who coordinated the efforts 
of the volunteer examiner and for which 
reimbursement was received. The 
volunteer examiner coordinator must 
forward all such certifications and ila 
own certification concerning expenses 
to the FCC on or before fanuary 31 of 
each year. 

(F) The volunteer examiner coodinator 
must disaccredit any volunteer 
examiner who fails to provide the 
annual certification. The volunteer 
examiner coordinator must advise the 
FCC on January 31 of each year of the 
volunteer examiners that it has 
disaccredited for this reason. 

4. Section 97.507(e J is revised to read 
&9 follows: 

§97.507 VEC qualfltcetioftf. 
« * • + * 

(ej Agree not to accept any 
compensation from any source for its 
services as a VEC, except 
reimbursement for out-of-pocket 
expenses permitted by g 97.36: and 

A ^ * -k * 

5. The introductory text preceding 
paragraph (a) in § 97.515 is revised to 
read ^s follows: 



HAW HELP 



I need a manual and plug-in rriiemory 
modules for a Memory-Malic 8000 l<;eyer 
by Data EngineefloQi Inc. 

K. 0, Benton K4FHQ 

333 Croashill Lane 

Warrior AL 35 ISO 

Vd like information on interfacing a Mo- 
torola speak er/m Ike to a Yaesu Fr-2DBR. 1 
have it tiooked up but th^ speaker/mike 
overheats. 

ArtOates K9GBN 

12^ Arrow I>rive 

PeklnIL 61554 

Help] Whsfe can 1 get a 15m SSB con- 
version kit for my Sears 663-3610,0050 CB 
tfansceiver before \ go back to Europe? 

Klaus Slichtern^th N2EH0 

£8 Mandalay Drive 

Poughtkeep^ie NY 126D3 

I am interested In starting a club for 
overseas American hams. This would in* 
elude publishing a newsletter for the 
members to exchange ideas, equipment, 
and Information, running a weekJy net, 
tietplng individuals get licensed in some 

80 73 Magazine * October, 1984 



countries, and assisting indivlduais in 
getting equipment air-st>ipped to remote 
locations, ft you are Interested in forn^ing 
such a ciui>, please contact me at the 
following addre&s. 

Charres E. Martin AB4Y 

Am Embassy MAPUTO 

Dept. of State 

Washington DC 20520 

I need to know where I can buy parts 

and have a high-voitage transformer re- 
paired for a General Electric television, 
model 810. t also need & schematEc for a 
Grundig Universal Music- Boy, model K'74. 

William Deramo 

51 Sullolk Ave. 

Revere MA 02151 

I am 1fyin0 to locate Advanced Commu- 
nications Intemationalp a manufacturer ol 
watches, whose last current address was 
2^11 Lincoln Avenue, Belmont CA 94002 
If this company Is stilt in business, I would 
like Itie^r new address. 

Ernesto Hormlllo&a 

Det, 5AFSCFni6) 

APO San Francisco 96334 



§ 97. 5 1 5 CiMHtUniitlng voliim««r 
examirNBTS. 

A VEC vtfill accredit amateur radio 
operators licensed by the Federal 
Communications Commission as 
volunteer examinem [see § fl7,30}. A 
VEC will seek to recruit a broad 
representation of emateur radio 
operators to be volunteer examiners. A 
VEC may not discriminate in accrediting 
volunteer examiners on the basis of 



race, sex, religion or national origin. A 
VEC may not refuse to accredit 
volunteer examiners on the basis of 
membership (or lack thereof) In an 
amateur radio organization. A VEC may 
not discriminate in accrediting volunteer 
examiners based upon their accepting o? 
declining to accept reimbursement. A 
VEC must not accredit an amateur radio 
operator voLuateerlni; to be an examiner 
if: 



WE LUTES 



USING THE AO-10 APOGEE PREDICTIONS 

Apogee predictions for t?ie month of Octol^er are provided for three sections of tlie 
United States: Washington DC at 39 N 77 W, Kansas at 39N 95W, and California at 3aN 
122W. Times are in UTC and apogee in this case is mean anomaly 12S rounded to the 
nearest whole hour Use the chart as a guide In aiming your antenna, then fine-tune the 
azimuth and elevation values to peak the satellite s beacon signal, if you require more 
accurate orbital predictions, contact AWSAT at PO Sox 27, Washington DC 20044. 



AM5AT ANNUAL MEETING 

The yearly AMSAT technical symposium and general-membership meeting is slated 
for Saturday, November 10 at the Amfac (formerly Airport WlarlnaJ Hotel on the north side 
of Los Angeles intern at bnat Airport, A block of convention-rate rooms has been set 
aside— for reservations, contact Itie hotel at (2131-670-8111. 

Technical presentations on present and future amateur-satellite projects will be given 
during the morning and afternoon sessions. The ger^erahmembership meeting will be 
held in the evening following a banquet dinner. For detailed conference inforrnation and 
registration, send an SA3E to Dennis Olnga N6DD, PO Box 411 1^ Diamond Bar CA 91765. 

Thanks to Amateur Satellite Report for this month's n&ws. 

AMSAT^OSCAR 10 APOGEE PREDICTIONS 

OCTOBER 1984 









WASH 


KANSAS 


CALIF 


ORBIT 


DAY 


TIME 


AZ 


EL 


AZ 


EL 


AZ 


EL 


1309 


- 


0800 






184 


10 


269 


32 


1310 


1 


2200 


96 


17 


84 


3 






1311 


2 


0700 






280 


11 


264 


33 


1312 


i 


2000 


81 


8 










1313 


3 


0700 


285 


3 


274 


17 


257 


40 


1315 


4 


0600 


279 


12 


268 


27 


247 


50 


131.7 


5 


0600 


274 


16 


262 


30 


238 


53 


1319 


6 


0500 


263 


25 


254 


40 


22 2 


61 


1321 


7 


0400 


261 


35 


245 


50 


196 


67 


1323 


8 


0400 


254 


38 


235 


53 


180 


66^ 


1325 


9 


0300 


244 


48 


218 


61 


151 


64 


132 7 


10 


0200 


231 


57 


193 


66 


128 


58 


1329 


11 


0100 


211 


65 


162 


67 


113 


50 


1331 


12 


0100 


195 


64 


150 


62 


110 


44 


1333 


13 


0000 


166 


66 


.129 


57 


100 


35 


133^ 


13 


2300 


140 


62 


114 


49 


91 


26 


133 7 


14 


2300 


132 


56 


111 


43 


90 


20 


13 39 


15 


22 00 


116 


49 


100 


34 


82 


12 


1341 


16 


2100 


105 


40 


92 


25 


75 


3 


1343 


17 


2100 


103 


34 


90 


19 






1344 


18 


08 00 










278 


13 


1345 


18 


2000 


101 


28 


82 


11 






1346 


19 


08 00 










272 


16 


13 4 7 


19 


1900 


86 


17 


75 


3 






1348 


20 


0700 






282 


4 


266 


26 


1349 


20 


1900 


84 


11 










13 50 


21 


0600 


287 





276 


14 


259 


36 


1351 


21 


1800 


77 


3 










1352 


2 2 


0600 


282 


3 


271 


17 


252 


39 


1334 


23 


0.5 00 


276 


12 


265 


27 


243 


49 


13 5 6 


24 


0400 


270 


22 


257 


37 


229 


38 


1358 


25 


04 00 


264 


25 


250 


40 


216 


60 


1360 


26 


0300 


257 


33 


240 


49 


191 


65 


1362 


27 


0200 


248 


44 


225 


58 


162 


6? 


1364 


28 


0200 


240 


47 


S13 


59 


1 51 


61 


13 66 


29 


0100 


226 


56 


189 


63 


IW 


55 


1368 


30 


0000 


205 


62 


161 


63 


115 


47 


1370 


30 


2300 


178 


66 


136 


39 


103 


3% 


137 2 


31 


2300 


165 


62 


130 


53 


101 


33 



RTTY LOOP 



M^rc /. Leavey, M.D. WA3AJR 
6 Jenny Lane 
Pikesvme MO 21206 

Lers plunge into some quest ions this 
month, which I Itirnk arB broad efKXj^ to 
app^y to a g&ad rtiAtiy of us involved in 
RTTY. 

Ric* Thomas of Ohemos. Michigan. a5k3 
about the lise of optoi sola tors to pick oH a 
signal (rom a RTTY loop thmm-fitce 
phrase} fq^ Inputting to a co/nputer. Well, 
Rick, the use of isolating devl<;es between 
a teieprirtiar loop, typically running 150 to 
300 voUs at 60 mA, and the sensitive input 
qf a cornputer is a very good idea, As you 
suggest In your leifer, optolsotators are 
one such cfevic© which can be used. Fig. 1 
is a simple schema to ptck the signal off a 
loop and oulpui Ihe data through an opto- 
isofaTor. One feature of this scheme is the 
use of a bridge rectifier ro extract Ihe sig- 
nal from ttve loop. Ihus making the cifcuit 
immune to ihe polarity of the loop- 

Another *ay to derf>ve the RTTY sigrval 
tnit remain isolale<f elecirically from the 
loop is wjth Ihe use o1 a n^agneiic feed re- 
lay. Fig. 2 is a way lo mtertace a reed letay 
Into a loop, in this case. It*e cutrenl limit- 
ing on the loop stKHilcf keep the relay coil 
fiwn burning out despite beirtg supplied 
fiwre voltage iftan is normalty useil t 
■would use thts type ol a circuit if i had to 
key ano(t>er loop that didn t use TTL volt- 
age levels 

Rick also eipf esses co-ncem ovm light- 
ningnnduced votiage transients ^tting 
into his loop or equipment. Well, you 
might lake a look at a new little wonder, 
the nvetal-oxide varistor. These MOVs 
took like a diac capacitor but are truly lit- 
tle f^ORvets, pamfon Ih^ pun. Radio Shack 



carf ies iwo ^wsions: The vaZA1 t276-56^ 
protects digital ar>d linear circuits op* 
eraling at five volts arKf t>efow, and the 
V130LA10A i27&570> is for Irne^rperaied 
eguipmeni Fig. 3 is a simple diagraTn of 
tiow to hook one ol these up to a piece of 
line^operated equipmerit. It siKXjId be ret- 
a lively easy to adapt this lo wtiatever you 
like. 

Here's * note from Harvey Wenzet 
KAacUB in Brunswick. Ohio. iHarvey has 
lust gotten hold ot a Model 33 ASR Tele^ 
type*" machine and would like to hooN rt 
up. Way to go, Harvey! Unfortunateiy, a lot 
depends on jusi what "guts" your ma- 
chine has, aa different call-controC units, 
that's the circuitry in the panel on the 
right, require different hookups. Howi/ever, 
here's something to gel you started- Look 
inside of your mac h line for a nln&^onduc- 
tor screw-type terminal strip. It should be 
near the back and. if you're lucky, labeled 
15141 1 Now, look at Fig, 4 and try to use 
(f>e4e hookups to run your printer and key- 
t>oard Good luck. ar>d if you can deter- 
mine the exact call-contro4 unit or send 
me what^v^t Infoi maHion you can derive, i 
will see if I can f^elp oul. 

Fw years we called them either termi- 
nal units CH demodulators, Now, tliey &fe 
marketed as receiving i ntef faces. Still ttie 
same thing, folks Titat's wtty this rwte. 
from Kfis Cena in Hamillon, Ontario, nngs. 
a bell. Kns would like to know what the 
bost interface is to go between a receiver 
arK3 his mfcrocornputer. Kris, you don't 
want to know what the best interface is 
because, as the saying goes, if you have 
to ask, you can! afford M- The liottom line 
is that about any terminal unit will do ^st 
fine, not necessarily one that is directed 
at the computer crowd. If you are lucky, a 



TO 
LOOP 



iopn 




DLODES 
lA. 400VDC 



+5V 



4Na*j 




Fig. T. U^ing an optof&oistor ifi tfie ioop. 





iDon 


<^ 


V COIL 
FED Rf L*t 




TO J 




r 


1 > 


LOtm 




1 r- 
f 












\ 




' f 


— i 


f 



OUTPUT 



pass or two at hamfest tables may turn up 
just what you need. The essentials should 
be a stable. pfeteraJsiy fairly-modern unit 
that is capable of putting out a TTi4evel 
signal, 01 course, you could always use 
ooe of Ihe isolation circuits from above to 
adapl a "loop ofily ' bargain. Any of ihem 
srtouid work fust firwL 

Kaypro owners, listen up! We said a few 
months back that } had s^ nothing for 
that rnachine Well, I $titJ haven't but Tyier 
Parsons WB7DDL says that t>e has some- 
thinrQ fo* you. Tylcf is running a RTTY ter- 
mir\al program, written in Pascal, on his 
Kaypro II. He is offeiing Ihe program at 
S?9.9S. includir^ ttie program and instruc- 
tions on disk. He also indicates that he 
would consider adapting the program for 
the Kaypro 4 if there is sufficient interest. 
Write him tor more Information at I9t5 
S-E. Stone Street, Corvaltis, Oregon 
97333, and tell him you are interested In 
thfi Kaypro RTTV program mentioned In 
^'RTTY Loop," 

Another new member of the club is Ha r^ 
J, Pr^ekOp, Jr. WB9EDP near Chicago, Uli- 
no is. Harry is Interested In talking to other 
users of the Drake Ttieta 7000E communi 
cations terminal. Sorry to say, Harry ^ I 
have no personal information on this ter- 
minal. As I mentioned last month, what in- 
formation I get, I print. If the manutactuir- 
efs aie interested, t am available. Anyway, 
if you want to share your ejtperiences with 
Harry, drop him a line at 332 S. Cuyler . Oak 
Park. Illinois 60302. Send rne a copy, too, 
and I will share the information with the 
mghitudes! 

To ttH>se who have virritten asking wtiere 
tne printouts of tt>e winr^ers of this year's 
SCATS RTTY an contest are— they dn^t 
ser>d tfiem to me this year. Sorry. Maybe 
r>exi time? 

A ietter from Bay Smaiiey NB2W fn 
Soitth River NJ has me a bit contused. Ray 
relates that he is "trying to Lise Clay 
Al^fams' NEWRTTY program on the 
CoCo* Put would like to use the RS?32 
porl instead of the ROM port." Ray. let's 
define a few terms, then look at the pro- 
gram On Ihe back of the CoCo is a four- 
pin DIN connector, commonly called the 
RS-232 port. This serial port Is not a true, 
hardware, serial port, but rather a "bit 
banger" which uses one bit of a parallel 
port fof Input, one bit for output, and a 
software serial- in put routine, In som# re- 
spects, this resembles the RTTY program 
fOf ttie 6&00 published here about six or 
seven years ago. Now. on the side of the 
CdCd tsehind a spring-loaded door is an 




TO REST or 
EOUlPUEIfr 



ftdge conrvector, commonly called the 
ROM port. This Is. in fact, an extension of 
Ihe CoCo's address and data bus. Several 
manufacturers take advantage of this fact 
by building short extension buses, kind of 
mini mother t>oards. which allow several 
ROMpack^ype devio^ to be plugged in at 
Otice. 

Now, with that said. lel'S look at 
NEWHTTY. Til is program sends RTTY da- 
la Out and receives ctemodu Fated RTTY da- 
ta in through tt>e bi^^sanger RS 232 pofl. 
The software driving the pon tias twen 
changed so that instead of expecting 
ASCII, it expects Murray and does lf>e nee- 
essafy coAversion before presenting the 
dsla to yoti. So. as you can see. \t\e sl^rv 
dard RS-232 port is ali you r^eed use with 
this program; you need never touch the 
ROM pert. Perhaps someday Clay will 
come up with a disk version of the pro^ 
gram, and that ROM port will be needed Id 
run the disk. Hope this clears things up 
a bit. 

Okay east coasters, here we go Inundat- 
ing another amateur. Lowell F. LInd 
K4AWQ is willing to give away a Model 
28 ASR. If It has not been grabbed up by 
the time this sees print, you might want to 
drop him a note at 1308 N. Tuckahoe Street, 
Falls Churcli, Virginia 220J6. Remember 
that this column is written in July and pub- 
listied in tale September it it's gone whert 
you try. No guarantees. \ Just pass alorvg 
what I get. 

TttarU^s tor ;t>e interesting comments 
and kudos ff om some more of our readeis: 
Glenn Perry W7FyD, in Mountain Home^ 
Idaho; John A. Kiefef KA0SHT, in Siinny^ 
vale^ Caltfofnta: John Sater W3LJW. Union 
dndgie. Maryland: Alfred Forte III WD4P0N, 
Oca I a. Florida; and Tom Glaza KCdAE, 
m FilKMii. Mict>igan. t appreciate all of 
your comments and suggest rons ar>d 
shaft iry to irvciude some of rnern in future 
columns. 

Quite a potpourri this month. Don't you 
iove the suspense to see what comes next 
n:>Onlh? Be sure your subscnption is cur- 
rent so you won't miss anything in '*flTTY 
Loop," 



mkii 



TERMfNAL STRIP ISl4il 




PR^TEfi 



KtBD 



lirvAC 



Fig, Z Using a reed tetaf tn tfm loop. 



fig. 3^ Coanecting an MO¥ across the Hne. 



fig. 4.. Terminai strip in a Mtx^ 33, 



REVIEW 



TENTEC MODEL 4229 

ANTENNA TUNER 

Awhile back. I saw advertised In 73 ihe 
Ten-Tec Model 4229 Antenna Tuner kil 
(Photo A), After some plain and fancy 
dancrng. J managed to snare the check* 
book away from Ihe XYL to order il. As I 
am a rather new ham, shie didn't realize 
the tradhion-setting this order entaiJed. 

iDespite the slowness ot the military 



mall system, in aboui three weeks a large 
bOK arrived from Sevierville, Tennessee. 
Only three weeks to gel an order from the 
United Slates lo Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, 
can be likened to same-day service. 

Fortunately, I did not have duty the 
weekend the kit arrived. So, clearing a 
space at the dining room table, i carefully 
opened Ihe bOK and began. Oops! Look at 
all ttiose parts! This is a l^ol different from 
ttie tew Heaihkits* i've assemljled in ttie 



past instant doubt. Did my ambition over- 
load my ability^ Did i bite off more than i 
could chew? (Gasp) Do I need to roust out 
my Elmer and admit I need help? Tune In 
tomorrow tor the next episode in the excit- 
ing adventures ot a new ham. 

On closer reading of the instruction 
manual and a calming cup of coffee, I de- 
cided lo go on until l got stuck and only 
then ydp for help. The assembly ins I rue* 
tlons included with the kit said average 
assembly time was about eight hours. Not 
being as experienced, knowledgeable, 
and skiiiful as the average kit builder, and 
since I have always relied heavity on the 
blow-up drawings and pictures in the 
Heat hk It manuals, it took me about 18 
hours to complete the kit. Gf anted, some 
of this tS hours invohred finding the silly 



mistakes Td made and the time it took lo 
regroup. It was my^ several errors and r>ot 
the fault of Ten-Tesc or the manual. 

The roller inductor is pre-wound and 
formed when the kit arrives. The variable 
capacitor is the kit builder's assembly 
project (Photo B), All those staler and ro- 
tator plates and spacers! Do NOT lose a 
spacer] The remainder of the kit's assem- 
bly is straightforward. The assembly in* 
structions are more or less divided into 
Sections. Read each section thoroughly 
before starting. Work slowly and carefully. 

Yes, a Novice and a novice kit builder 
cart, with a little thought and a lot of care, 
assemble this tuner without too much 
trouble and without the assistance of an 
Elmer, it may take longer than the eight* 
fiouf average of the more experieftced 



73 Magazine * October, 1984 Si 



buHdef, but the results are vweM worth the 
time. 

Ti»chnlca( Data 

The Ten-Tec Mode! 4229 is an adjust- 
able reactive network used for matching 
the unbalanced SO-Ohm output ot a trans- 
mitter to a variety of loads, either balanced 
or unbalanced. It covers a frequency of T.8 
to 30 MH2, with a duaUrange power and 
3wr rneter Inciuded. Provision is made for 
selecting between four antennas (Photo 
C), on© of wtiich may be either to ng wire, 
balanced line, or for bypassing the match- 
ing network. 

The circuit is a modified L network with 
an 18-uH silverplated roller inductor ca- 
pable of handling 2 kW of rf power. The ca- 
pacitor voltage rating !s 3,5 kV, and the 
matching-output range is at least 10;1 
swf, any phase angle, i.a to 30 MHz. 

The assembly instructions are weli 
thought out. All of the problems I encoun- 
tered were because 1 was careless In read- 
ing Instructions, I tried to hurry, or I did not 
pay close attention to what 1 was doirig. 
Granted the Ten-Tec manual does not 
have all the pictures and drawings of a 
Heathkit, but even a kit builder with mini- 
mal expertise can assemble a good-iook- 
Ing, functional antenna tuner. 

Great, you are spying. This Novice has 
been rambling on about the assembly 
manual and how to put It together^ but 
how about after the kJt Is complete? Then 
what? 

Glad you asked. This Is my first experi- 
ence with Ten -Tec, The operator's manual 
is weti written, nicely laid out, and teiis 
you everything you might need to know 
about the tuner, the circuits, adjusting the 
swr/power meter— If It ever needs adjust- 
ing— and how and why the tuner works. 
After talking with other hams at Guanta- 
namo Bay, I found out that the operator's 
manual Js standard Ten Tec— in other 
words, high quaiityn 

Unplanned Benefit 

An unexpected bonus of using the tuner 
was that It showed that my ground instal- 
lation needed work- The ground system I 
had was not as good as it should have 
been, which caused arcing between two 
terminals on the roller assembly. The 
grounding system adopted consists of a 
ik'UF capacitor soldered between the 
center lead and shield on each end of coax 
long enough to connect radios, tuners, 
^tc*i with a good outside earth ground 
(see back Issues of 73 for detalis). This 
solved the arcing problem I had experi- 



enced. Properly grounded^ the tuner ioads 
nearly everything^ and very nicely^ too. 

Final Remarks 

If you already own a "Super Whiz-Bang 
Automatic Antenna Tuner/Oog Walkeri 
Coffee Maker Detuxe," the Ten-Tec iWodel 
4229 Antenna Tuner kit would make an ex- 
ceil ent spare for use during Field Day or 
emergencies. If you don't own a Super 
Whiz Bang, etc.^ and you want a good- 
looking, functional antenna tuner that you 
can assemibie yourself without the has- 
sies of scrounging parts and without a 
wailet-smashlng cash outlay, try the 
American-made Ten-Tec Model 4229 An- 
tenna Tuner kit. 

Thanks for the photographic process- 
ing go to John Howard, President of the 
GTMO Reriej< Photo Club^ Guantanamo 
Bay; thanks a^so to my Elmer, Tim Mliier 
WB0RXX/'KG4TW, who was never too busy 
to ar^swer my dumb questions. 

For more information, contact Ten- Tec, 
tnc^, Sevi&fviiie TN 37862. 

James Sackey KA2SHM^ 
Great takes IL 



DOCTOR DX FROM AEA 

it was Saturday morning, and the CO 
WW DX Contest was in full swing. As my 
wife waiked past the shack, she voiced 
her familiar "Are you going to be on that 
radio all weekend?'* complaint. Moments 
Eater she ramembered that I didn't have an 



antenna up! Obviously something strange 
was going on, for the sound of a raging 
contest was pouring out of the station 
speaker even though the rig was turned 
offl 

Vve been blessed with an understand- 
ing mate, i explained that, yes^ I would be 
contesting all day Satu/day, and no, I 
wasn't planning to use a radio— in fact, all 
of the hams I had been talking with were 
random bits inside a computer's braln. 
This, of course, confirmed her earlier as- 
sessment of my mental faculties. 

Etght hours later i had worked 541 sta- 
tions in 105 countries and had amassed a 
total score of 641,125 points. Without a 
radio. 

This was my introduction to Doctor OX. 
the latest product from AEA. Doctor DX is 
a contest simulator. If s designed for the 
Commodore 64 and requires only an exter- 
nal CW key to operate. And I do mean 
operate! 

After plugging the board into the back 
of your 0-64 and powering up, a sleek 
transceiver Is displayed on the screen. 
The rig features fuH ham-band coverage 
(10-160 meters), variable power output, 
and a digital frequency dispiay. A volume 
control and bandpass filter are also In- 
cluded. After setting the reai-time clock 
and defining your station's location (more 
about this in a moment), you are plunged 
Into the Incredible world of computer sim- 
ulation. 

The contest is recreated in intricate de- 
tail. As in real life, you have the option to 




Photo. A. Front view ot compteted kit. 



either sit on a frequency and call GQ or 
huot-and-pounce. In both Instances, sta- 
tions will interact with you during the 
course of an exchange. Here's an eit am- 
ple, where 0N7TC is calling CQ on 14,028 

0N7TC: CQ TEST DE ONTTC K 

KK2Y: TC DE KK2Y 

ONTTC: KK2Y "??? 14(1 missed the report} 

KK2Y: RST? 

ON7TC: 579 579 BK 

KK2Y: R 5NN 05 GL 

ONTTC: QSL TU QRZ QB ONTTC 

Kote that the simulated station re- 
sponded to my query. Stations will also 
honor requests to ORS or QRQ and will re- 
peat any part of the exchange that you 
happen to miss. They will occasionally 
ask you for a repeat when QRM Is heavy or 
you are sending too fast. 

Tuning up and down the band is accom- 
pushed by pressing one ot four keys on 
the 064, The higher end of each band is 
occupied by slow, inefficient stations. 
Dropping Into the Extra-class segment 
will allow you to contact super-stations 
running 30-40 wpm. No sloppy fists 
here — everyone sends computer-gener- 
ated codeE 

Earlier I mentioned the real time clock. 
The program uses the time of day and 
your location in a propagation model that 
creates the conditions you might expect 
to hear on the bands. For example, I worked 
ZL and VK stations on 10 meters early in 
the morning, and later that afternoon 
moved to 15 meters, which was open to 
Europe. During the daylight hours, GO and 
160 meters yielded nothing but Static, but 
excellent DX openings occurred on both 
of these bands after local sunset. Of 
course 20 meters was crowded with 
stateside big guns endlessly pounding 
out "CQ DX". The model seams to be very 
realistic and can be verified by comparing 
Doctor OX'S band conditions with the real 
thing. 

Possibly one of the most exciting as- 
pects of Doctor DX is the ability to operate 
from any location on Earth. As mentioned 
above, the propagation mode! uses both 
time and location to create band condi- 
tions. You have the option to define any io^ 
cation you wish by supplying Doctor DX 
with the appropriate latitude and lon- 
gitude. 

Ever wonder what It's like to live in Bur- 
ma? Key In 17N, 96E and you are there, ex- 
periencing conditions just as they would 
be if you made the trip. Like to activate Al- 
bania? Try 41 N, 20E and work the pileups! 
I took a trip to the Sudan and worked scores 
ol VUs on 160 meters! 





Photo a Variable capacitor has mAnypSfts to ^s-sem^/e. 

S2 73 Magazine * October, 1984 



Photo C- your chot'oe of 3 co^x-ted antennas and a iongwtre or bafancsd-fine antenna. 



On-screen scoring information is anoth- 
er outstanding feature. Doctor DX fS^ af tej' 
all-H a contesi stmulator/trainer. Complete 
statistics are displayed m real time and in- 
clude countri&sfeones worthed per band, 
aggregate countries/zones worked, num- 
ber of QSOs, points, and total score. Your 
contact rate, In QSOs per hour, is also 
given as an indication of ^our relative 
skiii — at one point I was cErpping along at 
136 QSOs per i^our wiiite working a string 
of J As on 15 meters. This detailed infor- 
matron allows you to compare your oper- 
ating skill with that of others and to mea- 
sure the improvement in skill that comes 
with practice. 

You may also use the scoring intorma- 
tion to participate in the AEA awards pro- 
gram. As in the real world, you can earn 
AEA-CC for 100 DX countries worked. 
AEA-AZ for contacting all 40 zones, 
5-band AEA-CC, or be admitted to the 
AEA Honor Roll for working 350 DX coun- 
tri'es or more. A spec fat coding system 
generates a checksum figure that veriHes 
your achievement— no QSLs are required! 
in addition, AEA ptans to publish a list of 
the high-scoring stations In theif maga- 
zine ad each month. 

This sJngie program is incentive to buy 
a C 64. I know it's tough to believe that a 
piece of software could so realistfcaiiy 
simiriate amateur radto, but it does. You 
absoiuteiy must hear it— a few times I 
caught myself reaching up for a knob to 
tweak! 

I could talk myself blue trying to con- 
vince you thai this product is the most ex- 
citing thi^ng I've seen in my eleven years as 
a ham^ hut it isn't the same as experienc- 
ing it yourself. My final advice? Buy this 
program now\ 

For detailed information on Doctor DX, 
contact Advanced Electronic AppHca- 
ttons, PQ Box C'216Q, Lynwood WA 98036. 

Perry Donham KK2Y 
73 S(aff 



BILALISOTRON40 

When the box arrived in my office last 
Wednesday, I remember thinking; "Even 
Ralph Bilal couldn't fit a 40-imeter antenna 
into a package only 33" x 6"*/?" x 
3",,, why, that's smaller than the boxes 
most model airplanes come in!" 

Raiph had promised to send me the lat 
est version of this Isotron 40, a small, ver- 
satile antenna designed for limited 
spaces such as apartments, condos, camp- 
ers, and the like where it is almost impos- 
sible, for either (egal or physical reasons, 
to put yp a fuil-sized antenna. It's also rec- 
ommended, from the standpoint of si^e 
alone, to serve as an emergency , mobile^ 
or portable antenna that can be used in 
motel rooms ^ at a disaster site, or even 
bracketed to the bumper of an auto- 
mobile. 

"All well and good," I thought, "but 
does it work?" 

Unpacking 

On Friday, after work, I took the box out 
of the trunk of my car and carried it into 
the workshop, wondering it Td be able to 
get it on the ai^r before dark. When i opened 
the box, the first thing I noticed was the 
neat packaging job done by Blial. There 
were two plastic bags containing hard- 
ware — good quality, plated hardware or 
aluminum hardware, depending on the 
use. ] wondered ft there was enough to go 
around; it has been my experience in the 
past to be shortchanged on nuts, bolts^ 
and washers. But not this time, as you'll 
see. 

Each component or group of compo- 
nents was neatly wrapped and protected 



with brown paper and packaging tape. 
There were four pre-drilled and bent alumi- 
num plates, one with an SO-239 UHF con- 
nector and a small standoff insulator al- 
ready mounted on it; there was a 31" 
length of clear plastic tubing, partiy wound 
with #12 insulated wire, with a riice foot- 
long lead and terminal soldered in place, 
and a piece of clear plastic tubing dt>OEJt 
20" long, pre-dfiiled with hoies; there were 
a couple of pieces of Lucite* with holes in 
them, a piece of V-square aluminym tub- 
ing, and several other, smaller pieces that 
I couidn't immediately identify. Nothing 
elaborate or fancy, either— just plain va- 
nilla—and good oid-fashloned workman- 
ship. I began to beiieve that when Ralph 
Bilal toid you something, you had better 
believe it. My confidence was increasing 
by I he moment. 

Assembly 

The instructions include diagrams, 
step-by-step assembly comments^ arid a 
final tuneup procedure. After reading and 
rereading the instructions [somethif^g ( 
seldom do because the drawirtgs are 
clear, but in this case the antenna compo 
nents seemed so different in size and 
shape From anything I had ever seen be- 
fore that I figured that I had better read 
them carefully^ I began the assembly. 
Surprisingly, it went smoothly and with- 
out any probiems at ail: a new first for mei 
Everything fit into place and all the holes 
lined up perfectly with no bending, bind- 
ing, or mismatches anywhere. 

Good heavens! So thaVs what this 

thing looks like! {See photoj I couldn't 
imagine anything that ever looked less 
like an antenna! Oh. well, Ralph has been 
at this for over five years, so I had better 
trust him. He knows more about this thing 
than I do. 

The 'far'" ends of the parallel rods were 
pre-driiied to accept typical TV-mounting 
hardwarei and the hardware itself was In- 
cluded^ U-boits, washers^ nuts, and plates 
of good, plated quaiity. Even the plastic 
bar had a dowei inserted In one end for re- 
inforcement—the result of experience 
and cut-and-try engineering. 

The instructions suggested mounting 
the antenna on a short length of IV* "-di- 
ameter TV-mast tubing, and I fust hap- 
pened to have a five-foot length in the ga- 
rage. I mounted the Isotron "antenna" to 
the TV mast with the help of my %Yl who 
held things straight while I tightened the 
clamps. After all was square and aiigned, I 
did the final tightening of the hex nuts, 
and there it was! Clearly, something dif- 
ferent. 

The weight was negligible and the wind 
loading laughable. Gosh, this thing could 
fit on top of almost any chimney bracket, 
on a mast alongside a trailer, or even In 
the shack in the middle of the floor! Yep, 
that's what I did, I happened to have a mili- 
tary surplus wooden tripod that had been 
used to mount a transit. The short length 
of TV mast exactly fit into the central coh 
lar, so I set it up In the shack (read spare 
bedroom) between the beds, A ten-foot 
piece of BG-B/U was enough to reach the 
operating desk and B&W coaxial switch 
mounted there. 

Turie^Up and Operation 

Here is where things usuatly begin to go 
very wrong, with my usuai luck, and I had 
little confidence that this ugly duckiing 
would ever be a swan in spite of Ralph 
Bilal 's confidence. Nevertheless, only 45 
minutes had elapsed between opening 
the box and carrying the contraption to 
my shack. . .sort of a new record for me. 
There it sat on its tripod, daring me to fire 
up the rig and see what would happen. 
Okay, here goes. 



Wow: signals— and quite loud, too! Put^ 
ting the rig on the lowest possible output 
power, just enough to get a vswr reading, I 
was astonished to get a reading of below 
2:1 ^ and by careful adjustment of the 
amall^ paraflei "tuning" plates attached to 
the upper and lower "diamond" plates, I 
was able to get a reading of below 1.5:1 at 
7025 kHz. That Is better than the standard 
trapped vertical i had been using was able 
to give me. i switched bach and forth be- 
I ween the vertical (roof mounted, with 12 
radlals) and the Isotron 40. noticing that 
the ORN was appreciably lower on the 
Bilal antenna, whereas the received sig- 
nals were not much if any different in 
strength. Once again^ I was Impressed 
with this little critter. Now if it would only 
trans m it r i'd be happy. 

Proof of the Pudding 

Rather than timidly call a CQ, I decided 
to be brave and answer someone else. Af 
ter all, If he didn't come baci< to me ft 
wouidn't be my fault— or as disappointing 
—as if I had called and tseen found want 
ing. Okay, let's see. . . here's a good strong 
Signal at 7031 kHz. . ,KU1<a. . nice CW. . . 
theref he's signing, . . 

KU1G KU1G, rfe WtXU, W1XU, K. 
W7XU de KU7Q; R R Tnx caii 0¥: ursfgs 
599, 599 hrjn Monroe, d; name )$ John. 
Mm copy?AR. W1XU de KU1G, K. 

Wow I 599 in Connecticut! Well, maybe 
that's ]usl an exception. Let's finish here 
with John and try another. 

At 0O20Z (twenty after seven, iocal time) 
I heard WX4L calling CO. A quick shout 
and he came back; 559 in Gaffney, South 
Carolina. Name is Ed, Weil, that is more 
reasonable, I thought, isut still, all the way 
to South Carolina on an indoor "lump" 
ain't too shabbyf 

Ne^tt, I called Steve K4CXJ In Nashville, 
Tennessee, and we compared antennas. 
The trapped vertical gave me a 569 with 
QS8 and the Blfal Isotron gave me a 569 
with no QSBE The band wasn't great, but It 
was active. 

Aiong about twenty before 9 i heard Biil 
K2SVC in Ithaca, New York, and he gave 
me a 599 with Some QSB. A quick compar- 
ison showed the outdoor vertical at S9 




The isotron 40. 



and the indoor isotron at SQ, Not bad, I'd 
settle for that any day. 

After signing with Biil, I worked Jim. 
KXBE in Highland, Michigan. Jim said I 
was 599 there and claimed very little if any 
difference between the vertical and the 
Isotron, It was obvious that the band was 
improving and that the mid- range stations 
were skipping in loudly. 

I wonder if I ought to try a "local" to see 
what happens, I thought. There was Paul 
KB1MJ/BS with his brand-new Extra-class 
ticket on 7024 kH2. Giving Paul a quick 
call, I got a 5S9 from him. He was down a 
bit, I thought, but the 569 i gave him was 
still a good report. When he told me he 
was running 20 Watts to a home-brew sta- 
tion (not just a transmitter^ I perked up. It 
seems that Paul actually loves to build 
gear, and his receiver Is about 9 months 
along h development. , , with a few more 
to go until he is satisfied. The keying was 
very nice, home-brew, of course, and Paul 
said he made the paddles, too! 

The transmitter was a combined solid- 
state vfo with a lul;>e final, Nice. I sug- 
gested to Paul that when his station was 
completed to his satisfaction, maybe he 
ought to write it up for a magazine. . hint, 
hint! Let's hope he does. 

Weil, It was getting late; maybe a cou- 
ple more and then to bed. Tuning around, 1 
discovered Frank VE2GG in Dorval, Que- 
bec, on 7021 l^Hz, He came right back to 
my call: "599, DM ' He was about a 589 a! 
my station. Comparing antennas. Frank 
mentioned to me that the isotron was 
S9-t- 10 dB, whereas the outside antenna 
was only S9-I-5 dBP Here, the Isotron ac^ 
tually put out a better signai than the regu- 
lar antenna! Probably skip angle, etc., but 
who cares? The performance of the iso- 
tron 40 Is just plain phenomenal. 

My last QSO of the evening was with 
Chuck N8FNZ in Detroit, He gave me a 589 
and i gave him a 579 at 0354Z, six minutes 
before eleven o'clock local time. Chuck 

was using his new Icom 761 and a dlpoie, 
sloping toward the east, 

Wei 1, time for hitting the sack soon, so I 
signed with him after a pleasant rag-chew 
and switched off the rig. Welf satisfied 
with the evening's work, I decided to try 
SSB on Saturday morning. After all, with 
75 Watts output, CW is a lot easier to cut 
the mustard than phone, I realized, so 
phone would be the finai proof I needed to 
see if the Isotron was reaily an antenna. 

On Saturday morning at 9:50 local ttme, 
I heard W3DWI calling GQ. His signal was 
loud and i wanted to call him, but I had not 
changed the setting of the antenna to ad- 
just it for iowest vswr up here on phone. 
Nevertheless, I decided, what the heck; I'll 
just call anyway; no harm If he doesn't 
hear me. A short twotjy-two, and Ed In 
Chambersburg, Pennsylvania, came right 
back with a 5/7 report . . very little QSB. . . 
nice steady signal. We exchanged the 
usual Information and had a pleasant half- 
hour chat right in the midst of the Satur- 
day morning QRM. 

When the QSB took me almost out J 
switched over to the outside antenna and 
was able to finish the QSO. So— we found 
out that under poor conditions, the out- 
side BIG antenna is a bit tietter than the 
small (tiny) Indoor one. Well, what's so 
surprising about that? That's what one 
would expect. . ,but I was still very satis- 
fled with the Isotron 40. Ralph hadn't lied 
to me yet; he hadn't overstated his perfor- 
mance figures; the antenna worked just 
as he said it would. Not only that. I firmly 
believe that if the isotron 40 were placed 
at the same height as my vertical and out- 
doors, it would work equally well! That's 
a lot to say, t>ul I think it Is a true state^ 
ment .. .and I'm going to prove It soon. 

Later, after a long weekend of testing 

73 Magazine * October, 1984 83 



ttw intenna (during which time, nearly IDO 
sialtong were worked on phone arvd CW), 
a pattern became quite clear. Uniiifer good 
conditions the Isotron 40 nearly equalled 
the much higher putdoor vertical. Under 
pOOf cpnd^ions. ii was nearly three Sninits 
poorei. Oft the average, the tsotron was 
only orw io Iwa S-units dcwni cOfTipar^ 
with the veri^cal. 

It will be d^iratrie to fTH>ijmt th« atitefv 
na outdoors at the same heigfit as the ver- 
tical for furthef cofTiparisoniS. I strongly 
t>e4l9ve, based on tests so far, that it could 
tw almost as effective as tire vertical^. 

OihQf stations contacted \n the US were 
K4JE C589). W4LRD {579J, and W2JUF 
(S79V During the European Field Day. we 
worked ttie following foreign stationiS us- 
Ing the tsotfon AO: ON7AH/P (589). G3WKX 
{589), DUET (559). DLiOS P79), DLIAU 
(659), G4GXK (579), DKOTU (599i OFdCN 
(BiQ), PI4RT? (599), and GJ^3USL (699). 
Lal«f, I hsafd NQ6E in San Francisco, and 
Bob gave ma a 569, Of course everyone 
knows that all contest reports are not ex- 
act, but at least the antenna car work DX 
without a terrific dtsadvantage. 

Many times my signal would be 58 on 
the Bilal antenna and S9 on the verttcal. In 
only orie caae, leported before, was Ihe 
laotrori better than the vertical. 

Almost every station contacted In the 
US and Canada was very interested in 
knowing mofe about Itte Isotron. One o^ 
efator even said he was goir^g to buy the 
SO-nteter vefsion after hearing what the 
4(MTieter wecston ctnjid do. So, there you 
hmm it, fans. Try one for yottrseff af¥t see 
whai fou think. 

Tlworyol Operatloii 

Tt^ ISOtron antennas may b^ capacttive 
hats on a loading coil. , .because Lhai's 
what they appear to be electticaJly. How- 
ever, ttie^e la a targe radiattng surface (ac- 
cording 10 flaiph) that would seem to 
make the Isolron antennas the equivalent 
Jn surface area to fuJI-sjze antenr^as. This 
does not Imply that the 'capture area" of 
the Isotron is the equivalent of the larger 
antenna, however, in spite of the small 
Slie(3V X 16^' X 12". approximately). It 
appears to be radiating quite efficienily— 
something that I had not thought possible 
with marety a loading coil wtth capacity 
hat as a radiator of rf energy. 

The claimed bandwidth t>etween 2:1 
vswr limits is 200 kHz, according to 
Ralph's measurements. I was able to ver I- 
ty Itiift apfiroximateiy tyy swinging be- 
tween roughly 706Q and 7250 kHz without 
retuniftg the antenna. However, fo* really 
Cf (Ileal wotk. It would t>e best to retune tt>e 
a^^tenna when movir>g from the low end 
dW portion to the high end SSB portion of 
Ihe bar>d. 

Rglph mentions tr^e fact ttiat it is neces^ 
sary to ba vmy carefui in adiustmg and 
tufiirig the antenna tiecause the sviroMnd- 



ings can affect its Empe^ance drastically. 
He give^ flome good counaei In the ln> 
struct ions atxtut this, and saverai feGom- 
mendattons to follow in case tuning up is 
a prdJlem. An rf noise bridge or similar 6&- 
vke lo be*p tuning is strongly reccxrv 
mended when setting up the Isotron fOf 
tMi^t performance^ 

Oih«T Aniennjs liy Eilal 

Ralph Bilal can furnish a tSO^netei Iso- 
tron, an BOhTT^tm vision, and a SQ-meter 
version also. I wouldf like to say titat the 
one that looks most interesting to me is 
the combination 8QM0 tsotron — actually 
two antennas, luned to the bands, mount- 

00 bi^k-lo4ftack on a sir»gle mast, and fed 
wilh two separate teedlmes- Living as I do 
In a home that rests in a small clear mg in 
the wocxls, that would really solve my an- 
tenna problem. 3 have used a chimney 
mount for several different verticals and 
small tieams, so I think It wou^d be very 
practical, simple, and nearly ideal in my 
location to solve the problem with the iso- 
tron system, 

Conclusion 

I really like the Isotron 40 and am gQifig 
to be very interested in trying out the other 
versions to see if they perform as well on 

1 heir respective bands as this one does on 
40 meters, Ceri airily the piice is reasorv 
able, considering what you qei: the "160- 
meter version that stands only S feel high 
arKJ welglis only 12 pourids (smaller than 
moAi two^metei tieams} for $t49,95 plus 
Shipping, the BChmefef versio^i at 4*^ fael 
and 7 pouncJs at $6395; the 4<MT^ter at 31 
irvcfies and 4 pounds for ^2.9S. and th# 
2(knetef isotron, on special sale at S38i;9S^ 
measuring only 21 incties and weighing in 
at a mere 3 po<unds. Finally, ttie 15-fnetef 
versi<Ki at 2i (rvches and 2 pounds, gKMft 
for $32.^. Ail of these mijsi have shipping 
costs added, varying ttetween $3,50 and 

The eO/40 'Speciar Isotron comes (or 
only %^^0 plus Sfi.50 shipping cost, and 
Itwfe arc also 1 5-meter and lO-meler ver 
a Ions for hams, as wei5 as an 1 1 -meter vm- 
slon for CQ. 

For your own Isotron, whatever It may 
be, caii or writs to the Bit at Company, S,fl, 
2, Biicha OK 74342; {918^2534094, Tell 
Ralph that 73 sent you, with a strong rec- 
ommendation. Reader Service number 
477. 

Jim Gray W1XU 
7J Staff 



BARKER & WILLIAMSON S 
AP 10 PORTABLE ANTENNA 

Nothing that simple will ever wcik. 

TT»t was my first thought on viewing 
the Barker & Williamson AP-tQ Portable 
Antenna. I had seen ads in ham put^ltca- 
tions from B & W but bad always fust 
glanced at ttiem, 

l^ow, however, for the tirst *ime In 15 
years, I was faced with living in an apart- 
ment. I had changed iobs and moved from 
Gfiio to Wisconsin, and I discovered that 
our new apartment compiei: allowed ab- 
soiuteiy no outdoor antennas. 

My fatf>er (K&MQ, a veteran DXer of 
many seasons, had purchased the B & W 
antenna for me as a Chrtstmas pHresent 
He did his t>est Iq convirrce me that this 
was tetter than no antenna at all, I decid- 
ed to give it a try- \\ wag a either thai or 
face the unpleasant withdrawal symp- 
toms associated with lack of exposure to 
Morse code. 

Tha antenna had arrived \n a neat iitlie 
box with all of tha parts inside. The parts 
included a 22 Va -inch whip which tele- 
scoped Eo 57 inches^ colls for 10 meters 
through 40 meters (including 30 meters), a 
wire counterpoise, coax, and assorted 
screws and t>oltS- {W^'vs heard that the 
AP10 wiff load on 2 and 6 mefors wifhaut 
additioimi hardware, —£d4 

Also included was a very ctearly written 
Instruction booklet Then again, the an- 
tenna was so simple that ttve instruction 
booklet necessarily was very basic and 
wail written. 

Assemtity time was about 5 minutes 
and requtired only a screwdriver and a pa^r 
of piiers. To a seasoned DXef and this seo- 
ond-gervefation ham, it seemed too good 
to be true. 

Not content to wait until I returned to 
Wlsconsm, we put ttte antenna on the air 
at my fattier s old hornestead in Ohio. 
Since the weather was a little nasty out- 
side, we decided to damp ihe antenna to 
a wooden table in the ham shack. 

To make a long story shorl, the antenna 
worked. It's true we didn't work any exotic 
country on Ihe first try, but our GQ calls 
produced solid contacts on 40 meters 
with hams in several ea si -coast states. 

Since both of us use antenna tuners for 
aii of our antennas, the B & W indoor whip 
was run through an MFJ tuner with 1000- 
Watt capacity. The swr was viriuaiiy a flat 
1.1:1. 



WHAT 00 you THINK? 

Ha»e yov recently purchased a new product thai has been reviewed in 73? If 
you have, write and teH us what fOutr\mk about it, 7Jwitl publish your co^nments 
so you can share ttiem wiin other hams, as part of out continuing effort to bring 
you thie best m new product in*ormat*on and reviews. Send your thmjghts to 
Review Editor, 7^ Amatevf B&dtQS fechnicat Jonmai. Peterborough NH 0345B 



tipon arriving back tn Wisconsin, I t>e- 
gan to have second thoughts about the 
antenna loading up property with my Tri- 
ton 4. After ail, that was a rugged an ten r^ 
tuner we'd used m Ohio. However, my wor- 
ries evaporated when 1 tunad ihe little 
whip attached to a wooden dresser in the 
bedroc^n with rrry DenTron Jr. Monitor tun- 
er. Swr i^Quld be ad|usted down to 1.4:1 
throughout the CW portion of the 40-meter 
band I called CO and worked statior^ fron^ 
Colorado to New York itiat first evening. 

Summoning up all of my courage 
several evenings later; 1 attached the 
SO-meter coil- The swr on this t>and could 
be ad|usted to l-l:l. and I wodied staf ions 
from Caiilomla to New Hampshire. 

Of course, I was very pleased ar>d sur- 
prised tsy this kind of periormarice from a 
little indoor whip, In addition, \ felt confi- 
dent this little B & W product would keep 
me on the aiir even in the apartment-com- 
plex environment. 

Needless to say, there are some com- 
promises and shortcomings one faces up 
to when using this Kind of antenna. You 
can't pul out a booming, dominating DX 
signal, and you don't always get 5^9 sig- 
nal reports, Fn addition, I have not tried the 
whip on SSB because i wori< 100% GW. 
I'm sure the results on voice trans mis- 
sions would be di^ppointmg with all of 
those t-kW (and 5~kW. too, I suspect) sig- 
nais on the a.ir, 

Woddr^ with thjft antenna on CW is 
very similar to woffc^ng ORP. It takes a tit- 
tle rr^ore effort to hear the incoming sig- 
nals ar>d a little patience when transmit- 
ting, too. However. tt>e proof is in the pud- 
ding, and ttw B & W whip has proved it can 
keep me on tfie air. Unless the bands are 
totaliy quiet. I can QSO [ust alXHit any 
lime I want to. 

For e)(ample, 1 have worked 30 stales on 
the 40'meter band, including California^ 
Oregon, Utah, and Maine. White signal re- 
ports are not always good, the fact still re- 
mains that hams In those places actually 
heard me wen enough to OSL 

The 20-meter band has been even bet- 
ter, and I've actually worked a III tie DX, I 
have QSL cards from Haiti, Franca, and 
the Virgin Islands^ I have many more cards 
from ail over the United StateS^ 

While I'm not saying the B & W model 
AP-tO antenna should be contiidered as a 
primary station radiator when betler gear 
can 1^ instalied. I am saying that It appar- 
ently does the fob it was designed to do. it 
keeps hams in my situation on Ihe air. I'm 
grateful, because I'd hate to face those 
horrible symptoms of withdrawal brought 
on tiy ttie lack ol exposurs to Morse code. 

For fuft)ier details. eor\(a<^l 6crk«r & 

WfH^m&m, 10 Canai Stmt. Brhiot PA 
19007. 

Rkh Cochran WBflULZ/9 
Kenvsha Wl 




Chad Harris VP2ML 

Box 4881 

Santa Rosa CA 95402 

AMATEUR RADIO 
IN WEST AFRICA 

While tuning across 15 meters lacii!(ing 
for a clear frequency to call CO, I over- 
Si 73 Magazine • October, 1964 



heard the foiiowing complaint from a 
group of W2 DXers; "Have you noticed 
that there aren't any Africans on the air? 
There are never any African stations 
around." I broke In and agreed with their 
observation that African hams were tew 
and far between. And then i signed my 
call, C5AAQ! 
While tho^e DXers got their wish of 



wortclng an African stallon. many other 
DXers continue to lament the dilliculty of 
working many of the countries on the Afri^ 
can continent. A recent conversation with 
Tom Gregory N4f^JW gives some of the rea- 
sons behind I his difficulty, Tom was ata- 
tloned In the ivory CoasI for a tour of duty 
with the State Depart ment, and he signed 
TU2MW during his stay in West Africa. 
Tom cites two major problems for hams in 
West Africa: the drought and Ihe Instabill^ 
ty of many of the military gdvarnnents in 
the region. 

The drought \n the region; began more 
than live years ago. The wesief^y winds 
which sweep across the coniineni Irom 
the If^dian Ocean seldom bring much rain 



to the inland areas, which Is why the 
world's largest desert forms the tujlk of 
the land area of these countries. Bui cli- 
matic changes have made the water prob^ 
iem much worse in recent years. 

The droughl affects amateur radio 
through the production of hydroelectric 
power. There isn't any. For many of the 
countries in the region. Including ivory 
Coast. Miger, Nigeria, Ghana, and Upper 
Volta, the lack of rain has run Ihe reser- 
voirs dry, and that means little or no elec- 
tricity En these countries. 

Obviously, the lacK of oleclrfcity makes 
amateur radio much rrrore dillicutt, Wtrite 
many of the famifies whtch are wealthy 
Bfiough to afford ham radio can also ai- 



ford a gas-drfven ef&ctric generator, that 
generator finds more use powering the 
drinking water distlllerv and keepfng the 
refrigerator going than handing out OSOs 
to deserving DXers. 

Even when the power fs on^ th& coat of 
operating 3 radio can be extremely high in 
West AfrFca. When I was last in the region 
{1978), an American stationed In the re- 
gion could count on an electricity bill ot 
$500-1000 per month, j jst for household 
needs. You can fmagine the bill for run- 
ring a high-powered ham station for sev- 
eral hours a day! 

However, the high cost {and frequent 
unavailability) of electric power is not the 
only problem facing West African amai- 
teyrs. Tribal conflicts, political corrup- 
tion, and staggering economic difficulties 
contribute to the highly volatile political 
situation In the region. Military coups and 
01 her changes in government are com- 
monplaoe, and ham radio often loses out. 

In the atmosphere of susptclon and In- 
trigue, anyone with sophisticated commu- 
nidations gear, such as a muHiband aima- 
teur transceiver, might be a threat to the 
existing government. And amateur radio 
rs probably out of the experience of many 
of the people making policy decisions in 
these countries, which simply adds to the 
suspicion. 

Let's look at what happened in Ghana 
as an example of the problems facing ham 
radio ]n the region. During the mIKlary 
coup in 19Q2, some of the Americans 
working In Ghana eavesdropped on the 
action with a Bearcat 250 VHF scanner. 
Living through a coup is a terrifying expe- 
rience. Most official forms of news are cut 
off by one side or the other, and what you 
do hear is simply what they want you to 
hear, not necessarily what Is actually hap- 
pening. So this small group ot Americans 
used their scanner to monitor the military 
and government VHF frequencies. 

Unforiunately for ham radio in Ghana, a 
Eocal African noticed this eavesdropping 
and reported the incident to the new 
powers that be. The new government was 
horrified to hear that someone could lis 
ten in on thelf supposedly-private radio 
communications and promptly arrested, 
the Americans as spies ^ 

Based on this incident, which really had 
nothing whatsoever to do with amateur 
radio, the new government tianned all am- 
ateur radio in Ghana and confiscated ail 
the rigs! When was the last time you 
heard a 9G station on the air? 

The local amateur-radio club is working 
to get the ban rescinded, but it rs a long, 
glow process to convince all the appropri- 
ate officials that amateur radio is a plus 
for their country. One amateur, 9Q2XX, 
was a good enough friend of the Chai rman 
ot Ghana to get on the air, so perhaps nor- 
mal ham radio will return to Ghana soon. 

Even in countries where amateur radio 
has not been completely banned, written 
itcenses are hard to come by. While the 



appropriate officials in the PTT or other 
telecommunications authority might be 
agreeable to issuing a license, such a re- 
quest must also win the approval of the In- 
ternal seoyrity people ^ a much more diffi- 
cult task. 

Whether this latter group goes under 
the name of Ministry of the interior, Inter- 
nal Affairs, or the Secret Police, their f unc 
t ion is the same: keep the present govern- 
ment in power. And permitting unrestrict- 
ed worldwide communications via ham 
radio is seEdom part of their efforts. 

So a person applying for an amateur-ra- 
dio license in Ghana, N^lger. Upper Volta, 
Benin, etc, will usually find his request 
sitting on the desk of some oflicial in the 
Internal Affairs departments probably in- 
definitely. 

Niger Is a good example. DXpeditioners 
Carl and Martha Hansen traveled to Niger 
3n an attempt to activate this hard-to-work 
country. Tom Gregory happened to be in 
the country at the same time, but even 
their combined efforts proved fruitless. 
Neither party could get the required per- 
mission to operate. 

On the other hand, as long as no written 
license is needed, l\ is possible to get ver- 
ba [ permission to operate. Nobody's Job 
^or head) is on the line [If the ham does 
turn out to be a spy) if there are no written 
documents. And ham radio does have 
great value for emergency and backup 
communications, especially away from 
the larger cities. The MARS-iii^^e operation 
of several French stations in Chad is a 
good example. These "amateur" stations 
are running health and welfare traffic 
from outlying military posts back to 
France. But don't bother to break in; their 
documentation won't pass ARRL DXCC 
muster. Unfortunately for DXers, contacts 
with these amateurs usually do nof count 
for DXCC credit. 

WorP(ii\g West Africa 

So much for the bad news. Fortunately, 
there is some good news about amateur 
radio in West Africa. First, the region is 
ideally suited to excellent propagation. 
Sticking out into the Atlantic Ocean In the 
tropical latHudes around the equator, 
West Africa offers some super radio loca- 
tions. 

Propagation to the States and Europe Is 
top-notch for many hours a day, and even 
the Japanese come through loud and 
clear along the all-water long path, around 
the tip of South America. 

Tom Gregory suggests the months of 
September and October as good times to 
look for the West Africans. What rain they 
get inland falls mainly durtng that time. 
and electricity supplies are more reliable. 
Good radio propagation continues 
Ihrough the winter months, if the hydro 
power hasn't dried up. 

As for the beat time of day to look for 
stations in this region^ Tom reminds DX- 
ers that local time in West Africa Is LFTC 



As with stateside DXers, early-evening lo- 
cal time is when most of the amateurs sit 
down in front of their rigs. So search out 
those Africans in the 1600-2200 UTC 
range. 

Tom spent a good deal of time on the 
lower frequencies, handing out contacts 
with his Kenwood TS830 and Alpha linear. 
Using a vertical on 40, Tom had good sue- 
cess working split frequency on 40-meter 
S3B, 7070 kH^ is a good spot to look for 
the Africans on 40, coupled with a listen- 
ing frequency between 7150 and 7200. 
7167 is an especiaiiy pood "hole" in the 
heavy Interference in that part of the 
world. 2300 UTC is a good time to try 40. 

75 meters is a difficuil band in Africa 
because of the extensive use of the 
3SO0-kHz band for RTTY and other point- 
to-point communications in ITU Region 1. 
Sometimes you can't even hear the static 
crashes tsecause the interference level is 
so highf With the recent expansion of the 
US phone bands, Advanced licensees will 
get a crack at the 75'meter DX window of 
3775-3B00. Tom made about 1000 con^ 
tacts on 75 during his slay as TU2tsiW, 

While 160 meters is not an amateur 
band in Region 1, many countries have 
granted operating permission on Top 
Band. Tom wrangled 160-meter ope rating 
privileges, but had little success on the 
band. Dragging himsell out of bed at 5:30 
in the morncng, Tom slugged it out on 160 
to the tune of 5-10 contacts per night. 
Even the CQ Worldwide contest only 
yieided 6 160-nneter QSOs. Tom transmits 
in the DX window and fistens at 1818 kHz. 

Tom made about 1 2,000 contacts dur- 
ing his tour as TU2NW, and he will be 
missed by those looking to confirm Ivory 
Coast, Anyone who hasn't yet confirmed 
their contact with TU2NW can do so 
Ihrough Tom's QSL manager, AK3F, Do 
not send cards to TU2NW through the bu- 
reau system. As with many visitors and 
DXpeditioners, the cards won't arrive in 
the country until long after the operator 
has departed. The chances of your bureau 
card catching up with the operator are 
very slim. Tom also operated as TU73 dur- 
ing the spring of 1934 (a special call sign 
granted for WPX contests). If you missed 
TU2MW. you stili can wori< Ivory Coast.. 
Tom reports that there are about 20 active 
amateurs in Ivory Oo^^t now, mostty 
French visitors. Assid TU1 BS is one of the 
more active hams, ar>d TU2JD occasional- 
ly runs plEeups in English. 

DXpeditroners might find some of the 

rarer countries very dtfficuit to activate for 
DXCG, but other countries in the region 
are good DXpedttion spots. In Mauritania, 
for example, Tom got his 5T5NW license 
in six minutes! Mauritania is somewhat 
unique in the region in that it only issues 
amateur-radio licenses to expatriates, not 
to locals! Other possibilities are Senegal, 
The Gambia, and Gabon. As with many of 
the French-speal^ing countries in the re- 



gion, a letter written In French has the 
best chance of gaining a valid license. 
For anyone traveling to the area, Tom 

suggests writing {\n French) to the PTT 
giving the usual Information about your 
operation: passport information, dates. 

location, rigs, etc, A copy of your state- 
side license and a couple of photographs 
are also necessary. A ietter from your 

local Chief of Police attesting to your 
good character is a valuable addition. 

Since many of the amateur licensing 
authorities in the region work cEosely with 
the local amateur-radio club, it would be a 
good idea to Include the local club in your 
plans, A letter to the radio club at the 
same time as your tetter to the PTT licens- 
ing group can help speed your application. 

Meanwhitei Tom Gregory is back in Afri- 
ca, this time stationed in Pretoria, South 
Africa. He reports that heshouldbeonthe 
air as t^J4NW/ZS6 by September. Then he 
expects to take the South African amateur 
exam to get his own ZS cali by the end of 
the year. 

Since Tom's work for the State Depart- 
ment has him traveling around the region, 
he might show up from another country at 
any time. In addition to his TU2NW li- 
cense. Tom holds 5T5NW and J5NW. Cur- 
rent plans call for an operation from Swa- 
ziland 306 for the CO Worldwide SSB at 
the end of October. 

In addition to the low-band frequencies 
mentioned above, you can look for Tom 
around 14155 or 14180, and 21255 or 
21280. He runs RTTY with his Commodore 
64 computer and he is often found on GW 
as well. 

While in southern Africa, Tom has high 
hopes of breaking the logjam of amateur 
licensing in Mozambique. C9 amateurs 
have been nonexistent smce the commu- 
nist-leaning present government took 
power. However, recent breaks between 
the Soviets and Mozambique suggest that 
some changes might be in the offing. 

QSL Manager Wanted 

With his change in location, Tom Is 
looking for a new QSL manager to handle 
his 2S contacts and other operations in 
the region. Since he Keeps his log on a 
disk with his Commodore 64, a manager 
with the same computer equipped with a 
disk drive would be ideal. Tom can then 
send a floppy disk up once a month for the 
conf iirmations. If you are interested in this 
job, contact Tom Gregory at the Depart- 
meni of State. Pretoria, Washington DC 
20520. 

Meanwhile, enjoy the good propagation 
of the fall months. The next few summers 
are likely to be as lousy for DXing as the 
summer of '84, so concentrate on working 
what you can when the bands are open. 
And iook for T32AW from Christmas Is- 
land in the Pacific at the end of the month 
fincludJng CO Worldwide SSS). That's 
yours truly out there. QSL T32AW via 
K1RH. 



DR. DIGITAL 



Robert Swirsky AF2M 
PO Box 122 
Cedarhurst NY 71516 

THE DR. DiGrTAL POLL 

It's hard to judge what interests the typ- 
icat Dr. Digital reader solely from the mail 
I receive. Only certain people are mot I vat- 



ed to write letters; for most, the process 
takes too much time or effort. I am going 
to get around this problem by conducting 
a poll. While John Edwards^ "FUlsil" poll 
revealed some Information about the 
computer habits of amateur-radio opera- 
tors, it was not specific enough for my 
needs. So grab a pencil and answer the 
following questions. 



Send your responses to the add f ess lisit&d 
at the top of this oolumn. You may keep 

your responses anonymous. 



1} Which microcomputer(s), if any, do you 
own? 

a) Apple 

b} Atari 

c) Commodore 

d} Epson 

e) Franklin 

f) leiVi PC 

g) Osborne 
h)TRS-80 
i}S-10O (IEEE 696) 
I i Other 



2) Which computer ianguage(s^ are you 
proficient In? 

a) Assembly language 

b) Ada 

c) Baste 
d)C 

e) COBOL 

f) Forth 

g) LISP 
h) Pascal 
I) PU( 

j} Other 

3) Do you have any experience with minl- 
or mainframe computers? 

a) Yes 
b}No 

73 Magazine • October, 1964 85 



1)abcdefghij 
^abcdefghSj 
3)ab 



RESPONSE FORM 

Read each question and mark your response by circling the appropriate letter next to the number of tlie question. 

11) a b 16)at9 

12) a b 17} a b 

13) a b 18} a b 



6} a b c d e 

7) a b c d 
B]ab 



4) a b c d e f g ti 
5)abcd 



g}ab 

I0}ab 



14} a b 
15}ab 



19) a b 

20) a b 



Connments: 



4) What amateur radio applications do 
you have for your computer? 
a)HTTY 

b) Control ot amateur-radio equip- 
ment 

c} Record keeping (logs, contests, 
DXCC Issi, etc.} 

d) Number crgnchtng (filter design, 
coordinate calculations, etc.) 

e) Satellite tracking 

t) Morse-code training 
g) SSTV 

h) other 

5} If you use computerized RTTVi which 
modefs) do you use? 

a} Murray or Baudot 

b} ASCI I 

c) AMTOR 
d} CI TOR 

6) How much tiave you spent on computer 
ec|u.ipment? 

a) Under $500 

b) 5500 to $T49& 

c) $1500 to $2999 

d) $3000 to $5000 

e) Over $5000 

7) What percentage of your computer pro- 
gramming is done in assembly language? 

a} None 

b) Under 33% 

0} Between 33% and 66% 

d) Over 66% 

6j Have you ever built any computer hard- 
ware? 

a) Yes 

b)No 

9) Have you ever des]gned any computer 

hardware? 
a) Yes 
b)No 

10) Have you ever made any repairs or 
modifications to your computer system? 

a) Yes 
b)tslo 



21) a b c d e 
22)ab 
23) a to 
24}at> 
25)abc 
26} a b 



11) Do you own any computer test equip- 
ment (i.e., logic probes, scopes, etc,)? 
a) Yes 

b)No 

12} To which hobby do you devote more 
time? 

a) Computers 

b) Amateur radio 

13) Do you belong to a computer club? 

a) Yes 

bj Wo 

14) Do you belong to an amateur-radio 
club? 

a} Yes 
b)No 

15) Are you In favor of a digital-class li- 
cense in the United States'? 

a) Yes 
b)No 

16) Which hobby have you been Involved 

with longer? 

a) Amateur radio 
b} Computers 

17) Do you own a modem? 

a} Yes 
b}No 

18) Have you ever used a data base pro- 
gram, such as dBase 11, for amateur-radio 
purposes? 

a) Yes 
b}No 

19) If you had to choose only one hobby, 
which would you pick? 

a) Amateur radio 

b) Computers 

20) Are you planning on purchasing more 
computer equipment In the near future? 

a) Yes 
b)No, 

21) What is your age? 

a) 15 or below 

b) 16-21 



c) 22-39 

d) 40-59 

e)60 or above 

22) Have you ever written any amateur-ra- 
dio computer software? 

a} Yes 

b}No 

23) Have you ever purchased any amateur- 
radio computer software? 

a) Yes 
b)No 

24) Do you own a microprocessor-con- 
trolled rig? 

a) Yes 

b) No 

25} What would you like to see empha- 
sized in this column? 

a) Hardware 

b) Software 

c) Equal empasis on both 

26) Have you ever used a packet repeater? 
a) Yes 
b)No 

Feel free to add any additional thoughts 
or comments. It is hoped that the informa- 
tion I receive will assist me in choosing 
topics for the column. 

ANOTHER APPROACH 
TO COMPUTER INTERFACING 

Whenever I discuss computer-to-ama- 
teurradio interfacing, I always assume 
that the reader has a computer with a pro- 
grammable parallel port or some TT Lout- 
put lines available. Many computers, 
however, have only an RS-232 serial port 
available. This type of port is meant to 
carry ASCII data and is not suited to con- 
trol devices. 

To get around this problem, a number of 
companies have developed serial liO con- 
trollers. These devices interpret certain 
ASCII characters from a serial pon and 



use them to control relays or other switcti- 
Ing devices. With a serial liO conlroSler, 
for example, a TRS-lOO can be used to 
control electronic equipment without an 
extra I/O port. 

One serial ]fO controller is the Sias 
Engineering C IP/35. This device will inter- 
face to any computer that has an RS-232 
port. Using certain ASCII characters, the 
host computer can switch any one of eight 
relay-controJied outputs on or off^ The 
C IP/35 also has eight inputs that can be 
read through the sef iai port. 

A controller such as the CIP/35 has 
some Interesting uses. If^ for example, a 
CIP^35 is used to control a repeats r. It can 
be connected with an auti>answer mo- 
dem to a phone line. The computer does 
not have to be located at the same site as 
the controller. This way, one does not 
have to dedicate a computer for control 
purposes. 

Each output on the CIP/35 can handle 6 
Amps. The eight inputs are opticaliiy iso- 
lated from the board. For more informa- 
tion on the CIP/35, contact Sias Engineer- 
ing, Inc, HK 1, Box 315, Salina^ Kansas 
67401; (91 3)-823-8027, 

TIPS ON CHIPS 

A good way to learn digital electronics 
Is to learn about the various types of digi- 
tal integrated circuits on the market. Ev- 
ery manufacturer of Integrated cirGuits 
publishes spec sheets and data books de- 
scribing their product line. These publica- 
tions, which are usually available at 
modest cost, contain a great deal of use- 
ful infonriation. 

One reference which \ use often is the 
National Semiconductor Oatabook. This 
publication lists many types of digital log- 
ic circuits ranging from simple NAND 
gates to complex mul lip lexers and shift 
registers. Chips are described using pin- 
out diagrams, truth tables, timing dia- 
grams, logical equations, and elect ricai 
characteristics. Applications notes are 
also given. For more information on this 
Databook, as well as other publications 
from National Semiconductor, contact 
National Semiconductor Corporation, 
2900 Semiconductor Drive, Santa Ciara, 
Caiifornia9505l. 

Some other companies that have \ov\h 
cost publications avatiabie are: Intel Cor- 
poration, 306S Sowers Avenue, Santa 
Clara, California 95051; Rockweii Interna- 
tional, Electronic Devices Division. 1842 
Reynolds, Irvine, California 92626. When 
writing to these companies, ask for their 
"literature guide." Intei and Rockwell aiso 
have many free publications available. 
These, too^ are listed iin their literature 
guides. 



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IForengn i>FdeTS please add 15.00 US funds for Shippina) 

« .K-PANDA-!-1VB ctjiivtTts your HusikT or Hy-Gain 
m<ihili? ^nriMTiiEi hoyt^ fjtu' to ftvebtwids Ad J q^ rTi^inv 
resoni^tt^rs for ili^i biinds yo(U wish fo oper^le AiJjitSii 
r^ysoniitors for rnininium SWR, i"tC(.5lopping ten 
(.'fifinyL' bainls diiy more. 

• X-PANDA-FIVE with propter r(>son,ators ftnd gocjtf 
ground plant^ makifsanideiil systt^m (or f^prirtmeiitiy 

and condomtniiims. 

• X-^ PANDA- FIVE ctin Lx.' used to miiks a miitti-bEand 
antyntia svsttrn for vans, carnpt'rs. iitolor h<.jrTies:. 
Wid naval irailers. 

• X PAN I J A b I VH wil I '^^i mthi^r r egy l«r or supt r 
Nnmt^ 



GaJi 

QTH 



To: J.L. INDUSTRIES 

P.O. Box 547, Hall^ndale. FL 33009 



ATTENTION 
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73 Magazine • October, 1984 87 










!^i 



EIWC i^e)aO.QO0D/8171 wjth SIGOO and SK1306 

SK300 and SK13DB Only. 

(Tliese are all new not used.) Limited Supplv 



S1200.00 
$ 350.00 



Km aiaRON]CS/!fC. W amplifier PC BOARDS AND RF TflANSISTOR tClTS. 

Model m-m RF power input 2wotts at m lo l^m\i output 70watts li-5vdc m ICdips. 

449.99 wltii (hiu K Boorxl Dnl^ moe 
MODEL PAIOl'WB RF Dcwer iiipiii liiwius ot I^rt to 1431 Iz outuut iiiOwatts 13.5vdc oi i8ac5. 

189.99 rtim OQta PC Board Oily *B.99 



GOIEVA CALCULATOR MATCH 

This attractive watch has tlie following modes 

Normal TiJBe Setting, 

Calendar Settlxjg, 

Daily Alarn Time Setting, 

Weekly Alarm Time Setting, 

Chrcmogcaph, 

Ca ley la tor* 



^Qr 




Features! In Black Plastic 



$18.99 



or Featured in Stainless; Steel 



$29,99 



SILICON DIODES 








FEED THRU SOLDER RF CAPACTORS 


MR7 51 




lOOvdc 


6Al!ipE 


10/ $5, 00 


100/$33.00 


470pf +-20% 




HR510 




lOOOvdc 


3Ajiips 


10/33.75 


100/$24,00 






HE? 170 




lOOOvdc 


2 Amps 


20/$2<00 


100/^15.00 


5/$U00 or 100/S15.UO or 


IN 32 09 




lOOvdc 


1 SAmps 


$2,00 


10/ $15.00 


1000/$IOO.OC 


1 


BYX2 1/200 




20Dvdc 


25Ajups 


$2,00 


10/ $15,00 






1N2138A 




600vdc 


60 Amp 3 


$5.00 


10/ $40,00 


1000pf/,001u 


if +-10% 


DS85-04C 




400vdc 


SOAmps 


$10.00 


10/ $80.00 






1N3269 




600vdc 


i 60 Amp 5 


$15.00 


10/$ 120, 00 


4/$K00 or 100/$ 20, 00 or 


275Z41 




300vdc 


250Ainps 


$20.00 


10/$ 17 5- 00 


[000/$t50.0C 


1 


7-5754 




300vdc 
15KVDC 


400Aiiips 
?Oni;*^ 


$30.00 
$3.00 


10/S250,00 
10/ $20.00 






RC0-15 


E FROHS 




SMFK20K 




20ICVDC 


20Ba. 


S4,00 


10/ $30.00 




ia4148 




signal 




30/SKOO 


100/ S3. 00 


270S 1024x1 
2716 2048x6 
27L32/25L32 


$2.00 each 


FAIRCHILD 


4116 16K DYKAMIC RAMS 200tts. Part i 


16iC7 5 


$4.00 each 


25 For S25 


.00 


or 100 For 


$90.00 or 


1000 For $750.00 


flO.OO each 


HEWLETT PACKARD MICROWAVE 


DIODES 










IN 5711 




(5082*2800) 




Schottky 


Barrier Diodes 


Sl.OO or 10 


for $ 8,50 


IK 57 12 




(5082-2810) 




11 


IT <l 


$1,50 or 10 


for $10,00 


XN6263 




(HSCH-1001) 




If 


ir II 


S .75 or 10 


for $ 5.00 


50B2-2835 








11 


II 11 


SI, 50 or 10 


for S10,00 


5082-2805 




Qija4 Hatched 


II 


per 


set 35*00 or 10 


for $40,00 



For Information csill: (602) 242-3037 



Toll Free Number 
800-528-0180 
(For orders only) 

PRICES SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE 



(fU'^ll^ electrof|ici 



"AM pans may be new or 
surplus, and parts may be 
substituted with comparable parts 
if we are out of stock o( a^ item. ' 



73 Magazme * October, 1984 



"MIXERS" 



WATKINS JOHNSON WJ-M6 Double Balanced Mixer 



LO and RF 0.2 to 300MHz 
Conversion Loss (SS8) 

Noise Figure (SSB) 
Conversion Compression 



IF DC to 3D0MHZ 
6.5dB Max. 1 to 50MHz 
8.5dB Max. .2 to 300MHz 
same as above 
8.5dB Max. 50 to 300MHz 
.3dB Typ. 



$21.00 

WITH DATA SHEET 



NEC (NIPPON ELECTRIC CO. LTD. NE57835/2SC2150 Microwave Transistor 



NF Min F-2GHZ 


dB 2.4 Typ. 


F=3GHz 


dB 3.4 Typ. 


F=4GHz 


dB 4.3 Typ. 



MAG F=2GHz 
F=3GHz 
F=4GHz 



dB 12 Typ- 
dB 9 Typ. 
dB 6.5 Typ 



$5.30 



Ft Gain Bandwidth Product at Vce=8v, Ic=lOma. GHz 4 Min. 6 Typ, 
Vcbo 25v Vceo llv Vebo 3v Ic 50m. Pt, 250mw 



UNELCQ RF Power and Linear Anplifler Capacitors 

These are the farnous capacitors used by all the RF Power and Linear An^lifier 
rranuf acturers , and described in the RF Data Book. 



5pf 

5.1pf 

6.8pf 

7pf 

8.2pf 



lOpf 
12pf 
13pf 
14pf 
I5p£ 



18pf 
22pf 
25pf 
27pf 
27 . 5pf 



30pf 
32pf 
33pf 
34pf 
AOpf 



43pf 
51pf 
60pf 
80pf 
82pf 



lOOpf 
llOpf 
120p£ 
130pf 
140pf 



200pf 1 to 
220pf 11 to 
A70pf 51 up 
500pf 
lOObpf 



lOpcs 

5 Opes 

pes 



SI. 00 ea 
$ .90 ea 
$ .80 ea 



NIPPON ELECTRIC COMPANY TUNNEL DIODES 

Peak Pt. Current ma. Ip 

Valley Pt. Current ma. Iv 

Peak Pt. Voltage mv. Vp 
Projected Peak Pt. Voltage mv. Vpp Vf=Ip 

Series Res. Ohms rS 

Terminal Cap. pf. Ct 

Valley Pt. Voltage mv. VV 



MODEL 1S2199 
9inin. lOTyp. Umax. 
1.2Typ. 1.5max. 
95Typ. 120max. 
480min. 550Typ. 630max 
2.5Typ, 4max. 
1.7Typ. 2[nax. 
370Typ. 



1S2200 * 

9min. lOTyp. Umax. 

1.2Typ. l.Smax. 

75Typ. 90max. 

44Qmin. 520Typ. 600max 

2Typ. 3max. 

5Typ. 8max. 

350Typ . 



FAIRCHILD / DUMONT Oscilloscope Probes Model 4290B 

Input Impedance 10 meg., Input Capacity 6.5 to 12pf . , Division Ratio (Volts/Div Factor) 

10:1, Cable Length 4Ft. , Frequency Range Over lOOMHz. 

These Probes will work on all Tektronix, Hewlett Packard, and other Oscilloscopes. 

PRICE $45.00 



I 



k 



MOTOROLA RF DATA BOOK 



Listsall Motorola RF Transistors / RF Power Amplifiers* Varactor Diodes and much much 
more. 



PRICE $7.50 



For information call: (602) 242-3037 



Toll Free Number 
800-528-0180 

(For orders only) 



^/l^^^x electrof|ic§ 



"AM parts may be new or 

surplus,, and parts may b© 
substituted with comparabEe parts 
ff we are out of stock of an item."' 



PRICES SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE 



73 Magazine • October, 1984 89 



RF TRANSISTORS, MICROWAVE DIODES 



■ 



TYPE 



PRICE 



■KPE 



PRICE 



TWE 



PRICE 



ITPE 



PRICE 



2N1561 


$ 25.00 


2N1562 


25.00 


2N16^ 


25.00 


2N2957 


1,55 


2N2S57JANrS 


4.10 


2K2857JAM^T 


4.10 


2N2876 


13,50 


2EI2947 


18.35 


2N2048 


13.00 


2N2949 


13.50 


2N3375 


17.10 


2N3553 


1.55 


2N3G32 


15.50 


2N3733 


11,00 


2Ky8lB 


5,00 


2N3S©6 


1,30 


2N3S66JAM 


2.20 


2^392-1 


3.35 


2,^33927 


17.25 


2M39S0 


25.00 


21*1012 


11. CX) 


2N4041 


14,00 


2N4072 


1.80 


2N4080 


. 4/53 


2M127 


21.00 


2N4427 


1.30 


2N4428 


1,.S5 


2M430 


11.80 


2N4957 


3.45 


2N'1959 


2.30 


2M5090 


13.80 


2N5108 


3.45 


2N5109 


1.70 


2N5160 


3.45 


2^^5177 


21.62 


2iN5179 


1^04 


mr32m 


56.00 


2N5583 


3,45 


2N558S 


9.77 


2N5590 


10.92 


2N5591 


13. SO 


2M5637 


15.50 


2)^5e4X 


12,42 


2K5642 


14.03 


2N5643 


15.50 


2fv5e.i5 


13.80 


2iN5646 


20,70 


2N5651 


11.05 


2N5^01 


ltt,00 


2N5764 


27.00 


2N5S36 


3.45 


2N5S42/M1607 


8.45 


2N5S49 


20.00 


2fJ59l3 


2.25 


2No9l6 


3e,oo 


.2N5322 


10,00 


2N5923 


25.00 


2N5tMl 


23.00 


2N5942 


40.00 


2N5944 


10.35 


.2K5945 


11.50 


2N5945 


14.40 


2?Jf>0^0 


10.35 


2I*60S1 


12.07 


2Ne082 


12.65 


2iN60e3 


13.25 


'A^fOM 


15.00 


2M6094 


11.00 


2mm5 


12,00 


2H6096 


16.10 


:f2Ni3097 


20.70 


2rfl5105 


:^i.oo 


2N61;K 


21,85 


2Neia6 


40.24 


2N6201 


50,00 


.2N6304 


1.50 


2N64&9 


18.00 


2ti6567 


10,0*? 


2N66S0 


80.00 


3SC703 


3.00 


2SC756A 


7.50 


2SC7S1 


2,80 


2scioia 


1,00 


2SC1(M2 


12.00 


2SC:i070 


2.50 


2SC1239 


2.50 


2SC1351 


12.00 


2SC1306 


2.90 


2aCl307 


5.50 


2SC1434 


2.80 



23C1678 $ 


2.00 


H1134 $ 


16.90 


M3C1821-3 


$125,00 


2aC1729 


20.00 


M9579 


7.95 


ft©Ci821-10 


325.00 


2SC1760 


1.50 


MB5S8 


7. .50 


Hscrpiooi 


40.00 


2SC1909 


4,00 


M9622 


7.95 


MSe22?.3-10 


200.00 


2SC1946 


36.00 


At9623 


9.&5 


MSC^OOO 


50.00 


2SC1946A 


40.00 


^^9624 


11.95 


.^tscsooi 


50.00 


2SC1970 


2.50 


M9625 


17.95 


ASSC73O01 


50.00 


23C'1974 


4.00 


MSX530 


18.00 


Rscsaooi 


40.00 


2SC2].66 


5.50 


M9740 


29.90 


N^£CS2014 


40. 00 


2SC2237 


32.00 


M9741 


29.90 


H3C820(20 


40.00 


2802095 


47.00 


liS755 


19,50 


MSC82030 


40,00 


A50-12 


25.00 


M964S 


37.00 


MtSC83001 


50.00 


A209 


10.00 


M9850 


16.90 


^LSCH3005 


100.00 


A283 


6,00 


M9S51 


20.00 


MT4150 


14.40 


A2S3B 


6.00 


M9887 


5.25 


MT5T26 


VOR 


AF102 


2.50 


!vIEL80091 


25.00 


Nfr5596/2N5596 


99,00 


AFYl^ 


2.50 


11IM1550 


10.00 


ifr576a/2N576S 


95.00 


BF272j\ 


2.50 


MM1552 


50,00 


m^762 


POR" 


BFR21 


2.50 


mi553 


50.00 


NE02136 


2.50 


Hi-'iiSO 


i.od 


M0.614 


10.00 


NE137S3 


POR 


BFtJSl 


1.65 


1&I19^13/2N4072 


1.80 


NE21339 


K)tl 


RFFE99 


2,50 


MKt26aS 


5.00 


Nlib7a35 


5.70 


wnp, 


2.50 


mo375A 


17.10 


NF:73436 


2.50 


RFWieA 


2.50 


MM4429 


10.00 


IKW 




i^m.7 


2,50 


HM8000 


1.15 


PKTmZl 


PQft 


rm92 


1.50 


MMSCXB 


2.30 


FT3190 


Pt)U 


RFM4 


2.50 


MM8011 


25.00 


'm'6l94 


POR 


Kh'X48 


2.50 


MPri02 


.45 


Fi3195 


POR 


BE'XSS 


2.50 


MPSU31 


1,01 


Fi'3537 


7.80 


BFX84 


2.50 


MEWi2023-l,5 


42.50 


PT4166E 


POR 


Brxs5 


2.50 


ltiKF2{J8 


16.10 


l'r4176D 


POR 


BFXS6 


2.50 


MRF212 


16.10 


PT4l8bT? 


POR 


BF5^9 


1.00 


MKP223 


13.25 


PT4209 


POR 


RFYll 


2.50 


MHF224 


15.50 


PT4209C/5645 


pcm 


BFY18 


a. 50 


MHF231 


10. a2 


PT4556 


24.60 


BFYIS 


2.50 


Mra^32 


12,07 


PT4570 


7.50 


KFY39 


2.50 


}fW^33 


I2,a^> 


PT>4577 


TOR 


RFY90 


1.00 


MRt^S? 


3,15 


Fr4590 


POR 


Br,XP7 


15,24 


ltRF23S 


13.80 


PT4612 


POR 


RfX68C3 


15.24 


tiR>'239 


17.35 


Pr4628 


POR 


HLK93C:3 


22.21 


MRF245 


35.65 


Fa^4(>40 


POR 


BL4Y87A 


3.94 


MRP247 


35.65 


Pr4642 


POR 


:BL¥88C3 


13,08 


MRF304 


43.45 


1^5632 


4,70 


PIi¥94G 


21.30 


MHFJ09 


33.81 


Pl*^749 


POR 


RT.Y351 


10.00 


MRF314 


2H.52 


FJ16629 


POR 


m,Y56SC/CF 


30.00 


MRF315 


28.86 


1^16709 


POR 


0458-617 


25.00 


MRi'316 


POR 


i'iiB720 


pa^ 


C4005 


20.00 


mt^ju 


63, S4 


PiK510 


pcm 


•mi899 


20.00 


MRf^420 


20.00 


Plia524 


POft 


iisiss 


18.00 


MRF421 


36.80 


PT8609 


PfH 


fTT-^54S 


25.00 


MRl-n22A 


41,40 


P'i'8633 


PGR 


C1TC3005 


100.00 


MRF427 


17.25 


PiB639 


POR 


Dexcel GaAs FET 




MRf42S 


46.00 


P1^S659 


POR 


nKL3501A-P100F 


49.30 


MRF433 


12.07 


P18679 


POR 


Piijit.su QsJk^ J^LT 




li1Kt449/A 


12.65 


P1B70S 


PCSi 


ESX52WF 


5S.00 


MFff'4S0/A 


14.37 


FrS709 


POR 


<M)29aA 


2.50 


MRF453/A 


18.40 


F1^727 


29,00 


HT^P76 


4.95 


MKi'454/A 


20.12 


PT8731 


POR 


Ht:PS3002 


11.40 


MRF455/A 


16,00 


Fi^742 


19.10 


HHPS3003 


30.00 


^tRF458 


20.70 


M^787 


POR 


HH^3005 


10. oo 


MRF463 


25,00 


Vly/83 


16.50 


HEPS3006 


19.90 


ma'4T2 


1.00 


PT9784 


32.70 


hb^SSOOl 


25.00 


MRF475 


3.10 


Piy790 


56.00 


tTT-psaoio 


11.34 


^fHl'^76 


2.00 


pTJises 


POR 


He!ft'lett Paclsirta 




MRF477 


14.05 


Fr31963 


PCR 


.HFI?r£204 


112.00 


^^RF492 


23.00 


Pt3mm 


POR 


3582 IE 


ris.oo 


MBFSm 


1.04 


pi'jiseso 


POR 


35826B 


:^.oo 


HKF503 


6.00 


RCA 




358261!: 


32,00 


MRF504 


7.00 


40081 


5.00 


35831B-1131 


30.00 


MHF509 


5.00 


40279 


10.00 


35e3rE 


30.00 


MRt''511 


10,69 


40280 


4.62 


35^32E 


50.00 


MRF515 


2,00 


40281 


10.00 


35833E 


50.00 


MRF517 


2,00 


■40282 


20.00 


:3.'"^853E 


71 . 50 


Mni^59 


2,05 


■40290 


2.80 


•35854E 


75.00 


^tRF605 


20.00 


40292 


13,05 


35866E 


44.00 


mt%nB 


25,00 


40294 


2.m 


HXUKSlOl 


7.00 


MRFS28 


8.65 


'1 0341 


21,00 


Hrm3l02 


a. 75 


mFa22 


3.45 


40008 


2.48 


HX'iK5104 


30.00 


.Sllffm4 


27.60 


40894 


1.00 


fmiiiUCM 


66.00 


wwme 


29.90 


40977 


10. 00 


HSi'H6105 


31.00 


MRiBtil6 


1S.(X) 


:62S0OA 


60.00 


HXlli6l06 


33.00 


Mlff823 


20.00 


RE3754 


25.00 


J310 


,70 


MIff^J?01 (3) Lead 


1.00 


RE3789 


25,00 


TOW 




MEtraOl (4) U^ad 


2.00 


SFllO 


25.00 


^UdOOO 


10,00 


MmrB&i 


2.30 


S50-12 


25.00 


joeooi 


25,00 


MRF911 


3.00 


S3006 


5.00 


Jt>3045 


25.00 


MRF961 


2. 3D 


S3031 


5.00 


Matoi^la Ojtitl. 




MRt^004 


2,10 


.<5CA:dS22 


5.a<:) 


mi3i 


8.5t5 


MS26lf 


pm 


SCA3523 


5.00 


M1132 


11.95 


M.SCl 720-12 


225,00 


PRiaH m REQUE 


ST = POii 



Toll Free Number 
800-528-01 80 

(For orders only) 



"AM parts may be new or 
surplus, and parts m^y be 
substituted with comparable parts 

if we are out of stock of an Item." 



t 



For information call: (602) 242-3037 ^^-« 



PRICES SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE 

(f\f^z electroiycg 



90 73 Magazine * October, 1984 



GaAs, TUNNEL DIODES, ETC. 



t R y 'VM^Sl&VCBS * 



SD345 

SD445 

SDI004 

$01009 

5DtOQy~2 

SD1012- 

SD10J3^3 

^1013-7 

SD1014 

3D1014-6 

SDlOje 

SD1016-5 

5010 IH-^ 

soioxa-^ 
ajioia-7 

S0I018-1S 

5DI02tJ 
SD1030-2 

3D1M3 

301043-1 

SD1045 

SD1019-1 

SD1053 

SDIOBS 

SD10(?S 

SD1074-2 

SD1074-4 

5P1074-5 

SD1076 

SD1077-I 

SD1077-6 

SD107S-6 

SDIOSO-^ 

3l>10Sa-1? 

SD1037 

SD10S9-a 

SD1095 

sa)iioo 

SD1109 
!S»lli5-2 
SDl 115-3 
SDl 115^7 
SD1116 

soma 



PR I a: 

I 5.00 
5.00 
15,00 
15* CM 
15.00 
9.90 
9.90 
9.90 
13.50 
13.50 
11.00 
11,00 
15.00 
15.00 
15.00 
15,00 
15.00 
15.00 
10- 00 
15. OO 
12.00 
12.00 

:o.oo 

3.75 

a. 00 

4, op 

4.75 

15.00 

18.00 

28.00 

2S.0O 

JSO.OO 

4.00 

4.00 

24.00 

6.00 

3.00 

8*00 

15.00 

15-00 

15.00 

5.00 

18.00 

s.oo 

8.00 

2.50 

5.00 

22.00 



'ITPE 


PRICE 


vn^E 


soil 19 


$ 5*00 


Sl>t27S-& 


SD1124 


50.00 


SD1231-2 


SU1I2T 


3.50 


SD1233 


SOI 133 


14.00 


SD1289-1 


SOI 133-1 


14.00 


SD1290-^ 


SDli:^-3 


3,00 


SD1290^7 


soil 35 


8,00 


aoisoo 


ajii:i6 


15.00 


SDlSOl--? 


SDl 136-2 


15,00 


3D13£>5 


SDl 143-1 


12.00 


SDT307 


SD1I43-3 


17.00 


SDiaoe 


SDl 1 44-1 


3.00 


SD1311 


301146 


15.00 


SD1317 


SDl 147 


15.00 


SD1335 


S0118S 


10.00 


SD1345-6 


soiia9 


24.00 


SDl 365-1 


soisoo 


1.50 


a31365-5 


so 1201-2 


10. oo 


SDl 375 


SO 12 02 


10.00 


ED1375-S 


SD12 12-11 


4.00 


aJ1379 


5011212-12 


4.00 


SDir^C^l 


a)12 12-10 


4.00 


fiD13eO-3 


SD1214-7 


5.00 


SD13fiO-7 


SD12 14-11 


5.00 


SD1405 


SD1216 


12,00 


SD1409 


SD1219-4 


15.00 


SD1410 


SO.1219-5 


15.00 


SD1410^3 


S0t2l&-S 


15.00 


SD1413-1 


S01220 


8.00 


SD141G 


sn:i22o-9 


e.oo 


ED1422-2 


SD1222-& 


le.oo 


SD142S 


ED1222-11 


7.50 


^^142^2 


£3^1234-10 


la.oo 


S01423-3 


SD1225 


18,00 


SD1429-5 


3D1S23-3 


FOR 


SD1430 


^1229-7 


13.00 


SD1430-2 


SD1229-ie 


13.00 


SDl 434-5 


.Sin232 


4,00 


SD1434-9 


301240-3 


15.00 


SD143S 


ED1244-1 


14.00 


SD1441 


SD1362 


12,00 


201442 


S:]12e3 


15.00 


SD1444 


S:i263-1 


15.00 


SD1444-8 


SD1272 


13.00 


St)I450-l 


SD1272-2 


15.00 


3D1451 


SD1272-4 


15.00 


SD1451-2 


SD127a 


30*00 


SD1452 


SiJl27tJ-l 


18-00 


3D1452-2 



S18.00 

8.00 

10.00 

15.00 

15.00 

15,00 

3.00 

3,00 

3*00 

3,00 

3.00 

1,00 

10.00 

3.00 

5,00 

2.50 

2.50 

7,50 

7.50 

15.00 

1.00 

1.00 

1.00 

40.00 

18.00 

22.00 

21,00 

IS. 00 

50,00 

24.00 

33.00 

15.00 

15,00 

15.00 

12*00 

xs.oo 

30. Of) 
30.00 
26.00 
91-00 
15.00 
6.00 

e,oo 

28.00 
18.00 

18.00 
20,00 
20.00 



TYPE 

SD1453-1 

SD1451-1 
SD1477 
• SD1478 
SD14S0 
SD1484 
^1484-5 
a:?148'l-6 
SD14S4-7 
SD14fiS 
SD148fi-l 
5014 J^J^ 7 
S014S8-S 
SLH49*->-l 
SDT.520-2 
SD1522^1 
S0IS2H- 1 
SDlS2fi-3 
aDlS3C>-2 
^1536-1 
SD1545 
SDl 561 



PftlCT:; 

$48,00 
48,00 
48, fX) 
21.00 
60.00 
1*50 
1*50 
1*50 
1.5b 
39.00 
38.00 
27. W) 
28.00 
3S).O0 
18.00 
33.00 
24.00 
34,00 
38. W 
41.00 
34.00 
79.00 



gF4557 Mot. 25.00 

SK3048 HCA 5.00 

SK3177 RCA 15,00 

S^]37714 Mut. 2.50 

SfiF7S0 mt, 36.00 

SRFime M3t, i^*00 

SBT2M7 Sfot, 22.00 

SRI-2356 ii>t, 38.00 

SRF237S htTJt, 16.00 

SRF2534 Mctt. 40.00 

SRF2fl21 ^tJt. 25.00 

SRF2S57 Mcjt* 20.00 

TAggy4 fCA 15.00 

Tisiea/JHu-^ee 3.55 

1P312 2.50 

TP1014 TOW 5.00 

IPlOaS TOW 15.00 
01-80703T04/ 
458^949 Mot.amn. 65,00 

TXVF2201 H.P. 450.00 

e2803 RCA 100.00 

TA7205/2N5921 SO. 00 

TA74S7/ 2N5920 75 . 00 

TA7995/2N6267 150.00 

SRF2092 Mot. 18*00 

M1^^479 8.05 



Vfe Caj] Ct^oss Reference Most RF Transistors, Diodes, H^'brid Modules And Any Other Tyix^ Of Semiconductor. 



****++*•♦ 



1N21 


¥ 3.40 


1^E1D 


4.00 


1H21WE 


5,80 


LN23B 


3,40 


LN23m 


4,00 


1N2SWE 


10. 00 


1JM76 


26.00 


1N78B 


26.00 


1N149 


6.00 


1NIJ15G 


15,00 


IM331 


10.00 


IN2930 


15.00 


IK3713 


IS. 00 


1S3717 


14.00 


L^[3747 


21.00 


1MS12B 


9,00 


1W5142A/B 


4.25 


1N5146A/B 


4,25 


1N5453 


3.75 


IN5713 


5.00 


1S2200 


15.00 


A2KlieM Aertedi 


50.00 


BU61 Dornac 


5,00 


M233B Alpha 


PUR 


rSMTC AlpJm 


POH 


PG061.58-9S Alpha 


PGR 


GCJ 631-89 GIIZ 


31.35 


GC2542-4e GHZ 


37,40 


tEP5082-Oll2 


14.20^^ 


111^032-0375 


KM 


HP5082-1028 


POH 


HP5O33-2303 


5.20 


HF5082-2aOO 


1.00- 


H1>50S2-30:^ 


6.70 


UP50S2-3379 


1.50 


HP5082-S01G 


POR 


MA475 


poe 


iiA41766 


POR 


MA43e36 


POR 


MA47100 


3.05 


^ti\47852 


pm 



1N2TT^ 


$ 3-40 


lM2im 


$ 3.40 


LN21C 


$ 3.40 


liNSlDlt 


4.00 


iieiER 


6.00 


ll^lRF; 


5.00 


1N21WG 


5.80 


irJ32 


5.00 


IN23A 


10.00 


1N23C 


3.40 


lN23at 


3,40 


l^a3D 


4.95 


1N23WK 


5.00 


1N2S 


7.50 


LN25AR 


18.00 


tN2:y 


10.00 


im'? 


20.00 


USf53A 


55.50 


wim 


38.00 


mru 


26.00 


1N7!^A 


20.00 


INTSD 


28.00 


mrsm 


28.00 


IN7SH 


28.00 


IN150MR 


18.00 


1IS415 


4.00 


u^loC 


4.00 


L^16D 


5.00 


imi6K 


6.00 


IM446 


10.00 


liN833 


10.00 


ira50 


4.O0 


IN1084 


2.00 


1N2932 


15.00 


1N3540 


15.00 


11^3712 


11. OQ 


1N3714 


U-'OC 


1N3715 


16.00 


IS3716 


10.00 


im7i& 


10.00 


1N3721 


14.00 


LN3733 


10. 00 


1N43S6 


20.00 


lfW396 


15,00 


1M785 


11.00 


LN5139A/B-: 


4.25 


1N5140A/B 


4.25 


1N5141A/B 


4.95 


1N5143A/E 


4.25 


1X^144A/B 


4.25 


US[5145A/B 


4.25 


IK5147A/E 


4.25 


1K5143A/B 


4.25 


1N5167 


5.50 


1N5465 


7.65 


11^5711 


1.00 


1N5711 JAN 


2.00 


L^5767 


2.00 


1116263 


1.00 


1S2199 


15.00 


1S2208/9 


1,00 


8B1087/48Ra69558 


65.00 


8D3020 


65.00 


BBIOSB 


1.00 


BB105G 


1.00 


F¥)4/4JFBD4 G.E. 


1.^,00 


CMD514AB CM. 


pm 


M060 Alpha. 


ixm 


04159 Alpha 


J^XJR 


L>39(X> Alpha 


[\M 


rM959 Alpha 


TKM 


I>4987Sii Alplia 


POT 


D614VU Alpa 


POR 


D5503 Alpha 


iAM 


D6506 Alpha 


POR 


D(iiD6022 Alpha. 


V<M 


DftiD6460A Alpha. 


IJGR 


DF^0054 Crowq 


POl 


0Cl(if]2''89 GHZ 


31.35 


GCI607^0 GH2 


31.35 


QC2531-88 Q{Z 


37.40 


GC3208-40 (Ml 


37.40 


GC17044 Om 


50.00 


HP33644A-il01 


125.00 


HP5O82-0241 


75. eo 


HP5OS3-0253 


105.00 


HP50S2-0320' 


58.00 


HP50S2-03e6 


K^ 


HP5Oft2-O401 


POR 


HP.'t082-0438 


POR 


HPS0g2-1332 


POR 


Hl^O^-2254 


POR 


HP5O82-2302 


10.70 


HP50e2-2696 


POR 


i0>5O82-2711 


23.15 


HP5083-2727 


rot 


Hf^S2-2305 


4,45 


[{r^062-2835 


1.00 


ifiP5082-2884 


x'^Jlx 


IIP50S2-3040 


36.00 


I:EP5082-3080 


2.00 


HP50B2-31SS 


1.00 


HP50S2-6459 


POR 


I{P50S2-6'162 


POR 


HP5082^588S 


IKH 


IiP5082-S323 


P(M 


K3A IfemtPon 


7.00 


^W^150A 


RHt 


MA40003 


PtJt 


ilA41487 


POR 


MA41765 


IX3R 


MA43004 


48.00 


ttA435S9 


PQB 


MA43622 


POR 


MA45104 


27.00 


1^^47044 


PCB 


^tA47051 


25*50 


m4T2ir> 


30.80 


MA47771 


POR 


^tA4733&* 


POR 


MA49106 


37.95 


MA49558 


PCM 


Mj\8i-i731 


125.00 



+ OOK STOCK. DyUSGES DAILY SO CALL IF IF ItlL PAiW YDL' NEED IS NOT Llffl[>U ******♦********#»*****••********** **it*=***t 



***+♦** 4 



For information call: (602) 242-3037 



Toll Free Number 
800-528-0180 

(for orders only) 



"All parts may be new or 
surplus, and parts may be 
substituted with comparable parts 
if we are out of stock of an item." 



Q^^l\z electroi||C$ 

PRICES SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE 



73 Magazine • October, 1984 91 



COAXIAL RELAY SWITCHES SPDT 



Electronic Specialty Co* /Raven £lectro&ics 
Part f 25N28 Part # SU-01 

26Vdc Type K CcFiioector, DC to L GHz. 



FSN 59e5-356-9&e3 



$49,00 




NC 



A 



COM 




;M S9S 



>f#rcj 



*!N 5-U lOI 



^ A 



Aspbdiol 

Part i 316-10102-8 

U5Vac Type BNC DC to 3 GHz, 



S29-99 



Part I 300-11182 

l20Vac Type MC DC to 4 GHt- 

FSN 5983-543-1225 

$39.99 




FSR 

Fart # 300-11173 
120V^c type fifiC Same 
FSN 5985- S43- 1850 





BNC To Banana Plug Coax Cable RG-5S 36 inch or BNC to N Coa^s Cable RC^Sfi 36 Inch, 



$7.99 or 2 Fqi- $13.99 or 10 For ?50.Q0 



$8.99 or 2 For $15.99 or 10 For S60.00 





SOLtP STATE RELAYS 

P&B Model ECriDB72 
PRICE EACH $5.00 

Diglsig, Inc. Model ECS-215 
PRICE EACH S7,50 

Crigsby/Barton Model GB7400 
PttlCE EACH S7.50 



5vdc turn on 



5vdc turn ofi 



5vdc turn on 



120vac contact dt Taisps or 20aBips on a 

I0"x I0'*x . 124 aluminum, Heatsink wltli 
Billcoi] grease. 

240viic contact I4a]i[ps or 40aiDps on a 

10"jt 10"x .124 ali^inura. Heatsink with 
silicon grease. 

240vac ccmtacc at 15aotps or 40aMps on a 

IO"x 10"x . 124 aluminum. Hears ink with 
silicon grease. 



HOTE; *** i 



Bay be substituted with other brands or eqwivalcnt modea numbers. *** 



gM^ 



For tntofmation call; (602) 242-3037 



electroqici) 



''Ail pans rnay be riew or 
surplus, and parts may be 
^bstitui^ '«triirixornpar3t>le parts 
if we aie pul of slock of an itttfTL" 



Toll FfM Numbtr 
600-528 0180 
(For ordirs only) 

PRrCES SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE 



92 73 Magazine • CN:tober, 1984 



RECALL PBONE MEMORY TELEPHONE tflTti 24 NUtfflER AUTO DIALER 

The RecalL Phone Telephone employs the latest state of art 
C0nMiiilcatt<3ns technology. Ic is a combination telephone 
and automatic dialer thet usea preinLmtt-quallty, soiid- state 
circuitcy to assure bigh-rel lability performance In pergonal 
or business applicacions* 349.99 




ARQN ALPHA RAPID BONDING GLUE 

Super Glue lCE-4e6 high strength 
rapid bonding adhesive. Alpha 
Cyanoacry late. Set-Time 20 to 40 
fiec . ,0. 7f 1. oz. (lOgm. ) 

$2.00 




TOUCH *rOl^E PAD 

This pad contains all the electronics to 
produce standard touch- tone tones. Hew 
with data. 



MITSUMI UHF/VHF VARACTOR TUN ER MODEL UVElA 

Perfect for those unscrambler projects » 
£iew vlth data. 






Si*? # 





INTEGRATTD CIRCUIT 



$9,99 or lO/$89.99 




S19,99 or 10/5149.99 



MCi372P 

MC13S8P 

NCi350P 

MCL330AIP 

MCi310P 

MCi496P 

LM565K 

LMjaONU 

LM1S89N 

NE564N 

hfE56lN 



Color TV Video Modulator Circuit. 

IF Amp. ,Ll!DiterpFK Detector , Audio Driver, Electronic Attenuator* 

IF Amplifier 

Low Level Video Detector 

FH Stereo Demodulator 

Balanced Modulator/Oemodulator 

Phase Locked Loop 

ZWatt Audio Power Amplifier 

TV Video Modulator 

Phase Locked Loop 

Phase Locked Loop 



1 to m 


Uup 


4.42 


$2.95 


5,00 


4.00 


1.50 


1-25 


KSO 


1.15 


4.29 


3.30 


1.30 


1.25 


2,50 


2.00 


1.56 


1.25 


5.00 


4.00 


10*00 


8.00 


ID. 00 


a, 00 



FERRANTI ELEC-mONICS AM RADIO RECEIVER MODEL ZW414 IHTgGRATED CIRCUIT. 
Featiu'es: 

1.2 to 1.6 volt operating range. ^Less than 0- 5iBa current consumption. 150KHz to 3MHz 
Frequency range. , Easy to assemble, no alignment necessary. Effective and variable AGC action., 
Will drive an earphone direct. Excelleit audio i^uallty* .Typical power gain of 72dB, ^10-18 
package* With data, $2.99 or 10 For S24.99 



HI CAD RECHARGEABLE BATTERIES 

AA Battery Pack of 6 These are Factory 
New. S5. 00 

StiB C Pack of 10 2,5Amp/Hr. SIO.OO 

Gates Rechargeable Battery Packs 



12vdc at 2,5Aiiip/Hr. 
llvdc at 5AiQp/Hr. 



$11.99 
$15,99 




(fVI^^^ electroi|ic$ 



^"All parts may be new or 
surplus, and parts may be 
substituted with comparabre pans 
If we are out of stock of an item " 



MOTOROLA MRF559 RF TRANSISTOR 

hfe 30iiin 90typ 20CrTDx. 

ft 30aQrhz 

gain Set) min 9.5typ at 870itiz 

13db typ at 312ntTZ 
output power .Swatts at 12.5v± 
at 87QTtiz. 

$2.05 or 10/$I5.00 



For information call: (602) 2423037 

Toll Fr«e Number 

800-528-0180 
(For orders only) 

PRICES SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE 



73 Magszifie * October, 1384 93 



"SOCKETS AND CHIMNEYS" 



EIMAC TUBE SOCKETS AND CHIMNEYS 



SKI 10 

SK^OOA 

SIC400 

SK406 

SK416 

SK500 

SK600 

SK6Qa 

SK606 

SK607 

SK610 

SK620 

SK626 

5K636B 

SK640 

5K646 

SK700 

SK7nA 

SK740 

SK770 

SK&OOA 

SK806 

SKSIO 

SK900 

SK90^ 

SKU20 

SK1490 



Socket 

Sockec For 4CK5000A,R,J ^ 4CX10,OOOD» 4CX1S,000A,J 

Socket For 4-l23A»250A,400A,400C,4PRl25A,400A,4-S00A, S-500A 

Chimney For 4-250A.A00A,400C^4PR400A 

Chimney For 3-400Z 

Socket For 4-iOOOA/4PRl000A/& 

Socket For 4CX230&,BC»FG»R,4CX3S0A,F,FJ 

Socket For 4CX25OB,BC^FG,R,4CX350A,F,FJ 

Chimney For 4CX250B,BC,FG,R,4CX3SaA,F\FJ 

Socket For 4CX600J,JA 

Socket For 4CX600J,JA 

Socket For 4CX60Cy,JA 

Chijfflijey For 4CS60OJ^JA 

Socket For 4CX6O0J . JA 

Oilmney For 4CX600J,JA 

Socket For ACX600J,JA 

Chimney For 4CX60aj,JA 

Socket For 4CX3O0A, Y,4CX125C,F 

Socket For 4CX300A,Y,4CX125C,F 

Socket For 4CX3O0A,y ,4CX125C,F 

Socket For 4CX3O0A,Y,4CX125C,F 

Socket For 4CXl000A,4CXl 300B 

Chiraney For 4CX1000A,4CX1500B 

Socket For 4CX1000A,4CX1500B 

Socket For 4X50OA 

Chinmey For 4X500A 

Socket For 5CX3000A 

Socket For 4CV8O0OA 



$POR 

$520,00 

260. 00 

74.00 

36*00 

390*00 

51-00 

73.00 

1 1 . 00 

60.00 

60*00 

66.00 

10.00 

66 . 00 

34.00 

36.00 

71.00 

225,00 

22 5,00 

S6.00 

86.00 

225,00 

40.00 

225.00 

300, 00 

57.00 

650.00 

583.00 



JOHNSON TUBE SOCKETS AND CHUfifEYS 



124-1U/SK606 

122-0275-001 

124-0113-00 

I24-n6/SK630A 

124-I15-2/SK620A 



Chimney For 4CX250B,BC,FG,R, 4CX350A.F.FJ 

Socket For 3-5002, 4-125A, 250A, 400A, 4-500A, 5-50(kv 

Capacitor Ring 

Socket For 4CX2 50B,BC,FG pB, /4CX350A,F.FJ 

Socket For 4CX250B,BC,FG,R, /4CX330A,F,FJ 

813 Tube Socket 



S 10*00 
(pair) 15.00 
15*00 
55.00 
55.00 
20.00 



CHIP CAPACITORS 

*8pf 

Ipf 

l*lpf 

L4pf 

I.5pf 

l*8pf 

£*2pf 

3.3pf 
3.6pf 
3.9pf 
4.7pf 
5,6pf 

s.apf 

8-2pf 



PRICES: 



1 to 10 - 
U to 50 ^ 
51 to 100 



lOpf 
12pf 
15pf 
18pf 
20pf 
Z2pf 
24pf 
27pf 
33pf 
39pf 
47pf 
Slpf 
55pf 
68pf 
82pf 

*90e 
.80c 



lOOpf* 

nopf 

l2Dpf 

I30pf 

I50pf 

160pf 

ISOpf 

200pf 

220pf* 

240pf 

270pf 

300pf 

330pf 

360pf 

390pf 



TUBE CAPS (Plate) 


$11*00 


HRl, 4 


HR2,3» 6 & 7 


13.00 


HR5, 8 


14*00 


HR9 


17,00 


HRIO 


20.00 



430pf 

470pf 

510pf 

560pf 

6£0pf 

680pf 

820pf 

lOOOpf/.ODluf* 

1800pf/,00iauf 

270Qpf/.0027uf 

10,D00pf/.01uf 

lZ,000pf/.0l2yf 

15»000pf/,015uf 

18,000pf/.0i8uf 



101 to 1000 
1001 & UP 



*60€ * IS A SPECIAL PRICE: ID for $7,50 
.35« 100 for $65.00 

1000 for $350.00 



HATKINS JOHKSON WJ-V9Q7: Voltage Controlled Hicrowave Oscfl later 



$110. 00 



Fr^qyency range 3-6 to 4.2GH2, Power ouput, Min, IQdBm typical, SdBm Guaranteed, 
Spyrious output suppressiofi Harnionic (nfo). win. 20dB typical, In*8and Non-Harmonic a Biin, 
60dB typical. Residual FM, pk to pk. Mast. SKHz, pyshing factor, Maj(. 8KHz/V. Pulling figure 
(1.5:1 VSWR), Hax* 6QHHz, Tuning voltage range +1 to +15volts, Tyning current. Max, -0.1mA, 
iBOdulation sensitivity range, Max, 120 to 30»lz/V, Input capacitance, Kax. lOOpf* Oscillator 
Bias *15 +*O.0S volts @ 55mA * Max* 



Toll Free Number 
BOO-528-01 80 
(For orders only) 



"'All parts may be new or 
aurpiys, and parts may be 
sut)5tf luted with comparaCM^ parts 
If we are out of stocic of an Hem" 



^/l^^J^x electroi|ics 

For infofmatton call: (602) 242-3037 
PRICES SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE 



04 73 Magazine • October, 1084 



TYPE 



PRICE 



TYPE 



PRICE 



TYPE 



PRICE 



2C39/7289 


S 34.00 


1182/4600A 


S500.00 


ML7815AL 


$ 60.00 


2E26 


7.95 


4600A 


500.00 


7843 


107.00 


2K28 


200.00 


4624 


310.00 


7854 


130.00 


3-5D0Z 


102.00 


4657 


84.00 


ML7855KAL 


125.00 


3-1000Z/8164 


400.00 


4662 


100.00 


7984 


14.95 


3B28/866A 


9.50 


4665 


500,00 


8072 


84.00 


3CX400U7/8%1 


255.00 


4687 


P.O.R. 


8106 


5.00 


3CX1000A7/a283 


526.00 


5675 


42.00 


8117A 


225.00 


3CX3000F1/8239 


567 . 00 


5721 


250.00 


8121 


110.00 


3CW30000H7 


1700.00 


5768 


125.00 


8122 


110.00 


3X2500A3 


473-00 


5819 


119.00 


8134 


470.00 


3X30DOF1 


557.00 


5836 


232.50 


8155 


12.00 


4-65A/8165 


69.00 


5837 


232.60 


8233 


60.00 


4-125A/4D21 


79.00 


5861 


140.00 


8236 


35.00 


4-250A/5D22 


98.00 


5867A 


185.00 


8295/PL172 


500.00 


4-400A/8438 


98.00 


5868/AX9902 


270.00 


8458 


35.00 


4-400B/7527 


110.00 


5876/A 


42.00 


8462 


130.00 


4-400C/6775 


110.00 


5881/6L6 


8.00 


8505A 


95.00 


4-1000A/8166 


444 . 00 


5893 


60.00 


8533W 


136.00 


4CX250B/7203 


54.00 


5894 /A 


54.00 


8560/A 


75.00 


4a250FG/8621 


75.00 


5894B/8737 


54.00 


8560AS 


100.00 


4CX250K/3245 


125.00 


5946 


395.00 


8608 


38.00 


4CX250R/7580W 


90.00 


6083 /AZ 9 909 


95.00 


8624 


100.00 


4CX300A/8157 


170.00 


6146/5146A 


8.50 


8637 


70.00 


4CH50A/8321 


110.00 


6146B/8298 


10.50 


8643 


83.00 


4CX350F/a322 


115.00 


6146W/7212 


17.95 


8647 


158.00 


4CX350FJ/8904 


140.00 


6156 


110.00 


8683 


95.00 


4CX600J/8809 


835.00 


6159 


13.85 


8877 


465.00 


4CX1000A/8i68 


242.50* 


6159B 


23.50 


8903 


13.00 


4CX1000A/8168 


485.00 


6161 


325-00 


8950 


13.00 


4CX1500B/8660 


555.00 


6280 


42.50 


8930 


137.00 


4CXS000A/8170 


1100.00 


6291 


180.00 


6L6 Metal 


25.00 


4CX100000/8171 


1255.00 


6293 


24.00 


6L6GC 


6.03 


4CX15000A/8281 


1500.00 


6326 


P.O.R. 


6CA7/EL34 


5.38 


4CWe00F 


710.00 


6360/A 


5.75 


6CL6 


3.50 


4D32 


240.00 


6399 


540.00 


6DJ3 


2.50 


4E27A/5-125B 


240.00 


6550A 


10.00 


6DQ5 


6.58 


4 P R60A 


200.00 


6883B/8032A/8552 


10.00 


6GF5 


5.85 


4PR60B 


345.00 


6897 


160.00 


6G05A 


6.20 


4PR65A/8ia7 


175.00 


6907 


79.00 


6GK6 


5.00 


4PR1000A/8189 


590.00 


6922/6DJ8 


5.00 


6HB5 


6.00 


4X150A/7034 


60.00 


6939 


22.00 


6HF5 


8.73 


4X150D/7509 


95.00 


7094 


250.00 


6JG6A 


6.28 


4X250B 


45.00 


7117 


38.50 


6JM6 


6.00 


4X250F 


45.00 


7203 


P.O.R. 


6JN6 


6.00 


4X500A 


412.00 


7211 


100.00 


60S6C 


7,25 


5CX1500A 


660.00 


7213 


300 . 00* 


6i(N6 


5.05 


KT88 


27.50 


7214 


300.00* 


6KD6 


8.26 


416B 


45.00 


7271 


135.00 


6LF6 


7.00 


416C 


62.50 


7289/2C39 


34.00 


6106 G.E. 


7.00 


572B/T160L 


49.95 


7325 


P.O.R. 


6LQ6/6MJ6 Sylvania 


9.00 


592/3-200A3 


211.00 


7360 


13.50 


6ME6 


8.90 


807 


8.50 


7377 


85.00 


12AT7 


3.50 


SUA 


15,00 


7408 


2.50 


12AX7 


3.00 


812A 


29.00 


7609 


95.00 


12BY7 


5.00 


813 


50.00 


7735 


36.00 


12JB6A 


6.50 



NOTE 



= USED TUBE 



NOTE P-O.R. = PRICE ON REQUEST 



"ALl PARTS MAY BE NEW, USED, OR SURPLUS. PARTS MAY BE SUBSTITUTED WITH COMPARABLE PARTS IF WE 
ARE OUT OF STOCK OF AN ITEM. 



NOTICE: ALL PRICES ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE. 



For Information call: (602) 242-3037 



Toll Free Number 
800-528-0180 
(For orders only) 



"All pans m»v be new or 
sufplite, «nd parls may be 
substityted with cofn parable parts 
tl we are out of Stock o* an item/' 



(f\f *7[z electrof|ic$ 



PRICES SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE 




73 Magazine * October, 1984 95 



Cfi 



99 



FILTERS 

COLLINS MecHonlcal Filter #525-972^-010 MODEL F455Z32F 

455KHZ at 3,2kHz wide. May be other nx5dels but eqLiivalent. May be used or new, $15,99 

ATLAS Crystal Filters 

5,595-2,?/8/LSB, 5.595-2.7/I5B 

B pole 2.7KHZ wide Ufpper sideband. Inpedence 8Q0ohms 15pf In/800ohms Opf out, 19,99 

S, 595^2- 7/8/U, 5,595-2,7AJSB 

8 pole 2-7Kh2 wide Upper sideband. Inpedence 900ohms 15pf In/800ohms Opf out* 19,99 

5. 595". 500/4, 5. 595-. 500/4 /CW 

4 pole 500 cycles wide CW. Ijnnpedaiice BOOohms 15pf In/SOOohms Opf out. 19,99 

9 . OUSB/CW 

6 pole 2.7KHZ wide at 6dB. Impedance 6B0ohms 7pf In/300ohms 8pf out, CW-1S99HZ 19.99 

KOKUSAI ELECTRIC CO, HechgniCQl Filter #f1F-A55-ZL/ZU-21H 

455KHZ at Center Preqaency of 453.5KC. Carrier Frequency of 455KBz 2,36KC Bandwidth, 
Upper sideband, (ZU) 19.99 

Inwer sideband. fZL) 19,99 

CRYSTAL FILTERS 



NIKKO 

TEW 

SDK 

TAMA 

■TYCO/CD 

FTI 
PTI 
PTI 
COTTEGH 

FRC 
FILTE3CH 



FX-07800C 

FEC-103-2 

SGH-113A 

TF-3U^250 

001019S80 

4884863B01 

5350C 

5426C 

1479 

A10300 

ERXP-15700 

2131 



7 . 3MM2 
10.6935MHz 

11.2735MH2 

CF 3179 -3KHz 

10, 7MHz 2pole ISKHz bandwidth 

11.7MHz 2pole 15KHS bandwidth 

12MHz 2pole 15KHz bandwidth 

21.4MHz 2pole 15KH2 bandwidth 

10.7Mflz 8pole bandwidth 7.5KHz at 3dB, 5KHz at 6dB 

ASMHz 2pole 15KH2 bandwidth 

20,6MHz 36MIZ wide 

CF 7, 825MHz 



$10.00 

10,00 

10,00 

19,99 

5,00 

5.00 

5.00 

5.00 

20*00 

6.00 

10,00 

10,00 



»41^^^H4^H;f^#«##44l#ftil#«4«4^'Ch«»4«ll#««»4««»4«##4«»»##'M^4«'J^fl^#««#-ft«»^#«#4»#ft«tti^ 



CERAMIC FILTERS 

AXEL 
a^EVITE 



INTIPPOW 



TOKIN 



4F449 
TCHOIA 

TCF4-12D36A 

EFB455B 

BFB455L 

CFM455E 

CFM455D 

CrR455E 

CFU455B 

CFU455C 

CFU455G 

CFU455H 

CFU455I 

GFW455D 

CTW455H 

SFB455D 

SFD455D 

SFE10,7MA 

SFElO,7MS 

SFG10,7MA 

LF-B4/CFU455I 

LF-B6/CFU455H 

IF-B8 

IF-Cia 

CF455A/BFU455K 



12.6KC Bandpass Filter 3dB bandwidth l,6KHz from 11.8-13,4KHs 

455KH24-2KH2 bandwidth 4-7% at 3dB 

455KHz4-rKfIz bandwidth 6dB min 12KHz, 60dB ma^ 36VHz 

455KHZ 

455KHZ 

455KH2 -1— 5.5KHZ at 3dB , 4-8KHz at 6dB , -»— 16K!!z at 50dB 

455KH2 4-7KFTZ at 3dB , 4-lOKHz at 6dE , +-20KIZ at SOdB 

455KH2 -I-5-5KH2 at 3dE , 4-8KHZ at 6dB , -f-16KHz at 60dB 

455KIIZ H-2KHZ bandwidth -1-1 5KH2 at 6dB, +-30KHZ at 40dB 

455KHZ +-2KHZ bandwidth ■+-12,5Kt{2 at 6dB , +-24KHZ at 40dB 



455KIfz -I— iKHz bandwidtli 4-4,5KHz at 6dB 

455KHZ +-1KH2 bandwidth -i-3KHz at 6dB , 

455KHZ ^IKlIz bandwidth ■i-2KHz at 6dB , 

455KKZ +-10KH2 at 6dB , -H20KHz at 40dB 

455KHZ -h-3KHz at 6dB , +-9KHz at 40dB 

455KH2 

455KHZ +-2KHZ , 3dB bandwidth 4,5Kt!z 4- IKHz 

10,7MFiz 280KH3 4-50KHZ at 3dB , 650KHz at 20dB 

10,7MH2 230KH2 -f-50KHz at 3dB , 570KHZ at 20dB 

10,7MHz 

455KHZ -f-lKHz 

455KH2 +-1KHZ 

455KF1Z 

455KHZ 

455KI-iz +-2KI!z 



f 4-lOKJiz at 40dB: 
+-gKHz at 40dB 
4-6KHZ at 40dB 



MATSUSHIRA EFC--L455K 455KHZ 



10.00 
5.00 

10.00 
2.50 
3.50 
6,65 
6.65 
8.00 
2,90 
2,90 
2,90 
2,90 
2.90 
2,90 
2,90 
2.50 
5*00 
2,50 
2,50 

10.00 
2,90 
2,90 
2.90 

10,00 
5.00 
7.00 



SPECTRA PHYSICS INC. Model 088 HeNe LASER TUBES 

BEAM DIA* ,75MM 
lOOOVDC -I—IOOVDC 

ROTRON MUFFIN FANS Model MARK4/MU2A1 



PQVER OUTPUT 1,6MW, 
68K OHM IWATT BALLAST 



BEAM DIR, 2,7^'[R 

At 3,7^^ 



B¥^ STARTING VOLTAGE DC 

$59,99 



115 VAC 14WAITS 

105CFM at 60CPS 



50/60CPS 

THESE ARE NEW 



IMPEDENCE PRDTECIED-F 



88CEM at 50CPS 



(f\f ^^l|z electrof^cf 

PRICES SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE 



Toll Free Number 
800-528-0180 
(For orders only) 



$ 7.99 

''All parts may be new or 
surplus, and parts may be 
5ubstitut^ wUh com parable parts 
if we are out of stock of an item " 



For informatfon call: (602) 242-3037 



96 73 Magazine * October, 1984 



f 



HEWLETT PACKARD SIGNAL GENERATORS 



&06A 

606B 

608 C 

&08D/ 
rS510 

608E 
603F 

612A 
B14A 



616A/ 
rS403 



50KHZ to &5MHi In & iMnds+^U. Output level odjusto&le O.luv 
to 5V into 50 otiins, Built- In crystal calibrotOr.UOO -lOOOHz 
modulation. 

Some OS i^t^ove but hos frequency contrut feoture to allow 
operation with HP 87 OS A Syncr^ronljer, 

lOiflNr to ^80MH7^o-1ljV-IV Into 50 oriins.M.CW.or Pulse mo(3- 
ul-dtion, talibroted atteni^ator, 

lOMHz to 420HHz/[J,iuV-0H5V Into 5Q [:hhms. + -0.5£ accuracy. 
t>ijj|t-in crystal calibrator^ AM-CVJ or pulse outuut, 

[FiKproved verslOFi df DODulor 60SC.Up to IV tjuiput. Improved 
stability, low resiauol fm.. 

iOWHz to U55HH? In 5 bands +-i£ frecruency occurocy Nlth 
built-lo crystol colibraEor.Con be used with HP B708A 
Synchronizer. Output continuously odiustoble from ,luV to 
,5V Into SO Ohms, 

^5a-i230liHz .0.1uV-G.5V imp Sfl ohms, ca libra ted outpuLt 

yoo-zlOOMHz With fiKiny featyres jnclutfJiia col sbroted outDut 
and all modulation charotteristlcs- 





&1GE 


t 650,00 


61SB 


$1100.00 


&iac 


$ 500.00 


620A 


$ 375.00 


620B 
626A 


$11+50.00 


8708J 


JUDO. 00 




1 ?5b.ob. 





i sno.GO 



Direct reoding and direct cantrol from 1.8 to i^,?Mz, The 
H,P,616A features *-l,5dE calibrated output accuracy from 
-3l27dBm to -dEfii.The output Is directly calibrated In micrt)- 
voltJ ana dBm wicii .continyous itionitoring, Simple operation 
freCLfencv diod accuracy is +-1% and stobllity estceeas 0.005%- 
/ C chonge in omtiient temperature, Catlhrotcd ottenuutor is 
within i--1.5aB over entire output band, 50 ohm impedance unit 
has Internal pulse inodulatlofl with rep rate variable from HU 
Hi to AKH;,vorlati]e puUewldthd to lOuseOond varioble oulse 
deloy(3 to SOOusec) .External modulating inouts irttreos ver- 
sotilltv, t 375,00 



UHEX WBORATDRIES THS-2 Fl£XIOT HEADSCT, 

these Jieoosets core with data to iiook ld lo a ICflM radios and QDnv other eouipntnt. 
Perfect far Ain>lcnes . i^Ucooters ^ MoDile Ridios . or just the Telepnone- 
These Are Foctorv ^Jevj in Sealed Bbxfes, Limited Simlv Only S69„95: 





569.95 



c5^^ 



48 



ScBtie 05 above but later uradel. 



S 60D.DO' 



5.S to 7,&GH? range^wtth calibrated output and selection of 
Dblse-FM or square wove miodulotlQn. * bOCOQ' 



Some as above but later inQdel. 

7 to llGHz ronge.wjth collbroted output and selection ot 
py]se-FM or .'jai.jare wove moOu lotion. 



:Si3ii^; OS DttOVe but later mtxjet 



10 to 156H2a0niw output 
pulse-squore wave or FM 



power with 
rnDduIatlctfi. 



CQllbrateij output and 



t2200.00 

* 75,0.00, 
S22:QQ-00'' 

tit2nn.oo 



Synchronizer used with 606B>60&F.Tne sviictironi^er is a 
phase- lock fretjiiency stabilizer wS^sch provides crystal - 
oscillator frequency stability to 43DnHj in the 6&SF signal 
generator .Phase Idcliing E]imlnote& microphonics and drift 
resulting In excellent frequency stabillty.Tbc S7DSA incluaes 
a vernier wbich can tune the reference Oscillator over a range 
of +-0,25S permittirtg frequency settobility to 2 oarts in ID 
to tbe sever+th.Pfovutes a very stable signal that satisfies- 
(Fiony. .erttlcat opplscotiaris, 

(With HP 6fl6E or fi08F) J 350.00 

(Without) ^ 450. 00^ 



fflC-10 
NF'IOSF 



12500, ():&: 



12100 <0Q; 




ELECIRQflETRICS EMC-lD RFl/Eill RECEIVER 

LOW frequency analyzer covering 20H^ to 50KH7 freauency 

range, Extendable to 500 'k^hz ir^ wideoond nioae^ 

EntPire Devices Fiela Intensity Meter. 

Has NF- lOS/TA. ftlF-i05/TX. NF -10!^/ f 1 .NF-105/ir2, f^F- 105/T? . 

Covers WKhZ to lOOOMH;. 

ALL LQUtPrtENT CflRRV A 30 DAY i^UAftANTEE, 

EOOIPMEMT IS NOT CALIBRATED, 



TERMS: DOMESTIC: PfftflSrfl, CO-D. W CfgiJil Card 

f Ofleit^N; P*'4j3Sirt (Jflily, U.S. Fun*s. Mflney Ottlm. or taahierg Criecfc Only, 

CO.D." Acceptable by ter«phanB of mstl. PByment Frofn cuslomer will be bfy OBShi, Munfly Order, or Caat^iw's Ct^ck W« an SOrry 
tHit we cannot acN^pl pecsonal chactia lor CO.D.'s. CO. P. 'a sre ah>lppEid by aif only and niru United Parcel ServicB. 

C:OStFIFthirN^ OI^PtFIS: W^ v/cm\if fifvstst ihai cani\nn\rM cKders nni be s^ni arte^T a E&1eptTone f>rdQr has basf^ i^laiced. ir GDmpany 
policy ni^i^^^jtatB^ a fjocillimlnQ order, ^leag,« mark '"CONFirihtlNO" boLdlyon the order tf pfoblems or duplicate shiipf^nCS cc- 
tma due tp an ottiM A-hlcti la not prapefly manned, ttie custcxTi&r will be held regponsiibie fcir any ctiargss Incurred, p^us a tbVt 
(eDtcick -^rn^i-ge on the nfy|uri!>^ p^Mi. 

CneoiT CAIRQ& We ^re no^ moBpUrvi MaSTEJICaF^O, VISA, AnQ AMERICAN EXPRESS 

DATA SHEETS,: Wn«n hvb luue date Bheals ^n slock on devicea we will supply them with the CKder 

DEFECTIVl MATERIALS; All claims to d«l«;tive materials fnwit t* mada Wfthin 30 OAVg Bftor r&teipt of Ihe parcel. All ctainva 
mu5] intkrcto the dalectivo mafarifti (f^jr Iwiling pwrptMftii), A CiypY cF <ju' :ni*it*, SnJ ii I'ftlui'n ^mTiOr'JJ'i-l'iOi^ numEiar (prhcch mus( be 
obtained prior to stripping I he Witjrchifndtso bsck m ut. This tan be obiaiood iJt -talltno (602J ?4J^FIlEi or ge«dlnfl u^ e poalcard. 
Oue (6 Manutaclurer warranti-es we sie unebie to fapl^ciS Or issue ttedJI on items which hin^e Nw sol^Jared 1o ar haine lieen 
aJtWBd in ari^ way, AH return itofTis must be paChotl prtiUefly or ii wMI viM M witmiWtyi We cJo nrj! aesuma ffispctsslbJtlt^ for ship- 
^n^ atid hBrKJNng c^li^rgsti incurred 

PELfVERY; OfdarS Are usually ifihippmf Ih* MiTia (Qy thSV *r« p^sCijil Of Ihfr n^sitl' hu^lrtfiijis; (JAy, ynleae we are out of atacfc on aa 
ilom. T^^J tustofiwr will be nOdifiEO by [)OSI C&fd if ** *re goififl Lo imckOftJer th* itom Ot^ir ncwmal shipping methsrf is UPS or Ll.a 
l^^it ^kip^jridirrg n^n :$4ri^ of ih>J weiphi c^r ih^ p^^Jt^g^ T^H ^quipniAnl Is ship^^ied ofiif/ by all ard Ib rnstght coNecl, u^iees pfjcU 
?jr0r>geh'*Dnt5 have been maute <'inrl approvi^d 

FOAeigh dHDEH^ All EDteitjn orders mu^t be prepai-d wJlh a CaahLer'a Clwck, or Money Ordler madle out iti U.5, RUMOS ONLY 
W$ arQ eorry t^ui C.Q.D. h i^i av^itable lo rofelgn ceHjntfles and leltere pt crsdyi are unaccepHable es e term of paymenl. Fuilher 
infotmfltiijri is av9M*Dr« on rftfl«»e&L. 

HQUHS: Monday thru Fri^jaV S:30 l.n^. 10 ^^ p.m. :&ati,[Tday$ S:3d e.m to 4^ p.m.. 

tNSUnANCE,- PJease mclurie 25* fdr ejKh additional J 100.00 o«bt tlOO.OO. UPS OIMLY- Alfc irtSured 0*CHsg(« are sJilpped thru UPS 
[}n[y. i1 yD4i wish Id hava it ahipped th^ouj^ the post atUca [h6r« Is a E5.0O fe«i> wl^ich rS jHMi|iO«4i li^ llv« jei||jp|/ia, handling end 'n- 
suFanoe. 

OPEN ACCOUNTS: We regrel lhe( we do not laauB open aooourrts. 

ORDER FORMS: IVew cfder Jorma are Included with each rifder tor your cortveni-enoe. Additiorral Order rerOtS- At^- evall£til« on 
rBquest. 

PARTS: We reserve trie right to iubstlture or reprice ajiy Etem wHh a pan ot equal or comparable 
sp&cJficaLiDn, 

POSTAGE: M^nimjm shipping and handling in Ihe L/.S.. Canorfa, and MeKiti;jiS $3,00 fot'3r'OlJnctsh^p- 
nn^nts, all othet coui^tries is S5,50. Air ral-s^ ar$ ava^l^taie at tha time ot your order. Afl toreign orders 
please include 3&'^<i of rha ordarsd amount tor shipping and handling. C.O.D.'s ane shipped AtR 
ONLY. 

PREPAID ORDERS: Orders must be accompanied by a check, 

PRICES: Prices are Subject to change wilhoul oolice. 

PURCHASE ORDERS; We accept purcrrase orijer^ only whon th^/ ara accoHmpanied by a check, 

RESTOCK CHAHQES: ff parts ara raturned to MHZ ELECTRONICS, INC. due to customeT error, the 

custoinef will be held responsible foe all fees incurred and will b# charged a 15% RESTOCK 
Charge with the remainder in CREDIT ONLY. The follow I rig must accompar^y any return: A copy ot 
our invoice, return authorization number which musl be obtained prior to sUppping the fnercliiandise 
back, Returr^s tnu&l be done wHhin 10 DAYS of recatpt of parcel. Rflturn authorization numbers can 
be obtained by calling {602} 242-6916 or notifying uS by (MSl card. Relurn aiilhorliationa will not be 
qiven out on our 80C" number. 

SALES TAX: ARIZONA residents must add 6% safes tfijc. unless a signed ARIZONA resale Tax card 
is cut rendy on (iEe with us. All orders placed by persons outside of Afli3Z0NA, but delivered to per- 
sons in AHI20N,A are subject lo the 6"-'o sales tax. 

SHORTAGE OR DAMAGE: All ciaJms for shortages or damages musl be made within 5 DAYS of 
receipt of parcel. Claims musl fnclude a copy of our Invoicen aEong wUh a return authorization 
number which can be obtained by contacting us at (602) 242-8916 or sending a po&t card. Aulhoriza- 
tJons cannot ba on ogr SOO number. Ail itama musl l>e property packed. If itefns are not. properly 
packed maFte sure to contact the carrl:er so that they can come out and i^nspact the package before 
it is returned to us. Customers which do nol notify us *llhin this lime period will be: held responsible 
for the entire order as we will consider the order compiets. 

OUR 600 NUMBER i5 STRICTLY FOR ORDERS ONLY (SOO) 52S>OieO. INFOHMATION CALLS ARE 
TA KEN ON {602} 242-89 1 6 or (602) 242-3037 , 



maslHT cllArg^ 



I 




elect ^of^CJ|^ 



2111 W. CAMELBACK ROAD 
PHOENIX, ARIZONA 85015 



"All parts may be new or 

surplus^ and parts may be 
substitutGd wflti comparable parts 
If we are out of slock ot an item." 



Toll Fr99 Numbftr 
6O0-52a'018O 
(For orders only) 

For information call: (602) 242 3037 



PRICES SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE 



I 



p 



^ See List of Advertisers on page 98 



73 Magazine • October, 1984 97 



mm 



ADVERTISERS 



'Please contact these advertisers directly. 

To receive full information from our advert is^ 
ers please complete the postage-paid card. 



R. S. No. 



Page R. S. No. 



Page R.S. No. 



Page R. S. No. 



* AEA/Advanced Electronic 
Applications 16J7, 65, B2J09 

297 A.G.W. Enterprises, Inc 46 

20 AH Eisctranics .27 

* Amateuf Communications, Etc. 

19 

Amateur Electronic Supply .23,63 

334 Am idon Associates 107 

71 Applied Invention 107 

293 Arcomrri . . .,,,.,...* 14 

266 Azimuth Communications Corp. 

79 

Barker &Wi I i lamson., 64,64 

305 Barry Electronics .3! 

1 52 Bencher, Inc. . . * 19 

477 ailal Company .83 

295 filial Company 86 

Btll Ashby&Son . . . .107 

^ Butternut EtectmnJcs. . .50 

462 CESJnc 114 

290 CMC Communications, Inc. .... .67 

1 1 1 CeCo Communications , . ,105 

267 Colico Elect. p Inc , . , 61 

301 Com-Rad Industries .61 

1 4 Com m u n Icat ions Concepts, Inc. 

296 Communications Electronics . ..13 



15 Communications Specialists Jnc. 

■ ■■■ ■IK.H,J|^.«.HB. MB.BBB.BJ Bd BB BB KB B O y £7 

280 Computer frsder 1 03 

* Connect Systems, Inc .57 

2& Control Products Unftd SO 

* Crumtronics 71 

* dataLOG 71 

346 DataServ^ce 99 

425 Dcppler Systems . , .24 

* EGE 36 

400 Engineering Consutting ...... ..5Q 

99 Faxscan .4 

304 Fox-Tango Corporation . . , 73 

139 Fox -Tango Corporation 109 

269 GIB Electronics 105 

281 Glen Martin Engineering , 107 

352 Grove Enterprises 103 

167 1-1. Stewart Designs ..86 

31 HaJ-Tronjx .64 

271 Ham MasterTapes 35 

Ham RadioOutlet .3 

465 Hamtronics, NY 100 

266 Hamtronics, NY 110 

33 Hamtronics, NY 111 

Horizon Printing Co 99 

123 Hustler, Inc.. ., 4 

291 Hustier,lnc,. ,.107 



274 ICOM ..Cov.il 

486 ICOM ..,^^,. . . 101 

J. L Industries .87 

481 J, L Industries 100 

KLM Electronics . . 105 

165 K & S Enterprises . . , 69 

* Kantronlcs 47 

Kenwood .T.CovJV 

462 Larsen Antennas 100 

322 larsen Antennas . , . * ....... 37 

9 ^rj Enterprises ....,, .52, 53 

46 MHz Etectronlcs 68-97 

45 MadFson Electronics Supply 41 

54 Magnum Distributors, Inc. ....... IS 

49 Micro Control Specialties 61 

51 MIcrolog Corp 43 

Mirage Communications 42 

254 National Cocnm. Group . ....24 

412 Nemal Electronics 79 

137 NiJi&&Von& 71 

0/^jf h^agazine ... 78 

P. C, Electronics .64 

4 Parsec Communications ... 108 

306 Phlladelpliia Resins Corp. 19 

146 Public Domain 24 

277 RF Products .... 101 

61 Radio Amateur Ca/^boofr, inc. ... 109 
454 Radlokit 69 



BOOKS, etc. 



AMATEUR RADIO/ELECTRONICS TITLES 



MICROCOMPUTER TITLES 



Catalog n 

BK7307 
CT7305 
CT7306 
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CT73CX) 

LB7360 

LB7361 

LB7362 

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item 
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5 WPM Code Tape 

6 + WPM Code Tape 
13+ WPM Code Tape 
20+ WPM Code Tape 
25 + WPM Code Tape 
Code Tapes {any four abova) 
Contest Cooktxwk 

A Guide to Ham Radio 
Hobby Computers Are Heie 
Living on a Shoestring 
The Magic of Ham Radio 
The New Hobby Computers 
The New Weather Satellite 
Handbook 

Owner Repair of Radio Equipment 
Propagation Wizard's Handbook 
SSB. . .The Misunderstood Mode 
VHP Antenna Handbook 
Study Guide-Novice Class 
Study Guide^enerai Class 
Novice Study Tapes {Set of 3) 
Test Equip. Lib. V2— Audio Tester 
Test Equip. Lib. V3— Radio Equip. 
Test Equip. Lib. V4— IC Test Equip. 
Test Equip. Lib. VO— Vols. 2. 3, & 4 
World Re|:^eater Atlas 



Page 



268 Ramsey Eleclronics 113 

* Hoensch Iwticrowave 101 

500 73 

Bac¥, tssyes , , , .69 

Dealer Ad ,.,..*.. 109 

Maiilr^g List B7 

Moving ..... ........... .78, 37 

Subscriptions ...... .18,51,99 

6S S-F Amateur Radio Sales .,.. ... - 87 
68 Spectru m Communications . „ . . , 69 

436 Spectrum International ,46 

Spider Antenna ,24 

TheHam Shack . . 45 

104 Trlonyx, Inc. . , 23 

203 Unicom Electronics . . . .25 

300 Unidan Bearcat 5 

149 UniqufeComm. Cofp^ »..,.. ^ 99 

179 Universal Electronics 49 

* University Microfilms ,,.,....... 99 

*• Vid-Com..... 71 

" W.H. Nail Company .99 

" W9rNN Antennas .71 



79 


Wacom Products .50 


80 


Western Radio Electronics 99 


t: 


Wheeler Applied Research Lab 




99 


m 


Williams Radio Sales 99 


83 


Yaesu Electronics Gov. Ill 



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BK73S4 


Annotated BASIC Vol. t 


10.95 


4.96 


BK73S5 


Annotated BASIC Vol. 2 


10.95 


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Inside Your Computer 


12.97 


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Introduction to THS-80 Data Files 


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The Select ric^M interface 


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Some of the Best from Kilobaud 


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BX1001 


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15.95 
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SHIPPING AMD HAN- 
DLING: $1,50 for the first 
book. $1.00 for each addi- 
tional book for US delivery 
and foreign surface, 
$10.00 per book for for- 
eign airmail. Orders pay- 
able in US dollars only. 

Complete the postage 
paid card, or itemize your 
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complete credit card In- 
formation (Include post- 
age and handling) to: WG 
Books, ATTN. Retail 
Sales, Rte. 101 and Elm 
St., PetertMTOugh, NH 
03458. 



98 73 Magazine • October, 1984 



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Send SASE for samples & 

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MICROWAVE PREAMPUFIERS 

Ampire 1690N: 

• 1.eto 1.8 GHz 

• 25 dB gain 

• 3.0 dB notse figure 

• N connectors standard 

• Use on GOES & f^ETEOSAT systems 

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• 2.0 to 2.6 GHz 

• 20 dB gain 

• 3,5 dB noise figure 

• BNC connectors standard 

• DC & RF cables included 

• Use with microwave TV converters 

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300 NoflhZeeb Road 
Dept P.R- 

AfinAfbor.Mt 46106 
U.S.A. 



18 Bedford Row 
Depl. PR. 
London, WC1R4E J 
England 



EGBERT ][+ 
RTTY-CW-XFER 

for the Apple II, II+, Me 
Transmit A Receive with Software Only 

NO TU REQUIRED 

The Egbert )[+ has RTTY/CW/XFER 
on the same disk! and features: split 
screen operation, type ahead buffer, se- 
lectable mark, space, shift and speed, 
change modes and speeds from menu, 
mailbo)( with selective call and save to 
disk. Provisions for up to 9 canned 
messages on each data disk, and much 
more. 

FOR MORE tNFO, ORORDER CALL OR 
WRITE: 

W.H. HAIL COMPANY 

275 Lodgeview Drive 
Oroville, Ca. 95965 
M/C (916)589-2043 yfSA 

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Telephones & Accessories 



AT LOWEST 
PRICES 

• Cordless Phones 

• Memory Phones 

• Answerers 

• Dialers 

• Hardware 

• Speaker Phones 

• Coll Diverters 

• Feature Phones 

Send $2.00 for 
Complete Catolog 




i 



UNIQUE COMMUNICATIONS, INC. 

tei E Longvrav^ P O Bo* 5234 

Mansfield. Ohio 44901 



*^ See List of Advertisers on psge 9S 



73 Magazine * October, 1984 99 



A/EIV PRODUCTS 



LARSEN NMO ANTENNAS, 
PaK MOUNTING KITS 

The L2r&«n PQ-K rrKHtntlng kit features 
SO-239-9tyl« mounting har<iware that can 
be ir^talled entirety from outside the vetih 
cle- The PO Sfties mount looks like the 
80-239 cofir>ectof {3ometliT^«$ catle^ a f«- 
male UHF conr^ector). but untike the 
S0239, It can be installed Irofn outside 
the vehicle- Its two O rings and wm gasket 
offer super moiaiuf« $«allng. 

Larsen^s PO-K ificlude$ complete 
mounting lut arid coax: the POB contains 
mounting hardware only. 

Larsen NMO series aniennos offer iiTh 
proved weather prelection. Jtm improved 
NMO co^i features an extra Up around the 
botiom, providing a place for an O ring. 
The rirtg surrounds itie threads itiai tight* 
en to lh«e vehicle surface, ellfninat^ng the 
charges thai water rrvay t>e drawn through 
the threads arKi decrease performance or 
corrode mounting hardware. 

All NMQ series VHF and UHF products 
nom incJude this €har%ge. LM and NLA se- 
ries are equipped wHh a neoprene gasket 




Larsmt NMO anSennA base and weather 
ssaling O rmg. 




arourtd mounting hardware fof a weather- 
tight seal. 

For more intormatiOf>, cof^tact Lerse/7 
Btectfonics, PO Box 1799, Vancouver WA 
9dMS: (2Q6h573-2722. Reader Service 
numtief 4B2- 




A Lsrs&n NMO antenna. 

ANTUNER AND HAM-ANTUNER 

J. L Industries has introduced An tuner, 
an automatic antenna tuner with no mov- 
ing parts. Antuner covers a wide spectrum 
of frequencies from .1 MHz to 100 MHz. An 





Jf>§ BtKM Jtck porfsble mo(tiilsNei0pfione isck ^ftaoAmefif for ctfmpat^ ff/ecommuni- 
Ctff/ons. 



The Tratfsi-Trap surge prot&ctor from 
CutMWAy cf larsen PO-K ant&nna mount. Atpha O^fta Communications, Inc. 

100 73 Magazine * October, 1984 



antenna system with Anturket in which 50 
feet of wire ts attached to fhe hot ervl of 
ttie unit and a minfmum of 25 feet is at- 
tached to 11^ ground siOe of the unit will 
produce an swr of no higtver ttian 1j5 to 1. 
For frequencies attove 12 MHXt it rareJy eat- 
ceeds r2 lo l. 

To achieve these resuils, Antuner incor- 
porates the use of sophisticated circuitry 
for tuning as well as inpyt*impedance star 
Ulizatlon. Ail this Is accomplished t>y the 
use of a three^pon circulator. The system 
ts phased so that there is minimal attenu- 
ation In ttie feed tfirection and a much 
greater atienuaiion in the reverse dlrec- 
lion. Currents in itie feed direction induce 
currents in the windings thai are in phase, 
wNle cuf rents in the reverse direction \n- 
duce currents that are out of please. A 
widel>and jnstanianeous antenna tuner 
without moving parts is the result. Com- 
pletely passive, it Is an efficient coupling 
system for an asymmetrical dipole anten- 
na. If desired, a long wire coutd he con- 
nected to the hoi end of Aniuner and a 
good ground to the ground side of Antun- 
er'. Antuner can be usod for marine instal 
latlcn^ (salltToals and c^ommerdal ships), 
oil rigs, ham radio for airplanes, and tor 
special situations in which uriobtrusfve 
horizontal antennas are needed. 

The Antuner can handle 1D00 Watts 
PEP. A 300 Wall version, called the Ham- 
Ant uner, is also available. 

For more information, contact J. L //^ 
tfwsff/es. PO Box 547. HaffanUale FL 
33009: 0O5}-4586O94. Reader Service 
number 481. 

SURGE PROTECTOR 
FROM ALPHA DELTA 

The new Alpha Delta CommunlGations, 
Irfec , Model ACTT ac Trans i-Trap^"^ is a 
direct ptug-irvthe-wajl ac surge protector 
which includes two 120'V-ac sockets, sta^ 
lus lighK circuit breaker, and a unique 3- 
Stage automatic surge-protection clrcuiL 

Tlw Model ACTT ptovides both trans- 
verse- and common-mode protoctton with 
ft hot-tofieutral. neutralto-ground, ar»d hot- 
tOijiound eOOO-volt, 2000 Amp surge dis- 
charge seitrestorir^ hlgh^pMd circuit. 
[Several typical competitive devices use 
only a sirtgle-stage. 100- Amp protector.) 

TT»e conliguraiioo of ttve Model ACTT 
also protects equipment plugged tnio any 
otr^ef cominorvbranch ac wall outlet down 
line from tt*e ACTT, 

Ibe unit is UL listed and is available at 
Alpha Detta dealers or tflrect tram ttie 
manufacturer. 

For more ctetalls. contact Afpha Dsfta 
Cammunicaiiofts, Iftc.^ PO Box S?^, Cen- 
tervm OH 454^9; (SJ3H3^T?Z Reader 
Service number 47^. 



PORTABLE MODULAR 

JACK FOR MODEMS 

The Mioroperiptreral Corporation has 
anc^unced a r^ew portable rtioduUir4ele~ 
phorie jach attachmeitt for computer tele- 
communications. The product is mar* 
keted under the trade name Black 

The Black Jack solves telephone ami 
computer Interface problems encoun- 
tefed tiy growing numt>ers of portabfe- 
computer owners and dtrect^connect mo- 
dem users. Most hotels, offices, and other 
locations from which computerized tele- 
communications are desirable and neces- 
sary do not have modular {BJ11C) (acks. 
Unless special equipment is installed or 
the butlty old-fashioned carbon acoustical 
coupler cups are used, telecommun tea* 
tions are not an option from many lo* 
cations. 

The Black Jack is constructed ol rubber 
with a built-in circuit card and modular 
jack. Its unfque connectors make it com- 
pat ithte with sinsle-or multi-line telephone 
handsets such as I hose manufactured by 
Sell, ITT, and GTE. The unit requires no 
power. Modems equipped with touch* 
tone^'^ dialing may dial directly through 
the Biack Jack Pulse dialing is accom- 
plished on the telephone Set Itself. 

In addition to solving the problems 
associated with hard-wired telephorves 
lacking modular jacks, the Black Jack 
eliminates the loss of line sensitivity as- 
sociated with the use of acoustical cou^ 
piers. The new direct-con nect modems 
result in sensitivity gains of approximate- 
ty 20 dB Qvef the otd-tashioned acoustical 
couplings. The Black Jack lets the modem 
user keep these iine-sensHIvily gains 
white improving telecommunications per- 
form aj^cei 

For additional informal ion. contact The 
MieToperiptierat Cotporatioa^ 2SK f52/icf 
Avenue ATE ReitmomS WA 9eOS2; (20^ 
S8t-7544. Router Service numbef 4d3. 

HAMTRONICS OUTDOOR 

SCANNER ANTENNA 

Hamtronics. Inc., a manufacturer of 
tow-r>Qdse receiving etfuipment lor an^a- 
teur raftio, has anrwunced a new antefina 
for scanner and monitor buffs to serve a 
need for a scanner antenna which is halt< 
way between a buitt-in whip on a scanrher 
and a large oulffoor ant^tna fequiring 
roof mounting wtlh some son ol mast »- 
rang^iient Hamtronics h^i dWMQnad a 
compact 'Power Antenna" which may txi 
Instalied easily on the side of a house, 
outside a window, in an at1rc» etc-^ without 
any special mast o<r brackets. 




Casficrafrs new amateur sat»ifite antenna system. 



The ACT-1 Powef Aniefin^ ts a broad- 

anipl^rier in its iia$«. AlthcHjgfi much 
umaUet than a full size otitdoof anienna 
(25 inches tall), it prg>yides good coverage 
of distant signals and js capable ol out- 
performing larger antennas because of 
Ihe active booster amplifier. The built-in 
preamp has a gain of up to IS dB, 

A kMHioise microwave transistof in the 
pceamp cover$ ffom 30 MHz througli ttve 
new 800-MHz bafid. and it covets low- 
band^ higivband, and UHF, M is a good 
oiiTdoor antenna for The 800^ Hz band. 
The probi^em of large Fosses in> ihe coax 
cable is solved by the amplifying of the 
weak aignat from the antenna before the 
coax cabte run can degrade ^1. There 1$ a 
benefit from this effect even on UHF and 
VHP reception. In this regard, the ACT-1 
ca^n outpeiforrri ant outd^oor antenna w^ith a 
separate pfeamp at the radio^ 

The simile installation required for an 
ACT-1 antenna and ttie fact that It is shipp^ 
fully assembled make it easy to impfove 
on the performance of radio-mounted 
whips. Four wood screws mount it to any 
flat vertical surface. The 5Q-foat cabEe 
plugs directly Into the "antenna" and 
''12V" facks on the rear of most scanner 
radiCA, If your partkytar scannef doesn't 
have a 12-V terminer, a srmpje 12-V-clc 
plug-In adaptef i$ available, 

Fof mofe information, contact Ham- 
ffonics. Inc.. ^~f Mout Road. Hitton NY 
J44m9535; (716^392-9430. A complete 
catalog is also available for pufchaae. 
fleader Service number 405. 



CUSHCRAFT SATELLITE 
ANTEKNA SYSTEM 

Cushcraft has introduced a new com- 
plete amateur satelHle antenna system 
featuring two nigh-galn, circularly-polar- 
ized yagi an ten n as. The 70-cm, 1&elamen.t 
uplink and 2^neter, 20-element downlink 
antennas are fixed to a common mounting 
boom. The entire array is lightweight with 
reasonable dirr^ension^ lor quick inslal- 
lat^oa 

For more information, contact Ciisfh 
Cfaff Corporation, PQ Box 4680, Manches- 
ter NH 03706: m3}^7 7$77; t^tex 953^?5^ 
Cvsfisig Man. Reader Service numt>er 480. 






The' fC-27H 2-meter mobfte transceiver from Icom. 



* — ^'' — * ■ ^ ' ^ 



An antenna tower constructed with 
FfsmsMaker damps. 



BUrLD YOUR OWN TOWER 

WITH FRAMEMAKER CLAMPS 

Build a sturdy, pfofessionat-loohtng 
tower for a TV. CB, of hanvfadio antenna 
out of aTmmon 3/4-inch electrical conduit 
and plated-steef FrameMakef Clamps. 

The only tools needed are a hacksaw (or 
tube culterj to cut the conduit and a cou- 
pie of wrenches. Conduit sections are 
simply placed into the openings of the 
clamps, and the plated nuts and bolts are 
lightened, loc^ir^ the ctamp jaws secure^ 
ly a/ound the condi/ilr 

To «votd the pitfaiis of "on&ciamp- 
doesalt" designs, s^eral kirhds of Frame- 
Maker clamps are mad^^: 4 way fixed and 
adjustable. 3-way T, 2 way adjustable, and 
paralleL No locking collars or sat screws 
are needed to prevent slippage. Unlike 
towers whose lolnts are welded or brazed, 
a tower made wJth FrameMaker clamps 
can easily be taken down, and the clamps 
ar^I conduit can be used to bulJid any num- 
bcf of other projects. 

Frem protect idea brochure is available 
from B<iy/seye Products, Dopi DY. 2BS06 
Hayes. Ros&vftte Mi 48066. Reader Service 
number 479. 



IC-27H 

Icom has introduced another in its line 
of ultra-compact mot>iles: the IC-27ti 
45-Wa|1, 2-rneter rr>ob4ie transceivet. 

Standard features include compact 
si]» (1-5/8 H X 5-t/2^"W K ^^fS'Dl butlt- 
in Interr^t speaker for easy mount i^ng^ 
nine full function memories, S2 buitt-ln 
PL^M frequencies, iC-HM23 DTWF micro- 
phone with up,/down scan buttons^ three 



scannir^ (unctions (mennofy scan, band 
scan, ar^ prFOrity sf^ani internal lithium- 
battery menriory t>acltgp to maintain mefn- 
orres tor up to Trve years, and the IC-I4B27 
niobile mount. 

A variety of options are also available, 
including an IC-UTie speech syntheS'l^er 
and IC SP4 and SP5 external speakers. 

For more Informal Ion, contact icom 
America, inc^, 2712 ri6th Ave. NE. Betie- 
vue WA 96004. Reader Sen^ice numtief 486. 

ANTENNA DESIGN SOFTWARE 

Smith Software Systems has released 
their fatest haiivf elated software pacMage 
for the Apple Jl-i- ar>d lie computers. Arv 
tenna Design Software ^s a meniKlrLven 
program composed ot twenty-sEx submod- 
ules to help m the design of HFA^HF/UHF 
antennas and transmission lines. 

CapaJt^ilities include design of antenna 
types such as dipote. folded dipole. verth 
cat, long wire. 2- and 3-elflfneni quad, para- 
bolic dish, and loop. Help is atso provided 
with calculaling feed line losses, phasing 
lin^. transmissiorvlir^e traris formers, and 
swr. There are also several related topics 
such as propagation and component 
design. 

The package was developed with the 
newcomer to ham radio and computers In 
mind, but it w^ if be an eKcellent asset to 
the expert in helping with long and tadi* 
ous calculations. The package inclu^fes a 
diskette (not copy protected) and an ex- 
tensive user's manuat. 

For additionai infofmatton, contact 
Smitfr SoftwarB Systems. 3767 Go/d Spffng 
Creanjery Road. Doytestown PA 1S9Qt. 
Reader Service number 4Q4. 



f 



MICROWAVE TEST EQUIPMENT 



RMSG Signal Generators 
Manual tuning • 8-30 
VOC input power • 
1 to 7 volt (except 
gri^aier than 6 voU for -7^ 
output to tuned 50 otim detector. 




RMSG 

• ) 

-3 

S 

-7 



Freq (GHZ} 
3 7 4 2 

2 3 7 45 



Electrical 
Tune |MH7) 

30 
6 
6 
10 10 t 



PHce 
S6T Ig 

$6t ie 

^1 20 



RMVO Votage Tuned Oscillators 

'2 V bias • 'I to -12 V, tuning • 1" X 

IV?" PCB 

rniVO Fre<| (GHZ| Pffi» 

! 2 1-25 «24 9& 

■2 IS -2 1 $;a4 95 



ROENSCH MICROWAVE 

R B \. Box t56B. PH at6-963-2&50 
BROOK FIELD. MISSOURI 64628 




— 'UP YOUR ERP — 

fot HI owners operating mside a vehicle and wantir^g 
incfeased T/R fange, RF PRODUCTS has the low cost 
solution. 

Remove your BNC antenna from Ihe NT ar\d mount or> 
the RF PRODUCTS BNC magnet mount, mstail the magnet 
mount on the roof lop and connect the BNC co^ax connector, 

The magnet mount (part no 199-445^ has 10 feet of small 
(5/32*) CO ax with BNC connector attached and is priced at 
$15 95 {including shipping by UPS to 48 states) 
TO ORDER - send SI 5.95 money order or cashiers checit only 

Fla. residents add 5% tax, for air UPS add SI. 50 



The F^ PROD UCT S M a gn el Mou nts are one ot the few m a gnet ic an tenna mou nts a vai lab Ie 
that can be r epai red should ( he co-ax cable be damaged. T1^ ca-ax cat^ connector mci udes 
a shrink tubing strain relief for long life at the con nee tor /'ca We Sex point (an RF PRODUCTS 
e^tdusive on all cal>ie assemblies^ 

Eight ot he r mode Is a va i labie with three each choice of a rrtenna co n n ec lOfs, co-a x types an d 
transceiver connectors (BNG, 1-1/8-18, 5/16-24 & RG-122U, HG-bSAlU, mini 6X & BNC, 
PL-259, type N). 




RF PRODUCTS 

RO, Bojf 3a Rockiedge. FL32B5S. U.S.A. (305) 63 1 0775 



$^^17 



1 



1 



^ S«« List of Adyeriisers on page 98 



73 Magazine • October, 1984 101 



comm 



Robert Baker WB2GFE 
t5 Windsor Or. 
Atco NJ 08004 

COLUMBUS DAY 

IffTERNATIONAL DX CONTEST 

Starts: 1200 GMT October 13 

Ends: 2400 GMT October 14 

THe f ifat DX contast In cofnmomoralion 
oi ColirmtKJS Day mHI be sponsored by ttte 
Mtanii Havana Uori:9 Club. The official 
contest opefatoce will l<tontlfy thefn&etv«9 
with Itwlr OR'^, call sign, and with the^f of^ 
Mai number as coniest opefatora, Sufh 
gnted frequencies wJll be US amamur 
teflds In 10, 15, 20. 40. a^id 80 metera, 
phone and CW. 

An amateur station making Mva coo 
ttcts with otflcial radlociub DX moinA^ef 
O p W H t O f t during ihe two days will be ellgl^ 
bie to apply for the Miami Havana Lions 
Club OSL Award. Contacts with olficial 
operalQfs must be made during (tie con- 
test period, exchanglrig RSfT) and QTH. 
Enf^ish, Spanish, and Portuguese lan- 
guages will be used. 

SWLa may also appjy for Ihts award on 
a tieard basis. Send OSLs or log along 
with SEOO In US funds or 6 IRCs for mi a 
apeqlal award to: Miami Havana Uon$ 
Ciub. Columbus Day Internalional OX 
Contest. Bo3c 674, Miami FL 33155. 

At the start of the contest, memlwrs of 
the contest committee will read the 
n«nie« and assigned numbers of the offi- 
cial operators on the followinQ trequan- 
cles; ?230, 14250. 21250. and 28915. 

RIO CW OX PARTY 

Starts: 1500 GMT October 13 

Ends: 1500 GMT October 14 

Sponsored by the Plca-Pau Carl oca (Rio 
Wood pec kera CW Group), PO Box 2673, 
20001 Rio d« Jarvairo, RJ, Brazil (with the 
cooperation of all other Breiiiiart CW 
grcups)^ The pyrpose is to prormote 2-way 
CW contecte between Bra^Jlian and OX 
stations, enabJino Ox st el ions lo obiain 
QSi-9 vaiid for s^everal Bfa^iltan Awarda. 
The event is held twice each year on tha 
last full weekend in March and the second 
full woel<end In October. 

The general call is '*0Q B\0 DX PTY"". 
Use all HF amaleuf bands within your own 
atation-licenge authcflty. Exchange RST, 
name ar>d OTH. There aie no logs, but 
quick OSUng (via bureau Of direct; Is 
e&9entiaU 

Reference ffequencles are as follows: 
3510/3520. 7{l20f70aO« 14030/1 4050, 
21030/21050. 21130/21150, and 28030/ 



FREQUENCtES: 

Ptione— 1SI0, 3929, 7260, 14300, 21370, 
and 28800; CW— 60 kH^ uf^ f rtim bottom of 
eiach istdvice band; VHF— contacts on 
simptex only, excluding 146.52. 

SCORiNQ: 

Count orw point per QSO. Of! statioris 
muUipiy QSO points by the sunf) of states, 
provinces, countries, and OR counties. All 
others muttipiy by the sum of Oft count lee 
worked {38 maximum)^ 

EfiTRlES AND AWARDS: 

All efitiles must have a log and sunv 
mary sheet, and if rriore than 200 contacts 
are made, a dupe slieet shqukt be included 
Entries may be disq^ualified if logs are in^ 
complete or loo many errors ajre ctetectetL 
You must sign ttie summary stieet stating 
that yc»j observed all iUe rules. You may 
photocopy log and dupe sheets or you 
may obtain extras from thie HAfiC (please 
send SASE), l^ogs must l» received buy No- 
ver^bef I2th and shoutd be addressed to 
tine Hemiiston Amateur Radio Oub.^ PO 
Box 962, Nermjston OR 97e3B Include a 
lafge SAS£ for a copy of the reeuita. 

RHODE ISLAND QSO PARTY 
1700 GMT October 1 a 

to 0500 QMT October 14 
1300 GMT October 14 

to 01O0 GMT October 15 

This contest Is sponsored by the Eaat 
Bay Amateur Wireless Association. Rl 
stations worK other Rl stations and tho 
reat of the world, AH others work only Rl 
stations. The same station may be wori^ed 
twice on each band: once on phone and 
once on CW, 

EXCHANGE: 
RS(n and state j province^ country, or Rl 

FHEQUENCiES: 

Phone-3900, 7260. 14300. 21360. 
2S600, 50.110, 144.2. and 146.52: 
CW-iaiO, 3550, 3710, 7050, 7110, 14060, 



21050, 21110, 28050, and 28110. Use FM 
simplex; no repealers. 

SCORING: 

Ali Station* score 2 points per phone 
QSO, 3 points per CW QSO, and 5 points 
to4 QSOa with Novices and Tech n lei ar\s. 
Rl stations multiply QSO points by the 
number of states, provinces, ar»d coun- 
tries wprlted. Others multiply total QSO 
points by the number of different H\ cities 
and towns worked (39 maximum). 

AWARDS: 

Certificates awarded to top-scofing sta- 
than In eacti state, pfovlnce. country, and 
Rl county; plus top-scofing Novice and 
Tectmician in Bl and out of state. There 
will a.lso be a ceftiftcate for the lop Bl 
rmilti^opefator station. 

ENTRIES: 

Log* must show datelime in GMT, cait, 
exchange, t«nd. and mode. Inctude your 
n«me, call, mailing address, club afftlka^ 
Uon If any. total OSO points, multipliefB 
claimed, and final score. Entftes must be 
postmarked no later thar) Novembei 15th 
and should be sent to East Bay Amateur 
Wireless Associafior\. PO Box 392. Wanen 
Ri O^SSS. incli>cte an SASE for resulis. 



MARYLAND-DISTRICT 

OF COLUMBIA QSO PARTY 

Starts: 1800 GMT October 13 

Ends: 2100 GMT October 14 

Sponsored by the Columbia Amateur 
Radio Association, the contest is open to 
ali sirtgieoperator stations. The same sta- 
tion may be wofked on each band and 
mode, 

EXCHANGE: 

QSO number; RSfT); and state, prov- 
irwe, country; or MO county. Remember 
that Baltimore and Washington are inde- 
pendent citiest 

SCORfNQ: 

MDC Stations multiply toiai OSOs by 
sum of MD counties, states* provinces, 
and countries. Others multiply MDC QSO 
tctai by number of MD counties and inde- 
pendent cities (25 maximum). Also, muLtU 
ply score by 1.& If running 200 Watts or 
less. 

FREQUENCIES: 
Phone-3350, 7250. t4290, 21390, and 



OREGON QSO PARTY 
1700 GMT October 13 

to OaOO GMT October 14 
1S00 GMT October 14 

to 0000 GMT October 15 

Tlie Hermistor* Amateur Radio Club irv 
vitoi all arTtateura to parlicipate in the 
OfBoon OSO Party. Each station may be 
worked once pef band artd ofice per rrwde 
Cfoosband ar>d cfossmode controls are 
not permitlsd. 

EXCHANGE: 

Slignoj repoft and state, pr^ince, coun- 
try, or OR county. 

102 73 Magazine • October, 19S4 





ALENDAR 

ARRL QSO Piny— CW 


Oct 13*14 


ARRL QSO Party— Ptiona 


Oct 13-14 


Rio CW DX Party 


Oct 13-14 


ColumtMJS Day IfvtematJonai DX Contest 


Od 13-14 


Marytand-DC OSO Party 


Od 13-15 


OfiQcm OSO Party 


Od 13-15 


Rhoii Island OSO Party 


Od 20-21 


JamtMfee on the Air 


Od 20-21 


Worlced AJI Y2 Contaet ! 


Od 20-21 


CLARA Aci1>c Contest 


Od27-2S 


CO Weddwtdft DX^PtkHie 


Nov 3 


PARC Cocona 10^M«tar RTTY Conlati M 


No«3-4 


ARRL Sweeps tskes—CW 


N<n1t 


fanemational OK DX Contest 


Not 17-11 


ARRL Sweepstakes— Phone 


Nov 24*25 


CQ WoHdwfde DX— CW 


D«1-2 


ARRL 160M»eter Corkiest 


Dec 8-9 


ARRL l&Mpter Cofltest 


Dec 2e- J an 1 


ORP Winter Sporti-CW 


Dec 30 


CinMla Corrteet 


Jan 12-1S 


Hunting Ltons In Eh« Air CorrleBt 



2B590; CM— 60 kHz up from low end; Nov- 
lce-3720, 7120, 21 120, and 28120. 

AWARDS AND ENTRIES: 

Maintain a continuous log for phor>e 
and CW. ibut Indicate on entry which cate- 
gory (phone, CW^ or mixed) you are enter- 
ing. Certificates for top scorers in each 
category will be awarded. Mall logs, dupe 
sheets (for over 200 contacts), ar\d sumr 
mary by Novemtjer 30th to CARA, c/o Rob* 
eft K. Nauman WA2VUQ, 4017 Font HDI 
Drtve, Ellicott City MD 21041. 



JAMBOREE ON THE AIR 

0001 Local Time October 20 

to 24O0 Local Time October 21 

JOTA is Scoullng's annual ham-radio 
event, heki during the third weeleeFKl o1 
OctOiber. This Is tt>e 27th ye«r ft has been 
held, writh thousands of stations around 
the globe participating. It pfopagaiion fa 
right, ^t is comjnon to work Scouting 
DXCC. In past JOT As, Scouts in some 
remote areas bike Antarctica^ Ascension 
island, Christmas island, Gough^ and 
Seychelles wens hteard, 

in the USA, many Seoul Councils and 
Districts hold camporees to ooinci<!e with 
JOTA. Hams set up Fleld-Day-type oper^ 
atione. ghrfng campefs a chance to ex- 
change greetings with Scouts every- 
where. 

Generalty, the exchanpes inctude typl^ 
caJ information If^e r>ame, QTH, Scout 
rank, tiols^ies, etc, with some leading to 
long-las tir»g pen-pai friendships and the 
exchange of photos, badges, and patcff- 
es. SSTV arvd ATV give some a chance to 
have a 'look-see'' at the other guy Other 
OSOs reported were via RTTY, EME, and 
even OSCAR. 

Look for K2BSA (the BSA i-ieadquerters 
station in Dallas TX), HBdS (the World 
Scout Headquarters in Switjterland), and 
for other special call signs from many 
Countries. 

Boy Scouts and Girl Scouts of all ages, 
Scouters, former members,, ham radio op- 
erators, and anyone Interested in doing a 
good turn for Scouting and ham radio are 
invited to participate. The contest period 
is given in local time, though some actlvl' 
ty flops over from Friday to Monday lo 
take advantage of DX time ditferences. 

Suggested frequencies are 3690, 7030, 
14070, 21140, and 28190 on CW; 3940, 
7290, 14290, 21360 and 2d990 on phone: 
RTTY. SSTV, and ATV on usual frequent 
etes. Check the Novice frequencies and 
please move off tt^ese calling frequencies 
to avoid QRM. 

No reports ir^ (tie form of logs are neces- 
sary, ^3 Is realiy not a contest. Exctiangea 
should be relaxed and relate to Scouting 
and ham radio as mucti as possitHe. Brief 
reports, however, are appreciated, giving 
Scout unit nunr>biers. ham calls used and 
hteerd/worked, numt>er^ ot paitici pants, 
tnteres^irvg incidents ar>d exchanges, etc. 
Photos with eapl forts especiaily welcome 
for the SSA repon lo the Woitd Bureau. 
Send them to JOTA t>>ordlnator W2GN0, 
2t6 Mas well Ave., Hightstown NJ 06520. 

Eladio amateute are encouraged lo in- 
vite Scouts or eyen Scout units lo theif 
shacks. If you do not know any, contact 
your tocaJ Scout office for ttie nanr>e ot the 
unil deader in your area. You or your redto 
club may volunteer to participate in a dls* 
trict or council campofee that weelsend, 
Pnor>e books list couricii offices as Boy 
Scouts of America. Call "CO Jamboree" 
or respond to such calls and observe all 
FCC reQuiations. Cufisider a fox h#tt for 
more fun. 

if you are not a ham or do not have one 
I fb your unit, contact one in yowr af ea lor 



help. If yoij need help finding one, contact 
Loo Kluger, American Radio Relay 
League, 2Zb Main St., Newington CT 
D6111. Make raports as Indicated above, 
coordinating with yotif ham tiejpdr. 

Ceftlflcata c«rds the size of a postcaitl 
M6 avaitabit to anyone participating in 
any way. They may t>e ordered beforehand 
for pf^esontation during J OTA or they may 
be a: warded at Scout or club meeting:? 
later^ Seind TwqtmtH to Jamboree On The 
Alf. 13^ WalniJt HIIL Irving TX 75062. 
along witti an SASE larQe wiot^ to hoJd 
lh« cards ofxIerBd Affix postage al 20 
cants ^Of the first 20 cards and 1 7 cents for 
each 8 QSr4^ thereafter, 

A temporary insignia to wear on ttie 
Scout uniform or on jackets Is av^ifab^e at 
Si -25 from the TX address atx>ve. Sepa- 
rate ordefs for certificates and patches 
will gel them to you faster. 

The World Scout Bureau, sponsor of 
J OTA, holds a QSl card contest with 5 
prizes for the best handmade cards and 5 
prizes for the best printed cards. Entries 
must be designed by registered Scouts 
(bioy or giri| 1i years of age or less. They 
must be In standard postcard size and be 
marked on the t>ack with name, age. Scout 
unit, and full home address (Include USA), 
Send entries to JOT A QSL Cont^t, Wof Id 
Seoul Bureau, PO Box 78, 1211 Geneva 4. 
Switzerland. They must be received by De- 
cembef 31st arKi er^lries will not be re- 
turned. Winners will be notified by March 
91st. t| would t>eip if radio amateurs would 
Syggesi ideas about OSL<ard design, in- 
cMf rig Scoirt and tiam-radio caftoons, eic 



WORKED ALL Y2 CONTEST 

Starts: 15O0: GMT October 20 

Ends: 1$00 GMT October 21 

The Radiociu5 of the German Demo- 
cratic Reput>li€ (RKQDR) Is pleased to In- 
vite radio amateurs a^l over the world to 
participate In and commemorate the anni- 
versary of the founding of the German 
Democratic Republic. Opefating sections 
Include single- and multj -opera tor sta- 
tions as well aa SWLs, Each Y2 station 
may be worked once per band on phone 
and once per band an cw. 

EXCHANGE: 
RSfT) piu& serial nu mb»er starting at 001, 



RESULTS 

1964 TWD-UND OSO PAHTY 



Caft 

MC2V 
W2B2IM 

wA29@eM 

K2HFV 
N2CQ 

AB2W 



VVB3IPX 
K2DNN 
K2PF 
W2CC 



KA1CLV 

W5WG 

WBRYP 

N*CLV 

K1VUT 

W6NR 

WA7FKD 

KilHQE 

KSifiG 

K5KIR 

W31JT 

KA7T 



County 

SalefD N4 
Various 
Various HJ 
Gloucester H4 
GlDucest^ NJ 
Gtoucester NJ 
Mercer NY 
CayufiaNY 
Chemung NY 
Somerset NJ 
Bergen NJ 



MA 

OH 

KS 

MA 

TX 

WY 

lA 

Wl 

Mt 

WV 

ID 



In Two-laTid 
OSOft QSO Pojnls 
1290 



§18 

t3S 

84 

102 

63 

$1 

56 

30 

2^ 

9 

1 



413 

2sa 

216 

1^ 

1QS 

112 

79 

m 

25 
2 



Outside Two- Land 



27 

29 
21 
29 
18 
10 
10 

e 

7 

e 

5 

6 



81 
60 
63 
75 
47 
30 

w 

18 
14 
18 
10 

a 



MultipliefS 

1^ 
41 
54 
5S 
40 
32 
26 
19 
19 

e 

1 



21 

t9 

18 

17 

15 

10 

7 

Q 

7 

5 

5 

3 



Score 

249,480 
16,933 
I3,a06 
12,528 

931 
3,466 
2;912 
1^1 
1,140 
ISO 
Z 



1,701 

1,140 

1,13^ 

1,275 

705 

300 

210 

106 



90 

50 
27 



Y2 Stations will 9er>d a fw&<J7glt number 
Of "Kreiskenner^' instead of a OSO 

IHJmtNSf. 

fBBQUBNClES: 

Um all aiTtateur bands, 3J thru 29 MHz, 
wim tru first 10 en<S last 25 kHz of the 3.5- 
and 14-MHz bands to remain contests ree. 

SCOfUNB: 

Count 3 points per Y2 QSO. Multiplier Is 
the sum of the number of different Y2 dis- 
tricts worked on eacti band (maximum of 
15 per band). The districts are Indicated by 
the last letter of the call. Final ^core is the 
sum of QSO points multiplied by the total 
mulUpiier. 

SWI^ count 1 point on phone and 3 
points on CW lor each Y2 call witli sent 



RS^. 2-digit nunriier, and cail of station 
worked with tt>e YZ. 



AWAf^DS: 

Certificates awarded to the leadpng sla^ 
tlons In each section of eact> country. 

ENTRIES: 

Separated logs are required for each 
band. Summary sheet showing multlptter 
and QSO worked on each t>and also re- 
quired. Each log must be accompanied by 
the following signed and dated declara- 
tion: "I declare that my station was oper- 
ated In accordance with the rules of the 
content, and in accordance with the re- 
quirements of my amateur-radio license." 
Logs ahouid be mailed within 30 days fol- 
lowing the content to: Y2 Contest Bureau. 
RKDOR, Ho^emannstr 14, DDR 1055 Ber- 



lin, German Democratic Republic. In ths 
case of any dispute, the decision of the Y2 
Contest Bureau shall be linal. Appiica' 
lions for awards issued by the I4KDDR 1 un- 
filled in ttie contest may be sent together 
wfth the contest log and indicated fee. 



CLARA AC-DC CONTEST 

Starts: 1800 GMT October 20 

Ends: 1B00 GMT October 21 

Sponsored try the Canadian Lejdies Am< 
ateur Radio Association, the Ac^Oc Ckih- 
Umt Is open (o aJI YL and OM amateurs. 
E^h station may tie worked twice^ either 
once on CW and once on plK>ne, of on two 
different tuar^^. 

EXCHANGE: 

Signal reports, QTH, and name. Bonus 
stations will be operating and will Identity 
as such. Each bonus station may be 
worked twice, once on CW and once on 
phone, but it must be on different bands. 

fREQUENCiES: 

Phone— 3900, 3775, 7150, 14280. 14190. 
21300. 26508, and 26488; CW— 3690. 7035, 
14035, 21035, and 28035 

SCORtNG: 

GLAflA members score 1 poini per coo- 
tact with nonmembers, 2 (>oint$ p^ 
CLARA-membef contact, and 3 points per 
bonus station. Multiply by two for con- 
tacts made on CW. MultipJy total ol the 
above by I tie number of Canadian prov- 
inces^erritones worked for total score. 
Non-CLARA members count points Ili« 
same except only CLABA^mefTi^^ cor*- 
tacts are lo be counted. 

AWARDS: 

First-place CLARA cup and certificate 
to fir St- place CLARA winner, certificates 
lo second and third. Plaque and certifi- 
cate to first-place non-Cl^RA winner, cer- 
tificates to second and third. 

ENTRIES: 

Ail Logs submitted are eHglble for the 
mini prize drawing. Mall ail logs and 
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73 Magazine • October, 1964 103 



INTERNATIONAL 







from page 60 

Classes: A, up to 1 kW; B^ up to 250 W, and 
C, up to 100 W. Afl Stations may be either 
fixed, mobiles, or portables and of Ihj'ee 
other categories: land^ marftfrne, or air- 
borne. Operators are classified as belong- 
ing to any of three categories: 

• Superior: able to operate class A sta- 
tions on all authorized bands. 

• Intermedia: autfiorlzed to operate 
class B stations on 160, 30, 40, 10, 6, and 2 
meters, and in the portions 14.000 ia 
14,200 and 21,000 to 21250 l^/^Hz. 

• Noviolo: authorized to operate class C 
stations In 1&0, 00, 6, and 2 meters, and In 
the portion 7.1 OO lo 7.150 MHz. 

Jt is compulsory for all amateur-radio 
stations to have operational equipment in 
the 40meter band. This is to be able to 
participate at any moment in case of 
emergency, fn ttrls context, it also is man- 
datory for all clubs and amateur- radio or- 
ganizations to maintain a schedule of 
radio watch and frequency control on all 
bands^ under supervision of government 
authorities. 

To get a license you must be Peruviahi 
either by birth or national a zat con. If you are 
under 18 years old, ^ou must get legal per- 
mission. Foreigners also can get licenses 
It their residence in the country Is for more 
than 5 years, or 3 years If married to a Pe- 
rtrvian citizen or have Peruvian children. 

The first license Is issued for the Novice 
class after an examination on elementary 
electronics and communications and 
practical station operation. Vou must re- 
main in that class until you get 100 OSL 
cards. To upgrade to Ihe next category, 
you must apply for another examination 
on radio communications: You must be 
proficient In radio station operation and 
must be able to receive and transmit CW 
at 5 wpm. 

You also must remain in that category 
until you receive another 100 QSL cards. 
Then you may apply for another examina- 
tion on advanced electricity and electron- 
ic fundamentals, proficiency in radio sta- 
tion operation, and musl be able to trans- 
mit and receive CW at 10 wpm. 

The Novice license is issued for a peri- 
od of 3 years, not renewable. Thus, you 
must attend an examination within the 
next three years for upgrade or your li- 
cense is cancelled. The other two catego- 
ries also are issued for periods of three 
years but are renewable for similar peri- 
ods, licenses under a reciprocity agree- 
ment are vaitd for up to 90 days only. 

The Di race I on de Telecom unlcac tones 
car> authorize the installation and opera- 
tion of amateur-radio stations to the mili- 
tary, radio clubs, and amateur-radio Insti- 
tutionSp Peruvian Red Cross, Civil De- 
fense, and scientific institutions in the 
areas of seismotogy, meteorology, and geo 
physics, to be operated onfy by licensed 
radio amateurs. 

Of all the above, It Is relevant to note 
that foreign operators can appiy for a reci- 
procity-agreement license for only 90 
days, but if he Is a resident, he will get 
DA prefixes v/ithout restriction. Unfortu- 
nately not all countries haye this preroga- 
tive. Also fnteresting is that amateur-radio 
stations installed at institutions like Civit 
Defense or Red Cross must t>e operated 
by licensed radio amateurs. In some coun- 
tries, there are even citizens-band organi- 
zations or Civil Defense stations with am- 

104 73 Magazine • October, 1984 



ateur-radio stations operated by anybody 
able to press the PTT button. 

The above information is based on cur- 
rent regulations, Decreto Supremo 009- 
74-TC, dated April 31 , 1974. 

That's all, I hope some fellow Peruvian 
will continue this writing from here on. 3n 
doing go» we'll see again the red and white 
flag waving in 'T5 International/' 




PHILIPPINES 

Leo M. Almazan WA6LOS/DU2 
10098 Knight Drive 
San Diego CA Q2126 

In my last column I wrote about the am- 
ateur-radio scene in the Philippines today. 
After a rather nice lengthy QSO wftii a W7 
ham from Seattle, Washington, who hap- 
pened to be in the Ptiiiipplnes before 
World War tl, he not only told me how the>^ 
used to DX on 40 meters with RCA's CW 
rigs, and Arc-BS receivers coupled to high 
zepp antennas, he also sparked my curi- 
osity at)Out the history of amateur radio in 
the Philippines^ 

After talking to the local OT hams in the 
country, I came up with pieces of Informa- 
tion that any wireless nostalgia buff may 
find rather interesting. In this column I will 
talk about the history of amateur radio 
from World War I righl up to World War 11. 
In a subsequent column 1 will deal with the 



history from World War 11 right up to the 
early sixties. 

The first wireless station in the Philip- 
pines was the powerful US Army sparl< 
station on Corregldor Island {made fa- 
mous by General Dougtas Mac Arthur's 
last-stand battleground} which was used 
to guFde ships in and out of Manila Oay. 
The second famous station was the NPO, 
a US Navy spark station near their Sang- 
ley Point Naval Base. Both of tiiese were 
built about or iu3t before the US had en- 
tered World War I. 

From this time fill 3ate 1919, the ama- 
teurs here followed US regulations since 
the Philippines was a US territory, and 
transmissions were considered 1 1 legal. 
Not till 1920 ^even when the Philippines 
Legislature did not pass any radio laws till 
1S24) was anyone given permission by the 
Bureau of Post to start transmission. Even 
then, due largely to confusion, amateurs 
were still using their InUlals as callstgns. 
Before the 1920s, the local hams and 
US service personnel were on the air using 
whatever parts they could scrounge. 
Some were using o^d Ford spark coils^ co- 
herers, and galena detectors that were 
bought stateside from H. Gernsback's E, 1. 
Co. catalog, then considered as the 'bible 
of wireless." 

In the early twenties, American hard- 
ware stores were selling "wireless toys" 
made by the famous A- C, Gilbert Co. of 
New York^ the maKer of the also-famous 
Erector sets. Each set consisted of an un- 
tuned crystal detector, headphones, an in- 
door aerial kit, ground connector, a key^ 
and a single-circuit heavy-duty buzzer tor 
the transmitter in&tead of the two^ircuit, 
spark coil. With such sets, neighboring 
amateurs could play wireless and learn 
the code by actual communication. No li- 
cense was required. 

In the thirties, several ham stations 
sprouted in the country. The most notable 
was KA1HR, a multi-op, l-kW station at a 
US Army base in Fort MacKlniey. (The 




"KA" prefix was used since the country 
was still a US territory.) In the early thir- 
ties^ the 1-V-2 ''super wasp" was consid- 
ered the standard station receiver. Other 
home-brewed receivers were buiil using 
the type-30 battery tubes. Commercial re- 
ceivers also were available, like the Na- 
tionai SW 2, SW 5, and the HBOs. 

Most Americans were already using 
multi-stage, c ry sta I -cont rolled transmit- 
ters as required by US regulations, but the 
locals were still using self -excited, single- 
stage rigs. 

Antennas were mostly ha tf- wave sky 
wires, like the voltage-fed zepps with tuned 
feeders. Some used current-fed Herti, or 
the single untuned, off-center -fed Windom 
antenna. 

AM phone started appearing in the mid- 
thirties, exciusiveiy operated by American 
hams mostly on 40 and 20 meters, though 
some were experimenting on 160 meters. 
Most transmitters were home-brewed and 
the receivers used were hlgh-<3uaiity su- 
perhets to ensure stateside reception and 
to avoid ORM. 

DXing remained on 40 meters even 
though competition from SW broadcast- 
ers was appearing in the band. The 40me- 
ter CW bandwidth had been cut from 300 
to 150 kHz during the International Radio 
Conference In Cairo in 1938, but CW DX 
Ing was sttlfc done primarily in this band. 
The US west coast came around 10:00 pm, 
South Africa around midnight, followed 
by the Europeans in the early morning. 
The top DK certificate then was the WAC, 
and many CW DXers had won it during the 
thirties. 

Well this fs it for now. Also, words are 
circulating that the Gl^ass B licensees will 
be sporting a "DW" prefix, so watch out 
for this new one. 




PERU 



POLAND 

Jerzy Szymczak 
78-200 Biaiogard 

Buczka 2/3 
Fot&nd 

The Board of the SP DX Club issued 13 
member diplomas recently. The last diplo- 
ma number is 323, Every candidate for the 
diploma must produce QSL cards con- 
firming mutual radio contacts with his 
own radio station with 75 countries on 6 
continents. After a 6-month period, he can 
receive tha diploma if he produces QSLs 
from 101 countries. Actuary, 25 candi- 
dates are waiting for the diplomas. 

There are 1710 honorary members of SP 
DX Club. To every European sender who 
establishes mutual communication with 
15 full members, and to every extra- Euro- 
pean ham who possesses at least 10 such 
QSLs, this honor can be done. 

TheSP DX Club celebrates its 26th anni- 
versary in J une this year. Eight SP senders 
have over 300 confirmed countries. There 
are 1 12 SP symbols on SP DX honor list for 
establishing 200 confirmed radio con- 
tacts. Leading radio amateurs of the SP 
DX Marathon are: SP3D0I (4334 points), 
SP3AGE f4235 points^ SP7HT (4086 
points), and SP&EWY (4054 points^ 

The first Polish winner of the WAC Sat- 
eiiite diploma suggests that Polish send- 
ers publish the 10 most- interest ing QSOs 
of every year. On his own first list, he put, 
among others: the first QSO (AprlE 3, 1983, 
on 7 MHs CW with SPSEVP. after martial 
law break), the first Polish contact via 
OSCAR 10 (August 15, 1^a3, with DjaRE). 
and the first contact with Australasia via 
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Twenty Polish amateur stations look 
pari \n the All Asjan OX Contest SS8 1963. 
The beat were SPBEMO on 3.5 MHs, 
SP9EMI on 7 fAHz, SP5LM on 14 MHa, 
SP7AWA on 21 MHz, SP6DNS on 28 MH^, 
and SP9ALM on SOMB and SP7KTE on 
MOMB. Dipiomas are awarded these 
stations. 

PoNsfy Scouts radio amateurs are 
always on the go. On the occasion of the 
70th anniversary of Scouting, the Scouts 
Communication Club organized the le^z- 
no Contest UHF '64 that took place In De- 
cember, 1983. Sixty UHF radJo stations 
took part in the contest The best fndfvi du- 
al stations were: SP6QZZ (2712 points}, 
SP3JBI (1917 points), and SP9MM (1617 
points). The best ctub stations: SP6VVCY 
(1066 points). SP2KFE (169 pointsl, and 
SP32HW (115 points). UHF radio amateurs 
from Leszno were informed ttiat every Fri- 
day (2200 local time) has been set up as an 
activity day of Leszno stations using ra- 
diotelephones. Most of thern wor^ on 
14S.200 MHz with antennas with tjoth ver- 
tical and horizontal poladiation. 

A new Scouts diploma, CZUWAJ, has 
been establisbed recently. It is awarded 
by the Wroclaw team, SP6ZDA. To get th\^ 
diploma one must acquire 50 points and 
assemble all the letters belonging to trie 
wofd CZUWAJ (WATCH E). Selected sta- 
tions send Individual letters. Stations with 
stationary QTHa grant 4 points, and with 
local QTHs 6 polrtts for every QSO. Eight 
points are awarded for QSLs with Scouts 
ceremonEai stations. Contacts on UHF are 
counted double points. 

In February this year, the first Polish re- 
peater UHF'FM was set in motion. It has 
omnidirectional antennas with vertical 
polarisation. The repe^iter works on the R 
channel. It receives signals on 145000 
MHz and transmits on 145.600 MHz. A 
100-km range for the repeater has been es- 
timated. Its callslgn is SE=t9E 






^^.i^jrw-' 



Roger de We&ver 9Y4RD. 



TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO 

JohnL Webster 9Y4JW 

c/o Department of Soli Science 

Unfverstty af the West indies 

St Augustme 

Trini^&d 

West Indies 

9Y4RD COMES HOM£ 

On March 24, 1984, Roger de Weever 
9Y4RD returned home for a well-deserved 
three- week vacation. Many of the DXers 
out there will be familiar with Roger's call- 
sign, which has popped up in the past two 
years from such good DX locations as SU 
and STii, and they may have received his 
attractive and amusing OSL 

At the monthly general meeting of the 
TTARS held on April 2nd, Roger was our 
guest of honor and addressed us for about 
one hour on his experiences in the Middle 
East, 1 was also privileged to have a 
lengthy (si>;-hour!) and very interesting 
eyeball with him about one week later. 

Roger, now 35 yeans old and married to 
a very attractive lady, Carmen, began his 
oareer in commercial radio in 1969 as a 
Ship's radio officer, after graduating from 
college in England. In 1970, he changed 
Jobs to become a radio technician with 
TEXTEL (Trinidad and Tobago External 
Telecommunications), In the ten years 
that followed, he worked his way up 
through the company to the position of 
Acting Maintenance Engineer at the Sat- 
ellite Earth Station located at Mature, in 
the northeastern part of the island. 

106 73 Magazine • October, 1984 



1979 was the year that Roger made the 
decision to become a ham. On the 
strength of his experience both as a ship's 
radio officer and his technical experience 
as a communications engineer, he ap- 
plied for the license and was issued the 
callsign 9y4RD— his initials, (Here in 
Trinidad we are allowed to ctioose our 
cad I signs, provided It has not previously 
been Issued or otherwise reserved.) 

Roger, in 1980, tooK up a job with the 
United Nations as a Field Service Officer 
in communications, lo serve In the Middle 
East, and was based in Jerusaiem, Israel. 
However, In the year prior to his departure, 
Roger, although only Involved in limited 
activity on the air — mainly local 2m and 
some lOm OX — devoted Gonsiderabie time 
to the training program of the TTARS and 
helped prepare about 30 students tor the 
annual City and Guilds RAE Exam. Most 
Of the students were successful in the 
examination, and needless to say, after 
Roger's departure, he was sorely missed 
by the TTARS. 

In his new UN job Roger found the chal- 
lenge he had been seeking I He has had to 
visit and work In such countries as Egypt, 
South Sudan, and Lebaraon and is based 
in Israel— the world's hot spots f He has 
tieen Involved in recommendations, de- 
sign, and establishment of & variety of 
communications systems, both HF and 
VHP, in these countries, to assist both the 
local governments and t?ie UN in their law- 
enforcement and peace-keeping activi- 
ties. He is not involved in military commu- 
nications and says that In spite of being 
based In one of the world's most turbulent 
areas, he has always been well treated 
and shown great respect and never felt 
tfiat hia life was in danger. 

Roger's amateur-radio activity from the 
Middle East began In September, 1982, 
from Jerusalem, with a MX callsign. His op- 
eration from SU commenced In October, 
1982, and when in I9d3 he was stationed 
In ST? for about 7 months, once again his 
ham equipment was lugged along. The 
equipment that Roger has used in his ac- 
tivity consists simply of a Yaesu 902 DM 
and a four-band trap dipole. 

One of his ambitions from each of the 
QTH3 he has operated has been to get a 
DXCC, and he has so far achieved this 
from: STO— about 2500 QSOs and 130 
countries; SU— 9000 QSOs and 185 coun- 
tries, and 4X— 1500 OSOs and 150 coun- 
tries. Whereas Roger enjoys ham-radio 
operation from comparativeiy rare DX lo- 
cations and will always try to comply with 
another ham's request for skeds, etc^ he 
detests his operations being referred to 
as DXpeditions. He does not go on DXpe- 



dltlons in the Middle East. He is simply 
working In whatever country he Is QRV 
from, and all his amateur-radio activities 

are done in his spare time as a form of 
relaxation. 

Incidental iy, Roger has been doing 
quite a bit of badly needed PR worl< for 
ham radio in countries such as SU and 
STO, where amateur radio is neither un- 
derstood nor encouraged as a worlhwhile 
hobby, in his job he works alongside many 
locals, most of them being qualified radio 
technicians, and wherever possible he 
tries to educate these persons and any 
others Interested In the benefits and use^ 
fulness of this hobby we all enjoy. 

One interesting fact revealed during the 
course of our discussion was the way in 
which ham-radio activity has assisted 
Roger in his job. The practical experience 
gained In antenna performance and con- 
struction, propagation conditions both on 
HF and VHF; and even |usi the way hams 
get things dene when others fail, have all 
combined to make him successful In his 
job. It Is especially for this reason that he 
has always mad© a point of lugging atong 
his trusty 902 DM, as heavy as it is, wher- 
ever he has traveled. 

By the time this article appears in print, 
he will Jong since have returned to con- 
tinue his tour of duty In the Middle East. 
Roger's plans in the coming months in- 
clude stints in SU and ST*. He already has 
re-eQUipped himself with new radio gear. 
From his home QTH he will be using the 
new FT-980 by Yaesu and a Cushcraft R3 
triband vertical— the one that's ideal for 
apartment dwellers as It needs no radial s! 
His portable operations will tie made with 
a much mora compact and lightweight 
transceiver^ the I com lC-730, and his old 
4-band trap dipote. 

Roger has Indicated that the following 
are some of his favorite operating fre- 
quencies and times: 



14.220 MHz 


0700Z 


21.157 MHz (DK9KE Net, 


mainly 


weekends) 


1000Z 


21 .335 MHz 


1&0OZ 


28.550 MH2 


1300Z 


1 4.332 M Hz (YL system) 


Occasionally 


AllOSUfor9Y4RD/. 


, . should be sent 



directly to his QSL Manager, KA2DDJ, as 
he does not have the time nor QSL cards 
to handle QSLs himself. 

Wherever Roger is QRV, you should 
have no difficulty identifying him, since, 
as a patriotic Trlnldadian, he plans always 
to retain his 9Y4RD callsign and operate 
as a portable. 



VENEZUELA 

Luis E. Svarei OA4KO/YV5 
Apartado 66994 
Caracas 1061 -A 
Venezueis 

CIRCUITO 2 (YV2) 

In Venezuela, call area 2 is composed 
of the states of Tachira, Merida, and 
Barlnas- The first two are Andean, with 
cities at altitudes ranging from 100 to 
3100 meters. Barlnas state, however^ is lo- 
cated in the plains on the eastern siide of 
those states and faces the Andes. 

San Cristobal is the capital city of 
Tachira. It is located in a hilly terrain, al- 
most like that of San Francisco. It is a 
modern city with all the traffic and noise 
that civilization carries on, 

Down the Andes there is another city 
with a funny name: La Fria {the Cold). 
When you arrive In that city you will expe- 
rience tropical heat, but la. Fria earned its 
name from a type of malaria which caused 
terrible chills and continuous chattering 
of the teeth. At first it was just some blacK 
humor, but the name remained. Today it ts 
a prosperous zone with a superhighway 
linking ihls city and San Cristobal San 
Cristobal's nearest airport is at La Fria. 

Merida, the highest state in the Andes 
Is called the Tacho de Venezuela l[Roof of 
Venezuela), Captain Juan Rodriguez Sua- 
rez (no relation) founded it in 1556. In fact^ 
he was not authorized to found cities, so 
he was rushed to Bogota, arrested, judged 
guilty oJ the usurpation of Royal preroga- 
tives, and sentenced lo be dragged by the 
tail of his horse until dead and then to be 
quartered. However, he escaped to Vene- 
zuela and got asylum. 

In Merlda Is located the highest moun- 
tain of Venezuela: Pico Bolivar. This 
mountain Is 5,700 meters high and wears 
a perpetual snow dress. It has the highest 
and the longest cable car In the world; it 
takes one hour If you go straight to the 
top. There is some skiing heref but it is not 
recommended unless you are profession- 
al. "It is oul of this world, and astronaut 
training is recommended for the success- 
ful Pico Espejo skier" {Ve Venezueia). 

Driving from Merlda city down the 
plains, and heading to Barlnas, Is some- 
thing you'll never forget in your lite, At 
first you go up the mountains to the An- 
dean paramo, it is as inhospitable, cold, 
cloudy, and damp In the rainy season as it 
is dry and drab in the dry season, it is so 
Isolated that you feel you are between life 
and death. You feel the necessity to stop 
your car and listen to the silence. I did and 
was surprised to know that the only plants 
in the zone, the frailejones, are really fra- 
grant and they perfume the paramo. 

At Apartaderos, midway between Merl- 
da and Barlnas, you may visit CI DA, an 
astrophyslcai institute, with Its four tele- 
scopes, among which are Coude Casso- 
grain, a double astrograph and a great 
reflector, as well as a Schmidt Camera, 
Visitors are welcomed. 

Continuing to Barinas, you may have di- 
rect radio contact now via 2m FM repeat- 
ers with Caracas or Maracalbo, as I ex- 
plained in a past column. Continuing with 
the trip and heading to Santo Domingo, 
you see the vegetation begin to change. 
After Santo Domingo, a snaking road 
heads you down to the plain. The moun- 
tains become green and you see small wa- 



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See List of Advertisers on pag& 9S 



73 Magazine • October, 1984 107 



terfalls coming naar the road. Tempera- 
turn increases and tropica^ veg^tst^on 
breaks all around as you approach Bar^ 
nas, the capital ctty ot Barlnas state. 

Barinaa ia flat and becomea inundated 
during the rainy season. Sine© the north- 
west part at this state la toward tha 
Andea, most of the towns are locaied \n 
the foiling foal hills at the edge of the 
mountains. 

tn my next column, I will bef|in de- 
scribing call area 3: Lafe, Yaracuy, and 
Pwlyguesa, 

MAP EXCHAKGE 

f Whm dty fnaps; if anytiodv out there ^s 
tfiterest&d in maps^. too, tet me knovv. Send 
ftm a map of your city and I wit I exchange 
vtiih the ma{>of Caracas P^^ase be aure U 
la a deiaiieo map with ell streets. (Canr»ot 



use those which advertise relative loca- 
tions of historical or Interesting ptaceSn 
liKe lour maps or souvenir meps) From 
the USA, Rand McNally ia preferred; Dolph 
Is OK. If you know your Maidenhead grid 
locator {with €-character precision), 
please mark your QTH, Otherwise please 
dOn"t. Let me find it myself I 

COMUNiCA BULtETIN 

Also 1 wish to mer>tion thai Tm publish- 
ing a Spanish newsletter namecS COMU- 
NICA. \f Ittere is anyt>ody wishing to 
spread any information to Venezuelan 
and Latin Ametican radio amateurs, let 
itie lKnow. The tiufletin is distributed 
monthly in all Latjn American countries. 
Subscription ts USS^S.OO fir^t -class Air 
Mail pef t^vetve issues. As far as I know 
this Is if>e first communications bulletin 



Jn Spanish ever published and distributed 
In 19 countries. 

tf you would like to take a look, send me 
your address and I will forward you a sam- 
ple. Maybe you would like to include, with 
your fequest, news from your fadio club 
for publication. If somebody is publishing 
sofTtelhlng similar^ an exchange is d& 
Sired. Polish, Chinese, ar^ Swahili bulle- 
tins are accepted. 

FEEDBACK 

I wish to thank all those colleagues who 
sent cards ar>d tetters, Alt those that re- 
quested intormaiion and services wete re- 
plied to Of the reQueet accomplished. I 
have published in COMU^itCA lt>e re- 
quests f couldnl answer In the hope that 
sometiody was able to reply directly. 

flegarding the article on parabolic an- 



tennas (7J, May, 19&4}, \ wish to mention 
that the article was intended to be as tuto- 
rial as possible. Really. I have no plans or 
drawings for construction and the inten* 
tion was that you personally develop your 
Own design. If yoo don't have the ability to 
construct a parabola, neither a drawing or 
a picture wili help. 

I guess the t>est solution is to make the 
drawing yourself and find sometiody who 
feels comJortabie with mechanical struc- 
ture 10 help yOii in construction. Anothw 
approach is to get ari already made parab- 
ola and to experiment with differeni feed- 
ers. Wilh the information in the articte you 
would be able lo know what yoiu ge! and 
wtiat you need lof your particular apiHica- 
ttOTL TTve last recomme^ation iz that you 
starf with a 1-meter dish and then qo 
ahead with a larger one if necessary. 



FUN! 



John Edwards K12U 

PO Box 73 

Middie ViliBge NY ft 379 

CALLSIGNS 

What does your caiifaign mean to you? I 
know my call means a tol to me. On the air, 
It's my name. When I v^sit hemfests, my 
calisign badge leis people know wtio I am. 
There may be hundreds of thousands of 
John Edwardses on this sad old planet^ 
but only one K{2U, Thank heaven. 

Unlike my name. I've held a number of 
calls over the years^ Including WQ24BE 
(my original), WR2APG. WA2DCS. and ot 
course KI2U. When I upgraded from Ad- 
vanced to Extra back in 1080, I had to do 
some serious soul searching before 
changing my call. My old ID had served me 
well over the years and, naturally, I was re- 
luctant to make such a drastic change in 
my amareur-radlo lifestyle Still, a snappy 
2x 1 call has it« advantages^ In pileupa^ so 
I reluctantly turned In my old 2x3 trada* 
mark for KI2U 

ELEMENT 1 
MULTIPLE CHOICE 

1) Before the FCC reshuffled the amateuf 
call sign allocation process in IB 7ft, what 
did a WT prefix signify? 

1) A Technician-class licensee 

2) A temporary license 

3) Nothing in particular 

4} A ham In the third radio district 

2) WN prefixes were formerly reserved for 
1^ Novices 



2} Interim licensees 
3|Sec^>ndary licertses 
4) Repeaters 

3) Tuning around 20 meters one night, you 
hear a statiion segning KAiQi^M Why do 
you suspect he is a bcotfeggef? 

t^The FCC doesn't usually Issue calf 
suffUes that are aiso Oslgnats 

2) KA calls aren't allowed on 20 meters 

3) The FCC doesn't issue calls with a 
OxK suffix 

4) You don't know 

4) What's wrong with WR2APQ, New 
York's favorite 220MHz slow-scan TV 
repeater? 

Iflt's using an expired call 

2) Repeaters aren t allovt/ed on 220 NflHz 

3) Slow-scan TV isn't allowed on repoatera 

4) t^lothing 
6) What was the callsign of the AflRL's 
first headquarters station? 

DWIAW 

2)1AW 

3)W1ARRL 

4)W1MK 



ELEMENT 2 

FILL IW THE BLANKS 

Fin in the calls of these prominent 
hams of the past and present: 

1J Arthur Godfrey 

2) King Hussein 



3) Barry GoEdwater 

4 J Mahmud Reia Pahtavi fShah of 

francs son; now the current Shah) 
5> Tom Chtistian 




>.' 



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GRAND LEDGE. JWICHEGAN 46837 



ELEMENT 3 


aa*9vi 


T) Singapore 


TRUEFALSE 

Tnia Fitse 


Z1) 5IJ7 
23) TA 


U) Argentina 
V) San Marino 
W) Chile 


jrograma its 
So it won't 
cer^or aug- 


24) H8 
^ST 


X) Guernsey 

Y) Pitcaim tsJand 



gaativa amaisiif call- 

2] All tMoadcasf statiofis 
oast of the Mississippi 
hav^ Wcafis^gns. 

3)WHA$lstdcatedln 
Louisville. Kentuclcy. 

4) A broadcast ^tattort 
may select its calk 

5) OSCAR 8^3 callsign 
was W120SC. 

6} Lee DeForest, famed 
radio inventor, held 
amateur call tOF. 
7} The FCC issued the 
first K caFfs to con- 
tinental US hams 
during 1943. 
a)W2XAMisrtOf aham 

caMsIgn, 
9) The Federal Radio 
Commission tiegan is- 
suing w and K caMfi \t\ 
^948. 
1D)KCBS islocatod In 

Los Angeles CA. 
11} Hlfam Percy Maxim's 
first callsign waa 
SNW. 
12) Marconi once received 
ttl FCC Citation for 
fatlir>g to propefiy iden- 
tify !i is station. 



ELEMENT 4 
MATCHING 

Matc^ the prefixes \t\ ColMmn A with the 
ootinirlea in Cotumn & 

Ceiumn A Colimin B 

T}CP A) Grenada 

3 LU B) Sikltim 

% 5H1 Q\ Ptilllppines 

4} LZ 0) Malawi 

5) J3A E) Colombia 

6) GU F) Iran 

7) SR G) Zanzibar 

3) OU H) Switferlar^ 

9) 3DZ Ij Mauritania 

tO) ST5 J) Papua Mew Guinea 

t1)AC3 K)lrerand 

tl^VRO U Soviet Union 

13) HK Mi Sudan 

\A) Ml H) Bolivia 

t^ EP O) Tufftey 

16)D4C RFIH Islands 

t7)El Q) Guyana 

t0)CE R)6uigana 

m 707 Sf Caoe Verde 



THE ANSWERS 

Bfement ?. 

1—2 Usually issued by t^e local field of» 

Fice wfien Gettysburg screwed up an 

applicaiiorL 
Z — 1 Also KM piefixes for a while. 
3—1 Sort of helps topf&vent confusion, 
4 — 1 Alt WR prefix repsater calls ha¥e 

expired, 
5—4 It got wtped out in a 1936 flood. 

Ef&ment 2: 
1— K4UB 

3— K7UGA 

4-e}<-EPl MP 
5-VB6TC 

Efement 3: 

1 — Tru e Al 1 1 h e funny on as . 

2— False Moat, but not all (e.g,, KOKA In 

Pittsburgh). 
3-Trye All 50 kW of IL 
4— True But hams can'L Not fair, really. 
5— False Satellites don't require a call, 
6— False De Fore at wasn't a ham. 
7— True During the fall. 
8— True It's a call for experimental 

steUons. 
9— False The year was 1329, 
to— False It's iri San Francisco. 
11— True Around 19U, the days when 

you could make up your own 

call. 
12— False Marconi's radio experiments 

were completed by the time ttre 

FCC came into iMing, 

1-N, 2-U, 3-G,4-=^n, 5~A,e— X, 7-Q, 
fl— C, 9— P. 10—1. 11— B, 12—^, 13— E* 
14— V, 15-F, 16-S. 17-K, 18-W. 
ig— D, 20-T, 21— Z, 22— J, 23-0, 
24— H, 25— M. 



SCORING 

Ffve points for each correct answer. 

Eiement 2: 

Rve points lor each Cdll correctJy filled tn, 

Eiement 5l 

Two points for each oorfect answer. 

Efement 4: 

0(¥i point tor each correct match. 

How^Kdyoudo? 

1-20 poinis— Called qm\ 
21-40 points --CaH for t^p 
41-60 potnls— Call bacit 
§1-80 points— On caU 
ai-99 points— A call to remember! 



100 73 Magazme • October, 19&4 



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TELEX— 620430 



1985 
CALLBOOKS 



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Order both books at the same time for 
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Order from your deaJer or directly from the 
publisher. Foreign residents add $4,55 for 
shipping. Illinois residents add 6% sales tax. 

Keep your 1985 Caltbooks up to date. 

The U»S. and Foreign supplements contain 
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t^ See list af Adv&rtisers qh page 98 



73 Magazine • October, 1964 109 



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in i-f, helical resonator front erxJ tor exceptional 
selectivity, more than -1 CX) dS at ±1 2 kHz, 
twst available today- Flutter-proof squelch, 
AFC tracks drifting xmtrs. Xtai oven avail. 
Kit only $138. 

• R451 FM RCVR Same but for uhf. Tuned Ime 
front end, 0,3 uV sens. Kit only $138. 

• R76 FM RCVR for 10M, 6M, 2M, 220, Or 
commercial bands. As above, but w/o AFC or 
heL res. Kits only $118. 

Also avail w/4 poie filter, only $3&/KiL 

• R110VHF AM RECEIVER kit forVHF aircraft 
band or ham bands. Only $98. 

• R11 0-259 SPACE SHUTTLE RECEIVER, 
kilonly $98, 



amironics 



110 73 Magazine * October, 1984 



^^2&S 



TRANSMITTERS 







^ 



T51 VHF FM EXCITER for 10M, 6M, 2M. 
220 MHz or adjacent bands. 2 Watis contin- 
uous, up to 2V^ W intermittent. S68/kit, 




T451 UHFFM EXCITER 2 to 3 Watts on 450 
ham band or adjacent freq. Kit only $78. 

VHF&UHFLINEAR AMPLIFIERS, Use on 
either FM or SS B. Power levels from 1 to 45 
Watts to go with exciters & xmtg converters. 
Several models. Kits from $78. 



A1 6 RF TIGHT BOX Deep drawn alum, case 
with tight cover and no seams. 7x8x2 inches. 
Designed especially for repeaters, S20. 



ACCESSORIES 



mh 




4* 44 ^ 





HELICAL RESONATOR FILTERS available 
separately on pcb w/connector$. 

HRF-144 for 143-150 MHz $38 
HRF-220 for 21 3-233 MHz $38 
HRF-432 for 420-450 MHz $48 

COR '2 KIT With audio mtxer, focal speaker 
amplifier, tail & time-out timers. Only S38. 

COR-3 KIT as above* bul with "courtesy 
beep'. Only $58. 

CWIO KITS 158 bits, ffeld programmable, 
clean audio, rugged TTL logic- Kit only S6S. 

DTMF DECODER/CONTROLLER KITS. 
Control 2 separate on/off functions with 
touchtones', e.g., fepeater and aulopatch. 
Use with main or aux. receiver or with Auto- 
patch. Only S90 

AUTOPATCH KITS. Provide repeater aulo- 
patch, reverse patch, phone line remote 
control of repeater, secondary control via 
repeater receiver Many other features. 
Only $90. Requires DTMF Module* 



NEW - SIMPLEX AUTOPATCH 

Use with any transceivef. System includes 
DTMF & Autopatch modules above and new 
Timing module to provide simplex autopatch 
and reverse autopatch. Complete patch 
system only S200/kiL Call or write fordetails. 



NEW LOW-NOISE PREAMPS RECEIVING CONVERTERS TRANSMIT CONVERTERS 




; Hamtronics Breaks 
the Price Barrier! 

NoNeedtoPay$80toS12S 
for a GaAs FET Preamp. 



FEATURES: 



• Very Low Noise: 0.7 dS VHP, 0.6 dB UHF 

• High Gain: 1 6 to 28 dB, Depending on Freq. 

• Wide Dynamic Range for Overload Resistance 

• Latest Duai^gate QaAs FET, Stable Over Wide 
Range of Conditions 

• Rugged, Diode*protected Transistors 

• Easy to Tune 

• Operates on Standard 1 2 to 14 Vdc Supply 

• Can be Tower Mounted 




Models to cover every practical rf S if range to 
ffsten to SSB. FM, ATV, etc. NF = 2 dB or less. 



MODEL 


TUNES lANGE 


PRICE 










Kit wjth Case $49 


LNG-28 


26-30 MHz 


$49 


Less Case $39 


LNG-50 


46-56 MHz 


$49 


Wired $69 


LNG-144 


137-150 MHz 


$49 




LNG'220 


210^230 MHz 


$49 




LNG-432 


400-470 MHz 


$49 




LNG-40 


30-46 MHz 


$64 




LNG-1 60 


150^172 MHz 


S64 





VHF MODELS 



Antenna 
Input Range 

26-32 

5Q-52 

60-54 
144-146 
145-147 
1 44-1 44,4 
146-1 4S 
144-148 
320-223 
220-224 
222-226 
220-224 
222-224 



Receiver 
Output 

144-14S 
2Q-30 

144-146 
2S-30 
28-30 

27-27.4 
2830 
50-54 
26-30 

144-14S 

144-148 
50-54 
28-30 



ECONOMY PREAMPS 



Our traditional preamps, proven in years of 
sen/ice. Over 20,000 In use throughout the 
world. Tuneable over narrow range. Specify 
exact freq. band needed Gain 16-20 dB. NF = 
2 dB or fess. VHF units available 27 to 300 MHz- 
UHF units available 300 to 650 MHz. 



P30K, VHF Kit fess case 
P30W, VHF Wired/Tested 
P432K, UHF Kit less case 
P432W, UHF Wired/Tested 



$18 
$33 
$21 
$36 



UHF MODELS 

Kit with Case $59 
Less Case $49 
Wfred $75 



432-434 
435-437 
432-436 
432-436 
439.26 



23-30 

28-30 

144^143 

50-64 



SCANISf ER CONVERTERS Copy 72-76, 1 35- 
1 44^ 240^270, 400-420, or 806-894 MHz bands 
on any scanner. Wired/tested Onfy $88. 



HELICAL RESONATOR 
PREAMPS 




SAVE A BUNDLE ON 
VHF FM TRANSCEIVERS! 



FM-5 PC Board Kit - ONLY $1 78 

complete with controls, heatsinl^, etc. 

10 Watts, 5 Channels, for 2M or 220 MHz. 





Our lab has developed a new line of low-noise 
receiver preamps with helical resonator filters 
built in. The combination of a low noise amplifier 
and the sharp selectivity of a 3 or 4 section 
helical resonator provides increased sensitivity 
while reducing intermod and cross-band inter- 
ference in criticaf applications. See selectivity 
curves at right Gain = approx,1 2 dB. 



Model 

HRA-144 
HRA-220 
HRA'432 
HRA-( ) 
HRA-( ) 



Tuning Range 

143-150 MHz 
213-233 MHz 
420-450 MHz 
150''174IVlHz 
450-470 MHz 



Price 

$49 
$49 
$59 
$69 
$79 




While suppiy 
lasts, get $60 
cabinet kit free when 
you buy an FM-5 Transceiver kit. 
Where else can you get a complete transceiver 
for only $178 



For SSB, CW, ATV, FM, etc. Why pay big 
bucks for a muJti mode rig for each band? Can 
be I i n ke d vi:i t h rece i ve co n ve rte rs f or t ra nscei ve . 
2 Watts output vhf, 1 Watt uhf. 



For VHF 

Modei XV2 
Kit $79 
Wired S 149 
(Specify band) 



Exciter 
Input Range 

28-30 

28-22 

28-30 
27-27.4 

28-30 

60-54 
144-146 

50-54 
144-146 



Antenna 

Output 

144-146 
145-146 

50-52 
144-144,4 

220-222* 

220-224 

50-52 

144-148 
28-30 



For UHF, 
Model XV4 
Kit $99 
Wired $169 



23-30 
28-30 

50-54 

61.26 

144-148 



432-434 
435-437 
432-436 
439.25 
432-436* 



*Add $20 for 2M mput 




VHF & UHF LINEAR AMPLIFIERS, Use with 
above. Power levels from 10 to 45 Watts 
Several mode is, kits from $78. 



LOOK AT THESE 
ATTRACTIVE CURVESI 















f 






























1 
























il 




a.^ 












ll 






{ 






















^ 






\ 










10 










J 


f 








\ 


















/ 










— ' 


\ 
















1 


A 


u 




to 


'i 


A 










1 


ib 


¥L. 


^ 
t 


Cl« 















" 






















/ 


\ 




























\ 
























i 






\ 








1 












/ 

■ 






\ 






























\ 


















/ 












^ 




- 


— 




J^.. 
.-'^■w^ 


'III 

tlS +*tl «* 4B(i 









Typ'fcaf Seiectivfty Curves 

of Rec&ivers &ncf 

Heiicai R&sonstors^ 



IMPORTANT REASONS WHY 
YOU SHOULD BUY FROM THE 
VALUE LEADER: 

1. Largest selection of vhf and uhf kits 
in the world. 

2. Exceptfonaf quaffty and fow prices due 
to large volume. 

3. Fa St delivery; most Hits shipped s^me day. 

4. Complete^ professionai instruction 
manuals. 

5. Prompt factory service available and 
free phone consultation. 

6. in business 21 years. 

7. Sell more repeater modules than stlt 
Other mfrs. and have for years. Can give 
quality features for much tower cost. 



Call or Write for FREE CATALOG 

(Send $1 .00 or 4 iRC'c for overseas mailing) 
Order by phone ormail • Add$3S&H per order 
(Electronic answering service evenings & weeicends) 
Use VISA, MASTERCARD, Checic, or UPS COD. 



ronics, inc. 



65-D MOUL RD. • HILTON NY 14468 
Phone: 716-392-9430 

Hamtronics '^ is a registered trademark 



See List of Advertisers on page 98 



73 Magazine • October, 1984 111 



DEALER 
DIRECTORY 



Culver Cib CA Livonia MI 

Jiui'5 Electronics* 3919 Sepulveda Blvd.. Culver Complete pbnttn d ta iu systeins, Anittteur rudio, 

City C A 90230, 390^003, Tradis 463 188^ San repeater, satellite, and eompuler applicatjonsl 

Diego, 827 5732 (Rervo NV). Call Paul \lTS8AHO. Encon Ftiotovoltaics, 

, 27GO0 SchiMJcmfi Hrtad, Uvmin Ml 4*150, 



FonLuis CA 



523.1S50. 



Lincoln NE 



Cojinptetfi lines ICOM. DenTron. Ten-Tec, 

Mirajie, CLibic. Liirietr, over 40(K) eliPs-^iroiiic 

products for hobbyist, technician. ejtper[ ^^^ GrMnmunicfttiims is a full Uiw distributor 

tiHuitCT- Also CB radio, landinobile. FoiitAna *>^ major-iini- amateur t^iufpnient and atK^siw*- 

Eiettroiiitif, (S6SS Siena Ave,. Fontana CA ^^^ antennas, and evtrythirtj^ 4230 Vrtigti^vif 

&2335, S23''771ill^ Ave., LineoLn NE £i8S04» 4€'RAD10. 



San Jose CA 

Bay flPftfl'i n*wt^ amateur radic> store. Ne^ 
& used autateur fadio iaies & sotvIm. We 
feShiTP KenwuKjd. ICOM, Azden. Yaesit. Ten- 
Tec, Santet flc many niott!, Sligvtr Raditi^ Int., 
1775 A S. WiTidiestei Blvd., Campbell CA 

New Castle DE 

Factdrj' Ajthori^od DbhIctI Yaesu., [COM, Ten- 
Tec,. KBK, Kenwood^ AEA, ICftiitn>i]k5, Santec. 
Ftill line of accessories. No sales tax in r^elaiitttre. 
One mile off 1-95, tl^kware Amateur Supply, 
71 Meadow Rnad, New Castle DE 19720, 
3S*-Tr2S. 

Boise ID 

Eockj Mountain area s newest ha.mi de-aler. Ca3l 
RJM first for AEA, A^d^n, KDK. Ten-Tec, But- 
ternut ^ Cuihcraft, and moire!' ftjM Eloettt>nic5j 
4204 Overland, Boise ID 83705. 343-4018, 

Preston ID 

BosJ WhlBYZ has the largest stock of amateur 
gear in th* lnl:€;nmE.n,jrtain H'est and the best 
prices. Call me lor all your ham needs. Rosa 
Distributing, 1& So. State, Freston ID S3263, 
SS2-0S30. 

Littleton MA 

The rcljabk- ham store serving NE. Full line of 
[COM & Kenwood. Yafrvii HTs, Drake. Daiwa. 
B&W accessories, Curlis ^ True ktrVKr.*;. LiTSicni^ 
t lustier, Tel es^Hy -Cain products. Mirage 
ani|):£r, Astrun P.S., Alpha Delia proleciors^ 
ARRL & KantrOnics instrucitiDn aids, Whistler 
radar deitseioti. Full line of doax fitting^, 
TEL— COM Elocir^nk Cammiinications, 675 
Great Bd. (Rt. IIEIJ, Littleton MA 01460, 
4«&^'tO0/aMO. 



DeriyNH 

Serving the ham community' with new and used 
<rt|iiip[)i:c:f[]t. Wa .stuvk and ser^'"ice most major 
lines; AEA, Astron, Aaden, RBtW, CushcraFl, 
Hy-Cain, Hustler, ICGM, Kenwood, KLM, 
Larsen, Miragif, Moslty; boob, M>toi^, <:*bkf 
and donnectorSt Business hours 9-7 Monday 
tb rough Thuffiday, arad 9-5 Friday and Satnr- 
day, Rivcndell, ^ WarflMr Hill ttoftd, Derry NH 
030QS; 434^371, 



Albany, New York 
UPSTATE NEW YORK 

Kenwood, iCOM, Ten-Tec^ Belden, Cushcraft, 
Larsen, HiistJw. AHfiL. Hy^ain, B&W. MF); 
Mirage, New and ii^ rtiuipiiimit. StJrt'Ing tlw 
amateur communit)' since 1942. Adirondack 
Electronjcs, tiK.^ li^l Central Avenue^ Albany 
NY 12205, 456-0203 (one mile wiMtMNorthway 



Cqlimibu^ OH 

The biggjest and best ham ^tore in the Midwest 
featUJiflg Kenwood and other quDlit>' products 
with work Eng display.^ ■ Wp ^\] only thel'ust. Au- 
thorized Kenwood service. Universal Amateur 
Badio, Inc., 12S0 Aida Or,, Reynoldsburg (Co- 
lumbus) OH 43D6S, $e6-l^67. 

Dallas TX 

IBM PC'XT kits, supplifis, cvpani^ion prod- 
uctsi video restorer kits for pay TV\ CATV, 
iiatcHHEr bi:ibb>-ists' electronic project kits/app- 
notes. More ihan 9OO0 parte in ,tHH;t; s^-^jujtOEi- 
ductorsj [Cs, disjcretes, video accessories, 
tOoh, audio, automotive, cabinets, computer 
peripberals, Pieoise write for your free ■6&-page 
catalog: Sabet Electronics, 13650 Floyd Rd., 
Sie. LU, D^lfls TX 75243; 7S3 4t>5« ffnrmerU 
I.E.^. 



DEALERS 

Your company name and message 
can contain up to 25 words for m 
little as $150 yearly (preimid), or 
?15 per month {prepaid quarterly) . 
No mention of mail-order business 
Of area code permitted. Directory text 
and [payment must reach us 60 days in 
ad vartce of publication. For example, 
advertising for the December '84 issue 
must be in our hands by Octol>er 1st. 
Mail to 73 Maga^ine^ Peterborough 
NH 03458. ATTN: Nancy Giampa. 



PROPAGATION 



Jim Gray W1KU 
73 Staff 

























1 


EASTERN UNITED STATES TO: 1 


GMT: 00 t>2 Od 06 OS 10 12 14 ie ib 20 ^z 


ALASKA 


20 












2(1 










15 


AROfeMTfftlA 


20 


4DA 


?0 


40 










10 




20A 


20A 


AUSTHALJA 


3D 


40A 




40 


40 


20 2(i 


30 




20 


IS 


IS 


CAMALZOhlE 


40A 


40A 


L& 


40 


40 




20 


20A 


ID 


ISA 


^OA 


20 


EMOLAWD 


40 


40 


40 


40 








15 


20A 


20 






HAWAII 


20 


20 








20 


20 






L3 


15 


15 


INDIA 












20 


20 


20 










JAPAN 


20 










4D 


20 








15 


IS 


MExfCa 


40A 


4 DA 


40 


40 


40 




20 


20a 


ID 


ISA 


20A 


20 


PHlLIPI^iniES 














20 












PUEFTORPCO 


40A 


4UA 


40 


40 


40 


20 


20A 


13A 


i5A 


20A 


20 


40A 


SOUTH AJSRICA 


hit 


40A 


20 










15A 


15A 


20A 


20A 


20A 


y, s,s. a. 


20 


20 










20 


i5 






20 


20 


WE^TCOASr 


21 A 


20 


40 


40 


40 


40 


40 


2U 


lli 


15A 


ISA 


ISA 


CENTRAL UNITED STATES TO: 


ALAISKA 


20 








40 ; 


40 


3D 


20 






l^ 


15 


ARGENTINA 


20 


40 


40 


iO 












1:.A 


20A 


20A 


AUSTRALIA 










40 


40 


20 


20 


20 




IS 


IS 


CAMAL^OlME 


40 


40 


40 


40 


40 


20 


2C 


15 


15A 


i 3A 


ISA 


IS 


ENCLAMD 


40 


40 


40 


40 








15 


L5 


20A 


20 


20 


HAWAII 


2Q 


20 


20 


40 


40 




20 


20 




ID 


ID 


IS 


IMPIA 


20 


ZO 










20 


20 










JAP-Ah* 


20 










40 


20 


20 








15 


MEXICO 


40 


40 


40 


40 


40 


20 


20 


20 


20 


15A 


ISA 


IS 


PHILIPPmES 


20A 


20 










2D 


20 






15 


]5 


pueftTO [%tco 


40 


40 


40 


40 


40 


20 


20 


20 


20 


15A 


ISA 


15 


SOUTH AFR4CA 














10 


15A 


IS 


20A 


20A 


20 


U.£.$.H, 














20 


20A 


IS 


20 


20 




WESTERN UNITED STATES TO: 


ALASKA 


ZOA 


2aA 


20 






40 


40 


40A 


20 


20 


20 


20A 


ARGEWTJNA 


20A 


20 


40A 


40 












ViA 


ISA 


ISA 


AUSTRALIA 


20A 


2 DA 


2i} 


2D 


40 


40 


40 




20 


20 


35 


15 


CANAL ION E 


20 


20 


40A 


40A 


40 






30 


2CA 


ISA 


ISA 


L5A 


EM-GLANd- 






40 










:2o 


15 


20a 


20 


20 


HAWAN 


15 


20A 


20A 


4CA 


40 


40 


40 


20 


20 


20 




ISA 


INDIA 


ZOA 


20A 












20 


20 








JAPAN 


20A 


20A 


20 






iO 


4D 


40a 


20 


20 


20 


20A 


MEXICO 


20 


20 


40 A 


■■■.OA 


40 






20 


20A 


ISA 


ISA 


i5A 


PfllLlPPlNES 


15 






2D 




40 


40 




20 


iO 






PUEHTQ RICO 


20 


20 


40A 


40A 


40 






20 


20A 


feSA 


]5a 


1.3 a 


SOUTH AFf^lCA 


20 














30 


20 


IS 


20 


20 


U. S. S. R. 






40 


40 








30A 


15A 


10 


20 


20 


EAST COASr 


L^JA 


20 


40 


iO 


40 


40 


40 


20 


15 


I5A 


15A 


i5A 



A = Next higher frequency band may also be usef oU 
B= Difficult circuit this period 

G = Good, F = Fair, P = Poor. * = Chance of solar flares- 
# = Chance of aurora. 









__^ 






^1 


UC- 1 C3BFR 


SUN MON rue 


WbU 


THU FRI SAT 




1 

P/F 


2 

p 


3 

P/F 


4 

F 


5 

F 


6 

G 


7 

FIG 


a 

F 


9 

p 


10 

p 


ri 

p 


12 

p 


13 

P/F 


14 

F 


15 

F/G 


16 

P/F 


17 

p 


18 

P/F 


19 

G 


20 

P/F 


21 

P/F 


22 

G 


23 

F/G 


24 

P/F 


?5 

G 


26 

G 


27 

G 


28 

F/G 


29 

F 


30 

G 


31 

G 





112 73 Magazine • October, 1984 



I 




THE FIRST NAME IN 
ELECTRONIC TEST GEAR 




20 MHz DUAL TRACE OSCILLOSCOPE 



Unsurpasaed qualKy at an unbeelable pnce, the Ramsey oseillc?- 
scoptf compares to olhers coating hundreds more. Features include 
fELCompofifinl testing circiu.it far resisl^r, cap&cHQf, digttal circui:t and 
diOde l^s-trng. * TV video syfic fin^r • wide banOiw^dth ^ iT^gh s*nsj- 
tsvKy • intej-nal graticule • iront panel irace rotator • 2axis • high 
BensitivHy K-y mode • regulated power supp^y ■ bmat-in ceiibralor 
* roclt soHd Iriggerjng 



$39995 

high qiuMly hook on 
pTDlMfi Included 




• .. in* *• 




45 MHz DUAL SWEEP OSCILLOSCOPE 



Tl>e Ramsey 525 is e dual time bese, delavM 3we«p unit that mctu0esa byph-m 
Si^naf deftly lino Itf p^ifirLil ■C^ear vleMwingflurimg uery jh^n nse limej^f higti f'e- 
C]U6tricy wavBiurms. DCh&r leaH^res i^ciu'de. vanabi* iirig^er hoidolf * 20cgii- 
brai^d &vj-eBp1ifTie rangeiiromO.Ss/dfvloa.SuS/'-div • iunyadii^stabl^ sweep 
lime • X& sweep magnilicaiion • 1'ive I rigger sources ■ CHT, Ch2. LINE B')(jBfr\B\ 
end iNTarnai fV niode) " ifOril jjanel x-y O0«ralion. £ a!c«5 irput ■ surn <Jlffer- 
enca gf CH1, and CH2 wBvefurmEdispldyvd a&aFrt>gi« !<a.ce • sw§ep.g0i:e ai^d 



$79995 

hJIgh quel \tf h&ok on 
pmbflft )rvc3uded 




RAMSEY D-nOO 
, VDM MUirrTESTER 

Com pact and reliable, desjgned to 
service a wlaa vari^ily of equipment 
ipftalurss loclude * mirror back 
scale * double- jeweled precision 
motfjng coil * doufaSQ overload pro- 
letiiori • an id^ai low cost unit for 
(he b^eg inner orag fi spftre b5tk-up 
unit. 



»1995 



te&l teads and 
batter;/ included 




NEW RAMSEY 1200 
ran MULTITESTER 

Check iransfsnors. -diodes and 
LEDs wjtri this professsoriai qua Illy 
meter. Olher features include; 
decibel scaJ^ * 2QK volt metermg 
sy^iem • 3'^" mirroreo scale * 
pofariiy switch • 2D measuring 
ranges • safety pfobes • high 
impact piastic ca$e 



$2495 



Ie9t leadQ dnd 
tMllery included 




RAMSEY D>3I00 
DIGITAL MULTIMETER 

Rol Fable, accurate digital mea- 
Syremanls at an am&zingly Sow 
coat • in-line color coded push 
buttons, speeds range selection 
» ab-s pJastbC tilt siand • recessed 
input jacks • overload protection 
on all ranges • 3:^ digit UCD dis- 
p\B.Y with au 10 zero, aulo polarity 
8t \o* BAT indicator 



$4995 



t«Bl l«ads and 
b^tterv included 



■ ■■;»•:- ;-v:^^j^<!W^ 




CT-7a 7 OIGIT 525 MHz 
COUNTER 

Lab qi>aJity at a breaklhrough price. Featureg 
• 3 frequency ranges eec^i wiih pre amp * duaS 
selectable gaiA times • gate acttvily iridicator 
» 50m ^ @ 1&D MH2 typical sensitivity • wide 
Irequency range • 1 ppm accuracy 



$11995 

CT-70I<H 

BP-4 nicad pacJ(. . , , 



vw^r«d includes 
AC a^lapier 



. .ft.95 




CT-ffil 9 DIGIT 600 MHz 
COUNTER 

The rnos5 wsrsaliFe for less: than S3oO. Features -3 
selectable gate limes • 9 dignts ■ gate indicalor 

• display hold • ?5mV Cq^ 150 IVIHz typical aem- 
■sitiviiy ' to MH£ timetsase for WWV caiibratJOJi 

* 1 ppm a;CCora,cy 



$1499$ 

CT-9a ki( ,,.,,. 

OV-1 0.1 PPM oven limebase 
BP-4 n lead pack 



wired includes 
AC adapter 



t129.9& 
. , . 59.3B 




CT-125 9D[GIT1.2GHz 
CQUNIEfl 

A 9 digit counter that will outperform unils cost-^ 
Ing hurtcsreds more. • gate ino^catqr • 24mV @ 
150 MHz lypical sensifivily • 9 digit display 
• 1 ppm accuracy * dispfay hold • dual inputs 
with preamps 



*1 6995 



wired Includes 
AC adapter 



BP-4 nicad pack S.9S 




, .;jM..... .■..*>-*M^ 



• • 



ivtivn lEiiMi lU^ 



CT-50 8 DIGIT GOO MHz 
COUNTER 

A vefSatile tab bench counter with optional 
receive frequency adiapter. which turns the CT- 
SO Into a digiial readout for most any receiver 
• £5 mV (3 150 MHz typFcal sensilt^v^^y • B digit 
diSpJay • 1 ppm accuracy 



$1699$ 



wlr*d 



CT-50 kit $139.9S 

R A-l receiyer adapter kit .*.,...,.»....,, . 14.95 




DM-700 DIGITAL MULTIIViETER 

Professional quaiiiy 31 a lobbyist price. Fea- 
tures include ^S different ranges and 5 lunc- 
lions • 3'/i digit. '/.■ inch LED display * aulo- 
matic decimal placatnont * automsillc iSOlarily 



«1 1 995 

DM'700ki! , 

y p- 1 pi^oba &&I . . - . 



wired includes 
AC adapter 



»9a.35 

. ,.4.£IS 




ih n i' -i flK -f' i ■ ■■ » ^-F 1 ■ " I '■ " ■ 



_.r^ ^ 



; k\;w£.^ 



riitti^ «ii«iur itt^ 




HI — 'w ^.v 




PS-2 AUDIO MULTIPLIER 

Tbe PS'^ is handy for high resolujion audio 
resoluti^on meaisuremenis, multiplies UP in Ire- 
Ouency • great for PL lone measurements 
• mu Hi plies by 10 Or lOO » DOl Hz i*"(isoiuli.on & 
built-iin stgnal pieamp/coniditiOMer 



PR-2 COUNTER PREAMP 

The PR-5 is ideal for measuring weak signals 
from to to 1,000 MHz* flat £5 dbgain * BNC 
connecldr& • great for shifting Rf • hdea] 
receiver/TV preamp 



PS-IB GOO MHz PRESCALER 

Extends the range of your present counter to 
800 MHz * 2 stage prsamp * divide liy 10 cir- 
cuitry • sensiliviiy; ?5mv @' i&Q MH; ■ BNC 
connectors • drives any counter 



94995 



$4495 



Mrir^d 



wired includes 
AC adapter 

PR-2 kit «34,9* 



$5995 



wlr^ Includes 
AC aidaipler 



PS-1 13 kii „ S49.9S 



PE-2 k»t 






S39.95 



ACCESSORIES FOR RAMSEY COUNTERS 

Telescopic whip antenna — BNC plug .. $ 8.95 
High impedance probe, light loading . , . 16.95 

Low pass probe, audio use 16.95 

Direct probe, general purpose use , , . . , 13.95 
Tilt bail, tor CT-70, 90, 125 . 3.95 



Mai^c-iGiEia'a . 



PHONE ORDERS CALL 

716-586-3950 

TELEX 466735 RAMSEY CI 



TERMS: • satisfacifon guaranleed • examine (or 10 days: if not ptea$Qd. ratun Ir 
Drf§iniJ TDrni tar relund • add 6% iw shipping and insufance Iq a maximum of 
S10.0Q * overseas add \b% for surface m\\ * C DO add $2.50 |C00 in USA cmlyl 
■ orders under $T^. DO add $LSO • NV residents add 7%S3Je&t»x • 90 day paris 
warraniv on ali kits ■ 1 ve^r parts & labor warranty on alf wired units. 

I = = = =^=;== I RAMSEY ELECTRONICS JKC, 



Penf ield. N.Y, 14626 ^ 268 



See Ust of Advertisers on page 98 



73 Magazine • October, 1984 113 



What To 
Look For In A 
Phone Patch 

The bpsi way to decide 
what patch is right for you 
is to (^fst decide u/hat a 
patch should do. A patch 
should: 

• Give compIt?t<? contTol lo 
the mobi(e« aJlowhig fuH 
break in operation, 

• Not tntetfere wfth the 
normal operation uf your 
base station. It should 
not require ycMJ lo con* 
nect and disconnect cab- 
les {CM^ Rfp sup'itches!} 
eif&y time you wish to 
use your radio as a nor- 
mal ba^e station, 

• Not depend on volume or 
squelch settings of your 
radio. Ii should work the 
same regardless of what 
you do urlth these con^ 
trols. 

• You should be able to 
hear your base station 
speaker uith the patch 
installed . Remember, you 
have a base station be^ 
cause there are mobiles. 
ONE OF THEM MIGHT 
NEED HELP. 

• The patch should have 
standard features at 
no exira cost. These 
should include program- 
mable Ml restrict (dip 
switch es)« tone or rotary 
dialing, programmable 
patch and activity 
timers, and front panel 
indicators of channel and 
patch s^tatus. 

ONLY SMART PATCH 
HAS ALL OF THE 
ABOVE^ 

Now Mobile 
Operators Can 
Enjoy An 
Affordable 
Personal Phone 
Patch. - , 

• Wjthuui an expensive 
repeater. 

■ Using any FM tranceiver 
as a base station. 

• The secret is a SIMPLEX 
autopaich. The SMART 
PATCH, 

SMART PATCH 
Is Easy To Install 

To install SMART PATCH. 
connect the multicolored 
computer stvl^ ribbon cable 
lo niic audio, receiver 
discriniinator^ PTT, and 
power. A modular phone 
cord Is provided lor con- 
neclion to ymir phone sys- 
tem- Sound simple? . . * 

rris! 




I 



impie 
Autopatclf,'\here*s no wait! 
B^ for VOX circuits to dro|l^ 
Simply key your transmitter 

to take control. 



SMART PATCH is all you need to turn your base station into a per- 
sonal aufopatch. SMART PATCH uses the only operating system 
that gives the mobile eomplete control. Full break-iti capability al- 
lows the mobile user to actually Interrupt the telephone party, 
SMART PATCH does not interfere wfth the normal use of your base 
station, SMART PATCH works well with any FM transceiver and pro- 
vides switch selectable tone or rotary dialing, toll restrict, 
programmable control cades, CW ID and much more. 

To Take CONTROL with Smart Patch 
- Call 800-327-9956 Ext. 101 today. 



^^ 




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Comniuiiicatjons Electronics Specialties, Inc. 

RO, Box 2930, Winler Park. Florida 32790 

Teli^hone: (305) 6454M74 Or caU loU-free (800)527-9956 



How To Use 
SMART PATCH 

Ptatring a call is stmpl 
Send your access coc 
from your mobile {exan 
pie; '73). This brings u 
the Patch atid i/oit w 
h€ar dial tone irati*»miit« 
from your has* ^taiio* 
Since SMART PATCH 
checking aboul once pc 
second to s^e if you wat 
to diaJ, all you hav« to d 
is key your transmitie 
then dial the phone tiun 
ber. You will now hei 
the phone ring and sonu 
one answer. Since the ei 
hanc^ control system « 
SMART PATCH is cot 
stantly checking to see 
yoii wish to talk* you ne«- 
to simply key your iran^ 
miner and then talk 
That's right* you simp I 
key your transmitter I 
interrupt the phtint^ II m 
The base station autc 
mattcalty slops Iransmji 
ting aher you key you 
mic. SMART PATCH doe 
not require any specif 
tone equipment to contrc 
your base statiofi. It sam 
pics very high firequenc 
noise preset i ai you 
receivers discriminalor t 
determine if a mobile i 
presenJ. No words or syllc 
bles are ever lost. 



SMART PATCH 
Is All You Need 
To Automatically 
Patch Your Base 
Station To Your 
Plione Line, 

Use SMART PATCH tor. 

• Mobile (or remote bast 
to phone line \ia Simple 
base, (see fig L) 

* Mobile to Mc^bile via Ir 
terconnected base stci 
tions for ejctended rang* 
(see fig. 24 

* Telephone line to tnobil 
(or remote base), 

• SMART PATCH use 
SIMPLEX BASE ST/ 
TION EQUIPMENT. Us 

your ordinaTv base sit 
tion. SMART PATQ 
does this without inte 
fering wiih the normi 
use of your radio. 



WARRANTY? 

YES, 180 days of warrar 
ty protection. You slnipl 
fan't go witjng. 
An FCC type accepte 
croupier is available ft 
SMART PATCH, 



YiV 1*1 K tJ 



N 



FM 



FT-aOdRH 




The^lkesu FT-209RH. 
5 watts that your 
batteries can live with. 



Have the power you need when you need it with 
"T&esu's new 5-watl 2-fneter handhetd, Fbwer to 
get out in situations where ondinary HTs just won't 
make it 

\Afe designed our HT with a unique user- 
pfDgmmmable fbwer Saver that puts the rig to 
"sleep" while you're monitoring and "wakes it up** 
when the squelch bneaks. So you can listen for 
hours and still have plenty of power to hit those 
hard-to-reach repeaters when you need to. 

With the FT-209RH there's no need to fiddle 
with knobs when you change from one mennory 
channel to another Thatis b^use you can inde- 
pendently stone everything you need in each of 
the ten memories: receive frequency standard 
or non-standard offset even tone encod^decode 
with an optional module. And then recall any 
channel at the touch of a button. 

tt's easy to hear what's happening on your 
fevorite repeaters or simplex frequencies, just 
touch a button and scan all memory channels, 
or selected ones. Or all frequencies between 
any two adjacent memories. Use the priority 
feature to nstum automatically to your special 
frequency when it becomes active. 

Bring up control led-access machines with 
the optional plug-in subaudible tone encoder/ 
decoder independently pnDgrnmmed from the 
keyboard for each channel. Listen for tone- 
encoded signals on seleaed channels— without 
having to hear a bunch of chatter— by enabling 
the decode function, 

The FT-209RH. which covers 10 MHz for 
CAP and MARS use, comes complete with a 
500-mAh battery charger and soft case. 

for those who want a basic radio without 
Htm bells and whistles, consider the compact, 
lightweight FT-203R.This economical HT features 
IS watte of power and an optional DTMF key- 
pad- Most all the accessories for the 209 work 
with the 203, including an optional VOX headset 
that gives you hands-free operation that's perfect 
for public service events. 

So when you visit your d^fer let him 
know you won't settle for anything but the best 
A iBdio built by "tSesu. 




Hbcsu Electronics Corporation 

6851 WkJthaii V% Fkramount CA 90723 
(213) 633-400Z 

Ibew Cfncinnati Servtoe Center 

9070 Gold PsTK Dnve- Hamitton. OH «011 
(513) 87+^3100. 



■209flH shown aaual size. 



Prices and specrfK^clons subjecc to change without notice. 




TM-211A DCS... a new turn In 2 meters/70 cm. 



I 



The TM'211A ? meter and the 
TM-^411A 70 cm mobiles combine 
ultra compaci size with the added 
feature of a 7 position adjustable 
front panel, allowing you maximum 
ffexibiiity in both home and automo- 
t'^ve insta* -i' These compact 

irn- . ers also f pr»tyre Kenwood's 

^ve DCS (L.y.ial Code 
^ rcuit, that allows you 

:am your transceiver to 
re -.,„. J only to transmissions fjoiii 
stations vwhose radios transmit a 
pre-selected digital code. Both 
radios deliver 25 biq watts ol R.F 




power on HI and 5 watts (approxj- 
rnately) on LO power. Dual digital 
VFO's, built-in, highly visible yellow 
LED display, five memories plus 
COMM Channel add to this Impres- 
sive array of features. The TM'211A 
and TM-411A e^rh boast high n*"-' 
formance receivi^ and transmit 
specifications and an external 
quality speaker thai provides unsur- 
passed sound quality. Mounting 
flexibility is also a feature ^^s, all 
these features, plus prior ny watch, 
memory and programmable band 
scan^ microphone test function, 
audible "beeper" for operation con- 
firmation, repeater offset switch and 
reverse switch. TheTM-211A and 



TM-411A oiler you the best in 2 
metf^rs and 70 cm opef . is! 

Optional accessories: 

• CD-10 Call Stgn Die, 

• PS- DC. Power Supply 

• f'.PS-7A Power Sunnly 

• MC-55 Mobrle t^n^iu^hone with 
Tir'oe-Out Timer 

• MA-4 000 Dual Band M 
Antpnr^a With Duplexef 

• S,. .J0^'» SWR/Power meters 

• PG'3A i\y*i.e Friter 

More information on these prod- 
ucts IS available from authorized 
dealers of Tno-Kenwood 
Communications, mi Wasi vValnut 
Street. Compton, CA 90220. 



CD -10/ DCS 





The optional CD -10 ht^ipt, 
maximize your use of Kenwood's 
1 revolutionary new sigr^Hing concept. 
DCS (Digital Cod'=' ^-"^'elch). DCS 
use~ -^ - '- " cod" J nation lo opt^w 
sqij on a receiver thai has been 

f programmed to accept the specific 
code being IransmrUed. Up to 
100,000 differenl S-digit codes are 
possible, allowing each station to 
have its own "private call" code or 



. ■ ■ * L 







-U W \m \m^ 




to respond to a "gfoup caii ui 
^'common call" code. Pfogram your 
call sign (up to 6 digits) in the ASCII 
code and it is automatically trans- 
milted when the transmit key 
is deprer 1 The CD-10 
stores the calling station's 
call sign in its memory 



'ere nee. am 
dtspla. ■] on the L.C.D. readout. 
The Cb-10 can storp '-all sign data 
of up to 20 stations, ^^^lowing you 
to quickly check for cails if you ^^ 

3ve . 1 absent from your station. 
and r'^vrr^w your con-^rts for logging 
purpo^ci. The DCS ' " 'in data 
transmission system ^ mark and 
space frequencies with normal 

speech band width rrnmpatibte 
w/most repeaters). 





II 



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TM- 201 A/401 A 

The extremely popular TM'201A 
2 meter FM (25 watts, 142.0QQ 
to 149.000 MHz) and the 
TM-401A 70 cm FM (10 watts, 
440-450 MHz) ultra compact 
mobile transceivers are also 
available.