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Internationa! Edition 





DECEMBER IWS 

ISSUE #33*> 

USA $2.95 

CAN $3.95 

A WGE Publication 



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$20 Keyer 

Modify Your Mid Ian 
RS-232 On The C-BU! 



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Annual iioiidau Buyer's Guide 




ICOM has a commitment to high per- 
formance 220MHz gear. That's why we're 
the only manufacturer who can offer you a 
full line of 220MHz equipment,., whet her it's 
a mobile, handheld base station transceiver, 
or fiber optic multi-bander. 

Handhelds Choose the full-featured 
five-watt 1C-03AT with 10 full function mem- 
ories capable of storing odd offsets 
and subaudible tones, scanning and 



JC-37A 

Mobile 







DTMF direct keyboard entry. Or select the IC-3AT easy-to- 
operate handheld featuring thumbwheel switch frequency - 
selection. 

Mobiles. ICOM offers the IC-3SA, which sports a large 
LCD readout, 21 memories. scanning P and memory lock-out 
The slim-line 1C-37A features an LED readout, nine mem- 
ories capable of storing offset and subaudible tones and 
both memory and band scan. 

Base Station. The 1C-375A is a 220MHz all mode open 
tors dream... 25 watts output, an internal power supply, 99 

memories, scanning, and 
all subaudible tones built-in 

M til tl- Bander The new- 
est addition to ICO Ms 
220MHz family., the IC-900 
fiber optic controlled six- 
band mobile, which has a 
220MHz optional band unit. 

Quality. High Perform- 
ance. That's ICOM 220MHz. 



IC-3AT 
Handheld 



ICOM 



Communicoi 

ICOM America, Inc., 2380-1l6th Ave. N.E, BelJevue. WA 98004 Customer Service Hotline (206) 454-761 

3150 Premier Drive, Suite, 126. Irving, TX 75063 / 1777 Phoenix Parkway, Suite 201 , Atlanta, GA 3034! 

ICOM CANADA, A Division of ICOM America, !na p 3071 - #5 Road, Unit 9 S Richmond, B.C. V6X 2T4 Canad 

All stated specifications are approximate ami subject to change without notice or obligation Ml ICOM radios sgmticantiy exceed FOC regulations hmrimg spurious emissions 220*fiHj£B 

CIRCLE 354 OH REAPER SERVICE CM* 



FOUR user selectable operating modes and 
a 90 number autodialer make Private Patch V 



the ONLY choice! 





SELECT AN OPERATING MODE 
USING THE BUILT-IN KEYBOARD. 



1. SIMPLEX SAMPLING PATCH 

Private Patch V achieves a level of sampling patch performance 
unobtainable in any other product. Crucial to performance is 
the noise squelch filter. Compare our five pole filter to the 
competition's two pole filter. Advanced software algorithms 
perform noise correlation tests which result in greater useable 
range than the competition. Nine selectable VOX enhancement 
ratios allow you to vary performance from straight sampling to 
highly VOX enhanced, (sampling rate decreased while the land 
party is speaking). The mobile is in full control and can break- 
in at any time. 

2. SIMPLEX VOX PATCH 

VOX mode offers superb simplex operation with any radio, 

including synthesized and relay switched models. VOX mode 
has other advantages too. 1. A linear amplifier can be used to 
extend straight simplex range, 2. You can operate through any 
remotely located repeater to greatly extend range. 3. if desired 
you can connect Private Patch V to the MIC and speaker jack 
of your radio. NO INTERNAL CONNECTIONS ARE REQUIRED. 
Control is maintained automatically with built-in dial tone 
detection, busy signal detection and fully programmable activity 
and time out timers. An optional electronic voice delay board 
eliminates first word clipping with slow switching radios. 

3. DUPLEX PATCH 

Select duplex mode when connecting Private Patch V to your 
existing repeater or duplex base station. Many features including 
semi*duplex privacy mode are user programmable. The mobile 
is in full control at all times. 

4. REPEATER CONTROLLER 

Private Patch V will convert any receiver and transmitter into 
an outstanding performing repeater with duplex autopatch. 
Features such as repeater on/off code, hangtime, activity timer 
time, CW ID interval etc. are fully user programmable. Private 
Patch V is the right choice for your club system. 



Private Patch V is a totally new concept tn automatic 
phone patches. A built-in keyboard and menu driven 
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Private Patch V can be a sampling patch today. A VOX 
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You may never need another patch again. 

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• Telephone remote base 

• Remote controlled relay (relay optional) 

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^? 



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Phone: (213) 373-6803 



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CIRCLE 12 ON READER SERVICE CARD 




"You're miles ahead 

^AF1| wT% | ^HT^itf^l^ ^ ' RickWoodsowe, Coirtmunications Consultant 
W tU i. ■ d%ll *9^^M &• Woocfeome^d Associates, Boulder, Colorado 

When the directors of the Coors International Bicycle Classic needed 
a sophisticated mobile communications system, they turned to commu- 
nications consultant Rick Woodsome. As a communications specialist, 
Woodsome knows what it takes to make a communication system work. 

That's why he turned to Larsen Antennas. 

"You don't pull off the largest sports event in the Western Hemisphere 
without good communication. And you don't have good communication 
without trie right equipment. 

"Larsen antennas were instrumental in making last summer's 
Coors Classic an overwhelming success. They were key to our entire 
communication network. 

"Without Larsen, it would have been uphill all the way." 

Rick Woodsome 





*- 




THE AMATEUR'S PROFESSIONAL. 

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dealer 
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line of 
Larsen 
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because theyte all backed by Larseris No 
Nonsense Warranty lor a full six months. 

For a professional approach to amateur radio, 
lune in to Larsen, 




Larsen Antennas 

The Amateur's Professional 

See your favorite amateur dealer or write for a free amateur catalog. 

IN USA: Larsen Electronics, Inc., 11611 N.E 50th Avenue, RO Box 1799, Vancouver. Washington 98668 (206) 573^2722 
IN CANADA: Canadian Larsen Electronics, Ltd.. 149 West 6th Avenue. Vancouver. B.C. V5Y 1 K3 (604) 872-S517 



CIRCLE 23 ON READER SERVICE CARD 




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dummy load, new peak reading Meter and more . . . 

The MFJ-9B9C is a compact 3 KW 



roller inductor tuner with a new peak 
reading Crass-Needfe SWR/Wattmeter. 
The roller inductor lets you get your 
SWR down to absolute minimum. 

With three continuously variable 
components ■■ two massive 6 J<V 
capacitors and a high inductance roller 
inductor - you get precise control over 
SWR and the widest matching range 
possible from 1,8-30 MHz. 

You get a new lighted peak and 
average reading Cross Needle 
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You get a giant two core balun 
wound with teflon wire for balanced 




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Its compact t0 3 Ax4V«15 inch 
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The MFJ 9fl9C is not tor everyone. 

However, ft you do make the 
investment, you'll get the finest 3 KW 
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i he MFJ-949C gives you more 
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*1 39 M uses two ta PP^ 'nducters. Why? 

Because you get two continuously 
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This gives you the precise control you need to get 
your SWR down to a minimum. After all isn't thai 
why you need a tuner. 

You also get a dual range lighted Cross-Needle 
SWR/Wattmeter. 6-position antenna switch, 50 ohm 
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continuous 1.8 30 MHz coverage - ait in a compact 
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MFJ-901B 

The MFJ 

90 IB is our 
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inches - and most affordable) zoo wan pep versa 
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verticals, mobile whips, beams, bafanced and coax 
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matching solid state rigs to linears. Efficient 
airwound inductor. 4:1 balun for balanced lines, 

1 44/220 MHz VHF TUNERS 

MFJ-920 

MFJ-921 

MFJ's newest VHF 

tuners cover both 2 Meters and the new Novice 
220 MHz binds. They handle 300 watts PEP and 
match a wide range of impedances for coax fed 
antennas. MFJ-921 has SWR/Wattmeter. 



MFJ's Fastest Selling TUNER 



MFJ's 1.5 KW VERSA 



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Ttie MFJ 9410 1$ MFJ's fastest selling 
MFJ-941D 300 W PEP antenna tuner! Why? 
$qq 95 Because ri has more features than 

v ^ tuners costing much more and it 
matches everything continuously from 1.8-30 MHz, 

It matches dipoles. vees, verticals, mobile whips, 
random wires, balanced and coax lines. 

SWR/Wattmeter reads forward/reflected power in 
30 and 300 watt ranges. Antenna switch selects 2 
coax lines, direct or through tuner, random wire/ 
balanced line or tuner bypass. Efficient airwound 
inductor gives lower losses and more watts out. 
Has 4:1 balua 1000 V capacitors. 10x3x7 inches. 

MFJ's Mobile TUNER 



MFJ-945C 

$ 79 95 



Don't leavn home without this mobile tuner! Have 
an uninterrupted trip as the MFJ945C extends your 
antenna bandwidth and eliminates the need to stop, 
go outside and readjust your mobile whip. 

You can operate anywhere in a band and gel low 
SWR. You'll get maximum power out of your solid 
state or tube rig and it'll run cooler and last longer. 

Small 8x2x6 inches uses little room, SWR/ 
Wattmeter and convenient placement of controls 
make tuning test and easy while In motion. 300 
watts PEP output, efficient airwound inductor, 1000 
volt capacitors. Mobile mount, MFJ-20. $3.00. 

2KWCOAX "?i 7 £ z 5 .^iAoj 
SWITCHES $19<> HP 

MFJ- 1702, $19.95. 2-poSltfons. N™>^ 

60 dB isolation at 450 MHz. ■* 

Less than .2 dB loss. 
SWFl below 1:1.2. 

MFJ-1701, $29,95. 
6-positrons. Unused 
positions grounded 
For desk or wall mount 



$ 29 95 MFJ-1701 





For a few extra dollars, me MFJ- 
MFJ-962C 962C rets you use your barefoot rig 

*1 99 05now ancl ^ ave lhe capacity t0 a d°" a 
1500 watt PEP linear ampfifer later. 

Two continuously variable 6 KV capacitors give 
you precise control for getting your SWR down to a 
minimum. And lots of inductance gives you the 
widest matching range possible. 

You can read both peak and average power with 
the lighted 2 color Cross Needle SWR/Wattmeter. A 
new directional coupler gives you more accurate 
readings over a wider frequency range. 

Has 6-position ceramic antenna switch and a 
teflon wound two-core baJun with ceramic feedthru 
insulators for balanced lines. 1 3 Ax4 1 /zx1 4 7/8 in. 

MFJ's Random Wire TUNER 

MFJ 16010 

You can operate 
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with any transceiver 
when you let the 
MFJ-16010 turn any 
random wire into a transmitting antenna, Great for 
apartment, motel, camping operation. Tunes 18 30 
MHz. Handles 200 watts. Ultra compact 2x3x4 in. 

MFJ artificial RF ground 

S 79 05 MFJ-931 

You can 
create an 
artificial RF 
ground and 
eliminate 
RF "bites", 

leedback, TVI and RFI when you let the MFJ-931 
resonate a random length of wire and turn it into a 
tuned counterpoise. The MFJ 931 also lets you 
electrically piece a far away RF ground directly at 
your rig -■ no matter how far away it is - by tuning 
out the reactance of your ground connection wire. 





ORDER ANY PRODUCT FROM MFJ AND TRY IT - HO 
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MFJ ENTERPRISES, INC. 

Box 494, Miss. State, MS 39762 



FOR YOUR NEAREST DEALER OR TO ORDER 

800-647*1800 

Call 601-323-5869 in Miss, and outside 
continental USA. Telex 53-4590 MFJ STKV. 
In CANADA call TEXPRO 416-332-5944, 





MFJ . . - making quality affordable 



CIRCLE 24 OH READER SERVICE CARD 



Number 1 on your Feedback card 



Never say die 



Wayne Green W2NSD/1 





Sun Spots and Antennas 

Even though antennas are by 
far the most interesting area 
for amateur experimentation— 
and also one of the easiest to in- 
vestigate, the field has seen pa* 
thetically little development in 
recent years, Tsk! 

With ihe sun spots rising at the 
fastest rate in history, it's getting 
time for all of us to start working on 
antennas. How much do you know 
about f em? Have you ever read an 
article on how they work? Do you 
have even a faint idea of how they 
work? Do you give a damn? 

What do you know about bi- 
squares T cubical quads, the Twin 
Three and the ZL-Special? ! re- 
member when I first ran up 
against a bi-square Sam Harris 
WBUKS T out near Cleveland, had 
put up a whopping tower and 
hung a 75m bi -square from it To 
change its direction he'd run out 
and move the pegs holding the 
antenna away from his tower. 
How'd it work? 

Well, this was 1951 , so he was 
running an old 40 watt Collins AM 
rig. I was in Brooklyn with my rock* 



crushing kilowatt and a dipole. I 
worked out pretty well, working all 
over Europe, down into Africa and 
even over to Japan. Sam, with his 
lousy 40 watts, clobbered me, 
He T d be talking with a ZS6. I'd 
break in and the ZS6 would men- 
tion that he'd heard a slight het- 
erodyne in the background. So 
they'd stand by to see who was 
breaking in. Drat! 

When's the last time you saw an 
article on building a bi-square? 
And why it puts out such a whop- 
ping signal? If you want a killer 
contest antenna. . .? 

In the middle of the rugged win- 
ter of 1947 I decided to try the 
W6JK Twin-Three antenna. Two 
dipoles spaced a sixth wave apart . 
For some reason this beaut has a 
lower angle of radiation than 
dipoles, yagis or quads. The result 
was that I'd have the first signal 
from my area. I'd call CQ and get 
calls from England saying I was 
the only signal on the band. Then, 
as they'd hear other signals get- 
ting stronger, mine would fade 
down and I'd talk with Italy. A little 
laier I'd be the first signaf into the 
middle east — then into India. 




GSL OF THE MONTH 

To enter your QSL t mail it in an envelope to 73, WGE Center, 70 Re. 
202 N„ Peterborough NH 03458, Attn: QSL of the Month. Winners 
receive a one-year subscription (or extension) to 73. Entries not in 
envelopes cannot be accepted. 

4 73 Amateur Radio * December, 1968 



One morning I heard a very faint 
W7 portable something in the OX 
part of the band calling CQ. Hm* 
mm. I called the "W7 something, 
portable something,' I felt so 
stupid l only called him once. He 
came right back, his signal gradu- 
ally improving. It was W7IMW/G7 
in Tsiensin. China 1 I was the only 
American signal on the band. 

We talked for a while, then he 
mentioned that other stations 
were beginning to call him, so we 
parted. An hour tater he called 
again to say that everyone else 
had faded out. 

The ZL-Special antenna is very 
similar to the Twin-Three, but 
made entirely from twin-lead, 
Have you used either of these 
barn-burners? They only seem to 
work well during high sun spot 
times, when the ionosphere is so 
heavily ionized that these ex- 
tremely low angle signals can 
propagate, 

The Twin-Three is simple to 
make. It's a wire beam with two 
three-wire dipoles spaced a sixth 
wave apart. You hang them from a 
pair of 2x2$, which, in turn, are 
hung by ropes between a couple 
trees or between a tall tree and 
your house. Vou feed 'em with 
quarter-wave 300O twin-line sec- 
tions and feed the junction of the 
two feeders with 300O twin-line. 

My question is this, how come 
you Ve not outside trying new an- 
tennas? Hells bells, it isn't as if 
you don't have a personal com- 
puter to do the calculations for 
you. an aid we dtdrVi have forty 
years ago. Let's see some experi- 
menting and some antenna arti- 
cles! 

How about a 40m Twin-Three? 
Maybe even one for 80m? How 
about stacked Twin-Threes? 
What's the radiation pattern from 
something like that? How about 
some club projects to test out dif- 
ferent antennas? 

Continued on page 6 



TAFF 



PUBLJSHER/EDiTOR 
Wayne Grew W2HSDH 

ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER 
Smart Norwood 

MANAGING EDITOR 
Bryan Hastings NS1 B 

SENIOR EDITOR 
Reoecee Niemete 

COPY EDITOR 
UndftHNtMN 

EDITORIAL ASSISTANT 
Martha Goun 

TECHNICAL EDITOR 
David McLanahan WA1FHB 

INTERN ATION AL EDITOR 
Richard Pheniv 

ART OBJECTOR 

BobDuketie 

GRAPHIC DESIGN MANAGER 
Deborah Smith 

GRAPHfC DESIGNER 
Marityn Mof an 

JAPANESE TRANSLATOR 
Oavitf Cowhig WA1 LBP 

ASSOCIATES 

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Uon Fletcher N6HYK 

Jim Gray W1XU 

Chod Harris VP2ML 

Dr Marc Leavey WA3AJR 

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Bill Pasternak WA6ITF 

Paler Putmao KT2S 

Mike Stone WQfQCD 

Arts* Thompson W7XU 

ADVERTISING 
1-603-525*4201 
1-600-225-5083 

SALES MANAGER 
EdVertw 

ADVERTISING SALES 

Jifn Bat) 

SALES SERVICES MANAGER 
Hope Carrier 



WGE PUBLISHING. 
INC. 

CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER 
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TYPESETTING/PAGINATION 

Sob Dufcette. Systems Supervisor 

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GRAPHICS SERVICES 

Richard Clarke. Manager 

Sue B. Flanagan, Dale Williams 

GRAPHICS PHOTOGRAPHER 
Den Croieau 

Ed iion a I onicee 

WGE Center 

Peterborough, NH 03455-1194 

603*525^201 

Subscription Customer Service 

1 -800-525-0643 

Colorado/ Foreign Subscribers 

call! -303-447-9330 



Wayne Green Enterprises is a division 
of I nte matronal paia Group 

Repfints:The first copy of an article — 
13.00 (each additional copy $1.5.0) 
Write to 70 Amateur Radio Magazine, 
WGE Center , Rie 2Q2 NodJi. Peter- 
borough, NH 03458 ATTN: Article 
Reprints 



QRM 

Editorial Qtl I ceB 

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phom 603-525-4201 

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Manuscripts. 
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Please enclose a stamped, seff- 
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Contract- Gooo— foa 'n dowry te ft w rng 
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8y the tkm*you ftmsfi rfH*s»ni»nc#. you wM 
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«• be glad mat you nsad ifta srnaa print 

73 AMATEUR RADIO (ISSN 0S89- 
5309) is published monthly by WGE 
Publishing. Inc., a division of Wayne 
Green Enterprises, lnc,> WQE Cen- 
ter, 70 Rte 2D2N, Peterborough, NH 
0345EH 194 Second-class postage 
paid at Peterborough. NH and addi- 
tional mailing offices 

Postmaster Send address changes 
to 73 Amateur Radio, PO. Box 
Boulder CO 80322-8866. 



DECEMBER 1988 




AMATEUR 
RADIO 



Issue # 339 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



FEATURES 

12 Civil Air Patrol 

Most radio fun you can have without a license 

14 




24 



27 



KA9KAF 

RS-232 Port For The Commodore C-64 
Give the ham's favorite computer this most standard 
interface Neal 

Don't Lose Your Memory 

Don'l lei a dead lithium battery ruin your listening 

p I tr dS Li r v . ..__•* f * <■ k i. i i * * »• - .••--■*■■■<■« XX 7 L^ vJ I 

Packet Tuning Indicator 

More easily enjoy world-wide packet operation, 

W2EKY 

Midland 13-509 Modifications 

Two nice low-cost additions to a popular rig. WB9 YBM 



29 



34 



57 



89 



d m 4 * 



Decatur Ham Launches Satellite 

A satellite to go up in the name of education. 

Charging Without Overcharging 
No more backup battery bum-up 

Buyers 1 Guide 

73 'spicks of 1988'scrop 

Yearly Index 

Easy reference for 1988 articles, reviews, and columns ...,,,. compiled by Linda Reneau 



- - m * ■ 



■ ■ m 



. . . . WB8UUE 



WB8VQR 



Staff 



REVIEWS 

11 The TE-144 Deluxe CMOS Keyer 

Solid keyer at the right price. 

19 Bel-Tek's CMOS keyer kit 

The best dit and dah for the buck. ...... 

49 The Carolina Windom 

An old design made even better 

68 The ICOM 32AT dual-band HT 

Full Duplex in a Handheld. . . 

7g B&WPT-2500AHFAmp 
QRO? QRO! - 



• * # * 



WAGOHX 



WA9FPU 



WA4BLC 



WB2MIC 



• NA5E 




DEPARTMENTS 



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the be £ itming of each 
ankle ;uid col umn, We'd 

c viiu to rule wrmi vou 
read mi (hat we cart pnnt 
what t> pa uf thing* > t m 
lifcebcu Andihen*c 
will dnw one Feedback 
canl cadi memh for a 
free subscription Ed 73. 



% Ad Index 

75 Above and Bc> and 

63 Aerial View 

72 AaR kaboom 

55 ATV 

87 Barter 'V Buy 

97 Dealer Directory 

77 DX 

17 Feedback 

6S Hamsals 

52 Homing Id 

% Index: 12*8 



67 Letters 

83 Looking West 
A VeverSa) Dte 

44 New Products 

HO Propagation 

71 QRP 

9 QRX 

84 QTHDX 
107 RTTYLncip 

103 ?3 International 

80 Special Events 

95 Tech Tips 




CLC0ME to Wnfis Island 




Photography by Suzanne Torsheya 



73 Amateur Radio • December, 1988 5 



Never Say Die 

Continued from page 4 

A few years back I visited (he 
Hustler antenna range out in east- 
ern Ohio— a ham's paradise! 
They even had a platform for cars 
so they could rotate a car on it and 
run a curve on the radiation pat- 
tern. That's something a club 
could do as a ctub project. Any 
takers? 

I remember reading an article 
on the optimum heigh! for 20m 
beams, ft turned out that about 73' 
above the virtual ground gave the 
best DX pattern. Beat out even 
higher antennas. Come on, fellas, 
let's get going on antenna experi- 
menting and get some articles in- 
to 73 so we can all have a ball as 
the sun spots open our bands. 
20m will soon be providing DX 
contacts around the clock, 10m 
will be fantastic almost every day, 
giving Novices and Teenies DX 
thrills. On 6m you'll be able 
to work all over the world with 
low power. Let's set some ORP 
records. 

We're already seeing crazy 
sporadic-E openings on 6m. It's a 
hint when you tune your FM radio 
and hear strange FM stations 
pouring in by the zillions. 

If you want to build a Twin- 
Three, dig back into a 1947 issue 
of CQ or an old Jones Radio 
Handbook and find the plans. 
Build one and let us know how 
you've made out. 

Music on 20m— Legally 

Yes, of course you can transmit 
music on 20m— or any other ham 
band. And. yes r if you do it right 
it's entirely legal. Would it help if I 
offered a prize for the first 20m 
ham transmission of The Blue 
Danube? 

For that matter it's also legal to 
send fast scan TV over 20m — if 
you use the same system. Heck. 
you can send high definition 3D 
full color TV in the 20m phone 
band if you want. 

So how do we send an Erich 
Kunzel and the Cincinnati Pops 
Orchestra playing The Blue 
Danube over 20m? Easy as pi. All 
it takes is some sneaky time shift- 
ing. You see, it's like this, that 
stuff on compact discs is digital 
data, not music. It isn't until we 
run it through a converter, deci- 
phering the bit stream, that we get 
music. 

The digital data on a CD is 
clocked at 44,100 Hz, so if you 
send it at full speed it's going to 
take up around 100 kHz of band- 
width, a bil much for 20m. It'd 
probably play on the UHF bands 



alt okay. So okay, let's slow it 
down by a factor of twenty so it'll 
only tie up 5 kHz— like we do for 
slow scan TV, where we pare 
down a 5 MHz bandwidth and 
cram it into a 5 kHz slot. 

A five minute musical selection 
would take a hundred minutes to 
transmit. Nobody said this was a 
fast system, we're aiming for 
sound perfection, not speed, 

Slowing the bit stream down 
for transmission and then speed- 
ing it up again for playing is an 
obvious challenge. One fairly sim- 
ple way of doing it would be to 
dump about 20 megabytes at a 
time from a CD onto a hard disk. 
You'd then program your comput- 
er to put it out at the slower speed 
into your rig. The receiver would 
do the opposite, loading the signal 



the time Cantor bought hundreds 
of old books for a quarter each 
and had a rubber stamp made 
with Pappy's address. Cantor 
left the books on store counters 
and in hotel rooms all over the 
country. There still being a few 
honest people in those days, 
these books would be returned to 
Pappy, often sent collect. Hun- 
dreds, 

Pappy was also an ace cartoon- 
ist. When I started 73 in 1960 I got 
him to do my first cover. Down 
through the years I've published 
hundreds of his cartoons for you. 
The last time I saw him 1 we got 
together while I was down in Mo- 
bile attending my old submarine 
crew reunion. Smoking had bro- 
ken his health, but not his spirit. 

Not long after my visit he had a 



' 'What do you know about 

bhsquares, cubical quads, 

the Twin Three and 

the ZL-Special?" 



onto a hard disk and from there to 
a DAT recorder, Voila: The 
Danube ftoweth, 

I've got $100 each for the first 
pair of you who pull this off . and 
prove it 

What about the FCC? If you'll 
read the rules carefully you'll find 
nothing to prevent your experi- 
menting in this way. However, If 
you ask a civil servant to put his 
pension on the line by providing 
you with an official okay to do this 
you are a nut case and should be 
demoted to a CBer, Just go ahead 
and do it and stop your confound- 
ed nit-ptcking. 

Pappy is SK 

I first met Pappy K4PP (K4LAP/ 
K8LAP) when I was working as 
an announcer/engineer for WSPB 
in Sarasota, Florida, 1950* Nice 
gig, where I put the station on the 
air in the morning, did some an- 
nouncing, read news, did a morn- 
ing disk jockey show and then laid 
around on the beautiful Gulf Coast 
beach in the afternoon, working 
on skin cancer and premature 
skin aging, 

Bandel Linn, "Pappy," did 
an afternoon talk show, so we got 
to be good friends. He'd bring 
in well known writers such as 
his good friend McKinley Cantor 
and interview them. He and 
Cantor were always pulling practi- 
cal jokes on each other. Like 



stroke that paralyzed his left side. 
He was still able to turn out more 
cartoons for 73— then a second 
stroke ended that— and his ham- 
ming. 

That's two old ham friends and 
73 contributors gone in a couple 
months— Bill Hoisington K1CLL 
and Pappy. Since most of you are 
about my age, you're having the 
same thing happen to you— good 
old friends dying. In this case 
we've lost two hams who have 
done much to make amateur radio 
more fun for all of us. 

Digital Audio 

At a recent ham club talk I 
asked the assembled how many 
had CD players. Bunch hands 
went up. Great! Then I asked how 
many were reading Digital Audio 
magazine. Darned few hands. 
Whoa! 

The reason I started Digital 
Audio magazine four years 
ago was because I knew that 
a high percentage of the early 
CDs would be technical disasters, 
I was right. Heck, even now, four 
years later, we're finding that 1 7% 
of the new CDs being released 
are barfs. They're so bad that 
most people who buy them play 
them once and that's It* Some 
are simply awful performances. 
Some are terrible recordings. 
Would you believe that you could 
end up with a CD made from 



old 78 rpm records, complete with 
the lousy sound and needle 
scratch? 

A recent survey of the field 
showed that the average CD 
buyer is spending about $670 a 
year on CDs, mostly to replace his 
old LP collection. That's $114 a 
year wasted. Worse, another 60% 
of the CDs coming out can best be 
termed mediocre. They're okay r 
but with modest performances or 
only fair sound. That's another 
$402 blown through a simple lack 
of research 

Now if you've got enough mon- 
ey so that you can afford to waste 
$516 a year by buying lousy or 
so-so CDs, fine. I'M tell you 
this, you won't find wealthy people 
throwing away their money like 
that. You get to be wealthy by tak- 
ing care of your money, not wast- 
ing it. Yes. the solution to 
the problem is simple: subscribe 
to Digit at Audio magazine — 
a crummy $20 a year* This is 
the only magazine devoted to re- 
viewing CDs, so it isn't like you 
have to buy a half dozen new 
magazines to keep track of the 
field. 

In QA, as in 73. I have an in- 
depth index to each issue so you 
can find the composer, performer, 
music or label of your particular 
interest. DA t like 73. is fun to 
read. My DA editors don't take 
themselves any more seriously 
than the 73 editors. Try it, you'll 
like it. 

If you haven't gotten a CD play- 
er yet you'll want to read the play- 
er reviews in DA, Compact discs 
are killing LPs r slowly, but surely. I 
stopped by the Sound Warehouse 
in Houston recently and found 
their sales were running 78% CD, 
2.6% LP and the rest cassettes. 
The down side of CDs is that their 
sound is so fantastic that you'll be 
wanting to improve your hifi sys- 
tem in order to hear that wonderful 
sound better. If you're short of 
money you can make do with 
some Koss headphones, that will 
knock your sox off with the sound 
they let you hear. 

Call my operator at 800-722- 
7785 with your credit card number 
and get started with DA. It's four 
years old now and has over 
100,000 delighted readers. In 
fact, according to the Audit Bu- 
reau, it's one of the fastest grow- 
ing magazines in the country. Or 
you can send $19.97 to Digital Au- 
dio, Peterborough NH 03458- 
1194. 

And yes, you're tn for another 
Wayne Green editorial every 
month. " 



6 73 Amateur Radio • December, 1988 





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EDITED BY BRYAN HASTINGS NS18 



Space Operations 

AO-13 operations continue normally. 

On 1 9 September, a new schedule reflects the 
spacecraft altitude change. 

The first Mode S transponder tests were 
successfully performed beginning at about 
2025 UTC, 17 September. Three stations 
were on during the first test run— VE4MA, 
WB5LUA, and KORZ Mode S uses an uplink 
at 435 MHz and produces a downlink at 2.4 
GHz, All three stations on the initial test ran 
SSB. K0RZ says the measured uplink band- 
width was 35 KHz; the measured downlink, 34 
kHz. More than a dozen stations around the 
world reported hearing the 2,4 GHz beacon. 
Recent reports suggest good to excellent re* 
suits may be obtained from very modest an- 
tennas. DF5DP used only a 20 dB gain yagi. 

AMSAT-DL and AMSAT-NA thanks all 
those who submitted telemetry reports on the 
Mode L AGC levels. They have now estab- 
lished an automated system on AO-1 3 for log- 
ging AGC levels. 

AO-10 is out of service for an indeterminate 
period due to poor sun angles. Recently, its 
beacon has been occasionally heard sending 
garbled PSK telemetry. This indicates the 
spacecraft IHU is powering down during 
eclipses and, when re-powered t 
logic circuits assume an indeter- 
minate state. Occasionally the 
PSK beacon will be commanded 
by a chance logic state. 

RS-11 will be operating Tues- 
day through Friday on Mode KA 
and weekends on Mode A. There 
is currently no RS-1 operation. 

The new Mode S test window 
will be announced. Mode S bea- 
con will run concurrent with Mode 
L but, for power budget reasons, 
will cause Mode J to be turned off 
during Mode S beacon opera- 
tions. On or about 19 September, 
the attitude will be changed to 
BLON = 2tQand BLAT = +5 to re- 
spond to seasonal sun angle 
changes. 



government to deal with electromagnetic in- 
terference problems by setting EMI suscepti- 
bility standards. 



Reciprocal 
Agreements 



Scotland 



Packet digipeating has come to Scotland. A 
packet radio digipeater (switch) became oper- 
ational in central Scotland on 27 August. It 
operates on 144.650. Address reception and 
verification reports to GM1VBE. 



Guinea Biseau 



Dave Heil J52US finally obtained 6 meter 
operating privileges in this tiny nation on the 
western tip of the African continent, located 1 2 
degrees north of the equator. Dave (US: 
K8MN) works for the US State Department. 

To get this truly rare locale on the air, sever- 
al members of the Midwest VHF/UHF Society 
are working toward finding a 50 MHz trans- 
ceiver to loan to Dave, and welcome any dona- 
tions. Equipment sought includes a Yaesu 
620B transceiver, amplifier, and memory 
keyer. Contact the Midwest VHF/UHF Soci- 
ety. c/0 Terry NetzEey W8NJR, 1821 E. Troy 
Urbana Rd. t Troy OH 45373. 



Canada 



A new Radio Communications 
bill was brought to the table in 
the House of Commons by the 
Hon. Flora MacDonald, Minister 
of Communications. This is the 
first proposed major revision to 
Canadian communications law 
since 1936. If passed, it will permit 
the Canadian Government to stop 
the importation, manufacture, 
and sale of substandard radio 
equipment, and also permit the 



SS HOMEBREW IV $$ 

73 Magazine again invites all home-brewers to turn their hot 
solder into cold cash, and to get their name in print to boot, All 
project have a chance to appear in the magazine, and we will 
handsomely reward the authors of the creme de la creme of 
these. 

First prize is $300 plus a ten-year subscription to 73. Second 
prize is $150. Third prize is $75. This is in addition to the payment 
every author receives for publishing in 73. 

Contest Rules 



1 . Entnes must be received by 1 April 1989, 

2. To enter, write an article describing your best home-brew 
construction project and submit ft to 73 If you've never written for 
73. send an SASE for a copy of our Writer's Guide, or download 
them from CompuServe (Hamnet forum, Library §,, filename 
"73WBTTJ. 

3. Here's the real challenge: The total cost of your project must 
cost under $73. even if all the parts were bought new. Be sure to 
include a detailed parts list with prices and sources. 

4. Our technical staff will evaluate each project on the basis of 
originality, usefulness, reproducibility, economy of design, and 
clarity of presentation. The decision of the judges is final. 

5. All projects must be original. That is, they must not be pub- 
lished elsewhere. There is no limit to the number of projects you 
may enter. 

6. All purchased articles become the property of 73 Magazine. 

7. Mail your entries to: 

73 Magazine 

WGE Center 

70 Rle. 202 N 

Peterborough, NH 03458-1 194 

Attn: Home-Brew IV 



The FCC announced that three more coun- 
tries — Antigua and Barbuda, Dominica, and 
Hong Kong—signed reciprocal licensing 
agreements with the US, 

Never Too Old 



Murl Fox KB6YPF is one man who apparent- 
ly has never heard the adage about "teaching 
an old dog new tricks." Murl received his 
Technician class call only three months after 
celebrating his 97th birthday! 



Hams at the Scene 



Amateurs were among the first to arrive at 
the scene ot the August 31st crash of Delta 
Flight 1141. The aircraft, a Boeing 727, 

crashed at takeoff. Immediately after the 
plane went down, both Dallas and Tarrant 
County RACES activated their "Mass Casual- 
ty Plan" mode, Under the Mass Casualty 
_ Plan, amateurs were dispatched 
to the crash scene and to alt area 
hospitals to provide tactical back- 
up communications. Virtually all 
the amateur radio communica- 
tions between the hospitals, 
where survivors were taken, were 
on the 220 MHz band. 

Some of the key operators were 
Art Hunstable N5KSA who served 
as Net Control Station for Dallas 
RACES, Ken Winters N5AUX who 
was one of the first hams at the 
crash scene, and Jim Haynie 
WB5JBP who manned the City of 
Dallas Emergency Operations 
Center, 

There were 94 survivors and 13 
fatalities in the crash. 



87-139 

Extension 

Hams have been granted an 
90-day extension to the com* 
mentary cutoff date on PR Docket 
88-139. This rule-making seeks to 
streamline the rules governing the 
Amateur Radio Service. The new 
cutoff date was changed to 29 
November. This came about as a 
result of many hams 1 concern 
about a part of the rewrite pro- 
posal which would give ihe Com- 



73 Amateur Radio * December, 1988 9 



QRX. . 



mission sweeping authority to restrict a ham 
from operating if his station caused any RFL If 
passed as written, there would no longer be a 
system of checks and balances of FCC per- 
sonnel handling RFI complaints. They could 
simply order hams oft the air without appeal 
recourse 

Dead Sputniks 

Leonid Labutin of Moscow, a prime mover 
in the Soviet Radio Sputnik (RS) program, 

reports that on 15 July, the first Western ama- 
teur visited the USSR RS command station 
RS3A in Moscow. Danny Kohn SM0NBJ of 
AMSAT-SM, visited UA3CR during his recent 
stay in Moscow Danny interviewed the chief 
operator there, Leo Makhakov RA3AT; made 
tape recordings, and took pictures. 

Danny will likely make an extensive report 
on his visit to RS3A after reluming to Stock- 
holm. Perhaps the most interesting news he 
learned was that, according to the operators 
at RS3A, RS~5 and RS-7 are now definitely out 
of operation, RS3A gradually lost control over 
these iasl two active RS satellites of the RS-3 
to RS-8 series. They are convinced that the 
batteries in RS-5 and RS-7 are dead and so 
expect no new activity from them. RS-3 
through RS-8 were launched together on 17 
December 1981. 

Amateur Radar? 

Nick Leggett N3NL continues his campaign 

with the FCC to obtain permission for ama- 
teurs to experiment with radar, He has now 
asked the FCC to modify Part 97 of the rules 
so that all RACES radio stations and all com- 
mercially built amateur equipment be protect- 
ed from Electromagnetic Pulse (EMP). 
Leggett claims that, to date, only a few select- 
ed military systems are shielded from EM P. 
He claims communications equipment can be 
protected from EMP by conductive shielding 
and active bypass devices. He asks that Part 
97.4 require that all amateur stations manu- 
factured or sold after 1 January 1990 be so 
protected. 



Japan under the auspices of JARL branches 
and JARL-affiliated clubs. 



88 and 73 



Japanese 
T-Hunting 



T-hunting is quickly gaining popularity in 

Japan. Last year, the first National Amateur 
Radio Direction Finding (ARDF) Competition 
was held in November 1967, with amateurs 
from the People's Republic of China (CRSA) 
and the Republic of Korea (KARL) participat- 
ing, ARDF f whtch was introduced to Japan 
from Europe, is attracting the interest of many 
Japanese hams. ARDF events have already 
been held in various locations throughout 

10 73 Amateur Radio • Dece m ber , 1 986 



The numerals 68 and 73 have been a tradi- 
tion in communication languages for almost 
130 years. The older of the two, 73, appeared 

in 1853 meaning "My love to you," In 1857, 
the first official definition made it a "fraternal 
greeting between operators." Two years later, 
in 1859 T Western Union made 73 a part of their 
iJ 92 code" to indicate "Accept my compli- 
ments- 1 ' The final change came in 1895, when 
73 meant "Best Regards 1 ' for the telegraph, 
and later for radio, operators. 

88 never received the formality of an official 
listing until it was adopted as one of the ham 
abbreviations. It had been one of the telegra- 
pher operator's traditional terms since well 
before the turn of the century. During the First 
World War, 88 was used by the U.S. Army 
Signal Corps, again strictly as an operator's 
abbreviation in unofficial communications. 
But at the close of the First World War. 88 
achieved official status as part of amateur ra- 
dio terminology, "Love & Kisses/' 



Not-So-Secret 
Service 



Ever wanted to listen in on the men in 
shades during a presidential visit? It's eas- 
ier than you may think! 

Most frequencies used by the Secret Ser- 
vice/presidential protection agents are in the 
UHF range, and most of the transmissions are 
unscrambled voice narrowband FM. It ap- 
pears that as many agents use plain English, 
as those who use code and ciphers. The 
secret service has also been known to use 
portable repeaters. Frequencies used in the 
past (either repeater output or simplex): 

Air Force One/Two in the air— 

171,235 MHz 
Air Force One/Two on the ground — 

171.285 MHz 
Presidential Li mo— 164.885 MHz 
Secret Service agents— 165,375/ 

,685/. 785, 166,700. 167025. 

169.625/.925. 171 .235/285 MHz 

France 

On 6 Meters 

France has authorized its amateurs the use 
of the 50-51 MHz band on a permanent 
basis. The band will be available only to ama- 
teurs living more than 100 miles from a televi- 
sion transmitter. Three watts ERP at a dis- 
tance of 150 km from a channel 2 transmitter 
is permitted- extending to 10W at a dis- 



tance of 200 km. For channels 3 and 4* the 
protection zone is the signal coverage area of 
the television station. CW, SSB, RTTY, and 
packet are authorized to fixed stations only. 

Repeaters in China 



Members of the Boeing (Seattle) Aircraft 
ARC were in China demonstrating FM, 
repeaters, and interlinking systems on the am- 
ateur 2 meter and 1 V* meter bands. According 
to Yaesu USA Vice President of Marketing 
C.R "Chip" Margelli K7JA, the Seattle ama- 
teurs took with them repeaters from I COM and 
Spectrum Communications, antennas from 
Larsen, and a number of Yaesu handhefds 
that are being used to demonstrate all aspects 
of VHF-FM operation. Including autopatching, 
They also took along packet radio gear from 
Advanced Electronic Applications, and vari- 
ous peripherals supplied by a long list of man- 
ufacturers. 

The demonstration was a joint effort of the 
amateurs from Boeing working with the Ama- 
teur Radio Manufacturers and Publishers As- 
sociation. 

Navy Testing 

at Va Capes 

If you live near the Virginia Capes or will 

be on a boat near there, be sure to listen to 
the maritime notices about the Navy test- 
ing going on in that region. The Navy is simu- 
lating nuclear blasts to learn about its effect on 
radio equipment. Make sure your gear is well 
shielded! 



NBC Hams 



Hams who are current or former employees 
of the National Broadcasting Company can 
keep track of one another over the 20 meter 
NSC Retirees Net. Hosted by Tony Rokosz 
W5RFO T the net meets daily at 1 AM Eastern 
time on 14.242 MHz. Rokosz, a former NBC 
Maintenance Supervisor, runs the conclave 
from his home in Rio Rancho Estates, just 
north of Albuquerque, New Mexico. For more 
information on the net, write Tony at: 1523 
Sara Rd~. Rio Rancho, New Mexico 87124, or 
caJI him at (505) 892-8308. 

A Hearty Thanks 

to the cast of thousands who helped 
supply this month's QRX items. Among them 
are: Westimk, ASR. FSAARC Newsletter. 
TSRAC e-fV-7, QRZ Newsletter. CAREN's 
World, 3irmingHam t JARL News, WertdRa- 
dio, Great Faffs AARC Newsletter. Mike & 
Key, NABET News, CARF. W70IO. and 
GB2RS. 



73 Review 



by Jennifer Roe WA 60HX 



Number 3 on your Feedback card 



The TE-144 Deluxe 
CMOS Keyer 



TRAC down this good value keyer. 



TRAC Electronics, Inc, 

PO Box 7685 

Charlottesville VA 22906 

PH: {804)973-3669 

Price CJass: $76 



The TE-144 is a deluxe CMOS electronic 
keyer from TRAC Electronics, Inc. There 
are six different models of keyers that TRAC 
manufactures, of which the TE-144 is the mid- 
dle-oRhe-line. It offers dot and dash memory, 
sidetone, a tune function, and speed (5-50 
WPM) and weight controls. 

Dot and dash memory only remembers that 
a dot/dash is sent in a specific order and out- 
puts if in the proper order, (if the operator gets 
ahead of the output), This memory assures 
accurate output, but can't be recalled or pro- 
grammed. The sidetone feature includes a 

"The sidetone has tone 
and volume control. ff 

tone and volume control. Sidetone capability 
permits the keyer to be used as a practice 
code oscillator. If sidetone is not required, 
TRAC suggests turning the volume to mint- 
mum to prolong battery life. The weight con* 
trol allows you to add a distinction, or thick- 
ness, to the dot and dash for different 
operating conditions. 

The input and output are Va " jacks. In the 
TE-144, the tip of the plug \s common, a 
somewhat unusual configuration. The sche- 
matic and instructions do not specify which 
connector is for the dot and dash, which re- 



quires a little detective 
work. 

To tune, put the semwu> 
TOfAUTO switch (positioned 
in the back of the box), in 
the semi-auto position. This 
is somewhat awkward if the 
back side of the box is not 
easily accessible in the 
shack. The only other adjustment on the back 
is the fos/neg (grid block) switch. Unless there 
are other changes in the shack, it only needs 
to be adjusted at installation. 

Circuit Workings 

The CMOS circuitry allows the TE-144 to 
draw low current from the battery, thus elimi- 
nating the need for an on/off switch. A single 9 
vott battery will last one year under normal 
operation. 

The circuit is described as follows: A clock 
oscillator establishes the basic speed of the 
dots or dashes selected by the paddle-con- 
trolling IC. A clock division in another IC es- 
tablishes precision timing control of the dots' 
mtra-character spacing and the dashes. A 
third IC with its weight control, allows some 
"stretching" of the dots and dashes as de- 
sired by the operator. This weight-modified 
code gates on the audio oscillator, whose tone 
(frequency) is operator-variable with the tone 
control. This audio version of the code is 




brought to a suitable output level by a tran- 
sistor amplifier using volume to control the 
level. A fourth IC, in addition to gating on the 
audio oscillator (sidetone), controls the tran- 
sistor switch MPSA92 and MPSA42, which 
provides contact-to-ground output for one SW 
(pos/neg grid block switch) position and a posi- 
tive output voltage for the other SW position 
(for the requirements of the transmitter to be 
operated). 

All the chips are on sockets and solid wire is 
used for all interconnects. The unit is housed 
in a heavy aluminum box with "feet" on the 
bottom to prevent marring. (I recommend 
scraping some paint away from where the cas- 
es connect (at the screws) to improve the 
bonding.) The integrated circuits (ICs) are 
easily available at most electronics stores. 

With the TRAC TE-1 44 connected between 
my Bencher Paddle and IC-430S, the keyer 
functions well and reliably. The TRAC TE-144 
is competitively priced and is a good looking, 
good operating piece of equipment. 





Photo A, internal view of the TRAC TE-144, 



Photo fr The hack panel showing the positions of the switches. 



73 Amateur Radio * December, 1938 11 



Number 4 on your Feedback card 



CIVIL AIR PATROL 

Best kept secret in the world. 



by Phil Nowak KA9KAF 



What kind of radio 
operator's li- 
cense can you obtain 
without having to 
wade through either 
code or theory? CB is 
such a license— but it 
lets you operate only 
on a few channels, 
and with very limited 
power. Yet there is a 
license that allows 
considerably more 
scope—one hundred 
and fifty watts on 
26,620 MHz, opera- 
tion on HF and VHF 
subspeetra, and oper- 
ation in a number of 
modes, including 
voice and RTTY, 
Much ham gear 
nowadays is easily 
convertible to fre- 
quencies in this Service, Licensing starts at 
fourteen years old. If you're lucky , you might 
even get a couple of weeks of an all-expense- 
paid vacation in a foreign land. 

No, I'm not suffering from code-induced 
delusions. This service actually exists, and 
quite naturally, thrives. It is the Civil 
Air PatroL the US Air Force Auxiliary. 
CAP has over seventy thousand members, 
many of them cadets under the age of eigh- 
teen. Senior members are generally twenty- 
one and older. 

The Waukcgan Civil Air Patrol squadron is 
an outstanding example of what can be done 
to interest young people in amateur radio. 
Based at the local airport, the Waukegan 
squadron boasts its own communications 
building equipped with a complete radio 
room, A CAP group consists of several 
squadrons. Lieutenant Colonel Leonard 
Bromstead WB9MTC is the communications 
officer for both the squadron and Group 
Twenty -Two. Col. Bromstead, a CAP mem- 
ber since 1952, was chosen CAP Communi- 
cator of the Year for 1986, He has been the 
* 'Elmer* for dozens of young people in his 
area and conducts ham classes in his home. 
Over thirty people have become amateurs as a 
result of these classes. 

CAP Hams 

Ted Mathis N9HJN is a sixteen year old 
ham. *I was interested in radio as a small 

12 73 Amateur Radio • December, 1988 




Photo A. One of the many activities of CAP. Mitch Mali f 'Red Fox 271 ' * copying traffic. 



boy. After I joined CAP* Col. Bromstead 
encouraged my interest in communications/ 
Ted is the only licensed amateur in a high 
school of 5000 students. When he carries his 
handie talkie to school, other kids think it's 
some kind of CB. He notes that "Most school 
kids have never heard of ham radio/ Ted, 
who has recently upgraded to Technician , 
remembers what launched him into this fasci- 
nating hobby; "I wouldn't be in ham radio 
had it not been for CAP/" 



"CAP has 

over seventy thousand 

members/ 9 



Mitch Hall age fifteen, who holds the 
CAP call "Red Fox 271," also recently 
entered the ham ranks as a Novice licensee. 
He concurs with Ted: **I wouldn't have even 
thought of a ham license without CAP/ 
Mitch has also had a wonderful time with 
CAP, and really appreciates the hands-on 
practice. Asked if there was a ham club in his 
school, he answered with depressing pre- 
dictibility: "No, and most of the kids have 



never heard of ama- 
teur radio/* 

Best Way to Go 

Why is amateur ra- 
dio activity in schools 
on the wane? For 
one, it's very hard to 
get teachers to run 
ham clubs. Len 
WB9MTC feels that 
the main reason, 
however, is thai ham 
clubs don't offer 
enough initial excite- 
ment for young peo- 
ple. In a CAP pro- 
gram, cadets often 
ride on Air Force air- 
craft, such as the C- 
130 Hercules. They 
take camping and 
hiking trips. Cadets 
visit Air Force bases 
(Wright-Patterson AFB in Dayton, Ohio, and 
Strategic Air Command at Offut AFB, for 
cadets from the Chicago area) , CAP has three 
primary purposes: aerospace education, 
emergency services, and the cadet program. 
Cadets participate in all three. 

'Young people are introduced to radio- 
communications, in the midst of all the 
excitement, and so they develop a good asso- 
ciation with it/' continues Len, "This helps 
them appreciate amateur radio that much 
more when they start getting involved with 

It. 

Cadets are encouraged to study aerospace. 
They lake periodic exams and are rewarded 
for good marks by promotion to higher rank. 
A cadet can progress all the way to cadet 
colonel. 

The US Air Force sponsors several CAP 
search and rescue missions each year, Group 
Twenty -Two cadets are capable of handling 
mosl of the communications workload of a 
mission, both in the radio shack and out on 
the flight line. They talk to pilots, flying 
observers, and ground personnel. Pretty ex- 
citing stuff, especially on an actual mission. 

Plenty of Incentive 

A very nice feature of CAP is the interna- 
tional air cadet exchange program. Every 
summer, a few lucky cadets, along with se- 
nior member chaperons, spend two weeks 
visiting foreign countries— at government 



expense . The cadets chosen to go are the ones 
who are very active in their units. 

Aviation is a big drawing card. Angela 
Greanias "Red Fox 311/' a fifteen year old 
female cadet* joined CAP to enter a flight 
training program at reduced cost. She 
stresses, "CAP doesn't have to lead to a 
military career. I personally have no desire to 
join the military, but that doesn't keep me 
from having a lot of fun with CAP." Angela 
is the Cadet Personnel Officer for the 
squadron. Angela's made many new friends 
in CAP, and she feels it's developed her lead- 
ership abilities. Angela operates a Regency 
VHF crystal-controlled radio for her CAP 
communications . She's now studying for her 
ham ticket to broaden her communications 
horizon. 

RDF Activities 

What bearing does CAP have on foxhunt- 
ing? Plenty! There are many simulated 
downed aircraft searches. In the Waukegon 
group, CoL Bromstead conducts ELT 
(Emergency Locator Transponder) search 
exercises* An ELT is an automatic on-board 
transmitter used to locate downed aircraft. 
A radio operator at a base station directs 
cadets in a car to a target location, A senior 
member drives the car and follows the direc- 
tions of the lead cadet. When they reach 
the target, they identify it. The next cadet in 
the car gets to be the lead cadet, and they 
search for another target. Everyone gets 
a turn. 



". , .most of the 

kids have never heard of 

amateur radio/' 



Cadets also participate in actual ELT 
searches. A ground team goes into action 
looking for the target. Ninety -seven percent 
of the time it is a false alarm— bur thev often 
save lives in the remaining 3 percent of true 
alarms. 

Opportunity and Fun with a Structure 

Cadet squadrons meet once a week. This 
provides an ongoing structure for both cadet 
and senior members. When someone Like 
CoL Bromstead takes an active role in re- 
cruiting, motivating, and training young 
communicators, it is inevitable that the ham 
community benefits. 

Kids aren't the only ones becoming hams, 
either. Carol Szarfinski KA9PRE is a captain 
in CAP. She is a senior member and a gradu- 
ate of CoL Bromstead 's ham class. She 
told me, b M heard about the week long 
CAP communications school held annually 
by the Great Lakes Region. I joined CAP to 
go to that school.* Her husband. Mike 
KA9ATL, and her father WBNSW, are 
pleased at the new hams, Now, as Red Fox 
277, she conducts the Tuesday night CAP 
northern Illinois VHF net She can now keep 




Photo B. Several coders getting the low-down on a Canadair Challenger from the co-pilot , Charlie 
Tenmtedt. 



in touch via ham radio with 
her rather. Milo W0NSW, 
in Kansas. 

Indeed, CAP and amateur 
radio activities often support 
each other, For example, the 
Waukegan squadron runs an 
annual hamfest, "It has been 
profitable every year we 
have held it. The proceeds 
go to fund squadron activi- 
ties thoughout the year. ' ' 

CAP Lingo 

While there is a lot of em- 
phasis on hands-on training, 
formal communications 
procedures are also taught. 
The student learns the use of 
prowords. These are words 
with specific meanings that 
communicators recognize, 
such as "Over," "Roger, 41 
and "Out. " The CAP radio 
operator takes an exam on 
communications and opera* 
Ltonal procedures at the end 
of the class. If he passes, he 
receives a Radio Operators 
Permit. This allows him to 
talk on any CAP radio with 
all the privileges mentioned 
earlier. 

Just the Beginning 

The CiviJ Air Patrol offers many ex- 
citing activities for teenagers and adults 

alike. Communications is an integral part 
of the entire process. While it is much easier 
to gel an ROP card than it is to get a ham 
license, there are just a few frequencies 
that you can use, Your audience is also 
quite Limited, Rag -chewing is not encour- 
aged, since these are military frequencies* 
Once CAP radio operators gain some ex- 
perience using the radio, they often want 




Photo C. Cot. Bromstead, flanked by Angela and Veronica, holding 
his "Communicator of the Year "trophy. 



to talk to more people on more fre- 
quencies. 

Get Involved! 

Sound appealing? Look up CAP in your 

telephone directory. Can't find it there? Send 
a postcard to HQ CAP-USAF/PA. Maxwell 
AFB. AL 36112-5572; ATTN: Tsgt. Scon 
and ask them to put you in contact with the 
unit nearest you. Too impatient to wait for the 
mail? Cal! 205-293-5463 and ask the same 
question. Tell them you read about it in 73 
magazine. Break and end. This is Red Fox 
197. out. 



73 Amateur Radio • December, 1988 13 



Number S Oft your Feedback card 



RS-232 Port For The C-64 



Allows easy file transfer to and from the C-64. 



There were many text files on my old 
C-64 computer I really wanted to trans- 
fer to my Amiga. Unfortunately, this wasn't 
easy to do. I transferred the first files by 
uploading them to a local BBS, and then 
downloading them with my Amiga- This 
works, but it is time consuming, and requires 
two modems* one each for the C-64 and the 
other computer. 

For the Amiga, it is more convenient to use 
a program that allows the computer to read 
C-64 files. However, the disadvantage is that 
to use the program, you must have a 5 W " disk 
drive attached to your Amiga, not a popular 
drive for the Amiga. 

A third possibility, and the one 1 prefer, is 
to use a null modem. For most computers, 
this is simply an RS-232 cable running from 
one computer to the other via ihc serial ports. 
This will not work for the unmodified C-64 
because it has no RS-232 serial pons. With a 
little work and time, however* you can build 
an RS-232 port for the C-64. But first, you 
need to know a little about how the RS-232 
works. 

A Little RS-232 History 
Several years ago, an industrial committee 



5V0C 
(Z) 



ICVF 



6 



5V0C TO -5VDC 
CONVERTER 



ICI 
7660 



5 -3V0C ' 



~jr f°* 



PA2* 
CM) 



IC2 
148B 



9VAC 
(10-11) 

PB? 

(U 



1N400I 

-w— 



14 



PB2* 

m 

FLAG Z 



ft? 



IOOjiF 



by Ralph Neal 

agreed to a standard interface for serial trans- 
missions. They agreed that -3 to -25 volts 
would represent a logic of 1 ? and +3 to +25 
volts would represent a logic of 0. While the 
C-64 is quite capable of sending and receiv- 
ing serial transmissions, it does not do so at 
these voltage levels. The C-64 uses a TTL 
standard in which I is defined as a voltage 
between +2.4 to +5 volts, and as a voltage 
between ground to about 0.8 volts. There are 
several ways to to make the TTL standard 
compatible with the RS-232, They range 
from discrete circuits composed of transis- 
tors, optical isolators, and the like, to ICs 
designed just for that purpose. In this article I 
chose the latter, using the MC1488 line driv- 
er and the MC 1489 line receiver. 

The Circuit 

See Figure I . This is a relatively simple 
arrangement, requiring only three ICs for its 
operation. However, the voltages needed to 
power the MCI 488 line driver range from 
+ 15 volts DC to +7 volts DC on the positive 
side, and from - 15 volts DC to -2.5 volts 
DC on the negative side. In fact, there are no 
usable voltages for the MCI488 line driver, 
plus or minus. 

It was not hard to 
generate the required 
voltages. I obtained the 
negative power with a 
special purpose IC the 
7660 voltage inverter. 
Using two lOpF capac- 
itors, this TC takes +5 
volts DC and converts 
them to —5 volts DC. 
■^^^ L " n The positive voltage 

*** was even simpler to ob- 

tain. While the user I/O 
has nothing greater 
than 5 volts DC, it does 
have a 9 volt AC 
source. With a diode 



TXD 



470 pF 



ffr 



3,6,7 



DSR/ 
DTR 



470 pF 



m 



RS-23 2 


RS-233 




T*0 
flxD 

SIGNAL 
BM0 




RED 

TM0 

SIGNAL 
GN0 
















COMPUTER U 1 




COMPUTER I2> 





Figure 2. RS~232 cabling wiring. 

and small filtering capacitor, I was able to 
half-wave rectify the 9 volts AC and obtain 
about 12 volts DC well within the 7-15 volts 
needed. 

When building this circuit, you will notice 
that only seven of the 14 pins are used on the 
MC1488 and five on the MC1489 ICs. Often 
it's a bad idea to leave your inputs dangling, 
as in TTL and CMOS logic, but in this case it 
does not seem to hurt. I have used this circuit 
several times now. with good data transfer 
each time- 

Now refer to Figure 2. To use the RS-232 
interface as a null modem, connect the TXD 
(transmit) pin to the RXD (receive) pin and 
the RXD pin to the TXD pin. You may need a 
third line, marked DSR/DTR (Data Set 
Ready /Data Terminal Ready), to inform the 
other computer that the C-64 is alive and 
ready. The fourth line from the RS-232 inter- 
face is attached to the signal ground from the 
other computer's RS-232 interface. Once the 
null modem cable is configured correctly, 
you will need to load terminal programs into 
both computers. Then you should be able to 
communicate from one computer to the oth- 
er, as you would in communicating with a 
BBS. 

In closing, I would like to point out that this 
circuit has other possible uses besides that of 
a null modem. It should be possible to con- 
nect RS-232 modems and printers to the C-64 
using this interface. Perhaps someone read- 
ing this will be inspired to do so. Happy 
building! 



PBOh*. 
CO 



PB3* 
(F) 



H* 



+5VDC 



IC3 

1489 



RXO 



+ 5VDC 
* 



I5K 



j 




470pF 



GND 
(l,2,A,N) 

C-64 USER I/O PORT PINS SHOWN IN PARENTHESES 



GND 



Figure /. C-64 RS-232 port interface schematic. 

14 73 Amateur Radio ■ December, 1968 





User I/O Port 


t 




Pin 


Type 


Pin 


Type 


1 1 


GND 


A 


GND 


2 


+ 5V 


B 


FLAG2 


3 


RESET 


C 


PB0 


4 


CNT1 


D 


PB1 


5 


SP1 


E 


PB2 


6 


CNT2 


F 


PBS 


7 


SP2 


H 


PB4 


8 


PC2 


J 


PBS 


9 


SER.ATNIN 


K 


PB6 


10 


9 VAC 


L 


PB7 


11 


9 VAC 


Wl 


PA2 


12 


GND 


N 


GND 



GET YOUR BEARINGS STRAIGHT 








' 







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An azimuth map provides information about heading and range to any place on Earth. No longer will 
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73 Amateur Radio ■ December, 1988 15 



INTRODUCING 
THENEW10-Hz-1.4GHz 

< DATA SCAI>J> FREQUENCY COUNTER 

from B & B INSTRUMENTS 



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16 73 Amateur Radio • December, 1938 



332 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



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Feedback* Title 

1 Never Say Die 
2QRX 

3 Review: TE*144 Deluxe 
CMOS Keyer 

4 Civil Air Patrol 

5 RS-232 Port for the C-64 

6 Review: Home-Brew Fun! 

7 Don't Lose Your Memory! 

8 Packet Tuning Indicator 

9 Midland 13-509 Modifications 

10 Decatur Ham Launches 
Satellites 

11 Charging Wilhout 
Over-Charging 

12 New Products 

13 Review: Communications 
Concepts 

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Antenna 

15 Homing In 

16 Index: 12/36 

17 ATV 



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in a Hand-held 

23 QRP 

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26 DX 

27 Review: B & W PT-2500A HF 
Linear Amp 

28 Special Events 

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3CI Barter 'n p Buy 

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73 Amateur Radio • December, 1988 17 






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IS 73 Amateur Radio • December, 1988 



CIRCLE 295 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



Number 6 on your Feedback card 



73 Review 



by Allen Short WA9FPV 



Home-Brew Fun! 

Bel-Tek's CMOS key er kit. 



Bei-Tek 

PO Box 125 
BeloitWI 53511 

Price Class; $10 
Add-on memory: $15 




i 1 1 1 r 







TT 




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Ittttftt 




* 



J 



Photo A. The board and parts before as- 
sembly. 

Are you a new Novice in need of your first 
keyer? Or perhaps an experienced Extra 
looking for a bargain in ham radio? I spotted 
an ad for (he Bei-Tek CMOS keyer kit that 
described a unit that seemed to fit both bills, in 
the November 1987 issue of 73 Magazine. It 
mentioned neat features such as a triggered 
clock to eliminate start delay, circuitry that 
automatically inserts a dot or a dash between 
tones, acceptance of any power voltage be- 
tween five and 1.2 volts DC. accidental polarity 
reversal protection, operation between five 
and 50 WPM, adjustable 800 Hz sidetone vol- 
ume, and compatibility with grid block, 
cathode keyed, and solid-state transmitters, 

All this sounded pretty tempting. The low 
cost of the kit— $9.95— finally convinced me to 
give it a go. 

First Look 

The printed circuit board for the keyer was 
small (2.5* x 3 5'), and it could be placed into 
many low band transceivers, but I wanted to 
us© it with several different rigs. 

When I started the CMOS keyer, I wanted to 
see if the cost of the project could be kept tow 
while still providing a nice piece of equipment 
when finished. As I looked through the well 
stocked junk box, I found the following parts: a 
speaker, a battery clip, a battery power lead, a 
switch, all of the hardware, the decaf kit. and 



the paint, I had some 
extra boxes, but they 
weren't the right size for 
the project So one 
night after work, I 
stopped at Radio Shack 
and bought the box 
shown in Photo C. It has 
a Radio Shack part 
number of 270-238, and 
it just fits the project. 

Bei-Tek did a nice job 
on the kit for Ihe money. 
They provided the 
board and the parts, 
with a set of instructions 
on building the board. 
To solder the board, I 
used a small iron to 
make the connections, 
but I didn't put in the 
CMOS chips until all soider connections were 
made. After building the board. I had a trial run 
to see if it worked. I have an old HW-16 CW 
transceiver that I used for ihe test. The keyer 
worked Just fine. The only problem was thai, 
when powering up the keyer, it would only 
send a single dash. I didn't find this to be a 
problem since I have heard other keyers do 
this same thing- 
Final Touches 

After the test run. I did get into another 
problem of my own doing. Some of my friends 
know me as a very conservative fe*low h or just 
plain cheap. What happened is that I tried to 
use an old nine volt battery, and it wouldn't 
work. So I went out and bought a new nine 
volt battery just like the instructions sheet said 
to do. 

Once aJI of Ihis was brought under control, it 
was time to begin the final assembly. The box 
was made of soft aluminum* so I used my old 
drill press to do all of the drilling. I had a can of 





Photo C. The front of the finished pr< 



Photo &. Getting ready for the test run of the keyer, 



spray paint from K-Mart that had a Fanspray 
valve on it, to give a very nice finished paint job 
at a low cost. After the paint had set up. 1 
baked the box in the oven for 10 minutes at 
200 degrees. This gave a nice baked paint job 
on the box. The decals were cut out and 
placed on the box to complete the finishing 
touches. 

On the back of the box, I have two terminal 
strips, one for the transceiver, and the other 
for the key. The small jack is for external pow- 
er for the power supply used as long as it is five 
to 12 volts DC, and of adequate current. I 
thought this would be a worthwhile addition, 
so that another type of power supply can be 
used other than the built-in battery. Have you 
ever been in a contest and had a battery die at 
a very late hour of the night? 

The keyer is very easy to switch between 
grid block and cathode keying. Simply reverse 
the leads on the transceiver terminal strip. It 
doesn't need any modification to the equip- 
ment in the set-up. 

The goal of the low cost keyer was 
achieved. The cost was as follows; the Bei- 
Tek kit $9.95 postage $1,50: the box $2.50; 
the battery $1 . Total cost: $14.95. 

En Sum 

I think the keyer will give many years of 
service at low cost. It was a rewarding experi- 
ence to build it and I woutd encourage the 
newcomers to amateur radio to give this pro- 
ject a try. It is a first homebrew type of project 
and from this, try something a little more diffi- 
cult. I feel that this keyer is a good way to break 
into homebrew. 



7$ Amateur Radio • December, 1988 19 



m 



Number 7 on your Feedback card 



Don't lose gour memory! 

End the backup battery problem in the ICOM IC-R71A receiver. 



Bob Roehrig K9EUI 



• ne of the most outstanding 
communications receivers on 
the market today is the [COM IC- 
R71 A, It has all the features you 
could want in a receiver, whether 
you are an SWLcr, amateur, or 
commercial user. 

The big drawback of this re- 
ceiver is that the necessary infor- 
mation to its operation is stored in 
RAM, and it depends on the lithi- 
um backup battery to retain this 
information. If this data is lost, 
the radio simply will not work. 

The lithium battery is supposed 
to be good for several years (I 
have heard that the expected life 
may be as long as 7 years). What 
if you were using this receiver, 
however, during a DXpedition, 
or during a contest, and suddenly the radio 
went dead? The manual says "Contact your 
dealer or ICOM service center.** 1 learned 
that, for S25. ICOM will replace the batten 
and reprogram the board it you send it to 
them. I figured there had to be a better way. 
and indeed there is. 

Some other ICOM models have the same 
RAM board- and so have the same problem. 
The ideas presented here will likely also ap- 
ply to this equipment. 

Choices 

There are other options to handle the bat- 
tery problem besides sending the board to 
ICOM. You could change the battery your- 
self before it goes dead. To replace the bat- 
tery, simply remove the board from the re- 
ceiver and power it from a 5 volt bench 
supply. You might consider changing over to 




Photo A . The new hoard in K9EUI 's receiver 



a more standard type of battery , such as three 
A A alkaline penlight cells. As long as power 
is applied to the board, the batteries can be 
replaced without losing the memory, 

To understand what is going on in the re- 
ceiver, look at Figure 1 , the schematic of the 
RAM board. There are apparently two ver- 
sions of this board. The board layout drawing 
in my manual is different than ihe board in my 
receiver. One version uses an iS-pin RAM 
and the other uses a 24-pin device. The result 
is the same so it doesn't make any difference 
which one you have. (Figure 1 shows the 
24-pin version.) 

Power and addressing connect to the board 
via J L and the data lines, write, and ground 
are on J2. Notice that only four data lines are 
used. When the receiver is turned on. the 
RAM IC is powered from the radio's 5 volt 
bus through diode Dl. When the receiver is 















PROM Program 
















00: 0, 


0, 


F. 


1. 


F. 


F. 


1, 


F, 


F 
1 t 


0, 


o, 


2, 


F, 


F. 


F, 


F 


10: 0, 


0. 


0. 


B, 


5, 


9. 


6, 


8. 


6, 


o. 


0. 


0. 


0, 


3, 


2, 





20: 0, 


5. 


9. 


3, 


0. 


0, 


0, 


5. 


0, 


0, 


0. 


0, 


0, 


0, 


0, 





30: 0. 


1. 


0, 


0, 


0, 


o, 


o, 


0, 


3, 


0, 


0. 


0, 


3, 


0. 


0. 





40: 1. 


0. 


0. 


0, 


0. 


0, 


0. 


0. 


3. 


0. 


0, 


F, 


F, 


F. 


F, 


F 


50 Through 


IFF: 


Data 


is all 


■■p' 

























Table L 



turned off. the RAM is kept alive 
by battery voltage through D2 t 
and the chip select lead is held 
positive by R I . This disables the 
IC and puts it in a high impedance 
state, The current drain is almost 
not measurable in this state. 

Also notice that address line 10 
is not used but grounded. Thus, 
only half the available memory is 
used. Only the lower 256 memo- 
ry pnsi lions contain the informa- 
tion that cannot be lost. The rest 
of the RAM holds the frequencies 
that are stored in memory, and 
the last frequencies (and mexk 
used by the two VFOs, When the 
lowest 256 addresses are being 
used, both A8 and A 9 are low. 
The output of IC2-C remains high 
which inhibits writing to the RAM. If either 
A8 or A9 or both are high (above address 
256) Ql is turned on to permit writing to the 
RAM, 

If the battery does go dead, you can repro- 
gram the board yourself. Table I shows the 
listing of what is in the lower 256 bytes of 
memory. Figure 2 shows the circuit for a 
manual programmer. Switches S I through S8 
select the address, and S9 through S 1 2 are the 
data switches, A simple adapter can be made 
using a piece of perf board and stiff wires to 
mate with J I and J2. After the battery has 
been replaced and the board is connected to 
this programmer, apply power and close the 
prog switch. Step through the addresses, one 
at a time, select the correct data for each 
address, and press the write button . 

RAM-Onlv to RAM and ROM 

The best solution to the problem is to re- 
place the present RAM board with a new 
board containing both RAM and ROM. The 
essential receiver information is put in an 
EPROM and the RAM is used just to store the 
memory/VFO information. So if the battery 
does go dead, you do not lose the operating 
data itself. 

You can manually program the EPROM 
programmer with the data in Table 1 or you 
can build an adapter that allows the data to be 



20 73 Amateur Radio * December, 1988 



wtour 



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73 Amateur Radio * December, 1988 21 



read from your RAM board directly into the 
EPROM programmer. Figure 3 shows such 
an adapter. The adapter simulates a 2716 
EPROM for read-only purposes. The highest 
four data bits arc not used and are grounded 
so that zeros result. Even though the pro- 
grammer expects 2048 bytes , we only need 
the lowest 256, and that is all the new 2716 
EPROM is programmed with. 

Figure 4 is the schematic for the new re- 
ceiver board, J 1-11 switches low when the 
board is addressed. When both A8 and A9 are 
low, the 2716 CS pin goes low to select the 
RAM. If A8 and/or A9 are high, pin 18 of the 
6116 RAM switches low. enabling this IC, 
The data and address lines of IC 1 and IC2 are 
paralleled. I used a Hitachi HMS-6116forthe 
RAM chip. This is an inexpensive device and 
the pinout is similar to the 2716 EPROM. 
While most of the 2716 is not used, this is a 
popular EPROM that most all programmers 
can handle. Other RAM and EPROMs can be 
used if desired. 

There are devices available called 
NOVRAMs, that can be used in place of the 
61 16, These devices need no separate battery 
to retain their data, I don't know the life 
expectancy of them, but the idea is certainly 
attractive. There is a NOV RAM that is pin- 
for-pin compatible with the 61 16. 

Power for the 6116 RAM is obtained via 
Dl or D2, as on the original board- I used a 
pair of germanium diodes to minimize the 
voltage drop. 

The second advantage of using this circuit 
in the R71 is that the number of memory 
channels can be doubled to 64, Since the 
highest address, A 10, is not used by the re- 
ceiver, only half the available storage is used. 
By switching A 10 of the RAM high, we now 
have twice the storage capability. If you do 
not have the remote option board in your 
receiver* the remote switch on the front panel 
docs nothing but light the remote LED. Pin 4 
of J 12 on the matrix board switches to ap- 
proximately 13 volts when the remote switch 
is turned on. Connecting this pin to Q2 of the 
new board permits selecting another bank of 
32 memory channels with the remote switch. 
When scanning, only one bank can be 
scanned at a time, 

For a backup battery, I used a Radio Shack 
holder with three AA alkaline cells. The 
standby current of the 6 1 1 6 is in the microam- 
pere region so the battery should last for some 
years, Do not forget to check for corrosion 
occasionally- 

The photo shows the new board installed in 
my receiver. There is not room to install it in 
place of the original board, so it is mounted 
on a metal plate above the logic unit. 1 re- 
placed the original plate with one of sheet 
metal about 1 inch longer. The old plate was 
used as a drill template for the four mounting 
holes and the scan rate control access hole. 
Slots for the connectors were cut in the plate 
with a nibbier tool, The cables for J 1 and J2 
have amp connector strips on the ends and 
were taken from a surplus computer board. 
The pins have 100 mil spacing and can be 
obtained from many supply houses specializ- 
ing in computer accessories. My board is a lot 

22 73 Amateur Radio * December, 1988 




JI-12 •> 



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3VDC 
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Figure /. Schematic for the l€~R7tA RAM board. 

larger than necessary but it allows for adding 

future modifications. 

With this new board in your receiver, you 
no longer have to worry about your radio 
losing its essential operating data. The re- 
ceiver itself is not modified in any way and 
can be restored to its original condition in 
minutes, if desired. 

If you wish to build this board and need the 
programmed EPROM, contact me at 3 14 S* 
Harrison St., Balavia, 1L 60510 and send a 
SASE for details, 

Thanks to AJ9S and WA9FVP for their 
comments on the R71 and special thanks to 
W9DJN for the use of his PC/XT and 
EPROM programmer. 



Figure 2. Manual programming setup. 



i.4 PJN 
HEADER PLUG 



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adapter. 



+ 5V 



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Figure 4. Schematic for the new R71 memory board. 




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CIRCLE 152 ON READER SERVICE CARD 

73 Amateur Radio * December, 1986 23 



NumberSon your Feedback card 



Packet Tuning Indicator 

Dead-on HF packet tuning for $15. 



by Ronald B. Koester W2EKY 



Many packet stations, including this one, 
got their feet wet on the VHF bands, 
where tuning is just a matter of button* 
pushing. Sooner or later, the old DX bug 
bites and the temptation of HF DX oper- 
ation arises. This is where the trouble be- 
gins: no buttons! Tuning in a packet station 
on the 20 meter band without a tuning in- 
dicator can be exceedingly aggravating be- 
cause you must tune to the 2025 Hz and 
2225 Hz modem frequencies directly. The 
slightest mistiming leads to no received 
packets on HF. 

You can buy commercial tuning indicators 
for around $40, or build one for less than half 
that. The unit deserihed here can be built for 
about $15, depending on what the old scrap 
box contains. 

The Circuit 

The circuit consists of two identical phase- 
lock loop (PLL) decoding ICs (see Figure 1), 
Decoding is a function of the timing compo- 
nents R1/C7 and R2/C8, The outputs of both 



Ci 



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CI 



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If 6 1 



IC I and IC2 feed a resistor transistor N AND 
gateQL 

Rl and R2 are 5kO 10-turn potentiome- 
ters. (I used lOkQ in the original design due 
to availability, but they required more critical 
tuning.) Both pots should be preset to 
3k across the unshoned portion before sol- 
dering. 

The tuning indicator fits on a PC board 
measuring 2* x 3* , Should you decide to use 
a different type of construction* you should 
find little difficulty at these low frequencies. 
You can house the completed unit in a plastic 
or metal box. 

A few more construction hints: note the use 
of a jumper directly above R3, and use a 
shielded cable for signal input. 

You can find all the parts you need at most 
Radio Shack stores. 1 listed below the parts 
by value and corresponding Radio Shack 
numbers. 

Adjustment 

This is best done using an audio signal 
generator and frequency counter, shown in 
Figure 2* Adjust the output of the generator to 



2025 Hz as read on the counter. Adjust Rl on 
the decoder until the red LED I lights up. 
Keep reducing the level of the signal by ad- 
justing control RA and repeated adjustments 
of RL This adjustment is critical for proper 
performance. Repeat the same procedure 
with R2, but use a frequency of 2225 Hz for 
LED 2 , There's a small amount of interaction 
between IC I and IC2, so it pays to repeat 
both adjustments. 

Lacking a signal generator and counter, 
you can tune the circuit by carefully adjusting 
your receiver until you are consistently re- 
ceiving packets. Next, alternately adjust Rl 
and R2 until they light at the lowest possible 
volume level . In operation, the correct recep- 
tion of a packet station will result in both 
LEDs flickering, and the corresponding 
lighting of the green LED 3 . In normal opera- 
tion, the red LEDs 1 and 2 are dimly lit in 
absence of a signal. 

Have a spare fifteen bucks and an eve- 
nine? You can go out an have a (modest) 
meal with a friend. Or— put together this pro- 
ject and enjoy worldwide packet with dead- 
on tuning! 



it? 



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Quantity Part// 

2 C1-C4 

2 C5»C£ 

2 C7-CE 

2 R1-R2 

2 R3-R4 

2 R5*R* 

1 R7 

1 RS 



Parts List 

Value 



Radio Shacks 

272-1 434B 

272^1012 

272-1069 

271-343/1 OK Sub. 

271-1342 
271-012 



Figure I. Schematic for the HF packet tuning indicator. 



1 


Q1 


MPS 3904 


276-2016 


2 


IC14C2 


LM567 


276-1721 


2 


LED1-LED2 


Red 


276-026 


1 


LED3 


Gr&en 


278-037 


1 


21 


9.1 Zener 


276-562 



AUDIO GEN 







T t 



FflEQ COUNTER 




-* 



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* 




$io m 



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HI *f 

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is- IDI 



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Figure 2. Alignment set -up for the tuning indicator ; 

24 73 Amateur Radio • December, 1988 



Figure 3. PC hoard foil diagram. 



Figure 4, Parrs placement diagram. 




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26 7$ Amateur Radio • December, 1988 



Number 9 on your Feedback card 



Midland 13-509 Modifications 



A few fun and useful mods. 

by Klaus Spies WB9YBM 



FROM R59-R60 

SQUELCH 
IN 



Although the Mid- 
land 13-509 radio 
has not been in pro- 
duction for ten years, 
many still consider 
it the 220 radio be- 
cause of its reliability 
and versatility. Even 
today* it's the rig 
of many repeater 
links. Therefore, it's 
inevitable that more 
modifications and 
improvements are be- 
coming available for 
it. The type of tran- 
smit and receive boards used in the 509 
are also used in similar radios, such as the 
Clegg, 

Better Squelch Performance 

The first circuit described here, the "High- 
Z COR," came about primarily because the 
squelch circuit in the 509 (R59-60 is the typi- 
cal place where the signal is obtained) is 
rather sensitive, It is prone to making the 
squelch sound strange when loading occurs, 
even when the load is buffered by a 2N2222A 
transistor. What is therefore needed is a high 
impedance load for the squelch circuit, so 
i hat there will be no degradation in its per- 
formance when an additional signal (as for 
a COR function) comes from the squelch 
circuit. 

There are two ways to bring a high 
impedance load to the squelch circuit, You 
can use a high -gain Darlington transistor with 
a large base resistor (wire the Darlington as 
a common-base switching amplifier}* or use a 
component with a naturally high input 
impedance, such as a FET or an IC with 
a FET input. This way, the loading on the 
squelch would be light enough to not affect 
the performance of the squelch, while provid- 
ing enough Amplification and current capabil- 
ities to act as a COR. It is practical to use 
an IC rather than a FET. An IC, such as 
the LM393 comparator, has gates left over 
which you may want to use later for other 
circuits. 

The squelch circuit of the 509 provides 
2.5 to 2.65 volts when the squelch opens 
(either at a received signal, or when 
the squelch is manually opened by turning 
down the squelch potentiometer), and a 
few tenths of a volt when the squelch is 
closed. PI is biased for approximately 1.5 
volts. Even though the LM393*s specifica- 
tions claim it can operate within a few tenths 



+I2V 




C.0,R. 

OUT 



Figure I, The high hnpnhmic It mil for the u/utlth circuit. Tins ensures no 
audio degradation when an additional signal (as for a COR function) comes 
from the squelch circuit. 



of ground, it isn't always wise to operate an 
IC near its limit. It's wise to bias it up. 
A potentiometer makes setting the voltage 
easier. You don*! have to calculate voltage 
dividers or experiment with resistor toler- 
ances. 

The output of the LM393 drives a transistor 
which can handle higher currents than the IC. 
I have used this circuit to actuate the RE- 
MOTE on/off function of a tape recorder for 
logging signals when the squelch opens in my 
509, and it works flawlessly. 

Are You Really TX? 

The second circuit, the TX Light Control* 
developed through a two-stage modifica- 
tion. In the first modification, the 5Q9"s small 
transmit light bulb was replaced with 
an LED, In the second modification, I real- 
ized that the 509*s transmit indicator (now 
an LED) went on whenever the PTT line 
was toggled into transmit, and not neces- 
sarily when the radio itself was transmit- 
ting. There is a difference between these 
two functions. When the relay used 
in the radio's T/R section becomes worn, 



+ I2V 



RFIN 



Dl 

SIGNAL R| 

DIODE )00K 



"X 



1 



Figure 2. Circuit to drive the TX light, it samples outgoing RF from ihe 
antenna. 



the radio will not necessarily toggle in- 
to transmit mode, even though the TX 
light comes on. Just because the radio toggles 
into transmit, it doesn't mean it is trans- 
mitting. 

In effect, therefore, the TX light was 
actually a PTT light — which is a bit mis- 
leading. The easiest way to turn this into a 
regular transmit light was by checking the 
antenna for outgoing RF. That was done as 
follows: a signal diode of the 1N914 variety 
was connected to the RF connector on the 
back of the radio (on the inside!!), using the 
shortest possible lead lengths; in series with 
this, a 100 kQ resistor provided (again, using 
the shortest possible lead lengths) high 
impedance isolation between the antenna cir- 
cuitry and our sampling circuit. With this 
high impedance and short lead lengths, 
effects on the antenna circuit is kept at a 
minimum. 

I added a 3.3 Mfl resistor to keep 
the transmit LED from staying on, espe- 
cially in the low -power position. Mount 
this resistor as near as possible to the an- 
tenna coax connector, with the shortest 
lead length possible. From this point on 
the radio's back panel, to where the LM393 
is mounted, I used very thin, shielded coax, 
for two reasons: to minimize the reception 
of any unwanted signals from inside the 
radio, and secondly, to prevent RF still on 
the line from creeping into the radio's cir- 
cuitry. 

Adjust PI so that the LED lights with the 
radio on low power. In all other respects, this 
circuit operates the same way as the high 
impedance squelch circuit previously de- 
scribed. 

The LM393 dual comparator is a very ver- 
satile IC you can use for many applications. It 
is commonly available as a quad package 

from Radio Shack. I 
purchased the dual 
package from Jameco 
Electronics in Califor- 
nia for 39c, A very 
reasonably priced IC 
for the experimenter. 
You can use either 
the quad or the dual 
LM393 in these cir- 
cuits. 

So, there you have 
it: two useful mods 
for a very popular 
rig. Have fun and en- 
joy improved opera- 
tion! 




01 

2N2222A 



73 Amateur Radio ■ December, 1988 27 




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LLauL iai 





A most unusual college project 



by Mark Lambert WB8UUE 



In 1957, a photo of 12-year- 
old Frank Wiesenmeyer 
and a few other hams ap- 
peared in their local newspa- 
per. Sputnik, ihe world's first 
satellite, had just been 
launched by the USSR, and 
Wicsenmeyer's radio club 
was the only one in the area 
that knew where to listen for 
the beep-beep -beep of the 
space beacon. Now Wiesen- 
meyer K9CIS, and a group of 
12 others in Decatur. Illinois, 
are the creators of their own 
satellite! 

Educational Bird 

EDSAT, an eight-sided 
satellite a little larger than a 
five-gallon patL is expected to 
be launched by this group 
of Central Illinois enthusiasts 
in early 1989. The Space 
Shuttle will deploy this in the 
low-cost Getaway Special 
program offered by the Na- 
tional Aeronautics and Space 
Administration (NASA). (See 
sidebar.) The satellite will 
feature a CW beacon and an 
amateur radio transponder, It 
will receive signals on two 
meters at 146 MHz and trans- 
mit on a 436 MHz downlink, 
A CW beacon will transmit on 
436J MHz. 

Once the satellite is built, 
the EDS AT team will trans- 
port it to Goddard Space Cen- 
ter in a special five cubic foot 
container. The satellite will 
then be transferred to a Getaway Special 
(GAS) can for its Space Shuttle ride. 

After the Shuttle reaches the desired or- 
bit, the satellite will be shot out of the 
opened GAS can by a simple spring-load- 
ed pedestal. It will have a 57-degrcc inclina- 




Photo A. Frank Wiesenmeyer mth a model of the EDSA T satellite* expected to go up in 
eurh- 1989* 



tion at its high point and will orbit at an 

altitude of at least 350 kilometers. Because 
the simple device will not have any boosters 
to adjust its altitude, EDSATs final posi- 
tion in the atmosphere won't be known until 
after launch. 



The special launch canister 
was designed to spring a simi- 
lar satellite into orbit in 1985. 
A team at Weber State Uni- 
versity in Utah used a GAS 
can to launch NUSAT, a small 
satellite designed to calibrate 
radar for the Federal Aviation 
Administration. 

EDSAT, Wiesenmeyer 
said, will be an educator's 
tool. The acronym stands for 
Educational Door to Space 
and Technology. "There 
were all kinds of interesting 
science experiments with the 
OSCAR scries/' Wiesen- 
meyer said, referring to the 
popular amateur radio satel- 
lite program. Of particular 
scientific interest was the 
telemetry, which included 
temperature readings, solar 
panel array current readings, 
and other related information. 
Wiesenmeyer is an associate 
professor of electronics tech- 
nology at Richland Communi- 
ty College in Decatur, and he 
used OSCAR to introduce 
space to his students. For ex- 
ample, he taught them how to 
plot Doppler frequency shift 
as the satellite whizzed by , us- 
ing it to calculate the satel- 
lite's altitude, 
VttL k4 It fit in perfectly with 

^jfc me/ 4 he said, "It provided an 

interest in space science, 
filled the bill for extracurricu- 
lar science activity, and gave 
us an involvement in antennas 
and communications/ 1 

With the death of OSCAR 8 in 1983, how- 
ever, Wiesenmeyer said the emphasis on edu- 
cation also died. Today's amateur satellites, 
he said, are intended more for communica- 
tion and not as a space science tool He 



73 Amateur Radio • December, 1988 29 



hopes EDSAT will restore the educational 

aspect to ham radio satellites. 

EDSAT will use a speech synthesizer 
to speak directly to students. The voice 

messages will include the spacecraft's tem- 
perature, the condition of the battery and 
electronics, the satellite's position* and other 
data. As it orbits the earth, it also will trans- 
mit voice bulletins to users. A high-speed 
digital transmission mode will be available 
for advanced users with access to a personal 
computer. 

Cheap (Relatively) 

Wiesenmeyer said they designed the satel- 
lite with as many commercial off-the-shelf 
components as possible, to keep costs down 
and to encourage others to try satellite build- 
ing on a limited budget. Donations of materi- 
al also have been invaluable. General Motors 
donated the high-quality aluminum for the 
satellite shell, and Motorola donated radios 
for the bird's transponder, Even so, it will 
cost the college team $25,000 to launch the 
satellite. The device itself will be valued at 
$100,000, 

Satellites have been the topic of discussion 
around Wiesenmeyer's small electronics lab 



"He (Wiesenmeyer) 

hopes EDSA T will 

restore the educational 

aspects to ham radio 

satellites." 



since NASA announced the Getaway Special 
program in 1982. It wasn't until 1985. how- 
ever, that the right combination of space 
enthusiasts came together at the college to get 
the project off the ground. 

Twelve people form the EDSAT design, 
engineering, and advisory team. There are 
other instructors, local businessmen, farmers 
and students involved in the project. The 
team has completed design of the satellite and 
is beginning to bolt the hardware together. 

Funds Needed 

Now the real work begins. The group will 
launch a fund-raising drive this summer to 
come up with the S25.000 needed to put its 
creation in orbit. "It looks like our experi- 
ment is way up the ladder, and we will go 
soon after shuttle flights resume, so we need 
to be ready/ Wiesenmeyer said, He talks 
about the launch with restraint, but it is 
obvious he is excited. 

"Think about what went on in the seven- 
ties! We launched satellites and payloads to 
Mars and Venus, and Voyager went to 
Jupiter. Saturn, and on out to Uranus and 
Neptune/ Wiesenmeyer said, "All those 
successes have had no real follow-up, 

"We are obviously in a period of declining 
space activity, and that is something we hope 
to change/ T 



Getaway Special 



The Getaway Special (GAS) program was never intended to launch satellites. It 
was designed by NASA to carry science projects on the Space Shuttle and return 
them in an unopened cylinder, 

A group of college students at Weber State College in Utah, however, requested 
in 1985 that a hinged lid be made available on one of the cans. They had done the 
unexpected, designing a satellite small enough to fit inside the 28-inch high cylin- 
der. A hinged lid and a spring-loaded base inside the tube were needed to launch 
the bird. 

The team successfully launched NUSAT in April of 1985 from the Space Shuttle 
Challenger. Already, the team led by an amateur radio operator at Richland Com* 
munity College in Decatur, Illinois, was planning the second use of the modified can 
to launch another mini-satellite. 

Getaway Special got its start in 1983 when 10 experiments by college students 
flew on the shuttle. Things like ant colonies and hybrid corn seed traveled up and 
back in sealed cans to test a variety of scientific theories, Since that flight, dozens of 
other experiments have flown, and reservations for hundreds more are waiting for 
shuttle flights to resume. 

There are two sizes of GAS cans. The one used by each of the satellite groups is a 
five cubic foot cylinder which is 28 inches high. It will hold 200 pounds of material, 
and costs $10,000 per launch. The hinged-lid version costs about $25,000. 

For experimenters with less grandiose projects, a 14-inch high cylinder is also 
available, (t holds 2 V2 cubic feet cf material. If you stuff it with 100 pounds of 
payload, it will cost you $5,000 per launch. Limit the baggage to 60 pounds and pay 
only $3,000. 

According to NASA, sponsor of the program, GAS cans are leased only to 
non-profit groups to carry out space-related research and development. Foreign 
groups are welcome to rent a can f but each project flown must be "peaceful in 
nature' ' Shuttle astronauts will assist with a maximum of three remote on-off 
commands for each can. 

Interested participants must classify their project in one of three categories: 
Governmental, Educational, and "Everything Else." A contract is signed with NASA 
and each group must pay $500 earnest money. NASA then sends each participant a 
videotape and manuals describing their responsibilities, 

Projects are flown on a "space available" basis, and the fee must be paid in full 
before launch. If you are interested in learning more, contact: Getaway Special, 
Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD at (301 ) 344-6760. 



EDSAT 

Block Diagram 



w 



tW/T0W BURST 



MODE E 



I 



146 MHz 
TuRnSTYlE 



V 



♦ 36 Mr*; 
MONOPOU 



SWREP 



COMMAND RCVR 
I46MH2NSFM 

TELEM XMTR 
43&MHfHefM 

~CWB£ACON 
436 1 MM* 



cw 

KEYM 



I 



E-SEL 

BURST 
CONTROL 



-uZ' C 



DIGIT A4.KER 



FSK TELEM 






1 



i 



->^ 



AFSK 
MODEM 



VOICE SYNTH CONTROL 



« DATA 



i 



MICROPROCESSOR 

controller *aK ram 

m ROM f 3£ VO 



J-SEi 



1 



MODE J 



COMMAND RCVR" 

ueMHz 



LINEAR TRANSPONDER 
t4£ UK* Uf>r*38 MHz DOWN 

CW BEACON 
43G1UHX 




CW KEYING 



24CHCW 
TELEM ENCODER 

I 



ANALOG TQ 
DIGITAL CONVTH 



TELEM 
SENSORS 

mo* 






aSOLAR 
ARRAYS 

18 WATTS 



BATTERY 
CHARGE REG 



LEAD ADD 

BATTER v 

fi CELL 5 AH 



r 



>TRUMENT 
MTCHMG 

REGULATORS 




30 73 Amateur Radio • December, 1988 






National Tower Company 

P.O.Box 15417 Shawnee Mission, KS. 66215 

Hours 8:30-5:00 M-F Price Subiect to Change Wilhoul Notice 




913-888-8864 



ROHN 



FflEE BASE STUBS WITH 
EACH BX SERIES TOWER 



?5G 

25 AG 2 & 3 
25AG4 
493 
45AG3 4 4 

55G 

mm 

BX-40 
BX 46 

BX56 

BX^64 

H BX-40 
KB&46 
HBX-56 

HDBX-40 
HDBX-48 

3/16EHS 
1/4EHS 

HYOAINf TELEX 
HF ANTENNAS 



6 sq.fl.] 
6 sq.fl/ 
6 sq.ft. 
[6 sq.H. 

10 sq.lt. 
10 sqtt- 

10 so,, ft 
18 sq.ft. 
18 sq 






TH3JRS 

TH5MK2S 

TH2MK3S 

TB7DXS 

EXP 14 

0K710 

103BAS 
105BAS 
155BAS 
2Q4BA5 
2Q5BAS 

7-1 S 
7-2S 
7-3S 

18HTS 

14BMQ 

18VS 
12AVQ5 
14AV0/WBS 
18AVT/WBS 

18TO 
2BD0S 

5BDQS 



3 

5 
2 
7 



eiemeni 
element 
eiemeni 
element 



23BS 
25BS 
28BS 
214BS 

648S 
V-2S 
V-3S 
V-4S 
GP&2A 

HRT44GRI 
HB144GRI 
H6144MAG 
BN86 

21 5S 
21 8S 



10' section 

model 2 of 3 lop section . 

model 4 top section 

10' section 

model 3 or 4 top seel ion.. 

10' section 

10' mast, 2"o.d. 
40 'self supporting 
48'self supporting 
5&'seif supporting 
64'seif supposing 
40 'self supporting 
48'self supporting 
56 'sett supporting 
40 'sell supporting 
48 'sell supporting 

* GUY WIRE SPECIAL 
500' galvanized 7 si rand.. 
500' galvanized 7 sirand 

ANTENNAS 

Tri bands 

'Junior Th underbid',. 

'Thunderbird' 

'Thunder bird" 

■Thunderbird' 

Explorer 14 triband beam 

30/40 M conv. Exp 14 

Mono band 
'Long John' 3 element 10 mtr 

"Long John' 5 element 10 mlr 

'brig John' 5 element 15 rntr... 

A element. 20 meter 

'Long John' 5 element 20 mtr 

'Discoverer" rotary dipole 3Q/4Qmtr.. 
'Discoverer' 2 elem. 40 meter beam. 

converts 7-2S to 3 elem. beam 

Multftand Verticals 

'Hy-Tuwer' 10 Ihru 80 meters 

roof mt kit tor 12 AvUHAVQ and 

IfiATV/WB 

base loaded, 10 thru 80 meters 

trap vertical 10 thru 20 meters 

trap vertical 10 thru 40 meters 

trap vertical 10 thru SO meters 

Miiltiband Doublets 
portable tape dipole 10-80 meters.... 

trap doublet 40 and SO meters 

trap doublet 10 thru 80 meters 

fleams & Verticals 

rneier 3 element beam 

meter b element beam. .., 

meter 6 element beam. 

meter 14 element beam 

4 element 6 meler beam..... 

colinear gain vertical 138-174 MHz.. 

colinear gain vertical 220 MHz 

colinear gain vertical 430-470 MHz.. 

base. 2 mtr. ground plane 3 dB 

VHF A UHF Mobiles 
ligergiass 2 mtr. 6dB gam 3/8-24 mt 
Hy Bander 2mtr 6dB gain 3/B-24 mt. 
HyBander 2 meter., 
lerrite balum for 10-80 meters. 
OSCAR LINK ANTENNA 

70cm, 435 MHz 

Complete Oscar link system.... 



$56.50 

I66.QD 
$73.50 
$133.00 
$136.00 
$166.50 
S13.50 
5196.00 
$250.00 
$334.50 
$431.50 
$226.50 
$308.00 
$39?. 50 
$2B4.50 
$384. &0 

$40.00 
350.00 



o 

> 



Tl 

o 




VHF ANTENNAS 

2 

2 

2 

2 






* 



CUSHCRAFT ANTENNAS 



A0P-1 

AP8 

A3 

A743 

A744 

4218XL 

R4 

A45 

AV4 

AV5 

ARX2B 

ARX450B 

A144-11 

A 147-11 

A1 47-22 

A144-10T 

A144-20T 

215WB 

22QB 

?30WB 

32-19 

424B 

1Q-4GD 

1MCD 

2D-4CD 

HUSTLER 

4BTV 
5BTV 
6BTV 
ROTORS 

Alliance 

Alliance 

TELEX 

TELEX 

TELEX 

TELEX 

CABLE 



complete Oscar Link system .... 
8band Yiwave vertical. 

3 element (riband beam 

7 & 10 MHz add on kit fof A3 

7 & 10 MHz add on kit for A4 .. 
18 element 2 mtr, 28 8' boomer 
10, 12. 15.20 mater vertical 

4 element triband beam 

40-10 mtr. vertical - 

80-10 mtr. vertical 

2 mtr. 'Ringo Ranger' 

450 MHz, 'Ringo Ranger' 

144 MHz. 11 eFe VHF 

11 eiemeni 146-148 MHz. beam 

Power Packer' 

2 mlr 'Oscar' 

2 mlr. 'Oscar' 

2 mtr. 'Boomer' 

FM 'Boomer" 

30 element 

mtr. Boomer' 



22 element 
10 element 
20 element 
15 eiemeni 
17 element 
144 -148MHz 
19 eiemeni 2 



24 element 'Boomer' 

4 element 10 rntf. 'Skywalker' 
4 element 15 mtr. "Skywalker 7 
4 element 14 MHz 'Skywalker' 
ANTENNAS 

40-10 mtr vertical 

8O-10 mtr vertical . 

6 band trap verticaF 

HO73[10.7sq.ft.I 

U110 

AR40TV, 3sq ft 

CD45-II [8.5 sq.ft.] 

HAM IV [15 sq. It.] 

T2X [20 sq. fi.] 



2-18 & 6-2?] 4080 - per loot 

2-16 & 6-20] 4090 - per loot 

1108 AG8LI Mini 8 low loss foam per fool . 

1198 RG8U Columbia su pert I ex 100" 
1 180 RG8LI Low loss 100% bonded Foil shield 
66% tin copper b'aided sheild -per foot 



$169.00 

$152.00 

$246.00 

$81 00 

$81.00 

$125.00 

$204.50 

$344.00 

594,50 

$111.00 

$39.25 

$39 25 

$50.50 

$50.50 

$141 75 

$54. OD 

$77.50 

$81.00 

$101,25 

$21600 

$101.25 

set oo 

1124 75 
S145.00 
$310 50 

$79.00 
$105.00 
$124.00 

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$47.00 
CALL 
CALL 
CALL 
CALL 

SO. 18 

$0.35 

$0.17 

$31.00 

$0.35 



RANGER 

IOmeter TRANSCEIVER, 25 watt, 
can be programmed to split 
transceive. SSB, CW. AM, FMJ 
programmable scanning, fulty 
automalic, noise blanker 2 3/8H, 
7V,W. 11D. oaQ QA 

uniden 

25 WATT 1 Meter Transceiver, all 
mode operation, backlit muiti func j 
tion LCD meter, frequency lock, 
auto squelch. NB. RF gain, PA, 
external speaker jack. 
7 l /+Wx9 l /*Dx2 3/BH. 





HH2510 



$249.90 




T 




MAXON....$26.95 

Model 49SA ■ 49 MHz, FM 2-WAY RADIO 
hands free operation, voice activated 
transmit up to V? mile. Batteries optional 

model 49B $34.95 

seme ieatures as 49SA except uses " AA " 
mead batteries and comes with battery 
charger 

ASTATIC 

0104 SILVER EAGLE $69.90 

Chrome plaied base station amateur microphone 
Factory wired to be easily converted to electronic or 
relay operation. Adjustable gain for optimum 
modulation 

ETS D104 SE . $89.90 

NEW. same as above with end of transmislon 'Roger 
fieep' 

RADAR DETECTORS 

UNIDEN 

ROS00 $69.90 

Dual conversion superhet. city/riwy. LEDs. audible a Jam. compact. 

RD9 $114.90 

2 power cords, travel case, dual conversion superhet, ctiy/hwy. 
audible fi LED alerts, mrni size 

HD7 $79.90 

Dual conversion superhet, mini size, LED's, audible alert. 

RD9XL $149.90 

Superhel w/two power cords carry case, City/Hwy, mini size. 

BEL 

XKR100 ...$43.90 

LED alert, tone alert, X & K band, dash/visor. 

876 VECTOR $94.90 

GAas diodes, sequential LED, City/Hwy, audio alert 

S47 $134.90 

EXPRESS REMOTE, V 4 Vband," Superhel! 2-way filter, LED & audi- 
ble alerts. 

HAXOH 

Wm mm Hto wm i + ■ h + t¥»***w + ****»*» + & ■ ^ *F v ■ v mr 

Superhet. X & K band, audible & visual alerl, city/ high way seJtmg. 

RD3 . . . $59 90 

Long range dual conversion, .x & K band, LED's. audible alert 
w /volume control, antFtalsmg, city/hwy, dash/ visor. 

FTO21 $54.90 

Mini size, audible & visual alert, omni -polarity guard, dash/ visor 

RD25 S79.90 

Deluxe mini, same as above with sequential LED's 

rdxl ;;:,;;,,-•; :.!.;.. $129.90 

CORDLESS, X & K bands, anti talsing, sequential LED's, audible 
aFert. city/hwy. cfark/mute swilch. with carry case 

TENNA PHASE III POWER SUPPLIES 

F$3 $15.fJD 

Output:13.8V DC - 3 amp constant 5 amp 
surge, electronic overload protection w/in- 
stan t auto reset, (use protected 

PS4 $1990 

Fully regulated, 13.8 VDC - 4 amps con- 
stant with surge protection, overload pro- 
lection w /instant auto reset. 

TO 9 ■■■: ■■■■■■■ ■ r «■■■■■■■!■! fll-S^^Sf U 

Fully regulated , 7 amp constant, 10 amp surge capacity. 

PS12 $34.90 

Fully regulated. 10 amp constant 13 amp surge, eFectronic overload 
protection w/instani auto reset. 

PS20 564.99 

Fully regulated. 20 amp surge capacMy. 13-6 VDC. 17 amp cons- 
lant, with meter 

PSZ5 -. $79.90 

ReguEaied 4.5-15VDC-25 Ampconsianl 27 amp surge, instant auto 

reset, dual meter tor current & voltage. 

PS35 S99J0 

Same as above except, 35 amp consiant, 37 amp surge, adjustable 
from TO to 15 volts. 




unlden 




BC800XLT . $239.90 

40 Ch 12 band, 800 MHi, aircraft & 

weather, priority, track tuning, scan 
delay, auto search, direct channel 

access, auto squelch, channel 
lockout . AC /DC 



BC55XLT 

$114.90 

10 Cnannel 10 
band,, prog ram - 
mabte, keyboard 
lock. 2 digit LCD 
display, review, 



channel 

battery 

dicator, 

backup, 

delay. 

channel 



lockout, 
low m- 

memory 
built-in 
direct 

access, 



track tuning, ac- 
cepts nicad bat- 
teries. 





BC145XL . . . $92.90 

16 Ch 10 band, programmable. 2 
digit LEO, priority, review, direct Ch 
access, track tuning, built-in defay. 
memory backup. Channel lockout, 
direel channel access, weather, 
AC/DC 



BC5B0XLT$ 189.90 

100 Ch 11 mobile, sery ice search, 
weather, priori! y. charrnei lockout, 
scan delay, auto search, il- 
luminated, programmable, track 
tuning, direct channel access 



BP55C Baltery pack & charger for BC55XL $29.90 

BC100XLT 100 CFi It band hand held $199.90 

aircraft, ch lockout, auto search, programmable, with battery pack. 
AC charger, carry case & earphone 

BC200XLT 200 Ch 12 band, hand held. $269.90 

WITH SQOMFfz band, priority, ch lockout, auto search. Iracfc luning. 
direct ch access, with battery pack. AC adaptor. Garry case. 

BC175XL 16 ch 11 band aircrah $149.90 

weather, ch lockout, auto search a squelch, delay, track tuning, 
memray backup, high/low scan speed, direct Ch access. AC/DC. 

BC210XLT 40 Ch. 11 band, aircraft & weather. $179.90 

Ch lockout, priori ly, scan delay, auto search, programmaOFe, track 
tuning, direel Ch access, AC/Dc with mobile mounting bracket. 

BC560XLT 16 Ch 10 band mobile, $99.90 

LED display, review, priority, memory backup, direct 'Ch access, 
weather search, built-in delay, Irack tuning, eternal speaker jack 

BC760XLT 100 Ch 12 band mobile. $279.90 

WITH 800 MHz u wealher & aircraft base/mobr-le. priority, service scan 
ch lockoul, scan delay, auto search. programmabEe. track tuning, 
direel Ch access, memory lock, memory backup, ext speaker jack. 

BETTY BEARCAT Frequency Directory 



BCFB-W 
BCFBE . 



Western LIS . , . 

. Eastern US , . . . 



$9.90 
$9.90 




INF5 . . . $89.90 

AC Powered TURBO SCAN* . 
pre- programmed by state to 
receive any type of poFfce 
transmission plus fire and 
weather, scans at 50 channels 
pee second, digiial display, in- 
stant wealher. 

INF1 $144.90 

Preprogrammed mobile, 
receives all 50 states police, 
plus instant weather, scans 40 
channels per second. DC 

SUPER 
CONUERTER 

installs on any scanner and is 
designed to receive frequencies 
belween 810 MHz & 912 MHz and 
convert them down to 4 TO MHz 
thru 512 MHz, easy to install 



Z45 $99.90 

45 Channel 7 band w/aircrafl. 
programmable, 45 preprogramm- 
ed channels search or scan, 
alarm clock, priority, permanent 
memory backup, ch lockout, scan 
delay, AC/ DC with both cords 

R1070 $89.90 

10 Ch 6 band, programmable, 
permaneni memory backup, dual 
level digital display, channel 
lockout, step contfol, AC oniy. 




CIRCLE 323 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



NYE 



Takes the fear out of full power antenna tuners, 
and the guesswork out of PEP measurement with 
these two MUST SEE PRODUCTS!! 




V-A 



RFM-003 







.*njp^* 



1 la*** i*'-** 



Discover this durably bui Lt, feature packed MB- V-A Antenna 
tuner. You'll find operating conveniences that make 
antenna tuning a snap and value engineered to do the job 
over wide operating ranges. Compare quality, features and 
the NYE VIKING TWO YEAR WARRANTY. 



Get correct easy to read measurements of PEP for SSB, 
AM, and PuLse along with full time completely automatic 
SUR display with this unique Power Monitor System. Two 
models to choose from: The RFM-003 for 3KU indication 
and the RFM-005 for 5KU. 



CHECK THE FEATURES: 



* Pi Network. Low Paaa Pi Network timing 15-30 UHr. Heavy duty silver pJaled continuously variable 
inductor with 25:1 vernier dial, 71)00 volt variable capacitor and lO.OOOv switch selected fijttd capacitors 
on output side. Tunes <0 -3000 ohm loads. Good harmonic suppression! 

+ AllLonidlic SWR. Hands free metering of SW1L No read, or calibration needed. Separate power melcr- 
300 or 3000 i La. automatically switched Easy to reed ZJ5" recessed and bsek-tigjiled Unit band indent 

* Antenna Switch. PUSH-BUTTON antenna switching to (4) antennas {Z coei, single wire iui twin 
lead). Coei bypassed on first coax output. 1 e designed this switch to take the power. Rated at 10KV 
and 30 amps. 

1 3 KW Balun. THfilar wounnd triple core torroid fives balanced output to twin feeders from £00 
to LOOt) ohina and unbalanced output down to 30 ohms, 

* Maximum Power Transfer, Welch your transmitter output impedance to almost any aoteimu 
system for maiimum power transfer Amplifiers only run at their designed Q when properly matched. 

T Model Options. UB-IM1 includes all WB-Y-A features less antenna avilch and balun. UB-IV- 
A2 is identical to MB-IY-M with the addition of a triple core balun. 

* 1.0 MHz. will not tune on some antennas, 



* (3) Modes - Peak Awrege and Peak and Hold with a unique non-drift Sample A Hold Analog 
memory circuit. 

+ (2) Ranges - Automatically switched power scales to 5 Kf . 

* Fully Automatic SWR - Full time meter displays rata directly without ML 

* TllJ il L — 111 AtjQ - Protect your amplifier tube investment with Uiis fast acting lookout 

* Rc fHOle Couplers - Six feet remotes the interchaiujcahle calibrated couplers, 

* True RMS Conversion - H.F. couplers U3e forward biased full wave detection. 

* Rugged Construction - Heavy gauflc aluminum construction, Top quality glass epoiy 
PCB. This meter is built to last. 

* Accuracy - Guaranteed to ±_h% P.S> 

1 Warranty - TWO FULL YEARS - 

* Added Features - Are swiUhable rewrae power all mode metering - Full status 1ZL1 Display 
- Adjustable? AID a swilriiabJe SWH/KS^ power - Heavy duty Nitad batteries charged by the applied 
RF for the field and a charger is supplied for lost charging and backlighting of the taut baud 
meters for the ham shack. 






OTHER NYE VIKING PRODUCTS 

Phone Patches - Electronic and Memory Keyers - Squeeze Keys - Straight Keys - Code Practice Sets 
- SWR Wattmeter for the blind - Low Pass Filters - All Band Antenna and more 

ASK FOR A FREE FULL LINE CATALOG. 






TO ORDER, CALL YOUR FAVORITE DEALER 



Amateur Electronic Supply 

Ham Radio Outlet 

Henry Radio 

Madison Electronics 

EGE 

R & L Electronics 



Barry Electronics 

C-Comm 

Ross Distributing 

Quement Electronics 

LaCue Communications 

Ham Station 




Wm. M. Nye Co, Inc. 

1614 130th Ave N.E. 
Bellevue, WA. 98005 
TEL; (206) 454-4524 
FAX: (206) 453-5704 



CIRCLE 353 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



uniden 



$III$M$I$I$ 



$12, 

Scanner Sale 

Uniden Corporation of America has pur- 
chased the consumer products line of Re* 
gency Electronics Inc. for $12,000,000. To 
celebrate this purchase, we're having our 
largest scanner sale in history! Use the 
coupon in this ad for big savings. Hurry... offer 
ends December 31. 1988. 

• * * MOMMY SA VI HO COUPON** • 

Get special savings on the scanners 
fisted in this coupon. This coupon must 
be tnciuded with your prepaid order. 
Credit cards, personal ch&cks and quan- 
tity discounts are excluded from thts 
otte r tfar valid oniy o n prepaid orders 
matted directly to Communications Elec- 
tronic s fnc, RQ Bom 1045-Dept. UN 11 f, 
Ann Arbor, Mich igan 4 8 1 06- 1045 USA 
Coupon expires December 31, 1968 
Coupon ma y not be used in confunctio n 
with any other otter from CEL Coupon 
maybe photocopied. Add S 9.00 tor ship- 
ping in the continental U.S. A 

Regency TS2-T . . $259.95 

Regency INF1-T ..,$119.95 

Regency INF5-T 579-95 

Regency R1090-T S114.05 

Regency UC1 02-T S1 09.&5 

Regency RH6068-T $413.95 

Regency RH25GB-T..„, $294,95 

Bearcat 200XLT-T $249.95 

Bearcat 1 00XLT-T , . „ . $1 84.95 

Bearcat S0OXLT T $249.95 

Uniden TALKER-T $179-95 

• * * • VALUABLE COUPON + + ** 

NEW! Bearcat? 760XLT-T 

List price $499.95/0 E price $244. 9 5/ SPECIAL 
f **«m4 lOO Channel e Crymtallaaa e AG/ DC 

Frequencyrange: 29-S4, If a-} 74, 406-5 1ZBQ6+956 MHz 
Excludes 823 9875-B49 0125 and 868 98 7SB94.Q 1 25 MHz 

The Bearcat 760XLT has 100 programmable chan- 
nels organized as five channel banks for easy use, 
and 1 2 bands of coverage including the 800 MHz. 
band. The Bearcat 760XLT mounts nealfy under 
the dash and connects erectly to fuse block or 
battery. The unit also has an AG adaptor, flip down 
stand and telescopic antenna for desk top use. 6- 
5/1 6" Wx1%"Hx 7% " D, Model &C 590XLT-T is 
a similar version without the 300 MHz. band for 
only $1 94 95, CTCSS squelch option now available. 

SALE! Regency® TS2-T 

List price S499.95/CE price S269.95/SPECIAL 
ta-Bmndt 73 Channel e Crystalteae a AC/DC 

Frequency range: 29-S4. It 8-1 75, 406-5 12, 806+950 MHz 
The Regency 1S2 scanner rets you monitor Military, 
Space Satellites, Government, Railroad, 
Justice Department, State Department Fish & 
Game. Immigration, Marine, Police and Fire Depart- 
ments, Aeronaut tea I AM band, Paramedics, Am- 
ateur Radio, plus thousands of other radio fre- 
quencies most scanners can' l pick up. The Regency 
TS2 features new 40 channel per second Turbo 
Scan"" so you wont miss any of the action. Model 
TS1 -T is a 35 channel version of this radio without 
the 800 MHz. band and costs only $ 199.95 

Regency® RH256B-T 

List price S799 95/CE price S299.95/5PECIAL 
fa Chmnnmi • 23 Watt Transceiver • Priority 

The Regency RH256B is asixteen-channel VHF land 
mobile transceiver designed to cover any frequency 
between 150 to 162 MHz. Since this radio is 
synthesized, no expensrve crystals are needed to 
store up to 1 6 frequencies without battery backup. 
All radios come with CTCSS tone and scanning 
capabilities A monitor and night/ day switch is also 
standard, This transceiver even has a priority func- 
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CIRCLE 121 ON READER SERVICE CARD 




Number i 1 on your Feedback card 



Charging Without Overcharging 

This circuit conserves AC and charges — not chars—station batteries! 



by Dennis Knittel WB8VQR 



It's always a good idea to have an 
emergency power source for the 
ham station. Hams are often need- 
ed the most during power outages. 
Auto batteries are good to keep the 
12 volt station running, but deep- 
cycle marine batteries from GNB, 
Sears, and others are ideal. Auto 
batteries are designed to provide a 
whopping current (100-200 am- 
peres) for very short periods. *uch 
as needed to start a car. and to float 
the load— lights ignition, radio, 
and so forth— against the alterna- 
tor the rest of the time. 

The deep-cycle batteries, on the 
other hand, are designed to be ful- 
ly charged, and then to provide a 
steady, medium range current 
(10-20 amperes) until discharged. Thus the 
deep-cycle is more appropriate to this appli- 
cation, but if the automobile batteries are free 
"putl-outs," or nearly so , . . 

More Than Just Trickle Charging 

A popular method has been to trickle- 
charge auto batteries while running gear off a 
power supply. When the power goes out, the 
battery takes over automatically, The prob- 
lem with this is that unless the charging 
voltage is set cxacdy, and the condition of the 
battery monitored occasionally with a hy- 
drometer, the battery will be either under- 
charged (leaving less reserve in an outage) or 
overcharged (driving off water and eventual- 
ly killing the battery), 

The circuit shown in the schematic uses 
two batteries alone to supply the station. 
When their voltages drop to a preset point, a 
control circuit activates the charger. One of 
the batteries begins to charge while the other 
continues to supply the station. After the first 
battery is charged, it powers the station while 
the second battery charges. After the second 
battery is charged, the charger shuts off and 
the station runs from both batteries. The 
charger draws AC only when needed. The 
charger doesn't need to be well -filtered be- 
cause it doesn't run the station directly. 

Since the equipment is not endangered, this 
method also allows the batteries to charge at 
15.5 volts. Once the charger is removed, the 
batteries will be at about 13.5 volts. Charged 
at only 13.5 volts, the battery voltage would 
be only about 12 volts after removing the 
charger. In the following text, you will note 
that the set points of 12.25 volts for starting 

34 73 Amateur Radio • December, 1988 




charge, and 1 3.50 for stopping, are values for 
new batteries. If your batteries are older, you 
could use lower numbers tike 1 2 and 13 volts. 
This just means slightly different settings on 
R6 and R5, respectively. Be aware of voltage 
drops due to the voltmeter when adjusting the 
potentiometers. 

Outage Warning 

During an outage, the station continues to 
operate from the batteries. When the con- 
troller begins to charge the batteries, howev- 
er, it discovers the outage and sends a pulsat- 
ing audio warning to indicate trouble. This 
audio can be piped to useful locations, such as 
to a speaker in the ham shack, or through a 
transmitter audio input at a repeater site. The 
controller can also switch the equipment to 
low-power operation during the outage. It 
won't allow the batteries to over- or under- 
charge. The batteries power the controller, 
which, due to its mostly CMOS circuitry, 
draws under 2.5 mA. 

Voltage Reference 

The controller circuit requires a voltage 
reference. Voltage reference criteria are: sta- 
bility, low current draw, and over- voltage 
detection. Over-voltage protection is set a 
little above the normal peak charge. If, for 
example, the batteries arc charging at 15.5 
volts, a good over- voltage point is 16 volts- 

It's easy to derive a stable 16 volt reference 
from batteries that fluctuate between 12.25 
and 13.5 volts. A 723 voltage regulator chip 
(U2), powered from the batteries, is set for an 
8 volt output. A voltage divider (R40. R2, 
and R41 ) divides charger voltage in half and 



compares it to the 8 volt reference 
from the 723. If the divided 
charger voltage goes above the 
reference voltage, the controller 
removes the charger from the AC 
line and begins the audio warning. 
It remains this way until manually 
reset. This over-voltage protec- 
tion keeps the batteries from over- 
charging, and protects the equip- 
ment from what might well be a 
fatal over- voltage. 

An LM339 voltage comparator 
chip (U3) monitors four voltage 
points. The four points are: 16 
volts (over-voltage), 1 1 volts (un- 
der-voltage), and the two inner 
limits of 12.25 and 13.5 volts, 
which control battery charging. 
All reference voltages for the 339 come from 
the 723 voltage regulator, and are separately 
adjustable. The capacitors and the series re- 
sistors, which are after the battery and 
charger voltage dividers, smooth out any 
spikes caused by load changes so that the 
comparators are not accidentally tripped . 

Circuit Operation 

Normal operation begins with comparator 
U3c. When it detects that the batteries have 
run below 12.25 volts, it sets flip-flop #5 
(FF5). This starts the 600 Hz oscillator, and 
the 4020 and 4017 divider chips. FF5 also 
causes Darlington pair #1 (DPI) to ground 
relay # I ( K 1 ) , that connects the charger to the 
AC line. The lime when FF5 starts the di- 
vider chips is the time reference for other 
events described later. The 4020 is a unique 
CMOS chip in that it is capable of division by 
as much as 16,384. Its last three outputs di- 
vide the 600 Hz down to one cycle every 
6.83, 13.65, and 27.3 seconds. 

This explanation uses the 1 cycle/6.83 sec- 
ond output. It gives 54.6 seconds of charge to 
the battery during each cycle. The 13.65 sec- 
ond output gives 109.2 seconds of charge, 
and the 27.3 output gives 218.5 seconds per 
cycle to the battery. If the batteries require 
longer charging cycles, the 13,65 or 27,3 
second outputs can be used, giving the longer 
times. Select the desired output with a jumper 
on the printed circuit board. The circuit recy- 
cles on each battery until it is fully charged, 
eliminating the need to worry about under- 
charging. Using too short a charge cycle, 
however, causes the circuit to test the battery 
voltage before it stabilizes. This fools the 



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ma 



circuit into prematurely thinking that the 
batteries are charged, causing unnecessary 
cycling and relay wear. 

We now have a 6. 83 second cycle from the 
4020 (U7) clocking the 4017 (U6). Each out- 
put of the 4017 starts with output #0 and will 
sequentially go higher for 6. 83 seconds while 
all others remain low. At seconds (when 
FF5 sets} output #0 goes high. At 6. S3 sec- 
onds output #9 returns low and output #1 goes 
high. At 13.65 seconds, output #1 returns 
low and output #2 goes high. This continues 
through output #9 and then begins over again 
at output #0, 

When output #0 goes low at 6,83 seconds, 
it causes a one millisecond negative output 
pulse from the capacitor-resistor network 
(CI 5 and R32). This pulse sets FF2 and FF3, 
causing DP2 and DP3 to ground K2 and K3. 
This means that 6.83 seconds after FF5 sets 
and the charger comes on and stabilizes, the 
first battery begins charging. The second bat- 
tery continues to supply your radio equip- 
ment. At 61.44 seconds, the 40 1 7 output #8 
resets FF2, releasing K2, and stops the charg- 
ing. At 68.27 seconds, the 4017 output #9 
causes a voltage check on battery #1. If the 
voltage is under 13,5 volts then at 75 + 09 sec- 
onds Ehe 4017 output #0 sets FF2 again and 
reconnects battery #1 to the charger for an- 
other round. If voltage is over 13.5 volts then 
FF3 is immediately reset, causing battery #1 
to return to supply the load. At 75.09 sec- 
onds, FF2 and FF4 cause battery #2 to begin 
the same charging cycle that battery #1 had 
used, At 129,71 seconds, FF2 resets and re- 
leases K2, stopping the charging of battery 
#2. Its voltage is allowed to stabilize and at 
136.53 seconds the voltage is checked. If 
under 13.5 volts, the charge cycle for battery 
Wl begins again at 143.37 seconds. If over 
13-5 votts, the entire circuit resets immedi- 
ately. The charger is disconnected from the 
AC line, and everything waits to be called 
into action again. If battery #1 has fallen 
below 12.25 volts by the time battery #2 is 
checked and found to be over 13.5 volts, the 
charger will not shut off. Instead, the se- 
quence restarts by charging battery #1 and 
then battery #2. This means that if there is a 
heavy load, the batteries will continue to 
charge alternately. 

Over- Voltage Protect 

If over-voltage should ever occur, FF1 will 
set, causing DPI and Kl to disconnect the 
charger from the AC line. FF1 also causes the 
Conserve output to go to the high state. This 
output can advise the equipment to go to a 
power saving mode. FF1 also sets FF5 via the 
diode, starting the oscillator, and allowing 
the audio output to send out a pulsed tone to 
indicate trouble. 

The over-voltage circuit is reset by 
applying a L Mow** to the reset input of FF1 . 
This stops the beeping and restarts the 
charging, The reset can be remote controlled 
unless the remote reset continuously trips 
out, which means a trip to the remote site 
to correct problems. The conserve and audio 
outputs will also operate if voltage doesn't 
reach point A, (due to AC power line failure, 

36 73 Amateur Radio * December, 1 



charger melting, etc.), when a charging 
cycle begins. In this case, an attempted reset 
is ineffective, Everything will return to 
normal when voltage does reach point A 
(the power comes back on or the charger 
is replaced), this time with properly sized 
fuses. The one megohm resistor (R48) 
between point A and the AND gate input 
is to insure that the gate is not destroyed by 
its input, (which is being forced higher 
than the B+ supply to the chip). The one 
megohm resistor (R49) and the one micro- 
farad capacitor (R49, C6)> on the output of 
that gate, causes a delay to prevent falsing 
of the audio. 

If the controller is beeping and is not at- 
tended to, the battery voltage eventually 
drops to 11 volts. If this happens, the output 
of the comparator U3d goes to a low state. 
This causes DP5 to ground K5, which in 
turn shorts B+ to ground and blows 
the B+ fase. This feature is provided to pro- 
tect equipment that may be damaged by over- 
ly low voltage. The beeping that begins, as 
the batteries drop below 12,25 volts, should 
give enough time to correct the problems 
before the 11 volt "self-destruct" point is 
reached. There are other uses for U3d and 
K5, such as starting a back-up emergency 
generator or changing the beep rate (to indi- 
cate the batteries are really on their last leg). 



A second 723 Ul is provided on the board 
for regulating your charger, It can control 
a string of 3055s, The 723 does not have 
to be used, but if it's not, it still must tie 
point A to the charger output. The circuit is 
able to continue detecting the power line or 
charger failure. Capacitors placed off the 
printed circuit board pins are used for sens- 
ing and regulator output to keep the 723 
stable, 

A third battery can be added after the relays 
but before the B + fuse. Once a heavy load is 
applied, a third battery will help prevent ex- 
cess voltage drop caused by wire and relay 
contact resistances. It may also save your 
equipment's volatile memory from loss due 
to dirty relay contacts. The third battery will 
remain charged by the first two. 

The contacts of K2 should be able to handle 
the current power supply charging the batter- 
ies. The K3 and K4 contacts should each be 
able to handle the largest current that the 
equipment will demand of the batteries. 
Don't forget the reverse surge protection 
diodes across all relay coils. 

I recommend using larger (500 Ah+) bat- 
teries. They hold a charge longer and require 
fewer charging cycles, 

I hope you will find this project useful for 
setting up a more secure and economical 
battery backup system 



Parts List 



Quantity 


Parts number 


Description 


2 




2N3055 power transistor 


11 




2N3904NPN transistor 


3 


D1-D3 


1N4001 diode 


2 


D4-D5 


20 amp 50 V on beatsinks 


2 


U1-U2 


723 vantage regulator 


1 


U3 


339 voltage comparator 


2 


U4-U5 


4011 


1 


ue 


4017 


1 


U7 


4020 


1 


U5 


4044 


1 


U9 


4069 


1 


U10 


4071 


3 


C1-C3 


22uF electrolytic 


3 


C4-C6 


1uF 


3 


C7-C9 


,1uF 


6 


C10-C1S 


.01uF 


7 


R1-R7 


20kQ 


5 


R14-R18 


470Q V* resistor 


11 


R8-R13, R19-R23 


lOkfl resistor 


1 


R24 


39kQ resistor 


9 


R25-R33 


47kO resistor 


1 


R34 


&6kQ resistor 


1 


R3S 


68 kO resistor 


1 


R36 


91 kQ resistor 


1 


R37 


110kQ resistor 


1 


R3S 


20GkQ resistor 


1 


R39 


220kD resistor 


4 


R40-R43 


240kQ resistor 


1 


R44 


27Qk0 resistor 


1 


B45 


300kQ resistor 


2 


R4&-R47 


330kQ resistor 


3 


R48-RS0 


ImQ resistor 


3 


K1.K2.K5 


Relay 12 volt coif 20-25 amp SPST contacts 


2 


K3 S K4 


Relay 12 volt coil 20-25 amp SPOT contacts 


5 




200 voit amp snirbber diodes for relay coils 


1 


T1 


Power transformer 


1 


F1 


Fuse 5 amp 


4 


F2-F5 


Fuse 20 amp 3 AG" 



A surplus 3-phase magnetic circuit breaker can be substituted for fuses F3-F5 to disconnect all power in 
case of overcurrent in any leg. Remove B+ (coming through F5> also disables AC input through the 
contacts of K1 , 

*Oo not substitute slow-bfow for F5. 



THEY'LL THINK 

THEY'RE JUST 

HAVING FUN 




YOU'LL KNOW 
THEY'RE 

LEARNING 

Carole Perry's (Dayton 1987 Ham of The Year) 

"Introduction To Amateur Radio" 
package allows children of all abilities 
to achieve success. 

Reody-to-teach package contains: Teacher's 
Manual with 26 lesson plans, Code Practice 
Oscillator for Morse Code practice, 
Spacecode audiocassette which follows 

lesson plans. 

D Any motivated teacher can teach the program. 

□ Ham Radio program is used as a motivational 

toot to teach skills in other subject areas. 

D 24 hour Hotlrne is available for help 
and questions. 

□ High motivational activities, tromeworks r fund 
raisers, quizzes, & reproducibles included. 



- Media = 

- M@nton 



P.O. Box 131646 
Staten Island 



r 
i 
i 
i 
i 
i 

i 
i 



pq. 



inc 



.NY 10313-0006 
{718)983-1416 



LIMITED TIME ONLY-FREE VIDEO 

CASSETTE SHOWING 

CLASSROOM USE 



n 



CHECK ONE 



□ Payment enclosed (shipping 
and handling FREE) 
G Bill me; school address only 
(shipping and handling wilt be added) 
Please send me one package of ' Intfoduction To 

Amateur Radio' at only $99.95 

Please send me additional Codekey 

1000s at only $19.95 each $ _ 

ptease send me additional Spacecode 

qudiocassettes at only 36.95 each S 

Take discount of 10%, with orders of 5 or more oi the same fern. 

TOTAL PRICE 



Please include fa* exempt number where a ppli cable 
Name 

TiHe./Po5tliDn 



School/Organization. 

Street Address. 

City 

Zip. 



.State. 




.Daytime Phone. 



J 



CIRCLE 241 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



The HF5B "Butterfly"™ 

A Compact 2 Element Beam 

for 20-1 5 1 2-1 Meters 

Operate As A Di-Pole on 1 7 Meters 



Butternut 
Verticals 



Butternut's HF 
verticals use 
highest-Q tuning 
circuits (not lossy 
traps!) to outperform 
all multibarrtf designs 
of comparable size! 



Model HF6V 

•60. 40. 30. 20 15 ana 10 meiers 
automatic bsndswtlchmg. 

•Add-on kjl fpr T7 and 12 meters, 
available now 
•2G n mii 



Unique design reduces stz< 
but not performance. 
No lossy traps; full 
element radiates on 
all bands. 
Turns with TV 
rotor 
19 lbs. 



Model HF2V 

■Designed to* the low- band DXer 

•Automalrc bands wil en ing on 80 and 
40 meiers 

■Add-on units for t60 and 30 or 20 
meters 

*12 feel la 1 1 ■ may be top loaded for 
additional bandwidth 



For more information see your 
dealer or writs for a free brochure 



fc^ 



n 



H 



BUTTERNUT ELECTRONICS CO. 

405 East Market, Loch hart, TX 78644 





New Mod Kit 

for Bird Model 
43 Wattmeter 





MEASURES PEAK POWER 

OF SSB AND OTHER AM SIGNALS 

Bird Model 4300-400 modification 
kit quickly adapts any Bird Model 43 
Wattmeter to measure audio peak power 

of single sideband 

and other AM modu fated signals. 

The 4300-400 kit pc board mounts inside the Model 
43 housing, on the meter studs. Estimated conversion 
time is only 15 minutes from start to finish. 

Once modified, you can measure peak power to an 
8% RS. accuracy, without affecting cw operation or 
accuracy. 

And, the Model 4300-400 is surprisingly inexpensive. 
Contact your Bird distributor or factory for details. 

30303 Aurora Rd., Cleveland (Solon), Ohio 44139 — 2794 
216-248-1200 TLX: 706898 Bird Else UD FAX: 216-246-5426 

WESTERN REGION OFFICE: 
Bird Electronic Corp. 
621 Ojai Ave. , Suite E P.O Box 28. Ofai. CA 93023 805-646-7255 





Electronic Corporation 



CIRCLE 176 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



73 Amateur Radio • December, 1988 37 







RF POWER AMPLIFIERS 

• Lowest NF GaAs FET Preamp 

• Finest Quality Military Construction 
• Off-The-Shetf Dealer Delivery 




For the past five years. Amateurs worldwide 
have sought quality amplifier products from TE 
Systems. Renowned for the incorporation of 
high quality, low-noise GaAs FET preamplifiers 
in RF power amplifiers, TE Systems offers our 
fine line of products through select national 
distributors. 

All amplifiers are linear (all-mode}, automatic 
T/R switching with adjustable delay and usable 
with drive levels as low as Va Watt, We incor- 
porate thermal shutdown protection and have 
remote control capability. All units are de- 
signed to ICAS ratings and meet FCC part 97 
regulations, Approx, size is 2,8 x 5.8 x 10,5" 
and weight is 5 lbs. 

Consult your local dealer or send directly for 
further product information. 



TE SYSTEMS 

PO. Bow 25845 

Los Angeles. CA 90025 

{27 3) 478-0591 



SPECIFICATIONS 



Freq. 
MHz 



Model 



Q50BG 



05100 



14Q9G 



1410G 



1412G 



Power Preamp DC Powar RF 

Input Output NF-dB GairvdB +Vdc 



50-54 



5054 



144-^48 



144-t48 



144-148 



170 



170 



160 



160 



160 



2210G 220-225 



2212G 



44tOG 



4412G 



220-225 



420-450 



420-450 



130 



100 



too 



13,6 



13.6 



13.6 



136 



13,6 



13.6 



13.6 



136 



13.6 



Conn 



UHF 



UHF 



UHF 



UHF 



iiMF 



UHF 



UHF 




Models also available without GaAs FET preamp (delete G suffix on model #). Air units cover 
lull amateur band- specify to MHz bandwidth for 420-450 MHz amplifier 

Amplifier capabilities: 100-200 MHz, 225-400 MHt 1-2 GHz. Military f28Vl Commercial, 
etc also available - consult factory. 



Look at our 



- - . 




"ON WINDOW" Line 



VHF 
(140-175) 

• No Hole 

• Easy to Mount 

• Rugged 

• Supenof 

Performance 

• Radiator S/iaps 

On and Off 

• Competitively Priced 



F 



PATENT- 

UHF 
(420-520) 

• 3 db gam 

• No Hole 

• Easy to Mount 

• Rugged 

• Supenor 

Performance 

• Radtator Snaps 

On and Off 

• Competitively Priced 



232 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



CellularTrunking 
(800-395 MHz) 

• 3doGatn 

• No Hole 

• Easy to Mount 

a Rugged - Goes through Car 
Wash Without Removal 

9 Superior Performance 
9 Broad Bandwidth 

• Smalt Size 

• Competitively Priced 




mm 



1 SIS u X* If IrVL. 



COMMUNICATIONS ANTENNAS 



3900-B River Road 
SehHIerPark, I L 60176 
312-671 -S690 



brings imagination and innovation to 

antennas and has been 

since 1948 ft 



CIRCLE 163 ON REAPER SERVICE CARD 

38 73 Amateur Radio * December; 1988 



LET THE SUN DO 
THE WORK 








y Electricity 




from the 
Sun with 



SO! 

SofarSystems 



tw 



Charge batteries on 
stored machinery 

Light your tent 

Run fans 

Run remote trans- 
mitters 

Light signs 

Pump water for your 
animals 

Power for your motor 
home 

Run your radio without 

batteries 

Light your home 

Yard lights 

Charge flash light bat- 
teries 

Light your cabin 

Run electric fences 

Charge your boat 
battery 

Run appliances in your 
home 

Charge hand held 
radio batteries 

Fish shanty lights 

Charge your Cam- 
corder battery pack 



ALSO: OUTSTANDING PRICES ON IBM XT 
COMPATIBLE SYSTEMS! 

SHIP PI NQ I NP0RUATTON; PLEASE INCLUDE 10 % OF OflOE R FOR SHI P 
PING AND HANDLING CHARGES {MINIMUM « 50. MAXIMUM 110) CA- 
NADIAN ORDERS. ADDS? S01N US FUNDS MICHIGAN RESIDENTS ADD 
4 % SA LES TAX FOR F flff F LV E R, S E N D 22% STAM P OR S ASE 



HAL-TRONIX, INC. (313)2817773 

12*71 Dlx Toledo Hwy ^Q? 6:00 ^ MQnSm{ 

BOX 1101 "HAL" HAROLD C NOWLAND 

Southgate, Ml 4819S wbzxh 




CIRCLE 175 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



:7:r,H4'J:H:Cii;(»]:T«E 



Quality Test Gear & Electronic Kits for Professionals and Hobbyists 



COM-3 



T 





$4995 

wlfitf Ifldudtt 
K ifliptnr 
PR^kil 




THE COMMUNICATIONS 
00 SERVICE MONITOR THAT 
WORKS HARDER FOR LESS. 

Introducing COM-3 .... 1 he new se rv ice mo n itor des ig n ed by ser v i ce 
lech n ic tan s f r service tochn tcia rts 1 1 wot ks ha rd e r for less g 1 v ■ 
mg you advanced testing capabilities at a very affordable price 
FEATURES • Direct entry keyboard with programmable memory 
• Audto i transmitter frequency counter * LED bar graph fre- 
quency/error deviation display • 1 10.000 ^v output levels • 
Htgh receive sensitivity, less than Spv • 100 KHz to 993.9995 MHz 
Continuous frequency coverage • Transmit protection, up to TOO 
watts * CTS tone encoder, 1 KHz and external modulation 




$69 9S 

W I ' |fl 




$3995 



PR-2 COUNTER 
PREAMP 

$W#$ from *lo. 000 Iftu • Hat 

OV|| " ■ BNT '" "''" •>•"""-• ■ Ml 
Por Miffing RF * idMl r«ei wt i r TV 
pr»^*3dbNF 



PS-2 AUDIO 
MULTIPLIER 

TRt PS*? « Harty tor too* nmmmm 

mjfopi q Ufrm frmm ncy * grea* if 

Ot 10orU)*QrjiH/rfsotutnfi& 
tnjiit-rn signal pKeamp/condit igrrar 



PS-IOR 1.5 GHz 
PRESCALER 

Erind! rne r anpe ol yo<* 
*z«a 



■ .- , ,, ^ 
Mi iniytiT 



w«wr»«¥ftmii*_ 
CfflwndOf»*tSG«rw iSMKzotfl 
* dnwrt any raumtf 



CT-70 7 DIGIT 525 MHz 



CT-90 9 0IGIT600HHZ 





icucm 



M 39.95 

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ICHlPTIft 



H69.95 

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FREQUENCY COUNTERS 



Ramsey BKBuma nas oeen m»iu.'ii*ciu' rng eiecvonic lesl gear Tor 

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IMt gf to« C091 CflyolPI Ml H« Kifl USA 
C^'COu'nE^a p ttu«ltaibria.fTart;j w ^iQO>ffl««nFETh«jti 
» mpedjnce input pmpif *■« sJiapf no ;itftn»¥ amf OVdMe h»on 

OMlrry epory glass, plited-ltiru PC fioanJ Boretrudian AH unrts are 
iixi tFacti mr In me usa 





5189.95 




ACCESSORIES FOR COUNTERS 






M 89.95 



UlU'lli 



anie nna-BlfC plug 
~ prooe iigm loadmc 
ic* jass profit, audio use 

OffKt P*O0* Otflfra' purpose krte 

cmao&ss 

CT7U 3D i 125 



■!■■■■■■■'■• 



IBK 



TUB 
IS 



MMtL 


n^iMS 


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ACCUflACr 


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FtESOLUTWI 


rwci 




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arjHj.sMMHi 


\. ■ ■ '• ■ • MHi 


lPPM 


7 


1Ha,lDHi,iprjHj 


1M-95 




CT-90 


10 Hi -600 MHz 


<150fnvTpfjfWrVif'/ 


1PPM 


9 


O.IHI. 10HJ 100 H; 


188.90 




CT-M 


SHz-WQWH? 


LESSlKWJ?bmv 


1PPH 


| 


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10*95 




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10 Hi- t asm 


< rSmvfrSttHAHj 
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with mi 
opt» 


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9 


GIKLIKMQH* 


— 





MINI KITS-EASY TO ASSEMBLE-FUN TO USE 




H* 



r*ta?Q turn pot wit- 



rannti 

«gt rigutaiHiT 567C Useful tor tone* 
irjne Durst ceteclran F5K. etc Can jlsn 
tn used as a srank lone encoder fflu-ns 



CornplBiEhil M' 1 



$5.95 



«OWATT2mlr 

PWRAWP 

S«i9to Ctes C tomet am 

mvmptmetmWmfraptiLimm 

IDT Bam 5« n ^f « WgtfL Mb a^pM 

c*S0W •ncredibitwaiuf complefe *iin 

if r pa? t3. kas uttmd r-3 r - j j^ 

PA'i.4DWp*fampNit S27.95 

tB-l.flF-senMflT-nrfliaviiii 6.95 



COt OH ORGAN 

See finite cpme aJiv»<3 

Qifircmi fcgflts flicker 

JCL„ 

Eacinnrirwdlu" 
dims up) io3G0W mnt 

oniJOWC 

MLIhil S8.9S 



VOICf ACTIVATED 

SWITCH 

Voice ati 1 vatrt snuicn 



patekivvpioiOQisA 

C*tflri*r relays. 



vS-r kit 



let- Nuns 1 



VIOfOMOOULRTX 

. ■ ■ Yi y TV 



idee "lamiar Supei 

rtv44 aurtSQn5rttV 

anil Beslunftoniht 



$795 



LEB Ht* K T H IT 
AnamaWy HasBgs ? 
lumtoLiOs Use lor 

name badges. buitoriH 
*amiU0jfcinei lights 
fluilsnn3l,o15vcllb 



■ iKii 



$2.95 



$6.95 



UWVLrLSALTINIEn 

Ptowdis Kt base pam 
= ■ - :• - 1 ■•-_-„ ■ 1 ■ 
OTh-ide a sol*cc dprt- 
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OfMi JC jfmJ wchnlesa 
rangn ol pirEs for masl 
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Ul'jhn $5.95 



MAO RUST IK 
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Vig-lK,r S4.95 



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lor rnonilDrmg tUttiyS 
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rmsouipul 'u!isfi!!.!i. 
ftvfliis.w*iMienm 
igwafcr 

m 5* S5.95 



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imnal jjprlnirnance Ftd 
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$14.95 



FMHECCIVfH 

Fc-f-JuiM-in,ipplKj(iQni 
nc hobby &Kpnfimenta- 
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'nifrovohiefiiilivily. 
*}7VimS imegraied 

CrCUftdCfKtOr *£>nt» 
9V 

WLTEK 

on&landani 
FUbroadcttfbmdas 
weff as large portions nn 
eacn sifle compact rtT 
sguareKlorftugdetec- 

"™ $14.95 



VNlSPiRLJSMT 
AnirArE$&Bgkil 



iqwrtietooorme 
wnl. (fit Of igNrt? me 
tight Includes nuae, ton- 
Iro^s up to 300 W. runs on 
no VAC 





FM 

WIRELESS 

MIKE 

tattsnosyptpJQHo 
1 wiKoafcajtiadio 
wMsapytvpeotm^e 

fl«nSflrl3lo9V TytM'FM 

?nas added sen5»hve 
ffuKcpreamostBgt 

FM-IKil S3 .95 
FM-ZHit $4.95 



A an per nigh pertof mance 
FMwirfllessrfiikohr 1 
Ifiiniiiints a stable Mgnai 
up to 300 yards with 
im n rr pi mna I and m qu *I ijy 
by means ol its buiH tn 
eUctfttmAt MKKtofles 
mM. on-gll i*rtcft 



HjgtraE&ucMns TMsis 

cntiinesiiinil».jJaDie 

fM3Ki! S 14.95 

FM3Wrred and Tested 

19.95 




MICROWAVE 
INTHUS ION ALARM 

ArsalmlcrDwave 
dappim sensor that *■ 1 1 
delect a human as lar 11 
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onUGHzanS^net 

v 



Si REN 

Produces 4*w ar cartf 
immmmimm t, 
peaA awMo oripul runs 
ona-CvoKs u*tt3-G 

onm speaker 

Complete ii 1 t.SM -3 

$2.95 



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Oo wnm ncaW «n MtW 
mimcf ff*r jflwf Hat- 
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usmg waqtjancv mvei- 
siDn.flunsona&VDir. 
Patle.'v BplhmiKEa^d 
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mpuls M*y to tonn«l 
lo any rad<&— te*eprwne 



ALL NEW KITS 




hit SG-7 



PERSONAL 
s 89.95 RADAR 

New irj* DH1 n-,i',.'ii*jrt dopplc< *adai iurcJoc*ii"cirr l , 
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ft: n* rflrft rang* l£$dxj^wMloifl displays ij>e«ds at 



thus T*o 1 McoHuf cans Mf antenna mm m mm Qu H and 
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speedy grapn-i. 1 1 r a pfatessionai lot*. A *try irseful and 
Inil-iil-funkii 



RADIOS 




40 & 80 METERS 
HAM RECEIVERS 

SensiUve all rnodff At*. CW SSEJTecaimrjIai 5 5— 4.0 fir 70- ?S MHz Oimtt conversion design 
using NEGO? IC as lealu ■ rd in 051 ane a flRL nandfeooks im rnan 1 ^ v icnsiti «ti y varacior 
diode Tuned 50 mp auda Ouiju-l HiftSon9Vtx: luvHFgamronlrol TN* Mawy easy lo 
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tasekrtf 




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htw^ "S24-95 W - HM f 24.95 ^°^ * 12,95 
QRP TRANSMITTER KITS, 40 & 80 METERS 

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ftyiisDn^vOCandiiV'SwPpJoiected Swrm*^ you can jfterch vo*j' Signal w«h one oi 
tnes* mm rigs 9in«MA3S casts arr available 



f^QRp^o s 24.95 






w« *24.95 a"" *12.95 




AIRCRAFT RECEIVER KIT 



Hear wtiUrtg aircraft commumcalions— picks up planes up In 10D miles away Receives 110 
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afrport 






S24.95 



Roomer case 
kit CAA-1 



1 12.95 




SHORTWAVE RECEIVER KIT 

A tantiHiic receiver Ihaj captures the wnrU with jusi a t?" anterina 1 Hecaivet 
r 4-ti mil in? MHr band* vaiatto* lunerj &ypt'tttl design wiiti AGC. RFga^tqsi 
irai am]»m* audio outotji UssnewS^nelicsrrBje* cn«lor less man t nucjovoirsensdiv- 
n> rttrn on 9V patwry f«rsAaf0scuiaiirigKAi.scnoolorciubiFOieci andimdproii^endMFs 
efiianiAMRWnostwmouilDCv AddthtoiitianaiuwMandywTtaiva^caiJiittioolcAg 
smwtmwmm. 



kit 5ft i 



*24.95 



M C5R.1 



si 2.95 



PACKET RADIO 

Commodore 064/128 packet* a dto mterldice Uses farnnus . airman Digicom son ware Fea lures 
EKAHlDchipsetlorrehdljip uperalion-funsHFor VKFIones IncSudesFWEEdiiilisollwaie PC 
braid all nEcessary paiti and ful! dc-cumfnlation 

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EM COMMUNICATIONS/2 METER RECEIVER 

StflStlrvf )upemetFUrccirvcT mnrs any iMH*segnwnf from t3£>— iTSMHr Lister to 2 mu 

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leaturts varaclor lunmg. |C mine r slagt, cm jitnc IF tiHers jinctdyiaT con^srbion design witn 
ad|u»nblesquelcn Lessin.ni i j.vseivuiivny. r nm on gv battery, wirn 50 mw audio oulpui 
Qp1ion 4 'il Abs cast with scteened graphic* and macrmKHJ aluminum knobs provide a nice pro- 

iessn>nalir-fii ^ ... _ 

tnn Ac Rec- - tin nc 



S29.95 



NEW MINIKITS-NEW MINIKITS 



T2VTX 

Cum pie I g »« r rtC 

KH.Mua *lb.9b 



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com scrarobkrs. 

Compieti 

kll.SS-7 
Casern. 
DS5-7 



S29.95 

12.95 



BROADBAND 
PREAMP 

A sens-jiivq ntl purpose 
preamp idea I for 
^r.anntrs, TVseli VHF 
UHf tigs counted etc 
Feattutes low nqrse 4 do 
KF 2Ddb<g«.»i nxi 
ntt— t f>/ operalaqB 
Rwsong-BVrC 50 
Otms input 

aa? *i2.95 



LIGHT BEAM 
COMMUNICATORS 

Transmits modulated mlrattid 
hghl up lo 3D leal wiinoui inn$«L 
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Be* tor ' Pugs" or ksfeamg to « 
tejso*«mfJt*i rraasauttef nas 



on 



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LB-6 

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*8.95 
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HIGH POWER FM 
WIRELESS MIKE 

A high pw ttnsMhal wtll 
|ran^mnurJtoi. f ?miiritQiiriy 
FM In ojdcasl rad»o SeMnEive 
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9-QVDC 



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ivisiaphone 
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2 MTR & 220 BOOSTER AMP 









VISA 



TERMS. • uiisladion guaranteed * eximine lor 10 days II PUniMEnRnFDQf 

flmni return mgrig i ml Irrro for reiund * add F*\m rnUIlL tfnULlliJ % 

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Hi • 90 days parts wirnnly grt ill km * 1 year Darto** Mv-na? car* a-uta 

lifjgr warranty an 3.1 1 m red units. rA A / 1 b- DOO-4 / D4 

RAMSEY ELECTRONICS. INC.. 2575 Baird Hd. p Penfield P N.V. 14526 



( 







• 30 WATTS OUTPUT 

• LOW NOISE PREAMP 

• LOW COST 

• RUCGED CAST ALUMINUM 
CASE 

• ONE YEAR WARRANTY 



Here's a n 1 ^ 1 booster for any 2 meter or 220 
IIHz hand-teld unit, i hes* pcrwir booirdfS 
deliver aver 30 wans of output ajlowtnd you 
lo hit Ltie repeaters full quieting while the low 

noise preamp remarkably improves recep- 
[ions. Ramsey Electronics has sold thou- 
?ands ot 2 inti amp kits but now, we offer 
completely wlrerj and tested ? mtr as well 220 
MHz units Bolh have all the features of int 
high priced boosiers at a ft action of trie cost. 

PA-IB 2 MTR HIWER BOOSTER I TO K pow gaim 
Fully wired 1 lESltfl . J59 S6 

PfV?0 Z2Q MK/ PfJWEfl BOOST! R \W powuifii 
Fully wired & lested , . 559.95 



HIGH PERFORMANCE 
PRESELECTOR-PREAMP 



The solution to most interference, intermod, and desense 
problems in AMATEUR and COMMERCIAL systems. 

• 40 to 1000 Mfriz - luned to your frequency 

• 5 large helical resonators 

• Low noise - High overload resistance 

• 8 dB gain ■ ultimate rejection> 80 dB 

• 10 to 15 volts OC operation 

• Size - 1,6 x 2.6 x 4 75" exc. connectors 

• FANTASTIC REJECTION! 

Price ■ CALL bipolar w/RCA jacks 
Connector options: BCN S5> UHF $6, 

N $10 
SUPER HOT? GaAs Fet option $20 




Typical rejection: 
±6D0Khz@144 Mhz: -26dB 
±1 6Mhz@220Mhz; -40dB 
±5 Mhz@450Mhz -50dB 



AUTOMATIC IDENTIFIERS 



ID-t 





ID? 



• For transceivers antf repealers ■ AMATEUR and COMMERCIAL 

• Automatic operation - adjustable speed and amplitude 

• Small size - easy installation - 7 id 15 voils DC 

■ 8 selectable, reprogrammable messages - each up to 2 mm long 

■ Wired, tested, and programmed with your message^) 

Model ID-1 • $5495 Mode! ID-2 w/2 to 10 minute timer - $79.95 
We offer a complete line of transmitter and receiver strips 
and synthesizers tor amateur and commercial use. 

Request oar free catarog. Ma&tefcard antf \fl$A welcome 



GLB ELECTRONICS JNC 

151 Commerce Pkwy., Buffalo, NY 14224 
716-675-6740 9 to 4 



CIRCLE 17 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



AMATEUR TELEVISION 



SMILE! YOU'RE ON TV 

Only 

$299 

Designed and 
built in the USA 

Value + Quality 
from over 25years 

in ATV...W60RG 

With our all in one box TC70-1 70cm ATV Trans- 
ceiver you can easily transmit and receive live action 
color and sound video just like broadcast TV. Use 
any home TV camera or VCR by plugging the com- 
posite video and audio into the front VHS 10 pin or 
rear phono jacks. Add 70cm antenna, coax, 13,8Vdc 
and TV set and you are on the air, jt's that easy! 

TC70-1 has >1 watt p.e.p. with one xtal on 439.25, 434,0 
or 426.25 MHz, runs on 1 2-1 4 Vdc @ .5A, and hot GaAsfet 
downconverter tunes whole 420-450 MHz band down to 
ch3. Shielded cabinet only 7x7x2.5". Transmitters sold 
only to licensed amateurs, for fegal purposes, verified in the 
latest Callbook or with copy of license sent with order. 

Call or write now tor our complete ATV catalog 
including downconverters, transceivers, linear 
amps, and antennas for the 70, 33, & 23cm bands. 




(818) 447-4565 m-f 8a m-5 :30 pm psl. 

P.C. ELECTRONICS 

2522 Paxson Ln Arcadia CA 91006 



Visa, MC f COD 

Tom (WGORG) 
MarvarrnfWBSYSS) 




■U 







3jP 

HC-Wi ■** + ' J * J # ' j i 1 1 



mm mm 




2H£';_.' 




■ 'JvMSjG 



5?# 




i 



wnrppfTTTrr 



'■■->:-:->^':*:*:*:v;\ 



3 
fr 



Program Feature*' 




| Copyn^rt ® 19A& a* H4G*T 



Runs on IBM Personal Computers and compatibles with minimum 

2S6K RAM and CGA EGA or VGA graphics capability. 

Contains entire question pool for each I Ice rise class. The Extra 

class version contains the quasi ion pool that will become 

off active in November 1, I960, 

Work with the entire pool or selected areas, ie. * Rules and 

Regulations*. 'Practical Circuits* «tc 
Includes full screen graphics on appropriate questions. 
Logs multiple study sessions and allows resuming at a later 

lime 

Returns to review missed questions rl desired, 
Creates ram don fy generated sample tests and analyzes resutrs 

showing areas for additional study. 



*- After tmuewitJIy tying the Tacfmoem teal iwcf, I paued w**i a peftac? tcort bf wwng 

your Mar* 

-'"Thar*! lor funking of in hams Your program hat aaminaled tie wrry tA the Theory part ol fw 
test for me"lt«*HW 

■"At ft computer proleauonal, I un rocogm* * quality piece o! software. At ■ »iuO*nt I can 
appreciate a itudy tool thai helps me gain the confidence I need to pats Iho amaieur en ami. By the 
way. I pattvtf with 100% ot trie que stent tnowered correctly * Dan Darenc* Jr. 

Public Domain dltk alto evelleol* corn a in* ikc alien) niorea code tutor He wall a confeii 
laQfler, propeyitlon prscMcton. beam punt mi and oih*r« r Con If 11 to cover malerlale 
end handling! $2 If inipped ertlh OSQ TUTOfl. 



Call or wrtta to order 

QSO Software 

206 Partridge Way 

Kenneu Square. PA 193*3 

215-347-2109 




^Icg/ffc.oz/ 



visa* uc mttpma 




% 

/ Class 



?A 



ado 4^* 



CIRCLE 145 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



NOW HEAR THIS 



FINALLY! * 

High-Powered 
Sound from 
your HT. 

• 10 DB of Audio Gain 

• 3.5 inch Oval Speaker 

• Automatic Shut-OFF 

• Internal NiCad 
Charger 

• External Power 
5-15 VDC 



HT AUDIO BOOSTER 



I 

UTS t 



% 




Model HTS-1 




ELECTRONICS INC. 

54 17 Jet View Circle, Tampa. Florida 33634 

Phone: {813) 885-6091 Telex: 289-237 (MAVL UR) Fax: (813) 885-3789 



CIRCLE 349 ON REAPER SERVICE CARD 



40 73 Amateur Radio * December, 1986 



& 



ASTROIM 

CORPORATION 



9 Autry 

Irvine, CA 92718 

(714)458-7277 




INSIDE VIEW — RS-12A 




MODEL RS-50A 



ASTRON POWER SUPPLIES 

HEAVY DUTY » HIGH QUALITY • RUGGED * RELIABLE 



SPECIAL FEATURES 

• SOLID STATE ELECTRONICALLY REGULATED 

• FOLD-BACK CURRENT LIMITING Protects Power Supply 
from excessive current & continuous shorted output 

• CROWBAR OVER VOLTAGE PROTECTION on all Models 
excipt RS-3A, RS-4A, RS-5A. 

• MAINTAIN REGULATION & LOW RIPPLE at low line input 
Voltage 

• HEAVY DUTf HEAT SINK • CHASSIS MOUNT FUSE 

• THREE CONDUCTOR POWER CORD 

• ONE YEAR WARRANTY • MADE IN U.S.A. 



PERFORMANCE SPECIFICATIONS 

• INPUT VOLTAGE: 105-125 VAC 

• OUTPUT VOLTAGE: 13.8 VDC ± 0.05 volts 
(Internally Adjustable: 11-15 VDC) 

• RIPPLE Less than 5m v peak to peak (full load & 
tow line) 

• Also available with 220 VAC input voltage 




MODEL RS-50M 




MODEL VS-50M 



RM SERIES 




MODEL RM-35M 



19" X 5Va RACK MOUNT POWER SUPPLIES 



MODEL 
RM-12A 
RM-35A 
RM-50A 

Separate Volt aod Amp Meters 

RM-12M 

RM-35M 

RM-50M 



Continuous 
Duty [Amps] 

9 

25 

37 

9 

25 

37 



IDS* 

(Amps) 

12 

35 

50 

12 
35 
50 



Size [IN] 
H x Wx 

5V< X 19 X Btt 
5 1 /4 x 19 x 12^ 

%% x 19 x rite 
5% x 19 x av 4 

5"A x 19 x 12ft 
5Y* X19X 12ft 



Shipping 

m. (lbs. | 
16 
36 
50 

16 

38 
50 



RS-A SERIES 




MODEL RS-7A 



MODEL 

RS-3A 

RS-4A 

RS-5A 

RS-7A 

RS-7B 

RS-10A 

RS-12A 

RS-12B 

RS^20A 

RS35A 

RS-50A 



Continuous 
Duly (Amps) 

2,5 

3 

4 

5 

5 

7.5 

9 

9 

16 

25 

37 



ICS* 

(Amps] 
3 
4 
5 
7 
7 
10 
12 
12 
20 
35 
50 



Size (IN] 
H x W X 

3 X 4% X 5Y* 
3% x 6ft x 9 
3ft X 6ft X Vk 
3 3 £ X 6% X 9 
4 x7ft X 10% 
4 X 7ft X 10*i 

4ft x 6 x 9 

4 x7ft x 10V* 

5x 9 X 10ft 

5x11 x 11 
6X 13% X 11 



Snipping 
Wl. {lbs | 

4 

5 

7 

9 

10 

11 

13 

13 

18 

27 

46 



RS-M SERIES 




MODEL RS-35M 



MODEL 

Switcriable volt and Amp meter 

RS-12M 

Separate volt and Amp meters 

RS-20M 

RS-35M 

RS-50M 



Continuous 
Duly (Amp$| 



16 
25 
37 



ICS" 
(Amps} 

12 

20 
35 
50 



Size |IN] 
H x W x 

4ft X 8 X 9 

5 X 9 x 10ft 

5 x 11 x 1t 

6x 13V4 x 11 



Snipping 
WL [lit,] 

fj 

18 
27 
46 



VS-NI AND VRM-M SERIES 



Separate Volt and Amp Meters • Output Voltage adjustable from 2-15 volts • Current limit adjustable from 1.5 amps 




MODEL VS-35M 



to Full Load 

MODEL 

VS-12M 
VS-20NI 
VS-35M 
VS-50M 

Variable rack mount 
VRM-35M 

VRM-50M 



Continue us 

Duty lAmps] 

@13,BVDC @10VDC @5V0C 

9 5 2 

16 9 4 

25 15 7 

37 22 10 



supplies 

25 

37 



15 
22 



7 
10 



ICS* 

(Amps) 
@ 13.3V 

12 

20 

35 

50 



35 
50 



Sittflff) 
H x W x 

4ft X 8 x 9 

5 x 9 x 10% 

5x 11 x 11 

fix 13 3 /< X11 



6ft X 19 X 12 1 £ 
5Vi X 19 X 12Y 2 



Shipping 
Wt. (lis.] 



13 
20 
23 

46 



38 
50 



RS-S SERIES 




Built in speaker 

MODEL 

RS-7S 

RS-10S 

RS-12S 

RS-20S 



Continuous 

Duty |Amps| 

5 

7.5 
9 
16 



ICS* 

Amps 
7 

10 
12 
20 



Sizi |IN| 
H xWx D 

4 x 7ft x 10ft 

4 x 7ft x 10ft 

4% X X 9 

5 X 9 X 10% 



Slipping 

Wt. (lbs.] 
10 
12 
13 
18 



MODEL RS-12S 



*ICS — Intermittent Communication Service (50% Duty Cycle 5min, on 5 min. off) 



CIRCLE 16 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



RADIO TELEGRAPH TERMINAL 



♦ • m m • 



MORSE CODE DECODER 



ELECTRONIC KEYER 



^R501 



MORSE CODE TRAINER 




$229.00 




DECODER 

Input level 
Input impedance 
Decoding speed 
Audio filter 



• 10mV to 2V RMS. 

• 8 to 1W1— 6O0Q typical 

• 5 WPM to 30 WPM 

• 800 Hz ± GO Hz 
Actrve and PLL filters 

700 Hz to 900 Hz fntemalty 
adjustable 





TRAINER 

Code generator 
Speed 



• Random code generator 
5 characters, code group 

* 5 WPM to 30 WPM 
1 WPM increment 




ELECTRONIC KEYER 

Paddle input 



Key input 

Keying speed 

Keyer output 



• TTL level 
— LOvActuating, Hi/Stop 
Contact input 

— ON/Actuating, OFF/Stop 

• TTL level 

— LO/Mark, Hi/Space 

Contact input 

— QN/Mark. OFF/Space 

• 5 WPM to 30 WPM 
I WPM increment 

■ Transistor switching. 
Open collector type 



SPECIFICATIONS 



Model 

Power source 
Size 



Controls 



Display 
Indicators 

Front connections 



Rear connections 



•AR-501 Radiotelegraph 
terminal 

• DC 12V to 13.8 V— t65mA 

• 45"-Wx2,24"-Hx6.25M) 

• 125 oz. (358 g) 

• Power On/Off 

• Random code generator On/Off 

• Print-out On/Otf 

• Monitor speaker level 

• Electronic keyer mode select 

• Speed Up & Down 

• LCD 32 characters— 16 per line 

• Power On — Green LED 

• Tuning — Red LED 

• ParJrJIe — Standard/Iambic 

■ Ordinary telegraphic key 

■ Headphone'Earphone 

• DC llfiV Input 

• Audio input 

• External speaker 

• Keyer output 

• Printer output 




PRINTER 

• Compatible with Centronics 8-bit parallel printer, At 
least 4K byte data buffer is required in a printer. 



BACK TO BASICS - • — * But far more advanced • - 

The AR-501 , triple mode CW terminal in a small package, is a powerful gear to practice and play with. For the Novice, SWL and Ama- 
teur radio operators it detects Morse code between 5 to 3GWPM. Just plug the AR-501 to your receiver to start translating the Morse 
code onto full 32 character LCD display. Very simple and easy to operate. You ask; for code practice?, both receive and transmit? Yes, 
the AR-501 does just that It will improve your cord reception and keying technique at the speed you want More?, it operates as an 
electronic keyer both standard and iambic. More Yet? How about a printer port? You bet the AR-501 provides parallel printer port for 
hard copy, You can Log the QSO, and Practice. It will help you immeasureably. We even offer a standalone Nicad operated thermal 
printer as an option. ACCESSORIES SUPPLIED: The AR-501 Radio telegraph terminal comes complete with Receiver cable, DC 
Power cable, Miniature Phone plug, Miniature stereo phone plug. Spare fuse, Wall receptacle style power adaptor and Instruction man- 
ual ACCESSORIES AVAILABLE: CC-501 Parallel printer cable — $3<hOO/DPU-4J] Standalone Thermal printer with 8K 
buffer— $235,00 

ORDERING INFORMATION: For fastest service, call 800- 523-6366 from 9 AM. to 4 P.M P.ST. Send mail orders to: ACE Communications, Inc. 
2251 1 Aspan Street, Lake Forest, CA 92630. VISA and MasterCard orders and certified or cashiers check or money order shipped within 48 hours of 
receipt Rush service by UPS/Overnight CJPS'2nd Day Air and Federal Express is available at extra shipping charges. Purchase orders accepted from 
Government agencies, CA residents add 6% sales tax. COD is 53.00 extra* WARRANTY INFORMATION: The AR-501 covered by One Year War- 
ranty. Extended warranty service available at the following rates: 3 Years — $25.00, 2 Years* — $ 1 5,00, SATISFACTION GUARANTEE; If, for any rea- 
son, the ORIGINAL PURCHASER, is not satisfied with the unit purchased, a hilt refund of the purchase price will be issued if the unit and all accessories 
are returned to us UNDAMAGED WTTH1N 25 DAYS of the date of original purchase (Invoice date). This policy excludes any additional freight that may 
be incurred, and in no event modifies or limits the limited warranty. 




Communications 
2251 1 Aspan Slree flake Forest • California •92630-6321 • (714) 581-4900 • Toil Free 1-800-523 6366 






CIRCLE 279 OH HEADER SERVICE CARD 



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call: 



the best buys in town 
21 2-9257000 

Los Precios Mas Bajos en Nueva York 

WE SHIP WORLDWIDE! 




KITTY SAYS: WE ARE NOW OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK. 

Saturday & Sunday 10 to 5 P.M. 

Monday-Friday 9 to 6:30 PM Thurs. to 8 PM 
Come to Barry's for the best buys irt town. 



ONV Safety 
belts-in stock 



ttmmh'. 



Santa Kitty says, * 'Seasons Greetings To All" 
See you Dec. 4, 8pm-BARA (speech), 
Paramus N J (Bergen CC) 








ii KENWOOD 




YAESU 

FT-23/73/33/727R 

Fl-2tltJ09RM 

FT-1 903/1 123 

h . FTH-2005/7005 
A-S r AE3, Cus-hcrafl, Hy Gain, 

Hustler, KLM r METZ, Mosley, 

M00UBLOX.TONNA 



FT-767GX, FT-757GXII, FT-311 RM, 
FRG-0800, FT-736, FRG-9600, FT- 
711RH, FT-4700RH, FT212/712RH. 

LandmobHe HTs 



Antennas 



(COM 

IC2AT/12AT 

1C02AT-32AT 

IC2/4GAT 

IC-A2/U16 



ICOW: U16, Hie.VtM. U4QO 
MAXON, MOTOROLA, 
YAESU: FTH 2005/2007 
UNIDEN, REGENCY, KING, TAD 
MAR I ME JCOM: MS, M55 r M700 
AVIATION ICOM: AEOH.T, 



TS440S/AT, R-5QO0, R-2QO0, TS-940 S/AT. TM 
221 A/421 A. TM-2570A/50A/30A, TR-751A, Ken^ 
wood Service Repair. TM-721A, TS-711/811A, 
TM353QA, TH205AT, TH215A, TM-621A, TM- 
321 A, TS14GS, TS6S0S, HZ-1. TS-790A 



Budwig ANT. Products 

NELTECHOVK-100 Digital Voice Keyer 
FLUKE 77 Multimeter 

Media Mentors— 

Amateur Radio Course $99 95 

VoCom/Mirage/Alinco 

Tokyo Hy Power/TE SYSTEMS 

Amplifiers & 

5/8XHT Gain 
Antennas IN STOCK 

MICROLOG-ART 1 v Air Disk, 
SWL, Morse Coach 



Soldering Station 4dVVatts $68, 



RF 
Concepts 







m 

ft 

ft 

ft 
ft 

m 

[ICOM ! 

IC-R71A. 751 A, 781. 28A/H, 38A, 48A. Micro2/4, 
R-7000, IC-761 , IC-375A, 275A/H, 321 0A, 475A/ W 
H, 735, IC-900, IC-228H jy 

ft 
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ft 
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ft 
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SMART PATCH 

CES-SimpLex Autopatch 510 SA Will Patch FM 
Transceiver To Yoyr Telephone Great For 
Telephone Gaits From Mobile To Base Simple 
To Use. 510SA/51OSAII 




,j .uj.ij.uujjjj 1 a,u.i.«. 



PRIVA TE PA TCH IV, Duplex 8000 

TUNERS STOCKED: 

NYE MBV-A3 Killowatt Tuner 




ALINCO ALD 24T 
DJ-100T 



m 



*; 



** 




Computer Interfaces 
Stocked: MFJ-1270B 
MFJ-1274 1 MFJ-1224,AEA 
PK'88,MFJ-1278 t PK-232 
W/FAX, 



FREQUENCY 

COUNTERS: 

1MH£- 1.3GHz 

St 69-95 



COMMERCIAL 

&HAM 

HEPEATEflS 

STOCKED. 

WRITE FOR 

QUOTES 



KANTRONICS 
UTU, KAM, UTU-XT 
KPC 2400, KPC IV 
KAM 



MFJ-989C 




MOTOROLA AUTHORIZED DEALER 
KACHINA COMMUNICATIONS DEALER 



SHORTWAVE RECEIVERS 
STOCKED 




Ten-Tec 
Tuner 229B 



ft 



•S 



n 



M 



METRON NIA-1 000 B STOCKED 

EIMAC 



AEA 144 MHz 
AEA 220 MHz 
AEA 440 MHz 

ANTENNAS 




3 500Z 

572B. 6JS6C 

12BY7A& 
6146B 

BIRD 

Wattmeters & 
Elements ^ 
In Stock =£ 




COMET ANTENNAS 
STOCKED 



DIGITAL FREQUENCY COUNTERS 

Optoelectronics model 1300H, 0-1 3COM Hz 
Trionyx. Model TR-1000, 0-600 MHz 

Long-range Wireless 
Telephone forexoort in sioqk 



BENCHER PADDLES, 

BALUNS, LOW PASS FILTERS 

IN STOCK 



MIRAGE AMPLIFIERS 

ASTRON POWER SUPPLIES 

Saxton Wire & Cable, Int'l Wire 




HEIL 

EQUIPMENT 
IN STOCK 

SANGEAN Portable Shortwave Radios 



Hy-Gain Towers 
& Antennas, and 
Rotors will be 
shipped direct to 
you FREE of 
shipping cost. 







New TEN-TEC 
Corsair II, PARAGON 



AMERITRON AUTHORIZED DEALER 



S MAIL ALL ORDERS TO: BARRY ELECTRONICS CORP. 512 BROADWAY, NEW YORK CITY, NY 10012 (FOUR BLOCKS NORTH OF CANAL ST.) 



LARGEST STOCKING HAM DEALER 



ra^w f ym Uliy 9 COMPLETE REPAIR LAB ON PREMISES 



"Aqul So Habla Espartol" 

BARRY INTERNATIONAL TELEX 12-7670 
MERCHANDISE TAKEN ON CONSIGNMENT 

FOR TOP PRICES 

Monday- Friday 9 A.M. to 6:30 P.M. Thursday to & PM. 
Saturday & Sunday 10 A.M. to 5 P.M. (Free Parking) 



IRT^LEX -"Spring SL Station". Subways; BMT- 
"Prince SL Station". IND-"F' Train-Bwy Station" 
Bus: Broadway #6 to Spring SL Path-9th St. /6th Ave. 
Station, 



COMMERCIAL RADIOS 
STOCKED: ICOM, Motoro- 
la, MAXON, Standard. 
Yaesu. We serve munici- 

palilies, businesses, Civil 
Defense, etc. Portables, 
mobiles, bases, re- 
peaters... 



ALL 

SALES 
FINAL 



We Stock: AEA, ARRL, Alinco, Ameco, Ameritron, Antenna Specialists, 
Astatic, Astron, B&K, B&W, Bencher, Bird, Bjtternut, CDE, CES, Cushcraft, 
Daiwa, Eimac, Henry, Neil, Hustler, Hy-Gain 1 1 com, KLM, Kantronics, Larsen, 
MJF ( J.W. Miller, Mirage, Nye T Palomar, RF Products, Saxton, Shure, 
Tempo. Ten-Tec, TUBES, Yaesu, Vibroplex, Duplexers, Repeafers t Scan- 
ners, Radio Publicati on s, Uniden, Kenwood, Maxon, RFC. 

WE NOW STOCK COMMERCIAL COMMUNICATIONS SYSTEMS 
HAM DEALER fNQUIRES INVITED PHONE IN YOUR ORDER & BE REIMBURSED 
COMMERCIAL RADIOS stocked A »«rvJc»d on or«mls«». 

Amateur Radio Courses Given On Our Premises, Call 

Export Order* Shipped Immediately. TELEX 12-7670 

FAX: 212-925-7001 



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Number 1 2 on your Feedback card 



New products 

Compiled by Linda Reneau 



PRODUCT OF 
THE MONTH 

AMERICAN ANTENNA 

American Antenna has a new 
10 meter antenna, the Ham-Ten, 
whose design is based on their 
K-40 CB antenna. It will handle 
power input up to 1500 watts 
when property installed, and has a 
bandwidth of 1.5 MHz between 
2:1 SWR points. The Ham-Ten 
complements all the single-band 
1 0-meter rigs currency on the 
market. An adjustable trunk lip 
mount comes with the Ham-Ten, 
or you can use American Anten- 
na's Magnamount. 

Price for the Ham-Ten is 
$45.50. For further information, 
write A merican A ntenna , 1575 Ex- 
ecutive Drive, Elgin IL 60123. 





WA9YW J PRODUCTS 

WA9YWJ offers a custom photo 
engraved callsign plaque on X M" 
thick glass in a gold-colored 
frame. You can choose a red, 
blue, black, or green velvet back- 
ground, The callsign plaque is 7" 
long x 2W wide. WA9YWJ guar- 
antees its craftsmanship. Price: 
$24,95 plus $2 shipping, 
WA9YWJ Products, 907 Baxter 
Ave., Superior Wt 54880. 




Private Patch I 




CONNECT SYSTEMS INCORPORATED 



CSI's Private Patch V can be 
programmed in four modes: Sam- 
pling Patch (VOX enhanced), 
VOX Patch (with remote), Duplex 
Patch, and Repeater Controller 
with Duplex Patch. It has a built-in 
keyboard and digital display, a 90- 
number auto-dialer, redial, re* 
mote hook-flash, programmable 
CW ID, toil protection, 1-5 digit 



access code, 2-5 digit secret toll 
override code, telephone remote 
base, remote controlled relay, and 
regenerated tone/pulse dialing. 
Options include a plugnn CTCSS 
conversion board and an electron- 
ic Voice Delay board. 

Price is $500. Contact Connect 
Systems, Inc., 237$1 Madison St. , 
Torrance CA 90505. 213^73^803. 




dbx PROFESSIONAL PRODUCTS 



dbx announces new software 
enhancements and price reduc- 
tion (from $6,950 to $4 t 500) for the 
RTA-1 Professional Real-Time 
Analysis System. The features in- 
clude enhanced room-response 
curve capabilities, and cus- 
tomized printout. Present owners 
of Ihe RTA-1 will be able to up- 
grade their equipment. The new 
version, designated RTA-1 V.1.5. 
also offers improved confidence 
indication and faster automatic 
gain setting. Direct readout of 



dB SPL is now possible, and the 
V,t,5 stores information for up to 
ten microphones, allowing cali- 
bration for any microphone and 
use of a microphone calibrator for 
automatic correction. Users may 
enter a 1-42 character banner at 
the lop of the printout. Printouts 
also contain an area for location, 
date, time, and other notations. 
For more information contact dbx 
Professional Products. PO Box 
1Q0C, Newton MA 02195. Or cir- 
cle Reader Service number 207. 




HEATH COMPANY 

The SB-1400 All-Mode Trans- 
ceiver is now available from Heaih 
Company. It provides all-band, alt- 
mode coverage with 100 watts of 
transmit power on all nine HF am- 
ateur bands. Maximum AM output 
is 25 watts. The SB-1400's receiv- 
er has 25 |iV (or better) sensitive 
ty, dual VFOs, RIT, a built-in 500 
Hz CW filter, "split" operation, 
squelch in all modes, 20 memo- 
ries, front panel controls and AGC 



action, and computer interface. 
Available accessories are: 20 amp 
power supply with speaker, FM 
module, hand-held microphone, 
mobile bracket, and switching 
relay. The SB-1400 is a no-frills 
transceiver with all the important 
features. Price is $800. To order, 
call 800-253*0570 or 800*44- 
HEATH, or write for a Heathkit 
catalog at Heath Company, 
Department 350-036, Benton 
Harbor Ml 49022. 



ADVANCED COMPUTER CONTROLS, INC. 



Advanced Computer Controls* 
new RC-850 Repeater Controller 
Computer Interface allows remote 
control, programming, and infor- 
mation access to FM repeater 
systems from a home computer or 
terminal via modem or packet 
TNC. Controller commands may 
be entered through the remote 
terminal with responses displayed 
on the terminal screen. The con- 
troller stores programmable 
speech and Morse code mes- 



sages. The menu-driven RC-850 
has two additional Touch-Tone 
decoders to offload the main 
shared decoder for full-time cov- 
erage of links and remotes. 

The RC-850 Interface is $350. 
For $75 more, the Vocabulary Ex- 
pansion Option increases the syn- 
thesized speech to 530 words. 
Contact Advanced Computer 
Controls, inc> 2356 Walsh Av- 
enue, Santa Clara CA 95051. 408- 
727-3330. 



44 73 Amateur Radio * December, 1988 



HOWARD W.SAMS 
& COMPANY 

Mastering Packet Radio: The 
Hands-On Guide, by Dave Ingram 
K4TWJ, Is now available from 
Howard W. Sams & Company. 
The book covers basic concepts 
as well as the more technical ar- 
eas of this mode, ft describes what 
packet is, how it works, why it is, 
and the hardware involved. Dave 
Ingram K4TWJ has written twelve 
books and over 300 articles for 
amateur radio magazines. He 
holds a First Class Radiotele- 
phone Commercial License and 
an Amateur Extra Class License. 
Mastering Packet Radio retaifs for 
$13 and is avaifable at book- 
stores, computer stores, electron- 
ics distributors, or direct from Ihe 
publisher by calling 800-428- 
7267. Howard W. Sams St Compa- 




ny. A division of Macmilian, Inc.. 
4300 West 62nd Street, Indiana- 
polis IN 46268. 3 1 7-298 5400. 




HUSTLER JNC 

Hustler, Inc., has a new version 
of Quick Disconnect, the Model 
QD<2. The QD-2 is simitar to the 
original Model OD-1. but it fea- 
tures a new design for the lower 
hall. Milled from a solid piece of 
stainless steel, the new design is 
virtually indestructible. The war- 
ranty extends to two years. For 
more information, contact the 
Sales Department at Hustler. Inc., 
1 Newtronics Place. Mineral Wells 
TX 76067. 




ULTRASOFT INNOVATIONS, 
INC, 

ULTRALUCENr\ from Ultra- 
soft Innovations, Inc.. is a screen 
restoration product that elimi- 
nates haiiiine and deep scratches 
from the hard plastic display of 
any laptop or notebook computer. 
It comes in a standard kit that in- 
cludes 6 re-usable, color-coded, 



abrasive pads, anti-static finish- 
ing cream, application foam 
block, wiping towel, and complete 
instructions for $20, For minor 
touch-ups. and for laptops with 
soft plastic displays. ULTRALU- 
CENT EL is available for $15- Ut- 
traSoft Innovations, tnc. f 76 Main 
Street t PO Box 247, Champtain 

NY 12919, 514-487-9293. 




CURTIS MANUFACTURING 
COMPANY, INC. 

Curtis Manufacturing's Anti- 
Glare Filter for computer monitor 
screens is made of distortion-free 
optically-coated glass, ft absorbs 
95% of reflected light internal and 
external to the computer monitor. 
The all-glass Anti-Glare Filter in- 



creases contrast and character 
resolution. The Filter comes in 
seven sizes to fit most color and 
monochrome computer monitors. 
It carries a lifetime warranty. Sug- 
gested retail price is $60. Curtis 
Manufacturing Company r Inc., 30 
Fitzgerald Drive, Jaffrey NH 
03452. 603-532-4 123. 



RADIO TEL 

Radio Tel offers a full duplex 
private mobile phone as an exten- 
sion of a regular home or business 
phone up to 30 miles away with no 
separate monthly phone bill. Send 
or receive calls from anywhere in 
the world. Outgoing calls appear 
on the regular phone bill. This sys- 
tem operates on VHF (138-174 
MHz) or UHF (440-512 MHz) with 
a 5 MHz transmit/receive split for 
duplex. Optional features are 
voice scramblers, intercom, and 
selective calling for multi- users 
Prices start from £2,995 for the 




entire system, Radio Tel 1025 S. 
La Brea Ave., Los Angeles CA 
90019.213-937-6766. 



MOTOROLA INC. 

The KDT portable data terminal 
provides communication between 
the people in the field and the cen- 
tral computer data files, it features 
a 4-line by 40-character super- 
twist, backlit LCD display. The 
terminal is battery-powered and 
contains an integrated radio 
transceiver for cordless opera- 
tion. The unit weighs 30 ounces 
and is small enough to hold com- 
fortably in one hand. The KDT has 
up to 96K of memory. Code read- 
ing and other accessories are 



available. The terminal is compat- 
ible with Motorola's Data Radio 
Network. 

Price for the data terminal is 
$3300. Contact Motorola, Inc. 
1301 E+ Algonquin Road t 
Schaumburg IL 60196. Attn: 
Nadtne Sudnick r 312-57&6640, 




BUCKMASTER PUBLISHING 

Originally designed for librari- 
ans, the Place-Name-Index CD- 
ROM from Buckmaster Publish- 
ing contains information valuable 
for amateur radio operators. It of- 
fers quick access to more than 
one million place names collected 
from the quadrangle maps of the 
US Geological Survey. Each 
record on the Place-Name-lndex 
contains the state, county, feature 
type, FIPS code, elevation, longi- 
tude/latitude, and quadrangle 
map name. Search on place 



name, mufti-word phrases, wild- 
cards, and other terms. The user 
can find the longitude and latitude 
of a contact in seconds. 

The Place-Name-Index CD re- 
quires a Hitachi, Phillips, or Sony 
CD-ROM drive. The user can 
store search results on disks or 
printouts. The Place-Name-Index 
CD-ROM leases for $295 and sells 
for $! p 495. including retrieval soft- 
ware. Buckmaster Publishing. 
Whitehall, Route Three. Box Fifty- 
Six, Mineral VA 23117. $00-282- 
5628 or 703-894-5777. Jack 
Speer N 1 BIC. President 



73 Amateur Radio • December, 1988 45 



73 Review 



bv Pete Put man KT2B 



Number 13 on Feedback card 



Communications 
Concepts 335A- 

2 meter 35 watt amplifier kit 




Communications Concepts Inc. 

121 Brown Street 

Dayton OH 45402 

(513)220-9677 

Prices: $79.95 kit 

$109,95 assembled 



Communication Concepts Inc. has ad- 
vertised this amplifier for several years. 
Basically, it is a gain block with T/R switching 
to boost a low-level 2 meter signal, such as a 
handheld, from 1-3 watts up to the 30-35 watt 
range. Unlike other amplifiers made by RF 
Concepts, Mirage, and THL. no preamplifier is 
available. It is strictly a no-frills way to add 
better than 13 dB to a handheld, (This review 
is somewhat unusual, as the product is sold as 
a kit, but the review unit arrived completely 
assembled.) 

The circuit is straightforward. A Motorola 
MRR24Q is used in a g rounded-emitter con- 
figuration, running Class AB1 bias for true 
linear operation. Hence, this amplifier can 
be used on sideband as well as FM and 
CW. The disadvantage of this is that idling 
bias current is always drawn, and there is no 
power switch. This means the user has to tie 
into a switched DC line when using the amplifi- 
er in a car, or else the battery runs down in 
short order. 

Photo A shows the PC board. Workman- 
ship on this model is good quality, and the 
component layout, plus simplicity of design, 
should allow any experienced builder to 
achieve similar results. All the components 
mount on the top plane of the PC board, ex- 
cept the bias regulator Q3 t which mounts be- 
low. The layout is uncluttered, as only small 
components are used. RF keying switches the 
antenna relay, but there's no provision for 
hard-keying. 

The DC power connector is a standard 4-pin 
TRVWJones type, but only two pins are need- 
ed. This might be a good place to bring out a 



Performance 


Input 


Output 


3W 


3.0 W 


1-2W 


25 W 


23 W 


30 W 


Note: Maximum 


input specified by 


manufacturer to be 5 watts. 



hard keying line, which could be nothing more 
than a 4.7k resistor to the base of Q2. Input 
and output RF connectors are BNC types. 
SO-239 connectors would have been better 
choices, since they hold up better in mobile 
nvironments. 



uai is so thorough that inexperienced builders 
might want to try it as their first RF project. 

Conclusion 

The CCI 335A-K is a no-frills amplifier kit 
that appears to be easy to construct and uses 



" . . . the manual is so thorough that 

inexperienced builders might want to 

try it as their first RF project " 



Instructions 

The instruction manual is well written and 
contains a check-off box for each series of 
instructions (a la Heathkit)* The tune-up 
procedure is simple but does involve a trial- 
and-error method of soldering and resoldering 
the chip capacitors, along the etched lines 
to obtain lowest VSWR. The manual does 
include several pictorials and a component 
layout to speed things along. In fact, the man- 



top-quality components. An amplifier such 
as this can serve many purposes. For exam- 
ple, it could be used to provide higher drive 
for grounded grid amplifiers, such as the 
3CX800 or 8877 tubes which need at least 
30 watts or more to really perk, it could also 
be used as a booster amplifier for QRP con- 
test work, and, of course, it can be used to 
kick up the signal from a handheld while 
portable, at home, or in the car. 




Photo A. Interior of the assembled 335A-K amplifier. Note the uncluttered PC board. 



46 73 Amateur Radio * December, 1968 



83 



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73 Amateur Radio • December, 1988 47 



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CAROLINA WINDOM 

SEETHE REVIEW IN JUNE '88 WORLD RADIO MAGAZINE. 

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73 Review 



Number 14 on your Feedback card 



by Bill Clarke WA4BLC 



The Carolina Windom 
Antenna 

Improvement on a tried and true design. 



Radio Works 

PO Box 61 59 

Portsmouth VA 23703 

PH: (804) 484-01 40 

Price Class: $70 



The Windom antenna was first 
invented in 1928 by W8G2, 
and immediately became popular. 
Like many older types of antennas, 
however, it eventually faded into 
obscurity. Although the Windorn 
popped up from time to time with a 
new twist or two, it never became 
really popular again, mainly due to 
the inherent feeding problems. 

The last Windom I saw in every- 
day use was in 1972, which 
belonged to a fellow in Cape Cod. 
It was a 1928 classic, fed with a 
single conductor. He used it only 
on 75 meters AM phone. It put out a loud 
signal heard regularly in Virginia. 

The Windom has reappeared once again, 
reinvented by Joe Wright W4UEB, Jim Wilkie 
WY4R. and Edgar Lambert WA4LVB. So 
much has changed with this new version, 
though t that they now call it the Carolina Win- 
dom— 'Carolina 7 ' for that beautiful part of the 
country where much of the improvement on it 
was done, and "Windom" for the basic off- 
center feed concept. 

Theory of Operation 

The only real resemblance the Carolina 
Windorn has to the original is the off-cemer 
feedpoint. The off-center feed creates an im- 
balance, which causes the feedline to radiate. 
The feedline and antenna then produce both 




49 M. & j«. 




DEDICATED 
MATCHING 

UNIT 



2211. RG 8* 
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VERTICAL 
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F£E0U»£ TO STATION 
RECOUmrHDED TOfL HIHIHUH 



The Carolina Windom Antenna. 

vertical and horizontal polarization patterns — 
horizontal along the wire elements, and verti- 
cal from the feedline. The manufacturer 
claims that this combination of radiations is 
what makes the Carolina Windom successful. 

While most transformers try to eliminate 
feedline imbalance and radiation, the Win- 
donVs matching transformer, at the feedpoint, 
is designed to encourage feedline radiation. 
But this radiation must be controlled . A line 
isolator, installed twenty-two feet from the 
horizontal element's feedpoint, acts as a brute 
force RF choke, to limit the vertical radiator at 
a predetermined length and to keep RF out of 
the shack. 

The overall design provides an antenna that 
is usable across the entire 75/80 meter band 
without an antenna tuner. Operation on other 
HF bands requires a tuner. 40/75/00 meter 



patterns are horizontal with verti- 
cal components- 20/15/10 meter 
radiation is primarily vertical. On 
the higher bands, the effect is an 
upside-down vertical with the hori- 
zontal elements as the radials, and 
the feedline as the vertical element. 

Installation 

I installed the Carolina Windom 
as a sloping dipole. with the apex 
at a height of fifty feet. I oriented it 
the same as my trusty 160/75/40 
meter fan dipole, figuring this 
would afford me a chance to make 
comparisons. I used seventy-five feet of feed- 
line (seventy feet or more recommended) and 
placed my tuner in the line. After an initial 
smoke test, I compared my results with the 
Radio Works SWR curve (see Figure 2). They 
displayed the same general curve , but my 
SWR curve was one full point higher than the 
one shown in Figure 2. 

I then tried to load the antenna on other 
bands by using the tuner. All was well except 
for 15 meters. There, it was no-go under any 
circumstances. I decided to change feedlines 
and put a forty-five footer on, It worked great, 
All bands tuned up easily, and the SWR on 80 
dropped to where the book said it should be. I 
checked the feedline, and have since placed 
others of varying length in service. Evidently , 
the Carolina Windom antenna is "feedline- 
length" conscious. 





Specifications 


(as stated by 


the manufacturer) 


Coverage: 




80-10 meters 


Gain: 




3-5 dB gain over a dipole 


Radiator Length: 




Horizontal 132": Vertical 22 + 


Feedline: 




SOD Coax 


Matching Method: 




Dedicated Matching Transformer & User's 


Transmatch Requirements: 




40-10 meters 


Power Rating: 




1 500 Watts 


Recommended Height: 




Above 35* 


Radials: 




Not Required 



Figure 1, Diagram of the Windom antenna. 



Table 1. 



73 Amateur Radio * December, 1988 49 



t.Q 

1.5 

1 O 














i 


.1 


36 


3.7 


3ft 


3.$ 


40 



Z-CJ 




































1.3 










































JO 
3 






















.3 


3,6 3.7 


18 


S3 


4.0 




Figure 2. Typical 75/80 meter SWR curve 
shown in the Radio Works instruction sheet. 
The curve this reviewer came up with, using 
75 feet offeediine r resembled this figure, but 
was a full point higher. 

Operation 

On 75 meters ! found that the antenna con* 
sistently performed as well, or slightly better, 
than my dipole. When working stations with 
20 + over nine signals. I could hear only small 
differences between the dipole and the Win- 
dom Reception reports indicated about the 
same for my signal. However, very obvious 
performance gains were seen when working 
stations at S-5 or S-6 levels. The Windom won 
every time. 

Since the initial installation, I have used the 
Carolina Windom on 10 P 15, 20, and 40 me* 
ters. All tests have indicated that the antenna 
performs as advertised. On 40, it consistently 
performs better, on the long haul, than the 
dipole, no doubt due to the vertical radiation 
component, On close contacts, it is always at 
least equal to the dipole. When I compared the 
Windom to a tribander. I found that what it 
lacked in directional capabilities, it made up 



Figure $. SWR curve of the Windom on 75 
meters after slightly shortening the two 
elements. 

for with vertical polarization. Signal reports 
were generally better on the beam than on the 
Windom, and I could not turn to get away from 
offending QRtVL However, I had no problem 
working stateside or DX stations. 

Changes 

In the booklet that accompanied my Caroli- 
na Windom, I saw a brief mention of optimiz- 
ing the antenna for the 75 meter band. I took 
this to heart and reduced the shorter ele- 
ment's length by one foot, and the remaining 
element by three feet The results were trans- 
parent on 40-10 meters, however the 75 me- 
ter SWR dropped down to that of my dipole. 
This is a worthwhile adjustment (see Figure 3), 

Impressions 

First impressions of the packaged Carolina 
Windom are good. The package contains two 
custom-made assemblies (feedline trans- 
former and isolator}, quality end insulators, 
stranded #14 copper wire, pre-bullt vertical 



Figure 4. Typical SWR plot of a full-sized 75/ 
80 meter dipole. 

coax element, and even a pack of coax seal. 

it offers unusual bandwidth on 75/80 me- 
ters, something my dipole cannot do (see Fig- 
ure 4). Though the antenna is about the same 
size as a full-size 80 meter dipole. and is fed 
with a single coax feedline, you can work all 
bands with a tuner. Using a plain, 80 meter 
dipole and a single feedline, you cannot effi- 
ciently do this. 

The $69,95 price tag is reasonable. After all, 
you could invest more than $45 in the materi- 
als alone, if you could find them all, and you 
would still have to measure and cut the verti- 
cal and wire elements, install the coax con- 
nectors, solder the cut elements to the center 
insulator, put the end insulators in place, and 
then build your own RF isolator. How much is 
your labor and time worth? 

The Carolina Windom would make an excel- 
lent ' 'take-along" antenna for vacations and 
field day. If you are looking for a good wire 
antenna that can do it all, and don't mind 
using a tuner on the higher bands, the Caroli- 
na Windom is likely for you, H) 

\ 




29th ANNUAL 



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A.R.R.L FLORIDA STATE CONVENTION 

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(BROCHURE WITH FULL DETAILS AVAILABLE DECEMBER 1st) 



73 Amateur Radio • December, 1988 



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73 Amateur Radio ■ DecembeM9S8 51 



Ho 



Number 15 on your Feedback card 



MING IN 



Joe Moell PE KQOV 
PO Box 2508 
Fullerton, CA 92633 



Loops: 

A Love/Hate Relationship 

"What equipment do t need for 
T-hunting?" That's the most com* 
mon question I hear. This month 
we'll begin to look at the many 
types of radio direction finding 
(RDF) gear. Stick around for plen- 
ty of no-nonsense advice on what 
equipment to choose for your par* 
ticular hunting needs. 

Would-be T-hunters have had 
trouble finding information on the 
sport in ham magazines. Of the 
few articles that have made it into 
print, a targe percentage of them 
have been about making and 
using loop antennas. It's easy to 
see why. 

Loops are the simplest RDF an- 
tennas to build. They're small and 
easy to mount, or you can hold 
them out the car window; They 



Radio Direction Finding 



can be made for any of the popu- 
lar ham bands. In an hour or so. 
you can have one ready to go. 

T-hunt loops aren't like the full- 
wavelength square or delta loops 
OXers use< Loops for RDF are 
small, usually less than 1/10 
wavelength in circumference. 
Electrically, they behave more like 
a coil than like a wire antenna. 

I have a file folder full of articles 
on simple RDF loops, taken from 
major magazines and club 
newsletters. It's fun to read the 
authors' claims. Here's one for 
two meters that says, 'Throw your 
competitors for a loop! A little 
practice will make you an expert, 
and you'll be able to invite your 
fans, family, and friends into your 
trophy room, „.** 

These Claims are reminiscent of 
the "hidden antenna'' articles in 
which the author says he worked 
DXCC in a weekend after hooking 
his rig to a downspout through a 
tuner made of old bedsprings. 



STOP! Time for a reality check. It 
just isn't that easy. 

Left or Right? 

The biggest problem with sim- 
ple loops is that they're bkiirec* 
tional. As you rotate the loop 360 
degrees, you get signal peaks 
when the plane of the loop is in the 
direction of the source, and nulls 
(minimum signal points) through 
the loop at the source. The peaks 
are broad and the nulls are sharp. 



too much time and mileage. You 
could circle in from the edge of 
the hunt boundary area, instead 
of starting at the center—but even 
if the hunt rules allow you to 
do that, you'll probably lose time 
or mileage because you have 
to pick the most distant edge. 
Or you could watch to see which 
way the hunters with uni-direc* 
tional antennas start out. But you 
don't want to follow them, do you? 
Though there are ways to 



"The biggest problem 
with simple loops is that they're 

bi-directional. " 



so the nulls give greatest RDF ac- 
curacy. Bui there are two nulls. 
and they're in exactly opposite di- 
rections. 

How do you figure out which 
way to go when the RDF system 
has 180 degree ambiguity? You 
could take bearings from two 
widely separated locations and 
triangulate, but that would involve 




The surplus A T-339/PRC loop and a portable receiver make a nice mobile or hand*camed RDF system for 6 
meters. George Stokes WT6U and Bob Miklos KdLPFare ready to hunt. 

52 73 Amateur Radio * December, 1988 



electronically solve the bi-direc- 
tionality problem at 2 meters, 
none of the VHF loop designs I've 
seen in the magazines have such 
a feature. Parasitic elements, tike 
directors and reflectors, will not 
work on a fractional wavelength 
loop antenna. Shielding methods, 
such as screens and metal plates 
won't make them unt-directional, 
either. The most effective way is to 
add a nondirectional whip to the 
antenna system. Then sum the 
whip and loop outputs with just the 
right amplitude and phase rela- 
tionship, to either enhance one 
lobe or create a cardioid (heart- 
shaped) pattern. For decades, 
this loop/sense scheme has been 
standard for RDF below 60 MHz. 
It's tricky at 2 meters, but it can be 
done. (For details of a simple loop/ 
sense system for 2 meters, see 
page 27 of Transmitter Hunting- 
Radio Direction Finding Simpli- 
fied, TA8 Books #2701. available 
from Uncle Wayne's Bookstore,) 

Loops Hate Multipath 

It is common in VHF transmitter 
hunting for the signal to arrive 
from more than one direction. 
This is called "multipath." It oc- 
curs because features of the ter- 
rain, such as mountains, hills, and 
buildings, reflect VHF signals. 
Good performance in multipath 
situations is an important feature 
of a successful RDF system, 

Null-hunting with a loop can be 
very frustrating when multipath is 
present. As the hunter sweeps his 
loop past the direct signal, trying 
to find the exact null direction, the 
null is filled in by a signal arriving 
from the reflection. Even if the re- 
flection is much weaker than the 

Continued on page 54 



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73 Amateur Radio • December, 1988 53 



Homing In 

Continued from page 52 

direct signal it may be impossible 
to get a correct bearing on the di* 
rect signal. 

Hunters using beams can dis- 
tinguish the peaks of direct and 
reflected signals as Jong as there 
is sufficient signal level differ- 
ence. Furthermore, when the sig- 
nal is weak, the higher gain and 
larger capture area of the beam 
make it a much better performer 
than the loop. 

Forget Loops? 

Were all those guys who wrote 
glowing descriptions of their 2 me- 
ter loops wrong? No. just overly 
enthusiastic. Either they didn't 
have serious competition, or they 
didn't realize how much more suc- 
cessful they'd be with a better 
setup. 

The loop is not the best tool for 
the task. It may be your idea of fun 
to enter a 20 meter DX contest with 
a QRP rig and a grounded vertical, 
but you wouldn't do it with the 
expectation of winning (unless ev- 
eryone else in the contest had QRP 
and a vertical). You need some- 
thing much better to be truly com- 
petitive against the big gun sta- 
tions. In T-hunting, it's the same. 



Several years ago, Dick Reimer 
W6ET knew there was a 2 meter 
repeater jammer in his neighbor- 
hood, because the jammer had a 
strong signal on the input, Dick 
didn't have RDF gear at the time r 
so he spent a couple of hours 
building a simple 8-inch diameter 
loop. It gave good nulls, and its 0,3 
wavelength size gave it good sen- 
sitivity. The jammer cooperated 
(unknowingly) by staying on the 
air and being in a location free of 
multipath. W6ET tracked him 
down in short order, and ended 
the problem. 



tests. I don't do that any more- 
Loops have their place, but com- 
petitive 2 meter T-huntmg around 
Los Angeles tsn't one of them. 
Signals are too weak, and the 
hiders usually pick spots in the 
hills or in urban areas that make 
the signal ricochet around like a 
ping pong ball. 

If you want to get started simply 
and cheaply in 2 meter hunting, 
and you want a fighting chance 
against big gun hunters, my ad- 
vice is to skip loops and use a 
simple qu d or beam. It's a bit 
more wor t, but there'll be no 



di Nuif-hunting with a loop can be 
very frustrating when multipath 

is present/' 



In that situation, a loop can do 
the job well but the serious sport 
hunter would not want a loop as 
his primary RDF system on a com- 
petitive hunt against experienced 
hunters. W6ET knew that, so he 
later got a commercial Doppler 
RDF for serious hunting. 

As part of my T-hunt talks to 
local radio clubs, I used to demon- 
strate W6ET's loop as an easy 
way to get started on T-hunt con- 



null-fill or bi-directionality prob- 
lems to worry about. You'll get 
much more signal, too. 

Try a Loop on HF 

Loops are far more success* 
ful on € and 10 meters, since 
there is much less multipath on 
these bands. Signals are stronger 
because they must overcome 
atmospheric noise to be heard. 
The Southern California Six Meter 



Club sponsors a monthly dual- 
band 6 and TO meter hunt in the 
Orange County area. Many of the 
participants use loops. 

The most popular 6 meter 
loop is the low-cost Army sur- 
plus AT-339/PRC (see photo). 
Ruggedly built for field use, it 
tunes 38 to 55 MHz with a built-in 
attenuator for strong signals, and 
a sense circuit to resolve the back/ 
front ambiguity, You can find oth- 
er models with a little scrounging, 
including the older AT-249/GRD, 
which also covers the same 
range. The AT*340/PRC looks just 
like the AT-339/PRC, but it's for 
20 to 39 MHz, making it suitable 
for 10 and 1 1 meter use. 

What's Better Than a Loop? 

In summary, a loop is a poor 
performer for serious RDF 
work above tOO MHz. In future 
columns, we'll look at the 
methods that top-notch hunters 
use on the VHF bands, including 
beams, switched antennas, and 
dopplers. Well compare their 
performance in a variety of hunt 
situations. 

If there's a T-hunt topic you'd 
like to see covered, please drop 
me a line, I am also eager to hear 
about hunting activities in your 
area. 



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for you. Hams will come into your store to 

lick up the latest 73 and end up buying the 

atest all-band, all-mode transceiver (or at 

least a few feet of coax). 



* 73 Amateur Radio guarantees each issue— 
you pay only for the copies that you sell. We 
pay tor all shipping. 

For information on selling 73 Amateur Radio, call Peter 
Murphy at 800-722*7790, or write to 73 Amateur 
Radio, WGE Center, Peterborough, NH 03458. 

Amateur 
Radio 

WGE Center, Peterborough, NH 03458 800-722-7790 







AMATEUR TELEVISION 



NOVICES: NOW YOU CAN TRANSMIT 

VIDEO WITH OUR NEW TX23-1 

Did you know that you as well as all classes of 
licensed amateurs can easily transmit live action 
color and sound video just like broadcast TV with our 
TX23-1 transmitter Use any home TV camera and/ 
or VCR T computer, etc. by plugging the composite 
video and audio into the front 10 pin or rear phono 
jacks. Call or write now for our complete ATV catalog 
including downconverters, transceivers, linear 
amps, and antennas for the 70, 33, & 23cm bands. 



Only 
$299 

Designed and 
built in the USA 

Value + Quality 
from over 25 years 

in ATV,..W60RG 



TX23-1 one watt ATV transmitter cryststed for 1289.25 
MHz runs on 12-14 Vdc @ 5A. PTL T/R switching. 
7x7x2.5". TVC-12G Downconverter $109. Transmitters 
sold only to licensed amateurs for legal purposes verified 
in the latest Calf book or with copy of license sent with order. 




54 73 Amateur Radio • December, 1988 



(81 8) 447-4565 nvf aam-5;30pm pst, 

P.C. ELECTRONICS 

2522 Pax son Ln Arcadia CA 91006 



Visa, MC, COD 

Tom (W60RGJ 
Maryann (WB6YSS) 






Atv 



Number 1 7 on your Feedback card 



Mike Stone WBQQCD 
POBoxH 
Lowden, IA 52255 

ATV for Weather/Packet 
Public Service 

The ATV mode can be especial- 
ly helpful in aiding already estab- 
lished weather storm alert and 
emergency weather nets com- 
monly held on 2 meters across the 
country, All our local amateur 
weather spotter nets were doing 
an admirable job over the 
years, protecting and serving lo- 
cal law enforcement and city/ 
county officials with storm spot- 
ting information updates. Many of 
the amateurs realize that they 
lacked professionalism in two ar- 
eas: 1) passing witnessed "spot- 
ter" messages and sightings on to 
nearby counties and states, and 
2) getting advanced early warn- 
ings to all affected areas, prior to 
establishing the weather watch 
spotters nets. 

Two years ago, our BRATS ATV 
club installed on our remote trans- 
mitter and repeater system 
(N9CAI ATV/RT/R) a Kavorus 
Color Weather Radar feed for 
910 MHz. We obtained this 
feed from a focal NBC TV sta- 
tion (KWQC-TV) which em- 
ploys a coupte of our ATV club 
members. We got permission 
from The Kavorus Company in 
Minnesota for just such a non- 
public view feed. These feeds 
and other types of radar ser- 
vices, including Doppler, are 
available in many area TV and 
radio stations or at National 
Weather Service facilities, 
They are also available at 
some commercial business fa- 
cilities, such as local Airport 
Flying Services or other busi- 
ness that use weather radar 
equipment, Once a weather 
radar feed source is captured 
on the ATV repeater or remote 
transmitter, your ATV system 
wilt blossom with new interest, 
members, and public service 
projects! 

EARWARN 

We established a brand new 
inclement weather early warn- 
ing group that comprised 
county-appointed ARRL EC 
and assistant ECs, RACES 
personnel, county and state 
disaster services officials, lo- 



Ham Television 

cat and county law enforcement 
department, ESDA directors, and 
weather observers. The basic pur- 
pose of this new group was to 
provide early warning and storm 
advancement information to alt 
the local weather spotter nets. 
We chose a wide-range, hardly 
used, quiet 2 meter FM repeater 
(in Maquoketa on 147.06 MHz), 
to conduct our meetings and 
nets rather than interfere with the 
ongoing local weather spotter 
nets. Assigned members from 
these nets come to our frequen- 
cy most of the time and thus re- 
port back into their own nets with 
updated information. We also 
hold a regular Sunday evening 
EARWARN NET at 9:30 PM after 
all other local nets are over. This 
new gfoup met monthly at dif- 
ferent locations to get things es- 
tablished, and eventually voted 
for quarterly meetings. We have 
our own newsletter — Take Cov- 
er—funded by donations from 
other local amateur radio clubs 
and groups. 



The Tri-State EARWARN 
Group works this way: Members 
of the local Fast Scan gang 
observe incoming inclement 

weather on a regular basis on the 
ATV weather radar feed. Once 
bad weather threatens, packet ra- 
dio beacon messages (145.01 
MHz) are sent to designated EAR- 
WARN relay dtgipeaters in the 
projected path of the storm. We 
also go on FM voice to several of 
the local 2 meter repeaters in the 
area and announce what is hap- 
pening to local EC or RACES per- 
sonnel. The ATV radar feed and 
television transmitter is 'locked 
on" for all to see during the entire 
span of the storm period. Packet 
radio beacon (unconnected) mes- 
sages are constantly sent up 
through the digi relay stations. We 
also man the mentioned EAR- 
WARN 2 meter FM frequency for 
general WX related talk discus- 
sions and updates. 

We are doing something on 
packet radio that relates to the 
used FSTV mode and is quite in- 
teresting and perhaps a "first 1 * for 
packet use around the country. 
We designed a video screen map 
of Iowa and Illinois counties and 
placed around this map (across 
the top), an A-Z and (down the left 



artiwntal S-E- lot** County ATV m vtm*ez ::vi^'i: -i -fOE? RADIO Hap 
by Cr«i3 riS>«QLJ and IHh« HBOQCI =- ?<-!-£?« -ft £££ttA3M 
Cmr*nng A.R.E.5. Districts II, III* V> 4*3 '■' 
SB CgIuAO TtBt Print R*quir«c 
August 9th, l r 



A B 

t 



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9 

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11 
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17 



CDC 



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* BLACKHAWK • BUCHANAN 



C-ELftUflfrE 



* DLIB'JCUE 

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» 0ENTON 



LINN 



• JONES 



• ;*Cr:sQN 




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* KEOKUK 

■ 



* WASHINGTON * 



* nuSCATINE 



ft LOUISA 

I ft ft ft ftfttt 



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. / niifiet* 

LEVEL It Lt. Run 

LEVEL Zt Hod. ftun 

LEVEL 3i Heavy Rain 

LEVEL 4s HRain/Windft 

LEVEL 5 i Hail Pass. 

LEVEL 61 Vei*y Sftvara 

T U V W X ¥ I 



STATISTICAL STORM WATCH I NFORttAT I ON t 



Tin* a* WK RADAR display* 
Gsnvrsl Direction of Star* Ctllli) 
Estiafttvd $f>**d •^H o* Storaj 
WARNINGS in *HKt fori 
Additions! Cpwinti: 



ti 



Conv*rtf4 (roa ATV to PftCkat fcyt 

Courtftfty BPATS ATV/P* C k»t CluO fc Trt-5t*t» EAfiWAAN 8RQU> 

KMQC-TV HSCb - noiirur Wition*! W**th*r Bureau at DC Airport* rtalina, IL. 



Map obtainable from packet radio on which observers pfot the tocation and 
movement of storm celts. 



side), 1-20 numbered grid refer- 
ence index for marker indicators. 
We distributed copies of these 
maps at meetings and may also 
sit on local BBSs for packet opera- 
tors to download and print out 
on their own personal computers, 
(We have, by the way. a KA Node 
designated weather BBS estab- 
lished (KOOQP-3) thai takes and 
stores all weather-related mes- 
sages, announcements, maps, 
charts, etc) At the ATV radar 
viewed station, and with these 
maps stored on disk files, the 
packet maps are filled in with 
XXXs and various NWS storm 
warning level indicators {222, 333, 
444, etc-) on the TV screen as to 
exactly where the inclement 
weather is located. Then this now 
updated. filled-in packet infor- 
mation map is sent over pack- 
et, oi\ on voice, is described in 
exact detail using the provided 
A-Z and 1-30 grid locators. Even 
those in the net without ATV capa- 
bility then has on paper a map 
showing where the inclement 
weather storm cells sit. This hard- 
copy is especially useful for pass- 
ing on to County Radio and Disas- 
ter Services Officials for their 
judgments and decisions. The of- 
ficials now have something to 
back up their decisions which 
may be controversial by the 
public after the storm period 
passes. All maps also include, 
among other information, low* 
er page time, direction of 
storm, and estimated storm 
movement speed. There's 
nothing like hardcopy evi- 
dence of Level 5 and 6 intensi- 
ty buitd-ups to set storm warn- 
ings in action! 

The work of being able to 
harmonize several Amateur 
Radio Groups together for in- 
clement weather situations 
(ARRL District DEC), is similar 
to the job of a county disaster 
services director. It is impor- 
tant to understand the opera- 
tions and needs of all of the 
local groups who are all trying 
to accomplish the same goals, 
ATV radar is the vehicle to do 
it. It is up to someone, or some 
newly established EARWARN 
type group, to take charge and 
blend these groups and ser- 
vices. 

For more information on this 
type of service, the EAR- 
WARN Take Cover newsletter 
is available. Send $1 and 
your SASE to Kurt Johnson 
K0OQP, c/o Cedar County 
ARC, Cedar County Court- 
house, Tipton, Iowa 52772, 



73 Amateur Radio * December, 1988 55 



HF Equipment Regular SALE 

IC-781 Xcvr/Rcvr/ps/tuner/scope„. 5995.00 Call 




IC-761 Xcvr/Rcvr/ps/tuner 

HM-36 Scanning hand microphone 
SP-20 ExL speaker w/audio filter .. 

FL-101 250 Hz 1st IF CW filter 

FL-53A 250 Hz 2nd IF CW filter .... 

FU02 6 kHz AM filler 

EX-310 Voice synthesizer 



2699.00 2369 

47.00 
149.00 139* 5 

73.50 
115.G01O9* 5 

5900 

5900 



.wHU- 4 ^ ■ ^ WIIHL 



*Vto#PX -iv'S^Btw 4*- '*-» : i 






>-^ E HP :• 



•"■ ■'. " ••• & • \1 






rcvr 



IC-751A 9-band xcvr/.l 30 MHz 
PS-35 Internal power supply ,<,.*.* 
FL-32A 500 Hz CW filter (1st IF). .„ 
FL-63A 250 Hz CW filter (1st IF) 

FL-52A 500 Hz CW filter (2nd IF).., 
FL-53A 250 Hz CW filter (2nd IF) ... 

FL-33 AM filter. ...._... ... 

Fi-70 2.8 kHz wide SSB filter „..„ 
RC-10 External frequency controller 



1699.00 1469 
219.00 199 9 * 

69.00 

59,00 

115,00 109" 
115,00 109" 

49,00 

59,00 

49.00 




1C-735 HF transceiver/SW rcvr/mic 1099.00 949" 
PS-55 External power supply....... 219,00199" 

AH50 Automatic antenna tuner ,.. 445,00 369" 

FL-32A 500 Hz CW filter 69.00 

EX-243 Electronic keyer unit 64.50 

UT-30 Toneencoder 1850 



Other Accessories 

IC-2KL 16015m solid state amp w/ps 

PS45 20A external power supply 

PS-30 Systems p/s w/cord, 6-pin plug 
MB Mobile mount. 735/751A/761A. 

SP-3 External speaker 

SP-7 Small external speaker T . 

CR-64 High stab, ref, xta! for 751A.. 

PP-1 Speaker/patch 

SM-6 Desk microphone 

SM-B Desk mic ■ two cables, Scan.., 
SM-10 Compressor/graph EQ P 8 pin mic 
AT-100 100W 8-band auto, antenna tuner 
AT-500 500W 9-band auto, antenna tuner 
AH-2 8-band tuner w/mount & whip 
AH-2A Antenna tuner system, only.... 
GC-5 World clock 



Regular 

1999.00 

175.00 

349.00 

25.99 

65.00 

51,99 

79.00 

179.00 

47.95 

89.00 

149.00 

445,00 

589.00 

659.00 

519.00 

91.95 



SALE 
1G99 
159« 
319" 



164" 



139" 
389" 
519" 
589" 
449" 
79" 



I COM 



+ Large Stocks 
it Fast Service 
* Top Trades 

at 




VHF/UHF base multi-modes 
IC-275A 25W 2m FM/SSB/CW w/ps 

IC-275H 100W 2m FM/SSB/CW 

IC-375A 25W 220 FM/SSB/CW (c/o) 
IC-475A 25W 440 FM/SSB/CW w/ps 

IC-475H 75W 440 FM/SSB/CW 

IC-575A 25W6/10mxwr w/ps„,„. 
IC-575H lGOWfi/lOmxcvr..:. 

1C-471H 75W 430 450MHz base (c/o) 

PS-35 Internal power supply 

AG-35 Mast mounted preamp 

AG-35 (Purchased with IC-471H) 

SM-6 Desk microphone . . + 

EX-310 Voice synthesizer . , 

TS-32 CommSpec encode/decoder..., 
UT-15 Encoder /decoder interface... 

UT-15S UM5Sw/TS~32 installed...,. 

VHF/UHF/1.2 GHz Mobiles 

IC-37A 25w 220 FM/TTP mic... (c/o) 

IC-47A 25w 440 FM/TTP mic. + (c/o) 

PS-45 Compact 8A power suppfy . . , 

UT-16/EX-388 Voice synthesizer .. . 

SP-10 Slim-fine external speaker 

IC-28A 25W2mFM,TTPrnic 

IC-28H 45W2mFM i nPmic.„. 

IC-38A 25W 220 FM, TTP mic 

IC-4&A 25W 440-450 FM, regular mic 
1C-48A 25W 440 450 FM, np mic . . . . 

HM-14 Extra TTP microphone 

UT-28 Digital code squelch 
UT-29 Tone squelch decoder 
HM-1& Speaker/microphone 

IC-22BA 25W2m FM/TTP scan mic 

IC-228H 45W 2m FM/TTP scan mic 

UT-40 Pocket beep function..... 

IC-900A Transceiver controller 



Regular 
1299.00 
1399,00 
1399 00 
1399.00 
1599.00 
1399.00 
1699,00 



SALE 
1069 
1129 
899" 
1099 
12&9 
1129 
1499 



+ p + ■ + ■ + 



d P * -I I- I 



1399 00 989 55 
219.00 199" 

99.95 

99.95 9" 

47.95 

59.00 

59.95 

34.00 

96.00 

Regular SALE 

499.00 349" 

549.00 399" 

145 00 134" 

34.99 

35 99 

469 m 409" 
499.00 439 95 
489.00 349" 
459,00 369^ 
509.00 449" 

59.00 

39.50 

46.00 

34 00 

509 00 449" 
539.00 479" 

45.00 
639.00 569" 



+ Package Special . . . 

IC-900A Transceiver controller with UX-29H 
2m/45W and UX-39A 220/25W band units. 

$96995 



W P 4 ■ ■ P * 



UX-19A 10m 10W band unit 

UX-29A 2m 25W band unit 

UX-29B 2m 45W band unit 

UX-39A 220MHz 25W band unit.... 

UX-49A 440MHz 25W band unit 

UX-59A 6m 10W unit 

UX-129A L2GHz 10W band unit... 

KM2O0A 10W 1,2GHz FM Mobile 

IC-3200A 25W 2m/440 FM/TTP (c/o) 

UT-23 Voice synthesizer 

IC-32I0A 25w 2m/440 FM/TTP 

AH-32 2m/440 Dual Band antenna ,., 

AHB-32 Trunk-lip mount 

Larsen PO-K Roof mount 

Larsen PO-TLM Trunk-lip mount,,,, 

Larsen PO-MM Magnetic mount — 
RP-1210 1.2GHz 10W 99 cli FM xcvr 

RP-2210 220MHz 25W repeater 

RP-3010 440MHz LOW FM repeater.,. 



299.00 269" 
299.00 2G9 95 
349,00 319" 
349.00 289^ 
349.00 319" 
349.00 319" 
549.00 499" 
699.00 549" 
695.00 499" 

34 99 
739^00 649" 

39.00 

35.00 

20.00 

22.00 

22.00 
1529.00 1349 
1649.00 1469 
1299.00 1149 



Due to the siie of the fCOM product line, some accessory 
items are not listed. If you have a question, please call. 
All prices shown are subject to change without notice. 






Hand-hekh Regular 

1C-2A 2 meters 289.00 

IC 2AT with TTP ,. 319 00 

IC 3AT 22D/TTP(c/o) 349 00 
ICMAT 440 MHz, TTP 349.00 
IC-02AT/High Power 40900 
IC-03AT tor 220 MHz 449.00 
IC-04AT tor 440 MHz 449.00 
IC-U2AT for2mw/TTP 329.00 
ICu4AT 440 MHz, TTP 369.00 
IC-2GAT for 2m, TTP 429.00 
IC-4GAT 440MHz ( TTP 449,00 
IC-32AT 2m/440MHz 629.00 



SALE 
259 95 
279 95 
269" 
299" 
349" 
289" 
389" 
289 95 
299^ 

379* s 
399 9h 
559" 



IC-u2A for 2m w/o TTP 
Reg $239 Closeout $249 9S 



IC-12AT 1W 1.2GHz FM HT/batt/cgr/HP 473.00 369 s5 
KM2GAT Dlx I/7W 12GHz FM HT/TT? 529.00 469" 
Aircraft hand handheld* Regular SALE 

A-2 5W PEP synth. aircraft HT 525.00 479" 

A-20 Synth, aircraft HT w/VOR 625.00 569" 

Accessories for all except micros Regular 

BP-7 425mah/13.2V Nicad Pak - use BC-35 79.00 
BP-8 800man/8,4V Nicad Pah- use BC-35... 79.00 
BC-35 Drop in desk charger for all batteries 79.00 

BC-16U Wall charger for BP7/BP8 „ 21 25 

LC-11 Vinyf case for Dix using BP-3 20.50 

LC-14 Vinyl case for Dlx using BP 7/3 20.50 

LC-02AT Leather case for Dl* models w/SP-7/8 54 50 
Accessories for IC and /C-O series Regular 
BP-2 425mah/7.2V Nicad Pak - use BC35..., 49.00 
BP-3 Extra Std. 250 mah/8.4V Nicad Pah .... 39.50 

BP-4 Alhaline battery cas^ .*..« 16.00 

BP-5 425mah/ 10.8V Mi-cad Pak - use BC35 65.00 

CA-5 5/8-wave telescoping 2m antenna , 19,95 

CP 1 G|, lighter plug/ cord for SP3 Of Dlx 13.65 

CP40 Battery separation cable w/ctip 22.50 

DC-1 DC operation pak tor standard models 24.50 

MB-16D Mobile mtg. bht for all HTs 25,99 

LC-2AT Leather case for standard models...,, 54.50 

RB-1 Vinyl waterproof radio bag..,.. ,. 35.95 

HM-9 Speaker microphone. 47.00 

HS-10 Boom microphone/headset „ 24.50 

HS-10SA Vox unit tor HS-10 & Deluxe only 24.50 

HS-IOSB PH unit for HS-10 24 50 

SS-32SMP Cummspec 32 -to ire encoder 27,95 

For other HT Accessories not listed please CALL 
Receivers Regular SALE 

R-71A lQOkH* to 30MHz receiver $999.00 869 95 

RC'll infrared remote controller..,, 70.99 

FL-32A 500 Hz CW filter 

FL-63A 250 Hz CW filter (1st IF)... 

FL-44A SSB filter (2nd IFJ..., „ 

EX-257 FM unit....... ,,., 

EX-310 Voice synthesizer 5900 

CR-64 High stability oscillator xtal 79.00 

SP-3 External speaker He .. 65.00 

CIW0{EX-299) 12V DC option 1299 

MB-12 Mobile mount... 25.99 

R-7000 25MHz to 2GHz scan rcvr..... 1199 00 1049 
RC-12 Infrared remote controller,... 70,99 

EX-310 Voice synthesizer ,,.. 59.00 

TV-R7000 ATV unit 139.00 129 95 

AH-7O00 Radiating antenna 99 00 (16J 



69.00 
59 00 

178.00 159** 
49 00 



HOURS * Mon. thru Fri. 95:30; Sat. 9-3 

Mrlwaukee WATS line: 1-800-558-0411 answered 
evenings until 8:00 prn Monday thru Thursday. 
WATS lines are for Quotes & Ordering only, 
use Regular line for other Info & Service dept. 



Order Toll Free: 1-800-558-0411 



in Wisconsin (outside Milwaukee Metro Area) 

1-800-242-5195 



T 



I 



T 



4828 W. Fond du Lac Avenue; Milwaukee, Wl 53216 

AES® BRANCH STORES 



Inc. 



Phone (414) 442-4200 

Associate Store 



WIGKUFFE, Ohio 44092 
28940 Euclid Avenue 
Phone (216) 585-7388 

Ohio WATS 1-800-362-0290 

°^ e 1 800-321-3594 



ORLANDO. Fla. 32303 

621 Commonwealth Ave, 

Phone (407) 894-3238 

Fla. WATS 1-800-432-9424 

ffia? 1-800-327-1917 



CLEARWATER, Fla. 34625 LAS VEGAS, Nev. 89106 CHICAGO, Illinois 60630 

1898 Drew Street 1072 N. Rancho Drive ERICKS0N COMMUNICATIONS 

Phone (813) 461 4267 Phone (702) 647-3114 5456 N. Milwaukee Avenue 

No In-State WATS No In-State WATS Phone {312} 631-5181 

No Nationwide WATS 8^1-800-634-6227 ?S e 1-800-621-5802 




ft Holiday 



Hiuers Guide 



ICOM 

The (C-32AT 2m/70cm dual band hand-held 
is new from ICOM, It is a full-featured HT. The 
32AT has five watts of power output on UHF, 
and five and a half watts out on VHF. It has 
out-of-band reception (138-174 MHz and 
440-450 MHz}. The 32AT also has full duplex 
capabilities when the two channels are in dif- 
ferent bands. 

There are also many 
memory features. The 
32AT has 40 simplex 
memory channels, that 
allow storage of up to 
20 duplex frequencies. 
Each independent 
memory stores fre- 
quency, offset, and 
subaudfble tone. It al- 
so has programmed 
scan. The memory 
scans all the channels 
except the one you 
have locked out. The 
optional UT-40 tone 
squelch unit monitors 
busy channels and 
beeps and flashes 
when the subaudible 
tone is received. By 
pushing the monitor 
swatch, you can check 
the repeater output. All 
ports have rubber plugs that insert into them 
when they are not in use. The IC-32AT also 
has priority watch, that monitors the call chan- 
nel every five seconds while operating on an- 
other frequency. The IG-32AT is available for 
$629. For more information, circle Reader 
Service number 230. 





The IC-781 HF base station transceiver 
operates all modes and bands 1 60-1 meters, 
and receives continuously from 100 kHz-30 
MHz. Its prominent feature is a band spectrum 
scope that displays signals in a 50/100/200 
kHz range of the operating frequency. This all 
displays on a built-in five inch CRT screen. 
This screen displays frequencies, modes, 
memory contents, operating notes, RIT, two 
memo screens, and subdfsplays for Packet 
and RTTY. The JC-7S1 also features dual 
band watch, twin passband tuning, 99 
tunable memories, all wide and narrow filters , 



direct keyboard frequency entry, 150 watts 
output, built-in power supply, dual noise 
blanker, five multi-function timers, and two 
internal clocks. 

Suggested retail for the 781 is $5,995. For 
more information on this and the IC-32AT, 
contact ICOM America, tnc, t Corporate 
Headquarters, 2380 116th Ave. NE, PO 
Box C~90029 t Belfevue, WA 98009-9029; 
206-454-8155. The Reader Service number 
is 229. 



KENWOOD 

The new TH-25 2 meter hand-held is similar 
in size to the BT hand-held series. The TH-25 
puts out 5 watts on the high setting. The fre- 
quency coverage of the TH-25AT is 141-163 
MHz (RX) and 144-148 MHz (RX and TX). It 
has a front panel DTMF pad and 14 memories. 
Other features include automatic offset selec- 
tion, mufti-function LCD display, rotary dial for 
memory, tone alert for quiet monitoring, band 
and memory scan, automatic power-off cir- 
cuit, and a CTCSS encode/decode unit (op- 
tional). It is also water-resistant. The price is 
$329.95. 

The TM-621A is the 
first 144/220 MHz FM 
dual-bander* It in- 
cludes a dual channel 
watch function, se- 
lectable full duplex op- 
eration, 30 memory 
channels, extended 
frequency coverage 
on receive (138-174 
MHz and 215-230 
MHz), large multi-color 
LCD display, and pro* 
grammable scanning. 
The 621 outputs 45 
watts on 144 MHz and 
25 watts on 220 MHz. 
Also included is an au- 
tomatic offset selec- 
tion on both bands, and dual frequency dis- 
play for main' 1 and 4 sub-band" with 
automatic band changes. The suggested re- 
tail price is $700, For more information contact 
Kenwood USA Corporation, Communications 
and Test Equipment Group, 2201 E. 
Dominguez Street, Long Beach CA 90810; 
213-639-4200, 






YAESU 

The FT-747GX is a compact S3B/CW/AM 
and FM (optional) transceiver outputtlng 100 
watts PEP on all HF amateur bands. It also 
has general coverage reception continuously 
from 100 kHz to 30 MHz. Features include 
operator selectable coarse and fine tuning 
steps optimized for each mode: 25 Hz and 2.5 
kHz for SSB and CW, 1 and 10 kHz for AM, 
and 5 and 12.5 kHz for FM (with the optional 
FM board), 

The 747GX has a dual VFO, along with 20 
memory channels, which ateo store mode. 
You can choose frequencies, too, over which 
the scan skips. Scanning can be set for auto- 
resume. Memories are selectable from the mi- 
crophone upfoowN keys, Eighteen of the mem- 
ories can also store independent transmit and 
receive frequencies for non-standard split-fre- 
quency operation. Suggested retail price is 
$890, Circle Reader Service number 228 for 
more information. 




The FT-767GX from Yaesu receives from 
1 00 kHz to 30 MHz continuously and transmits 
on all HF amateur bands. The receiver design 
is an upconverting triple superheterodyne. 
The PLL includes a modular temperature- 
compensated crystal oscillator (TCXO), to 
minimize frequency drift. 

Features include memorized pro- 
grammable tuning steps for each mode, from 
10 Hz to 100 kHz; digital wattmeter and auto- 
calculating SWR meters; and selectable VFO 
tracking, where both VFOs tune together (for 
convenient repeater operation). Ten memo- 
ries include modes and a check function, by 
which memory contents may be displayed 
without affecting simultaneous operation on a 
VFO. There is also band, memory, and limited 
band scan. 

The FT-767GX has a built-in automatic 

73 Amateur Radio • December, 1988 57 



M 



antenna tuner. The automatic HF antenna 
tuner includes one memory per band, The 
contents of this memory automatically returns 
the settings to their previous positions for 
quick settings when changing bands. 

Suggested retail price is $1 ,930. For more 
information, contact Yaesu USA, 17210 Ed- 
wards Road f Cerritos CA 90701. Circle Read- 
er Service number 227 for more information. 




\ 



HEATH 

Heath's new SA-2060A deluxe antenna 
tuner wiii effectively tune and match balanced 
or unbalanced feedlines and single-wire and 
ladder tines up to 1 kW, on the 160-10 meter 
bands. 

It features a dual wattmeter, single switch 
antenna selection, and total front panel con- 
trol. With a single switch, the user can select a 
dummy load, or any of three permanently 
connected antennas, including a long-wire 
antenna. 

Dual wattmeters read both forward and re- 
flected average power, and in two ranges. The 
wattmeter section of the antenna tuner installs 
directly into a transmission line to measure the 
power on all frequencies between 1 ,8 and 30 
MHz. It measures output up to 200/2000 watts 
in the forward direction and up to 50/500 watts 
reflected. The antenna tuner handles power 
input up to 2000 watts PEP on SSB, and 1000 
watts on CW< The suggested retail price is 
$270. Circle Reader Service number 226 for 
more information. 




Heath's HK-21 Pocket Packet TNC is the 
latest and smallest TNC available. 

If your hand-held transceiver uses a mini 
phone jack for speaker output and a sub-mini 
for microphone, you can immediately connect 
the transceiver to the Pocket Packet unit at 
any time with the two shielded cables sup- 
plied, The HK-21 includes a built-in mini bul- 
letin board. The HK-21 requires a 
9 to 13.8V supply at 40 mA nominal current. 
The price is $219.95. For a free catalog and 
more information contact Heath Company, 
Dept 01 1-652, Benton Harbor Ml 49022. For 
this product, circle Reader Service number 
225 for more information. 




MFJ ENTERPRISES 

The 3 kW Versa Tuner Model MFJ-989C 
is a full-featured HF antenna tuner. It has 
two large transmitting variable capacitors 
that can withstand 6000 RF volts. The 250 pF 
cap gives an extremely wide matching range, 
even on 160 and 10 meters. It also has a 
roller inductor. A three digit turns counter and 
a spinner knob give precise inductance con- 
trol. You can use this tuner from 1.8 to 30 
MHz, including MARS and all the WARC 
bands. 

Retail on the MFJ-989C is $349.95. For 
more information contact circle Reader 
Service number 224. 




Also from MFJ Enterprises is the new MFJ- 
986 2-knob 3 kW Differential-T Antenna Tuner 
with peak and average reading cross-needle 
SWR/wattmeter. The T-network tuner uses a 
single differential capacitof in place of two 
variable capacitors. It covers 1.8 to 30 MHz 
continuously, including MARS and all the 
WARC bands. The user adjusts only two con- 
trols. The MFJ-986 is broadband, which elimi- 
nates constant retuntng. A three-digit turns 
counter plus spinner knob gives precise in- 
ductance control. 

A lighted two color peak and average 
reading cross-needie SWR/wattmeter lets 
the user read forward and reflected power 
and SWR . It also has a new di rectional coupler 
that gives more accurate SWR and power 
readings over a wider frequency range. The 
six-position antenna switch lets you select two 
coax lines and/or random wires {direct or 
through tuner), balanced line, and external 
dummy load. 

A new current balun for balanced lines re- 
duces feedline radiation that causes RF in 
your shack, field pattern distortion, and TVI. 
Ceramic feedthrough insulators for balanced 
lines withstand high voltages and tempera- 
tures. The new MFJ-986 3 kW Roller Inductor 
Differential-T Antenna Tuner comes with 
MFJ's one year unconditional guarantee. The 
suggested retail price is $239.95. For more 
information contact MFJ Enterprises, inc. t PC 
Box 494, Mississippi State, MS $9762; 601- 
323-6551, Circle Reader Service number 214 
for additional information. 



GORDON WEST 
RADIO SCHOOL 

Gordon West Radio School offers cassette 
theory courses for the following amateur radio 
license categories: 1) Novice-two cassette 
theory and two cassette code; 2) Technician- 
four cassette theory and textbook; 3) Gener- 
al-four cassette theory and textbook; 4) Com- 
bination Tech/General-four cassette theory 
and textbook; 5) Advanced-four cassette the- 
ory and textbook; 6) Extra-four cassette theo- 
ry and textbook. 

Each theory course features the new re- 
vised question pool that parallels the actual 
VEC-administered examination. Questions 
are covered on the cassettes in the same or- 
der as they are in the book. 




Visually impaired will especially appreciate 
the fact that this course can be followed with- 
out any visual aids. The included textbook 
assists, however, in better understanding 
some schematic diagrams and block dia- 
grams. 

Each cassette course with its accompany* 
ing textbook is $19.95, plus $2,50 postage 
and handling, when ordering directly from Ra- 
dio School. For more information write; Gor- 
don West Radio School, 2414 Coiiege Drive, 
Costa Mesa CA 92626; 714-549*5000. Reader 
Service number 223. 




WILLIAM M, NYE CO, 

The Nye RF Power Monitor System con- 
tains many features. It gives peak, average, or 
peak and hold readings at a flick of a switch It 
has a sample and hold analog memory circuit 
capable of displaying for up to 20 seconds the 
correct peak power readings of a single 1 ms 
pulse. The power monitor automatically 
switches power scales to 5 kW. It has a built-in 
adjustable ALO, It comes with a directional 
coupler that goes in-line with the coax, and is 
connected to the meter with a four-conductor 
flexible cable. This lockout circuit for your am- 
plifier will operate from either SWR or reflect- 
ed power. It uses heavy duty relays with isolat- 
ed contacts rated at 5 A at 120V AC/28 VDC. 
The monitor is available in two models, the 
RFM-003 and RFM-005, which differ only in 



58 73 Amateur Radio • December, 1988 



wattmeter scaling. The models are priced 
the same at $297 t and backed by the Nye 
full two-year warranty. For more information, 
contact: William M. Nye Company, 1614 
130th Ave, NE, Bellevue WA 98005; (206) 454- 
4524. Circle Reader Service number 222. 




KANTRONICS, INC. 

Kantronics has combined the features of 
the KPC-2 and UTU-XT to create a true All- 
Mode unit, the KAM (Kantronics All Mode). It 
functions with VHF packet, CW, RTTY , ASCII, 
and AMTOR. 

KAM features HF and VHF radio ports, 
simultaneous HF and VHF packet connects, 
digipeating, and VHF/HF gateway. 

KAM also features bargraph tuning, user- 
programmable Mark and Space tones for 
RTTY and HF Packet, and limiter/limiterless 
operation on HF for weaker signal operation, 
KAM's separate CW demodulator is also 
center frequency and bandwidth pro- 
grammable. The price is $319. For more in- 
formation contact: Kantronics, inc. t 1202 E. 
23rd Street, Lawrence KS 66046. Circle 
Reader Service number 221 for additional 
information. 

ALINCO 




Alinco Electronics, 
Inc., has introduced 
the DJ-100T hand-held 
2 meter transceiver, 
The DJ-100T puts out 
about 3 watts in the 
high-power mode. A 
number of accessory 
batteries are available, 
which wifl supply up to 
6,5 watts of output 
power. 

The DJ-100T has a 
frequency coverage of 
144-148 MHz, and is 
easily modified for 
CAP and MARS sim- 
plex operation. Also in- 
cluded are 10 memo- 
ries, automatic battery 
saving feature, a func- 
tion and frequency 
lock, and a subaudible tone encoder. 

The price of the DJ-100T is $299, For more 
information on this product, contact: Alinco 
Electronics, fnc, 20705 S. Western Ave. t 
Suite 104 ij Torrance CA 90501; 213-618-8616. 
For additional information circle Reader Ser- 
vice number 220, 

HAL COMMUNICATIONS CORP. 

The ST- 7000 is specifically designed for 
300 baud HF packet. Techniques developed 
for the government and military ST-8000 



(MD-1232/G) HF Modem are applied in the 
ST-7000 for the unique problems of high fre- 
quency packet radio operation, 

AGC-controlled AM signal processing is 
used, providing a very wide dynamic range. 
All filters and detectors in the ST-7000 are 
optimized for 300 baud HF packet. The user 
has the choice of two modes: the standard 200 
Hz shift mode, and the 600 Hz shift mode. 
Both shifts are fully supported by separate 
optimized 6-pole input filters and a 40 dB AGC 
system. The standard 200 Hz shift mode uses 
an optimized phase-locked loop (PLL) detec- 
tor, whereas the more optimum 600 Hz shift 
mode uses separate 4-pole Mark/Space fil- 
ters, active detectors, and a 3-pole post-detec- 
tion filter. The transmit tone generator uses a 
proven crystal-based sine-wave synthesizer 
circuit to assure minimum phase distortion 
and spectrum splatter. The ST-7000 has three 
different packet controller (TNC) interfaces: 
RS-232C, TTL h and TNC Audio, making it fully 
compatible with all existing packet controllers 
on the market. 



The R4030 is available for $399 from 
Regency, Uniden Corporation, 4700 Amon 
Carter Blvd., Ft. Worth TX 76155. Circle 
Reader Service number 218 for additional 
information. 




ST-7000 operates from +11 VDC to +15 
VDC at .25 A. It is available for $299 from Hal 
Communications Corp., Government and 
Commercial Products Division, 1201 West 
Kenyon Road, PO Box 365, Urbana IL 61801* 
365; 217-367-7373. Circle Reader Service 
number 21 9 for more information. 



UNIDEN 



The new Regency R- 
4030 Programmable 
hand-held Scanner 
has many features. 
Among them are 800 
MHz coverage with 12 
bands including 806- 
956 MHz; 200 channel 
capacity; 10 priority 
channels to keep a 
close watch on up to 1 
channels; 10 channel 
banks to store frequen- 
cies for convenient 
use; rechargeable bat- 
teries with a detach- 
able battery pack; 
weather search to find 
the NOAA weather 
channel that is active 
in your area; keypad 
lock; channel lockout 
to lockout unused or 
busy channels to con- 
centrate on others; 
and a track tuning fea- 
ture that gives perfect 
tuning on every chan- 
nel for crystal clear 
reception. 



UtHl IMK H**t- 



W&8& 


I ■■ l jlb ""1 = 1 
■J m -J^H^^ij 

I " aa«_» rani, g 1 

■aaaB = 1 

I I ^^^^™ » ^HaaaaaV "-"" "" 


K irWiflJWWHI' » 1 " 1 ■ 

-jj : ■ _^a£i mc i UKX ■ ■ 5 is 

Quad 


TtDti 



ENGINEERING CONSULTING 

The new Model TSDQ four digit sequence 
decoder replaces the popular TSD decoder 
and adds several new features, including a 
DPDT 2 A relay, on-board 5 volt regulator, and 
digit valid indicator and expansion connector. 
Board connections are via a 24-pin card edge 
connector, which provides quick disconnect 
and the added feature of expansion with the 
new Model "Quad 1 ' four relay expansion 
card. 

The TSDQ operates as a stand-alone two to 
four digit touch-tone sequence decoder. The 
output may be either latching or momentary 
control of the DPDT relay. All 16 digits output 
to the card edge connector and can be used 
for single digit commands. The relay is turned 
on with a four digit code and relays which may 
be turned off with individual access codes, A 
master on code followed by the relay will turn 
on a relay while a master off code followed by 
the relay number turns the relay off. These 
relay on/off codes can be a total of three to five 
digits in length. In addition to the relay out- 
puts, there are four transistor outputs that can 
be used to provide LED read-outs of the relay 
states, or as control voltage for other devices. 
All output connections are via a 24 pin card 
edge connector using the same pin numbers 
for all inputs as the TSDQ card, This allows 
instant compatibility when adding the Quad 
expansion card. 

The TSDQ and quad specifications are: +8 
to +20 VDC of power, 200 mV-3 VAC of au- 
dio, 2 amp double pole relay for output TSDQ, 
1 6 individual digits (0-5V), and 2 A 4DP relays 
for logic output quad is four double poJe relays 
with 2 amps. The price for the TSDQ is $79.95 
and the price for the Quad is $99^95. For more 
information contact; Engineering Consulting, 
583 Candfewood Street, Brea CA 92821; 714- 
871-2009, Circle Reader Service number 217 
for additional information. 

NEL-TECH LABS 

The NTL Digital Voice Keyer (D VK-1 00) is a 
state-of-the-art microprocessor controlled dig- 
ital voice storage and announcement system. 
It has been designed specifically for amateur 
radio communications and represents the lat- 
est technology in audio processing. 

The D VK-1 00 provides four independently 
selectable, variable length, voice storage 
memories. It also contains a built-in selectable 
audio amplifier capable of driving an external 
80 speaker, with mute and high/low level 

73 Amateur Radio * December, 1988 59 




control. It also includes a selectable audio 
compressor and end of transmission tone 
generator have been included. 

The DVK-100 is virtually compatible with all 
transceivers, It will accommodate both dy- 
namic and condenser mikes and both positive 
and negative PTT transceiver inputs. The 
DVK-100 suggested retail price is $260. For 
more information contact Nel-Tech Labs, inc., 
PO Box 1Q3Q, Londonderry NH 03053. Circle 
Reader Service number 216. 



^^^^^—^^^^^ 




STONE MOUNTAIN 
ENGINEERING CO 

Stone Mountain's KW-QSYer for Kenwood 
rigs provides high speed keying and easy fre- 
quency selection. Its full-size keypad is in- 
clined at a 1 degree angle for comfort as well 
as speed. It is popular with contesters and 
blind operators. It has an internal speaker that 
sounds a different tone for each key. The KW- 
QSYer works with the TS-940 series (with the 
Kenwood IF-10B interface), the TS-440 series 
(with the tC-10 interface), the TS-140 series 
(with the IF-10C interface^ theTS-71 1/81 1 se- 
ries (with the IF-10A interface), and requires 
an 8-1 6V, 100 mA, external DC supply. The 
sister models are available for the 757GX, 
757GX-II, 767GX, and the IC-735. Priced at 
$89.50 plus $2,50 shipping. A companion 12- 
voit DC wall suppiy for the KW^QSYer is $10. 
For more information contact Stone Mountain 
Engineering Company, Box 1573, Stone 
Mountain GA 30086, 404-879-0241, Circle 
Reader Service number 215, 




CALL SIGN CUPS 

Call Sign Cups wi II personalize 1 oz. coffee 
mugs and/or 15 oz. beer mugs with your call 



sign. Ceramic decals are placed on stoneware 
mugs. They are machine washable and mi* 
crowave safe. The prices are $b.$b for the 
coffee mug and $7.95 for the beer mug, plus 
shipping and handling. Quantity discounts for 
clubs are available. For more information con- 
tact Call Sign Cups t PO Box 17062, Rafeigh 
NC 27619. 

EPSILON COMPANY 

Epsilon Company announces Vertical Pro t 
software that enables you to design medium 
wave and short wave vertical arrays. By mod- 
eling several possible antennas before build- 
ing, you can decide what to build on an objec- 
tive basis. Vertical Pro gives you the capability 
to design your own at an affordable price. 
Modeling the antenna first will stimulate cre- 
ativity in finding better solutions given limited 
resources, 

The Vertical Pro gives a sinusoidal projec- 
tion of the radiation pattern. This is a flat pro- 
jection of the three dimensional radiation pat- 
tern, color coded according to signal intensity. 
The projection can be explored with a mouse 
or cursor keys and the gain can be read at a 
particular azimuth and take off angle in a win- 
dow below. Antennas modeled with Epsi Ion's 
software can be modeled over your choice of 
ground types such as: sea water, fresh water, 
moist, average, or dry earth. The projection is 
displayed in the center of the screen, the origi- 
nal grid is on the upper left, and a report is on 
the upper right. By moving the cursor over an 
element on the grid, the resistance , reactance 
and element parameters are displayed on the 
bottom, Moving the cursor over the sinusoidal 
projection will display the gain at a particular 
take-off angle and azimuth. 



lit--*;* - 
urftUft4 



9 tot 



& £ 1 H11 I h 

TOfl 

tl lamp fey- . t)l m 



mm* 



£haraotf>p, sties of ra<S >* t rt r* , 



.: 



Epsilon software runs on IBM-PCs and com- 
patibles with at least 256K (640K recommend- 
ed), DOS 2.0 or higher. CGA or EGA needed. 
The programs can make use of a 8087/80287 
math co-processor and a mouse. 

Vertical Pro sells for $80 plus $5 for interna- 
tional shipping. Order by sending a US check 
or International money order in US dollars to 
Epsilon Co., PO Box 715, Trumbull, CT 
06611; 203-261-7694. Circle Reader Service 
number 213 for more information. 

S-F AMATEUR 
RADIO SERVICES 

The S-F Radio Desk STD-36, from S-F Ama- 
teur Radio Services, eliminates clutter by 
providing enough space for a complete radio 
station. It has enough space for antenna 
tuners, VFO h CW keyers, filters, telephone, 
and log books. It will support over 200 pounds. 



It comes as a quick-assemble kit. The rear 
shelf is angled at 1 5 degrees for better viewing 
of the displays. The S-F Radio Desk is 50" 
high by 39" wide. The suggested retail price 
is $200. For more information contact; S-F 
Amateur Radio Services, 4384 Keystone 
Ave., Culver City, CA 90230; 213-837-4870. 
Circle Reader Service number 212 for more 
information. 




S-COM INDUSTRIES 

S-COM Industries introduces an option 
display cabinet for the S-COM 5K repeater 
controller. This cabinet may be retrofitted to 
the 5K controller without soldering or rewiring. 
The front panel is made with non-chipping 
black anodized, with white graphics and 
hidden fasteners. The red Hewlett-Packard 
AIGaAs LED lamps inform the viewer of impor- 
tant circuit status data f e.g. receiver COR, 
transmitter PTT, CTCSS decoder, control 
receiver COR, DTMF data valid, power on, 
logic inputs 1, 2, and 3, and logic outputs 
1 1 2, and 3. These LED lamps draw only 1 pA 
each. 




A conductive iridite-plated chassis box 
reduces RFI and houses the 5K board, display 
board, and an optional audio delay module. 
The cabinet provides cutouts for the 5K's 
power and input/output connectors, and uses 
PEM fasteners to eliminate troublesome nuts 
and standoffs. A ribbon cable assembly 
attaches to connectors located on the 5K 
and display boards, making for easy installa- 
tion. The assembled and tested display cabi- 
net is priced at $69 plus $5 shipping and han- 
dling, A similar cabinet is available without the 
display feature. Contact S-COM Industries, 
PO Box 8921, Fort Collins, CO 80524; 303* 
493-8316. Circle Reader Service card number 
21 1 for more information, 



60 73 Amateur Radio • December, 1988 




MFJ ENTERPRISES 

MFJ Enterprises Inc. has a new MFJ-T09 
World Time Clock, This clock features a slid- 
ing indicator you can set to learn the times of 
any of 24 international cities. It has a 24-hour 
world time display and a local time display. 
The LCD characters are % " high. 

The MFJ-109 also has a Greenwich Mean 
Time (GMT) pointer for instant access to the 
international standard. Other features include 
alarm with snooze, night light, daylight sav- 
ings time adjustment, date change indicator 
suede-like carrying case, and flip stand. The 
MFJ-109 World Time Clock comes with a one 
year unconditional guarantee. Price is $18,95 
For more information, contact MFJ Enterpris- 
es lnc. r PO Box 494, Mississippi State. MS 
$9762; $01*323-5869 Call $00-647-1800 to 
order Circle Reader Service number 210 for 
additional information. 

SIBEXINC. 

The VR-1 is one of the new lines of portable 
test equipment from Sibex Inc. The VR-1 is a 
battery-powered voltage calibrator. The user 
can select us output from 10 mV to 10 V in a 
1-2*5 sequence, using the 11 position switch 
Both + and - voltages are available at the 
output terminals. The front panel has a tow 
battery indicator. The VR-1 can be used for 
equipment servicing and calibration, R&D 
work, instrument calibration, and recorder cal- 
ibration, to name a few applications. 

It is housed in a pocket sized plastic case, 
shaped for convenient holding. The power is 
supplied by a standard 9V battery contained 
within the case. VFM is available from stock at 
$89.95 For more information, contact Sibex 
inc., 1088 Kapp Drive. Clearwater, FL 34825: 
813-441-8525. For ad- 
ditional information, 
circle Reader Service 
number 209. 

CUSTOM 
TECHNOLOGY 

Custom Technology 
now offers a line of 
wideband RF BALUN 
antenna auto-trans- 
formers. The trans- 
formers match unbal- 
anced loads (coax) to balanced loads 
(antennas and ladder transmission lines). 

The BALUNs are rated at 2 fcW (PEP) from 
1 .8 to 30 MHz continuous. The cores ate pow- 
dered iron toroidal types covered with glass 
tape. Windings are high isolation magnet wire 
to ensure maximum performance without 
breakdown even when subjected to high SWR 
conditions. 




Available ratios are 1:1, 1:4, 1:6, and 1:9. 
Coaxial termination is made with a UHF 
S0239 receptacle. The coaxial connection 
is housed m a PVC cover. An "N" type recep- 
tacle is available at extra cost as a special 
order. The 3" x 4" BALUN is made of cadmi- 
um steel; the termination is made of flexible 
copper braid. The complete BALUN assembly 
is potted in epoxy backfill for ruggedness The 
price for each BALUN is S25. Multiband 
antenna kits are available for $35 each, plus 
$3 for shipping and handing. Product litera- 
ture is available on request from Custom Tech- 
nology, 8385 Locust, Kirtiand OH 44094. For 
more information, circle Reader Service 
number 208, 



ter on-off lighted switch, the Model SP4M has 
a surge failure light which indicates abnormal 
voltage or noise This UL listed unit includes a 
resettable circuit breaker and a six-foot heavy 
duty cord. The Model SP4M Surge Protected 
Outlet Strip is $89.95. Scooter Products, 
Ohm/electronics, inc., 746 Vermont St.. 
Palatine IL 60067. 800-323-2727 (Illinois. 312- 
359*6040); FAX number is 372-359-9686- For 
more information, circle Reader Service num- 
ber 206. 





SCOOTER PRODUCTS 

Scooter Products' Model SP4M Guard-It™ 
Surge Protected Outlet Strip protects modular 
FAX, modem, and electronic equipment and 
peripherals from surges and noise Model 
SP4M has an anti-static grounding jack for 
your anti-static accessories, such as touch 
pads and screens. There is full MOV protec- 
tion on the power sockets to protect your 
equipment. 

Model SP4M handles peak surge currents 
up to 6000 amperes with a clamping time of 
less than 1 nanosecond. In addition to a mas- 



SOLAR ELECTRIC 

Hams and other radio operators can keep 
their batteries fully charged with Solar Elec- 
tric s new line of solar battery chargers Mea- 
suring only a few feet square, the Maintainer 2 
model is portable enough to bring almost any- 
where. The panels will keep storage batteries 
charged orvsrte, or power the devices directly 
during daylight hours. The new generation of 
solar panels are also more sensitive to low 
light levels and more efficient in high tempera- 
ture sites. The Maintainer 2 is available for 
$89 95. For technical details, write or call So- 
lar Electronic, 175 Cascade Court, Rohnert 
Park, CA 94928; 800-832-1986 or 707586- 
1987. Circle Reader Service number 205 for 
additional information. 



GUARANTEED TO OUTPERFORM" 



THE 



OR YOUR MONEY BACK! 



HAM 



■ 



CUTAWAY 
VIEW OF 
THE HAM 10 



TEN 
METER 
HAM 
r TM ANTENNA 

The ri HAM 10 M ten meter antenna is designed and manufactured by American 

Antenna, makers of the world Famous K40 Antenna. With a power handling 

capacity of 1500 watts and a band width of 1.5 mhz between 2; 1 Swf? points 

the "HAM 10* is the perfect compliment to ail single-band ten meter rigs 

me stainless steel base of tne 'HAM io~ Is supplied with an adjustable 

trunk lip mount. Also available Is an optional adaptable heavy duty 

magnamount Por a free brochure, call 1-800-323-6768 in 

_" Illinois 1-80G-942*ai75 

EXCLUSIVE FEATURES: 

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© COMPUTER DESIGNED ISOLATION CHAMBER. 

For A Free Brochure, Call: 

1 800-3K-6768 IN IL 1 800-942-8175 
TLX# 6871370 K40INTL 

..{Or Write) AMERICAN ANTENNA 
1500 EXECUTIVE DR. ELGIN, IL. 60123 

CIRCLE 235 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



73 Amateur Radio • December. 1988 61 



You ' re Breaking 
Santa's Heart 



How could you? 

After all he's done for you, you still haven't sub- 
scribed to 73. Month after month, Wayne and 
his little elves churn out the finest ham maga- 
zine in the land, working long into the cold New 
Hampshire nights. Hey! The Waynedeer are 
getting westless, 





f 



•Santa's Clause: 

Just because it's Christmas, 
Santa's going to give you a 
break. When you subscribe, 
he'll dig into his bag of goodies 
and send you a free yule tide 
present: your very own Giant 
DX Map of the World! 
Normally 15, this 38* x 25* 
map is the most up-to-date 
available, pinpointing nearly 
400 DX countries. It's the ulti- 
mate wallpaper, and it's yours 
free when you subscribe! 



r 




IYES, 



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I can't stand to see Santa 

SO sad! Here's $19.97— send me 
a full year of 73 Magazine and my 

FREE Giant DX Map! 



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For immediate service, call our smiling 800 operator: (800]-525-0643 

nffint utkUri fnra limited tim* O/llv 58 D6 



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Offer valid fore limited tima only. 



Put my friend's name on Santa's list, too! Here's 
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Mail to: 73 Magazine, Circulation Dept,, WGE Center, 70 Rte. 202N, Peterborough, NH 03458-9995 

62 73 Amateur Radio * December, 1988 



Number 1 9 on your Feedback card 




ERIAL VIEW 



Artiss Thompson W7XU 
RR 3, Box 224 

Sioux Falls SD 57106 

Transmission 
Line Transformers 

The column covering transmis- 
sion line transformers in the Au- 
gust 1986 issue of 73 generated 
more feedback than any previous 
installment of Aerial View. This 
month's column will be devoted to 
answering some questions and 
making comments of general in- 
terest to all readers. 

Many attempted to run the BA- 
SIC program listed in that article. 
but had problems with it. Readers 
alerted me to several problem ar- 
eas, Joel WB0OGF pointed out 
two errors in the program fisting. 
First, there are two tines num- 
bered 220. Change the first line 
number to 200. The second error 
in the listing ts in line 470. In this 
line, change "nad" to "and." 

A number of persons com* 
plained that while they were able 
to get the program to run in the 
quarter-wave transformer mode, 
they ran into difficulties when they 
used the series section mode. The 
general theme seemed to be that, 
in the program, the impedances of 
the matching section and the 
main transmission fine were too 
close in value. Since some of 
these comments came from users 
of IBM clones and GW BASIC (the 
same version of BASIC that I use), 
the difficulty probably arose from 
constraints imposed by the pro- 
gram and its equations. 

Impedance Values 

Recall that the impedance of 
the matching section cannot be 
too close to that of the main trans- 
mission line- Program tines 230- 
280, and line 340, involve some 
calculations that determine if 
those two impedances are too 
close in value. The general rule is 
to first calculate the SWR that 
would exist if the antenna and 
main transmission line were not 
matched. If the square mot of that 
number is greater than 1 , then the 
impedance of the matching sec- 
tion should be greater than the 
square root of the SWR multiplied 
by the impedance of the mam 
transmission line, 

Next, reverse the numerator 
and denominator in the SWR cal- 



Antenna News 

cuiation The impedance of the 
matching section is now accept* 
able, being less than the square 
root of the SWR times the im- 
pedance of the main transmission 
line. For example, say the anten- 
na has an impedance of 200Q and 
the main transmission line has 
an impedance of 5GfX Without 
matching, the SWR would be 
either 4/1 (that is, 4:1) or 1/4 (nor- 
mally SWR is calculated so that it 
fs always greater than 1 . but we 
must make an exception in this 
case). 

The square root of 4/1 Is 2. 
Therefore, the matching section 
must be greater than 2(50) = 
100O, or it can be less than the 
square root of 1/4 times the main 
tine impedance. With this exam- 
ple, that means that the matching 
section impedance would also be 
acceptable if its impedance was 
less than 1/2(50) = 25Q. If you 
have difficulty with this, try work- 
ing through the examples that ap- 
peared in the column. The an- 
swers in the examples were 
calculated by the listed program. 
If you have problems with the ex- 
amples, check your listing for the 
above corrections. 

BASIC Problems 

An ever-present hazard of writ- 
ing programs in BASIC is that dif- 
ferent computers frequently use 
different versions of BASIC. For 
example, a BASIC program writ- 
ten on an IBM clone may not run 
perfectly on a Commodore ma- 
chine. In fact, it may not run at all! 
Larry W8VLN wrote that his Com- 
modore 64 consistently gave an 
error message when he tried to 
run the series-section portion of 
the August program. 

Speaking of BASIC dialects, I 
know of at least one book which 
can help you translate different 
versions of BASIC— The BASIC 
Handbook, by David Uen (Com- 
pusoft Publishing, POBox 19669. 
San Diego, California 92119: 
1981 ) It may no longer be in print, 
but it might be available at your 
local library. Similar volumes may 
also be available from your local 
computer store. 

Those readers with Apple II or 
IBM PC computers may be inter- 
ested in an offer from Larry 
W1HUE, He wrote an improved 
version of this program in "Apple- 
soft" BASIC as well as in PC-style 



BASIC. He also has another short 
program that calculates the de- 
sign parameters for antenna traps 
made from coaxial cable, Larry 
will supply copies of both pro- 
grams for $10 ($12 for overseas 
airmail) to cover the cost of the 
disk and mailing. They are avail- 
able on either 3.5" or 5.25* 
diskettes in either IBM or Apple 
format (specify which). Write to 
Larry East W1HUE, 119-7 Buck- 
land St., PJantsville. CT 06479. 

Frequency Specific 

Another question centered on 
transmission line transformer use 
in the field. One reader wanted 
to know what length of series- 
section matching transformer he 
should use to feed a multiband 
trap dipole, Unfortunately, series- 
section transformers are frequen- 
cy specific; they work over a rela- 
tively narrow band of frequencies, 
such as an amateur band, but 
not on multiple bands. The same 
is true for quarter-wave trans- 
formers (a special case of series- 
section transformers), quarter- 
and half-wave batuns, etc. It's not 
possible to feed a multiband an- 
tenna through a single series- 
section transformer and obtain 
the correct impedance transfor- 
mation on all bands, 

Another reader asked whether 
series-section transformers func- 
tion as baluns. The answer is no, 
A balun is a device that matches 
an unbalanced line (such as coax) 
to a balanced line or load (such as 
open wire line or a dipole anten- 
na). Series-section transformers 
here match impedances. They 
could be coiled to form an RF 
choke type of balun, or ferrite 
beads could be slipped over the 
outside of coaxial series-section 
transformers to choke off currents 
flowing on the outside of the coax, 

Ground Systems 
for HF Verticals 

The recent column on ground 
systems and vertical antennas 
brought in some interesting ques- 
tions. Let's see how your answers 
compare to mine. 

Q. M The well-known manufac- 
turer of my multiband trap vertical 
says that the antenna has minus 
3-dB gain compared to a dipole. 
This is less than that of an isotrop- 
ic antenna — can this be true?" 

A. Keep in mind that a dipole 
has2.14-dB gain over an isotropic 
antenna only in free space. Over 
perfect ground, an additional 6-dB 
of gain is possible (the direct and 
reflected waves reinforce each 
other); gain over real ground is 



less T but still important. Even if 
this gentleman's antenna has 
3*db less gain than a dipole, it may 
still show gain over an isotropic 
radiator, particularly when over 
very good ground. 

Now for the meal of the ques- 
tion: might a vertical be 3-db down 
from a dipole? Yes! A vertical with 
better than a fair ground system 
can easily be fifty percent or less 
efficient. Dipoles, on the other 
hand, are typically over 90 per- 
cent efficient. Of course, this anal- 
ysis overlooks any differences in 
polarization, angle of maximum 
radiation, and so forth, but as a 
general statement, yes— a multi- 
band vertical over fair to poor 
ground will probably be 3-dB or 
more down from a dipole. 

Q "I have a horizontal mono- 
bander 1 8 feet above my roof. The 
roof is 1 3 feet above ground. Does 
my antenna think it is 18 feet 
above ground, or 31 feet up? Do 
wires running across the roof act 
as a ground?" 

A This ham's antenna probably 
'thinks" it is 31 feet or so above 
ground, as far as distant commu- 
nication is concerned. Radiation 
straight up may be reinforced by 
wires lying beneath the antenna, 
but that radiation will be of little 
use on the higher frequency 
bands. As the angle of radiation is 
lowered, the reflection point 
moves farther from the antenna. 
At low angles of radiation, the 
area of reflection for the antenna 
may be up to 10 wavelengths 
away. 

If the roof were very large in 
terms of wavelength, there could 
be some ground effect from near- 
by wires lying beneath the anten- 
na, though this is not likely in most 
suburban or rural locations. Note 
that these comments are directed 
with regard to a horizontal anten- 
na. Also, the ground may not be 
RF ground. The point of reflection 
for signals typically does not oc- 
cur exactly at ground level, but 
rather it is usually a few inches to a 
few feet below the surface. It is 
deeper in poor soil, and closer to 
the surface over highly conduc- 
tive surfaces. 

That's it for this month. Thanks 
to all of you who wrote with ques- 
tions, comments, and sugges- 
tions. Due to my recent move, 
replies to some requests for infor- 
mation have been somewhat less 
than prompt, but any backlog will 
have been cleared by the time this 
appears in print. My apologres for 
any delays. Keep those cards and 
letters coming (with SASEs. 
please, for a reply). 



73 Amateur Radio • December, 1988 63 



Satellite Tracking 

with your PC and the Kansas City Tracker & Tuner 




m- 






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mnii 








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r 1 





I -Err 




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-Li.,1! i 




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: 








The Kansa* City Tracker is a hardware and software package that connects between your rotor controller and an IBM XT, AT, or 
clone. It controls your antenna array, letting your PC track any satellite or orbital body. The Be n e e ■ City Tracker hardware 
consists of a haff-size interface card that plugs into your PC. It can be connected directly to a Yaesu/Kenpro 5400A/5600A rotor 
controller. It can be connected to other rotor assemblies using our Rotor Interface Option. 

The w««« C*ty Tuner is a companion product that is used in satellite work. It can provide automatic doppler-shrft compensation 
for digital satellite work. Using our new F-Trak feature it can also slave the uplink radio frequency to the downlink radios frequency. 
The Toner is compatible with most rrgs including Yaesu, Kenwood, and I com. ft controls your radio thru its serial computer port (if 
present) or through the radio's up/down mic -click interface. 

The BCj """ City Tracker and Toner include custom serial interfaces and do not use your computer's valuable COMM pons. The 
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aims your antennas and tunes your radios in its spare time Status pop-up windows allow the user to review and change current and 
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Satellite and EME Work 

The Kansas City Tracker and Kansas City Toner are fully 
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BBS or packet station can be programmed to automatically solicit 
mail from remote packet sites 

Vision-Impaired Hams 

The Kansas City Tracker has a special morse-code sender 
section that wilt announce the rotor position and status auto- 
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The Kansas City Tracker and Toner packages include the 
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• KC Tracker package for the Yaesu/Kenpro 
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CIRCLE 11 ON REAPER SERVICE CARD 



H 



Number 20 on your Feedback card 



A MS A TS 



Andy MacAttister WA5ZIB 
74714 Knightsway 

Drive 
Houston TX 77083 

A Great 

Year! 

Wow! 1988 has 
been the best year 
ever for the amateur' 
satellite program, Ham- 
sats have come a 



Amateur Radio Via Sateliite 

this five-and-a-half-year- 
oid satelfrte is for the 
batteries. During 
each period of off 
lime, when the 
satellite's panels 
are pointed away 
from the sun, the 
batteries experi- 
ence serious and 
potentially damaging 




ischarge. During Sep- 
tember, the beacon was occa- 

way since [he sionatly heard 

, - rto Photo B, Mission patch from STS- , 

launch of OS- sending mean- 

o a m ■ * rk« „ **« 2& : A merica s return to space \ . G ^ ^ 

CAR 1 in Decern- ^ ingless PSK, in- 



long 



ber, 1961. Twenty-seven years 
ago, we had a single small trans- 
mitter in space sending tl H\ iT in 
code as it circled the earth, until 
atmospheric drag took its toll a 
few short months later. Today the 
picture is much different. 

For me, 1988 satellite activity 
started a few minutes after New 
Year's festivities had subsided, 
AM SAT-OSCAR 10 was up and 
running in Mode B (70 cm up and 
2 meters down) with good access 
to Europe, After a leisurely con- 
versation with G1IMM. a check of 
my satellite predictions showed 
RS-10/1 1 available with a pass to 
the west. WA6TKV and N6DGK 
were both ready with New Year's 
greetings for those on RS-11 
Mode A (2 meters up and 10 me- 
ters down). Later that day, I 
tracked more RS-10Y11 passes 
which yielded contacts all across 
North America. The UoSAT 
spacecraft, U-O-9 and U-O-11, 
were both sending telemetry and 
messages at 1200 baud on 2 me- 
ters. Fuji-OSCAR-12 was soon to 
be available with its digital packet- 
radio system bulletin board using 
Mode J (2 meters up and 70 cm 
down). Operation via the analog J 
transponder continued for voice 
communications Things were 
looking good for 1988. and they 
only got better. 

Those Still With Us 

OSCARs 9, 10, 11 and 12 are 
still with us as the year comes to a 
close. U-O-9 continues with te- 
lemetry and bulletins. A-O-10 is 
available again for contacts as its 
orientation of its panels to the sun 
improves. The loss of control due 
to onboard memory degradation 
has not affected the Mode B tran- 
sponder's performance. The only 
concern among those active on 



dicating that complete discharge 
could be causing system resets at 
low voltage levels. As long as the 
batteries hold on without shorting 
internally, A-O-10 with its high el- 
liptical orbit may provide many 
more months* or even years, of 
service. 

Earlier this year, U-O-11 per- 
formed admirably during the 
transpolar Ski-Trek operation in- 
volving a joint Canadian and Sovi- 
et group of skiers. This University 
of Surrey satellite is now back to 
its normal activities with the digital 
communications experiment, ra- 
diation measurements, and dig- 
italker synthesized voice trans- 
missions. 

F-O-12 still suffers from its neg- 
ative power budget. The systems 
require more electricity than the 
solar cells can provide. The 
schedule of digital and analog 
transponder activity alternates 
with recharge days to keep the 
batteries up. The JARL (Japan 
Amateur Radio League) has pro- 
vided satellite itineraries as much 
as a month at a time, though. This 
has helped remove the guess- 
work from 
F-O-12 op- 
eration. It 
is no longer 
necessary 
to listen for 
a pass in 
hopes of 
finding an 
active tran- 
sponder, 
A M S A T 
North 
America 
forwards 
the sched- 
ule updates 
every week 
via HF and 



sateliite nets, and also publishes 
them in Amateur Satellite Report, 
the bi-weekly newsletter for mem- 
bers. 

RS-10/1 1 seems to be stuck. 
For 1988 there has been no RS-10 
operation, and Mode T (15 meters 
up and 2 meters down) has not 
been heard via either unit. For the 
year, we have had Modes A and K 
(15 meters up and 10 meters 
down) via RS-11, Mode A has 
been active continuously, while K 
can be used on weekdays. Uplink 
sensitivity is still excellent and 
downlink signals are strong. The 
auto-transponder t ROBOT, has 
been calling CO on 29.452 MHz 
every day. Many stations have re- 
ceived QSLs for ROBOT con- 
tacts. Unfortunately, they are old 
RS-5/RS-7 cards with RS-10 or 
RS-11 handwritten over the old 
sateliite names. 

AO-13 Settles In 

On June t5th, A-O-1 3 joined the 
club of active hamsats. After sev- 
eral months of great contacts H sys- 
tem tests and flawless ground 
control, the verdict is m. This is the 
satellite for which we've been 
waiting. With A-O-10 still perform- 
ing well when properly illuminat- 
ed, we now have two Phase 3 type 
(high-orbit and long-life) satellites. 

Thousands of stations are set 
up for Modes 8 and J. A few hun- 
dred are on Mode L (23 cm up and 
70 cm down), and a few dozen 
have been on the air via Mode S 
(70 cm up and 13 cm down), 

During September, tests were 
run on the Mode S transponder, 
The beacon frequency was quite 
different from previous announce- 
ments and charts, but the tran- 
sponder limits were close. The av- 
erage Mode S station has 2 kW 
effective radiated power for the 70 
cm uplink and a five-foot dish with 
a GaAsFET preamplifier for the 1 3 
cm downlink, Due to the highly 



directional helix antenna on the 
satellite for the 13 cm downlink, 
you can only operate Mode S 
when the satellite's antennas are 
aimed directly at the earth. Short 
stretches of S activity have been 
scheduled in the middle of Mode L 
periods, another mode with highly 
directional characteristics. 

Now that the satellite's circuitry 
has stabilized, accurate frequen- 
cy lists have been made. Bob 
N5LCO composed Table 1 using 
data from AMSAT-NA and Bill Mc- 
Caa K0RZ. Bill was the designer 
and project manager of the Mode 
S system. 

Shuttle Activity 

Amateur satellite enthusiasts 
around the world closely followed 
the launch, in-orbit activities, and 
the landing of STS-26. The mis- 
sion did not carry any amateur ra- 
dio equipment, but it represented 
a return to space for America and 
the potential return of ham-in- 
space activities on future shuttle 
flights. 

Most hams recall the 2 meter 
activities of Dr. Owen Garriott 




Photo A. RS-11 "re-made" QSL 
card^ 



OSCAR MODE-J FILTERS 



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CIRCLE 183 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



73 Amateur Radto • December, 1988 65 



W5LFL on STS-9 in December, 
1963. Signals from Owen's HT 
and window-mounted antenna on 
145.55 MHz were excellent. Ten 
years of planning had finally paid 
off. Earlier requests to place a 
ham rig on Skylab had been 
turned down. 

During the summer of 1985, Dr. 
Tony England W&ORE on board 
the Challenger provided many 
scheduled voice contacts and ex- 
cellent SSTV (slow scan televi- 
sion) transmissions from space. 
Even though there was little time 
for making casual contacts, the 
TV system was activated much of 
the mission, 

tn late autumn 1985, Spacelab 
mission D1 took two German ama- 
teurs and one Dutch ham to low* 
earth orbit on board the Columbia. 
Using the callsign DPOSL, this op- 
eration used 70 cm as an uplink 
with 2 meters as the downlink. A 
CD message in Morse Code (F2 
transmission) could be heard on 2 
meters when the system was not 
used for voice communications. 
Listeners could then call on 70 cm 
(FM voice) in hopes of being heard 
by the DP0SL receiver and re- 
corded on tape. 

Columbia again played host to 
an amateur radio project in early 
January 1987. MARCE. the Mar* 











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AMSA T OSCAR-13 Phase 3C operating modes and frequencies. 

shall Amateur Radio Club Experi- er T data from the alloy solidifica- 
ment, flew in a Get Away Special tion experiment, the plant physio[- 
canister. Using a voice syntheslz- ogy experiment, and the crystal 



growth experiment, flowed to 
ground stations on 70 cm. The 
transmission frequency was set to 
match the uplink band of AO-10, 
allowing linking of the transmis- 
sions through the satellite for 
those not able to monitor the sig- 
nals from the pay load bay directly, 
Dr. Ron Parise WA4SIR will 
continue in the tradition of the pre- 
vious amateur activities with 
SAREX-2 (Shuttle Amateur Radio 
Experiment number 2). In addition 
to voice contacts, Ron will have a 
packet radio system. It will be acti- 
vated continuously to allow auto- 
matic contacts to be logged dur- 
ing times when the station is not 
manned. The ROM (Read-Only 
memory) software has been in a 
TNC (terminal node controller) 
and on the air from the Johnson 
Space Center with the callsign 
W5RRR. 

Ron's mission was originally 
scheduled for March 1 986. Now it 
is planned for March 1990 Other 
opportunities to ffy the SAREX-2 
equipment may come before 
then, but at least ham-in-space 
activity is on the NASA manifest. 
Till then we have four micro- 
sats t RS-12/13, JAS-1B, and two 
UoSATs waiting for their trips to 
space. While 1988 was great, '89 
may be better yet. 




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G6 73 Amateur Radio * December, 1988 



ORCLE 47 OM RfADEft SERVICE CARD 



Letters 



Number 21 on your Feedback card 



From the Hamshack 



73 Worldwide 

As usual. 73 has always pro- 
vided interesting articles and 
information. However, the days 
are gone when the magazine 
could be considered an "Ameri- 
can" magazine. With its primary 
and secondary readership world- 
wide, the editorial slant ought 
to lay greater emphasis on the 
needs of hams worldwide. 

J, Srinivasan VU2 JX 
Bangalore, India 

Thanks very much for your kind 
comments on the magazine! 73 
has always made a serious effort 
to stay in tune with hams world- 
wide. What other magazine 
devotes a monthly 3-4 page 
column to international ham af- 
fairs? This represents a minimum 
of 7-6% of our editorial material 
each month. (Foreign subscrip- 
tions are only 5% of the total) if 
you are interested in becoming 
our Indian correspondent for "73 
international," contact Richard 
Phenix here at 73 HQ . . . de 
NStB. 

No Code 

Rere visited 

I wish to express my appre- 
ciation for the useful data I have 
gleaned from 73. I have only 
been reading it for one year, but 
I have already learned from 
your antenna articles how to get 
our mobile-to-base range up to 
about 30 miles on a good 
morning. 

While I'm on-line, Til put in a 
plug for a code-free VHF/UHF 
license. Some of us radio devo- 
tees have a good deal more to do 
than memorize things which we 
will use so seldom that we forget. 
This is a busy time in human 
history, I expect that there are a 
lot of us out here who could 
make a bit of time for vox ham p 
but who decline to (as we see it) 
waste the time to memorize, then 
forget, a language which is ar- 
cane and becomes increasingly 
archaic. 

If radio is looking to the youth, it 
will have to offer them a twenty- 
first century— not 19th century- 
mode of operation. 

JR.Mainfort 
Farmville VA 



Thanks 

to the Maritime Net 

I am currently serving with the 
US Navy in the Persian Gulf area. 
I would like to personally thank 
Fred W3WZU and Dick WB1 BYN 
on the Maritime Mobile Wet. 

Once I was licensed as a ham, 
J have met quite a few extraordi- 
nary people who take their free 
time seriously to help out others in 
need. I was tasked to get priority 
cafls through involving deaths, 
illnesses, and Easter greet- 
ings. With no phone for 57 days 
straight, people look for alterna- 
tives. 

Thanks to all the net members 
on 14.313. 

Bill Poulin KA4WWG/MM3 
USS San Jose 



Try 1601 

Which BS is Bill W4TAL refer- 
ring to when he says, "Sure 
don't care for the BS that clutters 
up the low bands . . . sure enjoyed 



the days when you could get into a 
good technical conversation with 
another amateur?" Sure hope he 
isn't referring to ME! 

One reason I like 160 meters is 
that there IS plenty of technical 
conversation, and very few short 
rubber stamp QSOs> 

Listen on about 1 823 kHz any 
morning before work. There are 
some W4 stations talking com- 
puter technology EVERY DAY. 
Fascinating to listen to. And every 
evening there are a couple of 
hours of conversation about 
packet, AMTOR, and antennas, 
on about 1865 or so by a group 
of 7s. 

And Wayne — Newfoundland 

was not an independent country in 

1959. The province joined the 

Confederation on March 31 , 1949, 

Bob Eldridge VE7BS 

Pemberton BC 



191 Hz or 1 Meg? 

I have to take issue with Mr. 
Hotine's claim that a narrow fre- 
quency spectrum is occupied by 
his method of phase modulation in 
which short pulses are used to 
phase modulate a carrier using a 
small deviation. The phase modu- 
lated signal can be expressed as: 
s(t) = A(cos[wt + 



where A is the amplitude of the 
signal, wis the carrier frequency 
in radians/sec, and m(t) is the 
time-varying modulating signal. 

Using a trigonometric identity, 
the equation can be written: 

$(t) = A(cos[wt}co$[m(t)} - 

sJn{wt}$in[m(t)}). 

If the amplitude of m(t) is small 
(less than 0.1 radians), the equa- 
tion can be approximated: 
s(t) * A(cos(wt) - m(t)sin(m(t)Q 
since sin[m(t}} m m(t) and 
cos[m(t)j * 1 if m(t) is small 

The equation shows a carrier 
component, cos(wt), and a double 
sideband component, m(t)sin{m(t)} ', 

This second term determines 
the bandwidth of the signal. The 
modulating signal m(t) is the su- 
perposition of the narrow pulse 
trains shown in Mr. Holme's artt* 
cle (Fig. 16 and 1D), with one of 
the waveforms inverted, since one 
causes a leading phase angle and 
the other a lagging phase angle. 

The bandwidth of a pulse train 
such as this is well known and will 
in fact be inversely proportional to 
the pulse width, t vsec in this 
case. Therefore, the bandwidth of 
one sideband will be approximate- 
ly 1 MHz, far greater than the 191 
Hz that Mr. Hotine calculated 

DanMulally WltC 
Rapid City SD 



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73 Amateur Radio * December, 1968 67 



Number 22 on your Feedback card 



73 Review 



by Jozef Hand-Boniakowski WB2MIC 




Full Duplex in 
a Hand-held 

The ICOM 32A T Dual-Band HT 



ICOM America, Inc. 

2380 116th Ave., N.E. 

Bellevue, WA 98004 

206-454-761 9 

Price $629 



The 32AT, ICOMS's entry into the dual- 
band HT field, is a little beauty about the 
size of the 02AT. It is one of the slickest FM 
phone radios of any type that I have had the 
pleasure to use, and I've used many HTs and 
portable 2 meter ham gear over the years, 
beginning in 1967 with the Varitronics HT2. 

Less rounded in appearance than the 02AT, 
the 32AT weighs 590 grams with the stock 
BP-70 battery, 510 grams with the BP-3, and 
545 grams with the BP-4. The BP-4 pack is 
just a shell for two AA-size NiCds. With the 
BP-70, overall metric dimensions are 65mm x 
160.5mm x35mm, 

Feature Packed 

It takes a bit of reading to become familiar 
with the 32AT f s features. Relying heavily on 
surface-mount technology, this dynamo 
sports 20 independent memories. Similar to 

68 73 Amateur Radio * December, 1988 



the02AT, you can program each memory with 
its own input and output frequency, PL tone, 
offset, and any frequency scan lockout. Each 
memory therefore has two stages. When not 
used, they serve as additional memory 
channels. If you programmed only simplex 
frequencies into memory, 40 channels would 
be available. In addition to the stock memo- 
ries, there are two VFOs t one each for VHF 
and UHF, a priority frequency and two call 
frequencies, which again are one VHF and 
one UHF. 

You can program quick frequency and 
memory selection through the keyboard or the 
main tuning dial, a welcome addition. For me t 
this was more memory, power, and flexibility 
than I could possibly use, The right hand 
column of the touch-tone pad has the A, B, C, 
and D keys. Used in conjunction with the 
function key located on the left side of the 
radio, they perform Clear-Scan-Stop/Transfer 
memory frequency into VFO, Memory Read/ 
Write, and VHF/UHF Split operation and Call 
functions. 

Full-Duplex Operation 

The most amazing feature of the above is 
the Split function, It allows a memory to retain 
a TX frequency in VHF, and an RX frequency 
in UHF and vice-versa, AND allows full-duplex 
operation. That is, you can wear a headset 
and talk one on band while listening on the 
other, simultaneously— just like using a tele- 
phone ! This is a great feature for public 
service communications, such as directing 
traffic, coordinating hamfest activities and 
bike-a-thons, and T of course ; checking re- 
peater links- Imagine full-duplex in an HT! The 
possibilities are astounding, including dual- 
band, full-duplex packet operation, and 
digipeating! 

A word of caution: When operating full- 
duplex, your frequency on UHF receive must 
not be the third multiple of the VHF TX 
frequency. The third harmonic would be 
picked up, and you'd receive howling 
feedback. 

Also, you cannot use the optional 
HS-10 headset. However; I can't see why 
a headset cannot be rewired or home- 
brewed for separate TX and RX audio 
lines. OK, ICOM, when will that accessory 



be available? 

Scanning Capabilities 

The 32AT comes equipped with scanning 
capabilities. You can set it to do a fulf band 
scan, a programmed band scan with user- 
defined top and bottom limits, a memory scan 
of both bands, or a selected band memory 
scan and priority watch. You can do the full 
band scan within one band only. In the 
memory scan mode, use the SKIP function to 
eliminate any memory frequency from being 
checked. SKIP functions with all of the 20 
memory channels. It comes in handy when 
you need to put non-amateur frequencies into 
memory for occasional recall. 

For example, I programmed 162.550 and 
162.450 MHz into my 32AT for listening to 
NOAA weather information from Albany, 
New York, and Burlington, Vermont, with the 
SKIP function enabled for both frequencies. 
When I want to scan the 2 meter band, 
these are skipped over, thus preventing 
NOAA's 24-hour transmission from tocking up 
the radio. 

You can set the 32AT to temporarily stop for 
a few seconds on every active frequency, then 
continue. This allows a quick listen to busy 
repeater frequencies, and comes in handy 
when you're listening for a friend and you're 
uncertain about which repeater he or she will 
show upon. 

Programming the 32AT 

You can activate many combinations of 
scan and watch operations: VFO and memory 
channels, VFO and call channel, VFO and 
another band, and of course, all of the above 
with the priority channel. 

With such complexity, you may be over- 
whelmed by the programming requirements. 
However, there is a SET mode, accessed by 
depressing the FUNCTION button along with 
the ,J 5 fr key, which makes programming con- 
venient. Then you can use the main tuning 
knob to set subaudible tone frequencies, 
offset frequencies, tuning steps (the rate of 
frequency change when using the mai n tuning 
knob or the UP and DOWN keys), scan edges, 
and whether you want the power saver on 
or off. 

Continued on page 70 



o 



TECH TALK from ICOM 



ICOIVL 



Limelight Views of the IC-781 



ICOMs incomparable IC-781 HF transceiver 
is truly creating widespread excitement in the 
amateur radio world and requests for 
additional plain language details continue filling 
the ICOM company mailbag, Thank you! 
Responding to your inquiries, this Tech Talk will 
overview some of the IC-781 's most noticeable 
front panel operating attractions. Future Tech 
TaJks will detve further into special features and 
circuit designs of this pacesetting transceiver, 

So what's behind ail the initial view bi oohs and 
afths" of the IC-781? In addition to its numerous 
front panel controls and its five-inch multi-function 
CRT is a complete station control and monitor 
center with tremendous flexibility. Despite its 
sophisticated and futuristic appearance, however, 
the IC-781 is surprisingly easy to operate. Its 
special features are simply 'called into use M as 
you desire, 

The CRTs top section always displays your 
present operating frequency [in bold numbers) 
plus the selected mode, filters, RIT/XIT offset and 
VFO or memory operation. The alternate VFOs 
data is displayed below that bold/ in use infor- 
mation. Although not readily apparent in ad 
photos, VFO A and VFO B plus any selected 
memory can also be set to different bands! A 
highlighted block in the CRTs lower right area 
also indicates local or world time right on the 
screen! 

An impressively advanced concept of fre- 
quency selection and control is included in the 
IC-781 Initially pressing VFO A and rotating the 
main tunrng knob selects frequencies in the usual 
way. Rotating that knob after pressing VFO B, 
however, lets you select standby operating 
frequencies on the alternate VFO while continuing 
an on-the-air QSO wrth the operating VFO! You 
can also change band and or modes on VFO 
B or load informaton into any memory without 
disrupting an ongoing QSO! In other words, the 
VFO A and B buttons electronically shift only the 
main tuning applications, Totally unique! There's 
more! Press the CHANGE button and operating/ 
standby VFO content swap positions. You can 
shift between VFOs and bands for rapid-fire 



DX'ing in a genuine contest-winning manner. 

When split-frequency DX'ing, alternately 
working two DX pile-ups or lining up sequential 
contest QSO's, both VFO's contents can be 
received simultaneously. This dual receive 
function is activated by pressing the DUAL 
WATCH button then adjusting the front panel's 
BALANCE control for a comfortable VFO A/B 
blend A single speaker is used for this simul- 
taneous dual reception, and the previously 
mentioned VFO A or VFO B buttons select which 
VFO is tuned via the main knob. Simultaneous 
dual receive within the same mode on different 
bands like VFO A on 20 meters and VFO B on 
15 meters is also a snap; however, greatest 
sensitivity always coincides with the operating 
VFO/bofd numbered CRT display. 

The panoramic display indicates all received 
signals within a horizontally-marked range of 50, 
100 or 200kHz as selected by Y keys in the 
CRT's escutcheon. The IC-781 's present oper- 
ating frequency always appears in the spectrum 
display's center with lower frequencies to the left 
and higher frequencies to the right of that point 
Horizontal marks indicate relative signal strengths, 
and background noise appears as "grass" along 
the bottom edge. It also reads your instantaneous 
signal level during transmissions. 

On-the-air activities and DX pile-ups are easily 
detectable at a glance, and they shi position 
according to frequency selections on the main 
tuning knob, Visualize combining this superti 
asset with the DUAL WATCH and you, too, will 



echo the slogan "ONLY WITH AN ICOM!" 

Pressing the CRT estuteheoiVs "F6" key 
changes its screen's lower area to indicate memory 
contents. Consequently, pressing the "F1 " key and 
rotating the main tuning knob scrolls Memory 1 
through 99 for reviewing their contents- Additionally, 
pressing the VFO MEMO button switches fre- 
quency control from VFO to the cursor-indicated 
memory. 

An electronic notepad for memory use can also 
be called up for use by pressing the "F5" button. 
Personal memos can thus be included in selected 
memories by selecting letters via the main knob 
with one hand while pressing the T2 M (Write) button 
with the other hand. 

The previous functions, incidentally, can even 
be performed while you are in QSO or not selecting 
frequencies wrth tie main knob. Visualize the 
versatility and convenience of this feature for noting 
schedules or net operations: you enter ail details 
in memory and even program the IC-781 to switch 
on and remind you of DX activities! 

Another press of the LI F6 M key changes the 
CRT's lower screen area into video display of 
printed modes like RTTY or PACKET. An external 
Tils RS-232 video data is connected to the 
IC-781 *s rear input T" keys select compatible 
operating parameters, and you enjoy ultra-deluxe 
video readouts on the C-781 's screen! 

The IC-781 p s innovative features and designs 
trufy reflect ICOMs dedication to excellence: a 
proud tradition that is built into every (COM unl 
Tune in wrth COM and join the winning team! 




ICOMS NEW IC-761 "The future of amateur communications. " 

CIRCLE 84 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



ICOM America. Inc.. 23B0-116m Ave, NjE, 8e»evue, WA 98004 Customer Service Hotline (206) 454*7619 

3150 Premier Drive, Suite 126. Irving, TX 75063 1 1777 Phoenix Parkway, Surte 201, Atlanta, GA 30349 

ICOM CANADA, A Diwsw of ICOM America, Inc. 3071 - »& Road, Unit 9, Richmond, B.C. V6X 2T4 Canada 

AM staled specifications are approximate and subject to change wthoul notice or obbgalion. AJI ICOM ratios s*gnrficantiy exceed FCC legutafeans iimtt:ng spunous emissions TT4B8. 



(COM continued from p. 68 

Changes in offset frequency come in handy 
when you're using repeaters with non- 
standard splits. The standard offsets are 600 
kHz on VHF, and 5 MHz on UHF, There are 38 
different tone encoder frequencies. 

Coverage 

The general coverage of the 32AT (USA 
model), guaranteed by ICOM to meet the man- 
ufacturer's specifications, is 144-148 MHz 
and 440-450 MHz, Within these frequencies, 
the double conversion superheterodyne re- 
ceiver boasts a sensitivity of less than 0.25 pV 
for 12 dB SINAD and a squelch threshold of 
less than 0.158 uV. The RX audio is greater 
than 400 mW at 10% distortion with an 8 ohm 
load. Compared to the 2AT and Q2AT, the 
32AT RX audio is more than adequate, and in 
fact, a big improvement. The IF frequencies 
are 30.875 MHz and 455 kHz. The operational 
range of the 32AT receiver is 138-174 MHz 
and 440-450 MHz. For the transmitter, it is 
1 40-1 50 M Hz and 440-450 M Hz, 

There are five versions of the 32AT. They 
are the USA, Italian, Spanish, Australian, 
Southeast Asian, and European versions. The 
main differences are in the frequency cover- 
age, while minor differences involve tone 
burst operation. In non-USA versions, cover- 
age includes 430-440 MHz. This leads me to 
suspect that as with the 02AT t a minor 
component removal or change is all that is 
necessary to extend the range of the USA 
version. Within the guaranteed range, the 
transmitter puts out a clean signal with +/•- 5 
kHz deviation. This swing is derived from a 
variable reactance frequency modulator. 

LCD Display 

The function display is large and easily 
readable . The LCD is sidelit with 2 green LEDs 
from left and right. The light button is just 
below the PTT. Once depressed, it gives five 
seconds of illumination if the main tuning knob 
or keyboard is not touched. 

The function display includes frequency 
readout, "TS" indicator in SET mode (more 
on this later), "M" in memory mode, "C* 1 in 
CALL CHANNEL mode with the appropriate 
numbers 1-20, l 'DUP" or'-OUP" indicating 
appropriate frequency split, "SPT" on full- 
duplex operation, J 'PROG" during pro- 
grammed scan operation, "PRIO M in priority 
watch mode, "T" for activated tone encoder, 
"SQL" with optional pocketbeep UT-40, "T 
SQL*' with optional tone squelch without 
pocketbeep, "SKIP" for skip a frequency 
during memory scan, "TO" for setting the 
subaudibletone, bt OW" while writing an offset 
frequency, and "L" when the keyboard is 
locked. Finally, there is a large S/RF bar graph 
meter. 

Versatility 

The UT-40 transforms the 32AT into a 
pager. If the transmitting station's PL tone is 
the same as the tone set on the 32AT, and if 
the pocketbeep function is enabled, beep 
tones are emitted for 30 seconds, and the 
"SQL" and "(((.)))" displays on the HTs large 
LCD screen begin to flash, Within 30 seconds, 

70 73 Amateur Radio • December, 1988 



press the CLEAR key ("A" on the touch-tone 
pad), or the PTT will cause the 32AT to select 
the tone squelch function and audio from the 
transmitting station. It is checked for PL tone, 
and, if it matches, audio comes through the 
speaker. 

There is, however, a MONITOR button 
located just above the PTT and FUNCTION 
buttons which will disable pocketbeep opera- 
tion and automatically break the squelch for 
frequency spot checks. MONITOR also works 
during casual listening, when you do not wish 
to break the squelch with the squelch knob. 

Features at the top include a BNC antenna 
connector, external RX/TX audio and PTT, 
a13.2 V DC Jack, volume control, a tuning 
knob for the dual VFOs, ON/OFF and volume 
control, squelch, and HI/LOW power. 

In a previous product review of the u2AT, I 
complained about how easily the ON/OFF 



n 



. this dynamo sports 
20 independent 



memories. 



ft 



knob can be accidentally and unknowingly set 
to ON, killing the battery. On the 32AT, [COM 
has placed the squelch control on the top far 
left of the radio with the ON/OFF switch in the 
middle, thus eliminating this possibility. The 
32AT ON/OFF switch is also more secure with 
a positive click, 

Battery and Accessory Compatibility 

The 32AT comes with the BP-70 battery, 
which provides 5.5 watts output VHF, and 5.0 
watts output UHF in high power. The low pow- 
er setting is 1,0 watts output on both bands. 
The BP-70's capacity is 270 mAh at 1 3.2 volts. 
ICOM made the 32AT compatible with all the 
2A/AT and 02AT batteries and accessories, 
As a result, ICOM has not yet made a single 
full-sized HT which suffers from obsoles- 
cence. 

In anticipation of the 32ATs arrival, I had a 
fully charged Periphex BP-8S super-battery 
ready to go. The 32AT easily played a 12-15 
hour day. The programmable power saver 
function helps out here. If there are no incom- 
ing signals, PTT, or keyboard entries for more 
than 30 seconds, the 32AT shuts down, and 



ICOM battery pack life chart, based on a 


ratio of 1:1:8 of transmit/receive/standby 


operation: 








Pack Volts 


mA 


VHF Op 


UHF Op 






hours 


hours 


BP-2 7,2 


450 


3.7 


3.1 


BP-3 8.4 


270 


1 + 9 


1.6 


BP-5 10.8 


450 


3,2 


2,4 


BP-7 13.2 


450 


3.4 


2.4 


BP-8 8.4 


800 


5.8 


4.8 


BP-70 13,2 


270 


2.0 


15 



goes into listen mode briefly every few sec- 
onds. This feature saves 10 mA on VHF and 
12mAonUHR 

Also included with the 32AT are a good 
quality dual-band rubber ducky antenna, a 
belt clip with mounting screws and washers, 
an earphone t rain-proof cap, hand strap with 
clip, and a BC-16U wall charger. Popular 
accessories are available, such as an external 
speaker/microphone, headset (PTT or VOX), 
desktop battery charger, and a nifty little 
device called the UT-40 tone squelch decoder 
and "pocketbeep." 

ICOM makes a rounded speaker/micro- 
phone that is very convenient to use with the 
2A/AT/02AT radios. They are now also mak- 
ing a much smaller, sleeker speaker/mike 
called the SM46L, However, it has a right 
angle double connector, a miniature plug for 
the RX audio and a subminiature for the TX 
AUDIO/PTT; that bends right over the 13.8 V 
DC jack at the top of the 02AT/32AT. This 
makes external 12 VDC mobile operation very 
inconvenient. If the right angle were shifted 
180 degrees, 02AT owners would be happy, 
but 32AT owners would find the cable jammed 
into the antenna. 

The Culmination of High Tech 

I bought my ICOM 32AT from Ham Radio 
Outlet in California in early June, and received 
it in late July. I knew that I was buying a 
new radio which might be included in the 
"test market" category, but I did not want 
to wait. 

Being very active on packet, I quickly sent 
an "ALL" message inquiring about the 32AT. 
Surprisingly, I received a reply from an old 
friend in New Jersey who had purchased one 
as well. Steve WA2NHZ mentioned that he 
and a few others were having PLL problems. 
When running the transmitter for three to sev- 
en minutes in full duplex, they reported that 
the synthesizer would go out of lock in UHF. I 
tried to create the problem, but could not, 
Steve's 32AT had a lower serial number than 
mine. The serial number of my unit is 01267. 

I can find no operational problems with the 
radio- In fact, I find the 32AT remarkable. I am 
thoroughly satisfied with its operation, and I 
have used it daily in my summer employment 
as a painter. The backplate/heatsink of the 
HT does not heat up as the 02ATs did. The 
32AT is ruggedly constructed, and its sections 
and backplate are sealed with water-resis- 
tant gaskets. 

My one and only complaint is minor — I am 
disappointed with the lighting on the LCD 
function display. If ICOM could have provided 
the back lighting of the U.2AT for the 32AT, this 
review would have been flawless. 

WeVe come a long way in twenty years, 
since the Varitronics HT2. The 32AT is the 
present culmination of high tech. With ICOM 
and the IC-781 HF radio making such a splash 
with its built-in video display screen, I wonder 
how long it will be before we see a packet TNC 
and LCD text screen inside HTs? How long 
before a triband HT becomes available? The 
prospects of a full-duplex OSCAR HT are 
becoming more real. In the meantime, Tm 
having a lot of fun with a very nice radio. 




Number 23 on your Feedback card 



Mike Bryce WBBVGE 
2225 Mayflower NW 
Massiifon, OH 44646 

To maximize the use of solar 
energy, we need some means of 
storing it for use during cloudy 
days. Recall in physics the law of 
the conservation of energy; You 
cannot create or destroy energy, 
only change it. In this case, kinetic 
solar energy converts to potential 
energy, to be stored and later con* 
verted back to kinetic energy at 
wriL The best container of this erv- 
ergy in its potential form is the 
lead-acid battery. 

Good or PbandH.SO, 

Even in today's technology, the 
composition of a lead-acid battery 
remains basically the same: lead 
and acid, A lead-acid battery is 
typically constructed of lead or 
lead- alloy plates immersed in a 
sulfuric acidfwater solution. This 
solution is called the electrolyte. 
Lead-acid batteries store and re- 
lease electricity by a process 
know as an electrochemical reac- 
tion, which involves a series of 
chemical changes within the bat- 
tery and the flow of electrons. 

What happens when we dis- 
charge a lead-acid battery? When 
a battery is connected to an exter- 
nal load (e.g. a rig), current flows 
through the load and the battery 
starts to discharge. The lead diox- 
ide, PbO?, in the positive plate is a 
compound of lead, Pb, (sometime 
called "sponge lead") and oxy- 
gen, 2 . Sulfuric acid, the elec- 
trolyte, is a compound of hydro- 
gen, H : , and the sulfate radical, 
SOv. As the battery discharges, 
lead combines with the sulfate, 
SO*, found in the electrolyte, 
forming lead sulfate, PbSO,, on 
the positive plate. Oxygen, O, in 
the active material of the positive 
plate combines with the hydro- 
gen, H ? , from the sulfuric acid to 
form water, H,Q, which reduces 
the concentration of acid in the 
electrolyte. A similar reaction is 
occurring at the negative plate at 
the same time. Lead, Pb, of the 
negative active material com* 
bines with sulfate, S0 4( from the 
sulfuric acid to form lead sulfate, 
PbS0 4 , on the negative plate. As 
the load remains (e,g f as we con- 
tinue the use the rig), the dis- 
charging progresses, the newly 
formed water continues to difute 



Low Power Operation 

the sulfuric acid in the electrolyte, 
lowering its specific gravity. (You 
can measure the specific gravity 
with a hydrometer to accurately 
and conveniently determine the 
battery state-of-charge.) The ac- 
tive material of both plates slowly 
changes to lead sulfate, PbSOj, 
The plates become more alike 
and the acid becomes weaker. 
Therefore, the terminal voltage 
lowers, since this is a function of 
the difference between the two 
plate materials and the concentra- 
tion of the electrolyte. Keep using 
the rig, and you eventually reach a 
point when the battery can no 
longer deliver electricity at a use- 
ful voltage. 

About Face 

Using electricity from the photo- 
voltaic array* we start the charge 



faster you discharge the battery, 
the less capacity you'll receive. 
Battery capacity is also a function 
of size, construction, tempera- 
ture, and concentration of elec- 
trolytes and plate construction. 

Temperature has a direct effect 
on the capacity of a battery; the 
lower the temperature, the lower 
the amount of capacity available 
for use. A battery rated at 100% 
available capacity at 80° F is rated 
at 105% at 85°F. The same bat- 
tery is rated at 90% efficient at 
60 °F. Long periods of higher- 
than-normal temperatures, how- 
ever, decrease battery life. Warm 
temperatures will also cause 
the battery to overcharge. The op- 
posite happens m colder months. 

Battery cycle life depends on 
the depth of discharge. An 80% 
discharge (to a 20% state-of- 
charge ) is considered deep. Best 
battery cycle life occurs at dis- 
charge depths of 60-70% of total 
capacity. 

There are^of course other fac- 
tors that affect battery perform- 



"Battery capacity is directly 
related to the rate of discharge. 



9f 



cycle. When we apply current to 
the battery, we simply get the re- 
verse of the above reaction. This 
causes the specific gravity of the 
battery to raise as acid forms, re- 
placing the water in the elec- 
trolyte. 

A battery gives off gas as it 
charges; hydrogen from the nega- 
tive plate, and oxygen from the 
positive plate. These gases result 
from the decomposition of water, 
H 2 0, Heavy gassing can be 
caused by several conditions; 
overcharging, cold electrolyte, 
and old age. Since these gasses 
can combine violently, causing an 
explosion, make sure to properly 
vent your batteries. II your batter- 
ies are contained in an enclosure, 
make sure there T s plenty of con- 
vective air movements such that 
air moves from the bottom of the 
containment to the top, then out. 

Batteries are rated on the basis 
of capacity (in ampere hour, Ah, 
capacity) and life cycle (the num- 
ber of times a battery can be dis- 
charged before failing). Capacity 
is directly related to discharge 
rate. For example, a battery rated 
at 100 amperes over 20 hours can 
deliver 5 amperes for 20 hours. 
The same battery will only deliver 
70 amperes, however, if it is dis- 
charged within five hours. The 



ance. Charging procedure is one. 
For example, if a battery is never 
allowed to be charged over its 
float voltage, two problems can 
occur. First, the electrolyte may 
stratify. The acid, being heavier 
than water, concentrates on the 
bottom, resulting in poor perfor- 
mance and increased suscepti- 
bility to freezing, Second, in a 
battery bank that has several bat- 
teries connected in series, one or 
more batteries may lose its capac- 
ity before the rest. This reduces 
the entire battery bank per- 
formance. 

Car Vs, Deep-Cycle Batteries 

Let's look at deep-cycle vs. 
starter batteries, A deep-cycle 
battery supplies a relatively low 
amount of current for a long dura- 
tion. Car batteries can supply a 
great deal of current for short peri- 
ods, and run down and recharge 
repeatedly with a minimum loss of 
capacity. **lf you want to run 
something, you select a deep-cy- 
cle battery; if you want to start 
something, get a car battery," 

Now for a harder look at deep- 
cycle batteries. Deep-cycle lead- 
acid batteries are constructed 
with several different types of 
plate and grid compositions, de- 
pending on use. The pure lead 



battery typically has a very long 
life, 25 years or more. This is the 
most common type used by the 
phone company today to provide 
back-up power. 

The second type of deep-cycle 
battery is the lead antimony. Lead 
antimony batteries have 2.5-4% 
antimony on their positive pfates. 
They are the most common type 
of deep-cycle battery on the mar^ 
ket. These batteries are designed 
to tolerate a deep discharge and 
have very good charge/discharge 
cycling capabilities. The antimony 
is, however, a real poison to the 
batteries. The lead antimony bat- 
tery often requires an overvoltage 
charge during the charge cycle to 
assure that all of the batteries in 
the bank recharge to the same 
level. This is called equalizing the 
batteries. The lead antimony bat- 
tery has a much higher seff-dis- 
charge rate. As the battery ages, 
the self-discharge rate increases. 
The battery will also produce 
more gassing than others. Even 
with all this going against the lead- 
antimony battery, it's a solid per- 
former! 

The lead-calcium battery, as 
the name implies, contains lead 
afloyed with calcium. The lead- 
calcium batteries, which have 
about the same output and Ah rat- 
ing as the lead-antimony batter* 
ies. usually do not require an 
equalizing charge, and they are 
less prone to self-discharge, typi- 
cally less than 1 to 4% per month 
at room temperatures. They 
also produce less gassing when 
charged. 

They have several disadvan- 
tages, however. Principally, they 
are limited in the number of deep 
discharges. Further, lead-calcium 
batteries are "maintenance free f ' 
batteries and are most often 
sealed. This stops you from taking 
the preferred specific gravity 
readings with a hydrometer Final- 
ly, they are expensive. 

The jury is still out on which type 
to use in a stand-alone PV system, 
I opt for the fead-antimony units. 
For ease of maintenance, others 
prefer the lead-calcium batteries. 

Look to next month's column 
for a continuing discussion of bat- 
teries. 

Before 1 Go - . . 

Im on the lookout for more 
mods for the for the Heath HW 
series of radios: the HW-7, H W-B, 
and the new HW-9, I'll be re- 
printing the HW-6 Handbook 
sometime in early 1989* In clos- 
ing, when you turn it on, turn if 
down! 



7$ Amateur Radio * December, 1988 71 



Ask 



Number 24 on your Feedback card 



KABOOM 



Michael Jay Geter KB 1 UM 

7 Simpson Court 

So. Burlington, VT 05403 

Welcome to "Ask Kaboom.' T 
This column will dispense advice 
regarding the adjustment and re- 
pai r of your rigs, with emphasis on 
modern solid-state gear. Many 
problems can be fixed right in your 
shack, saving you time and mon- 
ey, and fulfilling a basic purpose 
of amateur radio: the mainte- 
nance and advancement of tech- 
nical skills. Besides, doesn't it feel 
great to use the old noodle instead 
of the old wallet? 

Have you ever noticed when lis- 
tening to a SSB QSO on HF that 
no two stations seem to be on the 
same frequency? They always ap- 
pear to be 30 or 40 Hz offset from 
each other. It's especially frustrat- 
ing in roundtable situations; you 
have to twiddle your RfT constant- 
ly. In the analog days, that was 
understandable, because VFGs 
weren't all that stable, and dials 
were neither accurate nor precise, 
In addition, many rigs had internal 
controls to set the transmitter and 
receiver to the same frequency, 
and these settings drifted over 
time. 

With today's frequency-synthe- 
sized rigs, there is just no excuse 
for being more than a few Hz off 
frequency at any time, Yet T many 
stations continue to have this 
problem, due to a simple lack of 
calibration. In my experience, 
Japanese gear is often badly 
aligned at the factory! The prob- 
lem is compounded by the fact 
that the crystal whtch serve as 
the reference for the frequency 
synthesizer, drift, both with aging 
and temperature. So you can't 
assume that, just because you 
have a digital-synthesized radio, it 
is dead on frequency. 

Invariably, there Is a trimmer 
capacitor in the master reference 
oscillator which you can set to cor- 
rect the error. In some rigs, like 
the Kenwood TS-94QS, it can be 
accessed from the outside. In oth- 
ers, you will have to remove the 
covers to get at it. The big problem 
with thfs adjustment is that the 
manufacturers' instructions, if 
there are any at all, are so confus- 
ing that most folks can't tefl when 
the rig is correctly adjusted. 

Here is a simple method that 
will get you right on the money, 



The Tech Answer Man 

with absolutely no test equipment, 
it is done best with a plastic tool 
(such as one found in Radio 
Shack's TV tool set f catalog num- 
ber 64-2220, which sells for 
$2.99), but can even be done with 
a small screwdriver, as long as it 
has a plastic handle. 

First, let the radio warm up for a 
good half-hour. While the rig 
cooks, get the owner's manual 
and find out where the master ref- 
erence adjustment Is, If there's no 
mention in the book, then look at 
the schematic and try to find it. 
Failing that, call up a ham store or 
the manufacturer and ask. The 
phone call is a lot cheaper than 
the shipping charges. 

If you have to remove the cov- 
ers, do so now, after disconnect- 
ing power and antenna from the 
rig, Find the adjustment and then 
reconnect the power and antenna 
and let the rig warm up for a few 
more minutes. Now comes the 
secret; tune in WWV on 5, 10, or 
15 MHz. If 20 meters is open, 15 
MHz is probably your best bet, but 
any of them wi II do. If you have 1 
Hz readout on your display, be 
sure the last two digits are set to 
"OO." If you only have 100 Hz 
readout, then you can't know pre- 
cisely where you are, and can 
make things worse by adjusting 
the frequency to "15.000.00" 
when the rig is really set to 
^15.000,07." There is, however, 
an easy way out of this mess. The 
mikes that come with nearly alt 
digital rigs have "up" and 
"down" buttons. Set the rig to 
"14,999.9" and then click the 
"up" button repeatedly until the 
display changes to "1 5.000.0. " 
Now you are really set to 
"15.000.00" and ready to go. 

You must wait until WWV is 
sending tones, rather than clicks. 
Place the rig in USB and listen to 
the tone. Now switch to LSB, If the 
pitch of the tone stays exactly the 
same, then your rig is dead on 
frequency. If it changes, then you 
must adjust your trimmer, If you 
are really tone-deaf, get someone 
else to listen for you. (A note to 
JCOM owners: Many of their rigs 
shift the frequency display when 
you change from USB to LSB. It is 
tedious, but you will have to go 
through the whole mike clicking 
thing to reset the display every 
time you switch modes.) 

Slowly turn the trimmer just a 



little bit. Now, switch modes 
again. If the difference in pitch 
gets worse, then you turned it the 
wrong way. Go the other way and 
try again. Keep adjusting (slowly!) 
and changing modes until the 
tones are exactly the same pitch, 
Your rig is now precisely on fre- 
quency. 

If you are using a metallic tool, 
you may find that the frequency 
shifts a little when you remove the 
tool from the trimmer. In that case, 
pull the tool away before checking 
the tones. This makes things 
harder, but the results will be the 
same. Be careful not to short any- 
thing with the metal in the tool! 

When you T re satisfied with the 
adjustment, shut off the rig, dis- 
connect the power and antenna 
and close it all up. Voila!— no 
more complaints of "you're too 
high.OM." 

As the radio ages, it may shift 
frequency slightly, you should do 
this procedure again if you are as 
picky as I am. I touch up my '940 
about every six months, 

Oh yeah, one caveat, there are 
other crystal oscillators (besides 
the master one we have just ad- 
justed) and they, too, can drift off. 
If the rig seems REALLY far off, 
and one sideband sounds MUCH 
more muffled than the other, your 
radio may need more alignment 
than this, and probably should be 
seen by the service shop. 

Now that we're all on frequen- 
cy, let's look at some letters. 

Dear Kaboom, 

I wired up a favorite mike for my 
Kenwood TS-440. if works, but t 
get terrible RF feedback. This 
doesn't happen when I use the 
stock mike. What gives? 

Signed, 
Whattdldo 

DearWhattd I do. 

When wiring the mike, you may 
have noticed that there were two 
grounds on the connector. Yes, 
they both go to the radio's ground, 
but there is an important differ- 
ence between them. Pin 7, the 
'mike gnd," goes directly to the 
mike preamp circuit, and is the 
internal cable's shield. Pin 8, the 
"stby (standby) gnd/' is the rig's 
general ground. It is done this way 
to avoid RF ground loops, which 
can cause the feedback problem 
you have. The shield on the mike 
cable should go to pin 7 and the 
PTT switch's ground to pin 8. 
Even if you have wired them sepa- 
rately, you may find that they are 
connected inside the mike! Open 
it up and separate them, 



DearKaboom, 

I use a 20-amp DC supply with 
an ICOM IC-28A mobile rig for a 
base station. Sometimes, there's 
a hum on my transmitted signal 
and other times, it's not there. 
Tests of the supply show no ripple 
at the output. Where the heck is 
that hum coming from? 

Signed, 
Hummin' Away 

Dear Hummin 1 Away, 

Sounds like RF is getting into 
the DC leads coming out of the 
supply. Check your antenna SWR 
and also make sure your antenna 
is not real close to the rig or sup- 
ply. Never plop a mobile antenna 
on top of the supply, The RF is 
high enough in frequency to get 
past the filter caps and into the 
regulator, where It can mix with 
AC hum in mysterious ways and 
cause trouble. Try putting a .01 uF 
cap across the DC lines right at 
the supply. Also, keep the DC 
cord short, or try coiling it or wrap- 
ping it through a large toroid. Fi- 
nally, try the same toroid trick for 
the AC cord. 

Dear Kaboom, 

My Yaesu FT-757GX has been 
in for repair twice now. Each time, 
the FM quit and then the whofe rig 
wouldn't TXorRX. Now t it's doing 
it again. What should I do? 

Signed, 
Love it but Hate it 

Dear Love it but Hate it, 

This is a common problem in 
"757s which were made two to 
three years ago. The cause is bad 
switching diodes. The radio uses 
lots of diodes, rather than a relay, 
to switch between TX and RX. It's 
a good idea, but there was a ru n of 
bad diodes a few years back. They 
get leaky and allow voltage to the 
wrong circuits at the wrong times, 
causing the radio to try to TX and 
RX at the same time! Thfe result is 
a blown transistor in the FM 
squelch circuit and a dead-acting 
rig. Sometimes, some tiny coils al- 
so get blown. This is a compact rig 
and not easy to work on. Also, 
they are special low-noise diodes 
and should be replaced with the 
same type. Unless you're really 
skilled, youYe better off sending 
this one to Yaesu. 

Finis 

That's it for this month, Next 
month's topic: Troubleshooting, 
the art of finding what does work, 
not what doesn't! 



72 73 Amateur Radio * December, 1988 



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74 73 Amateur Radio * December, 1988 



Number 25 on your Feedback card 




BOVE AND BEYOND 



Pete Putman KT2B 
3353 Fiefdstone Drive 
Doyfestown, PA 1S901 

NY and Ontario 

Grid-peditioning 

I don't know how these things 
get started , . , Sometimes you get 
an inspiration, sometimes just a 
cockeyed notion. Like trying to 
combine a long weekend with 
some grid-hopping. Like driving 
almost 1 000 miles in 4 days via the 
"scenic route" for the privilege 
of standing in a downpour with 60 
pounds of equipment on your 
back. Or running back and forth 
through Canadian and US Cus- 
toms via inconvenient ferry trips 
to work a couple of stations on 
903 MHz. 

This was to be nothing more 
than a short jaunt up through New 
York state to the St, Lawrence 
River, where I'd board a ferry- 
boat to Wolfe island. Ontario. 
Once there, Id spend a leisure- 
ly weekend helping my family 
close up their summer home for 
the season. . get a little swim- 
ming and boating in. , maybe a 
little fishing. , .maybe throw 
some 903 gear in the car and try 
operating from the back yard . . . 
no, make that the ferry slip at the 
southern end of the island. . . 
better take some 1296 gear along 
as well . . . maybe even something 
for 2304 not to mention a 2 me- 
ter liaison station, 

WeN, things got quickly out of 
hand (as usual) and I found myself 
speeding north on the Pennsylva- 
nia Turnpike on Thursday morn- 
ing. August 25 with the Honda 
completely stuffed to the gtlls with 



VHFand UHF Operation 

camping and radio gear Three 
loop yagis and 15 feet of antenna 
mast were fastened to the roof 
carrier, and I left behind more than 
a few very interested operators 
who would attempt to contact me 
in three different grids over the 
weekend* 

I had decided to spend that 
evening at my aunt's house in 
Goose Bay. NY, , Just a few 
miles northeast of the dividing line 
between grids FN 14 and FN24, 
Both are fairly quiet on the mi- 
crowave bands, with most opera- 
tion limited to grid-peditions. The 
plan was to drive to a suitable high 
spot after dinner and activate 
FN24 for a few hours on 903, 
1296, and 2304, using 144.150 
MHz as a coordinating frequency, 

To that end. I packed the Yaesu 
FT-290R and a Microwave Mod- 
ules MML-200S amplifier along 
with a Tonna nine element 
portable yagi to make sure I'd be 
heard, The Yaesu also served as 
the IF stage for the microwave 
equipment: An SSB LT-33S run- 
ning barefoot with 20 watts on 
903.100; SSB LT-23S and 
DownEast Microwave 2335PA 
running 30 watts on 1296.100, 
and a homebrew transmitter/re- 
ceive converter running eight 
watts concocted by Ron Whitsel 
WA3AXV. The antennas were 
half-sized loopers designed by Bill 
Olson W3HQT, with 19 elements 
on 903 r and 25 elements on 1296, 
Only the 2304 looper was full- 
sized at 45 elements. 

The forecast caHed for clear 
skies and no precipitation through 
the weekend, so (of course) a 
good-sized thunderstorm showed 




up about 6 PM Thursday and 
washed out my carefully-laid 
plans. A quick call to Dave 
Hackford N3CX allowed me to 
re-schedure for early Friday morn- 
ing, and I spent the better part 
of the evening assembling the 
stacking frame for the yagis as 
well as packing the car. 

Station Setup 

After dragging myself out of bed 
at 5 AM. the three stations were 
wired up on the passenger seat. A 
terminal strip was plugged into the 
main battery connector and I 
brought out 13.8 VOC lines to the 
twotransverters and the amplifier. 
The Yaesu was fitted with the 
YBA-8 battery case, allowing a 
maximum of three watts output — 
suitable to drive the transverters 
or the MML amplifier to 150 watts 
output. An interconnected se- 
quencing box made sure all the 
relays fired at the right lime. The 
only trouble was keying it with a 
footswrtch held in my hand! 

The entire station managed to 
travel about 20 miles down Route 
26 to the small village of Pamelia 
Four Corners, NY without crash- 
mg to the floor. . quite an 
achievement in itself. After arriv- 
ing at the chosen location— a 
500+ foot rise along a lonely rural 
road— I set about erecting the 
mast sections and microwave an* 
tennas just in front of the Honda, 
using the bumpers as two of the 
guy anchors. This was made nec- 
essary by the soil adjacent to the 
road, which was very ioose and 
sandy. 

Despite all of the time I spent 
setting up the night before, things 
took longer than expected and I 
was unable to get a signal out on 
two meters until almost 7:15 AM, 
Considering it was a weekday 
morning and I was several hun- 
dred miles removed from my 



target audience, I didn't expect 
much activity on the liaison fre- 
quency. But lo and behold, there 
was Dave Halfiday KD5RO in 
Pittstown. NY (near Rochester). 
all tuned up and ready to roll. 
Someone actually believed Td 
make it on the air. . .will wonders 
never cease? 

Dave's two meter signal wasn't 
too encouraging until he men- 
tioned that hts hardline was full of 
water. Seen in that light, his signal 
strength was amazing! We quickly 
QSYed to 903 T working a path 
across Lake Ontario of about 100 
miles with 599 reports either way. 
Dave suggested moving directly 
to 2304 MHz to take advantage of 
some nice tropo enhancement 
over the lake, ft was a good call, as 
his 13 cm signals were just as 
strong as those on 903, hitting S-9 
on peaks and never dropping be- 
low S-3. Our 1296 QSO was anti- 
climactic, as we both enjoyed 
armchair copy (well, bucket seat 
copy for me). 

Wayne King N2WK was raised 
at work and got on the air a little 
after 9 AM, when we quickly ex- 
changed reports on 903 and 1296. 
Were we having fun yet? You bet. 
so as you might expect a squall 
line quickly blew up over the lake 
and headed in my direction, with 
40 mph wind gusts straining 
against the */*" diameter guy 
ropes. The 2304 attempt was 
brought to a sudden halt when the 
microwave array became air- 
borne and landed ten feet away in 
the ditch. So much for FN24. 
SCORE: five contacts on three 
bands, four bent elements, and 
one ruined piece of coax. 

North Of The Border 

After fussing with the Canadian 
Customs and Immigration service 
and one wild ride across the St. 

Lawrence on the Kingston ferry T I 




Photo A. The Honda Civic 1 s front seat set up for 903. 1296, and 2304 
MHz operation. 



Photo B The portable antenna array, with 19 elements on 903, 25 on 
1296 and, 45 on 2304. Lots of gain in a small area. 



73 Amateur Radio • December, 1988 75 



arrived on Wolfe Island and imme- 
diately scouted out five potential 
locations lor that evening. In 
keeping with the general trend, 
none proved suitable. It was the 
ferry slip or nothing! 

The work at the house went fair- 
ly quickly, so I was able to spend 
some time repairing the loop yagis 
and reconfiguring all the equip- 
ment for Friday night. The two 12 
voft gell cells needed to run the 
2304 station were difficult to fas- 
ten down. The object was to keep 
the power run short, so everything 
wound up carefully stacked and 
balanced against the door and the 
seat. One sudden stop and 
CRASH!!! No more equipment! 

Friday's blustery weather finally 
died down about 8 PM, so I bid 
adieu to the clan and drove for 
about 25 minutes to the Cape Vin- 
cent ferry slip. Unlike the Kingston 
ferry, this service stops after 7:30 
PM and the area is relatively 
deserted at night (albeit well-lit). 
Three huge tires served as excel- 
lent guy anchors, and within a 
half-hour I was up and running 
again on 144.150 from FN14. 

Contact was immediately made 
with K2SMN and K20WR in New 
Jersey, and I was informed that 
quite a few stations were ready to 
take a shot on 903. Unfortunately, 
the excellent tropo conditions of 
Friday morning were nowhere to 
be found, which I assume was the 
price paid to Mother Nature for 
having such a beautifully calm 
and clear night! Both N3CX and 
K2SMN did report hearing my 
CQs on 903, although I was un- 
able to detect anything coming 
back the other way. 

Wayne IM2WK was once again 
on with a potent signal, so we ran 
on 903 and 1296 with Tom Mott 
W2DRZ in Jamestown, NY 
tailending both times. Wayne's 
big thrill came when I finally heard 
his 2304 signal after about 1 5 min- 
utes of back and forth CQs, giving 
him a new grid and me a head- 
ache from having the receiver vol- 
ume up all the way! Shortly there- 
after, KD5RO popped up and we 
quickly fired off QSOs on 903 5 
1296 and 2304. . .again, arm- 
chair copy each time. After a few 
more tries with K2SMN, I pulled 
the plug on FN14 at 1 AM. 
SCORE: ten contacts on four 
bands. 

On The Last Leg(s) 

All of the previous weather con- 
ditions did nothing to prepare me 
for the third and final leg of the trip 
up Cathead Mountain in the lower 
Adirondacks, I'd been up there 



during the August ARRL UHF 
Contest, operating 432 and 903 
with splendid results, but this time 
things were going to be a bit 
rougher. 

I proceeded serenely along to 
my tent site at Northampton 
Beach State Campground, as- 
sured by the ranger that no rain 
was in the immediate forecast. 
The backpack was loaded up and 
the antennas broken down for the 
climb next morning. The pack was 
quite a bit heavier than I had 
planned, tipping the scales at well 
over 50 pounds! This was largely 
due to the two gell cells which 
made up 16 pounds of the total 
weight. . .a necessary evil. 

Six hours of driving and packing 
made nodding off easy at 10 PM. 
Thirty minutes later, I was jolted 
awake by a tremendous thunder- 
storm and torrential rains. It 
continued to rain off and on all 
night long, and a heavy fog had 
settled around the campsite as 
the alarm went off at 5:30 AM. It 
didn't took any better at the base 
of the trail an hour later. To scrub 
or not to scrub. . .that was the 
question. Well, the temperature 
was comfortable. . J had plenty 
of bug repellent . everything 
was packed up as tight as possi- 
ble, , .what the heck! 

One of the quaint features of the 
Cathead trail is that it does double 
duty as a stream-bed after heavy 
rains. This and the extra ten 
pounds of stuff on my back com- 
bined to extend the climb to nearly 
one hour and 45 minutes, after 
which I reached the top of the 
mountain and was promptly 
soaked in a downpour. To make 
things worse, there are no shel- 
tered areas on the mountain to op- 
erate from, so my choices were 
simple: (1) Give up and retreat or 
(2) Wait it out at the ranger cabin 
1 00 feet down from the top. 

Option two gave me a chance to 
dry out (slightly) while looki ng for a 
glimmer of sunshine. After 45 min- 
utes without rain, the ranger 
solemnly informed me that the 
forecast called for thunderstorms 
the rest of the day. Weighing his 
advice carefully and considering 
my soaked condition, I made the 
only logical decision: Go back up 
to the top and get on the air from 
FN23! 

This was the fastest I've ever 
set up on a mountaintop, with all 
four bands fully operational within 
20 minutes. Although things got 
off nearly an hour late, the faithful 
listeners were quickly raised, and 
I banged out four 1296 contacts 
with WA2TEO, N3CX, K2JWE, 




Photo C. Mast support plate and guy fines. The Honda makes a good 
anchor point! 



i\ 

f w 







Photo D. Last year's modest setup will be repfaced by three separate 
towers plus lots of aluminum! 



and K2SMN. N2FRB and 
KA2CKV in FN30 were worked on 
two meters for their first FN23 con- 
tacts. A sked with W3IP in Balti- 
more didn't pan out (although I did 
hear his signals), so it was back to 
1296 for a QSO with Bill K20WR. 
N3CX ran with me on 2304 and 
copied a little bit of CW, but the 
on-and-off cloud cover wasn't 
making things any easier. 

Finally, KD5RO showed up to 
try for the 13 cm hat trick. We 
quickly made contact on 1296 
for another new grid but the 
path looked pretty bad, as copy 
was rough on both sides. No 
armchairs this time! To make mat- 
ters worse, the batteries were 
running down, causing instability 
problems with the 903 station. 
And — you guessed it — thunder 
was now heard to the northwest. 
Despite the odds, Dave and I 
finally hooked up after about ten 
minutes, giving him three new 



grids on 2304 in three days! I 
signed off with K2SMN and 
crammed everything into the 
pack, making a quick getaway 
down the mountain about 1 PM. 
SCORE: nine contacts on three 
bands, two dead batteries, three 
banged up loop yagis, and a nice 
head cold. 

The grand total for the weekend 
was 23 contacts. Not quite as 
many as I'd hoped for, but given 
the cards I had to play with, 
I'll take'em. The cold will go 
away soon, and Til get over that 
sore shoulder eventually. The 
loopers can easily be repaired 
as can the nine element Tonna 
for two meters, AH the sand I 
brought back in my shoes will 
end up in Ross' sandbox. Most 
importantly, the memories — good 
and bad— will last a long time. And 
maybe-just maybe— it'll be a little 
easier next time I go. , -Above 
and Beyond, 



76 73 Amateur Radio * December, 1988 




Number 26 on your Feedback card 



Chad Harris VP2ML 

POBqx48$1 

Santa Rosa. CA 95402 

The4J1FSM-V 
Island DXpedition 

In early July, 1988, a team of 
three Finnish and three Soviet 
amateurs operated 4J1FS from 
the tiny island of Malyj Vystoskij. 
in the Bay of Vyborg- The one- 
mile-long island lies about 75 
miles northwest of Leningrad, and 
only 25 miles from the border be- 
tween Finland and the Soviet 
Union. 

The unique DXpedition started 
as the Finns drove their van, heav- 
ily laden with a tower, antenna, 
rig, amplifier, generators, and 
lots of gear, down the roadway 
bordering the Saimaa Canal, 
surrounded by Soviet terri- 
tory, to the last lock of the ca- 
nal, on the Bay of Vyborg, at 
the eastern end of the Gulf of 
Finland, John Ahlbom OH5NZ. 
Pertii Turunen OH2RF, and Martti 
Laine OH2BH made up the 
Finnish half of the joint east*west 
DXpedition, Their gear totaled 
800 pounds, and included tables 
and chairs, as well as drinking wa- 
ter, food, tents, and even a bag of 
toilet paper! 

Off To The Island 

On July 7, 1966, the three 
DXpeditioners loaded their gear 
onto the 50-foot motorboat Veera, 
for the short ride from the lock 
to Malyj Vystoskij. The boat 
stopped at a Soviet Coast Guard 
station to pick up the Soviet half 
of the joint DXpedition: Enn Lohk 
UR2AR. Boris Stepanov UW3AX, 
and Gene Shulgin UZ3AU, The 
bare-chested Finns (it does get 
hot in Finland in July!}, showed 
their papers to the guards at 
the Coast Guard station, and 
then all six sailed the short dis- 
tance across the bay to Malyj Vys- 
toskij. 

The crew quickly unloaded 
their gear and started to set up the 
tower, antenna, and gear. Their 
operating permission restricted 
them to a single rig. so they decid- 
ed to concentrate on 20 meters. A 
40-foot aluminum tower was 
capped with a KLM KT-34A, A 
Kenwood TS-940 and TL-922 pro- 
vided the 4J1FS signal. They 
gassed and tested the 3 fcW Hon- 



Hams Around the World 

da generator, and all was ready 
for the opening gun, at local mid- 
night. 

Operating 

The gang concentrated on 
SSB. and made about 70% of 
the total 14 t 800 QSOs on that 
mode. About 5,000 contacts were 
made with US amateurs, and 
another 5 t 000 with Europeans 
They were even successful 
in working 2,500 Japanese DX- 
ers over the difficult polar path. 
Excellent propagation prevailed 
for the entire operation, to the 
great pleasure of the DXpedi- 
tioners. 

They were allowed to operate 
only for 96 hours. Jusf before 
shutting down, UW3AX and 
UZ3AU carved a center insulator 
of scrap wood, and improvised 



a reloading port and storage fa- 
cilities on M-V Island, but the 
plans were never carried out. 
The civilian population of the is- 
land left in World War II, and the 
island has since remained unin- 
habited. 

The Saimaa Canal, and M-V 
Island, are administrated by the 
Saimaa Canal Authority (SCA), 
which is composed of commis- 
sioners appointed by both Fin- 
land and the Soviet Union. To get 
permission to operate from the 
island, the DXpedition team had 
to secure not only the permis- 
sion of the SCA to land on and 
operate amateur radio from the 
island, but also permission from 
the USSR to cross the interven- 
ing territory, which swarms with 
military activity. The complexi- 
ties of getting all proper papers, 
and the need for discussions 
at the highest levels of govern- 
ment in both the USSR and 
Finland, prevented easy access 
to the island. In fact, the Finns 
worked on obtaining such per* 



"The gang 

concentrated on SSB, 

and made about 70 % 

of the total 14,800 QSOs 

on that mode/' 



a low-band antenna for a few 
contacts. On July 12, they low- 
ered the tower and antenna, 
packed up their gear, and took 
the short boat ride back to their 
respective countries. The first- 
ever joint east- west pure DX- 
pedition drew to a successful 
close. 

History of Malyj Vystoskij 

Malyj Vystoskij lies near 
the mouth of the Saimaa Canal. 
The canal was first constructed 
in 1856 to provide access 
for ocean-going vessels to the 
lake region of southeastern 
Finland, During World War II, 
the Soviet Union annexed that 
portion of Finland, incorporating 
the canal and Vyborg Bay into 
the Soviet Union, In 1962, the 
Soviets agreed to lease back 
to Finland that part of the canal 
that ran through the now-Soviet 
territory, Malyj Vystoskij Island 
was part of that 50-year lease. 
The Finns intended to set up 



mission for about 20 years! 

In the 1960s, Finnish amateurs 
felt that the island would qualify 
as a new DXCC "country" under 
the "separation by foreign land" 
provision in the DXCC country 
criteria. The island is essentially 
surrounded by Soviet territory, 
and thus met Point 3 of the DXCC 
country criteria in 1970. 

The ARRL Awards Committee 
agreed with the Finns, and then- 
DXCC administrator 8ob White 
W1CW wrote a letter to the Finns 
saying that the island would 
be added to the DXCC list 'at 
such time as operation takes 
place." There the matter sat for 
almost 13 years, until the 4J1FS 
DXpedition. 

DXCC Questions 

Will Malyj Vystoskij count as a 
new one for DXCC? The situation 
has raised many questions, ques- 
tions that must be answered be* 
fore the DXAC can make a de- 
cision. 



The first question, and per- 
haps the most basic, ts whether 
the island can be immediately 
added to the DXCC list on the ba- 
sis of the 18-year-old letter from 
W1CW? The Finns feel that they 
have a firm commitment from the 
ARRL that Malyj Vystoskij would 
be added to the DXCC list "at 
such time as operation takes 
place M from the island. There are 
no conditions nor time limit im- 
posed. 

The ARRL however, elected to 
treat M-V island as a new applica- 
tion for separate country status, 
and referred the matter to the DX 
Advisory Committee for evalu- 
ation. 

This raises two more questions: 
Should the application be evaluat- 
ed under the DXCC guidelines 
that prevailed in 1970 or should 
the new DXCC rules, adopted 
by the ARRL Board in January, 
1986, be used instead? If the 
latter, does Malyj Vystoskij count 
as one of two islands, or must 
the more stringent 75-mile sepa- 
ration limit be used? (M-V is only 
25 miles from Finland, and would 
not count as a separate country 
under new Point 3(a).) So which 
rule applies, continent land 
mass— Point 3(a), or Islands- 
Point 3(b)? 

The use of the 4J1FS callsign 
confused many DXers. If Malyj 
Vystoskij island is actually Finnish 
territory, why did the DXpedi- 
tioners use a Soviet 4J callsign? 
They argue that the SCA does 
not have its own International 
Telecommunications Union (ITU) 
callsign allocation, and thus any 
callsign can be used, as in the 
case of Spratly or Abu Ail. Discus- 
sions with the Russian Radio 
Sport Federation (RSF) led to 
the issuance of the 4J1FS call, 
symbolizing the first joint Finnish- 
Soviet DXpedition. The RSF only 
provided a distinctive callsign. 
not a license. SCA licensed the 
operation. 

Further evidence that the island 
is indeed under Finnish and 
not Soviet jurisdiction is that 
the Finnish members of the team 
did not have Soviet visas, normal- 
ly needed by Finnish visitors 
to Soviet territory- Their passes 
were issued by the SCA t not the 
USSR. 

The DXAC has a great many 
questions to resolve over the DX- 
CC status of Malyj Vystoskij, but 
regardless of their determination, 
the 4J1FS was a splendid exam- 
ple of east-west cooperation, per- 
sistence, and planning. Congratu- 
lations to all involved! 



73 Amateur Radio * December. 1988 77 



— 



Number 27 on your Feedback card 



73 Review 



by Larry L. Ledlow f Jr. NASE 



Barker and Williamson 

PT-2500A HF Amplifier 

Speak softly and carry a big signal 



P~ art 97 states that 
amateurs should 
use the minimum 
amount of power nec- 
essary to carry on a 
contact. Often it's 10 
watts, sometimes 100. 
There are those times, 
however, when that ex- 
tra few tfB make all the 
difference, especially in 
contests and DX pile* 
ups. These situations 
demand both craft and 
a solid kilowatt, For the 
latter, Barker arid Wil- 
liamson has just the lin- 
ear you need: the PT-2500A 1 + 5 kW amplifier 

Sensible, Mature Design 

In one relatively small, 80-pound package, 
B&W has produced a superb Class AB2 linear 
amplifier rated for continuous duty at 1500 
watts output. It will run happily and quietly for 
extended periods In SSB P AM. CW. ATV, and 
RTTY. The PT-2S00A offers excellent per- 
formance for any mode or style of operation. 

The PT-2500A uses two Eirnac 3-50OZ zero- 
bias triodes, real tried and true workhorses in 
many HF amp designs, In fact, the PT-25QOA 
uses a sensible, mature design all around. As 
a Class AB linear amplifier, it produces very 
little intermodulation distortion, -33 dB ac- 
cording to the specifications. Typical plate 
efficiency for such an amplifier is 60-65 per- 
cent, and the PT^2500 v s manual guarantees a 
minimum of 60 percent on all HF bands. This 
amplifier requires a 100-125 watt drive for full 
output power. Most contemporary HF rigs can 
supply at least 100 watts of drive. 

Circuit Superiority and Plenty of Power 

Each band uses a separate pi-network for 
its input circuit. These are superior to L-net- 
works, since they attenuate harmonics more 
effectively, and match somewhat greater 
impedance variations. Accurate matching on 
the input is essential, especially using a solid- 
state transceiver as a driver, Further, although 

78 73 Amateur Radio * December, 1988 




Barker and Williamson 
Bristol PA 19007 
(215)7&8-5581 
Price: $21 75 



er supply worthy of a 
continuous-duty ampli- 
fier. It uses a main 
transformer rated at 
1 300 VA, a separate fil- 
ament transformer, as 
well as ''computer 
grade" ' filter capacitors. 
Although B&W recom- 
mends 230 VAC prima- 
ry power, the unit will 
run from 1 1 5 VAC if 25- 
30 ampere service is 
available. 

Assembling 
the PT-2500A 



two Eirnac 3-5002s in parallel operating at 3 
kV (in a grounded-grid design) have an input 
impedance just over 55Q, circuit Q must be 
maintained. 

The output circuit is a pi-L design using a 
235 pF, 6 kV variable tuning capacitor and a 
heavy-duty, silver plated 7 kV rotary inductor, 
which allows impedance matching over an 
even greater range than the simpler pi- and 
L-net works. Pi-L circuits attenuate harmonics 
better than the other networks, typically -50 
to -55 dB with circuit Q in the 10-15 range. 
The PT-2500A specification calls for 50 dB 
minimum suppression of harmonics, easily 
meeting FCC requirements. (Part 97.73 speci- 
fies no spurious emission shall exceed -40 
dB below the fundamental or 50 mW. Assum- 
ing a mean carrier power of 1500 watts, 50 
mW is -44.8 d6c.) 

Since the PT-2500A uses a grounded-grid 
(cathode-driven) design, it is well suited for HF 
linear operations. Actually, grounded-grid am- 
plifiers require higher drive levels than, say, 
gnd-driven circuits. Also, the design must 
precisely maintain circuit O. or waveform dis- 
tortion occurs. The Pi-L output circuit compo- 
nents assure constant Q, and so help 
minimize intermodulation products. 

A chain is only as strong as its weakest 
link, and in many amplifiers, the power supply 
is given less attention than the rest of the 
circuit. (Slot so here. B&W has designed a pow- 



When the UPS man finally delivers the three 
boxes comprising the PT-2500A main compo- 
nents, you won't spend the rest of the week 
fiddling with cables or soldering. Unpacking 
and component integration take an hour or 
two, depending on your familiarity with com- 
ponents. Proceed slowly and carefully, in any 
case. 

The 3-500Z tubes, the main chassis, and 
the 40-pound power supply transformer are 
packed and shipped separately. Aside from 
the usual paperwork, you get two control ca- 
bles, an AC power cord, two tube chimneys 
and plate cap heat sinks, three extra fuses, 
and a 7/1 6" T- wrench. 

Transformer installation is the most tedious 
exercise, but requires only a screw driver and 
the T-wrencrv After opening the main unit's 
cover, the power supply filter bank is removed 
(three screws). Then the transformer is care- 
fully positioned over three \k* threaded 
mounting studs that protrude upward from the 
chassis bottom. The T-wrench screws V*" 
nuts to the studs, thereby securing the trans- 
former in place, A wiring terminal block then 
attaches to the top of the transformer, and six 
transformer primary leads and plate harness 
leads are attached to the block. Several other 
leads and jumpers are connected before in- 
stalling the power tubes. 

Despite their power-handling ability, the 3- 
500Zs are still mechanically fragile. It's worth 



the extra few minutes to carefully inspect each 
tube and chimney for possible damage. A 
magnifying glass can help highlight small 
cracks, (Report damage to the carrier.) 

The tubes drop relatively easily into place. 
Do not twist the glass tube envelopes! They 
will break. Also, be careful not to bend or 
break the base pins. Even moderate lateral 
force can damage the tubes, Assuming the 
tubes are undamaged at this point, the glass 
chimneys mount concentrically around them. 
The plate heat sinks then screw atop the 
tubes, and the sinks in turn accept a screw 
connection from the parasitic chokes. Voilai 
An amplifier almost ready for action. 



flip of the mam power switch, and I got quite a 
surprise when my PT-2500A came to life: It 
was quiet! I could actually carry on a whisper- 
ing conversation without an obtrusive whirring 
from the 60 cfm squirrel cage fan. GRM on the 
band is bad enough, but hours into a contest I 
have found myself hating unnecessary noise 
in the shack. What a nice surprise, indeed, to 
find the PT-2500A MUCH quieter than the old 
Alpha 340 I had come to despise. 

The second moment of truth comes with the 
application of RF to the input for initial tune* 
up, No problem here, and tune-up is very sim- 
ple. Fortunately, the PT-2500A does not 
require a warm-up period. The green operate 



"The first moment 

of truth is always the initial flip 

of the main power switch, and / got 

quite a surprise when my PT-250QA 

came to life . . . " 



Don't even think about plugging in the AC 
power cord until the cover is secure again. 
The PT-2500A has micros witches closed by 
proper cover seating, and only then will main 
power be available. Good safety practice, 
however, insists on no AC connections until 
the cover is screwed back on. Remember, this 
1$ a high-voltage device, not a solid-state 
transceiver with CMOS circuitry and TTL 
voltage levels. Treat the amplifier with the ut- 
most respect and with safety in mind. 

After the RF input, connect the antenna re- 
lay (key down) and ALC cables between your 
transceiver and the amplifier, and attach a 
properly resonant antenna (SWR less than 
2:1, and preferably less than 1 .5:1) or a dum- 
my load to the BF output connector. Use the 
latter while becoming famifiar with control set- 
tings and tuning, 

Dream Shack Operation 

The controls and meters are surprisingly 
simple to understand, and the instruction 
manual clearly explains each function. 
Review the manual BEFORE turning the pow- 
er on. 

The large vernier knobs on the amp's left 
face control load and tune settings for adjust* 
ing the output impedance to the load, and 
tuning the variable RF capacitor, respectively. 
The scales are 0-1 00 1 which make accurate 
recording of settings very easy. The knobs' 
actions are very smooth, though with re- 
spectable resistance to prevent inadvertent 
movement. The six-position bandswitch— 
yes t it only has five markings — selects the 
band of operation: 160 T 80, 40. 30, 20, 17, 15, 
and (with modification) 10 meters. 

Two white rocker switches below the meters 
select SSB/CW/RTTY modes and operate/ 
standby. The multi-function meters show 
plate voltage and grid current, as well as for* 
ward and reflected power. 

The first moment of truth is always the initial 



lamp lights when the stamdby switch is flipped 
to operate With no input, a quick check of the 
plate current should show 40 mA and 100 mA 
in RTTY and SSB modes, respectively, A 
quick adjustment of the exdter drive so the 
grid current is 90 mA (CW mode) followed by 
alternating tune and load adjustments, will 
resonate the amplifier. 

After several more checks to make sure the 
currents and voltages are within specs, the 
PT-2500A is ready to speak to the world. For 
fumbling fingers or forgetful hams T the PT- 
2500A has an SCR grid protection circuit, 
which will shut the amplifier down if grid cur- 
rent exceeds 400 mA, This is a nice feature, 
particularly for hams who forget to reduce 
drive or who get carried away and try to get 
every last milliwatt out of their amp by over- 
driving it. 

Several months of use didn't turn up any* 
thing wrong with the PT-25Q0A, It worked 
great in all modes. It does not key fast enough 
for AMTOR or QSK CW. but with a long 
txdelay, it T s even fine for Hf packet. All signal 
reports were clean; no one reported AC hum 
or other signal distortion. A sonagram taken 
by a friend several hundred miles away 
showed no leading edge clicking or chirp from 
35 WPM CW signals, fn a dozen comparisons 
of audio quality of SSB signals with and with- 
out amplification, there were no remarkable 
changes in signal characteristics except 
strength, indicative of little intermodulation 
distortion. 

It's too bad I had to send the demo unit 
back. The PT-2500 fits in quite welt with 
the "superstation" many of us dream about. 
Considering the bang for the buck (about 
$1 .45 per watt), it's a pretty good deal. B&W 
is known for quality products, antennas, 
and components. The PT-2500A linear am- 
plifier is worthy of their name. 1 know what's 
going on my Christmas wish list this 
year. . . 



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73 Amateur Radio ■ December, 1988 79 



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Number 28 on your Feedback card 



PECIAL EVENTS 



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ORLANDO FL 
DEC 3 

Shows Unlimited, Inc. is holding its annual 
PC Fest Computer Show and Sale. It will be 
held at the Orlando Twin Towers Hotel. The 
show consists of" supplies, chips and ICs, 
software/hardware, new and used equipment, 
local and national dealers, closeouts and liqui- 
dations. Commodore, Amiga, and Atari Soft- 
ware, brand names, IBM Clones, Apple prod* 
ucts and savings of 25-85%, Show hours are 
from 10 AM to 4 PM For more information to 
reserve a table or to get on the mailing list 
contact; Shows Unlimited, Inc.. at 301-970- 
2210 or 301-626-0311. 

FLAMINGO FL 
DEC 3-4 

The Everglades ARC will operate W4SVI 
from 1400Z Dec 3 to 1900Z Dec 4th, to cele- 
brate the 41st anniversary of Everglades Na- 
ttonal Park. Operation on CW is near 7030, 
14030, and 21130 kHz. and on SSB, near 
7230. 14230. 21330, and 28375 kHz. Novice 
contacts on 7130, 21130, and 28375 kHz. 
Send QSL and 2 stamps for unfolded certifi- 
cate. Novice certificate for those who identify 
as Novices on 2 of 3 bands, no stamps re- 
quired. E.AR.C, PQBox J 13, Homestead FL 
33090-0113, 

SAN BENITO TX 
DEC 3-4 

The San Benito ARC's Texas State QSO 
Party is from 0001 UTC the 3rd to 2359 UTC 
the 4th. Texas stations may contact any sta- 
tion, non- Texas stations may contact only 
Texas stations. All amateur bands, except 
WARC. Three contacts of 1 each per band 
permitted. Suggested frequencies are 40 kHz 
up from band edge for CW, and 1.890, 3.885, 
7.285. 14.285, 21.360, and 28.405, Novice 
segment CW operation, 25 kHz up from low 
band edge. Certificates. For information on 
exchanges, scoring, and certificates, contact 
San Benito Amateur Radio Club: #2247 SSC, 
PO Box 1382, San Benito TX 78586-1382. 

APACHE JUNCTION AZ 
DEC 3-4 

The Superstition Amateur Radio Club will 
host the 1988 ARRL Superstition Hamfest at 
the corner of Brown and Meridian. Swap and 
Shop both days. Test booth with 120 volts AC 
and antenna. Food, camping (no hookups). 
Tailgate admission is $3 and general admis- 
sion is $1 for both days. Primary talk-in will be 
on 1 47. 12(^) repeater and on the 145,41(-J/ 
223.82(-) link system. You can obtain infor- 
mation on 146J4, 14694. and ZIA system 
repeaters as well Contact Bill Glaze KA7SUF 
at 602*832-3955 or Larry Kuck WB7CRK at 
602-986-2298. 

HAZEL PARK Ml 
DEC 4 

The Hazel Park Amateur Radio Club will 
hold its 23rd Annual Swap & Shop at the Hazel 
Park High School. 23400 Hughes. General 
admission is $2 in advance. $3 at the door. 
Children under 11 free. Tables, S1 per foot 
Plenty of free parking. Talk-in from the 9-mite 



Ham Doings Around the World 

and t-75 area on 146-640- For tickets and 
table reservations, contact H.P.A.R.C.. PO 
Box 368 l Hazel Park Ml 48030. 

JACKSONVILLE FL 
DEC 4 

Shows Unlimited, Inc., is holding its annual 
PC Fest Computer Show and Sale It will be 
held at the Prime Osborn Convention Cenler. 
The show consists of: sop plies, chips and ICs. 
software/hardware, new and used equipment, 
local and national dealers, closeouts and liqui- 
dations. Commodore. Amiga, and Atari Soft- 
ware, brand names, IBM Clones. Apple prod- 
ucts and savings of 25-85%. Show hours are 
from 10 AM to 4 PM. For more information to 
reserve a table or to gel on the mailing list 
contact; Shows Unlimited, Inc., at 301-970- 
2210 or 301-626*0311. 

ALABASTER AL 
DEC 10-16 

The Shelby County Amateur Radio Club will 
operate AC200T to celebrate the 200th an- 
niversary of the US Constitution and the open- 
ing of the club station in Pelham, Alabama. 
AC20AT plans to operate all HF bands, con- 
centrating on CW and SSB, Other modes will 
be used if available. Special efforts will be 
made to contact Novices. Include SASE with 
QSLs and send to W4DYL, 632 Gten Park 
Drive, Fairfield AL 35064. 

NEWCARROLLTONMD 
DEC 17 

Shows Unlimited, Inc.. is holding its annual 
PC Fest Computer Show and Sale. H will be 
held at the New Carrollton Howard Johnson's 
Hotel. The show consists of: supplies, chips 
and ICs, software/hardware, new and used 
equipment, local and national dealers, close- 
outs and liquidations, Commodore, Amiga, 
and Atari Software, brand names, IBM 
Clones, Apple products and savings of 25- 
85%, Show hours are from 10 AM to 4 PM. For 
more information to reserve a table or to get on 
the mailing list contact; Shows Unlimited, fnc, 
at 301-970-22 10 or 301 -626-03 1 1 . 

BURLINGTON IA 
DEC 17-23 

The Iowa Radiosport Society will be operat- 
ing Amateur Radio Special Event Station K20 
0RW in celebration of the Constitutional Bi- 
centennial and the 150th anniversary of 
Burlington. Iowa, as the first territorial capiiol. 
Operations will be on CW and SSB, as propa- 
gation permits, with special emphasis on op- 
erations in the 10 meter and other Novice seg* 
ments Special OSL cards will be available tor 
return upon receipt of SASE or SAE and IRC 
sent to: t.R.S.A.C. 923 N. 9th Si, Burlington 
IA 52601. 

GARLAND TX 
DEC 24-30 

K200GHD, of the Garland Amateur Radio 
Club, will operate CW, SSB t and digital, on 80 
through 10 meters beginning 0001 Z the 24th 
through 2359Z the 30th. For special OSL, 
send your OSL and SASE to KF5PE. 2934 
Cotton Gum Road, Garland TX 75044, 



80 73 Amateur Radio • December, 1 




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Number 35 on your Feedback card 



Looking west 



Bill Pasternak WA61TF 
28197 Robin Ave. 
Saugu$>CA9t350 

The Save 220 NTRN 

How does amateur radio tell a 
deaf-eared FCC that we will not 
accept their highly questionable 
reallocation of 220-222 MHz? 
This was the question puzzling 
220 Notes Editor Art Reis K9XI 
and myself when we sat on the 
phone trying to find some answers 
to this and other allied questions, 

Since the release of the Report 
and Order on PR Docket 87-14 
last August, the amateur commu- 
nity continued to grow ever more 
incensed at what it saw, In its deci- 
sion, the Commission used arbi- 
trary and capricious methods to 
tahe 220-222 MHz from hams and 
give it to private business inter- 
ests. Even after the story dropped 
from the front pages of the various 
amateur news publications, the 
level of resentment toward the 
Commission, and specifically its 
Office of Engineering and Tech- 
nology, continued to grow. That 




the_ 

HAM STATION 



wm 



P.O. Box 6522 

220 N. Fulton Ave. 

Evansville, IN 47719 0522 

Store Hours 

MONFRI:9AM 6PM 
SAT: SAM - 3PM 

CENTRAL TIME 

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COO s Welcome 




.. ,_- 





became a story unto itself, Usual- 
ly, without follow-up coverage. 
nothing is forgotten sooner then 
yesterday's news. It wasn't the 
case here, as everyone — be it the 
Novices on 10 meters and the re- 
peaters of VM meters, the Techs 
of 2 meters, the DXers on 20, or 
the late-night Extras in GSO on 



matter, but many people are going 
off half-cocked in their attempts. 
The worst it of all seemed to be the 
ham/lawyers, many of whom obvi- 
ously did not understand either 
the terms of the Federal Adminis- 
trative Procedures Act or the lim- 
its available to them in the Federal 
Court system. They were heard 
loud and clear before many clubs 
and on many nets with their 
threats of Civil Rights suits 
against the FCC Fortunately, one 
perspicacious ham/lawyer, Joe 






. . bungled divided efforts 
would only ensure that the FCC 
decision would stick. " 



75 — became involved and stayed 
involved. The inter-community 
and intra-community chatter was 
the same; US hams wHi not rest 
until the reallocation decision is 
reversed and the entire spectrum 
from 220-225 MHz is declared 
"amateur exclusive!' 



i " 



Fits and Starts 

There's great motivation in the 
amateur community to fight this 



Merdler N6AHU, pointed out the 
danger of all the rhetoric and pos- 
turing — bungled divided efforts 
would only ensure thai the FCC 
decision would stick. Unity was 
desperately needed. 

Resurrecting the NTRN 

Enter the NTRN. Many people 
were involved in getting the Na- 
tional Teleconferencing Radio 
Network {NTRN] back up and go- 



ing. (See November "Looking 
West" for details.) Lou Appel K/ 
0IUQ is the unsung engineering 
hero of these events. He supplied 
the mid-USA telephone intertie 
system and was the man who sat 
there controlling it during each of 
these events in the past, and 
came through for us in shining col- 
ors again on 2 October 

There were four basic jobs to 
do, and really only two people to 
do them. We worked out the 
NTRN format in one night. We 
needed a panel of experts repre- 
senting every interest on 1 V* me- 
ters. We had to publicize the time 
and date of the NTRN. Finally, we 
had to register all participating 
outlets where the NTRN would be 
heard and assigned a port on the 
teleconference bridge. 

While Art put together the * 'pan- 
el* ' and secured studio facilities. I 
alerted the vast majority of active 
hams in the US to the NTRN 
through my Westlink Radio Net- 
work Newsline, and other news- 
letters, Soon the phone at my 
house was ringing day and night 
with requests for teleconference 
bridge assignments. Only re- 
peater groups, bulletin stations, 

Continued on page 100 




o 

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73 Amateur Radio ■ December, 1988 83 




Number 29 on your Feedback card 



TH-DX 



Leon Fletcher N6HYK 
274 Webster Drive 
Ben Lomond. CA 95005 

The Yuletide Island 

On Christmas day in 1 643, Cap- 
tain William Mynors of the Dutch 
sailing ship Royal Mary, spotted a 
small isolated bit of land in the 
Indian Ocean and named it Christ- 
mas Island, 

Apparently Captain Mynors 
was navigating from an outdated 
chart. The island had actually 
been discovered 28 years earlier, 
in 1615. Richard Rose, master of 
the Thomas, founded this island 
and named it Moni on a Dutch 
chart dated 1618, 

Today, the name Christmas is- 
land has won out, but the island is 
still largely unknown. Although 
the island is Australian territory, 
the information officers at both the 
Embassy of Australia, in Wash- 
ington DC, and at the Australian 
Tourist Commission in California, 
sard they'd not heard of the island. 
The latest Current Report about 
Christmas Island, sent out by the 
Australian Information Service, is 
five years old. In the last four 
years, the 400 "major maga- 
zines 1 ' published in the United 
States have printed only two arti- 
cles about the island. In the giant 
Australia Encyclopedia, the island 
gets just a two and one half inch 
notice. 

Out Of Obscurity 

Such solitude will soon be gone 
if the Australian government's 
plans work out They authorized 
the construction of a 170- room ho- 
tel*casino. scheduled to open by 
the end of 1939. Private investors 
are planning additional hotels, 
restaurants, charter fishing boats, 
and other leisure activities. 

Such changes are needed on 
Christmas Island. The island has 
been relying on just one economic 
base — the mining of phosphate, a 
vital ingredient in fertilizers. The 
mining hit its peak in 1978. when 
more than 1.26 million tons of 
phosphate were exported. In De- 
cember 1978, with the supply of 
phosphate nearly exhausted, min- 
ing stopped. But in July 1988, the 
Australian government an- 
nounced that mining may resume. 

Santa Claws 

Still, other economic resources 



QTH is Christmas Island 

are clearly needed. In addition to 
tourists, the government is trying 
to entice smaM-scale manufactur- 
ing and agricultural ventures. But 
a bothersome block to those 
plans— actually inhibiting virtually 
all activities on Christmas Is- 
land — are the swarming red 
crabs. 

Once a year in late spring, for 
about nine to 18 days, some 120 
million of the crustaceans — nearly 
9.000 tons — march on a breeding 
migration from the inland forest to 
the seashore. Their cfaws are so 
sharp that they could puncture the 
tires of an 'automobile running 
over them. 

The red crabs are just one of the 
15 species of land crabs that live 
on the island. Among them is the 
world's largest crab, the giant rob- 
ber, or coconut crab. They weigh 



VK9XI 



CHRISTMAS ISLAND 



opswron 

n 'AMii. HON 







— ii 



V 




fed by as much as 100 inches of 
rain a year. Temperatures range 
between 75 and 85 degrees. 

Most of the coastline consists of 
cliffs up to 600 feet high. There are 
a few sandy beaches and some 
small bays. Flying Fish Cove is the 
island's lone port. 

Who's There? 

Only about 1 .000 people live on 



"Christmas Island 

is in the Indian Ocean, 220 miles 

south of its nearest neighbor 

Indonesia ....** 



up to seven pounds. 

The island also ranks as one of 
the world's great seabtrd habitats, 
according to Australian conserva- 
tionist John W. Hicks. Of the eight 
kinds of birds which breed there, 
three — the Christmas Island 
frigate bird, Abbott's booby, and 
the gold bosun bird— breed 
nowhere else. 

In addition, of the some 200 
different flowering plants growing 
on the island, about 30 are en- 
demic. 

To preserve those distinctive 
plants, birds, and crabs, a six 
square mile national park was es- 
tablished in 1980. 

A Little Geography 

Christmas Island is in the Indian 
Ocean, 220 mites south of its 
nearest neighbor Indonesia, 
1.000 miles north and slightly 
west of the mainland of Australia. 
It is 12 miles long, 3.5 to 9 miles 
wide, and it is a 55-squa re mile top 
of an undersea mountain 

The island's central plateau ts 
about 1 ,000 feet high. Rain forest 
covers three-fourths of the island, 



Christmas Island. The majority 
are Chinese and Malays; most of 
the others are from Australia, New 
Zealand, and India, Just three 
years ago, before mining de- 
clined, there were around 3.000 
residents. 

Unemployment is high. In 1985, 
the government started retraining 
programs to help islanders find 
jobs in Australia. A "Resettlement 
Scheme" provides incentive pay- 
ments to encourage residents to 
move off-island. 

Until just 100 years ago, the is- 
land was uninhabited, The first 
residents came in 1888—14 
British adventurers. The coconut 
palms they planted still stand 
along the beach, 

In 1895, targe deposits of phos- 
phate were discovered. A British 
company started mining there two 
years later. 

During World War II. the 
Japanese occupied the island. 
In 1946 the island became part 
of the Colony of Singapore. The 
mining company was bought 
by Australia and New Zealand 
in 1948, and ten years later, the 



island became an Australian ter- 
ritory. 

In 1963, Christmas Island be- 
gan issuing its own stamps. They 
are especially colorful and attrac- 
tive. Some show the early sailing 
vessels and sail-and-steam ships 
which visited the island. One 
1980-81 series shows 16 steps of 
mining— drilling, drying, crush- 
ing, etc. While the stamps are 
avidly sought after by many col* 
lectors, they have not yet become 
particularly valuable. In a single 
year, the stamps brought more 
than a half-million dollars to the 
island. 

For resident Europeans, the 
center of social life is the Christ- 
mas Island Club, featuring 
a swimming pool, tennis courts, 
and movies. Other island attrac- 
tions include a nine hole golf 
course, cricket club, and, 
on Phospate Hill, a building 
known island-wide as the M Ham 
Shack." 

Two Christmas Islands 

Hams around the world know 
the island as VK9. The current 
Catt Book lists just two stations on 
the island, and one of those is the 
club station. Stilt, the island is on 
the air enough so that it didn't 
make the latest list of "100 most 
wanted DX stations/* compiled by 
The DX Bulletin. 

One caution: This Indian Ocean 
Christmas Island is often con- 
fused with the other Christmas 
Island, the one in the South 
Pacific, located 1 ,300 miles south 
of Honolulu. This South Pacific 
Christmas Island is the largest of 
the 33 islands of the Republic of 
Kiribati. 

Dedicated DXers never confuse 
the two islands — hams on the 
South Pacific Christmas Island 
use the East Kiribati prefix 
T32 f which counts for the country 
of Kiribati, not for the ''country" 
known as Christmas Island 



84 73 Amateur Radio * December, 1988 




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73 Amateur Radio • December, 1988 85 



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TU35B, $279,90; PS-30, $124.90; HENRY 
2K, $695,90; S-4T, $149.90; ICOM IC-471H, 
$799 90; IC-271H/WPS-35, $799.90; R-71A, 
$696.90; IC-74Q/WPS-35.EX-242.241 ,FL- 
45. $695.90; ROBOT 400. $299.90; YAESU 
FT-747GX. $679.90. LOOKING FOR SOME- 
THING NOT LISTED?? CALL OR WRITE 
WE HAVE OVER 315 USED ITEMS m 
SlOCk MENTtQN A& PRICES CASH, FOB 
PRESTON WE CLOSE AT 2:00 SATUR- 
DAYS * MONDAYS. ROSS DISTRIBUTING 
COMPANY. 78 SOUTH STATE. P.O. BOX 
234 H. PRESTON ID 63263; 208-852-0630 

BNB709 

DIGICOM > 64: C64 PACKET See AUG. 88 
73 Magazine (by W2UP| for circuit and soft- 
ware details, or wnte us for more info Order 
#154-KTT for kit with disc at $49 95 Of #154- 
AS Y for assembled board and disc at $79-95 
Add $2 50 SAH per order. A & A Engineering. 
2521 W La Palma. #K, Anaheim, CA 92801; 
714-952-2114 BNB732 

HAM TRADER YELLOW SHEETS. In CKir 
27th year Buy, Swap, Sefl ham radio gear 
Published twice a month. Ads quickly circu- 
late-no long wait for results Send #10 SASE 
tor sample cop/ $13 tor one y^ar (24 tssues) 
P.O.a. 2057, Glen EJIyn. IL 60138-2O57 

BN6741 



SSSSS SUPER SAVINGS $$$$$ on electron- 
ic parts, components, supplies, and comput- 
er accessories. Free 40-page calalog lor Self 
Addressed & Stamped Envelope. Get on our 
mailing lis! BCD ELECTRO. P.O. Box 
630119. Richardson TX 75063 or call 214- 
343-1770. 8NB749 



HAM RADIO REPAIR, all makes, models. Ex- 
perienced reliable service Robert Hall Elec- 
tronics, Box 280363. San Francisco, CA 
94128-0363, 408-729-8200 BNB751 

HAM HOLIDAY m VPS Jmn cycte 22 tun from 
rare DX OTH Turks & Catcos islands We 
supply transceivers, antenna, process li- 
cense and offer accommodations as low as 7 
nights $390 each double occupancy m pri- 
vate bungalow Direct Pan Am service. 60 
minutes Miami Details VP5D, PO Box 
100658. PL UuderdaJe FL 33310 BNS760 

WANTEO: Ham Equipment and other proper- 
ty The Rad>o Club of Junior High School 22 
NYC, Inc , is a non-pro*ri organization, grant- 
ed 50 1(C)(3) status by the IRS, incorporated 
with Ihe goal of using the theme oi ham rarfto 
to further and enhance the education of 
young people Your property donation or fi- 
nancial support would be greatly appreciated 
and acknowledged with a receipt tor your lax- 
deductible contribution We sponsor the 
■Classroom Net" on 7 238 at 1200 UTC daily 
and encourage your OSL lor our weekly 
award. Please write us at PO Box 1052, New 
York, NY 10002, or calf our round-the-clock 
hotline: {516) 674-4072. Thanks' BNB762 

COMPUTER CODE COURSE. Apple II -/c/e/ 
GS C 64/12B 37 Modes. Graphics, I -100 
WPM, menus, proportional spacing, variable 
frequency, more (529.95} With wordproces- 
sor {$38,95). Manual ($10) Check/MO. 
LARESCO. POB 2018-ST, Calumet City IL 
60409. 1-312-691-3279. BNB764 

INDIVIDUAL PHOTOFACT FOLDERS. #1 to 
#1400. $4.00, #1401 up, $6.00. Sam 1 s books h 
$7,00, Postpaid. Allen Loeb. 414 Chesinut 
Lane, East Meadow, NYl 1554. 8NB766 

VHF TO MICROWAVE: GaAsFETs, MWlCs, 
transistors, etc. SASE; WA31AC, 7148 Mon- 
tague St.. Phi ladelph m PA 1 9 1 35 BNB771 

HAMLOG COMPUTER PROGRAM Full fea- 
tures. 17 modules Auto-logs. 7-band WAS/ 



DXCC Apple $1 9.95. IBM, CP/M, KAYPRO, 
TANDY. CR6 $24.95. 73-KA1 AWH. PB 2015, 
Peabody M A 1 960 B N B 775 

KITS' PARTS* PLANS We have hard lo find 
parts' Variable Tuning Capacitors, Tuning 
Cods, Crystal and Magnetic Headphones, 
Germanium Diodes. Crystal and Shortwave 
Radio Kits. Yeary Communications, 12922 
Harbor #300-6, Garden Grove CA 92640 

BNB78G 

WANTED: Sunajr GCU-910A Of GCU 935 
Antenna Coupler Ray Dunham, 1030 Hillside 
Ave, Pacific Grove C A 93950 BN8790 

QSLs: Quality al a reasonable price! Satistac- 
lion Guaranteed, Send $1 tor samples and 
coupon worth $2. The Sugartosf Print Shop. 
PO Box 563, Sugarioaf . PA 16249 BNB791 

ELEC TRON TUBES : All types & sizes Trans- 
mitting Receivmg, Microwave Largo in- 
ventory - same day shipping Ask about our 
3-5O0Z speoaf Dairy Electron ics, PO Box 
5029 Comptort. CA 90224 800-346 6667 

BNB792 

KENWOOD 430s OWNERS! Stop Scan 
slops the scanner on busy frequencies re- 
sumes scanning automatically after an ad- 
justable 1-10 second delay SASE for 1989 
catalog. $1 9.95 kit. $29.95 assembled $3.50 
Sluppfno, JASCO ELECTRONICS. R'i Box 
386. Alexandria. IN 46001 . BNB794 

VOICEGATE communicalions noise reduc- 
tion wilh audio squelch, noise reduction. VOX 
cassette recorder control, 3 adjustable audk> 
filters, & more? SASE for 1 989 catalog $3.50 
for demo tape $109.95 complete (till 1/1789). 
JABCO ELECTRONICS, R1 Box 386, Alex- 
andria. IN 46001. BNB795 

LEARN CODE using your IBM PC orcompat 
ible {256KB RAM), Easy lo follow menu- 
driven program on DS/DD floppy disk rulty 
prepares you to copy 5 WPM for Novice 
license to 50 WPM, exceeding all license 
requirement. Features include adjustable 
^ratfrtfercharacter timing with 1 WPM 10 50 
WPM sending rale, keyboard-seiected char- 
acter generation and randomly generated let- 
ters, numerals, all FCC required punctuation' 
signals and mixed character types. S1 1.00 
including shipping LOGICON. PO Box 426, 
Lexington Park MD 20653, BNB796 

continued onp 86 



Barter 'N' Buy advertising must pertain to ham radio products or services. 

Individual (noncommercial) ,.**..... 50c per word 

: Commercial , S1 ,50 per word 

PrepaymerM required, Courtf only the words in the text. Your address is 
tree. 73 cannot verify advertising claims and cannot be held responsible 
tor claims made by ihe advertiser. Liability will be limited lo making any 
necessary corrections in the next available issue. Please print clearly or 
type (double- spaced ) 



"I 



No discounts or commissions are available- Copy must be received in 
Peterborough by the first of the second month preceding the cover date. 
Make checks payable to 73 Magazine and send to: Rebecca Niemela. 
Barter H Buy. 73 Magazine, WGE Center, Peterborough NH 03458. 



73 Amateur Radio • December. 1988 B7 



■■ 



WANTED: Dead Tempo 3020 for parts. Dan 
Giles VE7QM, RR3 Harrison Ave., C^6 t 
Ganges , BC , VBS^ 1 Efl . BM B797 

R-390A RECEIVER PARTS: Info. SASE. 
CPRC-26 military Man pack Radio, 6 merer 
FM. with antenna, crystal, handset' £22.50, 
$42,50 pair, Military-spec TS-352 VoltohmV 
Multimeter, leads, manual: $12.50. $4.50/ 
piece shipping, 39 maximum, Baytronics, PO 
Box 591 , Sandusky OH 44970- BN0798 



MACINTOSH Ham Software. MacTrak " 
tracks satellites, sun, moon. Graphic or tabu- 
lar outputs. Compatible with Mirage Tracking 
Interface for rotor control, $49.95. DX 
Helper™ provides DX info including distance, 
bearing, sunrise, sunset, propagation MUF„ 
great circle display, more, $24.95. SASE for 
into from R. Siegemeyer, P.O. Box 1590, Port 
O rch ard WA 96366 BN B802 



home-brew PROJECTS LIST SASE to 
WB2EUF, Box 70S, East Hampton MY 1 1937, 

BN&805 



GSLs & RUBBER STAMPS— TOP QUALITY! 
Slates, Worfd Maps, USA, Key, Shuttle, 
Globe QSLs. Report Form Rubber Stamps, 
More! Samples, $1 00 [Refundable With 
Order]. Ebbert Graphics D-7, Bex 70, Wester- 
vil!eOH430ai, BNB807 

ELECTRONIC WEATHER STATION. Su- 
perb bargain while they last. The one you've 
wanted, as featured in Popular Science 
Magazine, provides more than 20 functions, 
including barometric pressure. Complete 
system currently retails for $339 DISTRIBU- 
TOR CLOSE OUT price, only S 1 69. Includes 
full service and original warranty. Satisfaction 



guaranteed VISA, Master Card accepted. 
Hurry, call now for details and pre- hoi id ay 
delivery; 20 1 -53 1 -46 1 5 . B N B606 



PARTS & KITS for the Home-Brew Amateur. 
Two Firsi Class Stamps for Latest Catalog & 
Flier. Small Parts Center, 6816 Meese Drive, 
Laos i ng M I 4691 1 < BN 6809 

HAVE OCTOBER 1 960 and JANUARY 1961 
ISSUES to best otter. W7IXN, 14915 SE 47 
Court. Bellevue WA 98006. BIMB810 

FLOOD YOUR MAILBOX! You get 100s of 
radio & electronics specialty catalogs. Send 
$2,00, name & address to: Electronic List Ser- 
vices, Dept. B, PO Box 1683, Brookline MA 
02146, BNB811 

QUALITY CISL CARDS, rubber stamps, 
envelopes and printed lelierhead. Send 45c 
poslage or SASE for samples. Large selec- 
tion at attractive prices. San dollar Press, PO 
Box 30726, Santa Barbara CA 93130. 

BNBS12 

LOOKING FOR HAMS WORLDWIDE? 

Subscribe to QMT, an English- written ham 
quarterly where subscribers are entitled to 
place one free ad (max, 80 words) which is 
published for subscription period. Over 2,500 
ham ads quarterly. 87 countries. Subscription 
rates (CASH): 5-year 320,00; 3-year $15,00; 
1-year 310.00. Price includes p&h. Enclose 
name, call, address, and advertisement (non- 
obligatory). Order before Jan. 5 and get free 
gift. Paulo Lago, (Lyon Publications), Aparta* 
do 2804, 1121 Lisboa codex, Portugal, 

BN6S13 

WANTED: Azden PCS-4500 Regency HR-6, 



or Genare GTX-600. Reasonable. Jim, 469 
Jayson Avenue, Pittsburgh PA 15228, 

BNB814 

WANTED: Vaesu FT-625RD, FT-627RA, or 
FT6B0R. Also wanted: ICOM IC-505. IC-551 , 
IC-551D, IC-S60, or IC&Q2A. Reasonable. 
Jim. 469 Jayson Avenue, Pittsburgh PA 
15228 BNB815 



SLEP SPECIALS, MILITARY USM-117C 
S O LI D STATE SM A LL PORT AB LE DC-5MH z 
OSCILLOSCOPE, IDEAL FOR BENCH 
WORK OR RTTYf MODULATION TESTING 
$95.00; MILITARY USM-SG7 30UD STATE 
PORTABLE. 0-5G0MHZ EIGHT DIGIT READ- 
OUT. HIGH STABILITY OSCILLATOR, LATE 
MILITARY LAB QUALITY $185.00; TS-403/U 
MICROWAVE SIGNAL GENERATOR, 
1.8GHz TH ROUGH 4. 2G Hz , M I L/SPEC VER- 
SION OF HP61SB $195.00; TS-51QA/U 
SIGNAL GENERATOR 10MHz THROUGH 
420MHz, MIL/SPEC VERSION OF HP608D 
£195.00; BP614A SIGNAL GENERATOR 
900MH* TO 2100MH2 $38500; HP6Q6A 
SIGNAL GENERATOR 50 kHz THROUGH 
65MHz $295.00; HP417A VHF DETECTOR 
10-500 MHz $85.00; HP618B SIGNAL GEN- 
ERATOR 36GHz TO 7.8GHz $295. ALL LAB 
TESTED, PRICED LOW TO MOVE QUANTI- 
TY. SATISFACTION GUARANTEED, VISA, 
M/C, OR CHECK, ADD SHIPPING. WRITE 
OR PHONE BILL SLEP, 704-524-7519, SLEP 
ELECTRONICS COMPANY, HIGHWAY 441 , 
OTTO NC 26763. BNB816 

COMPUTERIZE with the "Amateur Radio 
Operating System. This MS/DOS based 
software features auto-logging, OSL man- 
agement, AWARD summaries, Contesting, 
and MORE. Base System $39.95, Demo disk 
$10,00 (credited). SASE brings details. Fun 



damenfai Services, 1546C Peaceful Lane, 
Clearwater FL 346 1 6 . BNB9 1 7 

FREE HAM EQUIPMENT, details Si. P.O. B 
1631, Arvada CO 800O1. BNB61B 

INEXPENSIVE VIDEO DIGITIZER THE 
IMAGE-IZER" from KINNEY SOFTWARE. 
See 73 Oct. 1988 page 10 for details. Capture 

RS17Q TV video {VCR or TV camera) to Com- 
modore 64/128 or IBM PC- Save images to 
disk files. IBM PCfXT 4 77MHz version 
requires CGA capability- $59.95. Com- 
modore version- $39.95. Includes disk 
software, documentation, pretinned and 
drilled PC board for easy assembly. Uses 
common, low cost part$. Specify computer 
type Order from: KINNEY SOFTWARE 
DEPT. 73V. 974 HODSDON ROAD, POW- 
N AL M E 04069 . BNB8 1 9 

INEXPENSIVE SLOW SCAN SEE WHAT 
YOU HAVE BEEN MISS1NG1 Either IBM PC/ 
XT/AT or Commodore 64/128 version only 
$39.95! Receives all popular SSTV modes, 
including 36 second color ROBOT, in 8 grey 
levels. Save images to disk. Commodore ver- 
sion also transmits black and white pictures. 
IBM version is receive only (requires CGA 
capability). Includes disk software, documen- 
tation, pretinned and drilled PC board for 
easy assembly. Uses common, tow cost 
parts. Specify computer lype. Order from: 
KINNEY SOFTWARE DEPT 73SSTV, 974 
HODSDON ROAD, POWNAL ME 04069, 

BNB820 

WANTED DRAKE R4245 Of R7A well Op- 
tioned for SWL and AM/SSB DXing io excel- 
lent condition in exchange for some cash and 

collection of mint New Zealand stamps, de- 
tails Ron. Harkness, 24 Talbot Place, Inver- 
carg i II , New Zeal and . 6 N 682 1 



THE SMILEY ANTENNA CO. 

THE HAND TUNED PERFORMANCE SYSTEM 

FEATURING PORTABLE RADIO SIMULATION TUNING 




THE TUNED: AHTENNA 



Electrical 

fcf a* rrtlcjjn Paw&f , 
Ff*tju*nC|/ Wans* 
ffnp&dancg 




Mechanical 

Costing Maitfial 



"Quality through Technology" 



B 



Hamaimq Etemant ..A 



!i 



.SO WelKs 
.nS-932MHi. 

.Mulched to the Portable 
Spurji allied Tunjng 
Available. 



PippSd if) SynLhelic 
Rubber To Seal and Webh 
Coil HruvHr'ir-g 
n-i&torliun 

1 PVC Covering 

2 Mil-Sptic MPO-20fJ£r. A 
Soivem and Acid 
fresislam Covering 






I 



n* 



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1 1 



Helical Waurtd Hsrdsjifld 
Steel Wtr», Coppfif Piaied 
lot Lower Fe&i&iancBAnd 
Higfief Velocity 
t25 dia High Carbon 
SlHisi Bias Wound 
Fluxibla Shalt Co^e- 
FIsiatiL 



» 



a i 



wajiaoIeTrom 
136-174 MHZ 



l_l L_l 



Available from 
210-250 MHZ 



i i i 



Availabfe from 
440-470 MHZ 



FDR DEALER 

LOCATIOM CALL BIS 573-BS16 

SMILEY ANTENNA CO. t INC. *oa la cresta heights road I=lcajon. ca 92021 




AXCDM Work n' 



CIRCLE 101 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



88 73 Amateur Radio * December, 1988 



Number 31 on your Feedback card 



Index: 1988 



ARTICLE AUTHOR 

ACCESSORIES 

He il B M- 1 Boom set N5EFG 

Security Aiem nmrve 

Tech Tips KK4CS 

AMPLIFIERS 

Ampsirier Add-on W7LNG 

Comm 2M 35W Kit KT2B 

Heathkrt HF Linear Mods VE5X2 

Heathfit SB- 1 000 1 inear Amp K3R V N 

Modernizing the SB^OO WA4BLC 

PT-25O0A HF NA5E 

fl F Concepts 3-3 1 2 220 MHz KT2B 

ANTENNAS AND ACCESSORIES 

10 Meter Beam NfflBLX 

Aerial Vtaw W7XU 

Aeriai View W7XU 

Request a copy of the corrected printout. 

Aenal View W7XU 

Aerial View W7XU 

Aerial View W7XU 

Aenal View W7XU 

Aerial View W7XU 

Aerial View W7XU 

See software corf eel ion in DEC issue, p. 63 

Aluminum Cloud NFIDH 

Antenna System 5 W37C 

See malh correction m NOV issue, p,67 

Antenna Systems W3ZC 

Above and Beyond KT2B 

ATV WB0QCD 

ATV WBCOCD 

ATV WBfflOCD 

Balloon-Supported Antennas WlGV 

B utte m ue Butterfly Anton no W A4BLC 

Carolina Wrndom WA4BLC 

Create CR-30 Roof Tower KA1 HY 

Create X^209 9-elernent yagi KT2B 

Cu&hcraft 1 24WB and Tonna 20804 KT2B 

Down Easi 3333/1 345-LYK loop yagis KT2B 

Down Easl Model 234SLY 45 loop yagi KT2B 

Hamsats WASZtB 

Hardty-Hard, Hardline Connector W5PFG 

Larsen HT Antennas W7XU 
Matcom Antenna Matchers 2QOD/XLD-T50 W7XU 

M B-V-A 3Q0QW Anienna Mate her KA1 XO 

Mobile Antenna for 2 Meiers W4JC 

Nye ViMng RFM-003 RF Monitor NS1 B 

Orion 146 MHz Antenna W7XU 

Portable Re-entrant Cavity W7AC1 

QHP W&BVGE 

WSE wP-727 and Com- R ad CR2/4 A KA 1 H Y 

AUDIO 

4 +■ 1 Tone Decod cr W A3LT J 
See clarifications byaulhor in J UN issue. p.iOQ. 

Digital Voice Compression WA3YQY 
See correction of decimals to (radians in JU N 

Monophonic Output. Adaptable WA&RON 

AWARDS and CONTESTS 

10 and 75 Meter Contest 

1987 World SSB Championship 

iOMete-r Contest Results 

Armed Forces Day 1986 

DX 

DX DA Award 

Golden Gigahertz Winners 

Sateiliie Awards 



DeEperdang 
VP2ML 



BANDS and tuning 

1750 M 

Above and Beyond 

CompuierJ2ed Freq Readout 

Computerized Tuning TS-S30S 

Datong's Greet Add-On Filters 

Digital 5C-V Oscilloscope 

Finger Tip Frequency Control 

Ham Radio 31 Its Best 

Life on a Megacycle 

Looktng Wast 

LooJurtg West 

Maxcom Antenna Matchers 2O0D/XLD-15O 

MB-V-A 300OW Antenna Matcher 

Tech Tips 

VHF/UHFTape Antennas 

PRO-&004 Scanner 

Propagation 

Trip Through Microwave Specif um 

BOOK REVIEWS 

Tille 

Contemporary Electronics Circuils De&fcbock 

Handbook of Practical IC Circuils 

Low and Medium 

Frequency Radio Scrapbook 
Low-Band DXing 

Master Guide to Electronic Circuits 
On the Road Again 
Passpon 10 World Band Radio 
RF1 

H utch-.nson/Kaczy nski 
Technofogy Dictionary, The 
Transmission Line Transformers 
Transmitter Hunting: RDF Simplified 
WlFB's Antenna Notebook 

CFRCUfTS 

CMOS Oscillator 
Fltp-Fiops and Latch Circuits 
Fiip-Ffops and Latch Circuits 
Oscillator Circuit 

Correction in OCT issue, p. 94 
Rectifier Diode 
Tech Tips 



WB5RMA 

W2IMB 

KT2B 

WA9RDE 

KF6DF 

WA4BLC 

WA&TYU 

WA4BLC 

KA 1 PZV 

N4RVE 

WA6ITF 

WAS IT F 

W7XU 

KA1XO 

Cameron 

WB3KCZ 

NA5E 

WlXU 

KT28 



DESCRIPTION 

headset and mike 
for Winnobiko 
quick HT holder 

for 160 meters 

review 

SB 200-220 

review 

Heathkit linear 

review 

review 



for 14 

parallel dipoles 
SWR 

3-ei e r ihi •■■ yagi 
spider antenna 
the dipole 
beam antennas 
transformers 
ground systems 

ettic antenna 
SWR and tuning 

Part 2 

configurations 

WSDNTAIfordSlotUHF 

Skeleton Sfol 

vertical/horizontal 

lor 60 and 160 meters 

review 

review 

review 

review 

144MHzyagiS 

review 

review 

anienna restrictions 

For antennas 

review 

review 

review 

HaradaMT-2 

review 

review 

2 meter 

Vee beam; wire antenna 

review 



speaker control 

synthesized voice 

p.94 

circuit 



results 

contest results 

world and 1 60 meter 

communications test 

new awards and ARRL rules 

rules., winners, countries 

list 

diverse awards 

160-190 kHz 

FCC beacon subbands 

digital treq display 

digital VFOs 

ANF.FL2.FL3 

tuning indicator 

QSYar 

14.275 MHz 

HF Bicycle Mobile 

220 MHz and FCC 

220 MHz and FCC 

review 

review 

10 mater antenna 

copper toil 

review 

VHF bands 

1.2-10G.H* 



ISSUE 

JAN 

JUL 
JUN 



JUN 

DEC 

MAR 

AUG 

AUG 

DEC 

NOV 

MAR 

JAN 

FEB 

MAR 

APR 

MAY 

JUL 

AUG 

DEC 

SEP 
SEP 



AuthorfEdilor[sj Reviewer 
Helms WB&RRT 

Helms WB9RRT 



Cornell 


WB9RRT 


Devatdere 


W7XD 


Helms 


WB9FIRT 


Johnson 


W6AAQ^NA5E 


Magne 


NA5E 


WB9RRT 


MAR 


Battle 


WB9RRT 


Sevtck 


WB9RRT 


MoellrCurlee 


KA9KAF 


PeMawWlFB 


W7XU 


KG5N 


variable 


W4RNL 


HsxrbiHly 


W4RNL 


HexibiNty 


WSLBH 


versatile 


W7FVM 


circuit 


DuBois 


connecting circui 



issue 

FEB 

FEB 

FEB 

MAY 
NOV 
SEP 

APR 



MAR 
MAR 
MAR 

MAY 

FEB 
JUN 
JUL 
JUN 

MAR 
JUN 



p. 25 
p. 58 
P-80 

p.74 
p.40 
p.20 
p. 15 
p. 42 
p.7B 
p. 24 



p.14 

p. 100 

P-89 

P-62 

p,76 
p.74 
p,75 
p.^8 

p L 63 

p.U 
plO 



OCT 


p. 38 


MAR 


p. 75 


MAR 


p.54 


JUL 


p. 70 


OCT 


p.73 


SEP 


p. 16 


SEP 


p. 16 


DEC 


p. 49 


MAY 


p,58 


MAR 


p. 16 


MAR 


p35 


MAR 


p. 11 


OCT 


p.44 


JUL 


P-63 


MAY 


p.32 


MAR 


p26 


MAR 


p42 


NOV 


p. 62 


MAR 


p. 28 


SEP 


p. 36 


NOV 


p.63 


OCT 


p.29 


OCT 


p.83 


MAR 


p.31 



APR p. 55 
JUN p.51 
MAY p..S0 



AUG 


p.74 


MAY 


p.41 


MAY 


p.43 


MAY 


p. 47 


APH 


p.45 


JAN 


p. 4i 


FEE 


p.27 


MAY 


p.30 


FEB 


p3l 


JUL 


p.6B 


JAN 


p35 


NOV 


p. 49 


JUL 


p,30 


JUN 


p20 


AUG 


p.34 


APR 


p.11 


NOV 


p. 55 


NOV 


p. 60 


DEC 


p. 100 


MAR 


p. 42 


NOV 


p.62 


JUN 


p. BO 


OCT 


p. 24 


AUG 


p. 50 


JUL 


p96 


OCT 


p.14 



p. 42 
p.42 

p4? 

p.51 
p.37 
p. 22 
p.37 

p27 
p27 

p.27 
p37 
p.51 



p. 63 
p.11 

p.43 
p.74 

p.96 
p. SO 



ARTICLE 

COMPUTERS and SO FTWAR E 

Briefly Speahtmg 

0-64^128 vs. Commerce Depi. 

Care and Feeding of a FBBS 

Care and Feeding of a PBBS 

CAT to RS-232 

Digital Accuracy for Vae&u FRG-7 

IBM PC Clones 

RS-232 Port 

CW 

Beauty and the Best 

Code Test Sure Shot 

CW Fitters 

GGTE Morse Tutor 

Home-Brew Fun! 

How lo Improve Your Code Speed 

Morse Code Motivational Techniques 

Novice Band Code Nets 

Op-Ed 

Problems Learning the Code 

ORP 

TE-144Kayer 

Why Become a Hem? 

DIAGNGST3CS/REPA IR7HOW-TO 

AH About Henry 

Anlennas m Uhe Spring 

AR-4&QD 3W LCD Meter 

Bicycle-Mobile R and Lab 

Ughming Protector 

Ludvigson Tonegen iorC-64 

Microwave Test Equipment 

PK232 

QHP 

Raise the Hazerl 

Ramsey CT-90 

Ramsey D-5100 Multimeter 

ScHdoring Sidebar 

Solder iron Shui Off 

Tech Tips 

Troubleshooting Trichs 

Voltage Sampling with a Computer 

DX 

10 Meier DX 
Above and Beyond 
AEADXIOmeler 
DX 
DX 
DX 
DX 
DX 
DX 

Holy Mackerel. What a Mess 
international Application 
MFJ Gray Line DX Advantage 
Nets, A Case for 
Nats H OX„ to Checlt Oul 
Newsletters, DX 
Pan American Games 
OSL Cards, OX with 
QTH DX 
QTHDX 
QTHD* 
QTHDX 
QTHDX 
QTHDX 
QTHDX 
OTHDX 
QTH DX 
The Colvins 
Working the World Fast 
See ?3 international by Richard 

EDUCATION 

Bears F reject 
Crew at 22 

How Not to Run a Novice Class 
Op-Ed 

Opening Doors for Kids 
W5YI Novice Course 
You Wit! Upgrade 
See also CW 

ENCODERS, DECODERS 

Homfcdower 2 
Two-Tone Encoder 

GENERAL INTEREST 

Aoove and Beyond 

Above and Beyond 

AR in National Emergencies 

Buyer Beware 

Choosing a QSL Card 

Civil Air Patrol 

Drifting Along the Tetegraph Tr 

Drifting Along the Telegraph Tr 

Drifting Aiong the Telegraph Tr 

Drilling Along the Telegrapn Tr 

Ham Profiles 

Ham Radio at Its Best 

LASHE's Commandments 

Look North! 

Looking West 

Looking West 

Looking West 

MARS and Amateur Radio 

Meteor Scatter 

On the Road and On the Air 

Passions Of trie Ether 

Patents Are Unique 

Propagation 

Propagation 

San Salvador Earthquake 

MOBILE OPERATION 

Aenal View 

Full Duplex 32 AT 

Hand-held Transformation 



AUTHOR 

W5PFG 

KD5EA 
WA1 FHB 
WA1FHB 
N9CLX 

WA9HDE 

N8GNJ 

Neal 

NA5E 

KAflNTK 

W4THU 

KA1HY 

WA9FPU 

W9NGP 

KZU 

W6DDB 

NA5E 

K9K2T 

WB6VGE 

WBflVGE 

WABOHX 

KA1HY 

WB4DCV 

WA4BLC 

WB9RRT 

N4RVE 

N1FID 

NA5E 

WBSiGP 

KF6DF 

WB6VGE 

W5PFG 

WB9RRT 

WB9RRT 

WB9RRT 

KABJOHV 

N7DFR 

Harshbarger 

Msgee 

VP2ML 
KT2B 
WBSVGE 
VP2ML 

VP2ML 

VP2MI 

VF2ML 

VP2ML 

VP2ML 

W2NSDH 

Richard Phenix 

Nowafc 

NOSM 



KA90IH 

NSFU 

N6HVK 

N6HVK 

N6HVK 

N6HYK 

N6HYK 

N6HYK 

N6HYK 

N6HYK 

N6HYK 

N6HYK 

N6HYK 



DESCRIPTION 

interface standards 
propagation 
packet BBS 
Pans 

Yaesu control 

064 

less expensive computers 

for C-64 

Brass Racer review 

w/o learning code 

2.1 kHzSSBand4O0Hz 

cooe practice 

kayer review 

lips 

teaching 

code practice 

no code 

teaching 

koyers and decoder 

keyer project, with schematic 

review 

CW learning psychology 

induclance checker 

m ai ntenance.'repai r 

review 

experimentation 

conslruction 

review 

1 G Hz detector mount 

FSfi* 

winding ooils;foroid& 

frame to lower anienna; review 

frequency counter, review 

Digital Auloranging 

tips 

safely switch 

PC board fabrication 

basic principles 

k\\ 

DX primer 

Canada {FN24) 

HT review 

Mt. Athos 

using RTTY 

IOTA designation 

United Arab Emirates 

1 60 meters 

Mafyj Vysloskij 

St. Pierre and Mk^uelon 

Inl'l app. form (proposed) 

software review 

case tor their necessity 

list 

list 

news 

rules for 

Nauru 

Iceland 

Pitcairn Island 

Australia 

Cambodia 

Anita 

Japan 

Luxembourg 

Christmas Island 

pXpeditioners 

DX how-10 



ISSUE 

JUN 

JAN 

JUN 

JUL 

AUG 

JAN 

AUG 

DEC 

SEP 

JUL 

FEB 

JUL 

DEC 

JUL 

JUL 

JUL 

MAR 

JUL 

MAY 

JUL 

DEC 

JUL 

NOV 
MAR 
JUL 

JUN 

DEC 

FEB 

OCT 

DEC 

MAR 

NOV 

SEP 

JUN 

AUG 

AUG 

JUN 

JAN 

JUN 

JAN 

DEC 

FEB 

MAY 

JUN 

JUL 

SEP 

NOV 

DEC 

AUG 

JAN 

SEP 

JAN 

JAN 

JAN 

JAN 

JAN 

FEB 

MAR 

APR 

JUN 

JUL 

AUG 

HEP 

NOV 

DEC 

JAN 

JAN 



Phenix in each issue for international news. 

KZ1Z ham radio scnoof project 

WB2J KJ NYC junior rad^o dub 

KC0ES Humor 

NA5E promoMng ham radio 

WB2MGP cl assroom program 

Norwood review 

KOHBO easy approach 



W5PFG remote 

WB7CPT conslruction 

KT2B Mid-Atianlic VHF Conference 

KT2B best and worst of '87 

W9JD bemg prepared 

WD6HCL used equip, shopping caveats 

WA6OHX buyer's guide 

KA9KAF privileges 

W6CK memoirs 

W0CK memoirs 

W6CK memoirs 

W6CK memoirs 

K A 1 H Y Leon id Lafjulin U A3CR 

KA1PZV 14.275 MH* 

VP2M L for QSL Managers 

NA5E Canadian/Soviet Ham Trek 

WA61TF radio nostalgia 

W A61TF . 220 MHz and FCC 

WASfTF 220 MHz and FCC 

W1ZM history 

WB5KYK calendar of meteor showers 

KA&OVA tech nomad 

N4RVE ham archetypes 

W6PFG protection 

W1XU planetary influence 

W1XU the troposphere 

W9ELR emergency Operallons 

W7XU mobife antennas 

WB2MIC review 

Nit LRT Kenwood Mini mod 



APR 
SEP 
JUL 
APR 
JUN 
JUL 
JUL 



JUL 
JUL 

JAN 
FEB 
AUG 

JUN 

SEP 

DEC 

FEB 

MAR 

APH 

JUN 

APR 

APR 

JUN 

JAN 

FEB 

NOV 

DEC 

SEP 

MAR 

FEB 

OCT 

SEP 

MAY 

JUN 

APP 

NOV 
DEC 
AUG 



p r 40 
p.4€ 
p.22 
p..60 
p.54 
p.35 
p.2S 
p.14 

p.40 
p.10 
p.46 
p.20 
p.19 
p.3T 
p,24 
p.18 
p 103 
p.55 
p. 06 
p. 60 
p.11 
p.4 

p22 

P-34 
p,39 

p.42 
P-95 
p,32 
p.40 
p. 95 
p.73 
p. 11 

P-42 
p 10 
p44 
P-57 

p.ao 

p. 26 

P-54 

p 102 
p. 75 

p.15 
p,84 

p.85 
p.87 

P-71 
p.S9 
p.77 
p 10 

p. 7a 

p.49 
p32 
p. 39 

p.4& 
p,14 
p. 31 

p.a? 

p. 106 
p,1O0 
p.87 
p. 95 
p.87 
p,&9 
p.73 
pfl'1 
p.28 
p.11 



p.14 

p.46 
p,44 

p.ttO 
p.14 
p.37 
p34 



p£e 

p.14 

p-62 

p4S 
p.32 
p.32 
p.44 
p.12 
p.34 
p.50 
p. 50 
P36 
pB5 
p,11 
p85 
p. 72 
p.S6 

p.ao 

p.100 
p23 
P-22 
P-11 
p.35 
p.39 

p.et 

p.76 
p.13 

p. 70 

p-ea 

p 19 



73 Amateur Radio ■ December, 1988 09 



—■ 



ARTICLE 

MOBILE (contmved) 

Mobile Antenna lor 2 Meiers 

Ouest For Ultra Portahikty 

7*0 Meiers Aboard lh& Winnebikd 

WSE WP-727 and Com-Rad CR2/4A 

PACKET 

ATV 

Bicyde-Motjile Packetaering 

Digicom §4 

Emergency "Pochsl" Packet 

Pac-Comrn Micro Power TNC 

Rachel 

P&cfcel Tatk 

Packet Talk 

Packet Talk 

Packet Tuning indicator 

ORP 

POWER SUPPLIES 

Aula- VIM 1 

AulfrVIM 

C-34 Power Supply 

Charging, w/q Overcharging 

Charger, NiCd 

Inverter. Low Power 

Ludvtgson Porta-Pow'r-Pak 

Power Supply Modulo 

QRP 

QRP 

QRP 

Winnebiko's Solar Power System 

PREAMPLIFIERS 

1COM *G-35S Masi-Mounted 70cm 
Oscilloscope Preamplifier 

RDF 

Datonq DF package 
Direction-Fading Loop 
Homing In 
Homing In 
Smart "S". Meier 

RECEIVERS 

Converter Receiver 
Don-'t Lose Merino^ 

(COM IC^TOOQ 

LF Eng L-101 S R-ac^iving System 

Micro- 20 Receiver 

ORP 

REPEATERS 

ATV 

ATV 

CES 51QSA-II interconnecl 

Kenwood 4 tOQA 

Lap-Top Hopoater ControlEar 

Looking West 

Looking West 

Looking West 

Maggiqre HI Pro Repeater 

Motion AK-tO 

Packet Talk 

Repeater Controller 

Uftimale Repeater I Dor 

RTTV 

RTTY.BAS 



AUTHOR DESCRIPTION 

W4JC Harada MT^ 

N4RVE Tech Nomad 

N4RVE problem solving 

KA1 H¥ review 

WBBOCD EARWARN 

N4RVE Pac-Comm 

W2UP packet system C-64 

WAtFHB portable digipeater 

WBSMIC review 

WB6RQN emergency communications 

WBGFIQN modems 

WB6RQN net protocols 

WB6RQN NBFM radios for oackel 

WSEKV lor $15 

WB8VGE digital QHP modes 

W4RML 5^15 V supply 

W4RNL Part 2, Bench Supply 

WA4GUW 3052 regulator replacement 

YVGBVQR battery back-up charger 

WB7CPT selectable 

ND6T circuit 

NASE review 

K1BQT regulator 

WB3VGE QRP5'er 

WB8VGE solar cells 

WB8VGE load- acid baltery 

N4RVE schematic 

KT2B preamplifier 

Pugh op artd video amps 

WA4BLC revle* 

WA4U2M bandaid tuning box 

KflOV inlroduclion 

K8JOV loop anlennas 

N6JSX circyh for T-hurttere 

WB2EUF forVFO 

K9ELJI RAMloEPR0MNllC0MR7lA 

receiver 
K3RVMGGEZZ review 

WB9RRT review 

KTBQT loll superhet in DC receiver 

WBflVGE Two-Fer recede r schematkr 



ISSUE 

MAR 
AUG 
FEB 
MAR 

DEC 

APR 

AUG 

APH 

AUG 

APR 

MAR 

JAN 

FEB 

DEC 

JUN 

AUG 
SEP 

FEB 
DEC 
JUN 
MAY 
FEB 
APH 
FEB 
AUG 
DEC 
MAY 

JAN 
AUG 

MAR 

JUL 

NOV 

DEC 

AUG 



YVBtfQCD 


coordination 


W&rjQCD 


cOfirdirUiLrtn 


WA4TEM 


review 


W3HW 


crossoand repeater mod 


KFSWO 


schematic 


WA6ITF 


coordination 


WASITF 


coordination 


WA61TF 


coordination 


K1ZJJH 


review 


KA1JJN 


review 


WBeRQN 


Oigipeeter 


N1AAQ 


low cost 


K7PF 


C w or voice 



MAY 
NOV 
FEB 
APR 

FEB 

MAY 

NOV 

NOV 

NOV 

MAY 

JUL 

AUG 

NOV 

OCT 

JUN 

JAN 

NOV 



p 26 
p.2Q 
p. 12 
p.31 

p. 55 
p41 
p. 22 
p24 
p.40 
p.67 
p.77 
p. 80 
p.70 
p,24 
p.67 

pl2 
p27 
p. 63 
p.34 
p. 74 
p. 90 
p.1& 
p. 20 
p.BO 
p,76 
p,71 

p. 21 
p.47 

p. 39 
0.22 

P-1* 
p. 52 
p24 



MAR p.96 



p,20 

p.44 
p.51 
p. 29 
p6Q 

p.54 

p.ea 

::.1t 
p. 39 
P27 
p. 65 
p. 96 
p. 78 
p.10 
p.58 
p.60 
p.61 
P-4S 



WA3AJR 



;-i\\YAv> neeodo, C&Gfi 



JAN p84 



ARTICLE 

RTTY (continued) 
RTTYLOOp 
See correclion of RTTY.BAS, SEP p. 57 and MAY p.73 



RTTV Loop 

RTTY Loop 

SATELLITES 

Decatur Nam 

Hamsais 

Hamsais 

Hamsais. 

Hamsats 

Hamsata 

Hftmtats 

Ham sat s 

Hamsats 

Hanisata 

History of Project Oscar 

Satellite Awards 

UoSATs 

UoSATs 

Why DoSatallii.es? 

TRANSCEIVERS 

lOGHzpolaplexer 

Allnco24T 144/440 MH* 

Full Duplex 32AT 

Going Microwave 

Helping and Hopping |he HW-9 

ICOM IC-375A 220 MHz Multi-Mode 

ICOM IC-475A 70CM 

ICOM IC 900 FM Transceiver 

Kenwood TM-221 A 2 Meier 

Kenwood TR-7&1 A Multi-mode VHF 

Kenwood TS-1 40 HF 

Midland 13-509 

Pee Wee Thirty Transceiver 

See correction in OCT issue, p.94 
Pee Wee Thirty Transceiver 
Pulsed Bi-Pha&e Dlgild 
Pulsed Bi-Phase Communications System 
Ten Tec Paragon Transceiver 
TH- 110 Transceiver 
Yaesu FT-747GX Transceiver 

TRANSMITTERS 

Beacon Transmitter 

Sea correction note tn JUN issue, p.100. 
ORP 
Tool a Transmitter for AM 

TRANSVEHTERS 

Above and Beyond 
Above and Beyond 
Deluxe Transverter for 1 7S0 M 
SSB Electronics LT-33S 
W2CRZ 902 MHz Linear 

VIDEO/VISUAL 

AEA PK-FAX Software 

ATV 

FAX Program, AEAPK-232 

Inexpensive Display 

Packets Full of Pixels 

Weathersais 

Wealheraats 

Weathersats 

Wealhersats 



AUTHOR 


DESCRIPTION 


ISSUE 




WA3AJR 


PK-232 


MAR 


PB1 


MAY p.73 








WA3AJR 


,J CPR" soltware 


JUL 


p.ee 


WA3AJR 


PC-Pakratt Terminal Program 


AUG 


p.63 


weeuuE 


launches educational sat 


DEC 


p28 


WASZIB 


AMSAT OSCAR 10; corcanfeedhom 


MAR 


p. 64 


WA5ZIB 


AM SAT OSCAR 1 1 


APR 


p.74 


WA52I8 


AEA PK-232 modilicatiflin 


MAY 


py? 


WASzie 


upn nk, downlink modes 


JUN 


p.7B 


WASZIB 


AMSAT OSCAR 13 


SEP 


p.67 


WA5ZiB 


telemetry decoding, satellites 


JAN 


p.90 


WASZIB 


tefemetry decoding, satellites 


FEB 


p.ftfl 


WA5ZIB 


the rnicrosata 


NOV 


p. 59 


WASZIB 


as update 


DEC 


PJ95 


K6LFH 


beginnings 


MAY 


p.27 


WB5RMA 


diverse awards 


MAY 


pM 


NSAHD 


British connection 


MAY 


p.20 


NSAHD 


British. Part 2 


JUN 


p. 29 


N5BF 


past and future 


MAY 


pll 


WBfltGP 


full-duplex on 3 cm 


OCT 


p.20 


WA80HX 


review 


OCT 


p.t3 


WB2MIC 


review 


oec 


p68 


WB6N0A 


AflflTRlOGAlOGHz 


AUG 


p,70 


WBWUZ 


adjustments 


FEB 


pSO 


KT2B 


review 


JUN 


p26 


KT2B 


review 


JAN 


p.2t 


KT2B 


review 


APR 


P34 


KT2B 


review 


NOV 


p. 13 


N1BLH 


review 


FEB 


p. 18 


WA4BLC 


review 


APR 


p.30 


WS9YBM 


modiltcatlons 


DSC 


p,27 


AC9E 


30 meier 


SEP 


p.30 


AC9£ 


Pari 2 


OCT 


p. 33 


K6HH 


communications system 


JUN 


p34 


K6HH 


Part 2 


JUL 


p.40 


NX2C 


review 


MAY 


p.14 


K1BQT 


review 


APR 


p-24 


WA4BLC 


review 


JUL 


p12 



N4HCJ 



circuit 



MAR pJ6 



WB8VGE 


The 6L8 Special 




JAN 


p 104 


W2IMB 


106 kHz 




FEB 


p.44 


KT28 


LMW oscii circuit 




APR 


p63 


KTSB 


LMW mixer board schemata 


JUN 


p.64 


WD4PLI 


VLF band 




FEB 


p2l 


KT26 


902 MHr linear; review 


OCT 


p.27 


KT2Q 


33 cm 




OCT 


p.30 


WBBOCD 


video 




APR 


P-38 


WB4QCQ 


video soltware 




NOV 


p.77 


WBOGAI 


Screenfax 




MAY 


p.49 


N1VC 


WEFAX 




OCT 


P-77 


WDHAOX 


packet scan 




OCT 


p-10 


WBaDQT 


Image processtng, 


circuit 


JAN 


p.62 


WB8DOT 


pixel values 




FEB 


P&4 


WB8DQT 


image processing 


hardware 


APR 


p,72 


WBSDQT 


scan converter software 


JUN 


p,70 




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il, was easy." Learn detailed theory not only The questions and 
answers en your tesl. Novice, Tech., General, Advanced, Extra 
Iheary courses on audio casseUes SI 9-95 each . 

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VHS video cassettes will show you everything you need to know 
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Amateur 
p adio s chool 



2350 Rosafia Drive ■ Fullerton, California 92635 

(714) 990-8442 



Number 16 on your Feedback card 



CIRCLE 2SS ON READER SERVICE CARP 



Index: 

December 1988 



FP'31 1 ^ l-t-ifkiiit-'-l-prl'i Cp 

2N2222A tt 27 

Amiga .,..,.._,,.,,... 14 

AMSAT-OSCAR 9,65 

battery charging/regulation - . 3471 

C-64H2S 14 

Carolina Windom Antenna 49 

Chrisimas Island 84 

EARWARN NET.... 55 

FET 21 

Hitachi HMSrBI 16 22 

ICOM32AT 68 

IC0Mltfl71A 20 

KIOV.JflftttteilPE... 53 

K9EUI,8obRoehrig 20 

KASKAF, Phil NowaK 12 

KB1UM, Michael Jay Geier 72 

KF6DF, Robert Fisher 95 

KT2B,PetePutman 75 

lightning protect 35 

LM3$a/339 27,34 

loop antenna . 52 

Maiyj Vystoslty] 77 

MC148B 14 

Midland 13-509 ,,,.,27 



Issue #339 



NIFIDJimSammons 


4 » ■ I I 


,95 


N6HYK,L#or>FtetChar 


,84 


Neal., Ralph 


. 14 


NOVRAM ....... 





.22 


PK232 


J M. m L L L 


. 95 


PT-25QOA 




78 


RDF 




5? 


RS^32.. 


, - - . 


. 14 


SAREX-2 




m 


TE-144K«y«r_ . r . 


. _ . . . 


. ii 


VP2MUChod Harris 


... 1 1 _ 


77 


W1 XU, Jim Gray. . 


.-_... 


110 


W2EKY, Ronald B.Koester . . 


, 24 


W7KU,Ariis$N. Thompson . . 


. 63 


WA3AJn,MarcLeaveyMD ,. 


107 


WA46LC, Bill Ctarke 


. . m 


WA5Z18, Andy Mac Alliste r. . 


66 


WA6ITF, Bill Pasternak 


.,83 


WA9FPU, Men Short.,.,,. 


„ 19 


WBflXD. Mike Stone 


. 55 


WB2MIC, Hand-8onialEQwskJ . 


. 68 


WB8VGE, Mike Bryce 


.71 


WBSVOR, Dennis KnilteJ 


r r (J^ 


WB9YBM, Klaus Spie 


S , , . . . 


71 



90 73 Amateur Radio • December, 1988 






A FANTASTIC 

GIFT 

IDEA! 



PRINTED 

CIRCUIT 

BOARD 

CLOCK 17\x 17" 




A unique gift for th« office or home. 



Available colors: 

blue/silver/white 
black/silver/white 

green/gold 
(battery operated) 



Price: $59,95 + $5-00 s/h 



To order: Send check or M/O to: 

WINTER DESIGNED CLOCKS 
267 Court Road 
Winthrop,MA02!52 
(617)846-5745 



Please allow 2-4 weeks for delivery 



CIRCLE 64 ON READER SERVICE CARP 



INDUSTRIAL PRINTER SALE 

IDEAL FOR INVOICING, BUSINESS FORMS, PACKET RADIO, TELETYPE. 
OR ANY HEAVY PRINTING APPLICATION. WHY USE A GOOD LETTER 
QUALITY DOT MATRIX OR DAISY WHEEL FOR PRINTING INVOICES AND 
FORMS. MONITORING PACKET & RTTY WHEN A HEAVY DUTY DOT 
MATRIX PRINTER IS ALL THAT IS NECESSARY? 

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> MADE FOR 
CONTINUOUS DUTY 

• 4 INTERFACES 
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FOR MORE INFORMATION, OR TO ORDER, PLEASE CALL: 

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IL AND TX RESIDENTS INCLUDE APPLICABLE SALES TAX 




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Your Ham Dollar Goes 

Further At 

call or write for special quote 



When it comes (o 

FAST DELIVERY HONEST DEALING ana 

PROMPT/DEPENDABLE S-E-H-V-l-C-E back-up 



We don't just adverse it — WE GIVE IT 1 




cc*>& Zieaf 



In 1937, Stan Burghardt (W0IT) h because of his intense interest in 
amateur radio, began selling and servicing amateur radio equipment 
in conjunction with his radio parts business. We stand proud of this 
long-fasting tradition of Honest Dealing, Quality Products and 
Dependable "S-E-R-V-hC'E"! 

Above all, we fully intend to carry on this proud tradition with even 
more new product lines plus the same "fair" treatment you've come 
to rely on. Our reconditioned equipment is of the finest quality with 30* 
60 and even 90-day parts and labor warranties on selected pieces. 
And always remember: 



SELECTION 



SERVICE 



SATISFACTION! 



AMERICA'S MOST RELIABLE AMATEUR RADIO DEALER" 

SELL-TRADE 

New & Reconditioned 

Ham Equipment 

Call or Write Us Today For a Ouotef 
You'll Find Us to be Courteous, Knowledgeable 

an J Honest 

phone (605) 886-7314 
fax (605) 886-3444 



— WE 


SERVICE 


WHAT WE 


SELL — 


AEA 


Belden 


Icom 


Nye 


Altnco 


Bencher 


JerofdyDelhi 


Palomar 


Amerrtron 


Bird 


Kantronics 


Radio Callbook 


Amphenol 


Butternut 


KDK/Encomm 


Rohn 


Amp Supply 


Centurion 


KUI 


Telex/Hygain 


Antenna 


CES 


Larsen 


Ten-Tec 


Specialists 


Cushcraft 


MFJ 


Trio-Kenwood 


Astron 


Daiwa 


Mirage 


Unadilla/Reyco 


B & W 


Hustler 


Moseley 


Yaesu 



STORE HOUftS: 

ft P.M. |OT) 

MOHQlf Ife, FilDAT 

OKIIUmtDATl 

irMti p.m. (art 
aow© 

MHIDMl HOI I D1T1 




Write today for our latest Bulletin Used Equipment List. 



182 N Maple 

P.O. Sox 73 

Watertown, SD 57201 




Gef the most of HF Mobiling 

Yaesu FT-747GX 

SPECIAL OFFER! 

CALL TODAY 
FOR SPECIAL QUOTE 



CIRCLE 92 ON READER SERVICE CARD 

7$ Amateur Radio • December, 1989 91 



THE WORLD 

1$ Yours Fir lily 

$5.00 



CBTOTEN 

73 has led the way on CB-to-IO meter conversions. Take 
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# TitJe 



Issue 




Yes, places you've never even 
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Lists of dozens of IARU mem- 
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other map available anywhere! 
ARRLs DXCC map doesn't even 
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73 Magazine offers readers our 
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Mail Your Order To: 

73 Magazine, WGE Center, 
Peterborough, NH 03458 



1 Bandplan and Crystal Info May 77 

2 Conversion Data fVlay 77 

3 Kadio Shack TRC 47 Jul 77 

4 E,F, Johnson Messenger 123A Jul 77 

5 Hy-Gain 670B Jul 77 

6 Arilerirm Suggestions Dec 77 

7 Radio Shack Realistic TRC-1I Dec 77 
tf The Fublieom ] Feb 78 
9 How about SSB Conversions? Jul 7% 

10 Radio Shack TRC- II and TRC74 Aug 78 

1 1 Radio Shack R ed ist ic Mi ni 23 Sep 7S 

12 Hy-Kangt:5&LA ;F[y-Gain| Sep 78 
\:\ KracoKCB-2:i]OB Oct 78 

14 Lafayette TL-tsatSSB- 75 Nov 78 

1 5 Radio Shack Rea fistic TRC-452 No ■ v 78 
16' CBWatkie^Tntki^ Conversion Nov 7fi 
17 Sharp Mndel CB-80OA Jan 79 

] H S BE Si debander 111 and Pa ce 1 2 3 A j a n 79 

1 9 Midland 1 .3-882C and Other PLL Rigs May 79 

20 Lafayette SSB-75 and SSB-lOO JutiTS 

21 Royce 1-655 Nov 79 

22 Johnson Viking 352 Nov 79 

23 CBlu 10 FM Parti fanflO 

24 CB In 1 FM - Pa rt II Feb SO 

25 More Talk Power for 3 he TRC- 1 1 Mar 80 

26 Sears RoadTa]kcr 40 Mar 80 

27 Penney s SSB Rig Apr SO 

28 The Poly-Paks 40 Channel CB Board jun 80 

29 The Cobra 132 Jul 80 

30 Mew Li f e Co r SSB C B R igs Jul SO 

31 Double Your Channels in SSB Conversions Jul 80 

32 On Ten FM Aug 80 

33 Put That Hy Gain CB Board to Use Sep 80 

34 P e-i k i n g and Twea king H y ■Gai n Boa rds M a r 82 

35 CBLnCW?|Hy-Gain| Jul 82 
3b Maximum Modulation for CB Conversions Dec 82 
i? Beef Up Your CBto-CW Conversion Feb S3 
33 Add a Digital Readout to Your CB Conversion Feb S3 

Send S3. 00 for the first article and $1.50 each thereafter, jusl 
choose the article numbers and call with a credit card number 
or send a check or money order to: CB u> Ten, 73 Amateur 
Radio Magazine, WGE Center, Peterborough NH Q345& (60S- 

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92 73 Amateur Radio * December, 1988 



UNCLE WAYNES BOOKSHELF 



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73 Amateur Radio • December, 1988 93 




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Tech tips 



Number 32 on your Feedback card 



PS Fix for the PK-232 

The AEA PK-232 is a very popular terminal 
unit. I've had mine for a year now. Recently, 
though, tt developed a problem. The Pakratt 
sometimes lost its presets in memory, even 
though the memory backup batteries 
checked out OK. The three LEDs on the left 
side of the display lit up randomly, The unit 
sometimes locked up and didn't print a 
thing. 

I soon found out that the problem was in 
the voltage regulator connection to the cir- 
cuit board, A screw with lock washer and nut 
at the bottom of the board loosened up, due 
to the heat sink temperature. This screw 
connects the output of the regulator from the 
heat sink tab to the circuft board. Tightening 
down this screw improved the connection, 
but there is a better way and permanent fix to 
this problem. 

To make a permanent fix, solder a wire 
to the center tab of the LM-317T voltage 
regulator and the other end to the anode 
of diode D12< If the tab is cut off too short, 
you wifl have to replace the IC with a new 
one. (Radio Shack has them in stock.) Apply 
heat sink compound to the regulator rC 
before mounting it to the heat sink unit. To 
remove the circuit board from the chassis, 
unscrew the six screws on the top of the 
board and the knob, and nut on the 
threshold pot on the front of the unit. The 
board will then lift out (don't bend any 
of the LEDs), You may have to hold the 
screws on the bottom from turning to loosen 
up the top ones. After you are done with 
the modification, carefully replace the board 
and align it, then replace the six screws, 
nut, and knob, 

Recheck connections before applying 
voltage to the unit, then fire it up. Be sure 
the memory batteries have been replaced. 
You will get the autobaud message asking 
to print an ""* to set the RS-232 port. The 
Baudot LED will be lit. Reset the missing 
presets. Turn off the unit, unplug the power 
then replace the top of the metal cabinet 
and the six screws. Now. install the unit 
as before and plug in the power and RS-232 
cable and you're ready for problem-free 
operation. 

Remember to observe safety precautions 
when working around ICs lo prevent static 
shock damage, and watch your soldering to 
prevent shorts and damage to the printed 
wiring. 

I love my Pakratt and have been very 
satisfied with its performance, Although 
you may not have this problem for a while, 
it will eventually come up T so don't pull your 
hair out until you check this regulator 
connection. What seems like a complex 
problem may be this simple. Here is the 



Pearls of Tech Wisdom 



corporate address if you need them for 
advice or IC upgrades. AEA Inc.. Units O&P, 
2006 196th S.W.. Lynwood, WA 98036: 
(206) 775-7373. 

Robert Fisher KF6DF 

5994 Arden Ave. 

San Bernardino, CA 92404 

Lightning Protector 

As I settled the dust in the new shack, I 
found that my previous lightning protect sys- 
tem was inadequate. I sifted through the 
materials that had been pack-ratted away 
and came up with a system that satisfied my 
needs, 

The materiafs I used were; a sheet metal 
box, measuring 7* cubed, enough SO-239s 
for each of the antenna systems I have, cop- 
per braid stripped from old coaxial cable, 
star washers and nuts to secure the SO-239 
to the box, solder and soldering iron, and a 
drill. 

On the bottom of the sheet metal box, I 
drew a pattern of the SO-239S, leaving 
enough space between each to allow secur- 
ing with star washers and nuts. I also left 
enough room to label each one. I then drilled 
the patterns and reamed the holes to take off 
any sharp edges. I connected the SO-239s 
in series by soldering the end terminals to 
the copper braid A short strip of braid was 
cut and soldered to the shielding coupler of 
each SO-239, to insure complete grounding. 
I cut a longer strip of copper braid long 
enough to reach the ground rod outside the 
shack. The series of SO-239s then fed 
through the open end of the box, so the 
threaded end protruded through the pro- 
drilled patterns. The SO-239s were then se- 
cured with the star washers and nuts and 
labeled. The longer strip was run to the 
ground rod and secured with a damp. 

This system saved me the cost of buying 
commercially made lightning arresters 
and splicing my coaxial cable. Now when 
the thunder starts to rumble, I simply screw 
my coaxial connectors to my home-brew 
lightning arrester and pray like everyone 
else that 1 don't take a hit. I do feel better, 
however, knowing that, if I do take a direct 
hit, the energy will not travel to my radio 
gear. I would rather replace my antenna 
system than expensive radios. 

Jim Sammons N1 FID 

Route 2, Box 3530 

Jodie Lane 

Fairfield Center, ME 04937 



Have a Tech Tip? Send it int Authors of 
printed Tech Tips receive a free one-year 
subscription to 73Magazin&. 






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CIRCLE 339 ON READER SERVICE CARD 

73 Amateur Radio * December, 1988 95 



Number 33 on your Feedback card 



ADVERTISERS 



R.S.# page 

65 AEA 108 

+ ARRL 109 

243 AXM 85 

279 Ace Communications {C A) 42 

355 Ace Communications (IH) 15 

335 Ace Systems .,-._. 23 

68 Aerospace Consulting , . . 53 

194 All Electronics 47 

■ Amateur Electronic Supply SB 

288 Amateur Radio School 90 

314 Amentron 81 

89 Antennas West 28 

90 Antennas West 2B 

236 Antennas West . , , . . . 73 

302 Antennas West 47 

303 Antennas West 1 04 

304 Antennas West 104 

5 Antennas West 94 

107 Antennas West 53 

82 Antennex 73 

271 Antique Radio Classified 28 

338 Ashton 5*1 

■ Associated Radio 86 

1 6 Astron Corp 41 

357 At Fab 95 

363 Atlas Radio 111 

105 Atlas Radio 104 

158 Azimuth Communications ...-., 86 

137 BAB instruments 16 

53 Barker and Williamson 79 

41 Barry Electronics 43 

42 Bilal 47 

94 BilfTrulockK9RKA-ATV 94 

176 Bird Electronics 37 

156 Buckmaster Publishing 28 

7 Buckmaster Publishing 73 

92 Burghardt 91 

• Butternut Electronics 37 



R.S.# page 

356 C&S Sates 51 

• COMB. ... ... 73 

• CBC Internationa] .... 53 

• CES 94 

* Call Sign Cups 15 

157 Cleveland Institute 73 

186 Coaxial Dynamics 109 

343 Comm-Pute 2Q 

99 Communications Concepts . , . . . 47 

121 Communications Electronics ...33 

10 Communications Specialists ... 99 

345 Computer Radio 85 

12 Connect Systems , 1 

* Control Products Unlimited .... 15 

306 Creative Control Products 73 

147 Data Com International 74 

352 DATAK ■ 18 

* Delaware Amateur Radio 26 

263 Dentron 94 

102 Dentron 102 

103 Centronics 73 

15 Doppler Systems 74 

339 DRSI 96 

112 BH, Yost 53 

133 EGE„ 112 

291 Electron Processing 94 

• Electronic Equipment Bank 

...47,53,104 

8 Elktronics 85 

* Engineering Consulting 85 

58 Fox Tango 74 

339 GGTE 95 

17 GLS Electronics 40 

327 GTI 73 

326 GTI , 80 

72 Glen Martin Engineering 74 

273 Gordon West Radio School 104 

346 Great Circle Maps 15 



R.S.# page 

175 HalTronix. 38 

* The Ham Station 83 

* HamtrOnics(NY) 25 

309 Hamtronics (PA) . . . 67 

* Heath Company 100, 101 

303 Horizon Manufacturing 91 

269 Hustler . . .„ 109 

354 ICOM C2 

84 iCOM 69 

358 Intercon Data . 80 

97 International Radio 86 

272 Jun's Electronics . . . 107 

235 K-40 Bl 

* Kenwood C4, 7, 8 

11 L.L.Grace 64 

23 Larson Antennas . , 2 

320 MAO Electronics 53 

24 MFJ ... 3 

25 Madison Electronics 23 

47 Maggiore Electronics 66 

336 Magnaphase . . 85 

* Maryland Monogram 23 

1 01 Maxcom 88 

241 Media Mentors . . 37 

162 Michigan Radio 21 

348 Micro Computer Concepts 48 

295 Micro Control Specialities .,,,,. 18 

252 Midland Technology 48 

187 Mission Consulting 48 

1 63 Mobil© Mark Antennas ..... 38 

127 Motron Electronics 80 

* N6KWQSLS 53 

323 National Tower 31 

349 Naval Electronics 40 

130 Nel-Tech 48 

* Nemal Electronics 100 

292 Omar Electronics 53 

i PC Electronics 40, 54 

152 PaoComm 23 

1 78 Pacific Cable 47 



R.S.# page 

68 Periphex .;,,, 28 

66 Pi po Communications 16 

87 Printer Productivity , 15 

30 QEP's 28 

145 QSO Software 40 

1 15 RF Connection 48 

142 RF Enterprises ,98 

78 RF Microtech 28 

* Hr Parts ■ . , .,,.... u ......... . 51 

356 Rad-Comm 48 

150 Radio Works . 43 

34 Ramsey Electronics 39 

254 Ross Distributing 28 

73 S&F Amateur Radio 51 

1 4 Sangean America 26 

332 Satellite City 16 

73 

* CBtoTen 92 

* Code Tapes 92 

* DX Map . . , 92 

* QSLs 92 

* Subscription 17 

* Uncle Wayne's Bookshelf 93 

274 Smiley Antennas SB 

250 Software Systems 48 

244 Software Systems 95 

51 Spectrum Communications .... 82 

183 Spectrum International .,.,.... 65 

37 Star Tone Electronics . . 26 

232 TE Systems 38 

268 Todd W. Skogen 53 

* Tropical Hambore© 50 

136 Unadilla 48 

* Univerisal Amateur Radio . . 18 

298 VHF Communications 53 

79 Vanguard Labs 53 

361 Vioroplex 94 

38 W9INN _ „ 28 

353 William Nye 32 

64 Winter Design Clocks ...... 91 

165 Yaesu C3 

351 Zeltwanger Electronics 21 



Easiest Packet Radio Ever! 



Is F E A R keeping you from joining the thousands of hams who are having the time of 
their lives with packet? FEAR no more! Here's the easiest packet radio set up yet — and 
you don't even need to buy one of those TNCs — just let your PC do the work. The DRSI 
PC* Packet Adapter plugs into your IBM PC (or clone) and gets you on the air In min- 
utes. Seconds even. The one-page Quick -Start-Guide will have you instantly 
going like an expert. It doesrft even keep you from using your 
PC for other work! Now. in addition to everything else, you'll 
have a dual-port TNC with cross-band digipeating,,.even if you 
don't even know what that means right now. Find out why 
thousands of hams are so excited — get your feet wet in 
packet with the DRSI system. Its only $139.95, 



.^^ ^^L ^^ ^^ ^^ 



To get going on the HF bands you'll want the DRSI HF* Modem/ 
Tuning Indicator — an extra $79,95. Go first class and get both — 
or stick to VHF with the basic POPacket Adapter. Find out for your- 
self why packet is the fastest growing phase of amateur radio today. 
It's a ballf See it at your dealer today. 



AAA 





Digital Radio Systems, Inc. 

2065 Range Rd. A Clearwater, FL 34625 A 



Packet Radio 

without a 

Packet Radio TNC 

[800] 999-0204 
[81 3] 461 -0204 



96 73 Amateur Radio * December, 1988 



CIRCLE 229 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



Number 34 on your Feedback card 



DEALER DIRECTORY 



CALIFORNIA 



Burbank 
New HAM store open and ready to make a DEAL. 
We carry all lines, ship UPS, and arc open Sunday. 
A-TECH ELECTRONICS, 1033 Hollywood 
Way, Burbank CA 91505; (818) 845-9203. 

San Diego 
Hard to find parts, surplus electronics, standard line 
items. Hams, hobbyists, industrial professionals — 
from nuts & bolts to laser diodes ... Electronically 
speaking, Gateway's got it! M-F 9^5:30 Sat. 9-5. 
GATEWAY ELECTRONICS, 4633 Convoy St., 
Sail Diego CA 92 1 1 1 ; (619) 279-4802. 



COLORADO 



Denver 

Hand to find pans, surplus electronics, standard line 
iten^ Hams, hobbyists* industrial professionals— 
from nuts & bolts to laser diodes.. Electronically 
speaking. Gateway's got it! M-F 9-5:30 Sat, 9-5. 
GATEWAY ELECTRONICS, 5115 N, Federal 
Blvd. #32, Denver CO 8022 1; (303)458 5444. 

Englewood 
Rocky Mountain Amateur/ Short wave Specialists. 
Ten-Tec. Yaesu, JRC-NRD* Sony. MRL KLM, and 
other fine gear. New and Used, Vi%a/MC. Antennas, 
Books , and Discount Prices, too! ALLIED APPLI- 
ANCE & RADIO. 4253 South Broadway , Engle- 
wood, CO 801 10; (303) 761-7305. 



DELAWARE 



New Castle 
Factory authorized dealer! Yaesu. ICOM, Ten-Tec. 
KDK, Kenwood, AEA. Kantrontcs. Santcc. Full 
line of accessories. No sales tax in Delaware One 
mile off 1-95. DELAWARE AMATEUR SUP- 
PLY, 71 Meadow Road, New Castle l)L 19720; 
(302) 328-7728. 

Wilmington 
Delaware's friendliest bam store, Also Shortwave 
supplies. AMATEUR & ADVANCED COMMU- 
NICATIONS, 3208 Concord Pike, Wilmington 
DE 19803: (302)478-2757. 



FLORIDA 



Stuart 

Radio Shack Computers and all other equipment . 
Nationwide. Best prices. Call FREE on orders over 
S5<L COTRONICS INC., Radio Shack Dealer, 
2200 S.E. Federal Highway, Stuart, FL 34994 

(407) 2JWi-3<U0. 



[ 



IDAHO 



1 



Preston 
Ross WB7BYZ has the largest stock of amateur 
gear in the Intcrmountain West and the best prices. 
Call me for all your ham needs. ROSS DIS~ 
TRIBITING. 78 S. State t Preston ID 83263; 
(208) 852-0830. 




Wellington 
We have it! ASTRON. BUTTERNUT, ENCOMM, 



HEATHKIT, GORDON WEST. KANTRONICS. 
LASER COMPUTERS, MFJ, RADIO SHACK, 
TEN-TEC, VALOR ANTENNAS & more. Small 
town service with discount prices. D ANDYS, 
124 So. Washington, Wellington, ICS. 67152, 
(316)326-6314. 




Littleton 

Reliable hamstorc servicing New England, Full line 
of Kenwood and I COM stocked and serviced. AEA. 
ARRL Publications. AnphenoL Alpha Delta. 
Austin, Avanli, Alinco, Ameco, Bencher. B&W. 
Cu she raft, Carol Cable, Daiwa. Hustler. KLM. 
Kcnpro, Larsen, Rohn, RF Concepts* Tokyo Hy- 
po wcr. Trac Kcycrs, Vibroplcx, Wei/,, etc, TEL- 
COM, INC., 675 Great Road (Rl. 119) Littleton 
MA 01460; (508) 486-3400. (3040). 




St. Ixiuts 

Hard to find parts, surplus electronics, standard line 
items. Hams, hobbyists, industrial professionals — 
from nuts & bolts to laser diodes.., Electronically 
spiking, Gateway's got n! M-F 9 >-3n Sat 9 _s. 

GATEWAY ELECTRONICS, 8123 Page Blvd., 
St, Louis MO 63130; (314) 427-61 16. 



NEW HAMPSHIRE 



Derry 

Serving the ham community with new and used 
equipment. We stock and service most major lines: 
AEA, Astron, B&W, Cu she raft. Eneomm, Hy- 
Gain. Hustler. ICOM, Kenwood, KLM. Larsen, 
Mirage. Moslcy; books, rotors, cable and connec- 
tors. Business hours Mon.-Sat. 10-5, Thursday 
10-7. Closed Sun. /Holidays. R1VENDELL 
ELECTRONICS, 8 Londonderry Road, Derry 
NH 03038; (603)434-5371 . 



NEW JERSEY 



Eat un I own 

Electronics Supplies for amateurs. Ten -Tec, Barker 
and Williamson. Cushcraft. Hustler, etc. ATKIN- 
SON AND SMITH, 17 Lewis St., Ealontown NJ 
07724(201)542-2447, 

Lyndhursi 
A full service Ham Radio Store! Discount sales 
and service on most major brands. Monday to Friday 
10:00am to 7:00pm. Saturday 9:00am to 3:00pm 
"A mile south of Re. 3, ABARIS SYSTEMS. 
227 Stttyvesant Avenue, Lyndhurst NJ 0707); 
(201)939^)015. 

Park Ridge 
Bergen County's oldest and only SWL/Amateur 
dealer. Specializing in HF receiving systems, anten- 
nas t ham/SWL accessories* books. Kenwood, JRC, 
Yaesu, Icoro. 1 mile from Garden State Parkway 
Exit 172. Tu-Fri 10-5; Sat 10-3. GILFER 
SHORTWAVE, 52 Park Avenue, Park Ridge, NJ 
07656; (201) 391-7887. 



NEW YORK 



Jamestown 

Western New York's finest amateur radio dealer 



featuring 1 COM~Larsen- AE A-Hamtronics-As- 
tron. New and used gear. VHF COMMUNICA- 
TIONS, 915 North Main St., Jamestown NY 
14701. (7 1 61664-6345. 

New York 
New York City's Largest Full Service Ham and 
commercial Radio Store. BARRY ELECTRON- 
ICS, 512 Broadway, New York NY 10012; (212) 
925-700(1, 



NORTH CAROLINA 



J 



Greensboro 
9a.m. to 7p.m. Closed Monday. ICOM our special- 
ty-Sales & Service- F&M ELECTRONICS, 3520 
Rockingham Road, Greensboro NC 27407; (919) 
299-3437. 




Columbus 

Central Ohio's full -line authorized dealer for Ken- 
wood , ICOM. Yaesu, Ten-Tec, Info-Tech, Japan 
Radio, AEA, Cushcraft, Hustler, and Butternut- 
New and used equipment on display and operational 
in our 4000 sq.ft. store. Large SWL department, 
too. UNIVERSAL AMATEUR RADIO, 1280 
Aida Drive, Reynoldsburg (Columbus) OH 
43068; (61 4 j 866-4267. 



PENNSYLVANIA 



Trevose 
Same Location for over 38 years. HAMTRONICS, 
DIV. OF TREVOSE ELECTRONICS, 4033 
Brownsville Road, Trevose PA 19047; (215) 357- 
1400. 



TENNESSEE 



Memphis 
M-F 9-5; Sat 9-12; Kenwood. ICOM, Ten-Tec, 
Cushcraft, Hy-Gain, Hustler, Larsen. AEA, Mi- 
rage, Ameriiron, etc, MEMPHIS AMATEUR 
ELECTRONICS, 1465 Wells Station Road, 
Memphis TN 38108; Call Toll Free: (800) 238- 
6168. 



TEXAS 



Dallas 

In Dallas since 1960. We feature Kenwood, ICOM, 
Yaesu, AEA, Butternut, Rohn, amateur publica- 
tions* and a full line of accessories. Factory autho- 
rized Kenwood Service Center ELECTRONIC 
CENTER, INC. 2809 Ross Ave., Dallas TX 
75201; (214) 969-1936. 

Houston 
Hard to find parts, surplus electronics, standard line 
items, Hams, hobby ists* industrial professionals— 
from nuts & bolts to laser diodes.,. Electronically 
speaking. Gateway's got it! M-F 9-5:30 Sat. 
9-5 GATEWAY ELECTRONICS, 10645 
Richmond Ave, 0100, Houston TX 77042; 
(713)978-6575. 

Southwest Houston 
Full line of Equipment and Accessories, in-house 
service, Texas 01 Ten Tec Dealer! MISSION 
COMMUNICATIONS, 11903 Alief-Clodinc, 
Suite 500, Houston TX 77082; (713) 879-7764. 



DEALERS 

Your company name and message can contain up to 25 words for as little as $300 yearly (prepaid), or SI 75 for six months (prepaid). No mention of 
mail-order business permitted . Directory text and payment must reach us 60 days in advance of publication. For example, advertising for the April 
*88 issue must be in our hands by February 1st. Mail to 73 Amateur Radio, Rebecca Nicmela, WGE Center, Peterborough, NH 03458. 



73 Amateur Radio • December, 1988 97 




if enterprises 



We Specialize In Antennas & Towers. 



ANTENNAS 



KIM 



World Clan Ant»nnii for the Serloui Arniteurl 

KT34A.....„ $395.00 KT34XA... *5o5.00 

Monobanders: 80-10 Meiers! 
High Partormance VHF I UHF antennae. 



hy-gam 



TH70XS 
E*ptoreM4 

Monobinoeft 


THSMItaS 
TH3JiS 


204 BAS 203 BAS 
155 BAS 153 BAS 
103 BAS 66 BAS 


205 BAS 
105 BAS 


"VHF, OSCAR 4. VERTICAL ANTENNAS! 
NEW! High Performance 144 & 432 M Hi Antennas 

Ceil For Prices! 



TEN -TEC 




H * I + <■ * ■ 



WINTER SPECIAL! The M A3S." 

The Popular A3 with Stainless Steel 
Hardware at a Special RFE Price 
A4S 

A744 Add on Kft . . , <«..,* 

A3SK & A4SK Stainless Kits 

AV3& A V5 Vertical.. 

APS & APR IS 

40-2CD 2-el. 40 Mir Beam . . 

MonoOerMletm For 10. IS, 4 20 In Stock 1 

617-6B 6 Mir BOOMER 
A50-5. ASM 
A147-11.AM7-20T 



o* V 



il l ■ *! ■ fca ■ i ■ HHii 



W¥^^P¥WW¥f«WW¥¥W¥¥^W 



215WB & 230WB 15 & 30 el 2 Mir e*X 

AOP 1 SalelUI* System Cr 

421 8XL & 3219 for 144-140 MHz ......... 

220B, 424B dOOMcRS mm».>.<h 

Large Inventory Of Other Antennas 6 Accessories 

BUTTERNUT 

^ 



M00ELS61 CORSAIR II 

OTHER TENTEC PRODUCTS; 
Model 565 Paragon 
Model 425 Titan Linear Amplifier 
Model 229A 2KW Antenna Tuner 
Model 2510 Sate* I He Station 

Pull line ot FIHerm, power suppllei, mobile 
antennae, end ■cceeaorlea In atock. 

ASTRON POWER SUPPLIES 

Rack mount and speaker models In stock! 
RS4A , . S37 9S RS-7A .... 49 96 RS-12A , . . 69 95 
RS-20A 88 95 RS35A 135 95 nSSOA.. 19395 
RS 20M . . 106 96 RS-3SM , . 153.96 RS-50M . . 216 95 
VS20M 124 95 VS-35M ,171.96 VS50M . . 232 95 




FT-757 GX1I All Mode Transceiver 




We Ship Worldwide. 



fVnn W PJK j 



HF2V. 



G* 



_ O* SC3000- 
HF5B CALL 

ALWMLMUA 

DX-A $40.96 DX-DD 64.95 DX-KT ... 27.50 

MEWl DXCC Aft band dlpole $79.96 

Full line Alpha Delta switches & TransMrapsE 



6BTV. 
G6-144B 



f 134 96 

66 95 
07 220.-. 
HF 



56TV 

Q7144 

.... 114.96 
Syatemi CALL I 



1124 95 

114. 



TA-33 
TA34 



MOSLEY 

CLASSIC 33 

PRO-67 



AMPLIFIERS & TUNERS 




TONNA 
ANTENNA SPECIALISTS 

ROTORS 

VAESU 

6400/400110 CALL 

G600RC CALL 

KR200QWC CALL 

G540O8...,, ., CALL 



HDA3SL. 

1 Mntiiri+iprt 

HAMIV 
CO 451 



GALL 

CALL 

CALL 

.CALL 

-GAIL 



■MM 

HCWl^^.GALL MftTSQPfe^. ..«.»,.,CALL 



NYE-VIKING 
MBVA 

MAGNUS SOLID STATE HF LINEAR AMPS 



MFJ 

C LOC* S ACCESS0B|ES •"«£*§ 



K6YERS TfJ 




SPECIAL! 

9898 Tuner $275.00 

SSS ELECTRONIC A MICROWAVE 
MODULES TRANSVERTERS, PREAMPS, 
A ACCESSORIES. CALLI 



TOWERS 



HY-GAIN 

Crank-Lip, self-supporting, galvanized steel 
towers. SS rated at 9 ft; HD at 16 ft. 

H0-54H0 CALL FOR PRICES HG-70HO 



ROHN 

Self -sup porting; Ratings; HDBX at ifl ft. 
HBX at 10 ft, BX at 6 ft 

HBX40 . \, HOBX40 ^V 

HBX4«____fjy HOBX46 *y 

HBX 5*,.,. VT BX 64 .... O 

Galvanized steel with base and rotor plale. 
Today's best buy. Frelohl additional but you save 
with our volume shipper's discount! 

GUYED TOWER SECTIONS: 
25G, 45G, 55G Sections and All Accessories In 
Stock Call for Current Prices, 



FOLD-OVER TOWERS: 

FK2S58. -&V 

FK2568. 



Prices 10% higher in western states. 



*# * m ■ n+4* 



FK4644 
FK4564 

FK4564 



....... ...a 



■ <» + + • lt4Hi + 



RCK>F TOWERS 4V CLIMBING BELTS Cain 
TOWER HARDWARE 

Quywlra:3/16EHS/ 1 4 EHS,pof ft 

COM Cable Clamper &1 8/ %,... 

Tumbucklem: 3/6" E k E/E & J 

V| E & E/E & J„ rrw „ i mni 



■ ■ M ■ IMd^l 



,,, "» 1 "" la HJ 



Thlfnbtes: V- M (3/16& V* 'cable) 

Earth Anchor: 4 ft . Screw In 

Preformed "Big Gripe": 3/16 & 'A 

Guy Insulators: 500 0^502 1.09*2.99 



1 a a a p. ■ r i n ■ I < r 



0.3ftr0.49 

6.96/7.95 

12.95/13,96 

a. *-a-i-a**I .aa a lUalar^a 

13,96 
,.2.49/2.99 



BB>aWa*B>anBBB| 



0.30/ 507.70 
8.95.1096 
1596 



PHILLYSTRAN QUY SYSTEMS 

HPTG-210G7-4000J-6700 Cable 
Cable End*: 9901 LD«02LO 
Socket fast Polling Cmpd 

WIRE & CABLE 

BELDEN COAX 

9913 low loea.90.45/rt RG-8X(9258) 0.20 

RG^213/U(S267) J . .0.46 RG-11AJU(e261) . . 0.41 

RG<«nj(8237) 0,36 RG 5aA^(8289» . . 0J5 

RGmi(82H) ...0.40 RG-5aTLK824tJ f „,0,1i 

AG-2l4AX82Ae> tt.25rf1. 
460 Ohm Ladder Una , 0.10 



■ + B-I-BB-B lit! 



......0X>fi 



COPPERWELD ANTENMA WIRE 

So*kil2ga...... 0.10 14^ 

Stranded 14 ga 0.10 

Plua Wide Selection 6eJun« 4 Ineulalon, 



ROTOR CABLE 

Std frtt r 2-1|»._ JKlt Mvy (6-18, 2^16^. . 0JX 
Others In atock 

AMPHENOL CONNECTORS 

PL 259: *td/ellv*f/1#flon _._« .0.69/1 £5/1 + 46 

UG-21B (8261) Type H Mala 2.96 

Ta, angles, adaptors, jacks, ft BNC In atock! 



COAX AVAUUL£ IS PftECUT LENGTHS WITH 
CONNGCTOm ATT ACHSX 



• • CO AXIAL SWITCHES • • 

AN DREW HGJAX 1 CONNECTOR* 

^ ' LDF4-60A ™ CALL 7«*'LOF5-50A 



CALL 




RETURNS REQUIRE AUTHORCATION & 



THANK YOU . . . AND HAPPY HOLIDAYS TO OU R CUSTOMERS AROUND THE WORLD 
RALPH K«m, GEORGE-AD6S, GWEN WMDZLRANDY-KAeVVO, MEL, CHERYL AND BRIAN 

ORDER Oh 

1-800- 2 33- 2 482 

SHIPPING 4N1CAL, MN & DX 

218-765-3254 

TELE FAX 

4933032 RFE Ul 218-765-3308 



Prices »ub|eel to 
change 

Minnesota residents 
adc tx 

Shipping add J t 'tot 



SUE STOCKING CHAR' ^a noted 



HCR Box 43 
Merriflelct, MN 56465 

(Located at Jen. Co. 3&19) 










CIRCLE 142 ON READER SERVICE CARD 




Choice Selection. 



Now you can have it all! Tike all the qualities you ve come to depend on in 
our programmable CTCSS lone equipment Astonishing Accuracy Instant 
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The choice is yours! If standard CTCSS ElA tones do not 
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ory can be changed in your shop with our HHP-1 programmer, 
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Call today toll-free and find out more about this fresh new flexi- 
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ttt all brought to market by the people who intnxjuce the fresh- 
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shipping and one >ear warranty apply 



TS-32 P CTCSS ENCODER-DECODER Based on the time pir>wn 
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SS-32P ENCODER Based on the equally popular 
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SS-32SMP SUB-MINIATURE ENCODER Our 

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COMMUNICATIONS SPECIALISTS, INC. 

426 West Tift Avenue • Orange, CA 9266S4296 



Local (714) 99&3Q21 • FAX (714) 974-3420 * Entire US.A- 1-800-854-0547 



CIRCLE 10 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



TALK IS 
CHEAP. 



Have you heard? For less than 
your AT or XT-compatible com- 
puter can talk! All it needs is the 
HV-2000 Computer Voice Kit from 
Heathkit. 

Reading letters, transcriptions 
and computerized instruction can be 
easier and quicker than you ever 
thought possible, Computer games 
gain a new dimension. Your com- 
puter can even entertain children 
with stories 
and songs. 




If you have 
a modem, 
the HV-2000 
Computer Voice will allow your 
computer to recite reference and 
research information from time- 
sharing services. Or, speak radio 
transmitted ASCII information. 

The HV-2000 Computer Voice 
Card, containing speech synthesizer 
and audio amplifier, plugs into any 
AT or XT-compatible computer's 
expansion slot. An external speaker 
is also included. Versatile, Heath- 
developed software gives you a 
wide variety of voices and easy in- 
terface to high and low level 
languages. 

The HV-2000 Computer Voice. 
At less than $90, talk IS cheap. To 
order, call toll-free 1-800-253-0570. 
■ Use your Visa, MasterCard, Ameri- 
can Express or Heath Revolving 
Charge card. Or call 616-982-3614 
for the nearest store location. 

Heath Company 



A subsidiary of Zenith Electronics Corporation 

Prices, product availability and specifications are 
subject to change without notice. 



Looking west 

Continued from page 83 

and those capable of distributing the net on 
the bands were granted assignments. With 
the number of bridge ports limited to 70 1 no 
individual hams were given special treatment. 

The crowning link to all this was donated by 
Bill Duval K5UGM of Irving, Texas. Bill ar- 
ranged the donation of uplink and air time on 
KSAT satellite radio, KSAT is on the ATT Tel- 
star 303 communications satellite on 
Transponder 19. With the addition of KSAT to 
the quickly filling teleconference bridge, it ap- 
peared as if the distribution was complete. 

Art wasn't sitting on his laurels. He man- 
aged to secure the facilities of the Satellite 
Music Network in Mokina Illinois, ft is state-of- 
the-art: a fullblown Auditronics mixing con- 
sole, audio cart machines, telephone hybrid 
interconnect, and an all-volunteer engineer- 
ing and production staff. 

First chosen for the panel of experts was 
ARRL Counsel Chrisopher D. Imlay N3AKD. 
Chris practices his profession in Washington 
and probably has a better understanding of 
how the Commission functions then anyone 
else in the League. From Ham Radio Maga- 
zine came its Associate Editor Joe Schroeder 
W9JUV. 

Hurt more then any others are the packet 
radio users. They are the fastest growing sub- 
culture in the modern world of amateur radio 
and were depending on 220-222 MHz to be- 
come the backbone of a real-time, coast-to- 
coast bofder*to*border emergency communi- 
cations network. A network, that due to 
channel loading elsewhere on 220 and on all 
other suitable VHF and UHF bands in urban 
areas, will now never come to be. Thanks to 
Steve Goode K9NG in Illinois* their position 
was well-addressed during the NTRN. 

Ed Gray WflSD in Salem, South Dakota and 
Roger Cox WB0DGF in Lincoln, Nebraska elo- 



quently addressed the needs of the EME and 
weak signal operators. 

FM isn't unaffected by this reallocation 
move. The job of making sense out of this falls 
to the nation's frequency coordinators. Every- 
one that now operates below 222 MHz, must 
be redistributed into the urban sprawl above 
222. Thus Karl Pagel N6BVU, president of the 
220-SMA frequency coordination group, 
came to be a part of the interactive panel. 
220-SMA, however, represents the "western 
view" so for balance we prevailed on Gary 
Cantor WA2BAW of the the Tri-State Amateur 
Repeater Council. 

Finally, the Condor Connection. This 
NTRN, through the outspoken Mark Giimore 
WB6RHQ, told the country about the world's 
largest 220 MHz open intertied repeater net- 
work. This is a radio network that permits 
hams throughout California and Nevada to 
talk to each other as if they were next-door 
neighbors, This legendary system relies total- 
ly on the 220-222 MHz band to interlink its 
sites. This system, which has served in nu- 
merous emergencies, will disappear if the re- 
allocation is permitted to proceed. Due to 
overcrowded conditions on other bands, 
there's no place for it to move. 

I have never seen such cooperation be- 
tween the various and sometimes highly diver- 
gent factions of the amateur community- 
While each speaker represented a particular 
point of view, the theme throughout the 2 
hours of on-air activity kept coming back to 
what people like Joe Merdter N6AHU, had 
hoped for. One of unity, of purpose, and an 
ongoing determination to do all that is within 
the power of man to keep 220-225 MHz and 
every ham band for the use of amateurs only. 

The NTRN's message to the FCC and the 
business community is clear: 'We are as one 
and we mean business!" 

Look for details on this NTRN P and info on 
future ones. Happy Holidays from the night 
shift in LA! 



100 73 Amateur Radio • December, 1988 



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Number 36 on your Feedback card 




INTERNATIONAL 



Notes from FN42 

Air mail subscriptions are be- 
ginning for established Hambas- 
sadors to 73 International! New 
Hambassadors* subscriptions wtll 
graduate to air mail on the Janu- 
ary after their first year's third re- 
port (third of the three Hambas- 
sadors send irt each year). This 
wilt improve report fothw-ups and 
help keep information as much up 
to date as is possible in a monthly 
magazine. And Hambassadors 
will be the most up-to-date read- 
ers in their countries f 

Callbook editors around the 
world: See the first item in the 
report from Israel, below. And 
even before receiving his October 
issue with the first revision of The 
73 International Universal Per- 
mit Application. 4X1 MK (not 
4X1 1MK t as mentioned in it!) has 
sent in some good news. Thanks 
to the good offices of the Israel 
Amateur Radio Club (whose 
Membership Services volunteers 
will do the work), visitors to Israel 
wishing to make good their recip- 
rocal licensing privileges no 
longer will have to show up in per- 
son at the Ministry of Communica- 
tions in Tel-Aviv, 

Here's why Send the IARC(PO 
Box 4099. 61040 Tel-Aviv, Israel) 
a photocopy of your valid license. 
a photocopy of the first page of 
your passport (with your photo on 
it) t and a check or MO. for the 
amount of US$ 12 (the Ministry is 
not authorized to receive foreign 
currency, so the IARC does the 
conversion} and the following in- 
formation: Family name, previous 
family name (if changed), first 
name(s), father's name, place and 
date of birth, country of previous 
residence, present address, last 
address, occupation, present and 
previous places of employment 
passport number and country. 
State expected date of arn'val in 
Israel and equipment to be used; 
make, model number, frequency 
range, power output, and types of 
emission. 

Your reciprocal license will be 
kept for you at the address of your 
choice here, OR, if you send the 
I ARC the materials far enough in 
advance ("Give us a few good 
months 1 " writes Ron) the license 
wilt be mailed to your home ad- 
dress. (Ron's regular repon fol- 
lows m this issue.) 



edited by C. C. C. 



December^ special days to 
mention in your QSOs: 1— Nation- 
al Day, Central African Republic 
(5th for Thailand. l?th for 
Bhutan), and Anniversary Day, 
Portugal (30th for Madagascar); 
2— National Holiday, United Arab 
Emirates (3rd for Laos); 5— Dis- 
covery Day, Haiti; 6— Indepen- 
dence Day, Finland (7fh for Ivory 
Coast, 9th for Tanzania, ttth for 
Upper Volta, 12th for Kenya, 16th 
for Bahrain); 10— Human Rights 
Day. Equatorial New Guinea; 
13— Republic Day, Malta (18th for 
Niger); 15 — Statue Day, Nether- 
lands Antilles „ Bill of Rights Day. 
USA; 23— Victory Day, Egypt; 
25— MERRY CHRISTMAS TO 
ALU; 2$—Boxmg Day, Canada. 
Great Britain; 27— Constitution 
Day, North Korea; 28— King's 
Birthday, Nepai 

Special Calendar Note: As this is 
written, in Japan the 63rd year of 
Showa (meaning "enlightened 
peace' 1 } is in its 10th month, 
There may not be a 64th year, be- 
cause the 124th Emperor. Hirohi* 
to. is gravely Hi and an era with a 
new designation wilt begin Year 





AUSTRALIA 

The following is from the fast re- 
port sent in by Jim Joyce VK3YJ 
before he retired as Australia's 
Hambassador to 73 International 
(The WIA should be naming his 
replacement soon.) We call his 
story 'Tour Men and an Island— 



"Willis Island — the site of one 
of the most remote 
'Observing Offices' of Australia's 
Bureau of Metereology. 



One with the reign of Crown 
Prince Akihito, Autumn festivals 
have been cancelled in that na- 
tion, so in your OSOs with Japan 
on November 23rd T rather than 
sending "Labor Thanksgiving 
Day" greetings (as listed on last 
month's international calendar) it 
will be more appropriate to ex- 
press condolences. Sympathy will 
be appropriate for the entire time 
of mourning— which could be as 
long as a year — for the period will 
be a sad one for the Japanese. 
Rice will be planted on sacred 
ground when Hirohito dies, and 
Akihito will eat its harvest in a car* 
emony which completes the rites 
of accession, whereupon he be- 
comes Emperor fully and in every 
way.—CCC 



Willis island's current total population. L to R: P. Giese, C. Clark 
(radioman). P. Dawson (the QIC), andD, Webb. 



Cairns is at 0200.) It is 400 meters 
long, TOO meters wide, and 9 me- 
ters high. The population of the 
island is 4, The morning paper 
sometimes drops down out of the 
sky; the island is bombed (with 
food and supplies) every six 
months. 

This is Willis Island— the site of 
one of the most remote + 'Observ- 
ing Offices" of Australia's Bureau 
of Meteorology, It is staffed for six 
months at a time by a team of 
three Observers and one Radio 
Operator/Technician, whose re- 
ports are used in the tropical cy- 
clone warning system, 

On November 8, 1988. Willis 
celebrated the 67th anniversary of 
its establishment. It has come a 
long, long way since the first team 
stepped ashore onto a bare, 
windswept island, inhabited only 
by birds and turtles. 

Davis, the Australian Antarctic 
Station, was named for the Com- 
mander of the Aurora of the 191 1 
Australasian Antarctic Expedi- 
tion, and Captain John King Davis 
was also responsible for the Willis 
Island station. As Common wealth 



Ft 



Weather from Beyond the Out* 
back." 

It is a tiny outcrop in the Coral 
Sea 400 km east of Cairns, a mere 
speck in the ocean. (If Australia is 
thought of as the face of a clock. 




Pitot's-eye view of Willis Island on the run-in for a drop. 

73 Amateur Radio • December, 1988 103 



R9100 SUPER ROTATOR 



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for the big gun with antenna loads to one ton. All components are designed and select- 
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The control system provides both analog and digital readout of direction to within ± 1 
degree, Provisions for external computer control which allows rotor positioning by 

the mere keyboard entry of a target country's prefix. Software is provided for use with 
most popular computers. 

This quality rotor is the most capable and powerful unit designed for the amateur mar- 
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List $3,975.00 

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Director of Navigation, he saw its 
forecasting value since it sat in the 
cyclone-prone waters of the Coral 
Sea. In September of 1921, he 
rode over governmental objec- 
tions that the cyclone season was 
less than two months away by vol- 
unteering to lead the first party 
himself, Davis didn't fool around, 
and one month later the steamer 
Innisfail dropped anchor off Willis 
and unfoaded a 15-man party and 
150 tons of cargo. 

Sixty-seven years later Willis 
has established coconut trees for 
welcome shade, well-kept lawns 
around the buildings, and con- 
crete paths to the weather-balloon 
launching area, the radar, and the 
beach. The beach is not a place to 
go to swim T however, By official 
decree, the ocean is reserved for 
the large shark population and 
other marine life. 

A large cool room and four 
freezers ensure fresh foods, and 
off-duty hours are made pleasant 
by TV from Cairns or Townsville, 
video cassette films, hi-fi music, 
billiards, table tennis, and a well- 
stocked library. Additional amuse- 
ments Captain Davis wouldn't 
have believed are (1) the mid-du- 
ty-term "bombardment" of food, 
supplies, and what really can 
be called air mail, by the Royal 
Australian Air Force, and (2) un- 
heralded overflights by recon- 
naissance planes which often 
swing by to drop the latest papers. 
Rumor has it that bets are made 
regularly on how close to the front 
door the pilots can deliver a morn- 
ing paper! 

(Next installment: Amateurs on 
Willis Island.) 

Jim wishes to express his appreci- 
ation for their help in his report on 
Willis to Ken McLachlan VK3AH, 
Dave Shaw VK3DHF, Dr Peter 
Barclay VK3FR, Reg Carter 
VK3CAZ, and Bureau of Meteor- 
ology staffers Trevor Farrar (PR 
Officer), Michael Joyce (Weather 
Observer), and the Bureau's 
house jounaL Weather News. 




ISRAEL 

Ron Gang 4X1 MK 
Kibbutz Urim 
Negev Mobile Post Office 
85530 Israel 

A request from the Soviet 
Union has come to me. Alex 
Lavrenchenko UM8MRG, QSL 




Eyal 4X6TC (right) makes contacts from 4X40R in Jaffa (one of the four 
commemorative stations for Israel's 40th Anniversary) while Nir 4X6RK 
logs and fills out QSL cards. (Photo by 4X1 MK) 



Manager for the UM prefix, the 
Kirghiz Republic, would like his 
address to be known to all the call- 
books around the world. It seems 
to me that 73 International is a 
good place to pass this on. It is PO 
Box 392, Frunze-55, Kirghiz 
720055, USSR. 

Congratulations to the Israel 
40th Anniversary Contest win- 
ners! Nearly 400 logs were re- 
ceived from around the world, and 
over 150 different Israeli calls 
were fogged during the 24-hour 
period last April. (Complete re- 
sults may be had from the IARC 
using the above address, for the 
price of return postage.) 

In Europe the top three were 
I5VIT first, SP2FAP r and OH7RS; 
in Asia, JA1BNW\ JA7HMZ, and 
VU2UR; Africa: EA9GS, 
EA8ABG, and EA9JB, From South 
America: LU7EVL, PY5EG, and 
LU1 JDL; and from North America: 
K1 MEM, K3ZO, and W4MLA. The 
first three Israeli single ops were 
424YX (4Z4KK), 4X6UU, and 
4X1MJ. 

Fox hunting DFing gains mo- 
mentum here, perhaps glorified 



by the catching of "Dr. Bereleh/' 
the Tel-Aviv jammer (see my Au- 
gust column, "The Phantom Un- 
masked. 1 '} In July in the Haifa 
area, Moshe 4Z4GM played the 
fox on 2 meters and finally was 
caught on the watls of the ancient 
city of Acre. The Holon Bat-Yam 
Club (just south of Tel-Aviv) plans 
a hunt on 80 meters. 

The packet explosion has 
been such that the 4X4HF BBS in 
Haifa received more messages 
and files than its memory capaci- 
ty, hampering operations. Just 
two short years ago its planners 
never imagined such widespread 
use. 

In July of 1987, Amir Bazak 
4X6TT started a year-long 
around-the-world DXpedition. 
In eleven months he made 67,000 
QSOs from 18 countries, visiting 
22, neglecting no modes, and giv- 
ing many of us new countries for 
our DXCC collection. (Don't con- 
fuse Amir with Barukh 4Z4TT f 
who close to a decade ago put 
some rare ones on the air in the 
Pacific area! They're two different 
chaps!) 




CQ ZONE 37 




ROD HALLEN 
NAIROBI, KENYA 



•:0m- if rwrwa 
qso-wjth 



! > - ; 



~2ML 



m>m» I tfaf 



urfc 



UHf 



>;-,.- 



.:■ W ,'■ : 



QSL VIA KE3A TNX & 73 



D^CQSL Dth*«sl 



A W*MPV OBJ. 



Some of the calls Amir put on 
the air were HSDB, XX9TTT, 
N4MJH/DU8, 4X6TT/DU1, XX9T, 
VK3ETT, AX3ETT, AX9L, 
VK3ETT/VK9, ZLOACF, 4X6H7 
FW0. T2STT h T27DX, 5W1TT, 
4X6TT/KH8, and 4U1UN, Not 
bad at all! Amir is taking care of 
his own QSLing, and cards can 
be sent to his home address in 
the International Calibook. Just 
remember to send return post- 
age! There is no way this young 
man can handle the mailing of 
cards from hrs own exhausted 
pocket! 

To the best of my knowledge, 
Ralph 4X6IF is the first Israeli 
station to make Eaiih-Moon- 
Earth contacts. Using four 
stacked Cushcraft "Boomers" 
fed by a kilowatt, the first historic 
QSO from Israel using the moon 
as passive repeater on the half- 
million mile route (I) was made 
with W5UUN on June 1 this year. 
If you want to work Ralph, 
chances are it won't be on the 
conventional bands, no siree! 
Check out 2 meters or 70 cen- 
tirneters-sateinte, EME, or 
Sporadic E, Ralph likes to sweat 
for his DX! 




KENYA 

Rod Hallen 5Z4BH 

Box 55 

APO New York 09675 

I We welcome KB7NK (take a deep 
breath: ex- 9G1RT t C5AZ, 5T5AZ, 
TL8AZ, TU4BB, EL2AE> 3D2RH, 
ZL0AGS, VK2EFI, VK1HR, /5NO 
/VSS/DU1, WA7N&V, WB&BOW) 
as our roving East Africa Ham- 
bassador (see last month's Kenya 
Roundup Hem). He will be tra- 
veling there extensively for the 
next four years and hopes to 
operate from many countries, (Bill 
KE3A will be his QSL Manager.) 
Rod is a Regional Communica- 
tions Officer with the American 
Embassy in Nairobi; he has 
been a ham since 1962, and was 
an Associate Editor of Kilobaud 
(later Microcomputing; around 
1978.— CCG] 

Kenya celebrates its 25th An- 
niversary this month (December) 
and will be using the special prefix 
5Z25 (so I will be 5Z25BH). On 
October 14 and 15, Kenya was 
represented on the Boy Scout 
Jamboree on the A*r by 5Z4LBP 
(LBP = Lord Baden Powell, Boy 



73 Amateur Radio • December, 1988 105 




Gennady Kofmakov UA9MA. 



RL1P call was used (and will be 
used throughout the year). 

Lots of stations called us, 
primarily at night. During the day 
20 was dead and 15 good only 
mornings and evenings. We had a 
damaged reflector on our 40-me- 
ter 4-el yagi and only a vertical 
loop (delta) on 80 meters. Never- 
theless, on 80 we worked 5Z4, ZS, 
VK, PY t LU, ZP, CX T YB f 5T5, 
CN8— and all that in the middle of 
the summer! 

The ops there are planning to 
put up 5 over 5 for 1 4 r 4 over 4 for 
7 t and a 3-el yagi for 3.5. Big 
plans. ( will be there, multi-multi 
again, for the CQ WW SSB. 

The station ops are making 
plans for a Vietnam DXpedition 
next year, with UL7PAE, 
UL7PCZ, RL8PY and one other. 



In addition to all that, I'm 
involved with the newly organ- 
ized West Siberia DX Club, and 
we hope to have our own bulletin 
and issue an international 
award. We also want to have joint 
US-USSR expeditions, ex- 
change delegates, etc. Many 
hams in the Soviet Union are now 
looking into organizing such re- 
gional dubs to have such plans 
implemented- 

This year I am planning a 
serious effort to be among the 
10 best "Soviet Sportsmen of the 
Year/' and make the grade of 
"Master of Sports, Igternational 
Class." [The former is a Fed- 
eration of Radio Sports title 
awarded those who win a certain 
number of contest honors, 
—CCC] 



Scout founder), operated by Ted 
5Z40TandPalte5Z4EJ. 

The Kenya Award is issued by 
the Radio Society of Kenya (RSK). 
Only contacts made after Decem- 
ber 31 . 1977 count. Ten points are 
needed: 2 points for a contact with 
any 5Z4 member of RSK, 5 points 
for contact with the RSK club sta- 
tion, 5Z4RS. Any band, any mode, 
SWLs eligible. Some past and 
present members of RSK are 
5Z4-BG h BH, BJ, BP, DS, DU, EJ, 
JB t LH, LL, LT, MR. OC, OT, PR ( 
PT, RK, RT r RY, SS, WB, and ZC. 

Send a log photocopy wit- 
nessed by an official of a local 
radio society or the licensing au- 
thority— QSL cards not neces- 
sary— wfth 10 IRCs or US$5 and a 
self-addressed adhesive label. 
Mail to Radio Society of Kenya , 
PO Box 45681, Nairobi, Kenya. 
Put KENYA AWARD on the upper 
left corner of the envelope. 




USSR 

Gennady Kotmakov UA9MA 
PO Box 341 
Omsk - 99 
USSR 




The RL1P antennas, L to R: 36-meter mast with delta loop for 80 t the 
lower antenna of the 28 stack (6 xG), 6x6 el on 21. The op on the tower 
is, yes, Genal 



[The following comes from a letter 
direct from Gena UA9MA and a 
letter from him written in Russian 
and sent via Ed Kritsky NT2X for 
translation. Ed wilt be helping us 
out (as an Assistant Hambas* 
sadorl) with translations and inter- 
pretations, when needed; his help 
plus our plan to send many Ham- 
bassador subscriptions airmaff 

106 73 Amateur Radio * December, 1988 



wilt speed up and make more up 
to date our reports from far-away 
countries.— CCC\ 

I received the August column 
with my first report and will send 
my next one some day! Hit Also 
received my first issue of 73 
Amateur Radio, Thank you very 
much! You made very consider- 
able article with my very short 
report! 

I have been away at a very big 
contest station for this year's All 
Asia Contest, RL8PYL. Exact 
address: RL8PYL, 472300 Kaza- 
kh Republic, Temirtau Box 49, 
USSR. We operated in a multi- 
multi category, 28, 21, 14 days 
and 14, 7, 3.5 nights. We made 
3500 QSOs, with 300 multipliers 
and scored approximately 1 
million points— at least twice the 
previous record I think, A special 



It will be sponsored by the 
Youth Communist League of 
Kazakh Republic (VLKSM), and a 
large sum of money has been 
allotted. 



I am happy to be a Hambas- 
sadorl— Gena. 

\NT2X tells us that the USSR 
"has lifted ail restrictions' on 
the sending of alt eiectronic goods 
and magnetic media (VCRs, PCs, 
etc.) to the country. Tariffs, which 
used to be as much or more t even 
double, the value of items mailed, 
are now down to 10% to 30% 
of the value. He aiso says there 
no longer is a risk of causing 
offense if US dollar bills are sent 
instead of IRCs r which cost $.95 
anyway. 

Readers can now OSL directly 
to Soviet hams and Soviet hams 
can now OSL directly to hams out 
of the country. For more informa- 
tion on the lifting of restrictions for 
Soviet hams, see the August 1988 
"QRX tr column, titled "No Longer 
Just 'QSL via Box 88.'" 

And see other USSR infor- 
mation in the Israel report, above: 
"A request from the Soviet 
Union," 

— ccc]BS 




The RLtPteam, L to R: UA9MA, UL7PAE ["chief"}, UL7PCZ, and the 
op responsible for computer-duping of logs. 



Rttyloop 



Number 37 cm your Feedback card 



Marc Leavey M.D. WA3AJR 
6 Jenny Lam 
Baltimore MD 21 208 

AMTOR 

While sitting in the doctors 1 lounge al a local 
hospital, another physician began gesturing 
to me. Expecting a question about medicine, 
or at least some hospital gossip, imagine my 
surprise when he asked me if I were the same 
Dr. Leavey who wrote 73 '$ RTTY Loop 
column! Thanking htm for the attention, 
I sat back as he challenged me with his 
situation. 

He had recently become interested in AM- 
TOR. While he could hear a great number of 
stations transmitting this mode, he could only 
obtain copy on a relatively small number of 
them. He wondered why an AMTOR station of 
equal signal strength to a conventional Bau- 
dot RTTY station, was so much more difficult 
to copy. 

His problem touches on a basic differ- 
ence between Baudot and AMTOR. repre- 
senting how the advance from the old to 
the new sometimes catches a tad in the 
cracks 

Conventional Baudot or Murray RTTY al- 
lows transmission of data from sender to re- 
ceiver, one way at a time. This is often termed 
"half-duplex" communication. With data 
rates typically of 45.45 baud (bits per second), 
each data pulse lasts at least 22 rns. A noise 
pulse would have to last a substantial time, 
perhaps at least 7 to 12 ms f to destroy a data 
pulse. 

Contrast this with AMTOR, in which a 
special seven level code is transmitted at 
100 baud. Here, each data pulse is only about 
10 ms wide. Consequently, a much briefer 
burst of noise can "take out 1 * a data pulse. 

Therefore, you may get the impression 
that AMTOR is a much less reliable medium 
than Baudot for RTTY transmission. Further, 
even if characters in Baudot RTTY take 
a noise hit, they can often be figured out 
by context. The receiver's brain fills in 
the missing characters. Thus, if you are 
looking at a line that says TO ALL STJTfONS 
your brain has little trouble realizing that 
the third word should be "STATIONS," par- 
ticularly if you know that Baudot codes for 
M A" and +I J" differed by just one bit- Monitor- 
ing a Baudot transmission is no problem. 
Everyone expects "hits" now and then, 
and you develop the knack for reading 
through them. 

Perfect Copy 

AMTOR, however, has one critical advan- 
tage over Baudot— error correction, Each 
character must meet certain bit matching 
criteria to be valid. Groups of characters con- 
taining an error are as invalid as random noise 
and are not displayed. The error correction 
scheme, however, works completely only 



Amateur Radio Teletype 

when two AMTOR stations are in synch with 
each other — that is, when two stations share 
the same timing cycle. 

Stations receiving AMTOR from another 
station with which it is not in synch, such as a 
broadcast station, have only partial error cor- 
rection. AMTOR broadcast stations typically 
send each bit bundle twice. If the first comes 
up as an error on the receive end. the receive 
station looks for the second bundle. If that 
comes up as an error, then the receive station 
puts a blank, question mark,or some other 
symbol indicating the uncorrected error in that 
character's space on the monitor. Unlike Bau- 
dot RTTY, a blank is left on the screen instead 
of a misinterpreted character. 

With a noise-free circuit, the rates of data 
transmission can approach the maximum 
data rate being sent. With a noisy circuit, how- 
ever; the many retransmissions can slow in- 
formation exchange to a crawl. But the data 
witt get through perfectly. 



"AMTOR, 

however, has one 

critical advantage 

over Baudot — error 

correction. Each 

character must 

meet certain bit 

matching criteria 

to be valid/' 



Those of you familiar with packet will see a 
certain similarity between AMTOR and pack- 
et, and indeed there is. With packet, the 
groups are longer and there are other conven- 
tions which have been established, but the 
operating principles are the same 

As with packet, you can command many 
controllers to ignore error checking, and just 
display what is received, That is the way to 
monitor an AMTOR circuit. There are solu- 
tions to these problems, though they're not 
always quite so obvious. It just takes under- 
standing what is going on in a mode to make it 
work the way you want it to! 

We have all kinds of goodies on tap for 
1989, folks. From answering all of your ques- 
tions, to asking a few of my own, I think it will 
be very exciting. Be sure to let me hear from 
you t by mail, by CompuServe {ppn 
75036.2501) or by Delphi (username MAR- 
CWA3AJR). I have had little feedback on a 
Computer Corner here in the Loop. Let me 
hear from you. You really do have input into 
this RTTY Loop* 



800-882-1 343 




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73 Amateur Radto • December, 1988 107 



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Number 38 on your Feedback card 



EASTERN UNITED STATES TO: 



ROPA GA TION 



Jim Gray W1XU 
PO Box 1079 
Payson, AZ 85541 

December 1988 

Conditions may be fair to poor 
on many days during the first and 
fast week of the month. In particu- 
lar, note the 4th-7th, and again 
the 26th-29th. The remainder of 
the month, however, should 
provide fair to good DX condi- 
tions, particularly the period from 
the 1 1th through the 22nd. During 
the fair (o poor days, the Earth's 
magnetic field is likely to be unset- 
tled to active, with the 4l A" index 
running well above normal; i.e., 
over about 10, On days of an ac- 
tive magnetic field, look for north- 
south propagation only on the 
higher bands, with typical "ring- 
ing" or hollow-sounding signals 
from the auroral zone to the north. 

Do not expect any OX on 40, 80, 
or 160 meters during the poorest 
days. Look for some VHF auroral 
openings, however, on the days 
when the magnetic field is most 
active. In particular, 6 and 2 me- 
ters should be good- While on the 
subject of VHF, the Geminid and 
Ursid meteor showers occur 
about the 13th and 22nd, respec- 
tively. Expect some meteor trail 
propagation on VHF bands duhng 
the peak showers, During the 
"Good' 1 (G) days on the chart, you 
will find some excellent DX on 10, 
12, and 15 meters— as well as on 



by Jim Gray W1XU 

20. Darkness comes early at this 
time of year and band openings 
will just about fade out at sun- 
down, except on rare days when 
you may find early evening open- 
ings on 1 and 1 5. Your best times 
for DX will be toward the east in 
local morning hours and toward 
the west in local late afternoon 
hours. For those who enjoy DX on 
40, 80, and 160 meters, the low 
atmospheric noise levels of De- 
cember will provide a good oppor- 
tunity to hear even weak DX sig- 
nals, and days of quiet magnetic 
field conditions will help the coun- 
tries totals of low-band DXers. 

Late afternoon and early even- 
ing hours, as well as early morn- 
ing hours, are the best times to 
listen for DX on the low bands, As 
always, keep your radio tuned to 
WWV at 18 minutes after each 
hour, for the latest propagation in- 
formation. Consult the charts here 
for the most likely times to work 
the countries of your choice on 
Fair (F) to Good (G) days. Al- 
though the winter conditions are 
not quite as favorable for DX on 
the HF bands as they are in spring 
and fall, remember that solar flux 
is constantly rising afong with sun 
spot activity, and the MUFs con- 
tinue to climb during daylight 
hours. Although the northern 
hemisphere is tilted away from the 
sun in tne winter, remember that 
the Earth, in general, is closest to 
the sun at this time of year! 



GMT: 


» 


91 


0* 


o« 


CM 


10 


12 


14 


1« 


H 


ID 


21 




AL45KA 


■ 


20 


- 


- 


- 




20 


20 


- 






15 




ARGENTINA 


20 


Vi 


40 


40 


- 


- 


20 


1.5 


l r i 


10 


10 


1? 




AUSTRALIA 


15 


2Q 


20 


- 


to 


10 


-.:• 




- 


20 


20 


15 




CANAL ZONE 


20 


7D 


20 


20 


20 ' 


■.T. 


20 




10 


10 


1> 


15 




ENGLAND 


40 


4Q 


40 * 


.... 


- 


20 


r> 


10 


15 


20 


20 






HAWAII 


15 


30 


— 


— 


- 


- 


20 


20 


20 


10 


10 


15 




INDIA 


_ 




— 


— 


- 


- 


20 


2D 


- 




- 






JAPAN 


15 


:o 


■» 


- 


- 


- 


20 


20 


- 




- 


15 




Mexico 


XI 


20 


■■■■ 


20 


20 


20 


?0 


15 


10 


10 


IS 


15 




PHILIPPINES 





- 


~ 




w 




20 


20 


- 






15* 




PU£HTO HlCd 


20 


20 


20 


20 


20 


20 


20 


15 


10 


10 


r 




SOUTH AFRICA 


20 


40* 


- 






m 


20 


10 


10 


11" 


15 


20 




- 


- 




U, S S R. 


_ 


_ 


- 


— 


— 


- 


20 


15 


20 


20 




- 




fflEST COAST 


15y2(i?ft/4( 


ao 


160 


IfiO 


1 01 


- 


- 


- 


10 


10 


15 




CENTRAL UNITED STATES TO: 




ALASKA 


15 - 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


20 


- 


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20 


zo 


20 


40 


4Q 


- 


20 


20 


15 


10 


15 ' 


15 




AU$tHALIA 


15- 


20 


20 


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15 


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20 


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- 


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20 


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15 


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20 


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ts 


20 


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20 


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H 


15 




PUEHTO RICO 


15 


30 


40 


40* 


40* 




20 


15 


10 


10 


10 


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40 


- 


— 


— 


— 


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10 


10 


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SOUTH AFRICA 


20 




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20 


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ALASKA 


10 


15 


20 


- 


- 


- 


40 


40 


40 


- 




20 




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1S> 


20 


- 


40 


40 


- 


- 


' 


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ID 


10 






AUSTRALIA 


10 


15 


20 


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- 


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20 


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15 


15 




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20 


20 


- 


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10 


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20 


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15 


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20 


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20 


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15 


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- 


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*Try 80 meters. 

The bands shown represent the highest usable at these times 
on "Good Days." 

Note that the lower frequency bands open first and close last- 



DECEMBER 

SUN MON TUE WED THU FRl SAT 




1 

F 


2 

F 


3 

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4 

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5 

p 


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p 


7 

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8 

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9 

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12 

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13 

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14 

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15 

F-G 


16 

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17 

G 


18 

G 


19 

G-F 


20 

F-G 


21 

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22 

G-F 


23 

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24 

F-P 


25 

F-P 


26 

p 


27 

p 


28 

p 


29 

P-F 


30 

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73 AMULE fcAdi:i 



lf*TEMOTF 0* flWNEMHIP, MAN AflEMENT *.U0 (HiCUIATION 



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110 73 Amateur Radio * December, 1988 



ATLAS RADIO & UNIDEN ELECTRONICS 
TWO LEADERS IN AMERICAN HAM RADIO 




AR/HR2510 
10 METER MOBILE TRANSCEIVER 



Comes complete - ready for installation: Mobile mounting bracket, 
Scanning microphone, power cord, etc., etc. 

Call for price, you will not be disappointed. 



That's right, 
Atlas Radio together with Uniden Corporation of America 
have joined forces to bring you this new exciting product. 

The 2510 tenmeter mobile transceiver. 

Many of the exciting new features are...25W PEP USB/LSB and 25W CW. 
LCD Digital readout display with full frequency coverage from 28.0000 MHz 
to 29.6999 MHz Digital VFO Synthesized for Superior stability. Prepro- 
grammed memory channels. RIT receive Incremental tuning Noise Blanker. 
Touch Tone scanning microphone & much much more. Remember Atlas 
Radio Co. will warranty your 2510 mobile transceiver for two years, full 
replacement, no questions asked. From Atlas Radio & Uniden Electronics, 
two World Leaders in portable communications. Order direct from this ad. 
Call anytime day or night, seven days a week, or write for free color brochure. 
Export inquiries invited. 



*m 



Note: Atlas Radio is fully 
equipped to service our past 
models of equipment, 180, 
210X,215X,350XL,Etc. 




r/Fu, ATLAS 

£3?r RADIO INC. 

PO Box 763 • Lynbrook, LI, NY 11563 

(516)678-3904 



_ 



CIRCLE 363 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



ege 



REMEMBER - BUY EARLY 

YOUR BEST CHRISTMAS BUYS 

GIFT SUGGESTIONS 



ege 



UNDER $25 

BK136 TECH/GEN MANUAL 
CALL BOOKS I960 
BK141 EXTRA CLASS 
BK120 REPEATER DIRECT. 
BK1 02 "NEW "ANTENNA BK_ 
LARSEN KD4142HQ 
KANTRONICS MAX-FAX 
ICOM HS 10 HEADSET 
ICOM HSlOSA/SB 
ICOM LC11,12,0R14 
ICOM 1X24,25,26, OR 27 
MFJ 1 09 WORLD CLOCK 
MFJ 108 24HRDUAL LCO 
MFJ1262 STARTER KIT DtSK 
MFJ12S4 STARTER KITTAPE 
MFJ 2B4 SPEAKER MIC 
MFJ1702 ZPOSJWT.SWrTCH 
UN1DELLAW2AU11 
VANGORDEN Hi-Q 
VANGODEN D10 10M 
VANGORDEN D1 5 15M 
VANGORDEN D20 20M 
VANGORDEN D40 40M 
VANGORDEN OSL CARD 
ARRL 1969 HANDBOOK 



UNDER $50 



ALUANCEU110 
ANT SPEC API 51 3G 
ANT SPEC AP4503G 
CUSHCRAFT CS147M 
CUSHCRAFT ARX2B 
CUSHCRAFT ARX450B 
CUSHCRAFT 124WB 
ICOM HM4&SPKR MIC 
ICOM HM46L SPKR MIC 
K2RAG RAG1 0,15,20 
K2RAG RAG4 2KW BALUN 
K2RAG RAG4040MDIPOLE 
K2RAG RAG8060M DIPOLE 
KANTRONICS KANTERM 
KENWOOD SMC30 
KENWOOD SMC31 
KETSU5 ENCODER 
KETSU6 ENCODER 
LARSEN KG144 
LARSEN KG144PL 
LARSEN AD2/70 
LARSEN KD14142HW 
MFJ 250 WW WET 
MFJ 250 300W DRY 
MFJ 1286 GREY LINE ADV 
NYE 020001 LOW PASSFILT. 
NYE 4040O2OSCIL.W/KEY 
VANGORDEN GSR V 
YAESUFNB10BATTEHY 
YAESUMH12A2B 
YAESU MH18A2B 



5.00 
24.95 

500 
5.00 
18.00 
16,95 
19.95 
24.50 
24,50 
20.50 
13 95 

18,95 
19 95 
19,95 
19,95 
24,95 
19.95 
1695 
14.95 
19.50 
20.95 
22,95 
24 + 95 
4.95 
21.95 



4995 

35.95 

35.95 
38.95 

40,95 

40 95 
38.95 
31 99 
31.99 
35.95 
24 + 95 
45.95 
49.95 
29.95 
49.95 
49.95 
49.95 
45 95 
49 95 
44.95 
43.95 
29.95 
40.95 
26.95 
29.95 
31.95 
29.95 
45.95 
4195 
4195 

4 1 95 




New Hampshire 
New Store Location 



UNDER $75 



ALINCO ELH230G2MAMP 
ASTRON RSlOA PWR SPLY 
AST RON RS12APWRSPLY 
B&W ASW60LSWL ANT 
BENCHER BY1 BLACK 
BENCHER BY2 CHROME 
ICON BP5 BATTERY 
ICOM EX243 KEYER 
ICOM FL32 CW FILTER 
ICOM RC11 OR RC12 
KENWOOD HS5 
MFJ 931 GRND TUNER 
SHURE 444D DESK MIC 
YAESU FNB4 OR FN84A 
YAESU FNB1 2 BATTERY 
YAESU FTS12 ENCODER 

UNDER $100 

ALINCO ELH230D 2M AMP 
ASTRON RS12M 
ASTRON RS20A PWR SPLY 
B&W AS80 BOM DIPOLE 
CUSHCRAFT A743 
CUSHCRAFT A744 
CUSHCRAFT 215WB 
HYGAIN 40M KPT EXP.14 
ICOM BC35 CHARGER 
ICOM BP7 OR BP8 
ICOM GC5 24HR WORLD CLK 
ICOM SM8 DESK MIC 
MFJ 482B MEMORY KEYER 
MFJ 941D TUNER 
SANGEAN ATS B0 1 RECVR, 
SONY AN1 ACTIVE ANTENNA 
TELEX PROCOM250 



72.95 

61.95 
71 .95 
66.95 
54.00 
66.50 
65,00 
64.50 
69.00 
70.99 
70.99 
73,95 
59,95 
64,95 
59.95 
61.95 



89.95 
92.95 
91.95 
94.95 
S4.9S 
84.95 
63.95 
99.95 
79.00 
79.95 
79 00 
89.00 
91 .95 
92.95 
89.95 
79.95 
72.90 



CALL FOR PACKAGE 
DEALS 



UNDER $150 

ALLIANCE HD73 ROTOR 1 1 9.95 

ALINCO ELH260D 2M AMP 124.95 

UNIDEN 55XL SCANNER 135.95 

BUTTERNUT NF6VX 129.00 

DIAWA LA 2 06 5 R 2M AMP 122.95 

HYGAIN 18AVT/WB 13750 

ICOM SM10 DESK MIC 130.95 

MFJ 1 270B PACKET 1 1 9,95 

YAESU MD1B8 DESK MIC 109.95 

YAESU SU726 129.95 

UNDER $200 

CUSHCRAFT AP8 HF VERT. 142.95 

DOCKING BOOSTERWP20 169 95 

HYGAIN 1 058 AS 1 0M BEAM 1 73,95 

HYGAIN CD45II ROTOR 199,95 

(COM FL44A SS8 FILTER 164,95 

ICOM PS15 PWR SUPPLY 156.95 

KENWOOD AT1 30 TUNER 1 84.95 

KENWOOD PS430S 175.00 

MFJ 1274 PACKET 152,95 

SANGEAN ATS303 RCVR 179.95 

UNIDEN 70XLT SCANNER 174.95 



UNDER $250 

CUSHCRAFT A3 HF BEAM 249.95 

CUSHCRAFT R4 HF VERT. 249.95 

DIAWA CNW419 TUNER 225.95 

HEATHKIT HK21 PACKET 215.95 

KENWOOD TH31 BT 220 HH 239,95 

MFJ 1278 ALL MODE TNC 225.95 

SONY 2003 SWL RECEIVER 249.95 

YAESU 6M736 GW MODULE 234.95 



UNDER $300 

AUNCO ALR72T 269,95 

ALINCO DJ100T 2M HH 263.95 

DOCKBOOST.WP727DX 299.95 

HYGAIN 155BAS 265 00 

HYGAIN HAMIV ROTOR 294.95 

ICOM 03AT220MH2HH 269 95 

ICOM U2AT 2M HANDY 286 ,95 

ICOM U4AT 440MHz HH 299.95 

KANTRONICS KAM 284.00 

KENWOOD TH205AT CALL 

KENWOOD TH25AT CALL 

MFJ 989 3KW TUNER 299 .95 

SONY SW1S RECEIVER 284.50 

UNIDEN 200XLT SCANNER 299.95 

UNIDEN 760XLT SCANNER 299.95 

YAESU FT23R 2M HANDY 259.95 

YAESU FT23R/TT2MHH 289,95 

YAESU FT33R220MHiHH 299.95 

YAESU FT73R 440MH* m 269 .95 

PACKAGE 
DEALS 

YAESU 

FTV726R 

OSCAR SPECIAL 

$1079.95 

includes 
FT726R 2m Transceiver 

MH1B8HandMic 

430 MHz UHF Module 

SU726 Dupl;ex Unit 

UPS Brown Shipping 

MFJ 1 278 
$244-95 

includes 

MFJ 1278 TNC 

1 284 Starter Package 

UPS Brown Shipping 

T»T 

TIN-TIC 

PARAGON 
$2245.00 

includes 

505 Paragon 

961 Power Supply 

705 Desk Mic 

UPS Brown Shipping 



Orders & Quotes Toll Free 800-444-4799 



Price* art Mibjed to change without notice or obligation 




New Fait 1986 Buyers 

Guide/Catalog 

Available-Send $1 



EGE VIRGINIA 

14803 Build America Drive, Bldg B 
Woodbridge, Virginia 22191 
Information: (703) 643-1063 
Service Dept: (703) 494-8750 
Fax: (703) 404-3679 

Store Hours: M - F 10-6; Sat: 10-4 
Order Hours: M - F 9^6, Sat: 10-2 



EGE NEW ENGLAND 

224 N. Broadway 
Salem, New Hamshire 03079 
New England {NH Included} 
Toll Free: SQ0-444-0Q47 
Info & Service: (603)898-3750 

Store Hours: MTuWF: 10-5 
Th: 12-8; Sat 10-4 





Our A**od*te *i«e: 
lacombe Dsinbutof t 
Davis 4 Jackson Road 
P.O. 8oi293 
Lacombe, Loutsiana 70445 
Phono: (604) 682*5355 



\ZW 



CIRCLE 133 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



I 



¥>ul be hard-pressed 
to beat the performance of 



Ifoesu's new FT-4U handheld 




Let Yaesu's "next generation" handheld lighten your load! 

Picking up where our popular FT-209R Series left, off, the 2-meter 
FT-411 will amaze with its astounding array of features! 

The brains of a base station. "Sophisticated operation" takes 
on new meaning in the FT-41L You get 49 memories, plus dual VFOs for 
quick band-hopping. Keyboard frequency entry. Automatic repeater 
shift, DTMF autodialer with ten memories of up to 15 digits each. 
Bidltdn CTCSS encode I decode. Selectable 
channel steps: 5/10/12.5/20/25 kHz. Pro- 
grammable band scan with upper/ lower 
limits. Selectable memory scan. And 
extended receive coverage of 140-174 
MHz (MARS/CAP permit required , 
for transmit on 140-150 MHz). ' 

Not bad for a handheld mea- 
suring just 55(w) x 32(d) x 139(h) 
mm (the same size as our FT-23R 
Series HTs)! 

Friendly operation. For ope- 
rating convenience, the FT-411's 
keypad features a "do-re-mf audi- 
ble command verification. Both the 
display and keypad can be backlit 
(brightly!) for night operation at the 
push of a button. A rotary channel selec- 
tor allows fast manual tuning. Or key 
in the frequency directly. Operate VOX 
(with YH-2 headset option). Plus you get 
a battery saver to conserve power 

while monitoring. And a (defeatable) automatic power-off feature 
that shuts down your radio if you forget to turn it off! 

High power capability* The FT411 comes equipped with the 
2.5-watt 600 mAh FNB-10 battery pack.1V>' our optional FNB-12 
5-watt, SOOmAh pack or tiny FNB-9 2.5-watt, 200 -mAh pack. Or 
get 6 watts output by applying 13.8 -volts DC from an external 
power supply 

Swap options with Yaesu's FT-23R Series. Our rugged 
best-seller's changers, batteries, and microphones are fully 
compatible with the FT-41L The FT-23R is the perfect com- 
panion for the FT-4IL, and at a great price! 
r 1Yy oat an FT-411 today. Ask for it now at your local Yaesu 
dealer. Or call 1-800 999-2070 for a free brochure. And experi- 
ence the legendary 
Yaesu HT performance! 






Yaesu USA 17210 Edwards Road, Cerritos, CA 90701 (213) 404-2700. Repair Service: (213) 404 -4884. Parts: (213) 404-4847 Prices and specifications subject 
to change without notice. Specifications guaranteed only within amateur bands. 



CIRCLE 165 ON READER SERVICE CARD 







...pacesetter in Amateur Radio 



Three Choices for 2 m! 



TM-2570A/2550A/2530A 



Feature-packed 2m 
transceivers 



The all-new "25-Series" gives you 
three RF power choices for 2m FM 
operation: 70 W, 45 W, and 25 W. 
Here's what you get: 

• Telephone number memory and 
autodialer (up to 15 seven-digit phone 
numbers) A Kenwood exclusive! 

• High performance GaAs FET front end 
receiver 

• 23 channel memory stores offset, 
frequency, and subtone, Two pairs 
may be used for odd split operation 

• 16-key DTMF pad with audible monitor 

■ Extended frequency coverage for 
MARS and CAP (142-149 MHz; 141-151 
MHz modifiable) 

• Center-stop tuning— a Kenwood 
exclusive! 




Big multi-color LCD and back-lit 
controls for excellent visibility 

The TM-3530A is a 25 watt version 
covering 220-225 MHz. The first full 
featured 220 MHz rig! 



• New 5-way adjustable mounting 
system 

» Automatic repeater offset selection - 
another Kenwood exclusive! 

• Direct keyboard frequency entry 

• Front panel programmable 38-tone 
CTCSS encoder includes 97,4 Hz 
(optional) 




Introducing... 
Digital Channel Link 

Compatible with Kenwood's DCS 
iDigital Code Squelch), the DCL system 
enables your rig to automatically QSY 
to an open channel. Now you can auto- 
matically switch over to a simplex 
channel after repeater contact! Here's 
how it works: 

The DCL system searches for an 
open channel, remembers it, returns 
to the original frequency and transmits 
control information to another DCL- 
equipped station that switches both 
radios to the open channel, Micro- 
processor control assures fast and 
reliable operation. The whole process 

happens in an instant! 



KENWOOD 



TM-2570A 



LAMP REV 







SCAN LOW 



m 

n n 

i u 

iiiiiiiiiuiilllllllllll f 5 




MHz 



IMF 



■» — r — t- 



*COmTO PUSH ON 



CTUN 



144MHz FM TRANSCEIVER 



*y 






LJ 


n 




n 




1 .1 

4r 


1 II 1 





! f.lock char men 



PAIR 
16-17 
IB -19 



DCL 









VOICE 



POWER 



Optional Accessories 

• TU-7 38-tone CTCSS encoder 

• MU-1 DCL modem unit 
■ VS-1 voice synthesizer 

• PG-2N extra DC cable 

• PG-3B DC line noise filter 

• MB -10 extra mobile bracket 

• CD-10 call sign display 

• PS-430 DC power suppfy for 
TM-255QW2530A/3530A 



• PS-50 DC power supply for TM-2570A 

• MC-60A/MC-80/MC-85 desk mies, 

i MC-488 extra DTMF mic. with UP/DVVN switch 
MC-43SUP/DWNmia 
MC-55 (8- pm) mobile mic, with time-out timer 

• SP-40 compact mobile speaker 

• SP-50B mobile speaker 

SW-200A/SW-200B SWR/power meters 

• SW-100A/SW-100B compact SWR/power meters 
SWT-1 2m antenna tuner 



Comptetg service manuafs are available tor ait Kenwood transceivers ar*o mosi accessories 
Speoftcattons and prices are subject to change Without notice or obligation 
Specifications guaranteed on Amateur oands anty 



Actual size front panel 



KENWOOD 

KENWOOD USA CORPORATION 

2201 E Dominguez SU Long Beach, CA 90810 
P.O. Box 22745/Long Beach. CA 9080V5745