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Full text of "Schuylkill County, Pennsylvania; genealogy--family history--biography; containing historical sketches of old families and of representative and prominent citizens, past and present"




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Vol.1 
1153969 



REYNOLDS HISTORICAL 
GENEALOGY COLLECTION 



^ 



ALLEN COUN 



3 1833 01203 8755 



GENEALOGY 
974.801 
SCH8S 
v.l 



SCHUYLKILL 
COUNTY 

PENN SYLVANIA 

Genealogy — Family History — Biography 



Containing Historical Sketches of Old Families and of 

Representative and Prominent Citizens 

Past and Present 



IN TWO VOLUMES 



ILLUSTRATED 






VOLUME I 



CHICAGO 

J. H. BEERS & COMPANY 

1916 



GL v06 

\, 7 9 10-3 : 3 5 



^ 

^ 



1153969 
PREFACE 



The importance of placing in book form biographical history of representa- 

^^ live citizens — both for its immediate worth and for its value to coming 

\Q generations — is admitted by all thinking people; and within the past decade 

there has been a growing interest in this commendable means of perpetuating 

biography and family genealogy. 

That the public is entitled to the privileges afforded by a work of this 
nature needs no assertion at our hands ; for one of our greatest Americans has 
said that the history of any country resolves itself into the biographies of its 
stout, earnest and representative citizens. This medium, then, serves more 
than a single purpose ; while it f>erpetuates family genealogy and biography, it 
records history, much of which would be preserved in no other way. 

In presenting to its patrons "Schuylkill County, Pa., Genealogy — Family 
History — Biography," the publishers have to acknowledge, with gratitude, the 
encouragement and support their enterprise has received, and the willing 
assistance rendered in enabling them to surmount the many unforeseen 
obstacles to be met with in the production of a work of this character. In 
nearly every instance the material composing the sketches was gathered from 
those immediately interested, and all were submitted in typewritten form for 
, correction and revision, thus affording ample opportunity for accuracy and 
\^v reliability. The volumes are placed in the hands of the public with the 
belief that they will be found a valuable addition to the library, as well as an 
invaluable contribution to the historical literature of the State of Pennsylvania. 

THE PUBLISHERS. 



INDEX 



Achenbach Family 759 

Achenbach, Gregory 7o9 

Acker, Mrs. Esther A 931 

Acker Family 930 

Acker, William S 930 

Adam (Adams) Families 

104, 221, 983, 1192 

Adam, George B 983 

Adams Family 104, 221 

Adams, Frank 1192 

Adams, George 105 

Adams, John H 107 

Adams, Eobert W 107 

Adamson Family 247 

Adamson, William R 247 

Alln-ight Families 96, 731, 806 

Alliright, Hiester S 96 

Allen, Charles F 268 

AUen, Lucian H 268 

Alspach, Charles P 317 

Als).aeh Family 317 

Andreas Family 393 

Andreas, Owen A 393 

Angst Family 251 

Angst, John H 251 

Aiiiuinciation Church, Shenandoah 1151 

Archbald Family 35 

Arehbald, Col. James, Jr 35 

Aregood, Isaiah 592 

Aregood, Ossman J 593 

Aregood, Samuel C 592 

Arndt Family 415 

Artz, Elmer E 1032 

Artz Family 1032 

Atkins, Charles M 1 

Auchrauty, J. E., M. D 452 

Bachert, Elias 475 

Baehert Families 438, 475, 659, 818 

Bachert, WUliam 1 658 

Bachman Family 456 

Bachman, Samuel 456 

Baer (Barr) Families 565, 990, 1011 

Baer, E'euben 517 

Bailey Family 3S3 

Bailey. Samuel S 3S3 

Bair. Cyrus W 665 

Baldinger, Albert 690 

Balliet Family 354 

Balliet, Tilghman S 354 

Bannan, Benjamin 163 

Bannan, Francis B 609 

Bannan, John , 609 



.990, 



Bannan, Miss Martha E. . . 

Banuan, Thomas E 

Bare Family 

Barket, Solomon A 

Barlow, Ephraim 

Barlow, Nathan 

Barr, Edward 

Barr (Baer) Families 

Barr, Milton 

Basler, Mrs. Mary C 

Easier, William 

Bast Family 

Bast, Jeremiah F 

Bast, Oliver O 

Batten, George 

Batten, Shadrach 

Baum, Earl D 

Baum Family 

Bauscher, David 

Bauscher Family 

Bausum Family 

Bausum, Frank W 

Baver Family 

Baver, Franklin D 

Beatty, George H 

Bechtel, Edgar W 

Bechtel Family 2, 

]?echtel, Francis W 

Bechtel, Judge O. P 

Beck, C. Lester 

Beck, Edward F 

Beck Families 

100, 466, 1087, 1092, 1141, 

Beck, George 

Beck, Isaac G 

Becker FlamUy 

Becker, Irwin H 

Becker, William 

Behler, Anthony 

Behler Family 

Behler, Samuel B 

Behney Family 

Behney, Prof. George A 

Bell Family 

Bell, James J 

Bendrick, Mrs. Helen 

Bendrick, Joseph 

Ben-Salem Church (Eeformed) 

Bensinger. Charles S 

Bensinger Families 404, 516, 730 

Bensinger, Frank L 

Bensinger, William F 

Bergan, William 



610 

610 

565 

719 

552 

552 

1011 

1011 

990 

566 

566 

496 

496 

498 

1171 

1171 

821 

821 

409 

410 

633 

633 

381 

381 

869 

188 

, 188 

188 

2 

1092 

1087 

1162 
1076 
100 
326 
326 
999 
828 
904 
904 
635 
635 
5.33 
533 
573 
.572 
426 
516 
, 937 
730 
937 
973 



SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PEXXSYLVANL\ 



Berger Family 58, 777 

Berger, John D 57 

Berger, William 53S 

Berk Family 636 

Berk, John K., M. D 636 

Berkheiser Family 544 

Berkheiser, Arthur J., M. D 544 

Berney, Timothy F 683 

Barrett, George 899 

Betz, Peter 671 

Bevan, John 1019 

Beveridge, David '. . . 1027 

Bieht, William F 1099 

Bierstein (Birstou), Pius W 1169 

Billig, William 827 

Billman Family 888 

Birch, Mrs. Margaret D 63 

Birstou (Bierstein), Pius W 1169 

Bisehoff, Conrad 357 

Bisehoff, William C 35S 

Bittle, Charles H.' 473 

Bittle Families 234, 

318, 329, 473, 525, 588 

Bittle, Isaac C 588 

Bittle, John C 233 

Bittle, Marcus 318 

Bittle, Oliver A 525 

Bittle, Mrs. Eosa 320 

Bittle, Samuel B 329 

Bittner Family 906 

Bixler, Irvin H 1055 

Bleiler Family 995 

Bleiler, Thomas F 995 

Bobbin, John J 861 

Boczkowski, William D 348 

Boden Family 89 

Boe, Joseph E 691 

Bolich Families 411, 618, 851 

Bolich, Herman A 852 

Bolich, Louis C 851 

Bolton, George W 900 

Boltz Family 548 

Boltz, Jacob 548 

Bond, Miss Emily 764 

Bond, George 763 

Boner, Mrs. Alice M 1198 

Boner, Ambrose 1197 

Boner Family 1197 

Borbach, Charles C 494 

Borlaee Family II.34 

Bosch, Joseph" C 1214 

Bosehe, Frank 10S4 

BcHighter. Ezra .T 1038 

Bowen, Charles K 695 

Bowen Families 695, 1066 

Bowers, Walter G., M. D 639 

Bomnan Families 194, 1178 

Bownnan, George F 1178 

Bowman, Peter 195 

Boyer Families 176, 421, 725, 1047 

Boyer, John O. J 725 

Brachman Families 797, 1034 

Brachman, Frderick W 796 

Brnchman, Harry ,T 1033 

Bradv, Michael j 413 



Braun (Brown) Families 768 

1072, 1096, 

Braun, Robert C 

Breen, Joseph 

Breen, Patrick 

Brciseh Families 803, 

Brennan, Hon. James E 

Brennan, Michael R 

Brobst, Edward C 

Brobst Family 

Brode Family 

Brode, Samuel 

Brode, William 

Bromraer FamUy 

Brommer, Manuel W 

Brown, Adam J 

Brown, Charles T 

Brown, Edwin 

Brown (Braun) Families 62 

405, 768, 875, 1096, 

Brown, Frank 

Brown, George W 

Brown, Harper H 

Brown, Jacob F 

Brown, John C 

Brown, John K 

Brown, Walter E 

Brown, Warren G 

Brown, William J 

Brown, William W 

Brownmiller Family 

Bruuim, Hon. Charles N 

Bruner Family 

Bryant, Willis L 

Buheck, Charles H 

Bubeck, Clayton W 

Bubeek, John E 

Buchsbice, Mrs. Dorothy 

Buchsbice, Gottlieb 

Buckley Family 

Buckley, William R., M. D 

Buck Rim Colliery 

Buehler, Francis J 

Buehler, Peter 

Buehler, Samuel 

Bull, Jonathan, Sr 

Bull. Ross 

Burke Brothers 

Burke, Edward J 

Burke Family 

Burke, James V 

Burke, Martin M 

Burke, Patrick H 

Burkhardt, James 

Burkhart Family 

Burkhart, Karl W 

Burnhiini, .Tose))h , 

Burnham, William J 

Butz Family 

Butz, George W 



1103 

76,s 

1069 

1069 

1160 

568 

1025 

230 

230 

254 

254 

256 

698 

698 

1103 

768 

152 

1103 
152 
62 

1071 

100(1 

405 

63 

1096 
875 

1121 
540 
726 
168 
115 
162 
561 
561 
560 

102s 

1028 
799 
799 
866 

1020 
519 
519 
770 
770 
350 
184 
184 
350 
182 
183 

1078 
947 
947 
950 
950 
281 
280 



Canfield Family 847 

Canfiold, Prof. Patrick S 846 

Cardiu Familv 1210 

Carl. Abraham 638 



SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



Carl, Mrs. Ellen M 639 

Carl Families 95, 837 

Carl, Frederick 837 

Carl, Harry R 95 

Carmitchell Family 954 

Carmitchell, George B 954 

Carroll, Prof. Charles 257 

Christeson, Capt. Hans C 689 

Christcson, Mrs. Louisa 689 

Clappier. Christian G 342 

Clappier, Peter 342 

Claiiser Families 749, 898 

Clauser, Jacob W 749 

Clay ( Henry) Monument 610 

Clayton, Nelson 296 

Clayton, R. Bruce 296 

Cleaver, James B 77 

Cochran, Andrew B -. 116 

Cochran, William A 117 

Coldren, Darius D 146 

Coldreu Family 146 

Collins, James"B 303 

Collins, Patrick 303 

Conrad. John L 344 

Conville Family 534 

Cook Family 841 

Coombe, John M 852 

Coombe Family 258 

Coombe, Richard 258 

Cooper Family 896 

Cooper, Prof. Jonathan W 896 

Corbe, August 829 

Crawford, Mrs. Alona B 285 

Crawford, Andrew J 284 

Crawford, Samuel G 285 

Crosby, NeQ 838 

Cullen, John J 1211 

Cimimings, Pierce 855 

Cummings, Thomas J 855 

Curran, James 779 

Daley FamOv 823 

Daley, William J 822 

Dampman Family 995 

Danipman, William M 994 

Daniel, Arthur H 1080 

Danncr, Henry 809 

Darkwater Colliery 866 

Daubert Family 601 

Daubert, William H 601 

Davis, E. F. C 43 

Davis Family 585 

Davis, Mrs. Ida H 290 

Da-s-is, John H 288 

Davis, Thomas D . 585 

Davis, Thomas J 153 

Dechert, Daniel, M. D 464 

Dechert Familv 464 

Deebel, John F 556 

Deebel, Samuel 555 

Degler Family 901 

Degler, .Joel S 901 

Deibert, Allen J 747 

Deibert. Charles V. B 834 

Deibert, Daniel 869 



Deibert, Daniel D 

Deibert Families 213, 

576, 663, 677, 747, 834, 869, 

Deibert, George B 

Deibert, James 

Deibert, Samuel J 

Deibert, William F 

Deisher Family 

Deisher, John H 

Delaney Family . 

Dengler Family 

Dengler, Howard 

Derr, Elias 

Derr Families 570, 

Derr, Gabriel B 

DeSilva, Mrs. Ella K 

DeSilva, John S 

Detweiler Family 

Detwiler, Dr. Peter C < 

Dewald Families 437, 

Dewald, Irwin . . . .» 

Dewald, Samuel 

Dewey Family 

Dewey, Michael G., M. D 

Diefenderfer FamOy 

Diefenderfer, Guy H 

Diefenderfer, William H 

Dietrich, Frank D 

Dillman Family 

Dillmau, Daniel D 

Dillman, Daniel K 

Dillman, D. Walker 

Dimmerling FaniUy 

Dimmerling, George F 

Dinger Family 

Dinger, Joel A 

Dinger, Wilson R 

Dirschedl, Henry A., M. D 

Dirschedl, Joseph 

Ditchey, Charles F 

Ditchey, Jacob W 

Dochney, William F 

Dodson, Weston & Co 

Doebler, Mrs. M 

Doebler, William G 

Doherty, Edward A 

Doherty Families 527, 

Doherty, William F 

Dohner, Henry J 

Dolbin Family 

Dolbin, John R 

Donahoe Brothers 

Donahoe Families 574, 

Donahoe, Hon. J. WOfred 

Donahoe, Richard A 

Donahoe, Thomas C 

Donmoyer Family 

Donmoyer, John W 

Donne, Daniel 

Donne Family 

Donoliue, Martin 

Donohue, ilichael M 

Dormer, Martin 

Dormer, Mrs. Mary 

Dornbach, Henry H 



576 

1004 

213 

677 

61)3 

1004 

426 

426 

858 

1048 

1048 

570 

670 

669 

380 

380 

23 

23 

1029 

1029 

437 

961 

961 

535 

536 

535 

1064 

80 

83 

82 

84 

1062 

1062 

667 

735 

667 

295 

295 

1119 

1119 

358 

860 

490 

489 

1156 

1156 

527 

310 

765 

765 

907 

908 

574 

909 

908 

1084 

1084 

1056 

1056 

317 

317 

964 

965 

543 



SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



Douglass, Dr. George 37 

Douglass, Miss Eachel M 37 

Doyle FamUy 240 

Doyle, W. Francis, M. D 240 

Dresher Family 623 

Drumheller Family 512 

Drumheller, Bert E 512 

Duiacius, Eev. John 300 

Ebbert Family 505 

Eberly Family 1102 

Eberly, William 1101 

Ebert FamUies 1037, 1077 

Ebert, George W 1077 

Eberts, Joseph 356 

'Ebling Families 948, 974 

Ebling, Irvin A 974 

Ebling, John M 948 

Eekert, Abraham L 297 

Ehrhart Family 433 

Ehrhart, Mrs. Julia C 436 

Ehrhart, William N., A. M., Ph. D 432 

Eif ert Family 1031 

Eifert, William P 1031 

Eiler, Elwood T 702 

Eiler FamUy 884 

Filer, Frank 703 

Eiler, John 703 

Eisenhauer, Samuel 557 

Eisinger, Charles W 816 

Eisinger Family 816 

Elison, Alois 1091 

Elison Family 1109 

Elison, Peter" 1091 

Elliott, William •...'.. 174 

Emerich, EUjah 222 

Emerich Families 223, 445, 714, 957 

Emerich, Irvin W 714 

Emrick Family 957 

Emrick, Jonathan B 957 

English, Ellis J 1100 

Esterly, Walter P 1071 

Evans, Miss Annie S 746 

Evans, Charles B 746 

Evans, Clarence H 1014 

Evans, Bev. David 1 1131 

Evans FamiUes 86, 801, 978, 1014 

Evans, Nathan 746 

Evans, Samuel J 977 

Evans, William D 1191 

Fahl Families 590, 950 

Fahl, John H 590 

Farquhar, George W 4 

Farquhar, Guv E 4 

Farquhar, Otto E 8 

Farrell Familv 775 

Farrell, Thonias A 775 

Faust, Andrew B 1126 

Fanst, Charles W 927 

Fanst, Mrs. Dora T 309 

Faust Families. 565, 627, 775, 899, 927, 1126 

Faust, Mrs. Rebecca E 1127 

Faust, William G 308 

Fayhev, John B 1190 



Feger, Jacob 642 

Fegley Families 298, 807 

Fegley, Perry W 298 

FeUer, Levi 1093 

Felty Families 1020, 1037 

Felty, Ferdinand 1037 

Felty, John H 1020 

Feniner Family 915 

Fenton Family 684 

Fenton, Ivor D., M. D 684 

Ferguson, Anthony 9S0 

Ferguson, Christopher P 57 

Ferguson, Daniel J 56 

Ferguson Families 50, 980 

Ferguson, Patrick J 50 

Fertig FamUy 396 

Fertig, John 396 

Fesig, Samuel M 850 

Fessler Families 351, 70S 

Pessler, Harry G 351 

Fessler, Jeremiah 708 

Fetterolf Family 826 

Fetterolf, Peter 826 

Fidler FamUy 445 

Filbert Families 11, 177, 248 

Filbert, John Harry 248 

Filbert, Maj. Peter A 177 

FUbert, Peter K., D. D. S 11 

Filer, Elisha, Jr 760 

Fisher, C. Arthur 291 

Fisher FamUy 291 

Fister FamUy 600 

Fister, James H 695 

Fleming, WUliam C 1106 

Flexer FamUy 392 

Flynn FamUy 389 

Flynn, John J 3S9 

Foley, James 1211 

Ford, Edwin ,S89 

Foster, Thomas 165 

Foyle, Martin E 1204 

Fraek, Daniel 77 

Franey, James J 1146 

Franey, Martin 1146 

Frantz, Christian 1180 

Freeman FamUy 709 

Freeman, John W 709 

Freese, William F 945 

Freudenberger, Fred D 399 

Fiitz, Martin 773 

Fryer, Daniel 1081 

Fuhrman FamUy ; 622 

Fuhrman, William F 621 

Gabbert, Christ F 980 

Gable FamUies 1033, 1056 

Gable, Harry P 1055 

Gable, Henry E 1033 

Gane, Uriah 450 

Gane. William U 450 

Gangloff FamUv 878 

GanglofF, Eev. WUliam 877 

Garis, Thomas 925 

Garrett Family 963 

Gazdzik, Father Joseph 495 



SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENNSYLVANL\ 



Gehrig, B. Frank 1194 

Gehrig FaiiiUies 712, 1194 

Gehrig, J. Franklin 712 

Geiger, Miss Augusta 891 

Geiger Family 5G2 

Geiger, Jeremiah D 562 

Geiger, William 891 

Geist, A. Frank 6G4 

Gcist Family 664 

Gensemer Family 235 

Gensemer, Daniel J 235 

Gerber Families 378, 461, 493, 649 

Gerber, William H 493 

Gerhard, Charles 99 

Gerhard Families 443, 485, 717, 903 

Gerhard, Frank 443 

Gerhard, Prof. Frederic 99 

Gerhard, Henry Y 485 

Gerhard, William F 717 

Gilibous Family 1123 

Gilgour, George 309 

Ginther, George C 455 

Ginther, John B 596 

Glunz, Bernard 436 

Glunz, aement B 436 

Goho Family 482 

Golden, Thomas B 713 

Gore Family 412 

Gore, Mrs. Mary E 413 

Gore, Samuel H 412 

Gorman, Joseph H 125 

Gorman, Miss Julia T 125 

Gorman, Thomas 124 

Gowen, Franldin Benjamin 171 

Gray Family 272, 341 

Grav, James C, M. D 272 

Gray, John M., M. D 341 

Green, Thomas 1058 

Greenawald, Daniel A 374 

Greenawald (Greenawalt) Families.... 

374, 597 

Greenawalt. Moses S .597 

Gregory. John 800 

Grieff, Elmer D 506 

Grieif Families 313, 506 

Grieff, William A 313 

Grosser, Edward W 375 

Grosser, George 375 

Grosskcttler, Eberhard C 1183 

Grosskettler FamUy. .1139, 1181, 1183, 1204 

Grosskettler, John 1204 

Grosskettler, Joseph '. . . .1139 

Grube, Charles W 981 

Grube, Ernest 750 

Grube Families 751, 817, 981 

Grube, Lewis J 817 

Grumm, Frederick L 885 

Haber, William 356 

Haeseler, Dr. Charles H 532 

Haeseler Family 531 

Haeseler, Frederick 155 

Hafer Family 794 

Hafer, Jared 794 

Hagner, William 488 



Hamilton, William T 220 

Hand Families 856, 1059, 1063 

Hand, Ira W 1059 

Hand, James Monroe 856 

Hand, John F 1063 

Hand, William E 856 

Hanney, Edward J 779 

Hanney, John F 778 

Hannum, Mrs. A. J 285 

Hannum, Jolin T 285 

Harlor, Thomas 1067 

Harris Family 262 

Harris, John M 261 

Harris, Robert 262 

Harron, Robert 784 

Hartenstein, Peter 340 

Hartman, Simon 763 

Hartung FamOy 407 

Hartung, Thomas 952 

Hause Family 154 

Hause, Frederick H 154 

Haverty, Peter F 1153 

Hawkins, Claude H 499 

Hawkins Family 499 

Header, Monroe 1025 

Heberling, John F 1201 

Hede Family 811 

Hede, John J 811 

Hehn, Alfred 722 

Hehn Family 722 

Heira (Hime) Families. .228, 408, 522, 748 

Hcim, Lyman D., M. D 228 

Heine, Francis W 583 

Heine, Michael H 537 

Heine, Solomon 538, 583 

Heiser Family 926 

Henry Family 414 

Henry, Wilson 414 

Hensyl Family 407 

Hensyl, George S., M. D 407 

Hepler Family 753 

Hepler, Rev. Henry 753 

Herbein, H. J., D. D. S - 624 

Herniany, Phaon, M. D 610 

Hess, Adam 825 

Hess, Jacob A 1107 

Hess, Lambert 463 

Hessinger FamUy 1008 

Hessinger, Howard W. 1008 

Higgins, Patrick T 1195 

Hikes FamUy 848 

Hikes, Morris W 848 

Hill, Dayid K 893 

Hill Family 893 

Hillanbrand, Charles L 608 

Hime (Heim) FamUies.. .228, 408, 522, 748 

Hime, Jacob F 522 

Hinkel Family 472 

Hinkel, William H., M. D 471 

Hoak, Peter 1109 

Hobart, John Potts 44 

Hobart, Nathaniel P 45 

Hock, Conrad, Sr 605 

Hock, Conrad K 605 

Hoeh Family 1054 



SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENNSYLVANLA. 



Hoch, Harry E 103-t 

Hoepstine Family 305 

Hoepstine, James W 505 

Hoff Family 252 

Hoff, WiUiam, Jr 252 

Hoffman Family 521 

Hoffman, Miss Maud E 814 

Hofifman, Peter L 813 

Hoffman, Robert J 520 

Holderman, Mrs. A 721 

Holderman, Carl F 720 

Holland, David A., M. D 595 

Holsliue, Josiah 570 

Holtgreve, Rev. Francis P 1193 

Holy Family Church, Shenandoah 1193 

Honsberger, Jacob S 1085 

Honsberger, William H 1085 

Hooper, Mrs. Mary J 782 

Hooper, Robert W. C 782 

Hopkins, Richard W 1022 

Hoppes, Charles H 934 

Hoppes Families 467, 934 

Hoppes, Joseph S 467 

Horn Families 641, 805 

Horn, George B. McCIellan 805 

Horn, Mrs. Hattie 806 

Horn, William 641 

Houser, Daniel 740, 741 

Houser Family 809 

Houtz Families 422, 425, 1193 

Houtz, Rev. Harry D., A. M 421 

Hoy Families . . ." 201, 389 

Hoy, Paneoast T 201 

Huber, Andrew W 776 

Huber FamiV 776, 1049 

Huber, Lyman A 1049 

Hubler Family 84 

Hughes, David C 1026 

Hughes, David G 987 

Hughes, Francis Wade 41 

Huling, J. W 1201 

Hullihan, John 1199 

Hummel, Engelhart 753 

Hummel, Frank J 752 

Hunter, Alexander 1050 

Huntsinger Family 1039 

Huntsinger, John E 1039 

Iffert, John 772 

Imschweiler, Lorenz 275 

James, Benjamin F 736 

James Family 736 

Jenkins, Frederick C 176 

Jenkins, Gething 514 

Jones, David 1104 

Kaier, Charles D 1 65 

Kaier, Charles F 168 

Kalbach Family 638 

Kaminsky, Rev. A. V 927 

Kane, John 1068 

Kane, John F 1068 

Kanter, Franklin 484 

Kauffman Familv 867 



Kaufman, Alexander 731 

Kaufman, Charles M 186 

Kaufman Families 1S6, 731 

Kaup Family 076 

Kaup, William W 676 

Kear, Albert S 138 

Kear, Charles R 137 

Kear, Edward G , 138 

Kear Family 134 

Kear, Frank G 139 

Kear, Harrison A 139 

Kear, Mrs. Mary B 13S 

Kear, Mrs. Sarah 137 

Kear, WUliam 136 

Keefer, Andrew 286 

Keefer Family 1154 

Keefer, Harry 1154 

Kehler Family 655 

Kehler, Henry C 655 

KeUman Family 764 

KeUman, John H 764 

Keith, Elviu W., M. D 698 

Keiser, G. M 213 

Keiser, William 1188 

Keiter, Samuel 206 

Kemner, Matthias 347 

Kepner Family 352 

Kepner, Mrs. Ellnora 354 

Kepner, W. Clinton 352 

Kerkesliiger Family 149 

Kershner Family 593 

Kershner, John U 593 

Kilgus, Jacob 537 

Killian, Joseph 883 

Killian Familv 883 

Kinimel, Andrew S 270 

Kimmel Family .• 271 

Kistler, Albert S 458 

Kistler, Alvin 646 

Kistler, Charles S 1141 

Kistler Families. . .458, 646, 936, 1095, 1141 

Klase, Edward 755 

Kleber Family 732 

KJeckner Familv 994 

Kleckuef , Samuel 994 

Kline, Adolph 1120 

Kline, Mrs. Caroline 829 

Kline, G. Edgar 710 

Kline Families 711, 941 

Kline, Harry P 941 

Kline, Rev. .Tacob 270 

Kline, Jeremiah 269 

Kline, Robert E 828 

Klingaman Familv 471 

Klinger Family " 1036 

Klinger, Lewis' A 1036 

Knapp, Alanson 452 

Knapp, Charles L 1199 

Knapp Families 452, 1199 

Knai)p, Joseiih P 1199 

Knanber, Henrv 1022 

Knecht, William F 607 

Kncpper Family 887 

Knepjier, Harry 887 

Knipe, Oscar ". 252 



SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



XI 



Knittie, George V 976 

Kiioedler, Ciottfrie.l lOOti 

Koili, Albeit (i 891 

Kouh Families. . .16, 419, 617, 891, 917, 976 

Kocli, Jacob M 419 

Koch, Hon. Richard H 16 

Koch, Salem W 617 

Koch, Walter M 917 

Koenig Family 971 

Koenig, Samuel 971 

Koerper, Harry H 222 

Kolbe, Henry 539 

Kopp Family 652 

Kopp, John"G., Sr 652 

Kramer Family 382 

Krammes, Charles H 700 

Kranimes Family 701 

Krapf, Richard 1213 

Krans Family 667 

Kraus, Henry W 667 

Krauss Family 788 

Krauss, Rev. Howard H 787 

Krebs Family 282 

Kreis, Henry C 766 

Krell, John " 1060 

Krell, George 822 

Krell, P. Philip ! 822 

Kressley, Rev. Clement D., A. M 586 

Kressley Family 586 

Kreitzer, George D 1114 

Kripplebaur, Peter 886 

Kiiebler, Henry Z 845 

Kull, 0. Fred 334 

Kunkel Families 744, 965 

Kimkel, Jonas 965 

Lally, Anthony B 501 

Lally Family 591 

Lamberson, Amos R 756 

Landemann, Henry 785 

Landcnberger, Harold L 1216 

Lattimore Family 657 

Lattimore, Harry D 657 

Laubenstein FamOy 612 

Laubenstein, Frank J 612 

Laubenstein Mfg. Co 613 

Laudeman, Jacob 909 

Laudig Families 563, 679 

Laudig, Joseph H 679 

Laudig, WOliam F 563 

Lautenljacher, Charles 142, 693 

Lautenbacher, Irvin L 693 

Lautenbacher, Jeremiah 142 

Leaman. Mrs. Ida L. W 267 

Lebo, John 841 

Lecher Family 960 

Lecher. William E 960 

Lehr. John 1045 

Leibig, Benjamin F 1017 

Leibig Fam'ily 1017 

Leiby Families 442, 660 

Leiser Family 973 

Lengel P'amily 715 

Lengel, John H 715 

Leonard, John 321 



Leonard, Mrs. Mary A 322 

Leonhardt, Henry 756 

Lesher Families 243, 1042 

Lesher, Feli.^ H 1042 

Levan Family 79 

Levan, Richard K 79 

Lime, John H 462 

Lindenmuth Families 

483, 622, 843, 1124, 1168 

Lindenmuth, George Clarence 843 

Linder, Burd R 373 

Linder, E. Raymond 373 

Linder Family 372 

Lindermuth Families 501, 1124 

Lindermuth, Horace D 1126 

Lindermuth, Joseph 1124 

Loch, Daniel 727 

Loch Family ,727 

Loeser, Christopher, Esq 632 

Lomas, Beniamin 1203 

Long, Charles F 716 

Lorah Family 625, 1130 

Lorah, James 625 

Lord, Henry 687 

Losch, Hon. Samuel Alfred 128 

Loy & Minnig 559 

Loy, Harry F 560 

Lucas, Edwin 918 

Lucas Family 918 

Lutz, Robert J 359 

Lynch, Abraham 226 

Lynch, John H 877 

Lynch, John W 226 

Lytle, L. C 1207 

Me Andrew, Thomas C 600 

MeClure, George W 227 

McCool, Rev. Joseph 98 

McGuire Family 1019 

McKnight, J. J 8.30 

McNoldy, Henry 1051 

Machamer, Oliver 1000 

Madara Families 526, 1118 

Madara, Zaecur P 526 

Madenf ord Family 518 

Madenford, -Jeremiah 517 

Mader, Christian 1082 

Maher, John P 857 

Maher, Mrs. Mary A 857 

Malarkey, E. C". 692 

Mandler, August 9'52 

Mandler Family 952 

Jlanhart, Henry 890 

Manhart, John M 890 

Mardis, William 709 

Marshall, Charles H 64f 

Martin Families 486, 868, llOJ 

Martin, John H 1107 

Martin, Thomas J 868 

Martin, William W 486 

Master, Harry E 1187 

Master, Milton H 1187 

Matz, William 220 

Maurer, Elmer H., M. D 277 



XII 



SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENNSYLVANL\ 



Maurer Families 277, 1088, 1105, 

Maurer, James A 

Maurer, Solomon 

Maurer, William E 

May, Charles H 

Meek Families 199, 

Meek, Walter F 

Meisgeier, August 

MeUey, Rev. Dennis J 

Mengel Family 

Mengel, Nathan 

Mengle Family 

Mentzer, John 

Mercantile Club, Minersville 

Meredith, Mrs. Leonora 

Meredith, John S 

Merkle Family 

Merrick, Edwin E 

Messersmith, Abram C 

Meyers, Charles 

Michael FamUy 

Michael, Harry M 

Miller, Alfred M 

MiUer, Mrs. Annie 

Miller, Charles B 

Miller, Charles D., M. D 

Miller, Edwin J 

Miller Families 

260, 304, 345, 446, 948, 1139, 

Miller, George G 

Miller, Dr. George M 

Miller, Henry L 

Miller. Homer F 

Miller, Jacob 

Miller, John Frederick 

Miller, John J 

Miller, Levi 

Miller, Milton H 

Miller, Oliver 

Miller, Kichard E., Sr 

Miller, Robert P 

Minnig, Floyd H 

Minnig, Rev. George 

Minogue, J. F 

Mohl Family 

Moll, George R 

Moll, Henry 

Moll, Mrs. "Mary K 

Molouy, Edward W 

Molony, Joseph F 

Monaghan, Charles J 

Monaghan Family 

Monaghan, James B 

Monaghan, Peter J 

Moore, Cyrus 

iloore, Mrs. Elizabeth M 

Moore Families 306, 492, 549 

Moore, George H., M. D 

Moore, Harry C 

Moore, John J., M. D 

Moore, Samuel 

Morea Colliery 

Morgan, George W 

Morgan, Morgan 

Morrison Family 



1159 

1088 

1105 

1182 

761 

10.30 

199 

979 

653 

895 

895 

309 

.340 

1101 

78 

78 

476 

736 

833 

631 

815 

814 

304 

782 

446 

102 

276 

1215 

1052 

103 

628 

948 

431 

628 

1215 

645 

345 

, 805 

260 

1052 

560 

179 

691 

742 

206 

886 

206 

785 

784 

1028 

1209 

1027 

1208 

54<.l 

550 

573 

305 

573 

492 

778 

860 

1215 

1003 

501 



Morrison, >s^athaniel C 501 

Morseher, Jacob 62 

Mortimer FamUy 150 

Mortimer, F. P., Sr 150 

Mortimer, F. Pierce, Jr 151 

Moser, Albert L 773 

Moser Family 773 

Moyer, Charles E 932 

Mover Families 

." 31, 274, 314, 584, 915, 932 

Moyer, Huston Eobison 349 

Moyer, Isaac 32, 274 

Moyer, Joseph W 314 

Moyer, AViUiam F 915 

Murphy, Dr. Dennis J 577 

Murphy Family 1064 

Murphy, Michael 1064 

Murphy, John 273 

Naffin, Paul E 71S 

Nagle, Col. Daniel 64 

Nagle Family 64 

Nagle, Gen. James 66 

Neidlinger, Christian 651 

Neidlinger Family 651 

Neiswender, Edwin E 723 

Xeiswender Family 723 

Nesbitt, ilrs. Kate 1068 

Nesbitt, Robert J 1068 

Xester, Aaron 881 

Xester, Daniel 931 

Xester Families 881, 922, 931 

Xester, Salem B 922 

Xoecker Family 173 

Xoecker, James A 173 

Noel Family 946 

Xoel, Stephen E 946 

Norton, Rev. Lemuel B 1147 

'Brien, Michael J 962 

"Connor, Thomas C 253 

'Donnell, Joseph 204 

Oerther, John 547 

Ohl, Samuel 690 

O 'Leary, David 1154 

Oliver, George 416 

Oliver, William 416 

O 'NeUl, Charles 1033 

O 'Neill, George B 985 

Oren, James 727 

Oren, John M 727 

Orwig, Peter 179 

Osenbach Family 796 

Ossman, Aaron 859 

Ossman, Philip 859 

Ost, August W 479 

Ost, Charles F 478 

Oswald Families 775, 882 

Owens, Ma,i. John F 697 

Parker Family 38 

Parker, Hiram, Jr 37 

Parrott, Benjamin F 1135 

Patten Families 831, 985 

Patten, Thomas 985 



SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENNSYLVANL\ 



Xlll 



Patten, William T 831 

Patterson, Frank B 1113 

Patterson, Hon. George E 70 

Patterson, Mrs. Mary A 76 

Paul Family 997 

Paul, John J 1035 

Paul, Thomas \V 997 

Peale, fharles Willson 8 

Peale Family 10 

Peale, Rubens II 8 

Peifer Families 839, 1132 

Peifer, John 839 

Peifer, Hiram 1132 

Pelefhoyyoh, Key. Joseph 973 

Perry, Eourindine 106.3 

Pershing, Judge Cyrus L 181 

Peter Family . . . ." S9-t 

Petery Family 302 

Petery, Oscar D 301 

Petry Family 332 

Petry. Haryey D 332 

Pf eiffer, John 620 

Plioenix Hose Company, Shenandoah. . .1162 

Pleasants, Gen. Henry 172 

Pollard, John H 2.56 

Portland, Charles A 1171 

Portz, Frederick, Jr 191 

Portz, Frederick, Sr 191, 203 

Portz, Harry K 203 

Pott (Potts) Families 44, 170,243 

Pott, John, Sr 170 

Preyost, John 47 

Price, John W 1108 

Pugh, William S 176 

Purccll, Mrs. Mary Ann 1153 

Purcell, Michael ." 1154 

QuaU, Charles Edward, M. D 117 

Quail, Mrs. Emma C 118 

Quandel, Charles 696 

Quick, Samuel 772 

Quigel Fajnily 672 

Quigel, Valentine W 672 

Quinn, Terence J 912 

Randall, Dayid V 290 

Rarich Family 431 

Ranch Family 335 

Ranch. George B 33.T 

Raykowski, Waldysluw 1044 

Relier Family 244 

Reber, George W 207 

Reber, Harry A 207 

Reber, Horace F 244 

Reddy, Christopher C 951 

Reed," Albert L 328 

Reed. Charles 1046 

Reed, Elias 109 

Reed Families. 292, 328, 333, 692, 1046, 1207 

Reed. Frederick B 333 

Reed, Harry D 692 

Reed, Jacob D 109 

Reed, Samuel 292 

Reed, Sherman H 1207 



Reese Families 287, 786 

Kee.se, Frank C 368 

Keese, .John 368 

Keese, John W 287 

Reese, Stephen 786 

Keichard, Joseph 398 

Rei<'hwein, Henry 1021 

Reick, Frederick 431 

Reick, William H 432 

Reid, Robert A 325 

Keilly, Bernard 14 

Eeilly, James B 14 

Reiner Family 1041 

Reinert, Daniel 200 

Reinhart Family 429 

Keinhart, Henry 429 

Reinoehl, Leyi E 1089 

Reiseg, Elmer G 1017 

Reisig, Frederick ,567 

Remaly, Lewis F 832 

Renner Family 1061 

Kenner, William 1 061 

Renuinger Family 970 

Renninger, John 970 

Rentschler Family 614 

Rentschler, Henry D., M. D 614 

Rice, Aaron L 1082 

Rice Family 1082 

Richards, William C 569 

Richcnderfer, John H 1137 

Rickert Family 39 

Eickert, Col. Thomas H 39 

RidgT\ay, Thomas S 610 

Riegel Family 542 

Kiegel, Samuel A 542 

Riland (Kyland) FamUy 852 

Kissinger, Abraham F 1188 

Rissinger, Jacob J 1190 

Robinhold Family 490 

Robinhold, Lewis C, M. D 491 

Robinhold, William L 491 

Rockwell, W. B 180 

Robinson, Moncure 180 

Robinson, William H., M. D lOS 

Rbmberger, James M 1048 

Romberger, Jesse M 1047 

Romig Family 649 

Eooney, Chris't J 1111 

Rooney Family 1111 

Rosenberger, Clemens M 367 

Roseuberger Family 367 

Rubright, Charles H 825 

Rubright Families 825, 939 

Rumbel Families 616, 1157 

Rumbel, Richard T 1159 

Rumbel. Trenton W 1157 

Rump Family 1098 

Rump, William 1098 

Ryan, Martin F 1061 

Ryland (Riland) FamUv 852 

Ryland, William H 852 

Ryon, George W 190 

Ryon, Judge James 190 

Kyon, John Percy 190 

Ryon, Hon. John W 190 



SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



Sabaleski, Mat 1113 

Sabold, William H., Sr 1182 

Sachs Family 801 

Sachs, Henry 801 

Sassaman Family 457 

Saterlee, Britton W 720 

Sehableiii, Josejih 283 

Schablein, Michael 283 

Schaef er, Charles T 830 

Schaefer FamUy 830 

Schaett'er Families 442, 462 

Schaeflfer, George M 462 

Sehaffer Families 807, 1010 

Schaffer, Salem B 807 

Schalek, Adolph W 528 

Schalek, Mrs. Emma R 531 

Schalek, George 528 

SchaUer Family 1008 

SehappeU (Shappell) Families 

541, 682, 733, 988, 1006 

SehappeU, George W 988 

Scharadin (Sharadin) Families 

211, 308, 312 

Scharadin, Harry F 312 

SeharadiD, Jacob A 307 

Scheaff er, Joseph 1013 

Scheaffer, Sebastian 1013 

Scheele Brothers 398 

Scheele, Carl 398 

Sehenck, Fred 940 

Schief, Charles F 1110 

Schief, Mrs. Sofie 1110 

SehUling Family 671 

Schilling, John G 671 

Schlaseman, Elmer F 514 

Schlaseman, Jacob A 515, 

Sehlear, Alfred 925 

Schlear Family 925 

Schlegel Family 553 

Schlegel, James D 553 

Sehmeltzer FamUy 1043 

Sehmeltzer, Frank A 1043 

Schmidt, Christian 336 

Schmidt, Philip 336 

Schneider, Mrs. Catherine 524 

Schneider, Mrs. Elizabeth 700 

Schneider Families 90, 706 

Schneider, John F 700 

Schneider, Peter J. (deceased) 524 

Schneider, Peter J. (Locustdale) 762 

Schneider, Theodore D 706 

Sehoch (Schoek) Family 954 

Sehoeneman, Michael 1102 

Sehrepple, Gottlieb E 650 

Schrope, Charles A 674 

Sehrope Family 674 

Schnlz, Jacob E 929 

Schnlze, Harry F 1075 

Schuyler, Joseph M 20 

Schuyler, Miss Mary 1 20 

Sehwalm Families 754, 992, 1217 

Schwalm, George M 992 

Rchwalm, Ralph A 1217 

Schwartz, Joseph 331 

Scott, Alexander 263 



Scott, George 

Scott, John A 

Scott, John G 

Scott, Robert S 

Scott, Walter W 

Seiberling Family 

Seitzinger, Miss Emma 

Seitzinger Family.. 19, 239, 783, 986, 

Seitzinger, Henry M 

Seitzinger, Jeremiah 

Seitzinger, James M 

Seitzinger, Col. Nicholas 

Seitzinger, Judge Nicholas 

Seligman, Abraham Pott, M. D 

Seligman Family 

Seltzer, Albert W 

Seltzer, Conrad 

Seltzer Families 619, 942 

Seltzer, Francis B 

Seltzer, Frank P 

Seltzer, Miss R. W 

Seltzer, Wesley A 

Shannon, Benjamin Franklin, M. D. . . 

Shannon, Samuel H., M. D 

Shappell, Andrew J 

Shapjiell, Benjamin 

Shappell, Daniel 

Shappell, Elias F 

Shappell Families . . 541, 682, 733, 988, 

Sharadin, Edward 

Sharadin (Scharadin) Families 

211, 308 

Shaw, John 

Sheafer, Lesley G 

Sheafer, Paul 

Sheafer, Peter W 

Sheafer, Walter S 

Sheafer, William L 

Shearer, Robert C 

Shellhamer Family 

Shellhamer, Jackson M 

Shellhammer, Benjamin F 

Shellhammer Families. .686, 755, 982, 

Shellhammer, James M 

Sherry Family 

Shirey Family 

Shirey, John 

Shissler, Mrs. Clara K 

Shissler, Edward L 

Shoemaker Families 737, 

Shoemaker, James A 

Shoemaker. John H 

Shoener, Edward 

Shoener, Mrs. Emma 

Shoener Families 279, 743, 7S0, 

Shoener, .John 

Shoener, Hon. John T 

Shoener, Joseph 

Sief ert, William IT 

Silliman, Mrs. Catharine 

Sillinian, Edward S 

Silliman (Sillyman) Families 

60, 68. 120, 

Silliman, H. I 

Silliman, James K 



264 
707 
265 
265 
707 
387 
240 
1036 
1036 
783 
986 
19 
239 
242 
242 
110 
110 
962 
962 
942 
963 
619 
162 
160 
683 
733 
683 
541 
1006 
211 

312 
413 

1176 

25 

1175 

24 

343 

755 

755 

1001 

1001 

686 

921 

1112 

1112 

867 

866 

913 

913 

737 

780 

744 

910 

910 

278 

743 

748 

62 

67 

208 

208 

60 



SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



XV 



Sillyman (SiUiman) Families 

60, 68, 120, 208 

Sillyman, Samuel 120 

Sillyman, Miss Susan J 122 

Simmons, Thomas 1075 

Sittler, Oalviu K ;!61 

Sittler (Sitler) Families oOl, 470 

Slater, Mrs. Clara K 401 

Slater, George W 400 

Slater, Henry P 400 

Smith, Oliarles E 1172 

Smith, (.■luules H 1074 

Smith, David G 227 

Smith Families 388, 477, 1074, 1172 

Smith, Jeremiah 388 

Smith, Joseiih G 1176 

Smith, William E 108 

Smith, William 8 476 

Snyder, Charles A, 144 

Snyder Family 488 

Snyder, Frank 316 

Snyder, Eeuben 316 

Spavd, Prof. H. H 126 

Speaeht, Mrs. Dorothy 393 

Speacht Family 392, 401 

Speaeht, Frederick 392 

Spencer, Mrs. Amelia J 47 

Spencer, George 4.1 

Spencer, William 4.5 

Spitzner, Valentine 1070 

Spohn, Moncure R 1023 

St. Clair Family 1024 

St. Clair, Oscar 1024 

St. Peter's Church (Reformed) 426 

St. Mary's Church, Tremont 653 

Stamm FamUy 879 

Starr, David 761 

Starr Families 88, 761, 1012 

Starr, William A 1012 

Staudt (Stoudt, Stout) Families 

447, 509, 729 

Staudt, John F 447 

Staudt, John S 509 

Stauffer, Arthur Elliott 482 

Stauffer, Elias K 480 

Stauffer Families 480, 845, 1115, 1165 

Stauffer, John M 1115 

Stauffer, Norman M 1165 

Stauffer, William E 1166 

Steigerwalt, Albert H 376 

Steigerwalt Families 376, 395 

Stein, Daniel 324 

Stein Families 140, 418 

Stein, Jonathan Frank 417 

Stein, Franklin M 142 

Stein, Moses S 140 

Steiner Family 424 

Stephens, Albert 10 tl 

Sterner Family 919 

Sterner, Frank R 919 

Stewart, Harry H., M. D 581 

Stichter, George H 625 

Stief Family 75S 

Stief, John A 758 

Stiles Family 1015 



Stiles, Michael V iui5 

Stine Family (J32 

Stine, William N (j32 

Stitzer Family 303, 687 

Stitzer, William F 503 

Stitzer, William G 687 

Stoker Family 93.^ 

Stoudt (Staudt, Stout) Families 

447, 509, 729 

Strauch Family 450 

Strauch, Robert D 450 

Strause (Straus.s, Strouse) Family.... 215 

Strause, Samuel 215 

Striegel, John G., M. D 520 

Strubhar, Aaron 767 

Strubhar Family 767 

Stutzman Family S36 

Stutzman, Raymond H., M. D 835 

Super Family 433 

Swoyer Family 997 

Tallman, Henry H77 

Tallman, Mrs. Mary A 1177 

Tasker, Reese 238 

Taylor, WUliajn T 827 

Thomas Family 192 

Thomas, Thomas L 193 

Thomas, Mrs. Thomas L 84, 194, 196 

Thompson, Alexander 668 

Thompson, Hon. Alexander 669 

Thompson, Charles D 906 

Thompson Families.. 32, 112, 114, 907, 1053 

Thompson, Heber H 35 

Thompson, Maj. Heber S 32 

Thompson, Isaac B 669 

Thompson, Lewis C 113 

Thompson, Oliver C 1053 

Thompson, Col. WOliam 112 

Tielman, WUliam 1110 

Toole, John 1114 

Toomey, .John 829 

Toomey, Michael 829 

Trachte, William 494 

Tregea Family 1004 

Trexler Family 967 

Turner Family 921 

Tyson Family 742 

UnderkofBer, Charles M 772 

Unger, Albert A 495 

Updegrave Families 439, 681 

Updegrave, Morris 680 

Updegrave, Philip H 439 

t'pdegrove Family 661 

Updegrove, Walter E 661 

Van Horn Family 644 

Veith, John 209, 1201 

A'eith, John, Jr 211 

Vetter, David 704 

Vetter Family 704, 977 

Wachter, George A 943 

Wachter, Rudolph 944 

Wadlinger, Mrs. Margaret D 50 



XVI 



SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 



Wadlinger, Francis 48 

Wadlinger, Judge George J -IS 

Wagner, Alfred B 1016 

Wagner, Charles C 545 

Wagner, Charles G 508 

Wagner Families 219, 

508, 545, 558, 781, S24, 886, 1014, 1016 

Wagner, Franklin 781 

Wagner, Frederick E., D. D. S 558 

Wagner, Henry A 547 

Wagner, Mrs. Mary .A- 571 

Wagner, Philip 823 

Wagner, Samuel C 571 

Wagner, AVilliam M 219 

Walborn Families 156, 1087 

Walborn, Ira Guy 157 

Walborn, Jonathan H 150 

Walborn, Joseph A 158 

Walborn, Maurice D 157 

Wallauer, Jacob 379 

Walter Families 677, 793 

Walter, George W 793 

Walters, Henry 92 

Walters, William H 92 

Warne, Joseph L., M. D 1175 

Watson Families 1175, 1186 

Watson, George M 1186 

Weaklim, WUliam T 63 

Weaver (Weber) Family 912 

Weber (Weaver) Family 912 

Weber, Louis 327 

Weber, WOliam F 327 

Weidman Family 864 

Weidman, Samuel 864 

Weiser, Conrad 158 

Weishampel Family 119 

Weissinger Family 27 

Weissinger, George 29 

Weissinger, Harry 30 

Weissinger, Leonard W 27 

Weldon, Michael 1100 

Weldy, Charles H 95 

Weldy, Henry A ; 93 

Wellendorf , Joseph 1080 

Wertley Family 266 

Wertley, Walter 266 

Wertley, Wellington A 267 

Wertman Family 820 

Wessner Family 431 

Whalen, Edward J 1160 

Whalen Family 1160 

White Families 978, 1090 

White, J. S 1090 

White, Maj. J. Claude 320 

White, Joseph E 978 

Whitfield, Joseph .' 928 

Whitfield, Mrs. Lottie E 929 

Whitfield, Rowland 928 

Wie.sner, Dr. Edwin E 384 

Wiesner Family 384 

Wiest Family 478 



Wilhelm, WUliam 

Williams, Mrs. Annie 

Williams, William 

Wingert, Adam 

Wingert Family 

Wintersteeu, Mrs. John 

Withelder FamUies 1079, 

Withelder, Frederick 

Withelder, John H 

Wittich, Henry W 

Wittmer, Martin 

Wittmer, Mrs. Mary 

Wolfgang Family 

Wolfgang, Paul 

Womer (Woomer) Family 390, 

\\'omer, Monroe 

Wonders, Newton M 

Woolcock, John 

Woomer, Elmer 

Woomer (Womer) Family 390, 

Yarnall Families 472, 

Yarnall, Ephraini 

Yeager, Alfred A 

Yeager Family 

Yeingst, Prof". Wilbur M 

Yerger Family 

Yerger, Henry 

Yoder Family 

Yoder, Irvin U 

YorkvUle Fire Company 

Yost, Benjamin J 

Yost Families. .322, 402, 446, 660, 798, 

Yost, Israel 

Yost, James A .• 

Yost, Jonathan I 

Young, George 

Zapf , Charles A 

Zapf, William E 

Zehner Families 739, 740, 

Zehner, Lewis A 

Zerbe Family 

Zerbe, William E 

Zettlemoyer Family 

Zettlemoyer, Frank 

Zimmerman, Alfred 

Zimmerman, Edward 

Zimmernuin Families 

550, 558, 811, 955, 1093, 

Zimmerman, George K 

Zimmerman, Robert J 

Zimmerman, William H 

Zion 's Lutheran Church 

Zion 's Reformed Church 

Zulich, Mrs. E. R 

Zulieh Family 

Zulich, Henry B 

Zulick Family 

Zulick, John S 

Zulick, Thomas H. B 



224 
1050 
10.50 

884 

884 

1172 

1083 

1083 

1079 

1U77 

999 

999 

771 

771 

440 

390 

714 

145 

440 

440 

666 

.' 666 

, 819 

. 819 

360 

, 701 

, 701 

582 

582 

456. 

797 

, 924 

924 

402 

322 

821 

578 
578 
984 
740 
579 
579 
1093 
1093 
955 
1093 



1205 
811 
550 
1205 
789 
426 
233 
232 
232 
603 
604 
603 




fy<rfr/(.j ^. ,sd^A^; 



u 



Genealogy— Family History 
Biography 



CHARLES ^I. ATKINS, deceased, was identified with the most impor- 
tant industries of Pottsville and as president of the Pottsville Iron & Steel 
Company contributed largely to the prosperity of the city. He was born in 
Columbia, Lancaster Co., Pa., March 17, 1827, and died at Pottsville, 
Pa., Sept. 3, 1889, having filled with unremitting industry a life of usefulness 
and importance to his fellow citizens. 

Charles M. Atkins was educated in the common schools of Columbia and 
sat at the same desk with Thomas A. Scott, afterwards the president of the 
Pennsylvania Railroad Company. He began to work for himself very early 
in life, his first adventure being freighting on the old Pennsylvania State 
road, and in a few years he became one of the leading freighters in this part 
of the State. It was not long ere he had a line of barges on the canal and 
these, in addition to his teams, made him the most important of the trans- 
portation men in this section. At the time he came to Pottsville, in 1853, the 
rolling mills, then owned by Yardley & Co., were about to be sold by the 
sheriff, and Air. Atkins at once formed a partnership with his brother, Hanson, 
and purchased the plant. Soon after they bought the Pioneer furnace, opened 
the ore banks in Cumberland county and the colliery at Gilberton, and com- 
pletely reorganized the works. When to this extensive plant was added an 
outfit of rolling stock, the freighting business, was gradually discontinued and 
the docks closed up. From time to time the furnaces were enlarged and 
relniilt. their capacity having been doubled five times in the time of Mr. 
Atkins's ownership. The rolling mill also grew in capacity during this time 
and then the steel plant was added. At one time in Mr. Atkins's control there 
were five thousand names on the payroll. When the works were capitalized 
anew and incorporated as the Pottsville Iron & Steel Company, with Mr. Atkins 
as president, he held nine-tenths of the stock, the remainder being held in the 
familv. 

Mr. Atkins was so enthused at the opening of the Civil war that he 
endeavored to enlist, but his friend. General Cameron, persuaded him that 
he would be of greater value to his country if he remained at home and 
manufactured the iron so badly needed by the army. 

On Oct. s. i8S4. ^Ir. Atkins was united in marriage to Anna M. Prior, 
daughter of Rev. Azariah and Isabella (.Adams) Prior. Their children were: 
( I I'^Villiam. now a resident of Philadelphia, is in the coal business in Mrginia. 
(2) Isabella P. became the wife of Hon. David C. Henning, one of the judges 
of Schu>lkill county, and both are now deceased. Their daughter, Anna, 
wife of 'Edwin C. Luther, is now living in Pottsville. (3^ Anna P., wife 
of .August Heckscher, lives in Xew York City. They have two children. 
Vol. I— 1 

1 



2 SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 

G. Maurice and Antoinette, the latter married to Hon. Oliver Sylvain Valior 
Brett, son of Lord Escher of England, and residing near Windsor Forest, 
outside of London (they have one son). (4) Phoebe W. married John C. 
Lee, and they had two children: Dorothy, wife of James G. Lucas, and John 
C. After his death she married (second) William L. Sheafer, who died April 
23, 1912, and his widow lives in Pottsville. They had no children. (5) 
Hanson E., living in Pottsville, married Ida F. Green, daughter of the late 
Hon. David B. Green, judge of the Schuylkill county courts, and they have 
two children, Elizabeth G. and David B. (6) George H., who died J\Iay 21, 
1912, left a widow, Esther B. (Hoffman), now residing in Pottsville. He 
left no children. (7) John Shippen died April 30, 1902, at the age of twenty- 
eight. (8) EHzabeth Inzevand Keim died in 1901, at the age of twenty-si.x. 
Mrs. Charles I\I. Atkins is living at the old homestead, corner of Centre 
and Mauch Chunk streets. This building was the first mansion erected in 
Pottsville and was the work of her husband. It is still one of the handsomest 
of the many beautiful dwellings in the city. 

JUDGE O. P. BECHTEL is an eminent representative of a name whose 
connection with the legal profession and judiciary in Schuylkill county covers 
a period of almost fifty years. Retiring from the bench after a continuous 
service of thirty years in January, 1908, he was succeeded as president judge 
of Schuylkill county courts by his son, Hon. H. O. Bechtel, present incumbent 
of that position. Other members of this family have also won high reputation 
in the profession. 

The Bechtel family is of German extraction and has been settled in eastern 
Pennsylvania since Provincial days. The Judge's grandfather was a native 
of Bucks county. Pa. John Bechtel, his father, was also born there, near 
Doylestown, Oct. 6, 1798. For a number of years he made his home in Berks 
county, this State, where he was well known as proprietor of the "Half-Way 
House" between Reading and Kutztown, and besides conducting the hotel he 
was a mail contractor and stage owner, transporting passengers and the mail 
between Easton and Harrisburg, by way of Allentown and Reading, and from 
Reading to Pottsville. From Berks county he removed to Northumberland 
county. Pa., where he was settled for about a dozen years engaged in farming 
and hotelkeeping on what was known as "Warrior Run Farm" ; the stone 
tavern which stood upon that property, a few miles from. Watsontown, was a 
popular stopping pla< e in its day. Thence in 1847 -^I'"- Bechtel removed to 
Pottsville, Schuylkill county, and in 1851 to Aliddleport, same county. He 
became postmaster at the latter place and continued to hold the position during 
the administrations of Pierce, Buchanan and Johnson. Politically he was an 
ardent Democrat and maintained an active interest in local, State and national 
campaigns. His death took place in the latter part of December, 1872. Mr. 
Bechtel was twice married, his second wife, the Judge's mother, being Eliza 
S. Beiber, of Berks county, who was born in 1808, daughter of John S. Beiber, 
a native of Maidencreek township, Berks county. Mrs. Bechtel died at Mid- 
dleport in June, 1880. John Bechtel was the father of the following children: 
James B., who died in 1873, was a resident of Reading, Pa., where he served 
as district attorney; Louise became the wife of Samuel Young, of Reading, 
Pa. ; Alfred B., deceased, was a traveling salesman and clerk : Elmira, deceased, 
was the wife of George L. Medler, of Mahanoy City. Schuylkill county; 
Francis W., who died Slarch 14, 1906, was a prominent lawyer of Schuylkill 



SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, TEXXSVLVANIA 3 

county; Hettie became the wife of David F. Ritter, a resident of Middleport, 
Schuylkill county ; O. P. is next in the family ; T. H. has been in the wholesale 
notions business for many years, belonging to the firm of Jones, Bechtel, 
Shibely & Company. 

O. P. Bechtel was born Jan. 31, 1842, in Northumberland county, Pa., where 
he spent his tirst years on his father's farm. He received his early education 
principally at ^liddleport, attending public school, and when about eighteen 
years of age began teaching in Wayne township, Schuylkill county, being later 
similarly employed in Brunswick township. Not long afterwards he registered 
at the Allentown Seminary (now iSIuhlenberg College), at Allentown, Pa., 
for part of a year. In September, 18O1, he became connected with Arcadia 
Institute, at Orwigsburg, Pa., where he was both teacher and student, and 
the year following he took control of the school in Alahanoy City, which he 
conducted very successfully until April, 1864. He then gave up teaching 
to become bookkeeper for the Preston Coal & Improvement Company at 
Girardville, Schuylkill county, holding this position until Alarch 20, 1865. 
It was then he began the study of law in the office of Hughes & Dewees, at 
Pottsville, Pa. Three years previously he had registered as a student in the 
office of his brother, James B. Bechtel, at Reading, Pa., and he now com- 
pleted the course, taking his examination for admission to the bar April 12, 
1866, and passing with credit. On May loth of the same year he was 
admitted to practice in Schuylkill county, and immediately opened an office 
on Centre street, Pottsville. It was not long before his conscientious work 
and able care of the interests of his clients began to attract attention. He 
refused the nomination for district attorney, preferring to devote himself to 
private practice, but in the year 1873 he yielded to the solicitations of his 
friends in the Democratic party, and accepted the nomination for State 
senator from the Tenth district. Though there were three opposing candidates 
in the field he was elected by a majority of nearly fifteen hundred votes, and 
his three years' service gave the utmost satisfaction. But meantime his pro- 
fessional work had increased to such an extent that he feared further public 
service would prejudice his personal interests and he declined a renomination 
for the senatorship. Until August, 1877, all his time was again given to his 
law business. Then at the Democratic convention he was unanimously nomi- 
nated for the office of Judge in the court of Common Pleas, to which position 
he was elected by a large majority, taking his place upon the bench in Janu- 
ary, 1878. At the expiration of his ten years' term he was unanimously 
renominated and was reelected by the largest majority ever given a candidate 
in Schuylkill county. In 1898 he again received this honor, retiring from the 
bench the first Monday in January, 1908, with an almost unprecedented record 
of service. 

Judge Bechtel's personality entered largely into his popularity and suc- 
cess' on the bench. His legal learning, acquired in the pursuit of private 
practice and in painstaking research during the many years he was on the 
bench, gave him a standing with lawyers generally which held their respect. 
His absolute impartiality could not fail to command the admiration of all who 
had opportunity to observe or occasion to test it, yet his sympathetic under- 
standing, never dulled in all the years of his service as a judge, made all who 
depended upon his rulings feel that he aimed to be just without respect of 
persons. In his social relations also his personal qualities have been a con- 
trolling factor. His considerable influence has been given to the best interests 



4 SCHUYLKILL COUiNTY, PENxXSYLVANIA 

of his city and county. Judge Bechtel is still active in business as president 
of the Merchants' National Bank of Pottsville. He was made a director of 
this institution June 19, 1908, and at the same time was elected to the presi- 
dency, which he has since held. The bank is one of the strongest in this 
region of the State, and both because of the character of its transactions and 
of the men at its head deserves the high reputation and standing it enjoys 
among the best people. 

On Sept. 15, 1868, O. P. Bechtel married Mary Elizabeth Epting, of 
Pottsville, daughter of Jacob and Rebecca (Myer) Epting. Her grandfather 
Philip Alyer and great-grandfather John Alyer both held the office of surveyor 
general, in that connection becoming very well known in the early days. Two 
children, Harry O. and Carrie, have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Bechtel. The 
son was educated at Haverford College, Pennsylvania, and entered his father's, 
profession. 

GUY EDWARD FARQUHAR (deceased), formerly a member of the 
Schuylkill county bar, was born in 1841 at Pottsville, Schuylkill Co., Pa., at 
the old P^arquhar homestead, which was located on the present site of the 
courthouse, a son of George Wildman and Amelia Farquhar. 

George Wildman Farquhar, Esq., father of Guy Edward Farquhar. was 
born in 1802, in the West Indies, and came to Pottsville, Pa., when it was 
still a small village. Here he passed the remainder of his life, becoming 
known as an upright, dependable and public-spirited citizen. He was ad- 
mitted to the bar of Schuylkill county ]\Iarch 29, 1830, and practiced at the 
old courthouse at Orwigsbtirg, this county. On Jan. 10, 1842, he had the 
honor of delivering an address upon the entering of the Philadelphia & Reading 
railroad into Pottsville; it was delivered at what was then the terminus of 
the road. Mount Carbon, a short distance below the present city of Pottsville. 
Among Mr. Farquhar's children were : Guy Edward ; Fergus G., born Feb. 
21, 1845, who died on East Market street, Pottsville, during 1913; Xorman, 
an admiral in the L'nited States navy, who died some years ago ; and Frank, 
also deceased, who was a prominent engineer, one of his famous works being 
the designing of the underground government work beneath the falls of St. 
Anthony, Minnesota. 

Guy Edward Farquhar, son of George Wildman Farquhar, proved a close 
and diligent student, receiving his education in the public schools of Pottsville, 
the Pottsville academy, and the University of Mrginia, which he attended one 
year, until the war broke out in 1861. Having early determined upon the law 
as his field of endeavor, he prepared himself thoroughly for his vocation, 
and was admitted to the bar during the Civil war period, having, at the time 
of his death, June 17, 1913, just rounded out half a century of practice at the 
Schuylkill county bar. His early associates included such brilliant Pennsyl- 
vania attorneys as John W. Ryon, F. W. Hughes, Judge Parry, F. W. Dewees, 
Lynn Bartholomew, F. W. Bechtel and F. B. Gowen, and he was also an inti- 
mate friend personally as well as professionally of ex-Judge G. M. Dallas, 
of the L'nited States District court, who in 1913 was retired after long and 
faithful service. 

In 1868 or 1869 was formed the law firm of Hughes and Farquhar, when 
Mr. Farquhar entered into partnership with F. W\ Hughes, and for years they 
maintained their standing among the leading legal connections in this section 
of the State. After the death of Mr. Hughes Mr. Farquhar continued alone. 



SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PEX.\SYL\A.\1A 5 

practicing in every court in this part of Pennsylvania and also before the vari- 
ous United States courts. In 1864 he was appointed district attorney of the 
county, to succeed Franklin B. Govven, whose duties with the Philadelphia & 
Reading Company assumed such proportions that he was obliged to relinquish 
his local connections. When Mr. Gowen became president of the road, P. \V. 
Hughes assisted him in the prosecution of those members of the famous 
"Mollie Maguire"' organization who had caused much loss of life in the county 
and surrounding countr}'. 

When the Schuylkill Valley division of the Pennsylvania railroad made an 
effort to enter Pottsville, Mr. Farquhar represented that company in the 
memorable legal tight which was undertaken by the Reading Company in 
order to prevent the Pennsylvania from entering this territory. The company 
opened its lines in 1884, Mr. Farquhar winning the memorable decision which 
permitted this action. Under his supervision the company purchased all of the 
property on Coal street, and from that time forward he continued as solicitor 
for the company. His private practice was wide and varied, and as a legist 
he ever held the respect of his fellow members of the profession and the 
esteem of the general public. .\t a specially called meeting of the Schuylkill 
Bar Association, of which he was for long years the president. President 
Judge H. O. Bechtel said in part: "T have the sad duty of announcing that 
death has again invaded our ranks and taken a brother. I cannot help but be 
impressed, and it cannot be other than a sad duty. Under all circumstances 
the death of Mr. Farquhar has been a shock and it serves to impress us what a 
slender hold we have upon life. This time Providence has seen fit to take one 
whom we loved to call the Xestor of the bar. He had reached the highest 
pinnacle of his profession and had the love of the members of the bar and 
everyone with whom he associated. He was taken in the zenith of his glory 
and removed, as we may say, in the twinkling of an eye. I feel that I can say 
that Mr. Farquhar was prepared to go. During several talks with him 
recently and in which he dwelt at length upon his belief in the future, I can 
say that he felt that it was but a step to that reward which he was striving 
to obtain. He always looked at the bright side of life and trials that w^ould 
have afflicted other men only developed in him a power to rise above and see 
the good in the chastening. He never murmured or complained during his 
afflictions, but looked forward to that reward which is taught is the result of 
all good service. It was a pleasure to have known Mr. Farquhar, and you 
felt good from having associated with him." 

In his younger years ^Ir. Farquhar took an active part in Democratic 
politics, but when corruption and graft entered so largely into the political 
workings of the county he quietly withdrew, although he ever faithfully dis- 
charged the duties of good citizenship. From its organization he was a helpful 
and earnest member of the board of health. In upholding law and order 
in the county he was always one of the most active workers, and for years 
participated in the withholding of licenses, by procuring evidence which would 
aid the organization in decreasing the number of licenses permitted in the 
county. He was the general counsel for the taxpayers' association which 
secured the convictions in the famous ballot box stuffing case. Press, bench, 
bar and public united in deploring his death. The Chronicle, in its issue of 
June 18, 1913, said editorially: 

"In the demise of Guy E. Farquhar, the Xestor of the Schuylkill county 
bar, there is lost to the legal profession one of its mainstays, extending through 



6 SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 

the years of a long life in which his legal counsel was much sought after, he 
having figured in many important cases, in addition to being solicitor for great 
railroad corporations. Aside from the high place which he occupied in his 
chosen profession, he was possessed of those sterling qualities which endeared 
him to all with whom he came into contact. In the home circle, in the activities 
of a busy church life, in the tasks imposed upon him because of his being the 
head of the board of managers of the Pottsville hospital, and in many other 
avenues of usefulness, with which his life was closely associated for more 
years than are allotted to those of present generations for strenuous work, 
he was prominent, and his presence will be sadly missed. He was a true 
citizen, whose loyalty to his town was proverbial." 

Mr. Farquhar was a man of the highest ideals, both professionally and 
personally, and his honesty was never questioned. In the editorial columns 
of the Journal the following tribute was paid to him: "The day has closed 
for a fine, courtly, scholarly gentleman of the old school, Guy Edward 
Farquhar. Yesterday we had the man with us ; to-day, we have only the 
memory of the man. But that memory is very sweet because he was so much 
of a man, because he always stood unalterably for such high ideals, because 
he was a good citizen, a fine, upright lawyer, a good husband and father, and 
because he was God-fearing in his every act. He did not live in vain. It is 
said of him to-day that he was more generally looked up to and respected than 
any other man in Schuylkill county. That, in itself, was worth living for." 

Mr. Farquhar devoted a great deal of his time to public matters of all kinds 
and was noted for his charity and benevolence, all of which was performed in 
a quiet and unostentatious manner. He never sought public praise or com- 
mendation for what he accomplished, but went along quietly, well satisfied in 
the success of the things which he undertook and repaid with the successful 
accomplishment of his efforts. He, with the late William L. Sheafer, prac- 
tically attended to all the details of the management of the Pottsville hospital, 
of which they were the founders. Some years ago there was an epidemic 
of typhoid fever in a suburb of Pottsville, and they secured an old frame 
building in Alount Carbon which they fitted up as a temporary refuge. From 
this beginning the hospital developed, Mr. Farquhar becoming the first presi- 
dent of the board and filling the position until his death. He ever took a keen 
interest in the welfare of the Phoenix Fire Company, the charter of which he 
had himself secured. 

The following is quoted from the editorial page of the Republican, issue of 
June i8, 1913: "When any town, no matter how large, suffers the loss of a 
man of the type and character of Guy E. Farquhar, a loss is sustained which 
even the most optimistic of citizens feel cannot be replaced. Mr. Farquhar 
was of that type of man which unfortunately is too infrequently encountered. 
His example of manliness, fearlessness and sympathy are lessons which we 
wish every citizen, would even in a small way emulate. Possessing one of the 
finest minds and finest characters, and a busy man whose moments of recrea- 
tion are few, he was a man most easily approached, no matter by whom or on 
what mission, and a respectful hearing was assured, after which, in that 
kindly, fearless and manly way, he delivered his answer with true judicial mind 
and bearing, speaking not that which was wished or that which would please 
most, but the truth, tempered with all kindness. He will be missed in many 
ways, but his character will live with those who knew him and make better 



SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENNSYLVANLA 7 

»nen and citizens and more honorable lawyers of all men who were blessed with 
his personal acquaintance." 

All his lifetime Mr. Farquhar was a faithful and devoted member of the 
Episcopal church. He taught Sunday school from the time he was sixteen 
years old until within seven or eight years of his death. An excerpt from the 
editorial page of the Trinity Church MontJily for July, 1913, will give an idea 
of his work in the church. "In the death of Guy E. Farquhar, Esq., this 
parish and this community as well have suffered a great loss, a loss which 
will be felt all the more because in these days there are very few men of Mr. 
Farquhar's ability and position ready and willing to give so much of their time 
and thought in such an unselfish way for the good and welfare of the church 
and the community in which they live. As a young man, ]\Ir. Farquhar was 
superintendent of the St. John's Sunday school, Fishbach, a little later and 
for a longer period the superintendent of St. Paul's Sunday school, Alechanics- 
ville, and still later superintendent of the church school. For thirty-three years 
he served as vestryman and for twenty-one years of that time as one of the 
wardens of the parish. Such a record of service is seldom equalled in any 
parish. For he was at all times the wise counselor and adviser of the vestry 
and rector ; he was ever ready to help in any w'ork or any undertaking that 
gave promise of building up and strengthening his parish church, aud he was 
not only willing, he was often most desirous, of keeping himself well in the 
background. He was content, indeed it was his pleasure, to render the service 
and allow the organization or some other individual to receive the praise and 
gain the reward. Mr. Farquhar was not content to limit his service to his own 
parish, however. He was in the truest sense of the word a Churchman. He 
knew what the Church is and what the Chin-ch stands for. In the delibera- 
tions of the Diocesan convention few men exercised such an influence as he. 
At the meeting of the Standing Committee and the Board of Missions, from 
which naught but the most important engagements could keep him, his opinion 
and advice were frequently sought and almost invariably followed. No one 
rendered a more willing service to the diocese than he, and no one served in 
so many different capacities. The example of his life and his services ought 
to be given a prominent place, for in these days far too many Christian men, 
occupying positions of trust and responsibility, are seeking wealth or name and 
fame, rather than the Kingdom of God and His righteousness. Surely nothing 
is more to be desired, at least when our earthly lives are brought to a close, 
than the record of a good life well lived, a life of unselfish, sincere, honest 
service for God and our fellows." 

Mr. Farquhar was united in marriage with Frances Elizabeth Hughes, the 
daughter of Francis W. Hughes, his law partner, and she died in 1910, the 
mother of six children: Elizabeth H. died when four years old; Frank H. 
died in Pottsville in 1909; George W., a graduate of the University of Penn- 
sylvania, for some time practiced in Pottsville, and is now located at Mount 
Alto, Pa., where he is engaged in his profession ; Annette is the wife of Frank 
Wells, and resides in Pittsburgh, Pa. ; Otto E. is mentioned below ; Marion, who 
is a trained nurse, is now located at the Naval hospital, Brooklyn, New York. 

At 2:30 o'clock on the afternoon of June 17, 1913, while seated at the 
side of his colleague, James J. Moran, in hearing the trial of the New Phila- 
delphia school directors' case, before Judge Koch, in courtroom No. 3, at the 
courthouse. Air. Farquhar was suddenly stricken by apoplexy, and in spite of 
prompt medical attendance died a short time later, without regaining conscious- 



8 SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENNSYLVANL\ 

ness. Judge Koch, when informed of his death, immediately ordered a juror 
withdrawn, and the court was adjourned. The widely attended funeral serv- 
ices were simple, the bereaved family and friends feeling that it would have 
been his wish to have no ostentation or display. After the services held at 
the family residence, at No. 912 West Alahantongo street, the cortege moved 
to the Episcopal Church, where the simple and impressive ritual for the dead 
was followed ; the interment was in the Charles Baber cemetery, where this 
great and good man was laid to rest at the side of his beloved wife. 

Otto E. Farquhar, attorney at law of Pottsville, son of ' the late 
Guy E. Farquhar, was bom Dec. 7, 1876, at Pottsville, and gained his prepara- 
tory education in the public schools there. Graduating from high school as a 
member of the class of 1895, he then took a course in the law department 
of the University of Pennsylvania, at Philadelphia, graduating in 1899, in 
which year he was admitted to the Schuylkill county bar. He has ever since 
been actively engaged in professional practice there, maintaining offices in the 
new Thompson building. His legal work and standing are such that he may 
be called a typical member of the Farquhar family. He is retained by the 
Pennsylvania, Lehigh Valley and Eastern Pennsylvania Railway Companies. 
He is a member of the Episcopal Church and the local lodge of the B. P. O. 
Elks. Mr. Farquhar married Emily Y. Parker, datighter of Hiram Parker, of 
Pottsville. They have one child, Julia Frances. 

RLTBENS H. PEALE owns and resides upon the old Peale homestead 
in North Manheim township, Schuylkill county, settled by his grandfather, 
Rubens Peale, in the pioneer period of this region. His great-grandfather was 
Charles Willson Peale, the celebrated American portrait painter, w-ho was born 
April 16, 1741, in St. Paul's parish, at Chestertown, Queen Anne Co.. Md., 
and died at Philadelphia Feb. 22, 1827. 

Charles Willson Peale is buried in old St. Peter's Church at Third and 
Pine streets, Philadelphia, and his tomb bears the following inscription : 

"CHARLES WILLSON PEALE 

Born April 16, A. D. 1741. Died February 22, A. D. 1827. He partici- 
pated in the Revolutionary struggle for our Independence. .\s an artist 
contributed to the history of the country. Was an energetic citizen, and 
in private life beloved by all who knew him." 

Thus briefly is outlined a career whose influence in American art and patriotism 
is still felt. ^Ir. Peale began life as a saddler, at Annapolis, ^Id., and it is 
related that he determined to devote himself to art after viewing a portrait 
for the first time, while visiting at Norfolk, Va. As there was little oppor- 
tunity in Atnerica at that time for art instruction he had to train himself for 
the most part, trusting to his good taste and artistic sense for guidance until 
he could visit the art centers for practical assistance. On his return to 
Annapolis from Norfolk he painted a likeness of hiinself which turned out so 
well that he gave up his trade and made up his mind to apply himself to portrait 
painting. He had some instruction from Copley at Boston, and from Benjamin 
West when he went abroad, in 1767, being one of a group of American artists 
of subsequent fame who were among West's pupils and followers. Returning 
to America in 1770, Peale remained in his native land until 1774, meanwhile, 
in 1772, painting his first portrait of Washington, as a \'irginia colonel. For 
this purpose he visited Mount \'ernon by invitation. How little could either 



SCflL'YLKlLL COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 9 

the subject or the artist foresee at that time the varying vicissitudes through 
which their country was to pass, or the exalted future in store for Washington! 
Peale has indelibly associated his name with that of his great countryman, 
through the products of his brush, painting him in the retirement of Mount 
Vernon, amidst the stirring scenes of canij) life, and when president of the 
United States. When painting the General in camp at \'alley Forge Mr. Peale 
was a soldier himself, and incidentally rose to be a captain of volunteers. In 
this year (1777) at Valley Forge, he painted portraits of his fellow officers. 
He was in action at Germantown, Trenton and Princeton, which probably 
explains the account given of him by a companion in arms who, in describing 
Peak's habits, remarked, "He fit and painted and painted and fit." 

While in middle life, in 1805, Peale established his celebrated Peale Museum 
at Philadelphia, which, in addition to curiosities and natural history specimens, 
contained a gallery of paintings, the likenesses of distinguished men in both 
military and civil life, which he began gathering as early as 1785. Peale 
established it first in his own house at Third and Lombard, then a fairly 
fashionable neighborhood. \Mien it outgrew the accommodations there he 
rented rooms in the Hall of the Philosophical Society on Fifth street, near 
Chestnut street. He gives an amusing and characteristic account of the 
moving of the collection; "To take advantage of ptiblic ctiriosity I contrived 
to make a very considerable parade of the articles, especially those which were 
large. As boys are generally very fond of parading, I collected all the boys 
of the neighborhood. At the head of the parade was carried on men's shoul- 
ders the American Buffalo, the Panthers, Tiger-Cats, and a long string of 
animals carried by the boys. The parade from Lombard street to the Hall 
brought all the inhabitants to their doors and windows to see the cavalcade. 
It was fine fun for the boys. They were willing to work in such a novel 
removal and saved me some expense in moving the delicate articles.'' 

In 1802 the State Legislature moved to Lancaster. This left the State 
House (Independence Hall) vacant. Peale petitioned the Legislature and 
was allowed to occupy the building as long as he allowed persons to pass 
through the Hall into the State House garden. His son, Rembrandt, used 
the east room on the first floor as his studio (the room now held sacred to the 
signers), while the entire second floor and tower were given up to the use 
of the museum. A catalogue of Peak's Museum issued in 181 3 shows a col- 
lection of 235 paintings. In 1816 the city purchased the State House from 
the State and at once raised the rent on Peale from $400 to $2,000. As Peale 
could not pay so much a compromise was made at $1,200. The museum ran 
at a loss for three years and Peale induced councils to reduce the rent to 
$600. In 1821 the JXiuseum incorporated itself, and after Peak's death moved 
to the Arcade on Chestnut, above Sixth street, then in 1835 to a fine building at 
Ninth and Sansom streets (site of present "Continental Hotel"). 

In 1854 the collection of portraits was sold at auction, the pictures going 
all over the country, but eventually one of them came back to Independence 
Hall. It was at this sale that the full length portrait of Charles Willson Peale 
— representing the artist himself lifting the curtain on a view of the museum — 
hanging in the academy of Fine Arts, Philadelphia, was purchased by the late 
Joseph Harrison, whose widow in 1878 presented it to the Academy of Fine 
Arts. It was executed by order of the trustees of the museum when Peale ■ 
was in his eighty-third year, and it is said he painted it without the use of his 
glasses. 



10 SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 

Charles Willson Peale was not the only talented member of the family 
in his generation. He was always referred to as the elder Peale, his younger 
brother, James Peale, having been also an admirable artist. At a very early 
period of his career he developed particular aptitude in the art of miniature 
painting, and his brother on discerning it referred all seeking to have minia- 
tures painted to him. In fact, the elder Peale abandoned miniature painting, 
for which he had been quite famous, and devoted himself thereafter to por- 
traits on canvas. Three of the children of James Peale inherited talent from 
their father. His son James, while not pursuing painting as a profession, 
executed works that were exhibited. An excellent view of the old Fairmount 
waterworks was one of them. The daughters were well known miniature 
painters. Anna Claypoole painted likenesses of such noted characters as 
General Lallemand, James Monroe, Andrew Jackson and Commodore Bain- 
bridge; her sister Sarah, a likeness of Bainbridge also and miniature portraits 
of Henry A. Wise, Caleb Cushing and LaFayette in 1825. 

The vitality of the stock is evidenced in the long lives of the various 
members of the family. The two women artists just mentioned reached the 
ages of eighty-seven and eighty-iive, respectively, their brother James, eighty- 
seven, and Franklin Peale, a son of Charles Willson Peale, reached the age 
of ninety. 

"Even in the christening of his children the elder Peale was fired with 
artistic fervor. Is it not strange to find in one family such a list of Christian 
names as Raphaelle, Rembrandt, Rubens and Titian, and, more wonderful 
still, to discover the bearers of them actually, if in varying degrees, fulfilling 
the hopes engendered by such names ? But not satisfied with these excursions 
into the past, we find the enthusiastic father carrying the glad tidings of art 
and antiquity to his daughters, in the names of Angelica and Sophonisba." 

Mr. Peale left descendants who maintained the prestige of his name if 
they did not add to it. Rembrandt Peale, the most distinguished of his sons, 
born in 1778 and painting Washington in 1795, shared to some extent the 
honors paid his father's name. He lived down to i860, and his career, in its 
activity and variety, resembles his father's, although not partaking of its 
military features. He traveled abroad, settled for a time in London and 
Paris, and painted many distinguished people. He opened a studio here in 
1810. Probably his best American portrait is that of Thomas Jefferson, hang- 
ing in the room of the New York Historical Society. This society also owns 
his portrait of Stephen Decatur, but any attempted list of his pictures would 
be a long one. His activity sought other outlets, and we find him among the 
first to practice lithography, gaining a silver medal in 1827 at the Franklin 
Institute for a lithograph portrait of Washington. Then, too, he wrote a good 
deal. His "Notes on Italy" and "Reminiscences of Art and Artists" are well 
known and often referred to and quoted from. (This part of the article 
concerning Charles Willson and James Peale is from a sketch by Edward 
Biddle.) 

Rubens Peale purchased 125 acres of valuable land in North Manheim 
township and followed agricultural pursuits there to the close of his life. 
He inherited artistic talent from his father and was himself an artist of some 
note, but never followed the profession to any extent. He died upon his 
farm, and is buried in the Presbyterian cemetery at Pottsville. To his mar- 
riage with Eliza Patterson were bom: C. W., Dr. J. Bird, Mary J. (who 



SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, rENXSYL\'ANL\ 11 

acquired reputation as an artist), George and Edward B. Mr. Peale was an 
Episcopalian. 

Edward H. I'eale was born in New York City, and came to Schuylkill county 
with his parents, spending part of his early life on the homestead in North 
Manheim town.ship. For a few years he was engaged in business at Shamokin. 
Northumberland Co., Pa., as a flour and feed merchant, returning thereafter to 
the home place. He was the first dealer in agricultural implements to engage 
in business in Schuylkill county, and became widely known among farmers 
throughout this section, the convenience of having such an establishment in 
their midst making a direct appeal which brought him a large business. He 
also engaged in baling hay, being thus engaged for the long period of fifty 
years, and acquired a very wide acquaintanceship in that connection. His 
busy and successful career closed in December, 1905, and he is buried in the 
Charles Baber cemetery at Pottsville. He was married to Louisa H. Hubley, 
daughter of Judge Hubley, of Schuylkill county, and they had two children, 
Anna Frances and Rubens H. The daughter is the wife of Dr. Frederick 
Carrier, of Philadelphia. 

Rubens H. Peale was born Aug. 10, 1872, at the place where he still lives. 
He had excellent educational advantages, attending school at Orwigsburg and 
Pottsville, and received a thorough and practical business training as his 
father's assistant, eventually becoming associated in business with him under 
the firm name of E. B. Peale & Son. After his father's death he continued 
the business until 1913, since when he has been giving his time to the manage- 
ment of his property interests, retaining ninety acres of the old Peale home- 
stead place. He built the beautiful mansion thereon which he now occupies, 
adjoining the old home. 

By his activity in the promotion of modenr institutions and public utilities 
Mr. Peale has come to be regarded as a man of leading influence, having the 
executive ability to plan and carry out large projects, as he has demonstrated 
in his connection with several local enterprises. He was one of the organizers 
of the Schuylkill Haven Trust Company and one of its original board of 
directors, still serving in that capacity and taking an active part in regulating 
the aflfairs of the bank; he is chairman of the finance committee. He was one 
of the organizers and a director of the Schuylkill Haven & Orwigsburg Street 
Railway Company, whose road was later sold to the Eastern Pennsylvania 
Railways Company, the present owners. 

Mr. Peale was married to Kathryn ]\Ioiifett, daughter of G. W. Moflfett, of 
Philadelphia, Pa., and they have one daughter, Ethel, who lives with her 
parents. The family are members of the Episcopal Church. 

PETER K. FILBERT, D. D. S., has been engaged in the practice of 
dentistry at Pottsville for over forty years, during which time he has also 
acquired important business interests there. He belongs to a Pennsylvania 
family which has been established here since Provincial days, and is himself a 
native of Marion township, Berks county, bom June 6, 1850, son of Samuel 
Filbert. He traces his ancesetry back to Samuel Filbert, the emigrant, and we 
have the following record of the early generations of this family. 

(I) Samuel Filbert, at the age of twenty-seven, came to the New World 
on the ship "Samuel," Hugh Percy, master, sailing from Rotterdam. Tradi- 
tion says he came from either Wittenberg or Wurtemberg, Germany. He took 
the oath of allegiance Aug. 30, 1737. The original signature was Samuel, but 



12 SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 

the clerk who copied the rolls wrote it Daniel, thereby causing some confusion. 
Samuel Filbert's wife's name was Susanna. He died in 1786, and his second 
son, Philip, filed papers as administrator of the estate Nov. 2, 1786. His 
grave is in the center of the old North-Kill cemetery, but the inscription on 
his white marble tombstone (as are those over the graves of his son Thomas 
and grandson Samuel ) is now illegible. To Samuel and Susanna Filbert were 
born six children, and the names and births and dates of baptism of the last 
five are taken from the records of Rev. John Casper Stover, who spells the 
name "Philbert" and gives the residence as "North-Kill." The children were: 
John Thomas, the eldest, married Catharine Batteiger (time and place of his 
birth unknown) ; Maria Catharina, born Oct. 25, 1739, baptized Dec. 30, 1739, 
sponsors, Andreas Knaft and wife, married Nov. 10, 1760. John Heinrich 
Ache; Anna Elizabetha, born Dec. 6, 1741, baptized Dec. 7, 1741, sponsor 
Anna Elizabeth Knaft, married May 16, 1763, John Henry Webber, a captain 
in the Revolutionary war; John Philip, born Dec. 7, 1743, was baptized Dec. 
27, 1743, sponsors Philip I\Ieeth and wife; John Peter, born Aug. 22, 1746, 
was baptized Aug. 31, 1749, sponsors, Peter Muench (or Minnich ) and wife 
Christina; Maria Christina, born May 25, 1749, was baptized May 28, 1749, 
sponsors Peter Muench (or Minnich) and wife Christina. The three sons 
having the first name John in common dropped it and became known as 
Thomas, Philip and Peter. 

Samuel Filbert and Godfried Fidler each gave an acre of ground to the 
old North-Kill Lutheran congregation at Bernville. This congregation was 
formed in 1730, and services were held in the different homes until 1743, 
when a log church was built on the part donated by Samuel Filbert. Each 
acre was in the form of a triangle, so that the two acres formed a square. 
On Dec. 25, 1745, each signed an agreement to deed to the trustees the acre 
in question, neither having as yet raised their patents from the proprietaries. 
Samuel Filbert deeded his in 1771. In 1791 the log church was replaced by 
a brick building, which Philip Filbert, son of Samuel, was instrumental in 
building; in 1897 the present handsome brownstone edifice was erected. Back 
of the chancel in the new building is a beautiful stained glass window to 
"Samuel Filbert, Founder. 1743." 

(II) Philip Filbert, second son and fourth child of Samuel and Susanna, 
born Dec. 7, 1743, was a captain in Weaver's battalion, and was mustered into 
service Dec. 3, 1777, for thirty days. On June 4, 1777, a commissitJn was 
forwarded to Col. Jacob Morgan, by Timothy Matlack, secretary of the 
executive council, for the 6th Battalion. Philip Filbert was commissioned 
captain of the 8th Company. In 1778 he served as captain of the 6th Bat- 
talion, and in 1780 he held a similar rank in the 2d Battalion. He died Aug. 
20, 181 7. He married Anna Maria Myers, and his will, probated Oct. 17, 
1817, provides for his wife Anna IMaria ; devises his farm in Heidelberg to 
his son John (grandfather of George of Womelsdorf ) ; leaves a bequest to 
his grandson Peter, son of his deceased son Samuel; and mentions a daughter 
Catharine. The will also mentioned Maria ]\Iagdalena, as a daughter of his 
wife. He is buried in Bernville. 

(III) John Filbert, son of Philip, was bom on the Filbert farm at North- 
Kill. He was a carpenter by trade, and became a very wealthy man, owning 
considerable land, and was widely known and prominent in public affairs. 
His genial disposition gathered him many friends, young and old, and he 
heartily enjoyed a good smoke and cheerful company. He married Anna 



SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, rilXXSYLXANlA 13 

Maria Leiss, dauylUcr of llenrich Lciss. Their childrL-n were: John married 
and had children, AmeHa, John Franklin and liiester W. ; Samuel is men- 
tioned heiow ; Anna Maria married John Groff, a farmer of IJernville ; Eliza- 
beth married Daniel Sohl, of Heidelberg, steward of the county home for 
twelve years (no issue) ; Gabriel married Elizabeth Kintzer, and among their 
children were Adam, John, Michael, Frank, Emma. Isaac. Maria and George ; 
Elias married Leah Kintzer, and had a daughter Isabella (married to Dr. L. A. 
Livingood. and died in 1899) • 'i"d Matilda married Augustus Leiss, and had 
children, Amelia, Emma and Alaria. 

(R) Samuel Filbert, son of John and father of Dr. Peter K. Filbert, was 
bom in iSio, in Heidelberg township, now North Heidelberg, but formerly 
called North-Kill, on the farm owned by the county controller, Dr. H. F. 
Livingood, and farmed for forty years by Nathaniel Blatt. He died Dec. 9, 
1872, aged sixty-two years, si.x months. He devoted himself to farming and 
was very successful. At the time of his death he was the owner of two farms, 
both now the property of his son George. His political support was given 
to the Democratic party, and he was frequently the choice of the people for 
public otifice, holding at different times all the various township offices. From 
1859 to 1862 he was a director of the poor for Berks county. He and his 
family were Lutherans, and attended the Union Church at Womelsdorf, in 
which he was very active, at one time serving as trustee, and also holding the 
offices of deacon, elder and treasurer. His remains rest in the family' plot 
in the cemetery there. He had an untarnished reputation for honesty and 
integrity, and he practiced in his daily life the high principles of morality of 
the faith he professed. He married Catharine Kalbach, daughter of John 
Kalbach and wife (whose maiden name was Ruth), of North Heidelberg 
township. To this marriage were born children as follows : John died aged 
sixty-seven years, leaving two sons, William and Samuel; William S., of 
Womelsdorf, had four children, John E., William D., Kate and Harry (de- 
ceased) ; Rebecca married Edward Killmer, of Stouchsburg, and had two 
children. Emma and John ; George has been twice married, having four chil- 
dren by his first wife and two by his second; Sarah died in 1844; Alaria mar- 
ried Jonathan Dundore, and had two children, Charles and Kate ; Amelia 
married Albert Faust and had a son, William; Adam M., of Lebanon, had 
one son ; Dr. Peter K. is a resident of Pottsville. 

(\') Peter K. Filbert attended public school in Marion township. When 
he began to support himself he clerked in a general store at Womelsdorf, in 
his native county, for a short time, and then, in 1871, entered the Pennsyl- 
vania Dental College at Philadelphia, graduating from that institution in 
March, 1873. Immediately afterwards he established himself at Pottsville, 
where he has been successfully engaged in practice ever since. The large 
patronage he commands is sufficient evidence of the strong place he holds in 
the confidence of his patients. His standing with his professional brethren 
is equally good, and he is an honored member of the Lebanon \'alley Dental 
Association, Schuylkill County Dental Society, Lackawanna Dental Society 
and the Pennsylvania State Dental Society (of which he has been president), 
having held office in all these organizations except the Lackawanna Society. 
His home and dental offices are at No. 206 West Market street, Pottsville. 
When the Schuylkill Trust Company was established he was one of the organ- 
izers, and he has maintained his connection with that concern ever since, being 
now the second vice president. Other business interests have also claimed 



14 SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 

his attention. He is an Odd Fellow and a Mason, being a member of Pulaski 
Lodge, No. 216, F. & A. M., of which he has been master; Mountain City 
Chapter, No. 196, R. A. M., of which he is a past high priest; Constantine 
Commandery, No. 41, K. T., which he served as captain general; Rajah 
Temple, A. A. O. N. M. S. ; Miners' Lodge, No. 20, I. O. O. F., of which he is 
a past grand, and Franklin Encampment, No 4. Though independent in 
politics his principles are those of the Democratic party. His religious con- 
nection is with the Episcopal Church, and he is one of the vestrymen. 

Dr. Filbert was married Feb. 25, 1875, to Julia M. Sell, daughter of John 
H. Sell, of Berks county, and they had a family of hve children: Bertha A., 
Edward S., J. Catherine, Emily Elizabeth and Mary AI. The son received 
his literary education in Pottsville high school, later taking a course in the 
dental department of the University of Pennsylvania, graduating in 1907, since 
when he has practiced in association with his father. 

JAMES B. REILLY, of Pottsville, has a record of professional success 
and public service equaled by few of his fellow members at the Schuylkill 
county bar. His legal patronage is not confined to his own county, but drawn 
from a wide territory, and he practices in all the State courts and the United 
States Supreme court. 

Bernard Reilly, father of James B. Reilly, was a native of County Meath, 
Ireland, born in 182 1, and spent his early life in that country. Coming to 
America in 1842, he was a resident of Schuylkill county. Pa., the remainder 
of his life, in 1850 making his home permanently in Pottsville, where he died 
in 1889. He had a successful business career as a railroad contractor, doing 
responsible work for the Canada & Atlantic, Schuylkill & Susc|uehanna and 
Philadelphia & Reading Railway Companies. A family of eleven children 
was born to him and his wife Margaret, nine daughters and two sons, James B. 
and Frank P. The latter, a telegraph operator, also made his home at 
Pottsville. 

James B. Reilly was born Aug. 12, 1845, in West Brunswick township, 
Schuylkill county, and removing to Pottsville shortly before he became of 
school age, received his early education there. He attended high school, and 
though he was not permitted to take a college course, did not give up study, 
which indeed he has found very necessary to him all through life. His legal 
training was obtained under Hon. Francis Wade Hughes, association with 
whom would be a liberal education for any young man, and he was admitted 
to the Schuylkill county bar Jan. 11, 1869. In the forty-six years which have 
elapsed since he has combined professional work with public service most hap- 
pily, in fact his legal experience has never been used to better purpose than in 
the discharge of his official duties. From the start he made so good an impres- 
sion upon his fellow citizens in the county that in 1871 he was the successful 
candidate for district attorney, in which position he served three years. His 
election to Congress followed immediately, in 1874, from the Thirteenth dis- 
trict, and at the close of the term he had additional proof of the approval of 
his supporters in his reelection. With a record which bore favorable com- 
parison with that of his colleagues he returned to Pottsville to devote all his 
time to practice, which came to him from' many quarters, and the character 
of his clients was sufficient indication of the reputation he had established. 
After about ten years of private practice he was returned to Washington, being 
elected a member of the Fifty-first Congress in 1888 and retained for three 



SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PEXNSYLVAXLA. 15 

successive terms, until Alarch 4, 1895. A pronounced Democrat, in a district 
where contests made on party lines are always close, his reelections were a 
frank tribute to the ability with which he was handling issues of importance 
to his locality as well as to his stand on national questions. There was never 
anything equivocal in his position on measures directly affecting his home 
county. He was absolutely loyal to the people who chose him to represent 
them, and in the larger affairs of government also expressed their wishes to 
their satisfaction, as an exponent of the most liberal progress of the day. His 
Congressional associates thought so highly of his talents that he was appointed 
to membership on a number of important committees, including the Pacific 
Railroad committee, the select committee on the Columbian Exposition and 
that on Alines and ^Mining. As a lawyer his services were invaluable in the 
framing of legislation. He was one of the authors of the law making it 
possible to grant a pension to a soldier's widow immediately upon his death, 
and sole author of that portion of the bankrupt law which relates to the 
preferred claims of workingmen for their wages; it was incorporated into the 
law upon his amendment. In 1890 he advocated the enforcement of the eight- 
hour-day rule for manual laborers. He was one of the fourteen representa- 
tives who voted for the measure to afford government aid to bona fide settlers 
on the public lands under the homestead law, which at the time was considered 
a most effective means of developing and promoting the general prosperity 
and welfare of the country. The enumeration testifies abundantly to the fact 
that he has been ranged on the side of the most progressive legislation agitated 
in Congress during his terms, and moreover, that he was fearless in advocating 
a revolutionary course when it seemed necessary. At one time Mr. Reilly was 
in a fair way to become Democratic floor leader in the House, which circum- 
stance alone stamped him as one of the strongest Congressmen of his party, 
who regarded his defeat in 1894 as a distinct loss. But he had held his seat 
long enough to complete a number of important undertakings he began, and 
made a name which reflected credit upon his district as well as himself. His 
work will stand with the best of its day. During Cleveland's second term 
Mr. Reilly was appointed United States marshal for the eastern district of 
Pennsylvania and had offices in the Federal building in Philadelphia, but 
continued to carry on practice at Pottsville. 

As a Democrat Mr. Reilly has done notable work for his party from young 
manhood. While in the public service he was always true to the principles of 
Democracy, and he has given freely of his time and counsel to the manage- 
ment of the party organizations, in which his participation has been welcomed. 
He has served as permanent chairman of various State conventions, and was 
a delegate to the National convention of 1880, when Hancock was nominated 
for the presidency. 

Mr. Reilly has been honored in his professional capacity on several occa- 
sions. In 1881 and 1882 he was chosen as candidate for additional law judge, 
and in the summer of 1913 as candidate for justice of the Superior court. 
Undoubtedly his association during the years he was preparing for his legal 
career, and in its early stages, with men whose greatness has reflected glori- 
ously on Schuylkill county, fostered his ambition and set high standards for 
his guidance, and the hearty indorsement he has received from his professional 
associates is conclusive evidence that his knowledge of the law and ripe 
experience are recognized by the most competent judges. His vigorous mind 
has made him independent of conventional ideas on most subjects, broad- 



16 SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENxNSYLVANIA 

minded and generous towards the opinions of others, yet a safe counselor 
and level headed thinker whose ability has been proved ni many severe tests. 

In business Mr. Reilly has been mterested in the Schuylkill Real Estate, 
Title, Insurance & Trust Lompany, serving as member of its board of directors, 
and he is a member of the Board of Trade. 

In 1868 ^ir. Reilly married Mary A. JM. Hoey, daughter of Owen Hoey, 
the latter born in Ireland, but a resident of Pottsville throughout his mature 
years. Frank X. Reilly, the eldest son of this union, has gained prominence 
as an architect, having his home and office at Pottsville ; he drew the plans 
for the armory. Mr. Reilly is a Catholic in religious faith. 

HON. RICHARD HENRY KOCH. The annals of Schuylkill county 
record the history of no name more prominently associated with the pioneer 
history of eastern Pennsylvania than that of the Koch family. 

Henry Koch, the great-great-grandfather of Richard Henry Koch, took 
an active part as a soldier in the French and Indian war. He left a family 
of eight children, one of whom, William Koch, was the great-grandfather 
of Richard Henry Koch. He was born April i, 1747, at New Hanover, near 
Philadelphia, where he spent his childhood and early youth. Later he lived in 
Oley township, Berks county. It was he who established the family name 
on the soil of Schuylkill cotinty, by moving into Brunswick township (then 
in Berks county) about the year 1780 and locating near the present site of 
the village of McKeansburg, in East Brunswick township. William Koch 
was twice married, his second wife, Maria JNIargaret Neufang, being the 
mother of Flenry Koch, the paternal grandfather of Judge Koch. Maria 
Neufang's father, Baltzer (Balthaser) Neufang, was twice married. On 
the 6th of March, 1756, the Indians murdered his first wife and their son on 
his plantation, which adjoined the one on a part of which the "Seven Stars 
Hotel" now stands. Alaria sprang from the second marriage, and was born 
on the 27th of April, 1766. It thus appears that Judge Koch springs from an 
ancestry that had its abode here more than half a century before the erection 
of Schuylkill county. William Koch died on his farm in East Brunswick 
township. May 3, 1832. 

Grandfather Henry Koch was born on the old homestead in East Bruns- 
wick township, Schuylkill county, Oct. 5. 17QI, and died at New Ringgold 
March 19, 1867. He spent his life in the vicinity of his birthplace, and was 
a prosperous farmer, miller and merchant. He married Susanna Bock, the 
only daughter of Balthaser Bock, who came to this country from Prussia 
with his parents when he was a small boy. He was born on March 30, 1746, 
in Aide Hassen, in the Countship of Hannau. Balthaser Bock served with 
the Continental army in the Revolutionary war. 

Henry Koch had ten children, of whom Daniel, Judge Koch's father, was 
the eldest. He was born at what is now known as Kunkle's Mill, which was 
erected by his father, his birth occurring on Dec. 24, 1816. On the 24th of 
October, 1830, he was united in marriage with Mary Ann Beck, who repre- 
sented an old family in this section of Pennsylvania. Her grandfather was 
a gtinsmith. by reason of which he was exempted from the performance of 
military duty during the Revolutionarv war. Marv .Ann Beck was born mi 
Jan. 24, 1818, and died Aug. 26, 1888. Eleven children were born to the 
marriage of Daniel and Mary Ann Koch, namely: Harriet, Francis D , .Allen 
Jeremiah, Albert B., Sarah, Richard Henry, Emanuel, Arenius, Kate and 





^7:c^x^ 



SCliL'VLKlLL COUNTY, PF.XXSYLXANJA 17 

Ambrose Ellsworth. Ten of the number lived to maturity, Allierl having 
died in childhood. Francis, the eldest son, served throughout the Civil war, 
ami .Allen servetl more than three years. The father and his third son served 
together during the emergency call when the State was invaded by the Con- 
federate army. Daniel Koch, with three of his sons and three of his brothers, 
volunteered and served in the Union armies in the Civil war. 

Excepting about a year spent in a store in Philadelphia, when a boy of 
sixteen, Daniel Koch lived in the vicinity of his birthplace until 1844, when 
he removed to Middleport and engaged in the mercantile business. Prior to 
1844 he was engaged in farming, milling, huckstering or the mercantile busi- 
ness. In 1S57 he moved to .\uburn and resumed farming operations, his 
earlier life work. In 1866 he purchased a flouring mill at Monocacy, Berks 
Co., Pa., but sold it soon afterwards, and the next year purchased a similar 
property at Fleetwood, in the same county, where he established the family 
home. He continued to operate his milling business until 1882, after which 
time he lived in retirement until his death, on Jan. 7, 1903. He was an ardent 
Republican and active in the councils of his party. He was the Whig candi- 
date for the office of sheriff of Schuylkill county in 1854, but was defeated. 
He was elected as a representative in the State Legislature in i860. 

Richard Henry Koch was born at Middleport, Schuylkill Co., Pa., on 
April 2, 1832. He was educated in the public schools of the locality in which 
he lived, and prepared for his enrollment as a student at the State Normal 
School at Kutztown, Pa., in the spring of 1868. He was graduated from that 
institution in 1871, with the first honors in his class. For two years he engaged 
in teaching in Schuylkill and Lehigh counties, and then returned to his alma 
mater, where he taught mathematics and civil government for six years. 
While thus employed he also turned his attention to institute work, and was 
engaged as instructor and lecturer at teachers' institute in a number of 
adjacent counties. In June, 1879, he resigned his chair at the normal school 
to take up the study of the law, becoming a student under the tutorship of 
the late Hon. Francis W. Hughes, of Pottsville. Mr. Hughes was then one 
of the leading law-yers in America. Mr. Koch was admitted to practice in the 
courts of Schuylkill county on the 2d of May, 1881, and was later admitted 
to practice in the Supreme court of Jhe State, and, in 1890, to the Supreme 
court of the United States. He is a thorough lawyer, devoted to his profes- 
sion, and maintains high standing in social and business circles. He is an 
active and earnest Republican, a talented and vigorous campaign orator, and 
a systematic political organizer. He was chairman of the Republican county 
committee in 1883 and 1884. Mr. Koch served three years as deputy district 
attorney, from 1887 to 1S90, and in the fall of 1889 he was elected to that 
office. The election was a high compliment to his popularity, in that the 
county was considered hopelessly Democratic. He was the nominee of his 
party for the ofifice of judge of the Common Pleas in 1892, but was defeated, 
Grover Cleveland, candidate for president, carrying the county by a plurality 
of 2,251 votes. In 1895 t^he Republican county convention of Berks county 
unanimously nominated him for judge of the Common Pleas in that county. 
He was earnestly solicited and urged to accept the nomination, and did so, 
notwithstanding the fact that the normal Democratic majority was from 
9,000 to 10,000 in that Gibraltar of the Democracy. The majority of President 
Judge Ermentrout, his competitor, was less than 4,800. 

He was appointed judge by Governor Hastings, on the death of Judge Weid- 
Vol. I — 2 



18 SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 

man, in September, 1897, and was his party's candidate in 1898, but owing to 
the great anti-yuay fight that year the election resulted in favor of every Dem- 
ocratic candidate in Schuylkill county. In 1907 he was nominated for judge 
by the popular vote of his party in Schuylkill county, and it is widely believed 
that his defeat in the general election was encompassed by ballot box stuffing, 
the widespread existence of which was finally unearthed and perpetrators 
thereof prosecuted a few years later. 

During his absence from home in the summer of 191 1 certain lawyers cir- 
culated a petition to have his name placed on the primary ballot for the judicial 
nomination, and he was once more nominated by the popular vote of the 
Republicans. In the election that subsequently ensued he was elected by a large 
majority over his two competitors. And since the first day of January, 1912, 
when the oath of office was administered to him, he has been discharging the 
duties of his office in a highly acceptable manner. 

Judge Koch was married Sept. 30, 18S4, to Annie S. Phillips, whose father, 
Capt. William Phillips, was fatally wounded at the battle of Cold Harbor dur- 
ing the Civil war. Judge and Mrs. Koch have four children : Roscoe Richard, 
who is practicing law at Pottsville ; Helen Elizabeth, the wife of Dr. Joel T. 
Boone, an assistant surgeon in the United States navy ; ^Marshall ]\IcKinley. a 
mechanical engineer at Denver, Colo. ; and Mary ]\Iarjorie, at home. 

The Judge is associated with a number of fraternal organizations. He has 
been a member of the Patriotic Order Sons of America since 1871, is one of 
the charter members of the Pottsville lodge of the Benevolent and Protective 
Order of Elks, and is a Mason of high standing. For more than eighteen 
years he was a director of the Centennial and Memorial Association of \'''alley 
Forge, which was established for the purpose of preserving Washington's 
headquarters at this historically sacred spot. L^pon the acquisition of the 
headquarters by the State the Association was dissolved. Judge Koch was for 
years a trustee of the Pottsville Hospital, and for a long time has been a 
member of the board of trustees of the Keystone State Normal School, located 
at Kutztown, Pennsylvania. He has been a member of the Pottsville Club 
since 1892, and was for more than s:x years its president. During his incum- 
bency of said office the club acquired its present beautiful quarters on Alahan- 
tongo street. For more than a generation the famous Third Brigade Band of 
Pottsville has had its most ardent and persistent supporter in him. For some 
time he has been president of the board of trustees of the Second Presbyterian 
Church. 

Judge Koch's activities have not been confined to the law. During the years 
1896 and 1897 he was president and general manager of the company operating 
the local trolley road, but relinquished this position in January, 1898, because 
of his judicial duties. It was during his administration "that the line to Schuvl- 
kill Haven was built. He opened that road on the same day that he took his 
oath of office as judge, the nth of October, 1S97. For several years he was 
president of the Rapid Transit Company and of the Lookout Mountain Inclined 
Plane at Chattanooga, Tenn. He was the first president and general manager 
of the Cumberland & Westernport Electric Railway Company, and still con- 
tinues one of its board of directors. He was also for a time connected with the 
Wilmington and New Castle trolley line. He financed the building of the 
Shamokin Extension Electric Railway, of which company he is the president. 
He was also president of the Danville & Bloomsburg Street Railway Company 
until its acquisition by another company. 



SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENNSYLVANL\ 19 

COL. NICHOLAS SEITZINGER founded a family in Schuylkill county 
whose members were among the most potent forces for progress in the early 
days, and some of his posterity continue to reside here, ready to aid in every 
good cause and ranking with the most intelligent citizenship of the present as 
those of the race have always done. 

Colonel Seitzinger was born in Reading, Berks Co., Pa. He had two 
brothers, Michael and Alexander, the latter dying unmarried. Nicholas 
Seitzinger married Barbara Setley, who died at Reading, after which the 
Colonel settled at what is now Fountain Springs, in Schuylkill county. Pa. He 
died there in 1835. He gave the land for the burial ground at that place and 
is interred there. His family consisted of eight sons and one daughter, 
namely: (i) Nicholas, who died at Reading, Pa., married Catharine Reese, 
and among their children were Alfred, Charles, Jacob, Harry, Amelia and 
Emma. (J) John, who died at Reading, married a Mrs. Brumm and had 
children: Henry, John, Amos, Rebecca and Sarah. (3) Daniel, who died 
in Iowa, married Mary Bean, and they became the parents of Edward, William, 
Jacob, Frank, Rebecca, Hester, Lavina, Heber, Mary and Jane. (4) Henry 
died at Pottsville. (5) Jacob is next in the line of descent, mentioned below. 

(6) Samuel, who died at Port Carbon, this county, married Anna Louisa 
Dreibelbis and (second) Hannah Reed. To the first union were born Charles, 
Augustus and Caroline. By the second there were Jeremiah, Samuel, Thomas, 
Charity Ann, Eliza, Matilda, and another whose name is not known. 

(7) Peter, who died at Fountain Springs, this county, married Catharine 
Shelly, by whom he had Joseph S., Charles L., Emmanuel, Peter W., Henry, 
Amanda, Barbara, Alice and Catharine. (8) George, born Jan. 8, 1781, died 
at Fountain Springs, April i, 1862. He married Catharine Kantner, who was 
born May 13, 1777, and died June 29, i860, and they had a family of nine 
children: Nicholas K., Peter K., William (born June 28, 1805, died July 21, 
185 1 ; his wife, Maria, born May 13, 1809, died June 5, 1890, and their son 
Erastus, born Sept. 17, 1829, died June 22, 1868), George, Harriet, Maria, 
Kittie, Barbara and Eliza. (9) Catharine married William Scott, and had 
the following family : William, John, James, Samuel, Barbara, Betsy and 
Catharine. James went West, to California. 

Jacob Seitzinger, son of Nicholas, was one of the prominent business men 
of Pottsville in the early days, settling there in 1816. He was one of the 
leading capitalists of his day, conducted a sawmill, tannery and brickyard, 
making the first brick in this section, and built the first brick house in Potts- 
ville. His progressive spirit drew him into many of the most ambitious under- 
takings of his time. He was one of the organizers of the old Miners' National 
Bank at Pottsville, and was its first notary. He was one of the owners of 
Penn Hall, built and owned the "Exchange" hotel, and also erected the old 
''Mortimer House." The only public position he held was that of justice of 
the peace. Few men of the borough were more intimately associated with its 
interests for the quarter of a century he resided there. 

Mr. Seitzinger married Elizabeth Moyer, daughter of George Moyer, and 
she survived him many years, his death occurring at Pottsville, May 23, 1844, 
hers in 1888. at the home of her youngest daughter, Mrs. Hippel, in Kansas. 
Eight children were born to this union : Jeremiah was a resident of Potts- 
ville, but his death occurred in Denver, Colo. ; Susanna married Joseph 
Kitchen, but had no children ; Israel, who died at Gordon, Pa., married Mar- 
garet Heebner, of Port Carbon, who continued to make her home at Gordon 



20 SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 

after his death (they had three children, John L., James and William) ; Isa- 
bella married Robert N. Palmer, of Pottsville; Lizzie married ^^'ashi^gton 
Bigler; Sarah married J. K. Fernsler ; Annetta married Joseph AI. Schuyler; 
Adelia married Charles D. Hippel and (second) Henry Streiff, and now lives 
in Effingham, Kansas. 

Joseph M. Schuyler was a native of Northumberland county, Pa., and 
settled at Pottsville, where he engaged in the manufacture of screens, follow- 
ing that business for many years. In his early manhood he taught school in 
his native county. His death occurred in Pottsville in 1880. His wife, 
Annetta (Seitzinger), died in 191 1, and they are buried in the Presbyterian 
cemetery at Pottsville. Their family consisted of three children: Joseph AI., 
deceased; Elmer, who lives at Pottsville; and Mary' Isabella, also of Potts- 
ville, who is an active worker in all movements intended for the social and 
material betterment of the community, and highly esteemed among her neigh- 
bors and friends. 

An interesting paper read before the Schuylkill County Historical Society 

.Dec. 27, 191 1, by Sliss Elizabeth Eastman, contains so many items portraying 

life in Pottsville \in the early days, and so much concerning the Seitzingers 

which should find a permanent place in their records, that we append most of 

it here : 

"Annetta Seitzinger was born in September, 1828, and died in August, 
191 1, so that her life covered almost the entire period of the history of Potts- 
ville. Her wonderfully keen and accurate memory was a treasure house of 
facts about the local history of the town, and even in her old age she retai'ied 
this vivid recollection of persons, places and incidents of the old days. She 
was born in a house which stood where the Exchange Hotel now stands. 
When she was only six weeks of age the family moved into what is now the 
Spicker building, afterwards used as the post office. The lower floor of this 
building was then occupied by Trego & Leib, dealing in dry goods and groceries. 
Mr. Seitzinger began the building of the Exchange Hotel, which he com- 
pleted in 1829. Pie was a contractor and builder, and built many houses in 
Pottsville, some of which are now standing. . . . Mrs. Schuyler (nee 
Seitzinger) said that her first clear recollection was of the farm at Bull's 
Head, which belonged to her father at that time, being part of the Seitzinger 
coal tract. She was taken out there with her mother, who was bringing dinner 
to the men working on the farm, and she remembered — as children often do 
remember little things — that each man was given a small rice pudding of his 
own. 

"In those days the citizens of Pottsville lived closer to the wild life of 
the woods than we do today. One time Mrs. Seitzinger went out to the old 
Turnpike road in the afternoon to visit her friend, Mrs. Starr, and had to 
remain all night, because the wolves made it dangerous for her to come home. 
At another time Mrs. Schuyler's brother came into the house saying that 
there was a sort of cow on the street near their gate. It proved to be a deer 
running along on Centre street, and it soon was driven back up Sharp 
Mountain. 

"The Seitzinger family came to Pottsville in 1816 and lived first on the 
site of the Merchants' bank, then on Union street opposite the old depot in 
a house which has now been moved back into the alley. Mr. Seitzinger had 
a brickyard where the Coal and Iron Company shops are now. He built the 



SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, I'EXX'SYLVANLA 21 

ILiuse building- with brick which he had manufactured himself, and brought 
the workmen from Reading. It was the first brick building in Pottsville. 

'Tn a building on the site of the old Coal and Iron building on Centre 
street was a parochial school, kept by the Sisters of St. Anne, an Order that 
came here from Reading in 1837. There Mrs. Schuyler went to school. 
Although called the convent, this school never was a convent in the strict 
sense of the word. There never has been a convent in Pottsville, as there has 
not been a training school for novitiates here. In 1840 the present school 
building at the corner of Seventh and Mahantongo streets was erected, and 
the school moved there. So it occupied the Centre street building for only 
three years. This had a free and pay department both, and music and embroi- 
dery, as well as common branches, were taught. When Annetta Seitzinger 
was there, she embroidered a large and elaborate sampler, still in the possession 
of the family. The young student of embroidery did not lack ambition, for 
one of the most popular designs was 'The Last Supper,' a large and ambitious 
work, containing twelve figures, and involving a vast amount of painstaking 
effort. But we must not conclude that only these more feminine arts occupied 
the time of these little pupils at the convent so many years ago. Science was 
also included in the curriculum, and here, in a pink muslin cover, is a little 
volume inscribed on the fly leaf, 'Annetta Seitzinger's Book, Feb. 21st, 1839. 
This is First Lessons in Natural Philosophy for Children, by Miss Mary A. 
Swift, principal of the Litchfield Female Seminary, Second Edition, published 
in Hartford, by Belknap and Hamersly, in 1837.' The arrangement of the 
book would seem curious to us to-day. The first twelve chapters cover the 
following subjects: solids and fluids, elasticity, motion, attraction and gravi- 
tation, the lever, wheel and a.xle, inclined plane, wedge, screw, pulley, motive 
power and friction, and curious clocks. The chapter on natural forces con- 
tains the Biblical story of Samson. Then come several chapters on physical 
geography, about lakes and springs. In one chapter is an account of the 
Dead Sea, with the statement that it was caused by the destruction of Sodom 
and Gomorrah. Then comes a chapter on specific gravity, and the barometer, 
section, sound, light and heat. The language is very simple and the lessons 
are all given in the form of question and answer. Another school book was 
colled 'The Young Ladies' Class Book,' a selection of lessons for reading in 
prose and verse, by Ebenezer Bailey, principal of the Young Ladies' High 
School in Boston, published by Gould, Kendall and Lincoln, in Boston in 1840.. 
Some of the subjects of these readings present a striking contrast to readings 
for children at the present time. One is 'On the relative Value of Good Sense 
and the Beauty in the Female Sex,' from an English paper — The Literary 
Gazette. It concludes with this ornate paragraph : 'The favored child of 
nature, w^ho combines in herself these united perfections, may be justly con- 
sidered as the masterpiece of the creation ; as the most perfect image of the 
Divinity here below. Man, the proud lord of creation, bows willingly his 
haughty neck beneath her gentle rule. Exalted, tender, beneficient is the love 
that she inspires. Even time himself shall respect the all-powerful magic of 
her beauty. Her charms may fade, but they shall never wither and memory 
still, in the evening of life, hanging with foul affection over the blanched rose, 
shall view, through the vale of lapsed years the tender bud, the dawning 
promise, whose beauty once blushed before the beams of the morning sun.' 

"In 1841 ]\Ir. John M. Crosland and Mr. John T. Hazzard arranged for a 
fimeral pageant to take place in Pottsville at the time of the funeral of Presi- 



22 SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 

dent William Henry Harrison, on April nth. Each State in the Union was 
represented by a young girl. Elizabeth Seitzinger (now Mrs. Bigler) repre- 
sented the Goddess of Liberty, and the subject of this paper, Annetta Seit- 
zinger, represented the State of Georgia." 

Here follows the account of the pageant published in the Pottsville Empo- 
rium of May I, 1841, from which we quote a couple of paragraphs of special 
interest in this connection. 

"The Field and Staff Officers of the 30th Regiment P. M. looked unusually 
well, but their appearance was entirely eclipsed by the next body in the 
procession. They consisted of 2,2 young ladies, from the age of 8 to 16 
years — the eldest representing the Genius of Liberty, the whole Union ! while 
26 represented the several states, one the District of Columbia, and four the 
Northwestern, Florida, Oregon and Iowa Territories. 

"We do not flatter ourselves with the idea of doing justice to this interest- 
ing part of the procession, but we should be wanting in common justice and 
the parental feeling of our nature, were we to omit the acknowledgment of 
our thanks to those who were instrumental in its accomplishment, and our 
heartfelt satisfaction at the beauty, correct deportment and interesting appear- 
ance of the young daughters of our republic. 

"The representative of our free and happy land deserves the most flat- 
tering encomiums of our citizens, for her maidenly reserve, her dignified 
deportment, and her able representation of the character throughout; which, 
with the appearance of the representative of New York and Pennsylvania on 
either side, in support of her, put all doubts of propriety and beautiful effect 
to flight. 

"The representative of Ohio was in deep mourning, supported by Massa- 
chusetts and Kentucky. Next came Virginia and Maryland, with their little 
relative, the District of Columbia. The remainder of this interesting retinue 
followed, two and two, each bearing a small blue silk banner with the State 
designated in gilt letters. All were apparelled in white dresses with black 
caps and black crepe veils, and never have we seen a better behaved or more 
interesting assemblage in our mortal career. We expect to carry this impres- 
sion with us to our graves; and while it is a source of proud satisfaction to 
the youthful hearts engaged in it, it leaves a lasting impress upon the reflective 
mind, of more value than all the idle pageantry attending the ceremonials of 
royalty 

"Each girl who took part in the procession was given a certificate bearing 
the following words: 'Reward of Alerit. The Committee of Arrangements 
appointed by the Citizens of Schuylkill County to arrange the Funeral Pro- 
cession in honor of the memory of the late President of the United States, 
William Henry Harrison, on the 26th of April, 1841, hereby tender their 
unfeigned thanks to the parents and relatives of Miss Annetta Seitzinger, who 
on that occasion, represented the State of Georgia in the procession, and this 
memorial is presented as a token of respect to the young lady for her deserved 
merit on that occasion. — John M. Crosland, Chairman of Committee ; Tno. T. 
Hazzard, Secretary.' 

"Mrs. Schuyler attended the Presbyterian Church, which stood where 
Mrs. A. M. Foster's house now stands, on Market street. The Rev. Joseph 
McCool was the first pastor of the church in her recollection, and a Mr. Swift 
was superintendent of the Sunday school. Miss Mary Moorehead was her 
Sunday school teacher, and Mary Beck, Mary McCool, and Tilly Beatty were 



SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 23 

in the class. Every Eourth of July the Sunday school went up to Agricultural 
Park, heard the Declaration of Independence read and were served with lemon- 
ade. Mrs. Schuyler's mother used to come on horseback to attend a little 
red church, a Lutheran Church, which stood near where Colonel Hyde's house 
is now. This was before i8i(). Mrs. Schuyler was a member of the Presby- 
terian choir, and others she remembered as fellow singers were Miss Mary 
Beck, Miss ^lary McCool, and Mr. and Mrs. Gore. Mr. Gore played the 
flute and Mr. John Little was the leader of the choir. 

"Among her memories of war times in Pottsville, Mrs. Schuyler recalled a 
song written by Mr. Crosland when the soldiers in the Mexican war returned 
home. It began "When the war clouds were rising, sweet peace fled away,' 
and was sung to the tune of 'Home, Sweet Home.' An ox-roast was held in 
Market Square on the occasion of the soldiers' return. 

"The social life of the early days was simpler than that of the present 
time. However, assemblies were held from time to time in the old Mansion 
House at Mount Carbon, and then in the old Town Hall. The singing school 
and the old Philharmonic Society existed for many years, and did much for 
the cultivation of music in the community. As to the drama, Mrs. Schuyler 
remembered attending a performance of 'Uncle Tom's Cabin' in the room 
above the 'Pottsville House,' kept by Edward O'Connor, at the comer of 
Centre and Mahantongo streets, several years before the war. And at another 
time she saw 'Romeo and Juliet' performed there. Memories such as these 
help us materially in framing a picture of life in the early days of Pottsville, 
and it seems wise to write them down while they are accessible." 

PETER C. DETWILER, D. D. S., the oldest living dentist in Schuylkill 
Haven, has been a resident of that borough since 1856, and though now in 
his eighty-second year is still practicing. His professional skill combined with 
conscientious work and honest advice to his patrons earned him a reputation 
years ago, and his wonderful vitality, enabling him to continue his career long 
beyond the ordinary limits, has made him a notable figure in the profession, as 
popular as he is widely known. 

Dr. Detwiler is descended from Swiss ancestors who long ago established 
the family in America, the emigrant coming from Duefelt, Switzerland. Jacob 
Detwiler, grandfather of Dr. Detwiler, lived near Kutztown, in Berks county. 
Pa. By occupation he was a carpenter. He married Maria Rothermel, mem- 
ber of an old and prominent family of that county, and their children were: 
Daniel, John, Charles and Maria (who married and moved West). Jacob 
Detwiler died when fifty-six years old. 

Charles Detwiler, son of Jacob, was born in Kutztown, Berks county, in 
1805, and passed all his life there, dying in 1889. Like his father he followed 
the trade of carpenter. He took an interest in the local welfare, particularly 
in support of the public school system, which in his day was in great disfavor 
among most of the residents of this region. For a number of years he held 
the position of school director in Rockland township. Originally a Democrat 
in politics, he became a Republican at the time of the Civil war. He was long 
a member of the Reformed Church, and a hearty worker in the promotion of 
its various enterprises, giving liberally of both time and means to maintain 
them. Mr. Detwiler married Catherine Christinan, daughter of Peter and 
Margaret (Barto) Christman. and they had a family of nine children, seven 
sons and two daughters, namely: Isaac C, deceased, graduated from the 



24 SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 

Hahnemann College, Philadelphia, and was long a successful practitioner at 
Reading, Pa. ; William C, who died at Easton, Pa., had followed the dentist's 
profession there for many years ; Peter C. is mentioned below ; Isabella, now 
living at Reading, Pa., is the widow of William Eckert, who was timekeeper 
in the Philadelphia & Reading shops there; Rosalind is the widow of John 
Sell, of Philadelphia, where she now lives; Charles C. entered the Civil vyar 
for the Union service, and was wounded in the battle of the Wilderness, dying 
from the effects of his injuries in the Chestnut Hill hospital, Philadelphia; 
Benjamin died when three years old ; Washington C. graduated from Jeft'erson 
Medical College, Philadelphia, and practiced his profession at Reading, Pa., 
until his death, July 6, 1884, he and his brother Aaron being drowned at the 
same time ; Aaron C. was also a graduate of Jeft'erson Medical College, and 
practiced at Reading, Pennsylvania. 

Peter C. Detwiler was born July 23, 1833, at Kutztown, and received his 
early education in the public schools of that borough and at Reading. In his 
youth and young manhood he was employed at farm and carpenter work. 
When twenty-one years old he commenced to study dentistry, to which pro- 
fession his life has since been devoted. Coming to Schuylkill Haven in Octo- 
ber, 1856, he has resided there ever since, and his extensive popularity is 
shown in the loyal patronage of many of his patients, who still rely upon him 
for professional services. Dr. Detwiler has also been quite successful in his 
business ventures, having owned several ice dams in the vicinity of Schu}'lkill 
Haven, from which a large part of the trade in the borough has been supplied. 
As a citizen he has been one of the most useful members of the borough, his 
work as a member of the council and on the school board being highly appre- 
ciated by those who have had the best opportunity of judging its value. All 
local measures for the general good have had his sympathy and support. He 
has been a member of the Church of the United Brethren in Christ for many 
years, and its enterprises as well as the broader religious movements have 
had the benefit of his financial and moral support. Fraternally he is a Mason, 
belonging to Page Lodge, No. 270, F. & A. M., of which he is a past master ; 
he also joined ^Mountain City Chapter, No. 196, R. A. ]M., of Pottsville, and 
was elected for membership in the commandery. but never took the degrees. 
He was originally a Republican in politics, but now supports the Prohibition 
party. 

Dr. Detwiler married Rebecca Bowen, daughter of Samuel Bowen, and 
of the six children born to this union but one, Samuel B., survives. He is 
a graduate of the Pennsylvania Dental College, and in practice with his father 
at Schtiylkill Haven. He married Gussie Saylor, and they have two children, 
Charles and Bessie. Mrs. Rebecca Detwiler died in March, 1875, and the 
Doctor subsequently married Lucetta Horn, daughter of Jonathan Horn. 
Seven children have been ^>orn to this marriage, of whom one is deceased. 
Of the survivors, Aaron H. is a physician in successful practice at Schuylkill 
Haven ; George H., a lawyer, is located in Philadelphia ; Maria is a nurse in 
the navy ; Lulu, formerly engaged as a nurse, is now the wife of Capt. James 
Goethe, of the United States army, now stationed in Texas, where he is also 
paymaster and land agent for the government ; Mark is engaged in the butcher 
business at Schuylkill Haven ; Ruth is a trained nurse. 

WILLIAM LESLEY SHEAFER, son of Peter W. and Harriet N. 
Sheafer, was born Feb. 19, 1859, at Pottsville, Pa. He was educated in the 



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SEAT NO. Ct^.J. 

Author /vh^.*{ K^. 

Ti tie J^^.^<^^^f. £M: i^.-l .... 

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Fort Wayne & Allen County 



SCHUYLKILL COUXTV, PEXXSVLVANLA. 25 

private and public schools of Pottsville, graduating from the high school in 
1874. He then entered Lafayette College, and was graduated in 1878. For 
the rest of his life he served as permanent secretary of his class. Later he 
returned to college for a postgraduate course, and at the end of one year 
received the degree of Master of Science. L'pon his return to Pottsville he 
received his introduction to business life in the office of his father, with whom 
he was associated until the elder man's death, in 1891. He then became one 
of the executors of the estate and continued to act in that capacity imtil his 
own death. A man of wide business ability, his cool, clear and farseeing 
judgment made him a most valuable acquisition to any extensive enterprise, 
not alone in its formation, but also after its organization. While he was 
largely engrossed in financial matters, as a director and second vice president 
of the Safe Deposit Bank of Pottsville antl in great business interests in behalf 
of the estate and privately, he at all times found leisure to devote to the 
welfare of his city, its public life, its churches, its schools and its charities. 
He served as a member of the council from the Second ward for two terms, 
and during part of that time was president of that body. As chaimian of 
the highwa)- committee he was an able pioneer in the good roads movement 
in Pottsville. He was very prominent in the organization of the Taxpayers' 
Association of Schuylkill County, serving as executive officer thereof until 
iyi2, when forced to retire on account of ill health. When an emergency 
hospital was established at Mount Carbon during an epidemic of typhoid 
fever in 1894, he took a very active part in the enterprise, and continued his 
interest in such matters when the Pottsville Plospital was founded in the 
following year. The welfare and progress of this institution were very close 
to his heart, and as a member of the board of managers and its secretary for 
eighteen years he was untiring in his devotion to its administration and devel- 
opment. Air. Sheafer was a trustee of Lafayette College for almost twenty 
years and at one time served as president of the Alumni Association. For 
many years he was a member of the American Institute of Mining Engineers 
and other scientific and economic societies. Mr. Sheafer died at his home, 
No. 430 South Centre street, Pottsville, April 24, 1913, after a long and brave 
battle with an illness that baffled the best medical skill. His death was a 
severe loss to the community, in the regard of which he held high place. 

In 1884 Air. Sheafer was married (first) to Ada Green, daughter of the 
late Hon. Henry Green, Chief Justice of the Supreme court of Pennsylvania. 
Mrs. Sheafer died in 1905, and two sons of this union survive: Lesley G. 
and Clinton \Y., both of Pottsville. In 1910 Mr. Sheafer was married (sec- 
ond) to Mrs. Phebe A. Lee, widow of the late John C. Lee and daughter of the 
late C. M. Atkins. Mr. Sheafer is survived by his two sons, his widow, his 
sister, Miss E. Louise Sheafer, and his two brothers, Arthur W. and Henry. 

PETER \\'. SHEAFER was one of the foremost men of this part of 
Pennsylvania. His special interests were in the coal industry, but he was 
associated with so many other activities of value to his locality that his name 
was widely known among all classes. He was born March 31, 1819, in Halifax, 
Dauphin county, son of Henry .Sheafer, a leading pioneer citizen of that 
county, prominent as president of the Lykens A'alley Railroad Company; he 
developed and superintended the Lykens valley coal mines at W'iconisco, and in 
1834 introduced anthracite into the Susquehanna markets. Peter W. Sheafer 
began his education in the home schools, later taking a course at Oxford 



26 SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENXSYLVANL\ 

(N. Y.) academy. As his father's assistant from early Hfe he had valuable 
business training. \\'hen still a young man he familiarized himself with the 
geological formation of the Lykens valley coal measures and pursued his 
investigations so thoroughly that he was eventually chosen as a member of 
the first geological survey of Pennsylvania, in 1836, when he became a member 
of Professor Rogers's corps. In this connection he was assigned to work 
with Professor W'helpley in 1837-38, surveying and mapping the southern 
and middle anthracite fields. It is noteworthy that the complex structure of 
these main basins was so accurately figured out at that time that the second 
survey, thirty to fifty years later, was simply an elaboration of the work then 
done. In 1839 Mr. Sheafer gave up this work to become his father's assistant 
again, continuing with him until 1848, at which time he moved to Pottsville 
to devote himself to surveying and engineering, first as assistant to Samuel 
B. Fisher, whom he later succeeded. From this time to the close of his life 
his services were in constant demand by landowners and coal operators in the 
Schuylkill, Mahanoy and Beaver Meadow districts, his reports, of which 
there are hundreds, covering almost every tract in those regions. It was 
through his efforts, in cooperation with William P. Foulke and other Phila- 
delphia men, that the State appropriation was obtained, in 1851, to complete 
the work of the first geological survey and give to the world the valuable 
work of Professor Rogers. When this work was resumed, in 1851, Mr. Sheafer 
took charge of the underground portion, connecting every working mine with 
the surface survey carried on by other members of the corps. Professor 
Lesley accredited him with knowing more of the field "than all the rest com- 
bined," and there were a number who attained eminence. Among the many 
important imdertakings which Air. Sheafer completed was the laying out of 
the towns of Ashland, Girardville, Alahanoy City, Shenandoah, Mount Carmel, 
Gilberton, Mahanoy Plane and other prosperous towns and villages in Schuyl- 
kill and adjoining counties. It was he who located the first mines in Shenan- 
doah and Mahanoy valleys, and he lived to see that section developed from 
a wilderness to a prosperous mining community, whose coal productioii 
amounted to millions of tons. His scientific knowledge of the geological 
structure of the fields combined with business ability, skill as an examiner of 
coal lands, and accurate judgment as to the possibilities of development, 
brought demands for his services all over the United .States and Canada, his 
reports covering investigations in Nova Scotia. Rhode Island. \'irginia. North 
Carolina. Alabama. Tennessee. Kentucky. Indian Territory. Te.xas. Colorado. 
New IVIexico, Wyoming and Washington. In 1889 h^ was appointed a mem- 
ber of the coal waste commission, retaining his association with that body 
until his death. Its mission was to investigate the economical production of 
anthracite, and he was also called frequently to give expert testimony on 
coal and coal lands, being an important witness in the celebrated Coxe-Lehigh 
A'alley case before the Interstate commerce commission. 

Mr. Sheafer compiled many maps and tables concerning the coal trade 
during his active connection therewith, one of his works being the historical 
map of Pennsylvania, published in 1875 by the Historical Society of Penn- 
sylvania. Like all his other works it shows patient research and wonderful 
aptitude for statistical details, and in fact the statistics he accunuilatcd would 
aft'ord material for volumes of scientific literature. He contributed exhaustive 
articles on coal to the Encyclopedia Britannica, published in the .\merican 
supplement, delivered addresses before various scientific associations, read 



SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 27 

papers before the American Association for the Advancement of Science, of 
which he was an honored member, as he was of many other societies of 
a literary or scientific character, including the American Philosophical Society, 
the Academy of Natural Sciences, of Philadelphia, the Historical Society of 
Pennsylvania, and the American Institute of Mining Engineers. The only 
public office Mr. Sheafer ever accepted, outside of his work already mentioned, 
was the honorary position of United States Assay commissioner, to which 
he was appointed in 1879. 

Though his life work took him so much out of his home community, Mr. 
Sheafer never lost his interest in its welfare, and he was foremost in encour- 
aging and supporting local educational, religious and charitable movements. 
For a number of years he gave valuable service as a member of the Pottsville 
board of education, and during that time was instrumental in having a high 
school established. He was one of the promoters of the Pottsville Athenaeum, 
was president of the literary society for several years, and donated many 
very valuable books to this institution from his private library. He was an 
original member of the Pottsville Benevolent Association, organized in 1877, 
and equally active in founding the Children's Home. His benevolence took 
the practical form of starting enterprises for giving employment to people, 
and he was always prominent in developing the best interests of Pottsville. 
Thus, though an active member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, he did not 
contine his philanthropical activities to supporting that church and its enter- 
prises. Politically he was a Republican and always actively interested in the 
success of his party: in 1884 he was a presidential elector. 

In 1S48 Mr. Sheafer was married to Harriet N. Whitcomb, of Springfield, 
\'t. Three sons and one daughter survived him. He died ]March 26, 1891, 
at Brown's Mills-in-the-Pines, N. J., to which place he had gone to recuperate. 
Until the illness which caused his death, he had continued his active business 
career without interruption. 

WEISSINGER. For almost sixty years the Weissingers, father and sons, 
have sustained very important relations to the commercial progress of Schuyl- 
kill county, particularly the borough of Pottsville. L. W. Weissinger made 
his way to a foremost place among the men of large interests in this section 
by sheer ability and the persevering methods characteristic of his race. A 
German by birth, he came to this country for the opportunities his native 
land did not aftord. Here he found plenty of incentive for the energy and 
ambition within him, and if he achieved much more than he could have hoped 
for at an outset which held little promise, he proved himself equal to the high 
position he attained. He was one of the ablest men of his generation in 
Schuylkill county, and his work lives to the honor of a name so creditably 
associated with the advancement of this region. 

Leon.\rd William Weissinger was born April 29, 1837, in Wurtemberg, 
son of Casper and Catherine (Liegel) Weissinger, natives also of that king- 
dom. He lived there until sixteen years old, coming to America alone in 
1853, in the fall of which year he was located at Reading, Pa. There he began 
work as a laborer on the canal, being employed for two weeks at eighty-one 
cents a day. Before long he came to Schuylkill county, arriving at Minersville 
on Thanksgiving Day, 1853. and entered the employ of Conrad Seltzer, butcher, 
for whom he worked four months. His next position was in the meat market 
of John Moser, in Pottsville, with whom he remained about two years, after 



28 SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PEXNSYLVANL\ 

which for fifteen months he was in Louis Stoeffregen's market. Though 
capable and industrious, he had never received high pay, having earned but 
tive dollars a month while with Air. Seltzer, and his greatest wages were four- 
teen dollars a month. He was also employed fifteen months by Jacob Rhoads, 
a butcher in Schuylkill Haven, up to March, 1857, when he left to engage in 
business on his own account, as a member of the firm of Keifer & Weissinger, 
who opened a market in Schuylkill Haven in April of that year. They did a 
successful business together until j\Ir. Keifer withdrew, Nov. i, 1859, after 
which Mr. Weissinger had a market of his own until 1865. That year 
Mr. Weissinger gave up butchering in order to give all his time to dealing in 
cattle, moving to Pottsville, where he established stockyards and feeding pens 
to accommodate his extensive trade. Although he was obliged, because of 
limited capital, to begin in a rather modest way, his good management and 
judicious dealing soon made it possible for him to engage in extensive trans- 
actions, and the business attained such proportions that it ranked with the 
most important of the kind in this part of Pennsylvania. It was nothing 
unusual for him to do a weekly business of ten thousand to fifteen thousand 
dollars. From this was developed the immense packing business now owned 
and conducted by his sons, George and Harry Weissinger. who are associ- 
ated tinder the name of George Weissinger & Brother, and are engaged as 
wholesale beef and pork packers. They also deal largely in stock and butchers' 
supplies, but their principal attention is given to slaughtering and packing, and 
the sale and shipment of their products. 

Meantime, other important projects had been claiming a share of Air. 
Weissinger's attention. While in business at Schuylkill Haven he had invested 
heavily in the Schuylkill Haven Direct Iron Company, of which he became 
president in 1869, acting in that capacity until 1880. In 1873, in partnership 
with the late Gideon Bast, he rented the plant of that concern, improved it, 
and was interested in its operatiort as part owner until 1874, when he became 
sole proprietor. With the exception of one year's partnership { 1874-75) with 
J. A. Medlar, Mr. \\'eissinger continued as sole owner initil Januarv, 18S0, 
when he sold two-thirds of the interest to George R. Kaercher and C. F. Rahn. 
During this time he had enlarged the mill, which he ran with steadily increased 
business, and under the new organization it suffered no impairment of pros- 
perity, never closing down for a day except for necessary repairs. \\'hen 
Mr. Rahn died, on Jan. i, 1893, Mr. \\'eissinger succeeded him as president 
of the Cressona Powder Company. He was one of the organizers of the 
Schuylkill Electric Railway Company, and became a member of its board of 
directors. Other enterprises had his encouragement and support from time 
to time, and his influence, in business or other circles, was always for all 
movements which promised benefit to the locality. Though conservative enough 
to be absolutely reliable, Mr. Weissinger had the foresight to appreciate proj- 
ects in keeping with the advance of the times, and he showed remarkal^le 
judgment in appraising new ventures. His strong character, balance and 
courage in the face of obstacles made him a very valuable citizen in the early 
development of Pottsville. What he accomplished for himself was remark- 
able. The manner of its accomplishment none could question who knew the 
high estimate placed on his life and work by his associates everywhere. 

Mr. Weissinger acquired large real estate holdings, in 1869 purchasing sev- 
eral tracts of land in the vicinity of Pottsville, one of which was the farm in 
the suburbs of the borough where he and his family resided for so many 



SCIILVI.KILL COUNTY, I'L' XXSVLXANIA 29 

years. Large and commodious buildings, and other improvements, made the 
place one of the most attractive homes in that part of the county. About 
one mile from i'ottsville is the famous Tumbling Run resort, which to a large 
extent was developed by Mr. W'eissinger. The grounds comprise nine acres, 
partly occupied by a fine natural grove of pines, and through which the beauti- 
ful stream runs. A large dam has been built across the water, where a boating 
and fishing resort has been established. In 1892 Mr. Weissinger erected a 
commodious hotel and a handsome carrousel. Though so importantly con- 
nected with many concerns affecting the welfare of his fellow men. Air. Weis- 
singer was modest and retiring in manner, and he had no aspirations for public 
honors or political power. He was a Democrat, but took no part in party 
affairs beyond casting his vote. His death occurred in May, 1903. He was 
a inember of the German Lutheran Church. 

On Aug. 26, 1858, Mr. W'eissinger married Rebecca Aloyer, of Schuylkill 
Haven, and twelve children were born to them, viz.: George is mentioned 
below: Annie C. is the wife of George G. Frick, and they live on South Centre 
street, Pottsville ; Mary A., unmarried, is living on the old homestead farm in 
North Manheim township : Laura E. is married to Fred Reickley, a lumber 
dealer, of St. Clair, this county : Leonard William is engaged in the packing 
business at Alount Carmel, Pa. ; Harry is mentioned below : Isaac Casper is 
also at Mount Carmel : Louis O. is deceased ; Frederick A. is deceased ; Emily 
R., who received her musical education in Boston, is now the wife of John 
Stouffer, an attorney practicing at Pottsville, though they make their home 
at Schuylkill Haven ; Walter Edgar is in the packing business at Mount Car- 
mel : a daughter, the youngest, died in infancy. The mother of this family 
died in March, 1897, and is buried in the Charles Baber cemetery at Potts- 
ville. 

George Weissinger was born Aug. 4, 1861, at Schuylkill Haven, where 
the family lived, however, for only a few years afterwards. His early educa- 
tion was obtained in North Alanheim township, at the public school in the 
vicinity of the homestead, and he also attended public school in Pottsville. 
When sixteen years old he began to learn butchering with Henry Wagner, at 
Frackville, this county, with whom he remained a year and seven months, 
spending the following si.x months at Middleport, Schuylkill county. He was 
next at Pottsville for a time, and then for eight months at Reading, whence 
he went out to Fort Wayne, Ind. At that place he was employed seven months 
in a sawmill. For a few months he was engaged in shipping horses to Harris- 
burg, Pa., and on his return to Schuylkill county located at Tremont, where 
he carried on a butchering business of his own for four years. In 1887 he 
became interested with his father in the establishment at Pottsville, as a 
drover and on the farm, and after five years' association bought his father's 
interest as a dealer in live stock, at the same time leasing the Dolfinger packing 
house at Fishbach (Pottsville), engaging in the packing business on his own 
account, when in 1897 ^''^ '^"d l^'s brother Harry formed the partnership 
which still exists, under the name of George Weissinger & Brother. After 
three. years of successful business at the Dolfinger plant the Weissinger Broth- 
ers purchased it, and under their control it is one of the most modemly 
equipped and conducted slaughtering establishments in this part of the State. 
From seventy-five to one hundred cattle are killed there weekly, besides a 
carload of hogs, and from fifteen to twenty men are employed regularly. 
Although the business is so extensive, the trade is practically local and the 



30 SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 

patronage of the home market has always been catered to especially. The firm 
makes a specialty of Bologna and other sausage. George and Harry Weis- 
singer bought half of their father's homestead farm of ninety-four acres, 
located near Pottsville, and during the winter fatten cattle there. After the 
death of his father George Weissinger bought the stockyards and hotel on 
North Coal street (the hotel was built in 1875), and a couple of years ago, in 
May, 1912, he purchased from the estate of Colonel Brown the well known 
"Penn Hall" hotel on Centre street, Pottsville. and very valuable property 
which he now owns in partnership with his brother Harry. His home at 
No. 801 West Market street was also at one time owned by Colonel Brown. 
As a man of diversified interests he is naturally concerned in banking facil- 
ities and the stability of financial operations in the borough. Since 1907 he 
has been a director of the Merchants' National Bank at Pottsville, and he was 
at one time a director of the Union Safe Deposit Bank of the borough, in 
which he is still a stockholder. He was one of the organizers and original 
directors of the Schuylkill Haven Trust Company, in whose transactions he 
still maintains an active interest. His share in the management of so many 
institutions whose prosperity is of vital significance to Schuylkill county makes 
him an important figure in the business world. He merits all the consideration 
his opinions receive. Public life has never attracted him. He is a Democrat 
but not active except as a voter. His church membership is with the Trinity 
Reformed congregation. 

On Dec. 31, 1884, Mr. Weissinger married Philepbena Korper, daughter of 
the late Peter and Margaret (Betz) Korper, natives of Germany, who lived at 
Middleport, Schuylkill county, where he was engaged in the mercantile busi- 
ness. Three children have been born to this marriage : Florence Amelia, born 
Aug. 3, 1885, is the wife of Dr. Howard Berger, a physician of St. Clair, 
Schuylkill county ; Leonard William, born Sept. 8, 1888, now employed with 
his father, married Esther Geary; Margaret Elizabeth, born Sept. 13, 1896, 
is at home. 

Harry Weissinger, partner with his brother George in the firm of George 
Weissinger & Brother, was born Dec. 20, 1870, in North ]\Ianheim township, 
where his early life was spent. He obtained a public school education there 
and at Pottsville, where he subsequently learned the trade of wheelwright. 
For two years he was employed by Samuel Aregood, a carpenter contractor, 
and then for three years he was at the plant of the Cressona Powder Company, 
having the contract to make the sheet-iron powder cans. Early in 1897 he 
entered into partnership with his brother George, in the slaughtering and 
packing business. They killed their first steer Feb. 22d of that year, and the 
business has continued since without interruption, expanding steadily as the 
trade has called for increased facilities of operation and justified new accom- 
modations. The plant has been modernized in accordance with changing ideas 
and the better comprehension of sanitation and allied subjects, and it is a 
credit to the town as well as to the owners. Harry Weissinger is also asso- 
ciated with his brother George as owners of the "Penn Hall" hotel at Potts- 
ville. where he enjoys the confidence and standing conceded to all the members 
of his family in the borough. He is a member of the German Lutheran 
Church, and socially is connected with the Odd Fellows, Lily of the Valley 
Lodge, No. 281, and with the B. P. O. Elks, as a life member of Lodge No. 207. 

On Oct. 4, 1899. Mr. Weissinger married Margaret Marie Scheerer, 
daughter of Peter and Bertha (Neisel) Scheerer, and of the three children 



SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 31 

born to them two died in infancy, the survivor being Mildred Beatrice, boni 
Aug. 27, 1902. The family home is at No. 305 North Second street. 

The Moyer family, from which the Weissinger brothers are descended in 
the maternal line, is of old Berks county (Pa.) stock. We find the following 
in a recent publication of Berks county: 

"P'ew families of Heidelberg township can trace more clearly an old and 
honorable ancestry than that of the Moyer, reaching away back to the days 
of religious persecution in 1708. The RIoyer (Meyer or Mayer) family was 
one of the many German Palatinate families of immigrants who in 1708 and 
1709 went to England, whence four thousand persons were given transporta- 
tion, by Queen Anne, to New York, where they landed Dec. 25, 1709, and 
June 14, 1710. On the passage and immediately after landing one thousand 
and seven hundred of these immigrants died. The survivors camped in tents 
which they brought with them, on Governor's Island, and here they remained 
until autumn, when about one thousand and four hundred removed to Liv- 
ingston Manor, one hundred miles up the Hudson river. Being unjustly 
oppressed by Governor Hunter, and seeing famine and starvation staring them 
in the face, one hundred and fifty settlers went to Schoharie valley, some 
sixty miles northwest of Livingston Manor, whither they traveled through 
three feet of snow, in the unbroken woods, hauling their baggage on rudely 
made sleds. At Schoharie they improved the lands which they had been 
granted by Queen Anne, but about ten years later, owing to a defect in their 
titles, they were deprived of the property which they had labored so hard to 
acquire. 

"Having heard of the just and liberal treatment given to settlers in the 
Province of Pennsylvania, thirty-two families removed thereto in the spring 
of 1723, and settled in the 'Tulpahaca,' which was at that time the furthest 
inhabited part of the province, northwest from Philadelphia. In subsequent 
years more than one hundred other families followed them and settled in the 
northwestern part of Berks county, and among these were the Moyers, or 
Meyers. In 1759, when the first Federal tax was levied in Berks county, the 
following Meyers were taxables of Tulpehocken township, and paid their tax 
as follows : Rudolph Meyer, twelve pounds ; John Meyer, eight pounds, and 
Philip Meyer, three pounds. 

"In Heidelberg township was one John Moyer, who paid ten pounds tax 
that year. It is the family tradition that the ancestor of this particular 
branch of the family was John or Johannes Meyer, and that he had seven 
children. In the courthouse is his will, which was probated Dec. 28, 1765, 
the year of his death, he being then a resident of Tulpehocken township. The 
executors of his estate were his two sons, George and Henry, and in it were 
the following provisions: George was to receive the homestead of 120 acres, 
and the 'still,' and was to pay his brothers and sisters 200 pounds ; Henry was 
given the mill and the house and 128 acres of land. The other children were: 
Anna Barbara, married to George Wolff ; Eva Catherine, married to a Stetler ; 
Gideon ; Catherine, married to a Deissinger ; and Valentine. By the testator, 
his beloved 'son-in-law, George WolfT,' was made guardian over the children 
of Catherine Deissinger and Valentine Moyer." 

Among the children of George, son of Johannes, we find a Jacob, but 
whether he is the Jacob who was the great-grandfather of Mrs. Rebecca 
(Rloyer) Weissinger we do not know. 

Jacob Moyer lived in Longswamp township, Berks county, where he was 



32 SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 

a landowner and followed fanning. He was one of the well known citizens 
of his day in that section. His death occurred in Berks county. Among his 
children were Jacob, Isaac and Daniel. 

Isaac Moyer, son of Jacob, was born in Longswamp township, Berks county, 
and coming to Schuylkill county when a young man settled at Pinedale, at one 
time owning the greater part of the site of that place; he had about 150 acres 
of valuable land, most of which he cleared and cultivated. He was active until 
his death, and prospered, building two farmhouses and two barns upon this 
property. Though he retired from regular business pursuits the last ten years 
of his life he relinquished none of his interest in his own or public affairs. He 
married Rebecca Ketner, of Pinedale, who survived him, his death occurring 
in 1870, hers in 1875. They are buried at the historic Red Church, of which 
both were members, Mr. Moyer being especially active in the furtherance of 
its work and a trusted official. The following children were born to this 
honored couple : Sarah married Andrew Boyer ; Isaac is mentioned below ; 
Abraham married Rebecca Cramer ; Polly married Samuel Moyer ; Rebecca 
married Charles Rhan ; Maltida married Martin Hummel ; Jackson married 
Mar}' Christ: Catherine was the wife of Moses Hoover; ^lorgan married 
Elizabeth Hill; Annie, who never married, took care of her parents in their 
declining years. Jackson ]\Ioyer, now (1914) in his eighty-fourth year, is liv- 
ing in the Blue Mountain valley, near Auburn, Schuylkill county. 

Isaac ]\Ioyer was born May 10, 1815, at Pinedale, Schuylkill county, and 
learned the trade of tanner with Andrew Boyer at Schuylkill Haven. He 
also followed boating on the 'old Schuylkill canal until that industry died 
down, owning a line of boats and also teams. Most of his life was passed at 
Schuylkill Haven, where he ended his days at the home of his daughter, Mrs. 
Murphy, dying March 25, 1898. He had lived retired for about fifteen 
years. He is buried at Schuylkill Haven. As a member of the German 
Reformed Church he was deeply interested in its welfare, and served as 
deacon. Politically he was a Democrat. At Schuylkill Haven he married 
Annetta Buzzard, daughter of Jacob and Rebecca (Derrick) Buzzard, the 
ceremony being performed by Rev. Mr. ^linnich, a German Reformed minister. 
Mrs. Moyer was born at Reading, Berks county. Children as follows were 
born to this union: Rebecca, the eldest, became the wife of Leonard William 
Weissinger; George, a resident of Manayunk (Philadelphia), married Chris- 
tine Hain ; Mary, who died in 1908, was the wife of Gottlieb Berger; James, 
who married Mary Fisher, died at Schuylkill Haven and is buried there ; 
John married Lucy Schrub, and died at Harrisburg, Pa. ; Erma died when 
five years old; Charles, who died at the age of fifty years, was never married; 
Alice is the wife of John Murphy, and they reside at Schuylkill Haven; 
Catherine married Frank Hummel, and died in 1892 at Schuylkill Haven; 
William married Mary Boyer, and they are residents of Schuylkill Haven. 

MAJOR HEBER SAMUEL THOMPSON, late of Pottsville, was for 
years one of the foremost citizens of Schuylkill county, where as manager of 
the vast Girard Estate he was associated with some of the most important 
business operations of this section of Pennsylvania. He was bom at Pottsville 
Aug. 14, 1840, the son of Samuel and Elizabeth (Cunningham) Thompson. 

The ancestors of this family in America came to this country from County 
Antrim, Ireland, about 1735. The family, however, is of Scotch lineage, of 
old Scotch Covenanter stock, which early in the eighteenth century moved from 




7^^~&/y<A. ^ . y^^^^^^^^r^ 



SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 33 

their home in Scotland to Ireland, residing temporarily in that country. John 
Thompson, Sr., and his brother James, upon their arrival in America, located 
at Cross Roads, Chester Co., Pa. Then they removed to Hanover township, 
in the same (now Lebanon) county, and later to a fann near Derry Church, 
about ten miles from Ilarrisburg. Here John Thompson married his second 
wife, whose maiden name was Slocum, and shortly afterwards removed to a- 
farm three miles from Thompsontown, which was inherited by his sons, Peter 
and Thomas, to whom he willed it ; when Thomas died his interest went by 
bequest to I'eter, who in turn left it to his son John Peter, who died in 1882. 
John Thompson, Sr., married for his third wife Sarah Patterson. By his 
lirst, whose maiden name was Greenleaf, he had four children, one of whom, 
William, was the grandfather of Heber S. Thompson. 

William Thompson, grandfather of Heber S. Thompson, was born in 1754 
in Thompsontown, Cumberland (now Juniata) Co., Pa. During the Revolu- 
tionary war he served as a soldier in the Colonial cause, and participated in 
the battles of Brandy wine and Germantown. By occupation he was a farmer 
and merchant. He married Jane Mitchell at Chambersburg, Pa., and they 
had a family of nine children, six sons and three daughters. 

Samuel Thompson, son of William, was born in 1792, in Thompsontown, 
and died March 7, 1851, in Pottsville, Schuylkill county. On Nov. 6, 1827, he 
married Ann Alricks, of Harrisburg, Pa., who died Aug. 27, 1828, less than 
a year after their marriage. On Aug. 6, 1833, he married Elizabeth Ciuining- 
ham, of Newton Hamilton, Mifflin Co., Pa., who was born March 3, 1805, 
and died in her seventieth year, Oct. 5, 1874, at Pottsville. Four children 
were born to this union. Of these Col. William, bom May 22, 1834, served 
through the Civil war in the 17th Pennsylvania Cavalry, being mustered out 
at its close as lieutenant colonel, and became a prominent business man of 
Pottsville, particularly in connection with the ]\Iiners' National Bank, of which 
he was president from 1894 until his death, on July 9, 1903. Lewis Cunning- 
ham, born Nov. 7, 1835, also a veteran of the Civil war, having served in 
Company A, 27th Pennsylvania Emergency Regiment, during the invasion 
of the State by Lee in 1863, is now a prominent merchant of Pottsville. The 
only daughter, Emily Jane, became the wife of Major Edward C. Baird, and 
both are deceased. Heber Samuel was the youngest of the family. 

Heber S. Thompson received the foundation for his education in the 
schools of Pottsville and entered Yale College, graduating in 1861 with the 
degree of Bachelor of Arts, and iii 1871 receiving the honorary degree of 
Master of Arts from that institution. Just before graduation he enlisted for 
service in the Civil war, on April 16, 1861, becoming a private in the Wash- 
ington Artillerists, later Company H, 25th Pennsylvania Volunteers, who, with 
four other Pennsylvania, companies, were the first troops to reach the national 
capital in response to the president's call for three months' volunteers. The 
members of these companies formed the Society of First Defenders, of which 
Major Thompson served as president and the history of which he compiled. 
His term of enlistment expired July 29, 1861, and he was honorably dis- 
charged, reenlisting on Oct. 22d, in the 7th Pennsylvania Cavalry, becoming 
first lieutenant of Company F: on July i, 1863, he was promoted to captain 
of Companv I. On March 18, 1864, Captain Thompson was placed on detached 
service, being transferred to the position of acting inspector general of the 
1st Brigade, 2d Cavalry Division, Army of the Cumberland, and he served as 
such until captured, Aug. 20, 1864, at Lovejov's Station, Ga. W'hile in the 
Vol. 1—3 



34 SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENNSYLVANL\ 

Army of the Cumberland, under Generals Buell and Rosecrans, he saw service 
in many battles and innumerable engagements, including Perryville or Chaplin 
Hills, Ky., Stone River or JNIurfreesboro, J\Ic2\Iinnville and Shelbyville, Tenn., 
and Chickamauga, Georgia. At Shelbyville, June 27, 1863, although only a 
lieutenant, he was selected, because of his tried courage, coolness and judgment, 
to lead the regiment in the famous charge against Gen. Joseph Wheeler's 
command which practically annihilated it, and drove General Wheeler into the 
Duck river. Later, under General Sherman, he took part in the Atlanta cam- 
paign and in the engagements at Noonday Creek and Kenesaw Mountain, 
Atlanta, Jonesboro and Lovejoy's Station, where he was taken prisoner. He 
was taken to Macon and then to Augusta, Ga., later to Charleston, S. C, where 
as nurse for a wounded comrade he remained in the prisoners' hospital at 
Rikersville, a suburb of Charleston, until paroled, Dec. 18, 1864. Being unable 
to effect an exchange, he declined to accept a commission as major, which was 
tendered him, and resigned from the army, receiving his discharge Jan. 24, 
1865. He was always active in all the veteran organizations, being a member 
of the First Defenders Association, Gowen Post, No. 23, G. A. R., Pottsville 
Encampment of the Union \'eteran Legion, and the Loyal Legion of the 
United States. 

After his return from the army Major Thompson entered actively into 
business life. In 1874 he became engineer and agent of the Girard Estate in 
Schuylkill and Columbia counties, continuing to hold that position until his 
death in 191 1. He was also general manager of the Girard Water Company. 
Though the Girard Estate interests engaged most of his attention, he was also 
active in other business connections, being president of the Edison Illuminat- 
ing Company until it was absorbed by the Eastern Pennsylvania Railways 
Company, of which he became a director; a director and at one time president 
of the Aliners' National Bank, and a director of the Schuylkill A'alley Division 
of the Pennsylvania railroad. During 1908-09, in conjunction with the estate of 
his brother William, he erected at the corner of Centre and ^larket streets, 
Pottsville, the Thompson building, which is the largest office building in 
Schuylkill county. It is six stories in height and a notable addition to the 
business structures of the town. The wide range of his sympathies and inter- 
ests is well indicated by his active association with numerous charitable enter- 
prises. He was a member of the board of directors of the Pottsville Hospital ; 
president of the board of trustees of the State Hospital at Fountain Springs, 
an institution for those injured in the anthracite coal regions ; a member of the 
County Visiting Committee of the State Board of Charities, and a member of 
the State Committee on Lunacy. For many years he was a school director. He 
belonged to the American Philosophical Society of Philadelphia, to the Histor- 
ical Societies of Pennsylvania and of Schuylkill County, to the American Insti- 
tute of Mining Engineers and to the Engineers' Club of Philadelphia. His 
religious connection was with the First Presbyterian Church of Pottsville, 
which he served as elder, and for many years as superintendent of the Sunday 
school. 

On Jan. 23, 1866, Major Thompson was married to Sarah E. Beck, 
daughter of Isaac and Margaretta (Pitman") Beck, of Pottsville. They had 
a family of five children : Emily Baird, widow of J. Parke Hood, of Phila- 
delphia ; Samuel Clifton, a graduate of Yale University, 1891, and of the 
School of Mines, Columbia University, 1893, ^o^ many years a prominent 
mining engineer in Johannesburg, South Africa, now a consulting engineer 



SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENi\SYLVAXL\ 35 

in New York; ^Margaretla, wife of Colonel James Archbald, of Pottsville; 
Eleanor, deceased ; and Lleber Harris, agent of the Eastern Pennsylvania 
Railways Company at Tamaqua, Pa. Major Thompson died JMarch 9, 191 1, 
and is buried in the Charles Baber cemetery, Pottsville. 

COLONEL JAMES ARCHBALD, of Pottsville, engineer and agent of 
the Cirard Estate in Schuylkill and Columbia counties, in which he succeeded 
his father-in-law, the late ^Lijor Heber S. Thompson, has had a well rounded 
career, quite typical of all the members of this prominent family. For years 
the name has been well known among the leaders in the development of coal 
properties in Pennsylvania, and his talent for engineering has no doubt been 
inherited from his immediate ancestors, whose cleverness in that and similar 
lines has added prestige to the high reptitation they have borne as business 
men and managers of large enterprises. 

Colonel Archbald is of distinguished ancestry in both paternal and mater- 
nal lines. James Archbald, his grandfather, was the fourth of his name in 
direct descent and was also a descendant of Robert Wodrow, the Scotch his- 
torian. A native of Scotland, James Archbald came to this country with 
his parents when twelve years old. His life and work made him one of the 
most prominent men of this section of Pennsylvania in his day. The town of 
Archbald, Lackawanna county, above Scranton, was named in his honor. He 
planned, built and managed from 1829 the gravity railroad of the Delaware 
^ Hudson Canal Company, from Carbondale to Honesdale, the first railroad 
to enter the Lackawanna region, and later planned the similar railroad of the 
Pennsylvania Coal Company from Scranton to Hawley. In 1858 he became 
chief engineer of the Delaware, Lackawanna & Western railroad. He married 
Sarah Augusta Temple Frothingham, a native of New England, and of old 
American ancestry, being a descendant in the fifth generation from William 
Frothingham, who came from England in 1630 and settled at Charlestown, 
Mass. Some of her ancestors served as officers in the Colonial army during 
the Revolutionary war. 

James Archbald, father of Colonel James Archbald, succeeded his father as 
chief engineer of the Delaware, Lackawanna & Western railroad in 1870, and 
held that position for thirty years. At one time he was general manager of 
the Barber Asphalt Paving Company, and in later years was engaged in rail- 
road construction in Mississippi. During the Civil war he served as a captain 
in the I32d Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry. He died in Venice, Italy, on 
Oct. 4, 1910. His brother, Robert Wodrow Archbald, became a judge of the 
United States District court. James Archbald married Hannah M. Albright, 
daughter of Joseph J. Albright, the latter a native of Nazareth, Pa., and for 
many years general manager of the coal department of the Delaware & Hud- 
son Company. Mr. Albright's early life was spent in the manufacture of iron 
in Pennsylvania and Virginia, where he owned and operated furnaces. The 
Albright Library in Scranton was erected as a memorial to him. He was a 
man of sterling character and strict attention to duty, and a worthy descendant 
of his Moravian ancestry. He married Elizabeth Sellers, whose family were 
Friends from near Philadelphia. 

Colonel James Archbald was born Feb. 19, 1866, at Scranton, Pa. After 
a thorough preparaton,' education he entered Phillips Academy, at Andover, 
Mass.. and then Yale College, graduating in 1887. He began business life 
with the Barber Asphalt Paving Company, being employed in Scranton and 

1153969 



36 SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 

Wilkes-Barre, Pa., and during the winters working with an engineer corps. 
For a short time he also studied law. After 1890 he was for two years man- 
ager of the Sterrick Creek Coal Co., at Peckville, Pa., and for six years man- 
ager of the Albright Coal Company at Llewellyn, Schuylkill county. In 1898 
he became associated with his father-in-law, Alajor Heber S. Thompson, as_ 
a civil and mining engineer, and this connection lasted until Major Thompson's 
deatii in 191 1, when Colonel Archbald succeeded him as engineer of the Girard 
Estate and general manager of the Girard Water Company, a responsibility 
for which he had been well htted by his long association with his predecessor. 
Colonel Archbald has given a good account of himself as a professional man 
and in the conduct of his business affairs, and has measured up to the promise 
of his early career and to the unusual intellectual strength and moral fibre of 
his ancestry. In addition to his connection with the Girard Estate, he is a 
director and vice president of the Miners' National Bank of Pottsville, and 
consulting engineer for various coal interests. He is a member of the Potts- 
ville Club, of the Outdoor Club of Pottsville, which he organized and of which 
he was president for ten years and is now a director, and of the Y. M. C. A., 
of which he has been a director and treasurer for twenty years. He is a mem- 
ber of the American Institute of Mining Engineers and of the Engineers' Club 
of Northeastern Pennsylvania. He is a trustee of the First Presbyterian 
Church. 

Special mention should be made of Colonel Archbald's military career. In 
1880 he became a member of Company C, 13th Regiment, Pennsylvania Na- 
tional Guard, serving under Colonel Henry M. Boies, commanding the regi- 
ment. Lieutenant Colonel Frederick L. Hitchcock (later colonel), Major Ezra 
H. Ripple (later colonel and assistant adjutant general of the State), Captain 
Henry A. Coursen (later colonel) and Lieutenant Louis A. Watres (later 
lieutenant governor of the State and recently in command of the 13th Regi- 
ment), who was then second in the command of Company C. The regiment 
was noted for its efficiency under these capable disciplinarians and the training 
was unusually valuable. As a member of the 13th Regiment, Colonel Archbald 
attended the First Division encampment at Fairmount Park, Philadelphia, in 
1880. Three years later, when he entered college, he received an honorable 
discharge, but continued his interest in military matters and kept up his knowl- 
edge of the drill regulations, so that when the Spanish-American war broke 
out his services were sought as drill master for a battalion in Schuylkill county. 
Its services were not accepted, as the National Guard organizations filled 
up the State's quota, and at the request of the State authorities he organized 
Company M, iith Infantry, of the Provisional National Guard, and com- 
manded this company until the reorganization of the National Guard in 1899, 
when Company M was consolidated with Company F of the 4th Infantry, and 
Captain Archbald was chosen captain of the new organization. He at once 
instituted measures for the systematic training of the company, making it one 
of the best in the State, and rendered efficient service with it through the 
anthracite strike in 1900. 

Because of business demands, however, he resigned on April i, 1901, but 
has always maintained an active interest and close association with his old 
command, and has never relaxed his eft'orts for the promotion of its best 
interests. He resimied his connection with military service on Feb. 4, 
1904, having been appointed aide-de-camp on the staff of Governor Penny- 
packer, with the rank of lieutenant colonel. On Feb. 14, 1907, he was reap- 



SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENNSYLVANL\ 37 

pointed by Governor Stuart. He retired with the latter in 191 1. Colonel 
Archbald has been a thorough and earnest student of military affairs, and by 
his ability and zeal has contributed much to the efficiency of the Pennsylvania 
National Guard. He is now treasurer of the local Armory board. 

On Oct. 21, 1S97, Colonel Archbald was married to Margaretta Thompson, 
daughter of Alajor Heber S. Thompson, and they have a family of four chil- 
dren, Margaretta Thompson, Sara Thompson, James 7th, and Wodrow. 

DR. GEORGE DOUGLASS, late of Orwigsburg, established his resi- 
dence in that borotigh over a quarter of a centtn-y before his death, and was 
one of its most estimable citizens. As a gentleman of broad education, 
cultivated tastes and unustial literary attainments, upholding high ideals in 
his own career, he quietly but effectively directed his influence to the better- 
ment of social conditions and living standards in his adopted community. 
His position as a professional man of the highest repute made his opinions 
doubly respected. Dr. Douglass was a native of Philadelphia, Pa., born Aug. 
8, 1796, and his father, Andrew Douglass, was a prominent merchant of 
that city, member of the firm of Douglass &: [Morgan. He also had business 
relations with Stephen Girard. His wife, whose maiden name was Morgan, 
was a daughter of General Morgan, of Revolutionary fame. Andrew Douglass 
died in Philadelphia and is buried there, in the Christ Church cemetery. 
Dotiglassville, in Berks county. Pa., was founded by this family and named 
in its honor. 

George Douglass was reared in Philadelphia, and was carefully educated, 
graduating from' the University of Pennsylvania in 1823. Though only a 
boy when the war of 18 12 broke out, he was a soldier in that struggle. 

Dr. Douglass was married at Douglassville to Mary Bannan, who was 
born Jan. 3, 1795, daughter of Benjamin and Sarah (Bunn) Bannan, and 
not long afterwards, in 1830, they settled at Orwigsburg, Schuylkill Co., 
Pa., where they made their permanent home. Dr. Douglass was a man of 
means and in a position to indulge his literary tastes, and he led an enjoy- 
able life of leisure, dying at his home in Orwigsburg Aug. 11, 1858., His 
wife survived him many years, passing away in 1888, and they are buried 
in the Charles Baber cemetery, at Pottsville, this county. To Dr. and Mrs. 
Douglass were born the following family : Elizabeth Borga Sergeant, born 
in 1827; Andrew Jackson, born in 1828; Sarah Bunn, born in 1830, who 
makes her home at Pottsville, with the family of George D. Rosebury ; John 
Bannan, born in 1832; Rachel Pearsol Morgan, born in 1833: George Wash- 
ington, born in 1834; \'ictoria, born in 1837; and Rebecca Pearsol, born in 
1839. The Misses Rachel, ^''ictoria and Rebecca Douglass occupy the old 
homestead in Orwigsburg. The family are Episcopalians in religious con- 
nection. Dr. Douglass was a member of the Alasonic fraternity. 

HIR.-\M PARKER, JR., now living retired at Pottsville. was one of 
the influential figures in control of the industrial situation of that place for 
over thirty-five years and associated with an establishment which during 
more than half a century had a distinct place among the vital business forces 
of the borough. Other local enterprises have benefited by his cooperation, 
for he has been public-spirited in the very best sense, aiding every project 
which seemed to promise to advance the general welfare. 

Mr. Parker was bom in Pottsville Oct. 4, 1841, and belongs to a family 



38 SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 

of English origin which has been on American soil from the Colonial period. 
We give some record of the earlier generations. His great-grandfather, born 
in February, 171 1, took up a tract of land at Masonville, N. Y., where he did 
some clearing and erected a sawmill which he operated for many years. His 
death occurred there. His wife, Ruth, was born in February, 1712 ( ?). Their 
son, Josiah Parker, born Jan. 31, 1771, followed farming in New York State, 
and died Nov. 23, 1857. On June 6, 1796, he married 2vlary Haskill, who 
was born Sept. 2, 1774, and died Dec. 4, 1832, and their children were born 
as follows: J\Iary, Aug. 2y, 1797: Josiah, Jr., June 16, 1799; Adolph, June 23, 
1801 ; Rebecca, April 13, 1803; Hiram, Oct. 3, 1805; Erastus, June 4, 1808; 
Israel, Jan. 22, 1813; Ruth H., Jan. 22, 1815. 

Hiram Parker, son of Josiah, was born Oct. 2, 1805, in ^Massachusetts. 
He first learned the trade of carpenter, but after following that occupation 
for a short time turned to tailoring, which continued to be his calling through- 
out his active years. He came to Schuylkill county, Pa., in young manhood, in 
1830 locating at Port Carbon, where he lived in a log house, and under the 
primitive conditions characteristic of that day here. In 1831 he removed 
to Pottsville, and established himself in business as a merchant tailor, building 
up a large custom trade in the borough and vicinity, where his reliable work- 
manship and satisfactory service to all his customers kept him in popular 
esteem as long as he worked at his calling. He died in Pottsville March 8, 
1891. J\Ir. Parker was an earnest member of the Presbyterian Church, which 
he served many years as ruling elder. He married Sarah P. Craft, who was 
born Feb. 12, 1803, in Massachusetts, daughter of Joseph Craft, and died 
April 16, 1876. They had a family of five children, three sons and two 
daughters: Alary Elizabeth, born April 5, 1831, died young; Harriet Jane, 
born Jan. 26, 1836, died young; Samuel H., born Jan. 24, 1838, is a farmer of 
Maryville, Nodaway Co., Mo. ; Hiram is mentioned below ; Charles H., born 
May 6, 1844, died in 1905. 

Hiram Parker was given a public school education at Pottsville, and for a 
year or two after leaving school clerked in a store. He then learned the trade 
of machinist, serving his apprenticeship in the Philadelphia & Reading railroad 
shops, at Reading, Pa. The first year of the Civil n-ar he enlisted in the navy, 
which he joined in 1861 as assistant engineer, assigned to the gunboat "Ka- 
nawha," in the Gulf squadron, under Farragut and Porter, being with the 
blockading squadron off Mobile and in the Gulf and lower Mississippi 
maneuvers. After one year of such service he was detailed to take a prize 
vessel from Mobile bay to New York, where he was examined and promoted, 
and assigned to the gunboat "Louisiana," in the North Atlantic squadron, 
with headquarters at Newbern, N. C. As the "Louisiana" was to be used as 
a floating mine at Fort Fisher he was detailed to another gunboat, the "Tacony," 
just before the action at Fort Fisher, which took part in the bombardment 
there and also in the second battle, when the fort was captured. He remained 
on the "Tacony" to the close of the war. During the Cuban filibustering 
which gave so much trouble at that period he was chief engineer on the monitor 
"Manhattan." He also saw three years' service on the "Dacotah," in the 
South Pacific squadron, and three years on the flagship "Lancaster," of the 
South Atlantic squadron, principally on South American coasts. With a year 
on shore duty his connection with the navy covered over twelve years, during 
which he visited nearly every port in the civilized world and had a wide 
experience which assisted him greatly in his subsequent business operations. 



SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PEXXSYLVANLV 39 

He resigned from the navy in 1876, and became associated with Jabez Sparks, 
his father-in-law, in the boiler and machine business. (The latter had begun 
it in 1855, on the site of the present Reading railroad station, with John Sparks, 
his brother, and lidward Greathead. It was started for the manufacture of 
steam boilers, smoke and ventilating stacks and ventilating mine fans, as 
well as general machine repairing. Air. Greathead was killed in 1857, and 
John Sparks retired in i860.) Jabez Sparks, William G. Sparks and Hiram 
i'arker were members of the firm, which was organized in 1876 under the 
name of Sparks & Parker, and the plant was known as the Schuylkill County 
Machinery Depot, and operated under that name until the death of Jabez 
Sparks, after which William G. Sparks and Hiram Parker were the constituent 
members of the tirm. The business prospered without interruption under 
the regime of Sparks & Parker until the death of W. G. Sparks, in 1898. It 
was then continued under the same name by Mr. Hiram Parker, who became 
sole owner. He retained his interest until his retirement from active business, 
in iyi2. Mr. Parker has always been regarded as one of the foremost manu- 
facturers in his line in the county, and his practical familiarity with machinery 
was not only a help in the management of the shop but gained confidence 
among its patrons, and made him a competent adviser. 

Air. Parker was married in 1871 to Mary E. Sparks, a daughter of Jabez 
Sparks, and she died in 1877, leaving three children : Jabez S., who graduated 
from the University of Pennsylvania and is now a practicing physician in 
West Philadelphia, Pa. ; Emily Y., now the wife of Otto E. Farquhar, attorney, 
of Pottsville (they have one daughter) ; and Jessie C, wife of W. T. Jennings, 
an electrical engineer in the employ of the Reading Company at Pottsville. 
On Sept. 4, 1885, Mr. Parker married Julia F. Sparks, sister of his first wife. 
She died May 14, 1912. 

Air. Parker continues to reside in Pottsville at No. 1707 West Alahantongo 
street. Like his father he has been a ruling elder in the Presbyterian Church, 
and fraternally he belongs to Pulaski Lodge. No. 216, F. & A. AL, of Potts- 
ville, the chapter and commandery ; and to Aliners' Lodge, No. 20, I. O. O. F. 
Politically he is a Republican, and though he had no desire for the honors of 
office he has occupied the position of school director, serving as a member of 
the Pottsville school board for a number of years. 

COL. THOMAS H. RICKERT, late of Pottsville, was one of the energetic 
spirits of his generation in this part of Pennsylvania, associated with its most 
ambitious projects. Particularly successful in the building of railroads, to 
which the later years of his business life were devoted, there are many 
evidences in existence of his competence and trustworthiness as a contractor. 
It was characteristic of him that his undertakings were all of the kind whose 
value is permanent, marking progress and leading it. This was true of his 
ideals as well as his material accomplishments, many of which were indeed 
the realization of visions long cherished. Colonel Rickert was a native of 
Schuylkill county, born April 8, 1834, near Schuylkill Haven, in North Man- 
heim township. He was a son of George Rickert and grandson of Richard 
Rickert. 

Richard Rickert was born in Bucks county. Pa., and his father dying 
when he was quite young came alone to Schuylkill county when a youth, 
settling near Orwigsburg. There he spent the remainder of his long life, 
which temiinated about 1857, at the age of eighty-five years. He was prin- 



40 SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 

cipally occupied in farming and mining, though he also did other work. In 
spite of his lack of early advantages he became a well informed man, and he 
was thoroughly respected for his substantial qualities and upright life. He 
was particularly well known as a zealous worker in the Evangelical Associa- 
tion, helping to found the church in his neighborhood and always giving his 
best efforts towards its successful maintenance. Politically he was a Whig 
and interested in the doings of the party, and he was remembered as an ardent 
admirer of Henry Clay. His wife's maiden name was Gilbert, and they 
were the parents of six children, three sons and three daughters. 

George Rickert, son of Richard, was born in November, 1810, at Orwigs- 
burg, where he was reared. When but fourteen years old he began mining 
on his own account, at Minersville, hauling his coal to Mount Carbon, whence 
it was shipped to Philadelphia by way of the Philadelphia & Schuylkill canal. 
He was one of the first to ship coal from this section. He also built boats for 
transporting coal and other freight, at Landingville, Pa. He continued mining 
in Schuylkill county, at New Philadelphia and other points as well as his 
original location, until his retirement in 1872. Thereafter he lived at Potts- 
ville until 1891, in which year he removed to Reading, and he died at Phila- 
delphia, while on a visit to his daughter there. Like his father Mr. Rickert 
was an earnest member of the Evangelical Association, faithfully filling its 
important offices and doing all in his power to promote its welfare. He was a 
Republican in political sentiment, and did his duty as a citizen, having a high 
sense of his obligations to his fellow men. To his marriage with Amelia 
Hammer, whose family was at one time one of the most prominent in Schuyl- 
kill county, was born a family of five children : Mrs. Elizabeth Linder, of 
Orwigsburg ; John R., of Reading, Pa. : Mrs. Emma Bohannon, of Philadelphia ; 
George L., of Virginia; and Thomas H. The mother died in July, 1890, aged 
seventy-eight years. 

Thomas H. Rickert received a public school education, attending at 
Norristown, Pa. He followed in his father's footsteps, becoming a coal 
operator, first in association with his father and later independentlv, and met 
with substantial success. Though it was not until 1881 that he began taking 
contracts for the construction of railroads, he did notable work in that line, 
assisting in laying the Bufifalo extension of the Lehigh Valley road, besides 
work on the Cumberland Valley, Schuylkill A^alley, Pennsylvania, Philadelphia 
& Reading, and other roads. His work has stood the test of time, a worthy 
monument to the mind that planned and executed it. As a man of capital 
Colonel Rickert was naturally concerned in having stable financial institutions 
in his section, and he was one of the directors of the Safe Deposit Bank of 
Pottsville. and also of the ]\Iiners' Bank of that city. He was also a director 
of the Edison Illuminating Company and in other associations identified with 
the improvement of material conditions in his borough. 

Colonel Rickert was a Republican, and although never a politician felt 
strongly on national questions. When the Civil war broke out his sympathies 
were with the Union, and he showed his convictions by enlisting for service 
early in the struggle. He was made quartermaster of the 7th Pennsylvania 
Cavalry, and subsequently served in that capacity with different divisions and 
corps of the army of the Cumberland, remaining with the army until the spring 
of 1865, when he resigned. He saw active service in practically all the 
engagements of the Army of the Cumberland, including the battles of Stone 
River, Chickamauga, Chattanooga, Missionary Ridge, and the Atlanta cam- 



SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PEXXSYLVANL\ 41 

paign, after which he returned to Tennessee with General Thomas and fought 
at Franklin and Nashville. He kept up association with his fellow soldiers 
by his membership in Gowen Post, No. 23, G. A. R., the Loyal Legion, and 
Encampment No. 19, Lhiion X'eteran Legion. Colonel Rickert's fine appear- 
ance, attractive personality and friendly manner, his often proved public 
spirit, his kindness towards the unfortunate or lonely, and the cheer of his 
social qualities, will keep his memory alive for many years. His death, which 
occurred Nov. 19, 1899, was deeply mourned. 

On Sept. 23, 1856, Colonel Rickert married Elizabeth \'an Duscn, and they 
had a family of five children, two of whom survive: Anna T., wife of Dr. 
T. W. Swalm, of Pottsville ; and G. \'an Dusen, who married Allie McMurtrie, 
daughter of George K. JMcMurtrie, of Belvidere, N. J., and has three children, 
Thomas H., \"an Dusen and Helen. 

Colonel Rickert's widow continues to occupy the old homestead at No. 201 
West Mahantongo street, Pottsville, beloved throughout the wide circle of her 
acquaintance. 

The \ an Dusen family is of Holland Dutch origin and has been settled 
in New England from early Colonial days. Mathew Van EHisen, Mrs. 
Rickert's grandfather, was born in Massachusetts. For a number of years he 
lived at Pottsville, Pa., returning to his native State, where he died. His 
son, Henry \'an Dusen, Mrs. Rickert's father, was born also in Massachusetts, 
came to Pottsville in 1829 with his parents, and became one of the prominent 
citizens of this region. For a time he was engaged in the tanning business 
at Catawissa, Columbia Co., Pa., later retiring to Berwick, Columbia county, 
where his w-ife, Catherine (Boyd), died; but his death occurred in Pottsville. 
Of their nine children only three survive: Elizabeth, widow of Colonel 
Rickert ; Catherine, and Henry J. 

FRANCIS WADE HUGHES, in his day one of the most distinguished 
citizens of Pottsville, probably made his greatest reputation as a lawyer, yet 
the record of his activities in other fields would indicate that he could have 
been successful in any line. For years he looked after a large legal practice, 
took a prominent part in politics, and meantime carried on business concerns 
which would have been sufiicient in themselves for the whole attention of 
the average man. That none of his interests was neglected emphasizes one 
particular trait of his character, his faculty for going directly to the heart of 
things without wasting any time in preliminaries. It was a great quality, and 
characterized everything he undertook to do. 

Mr. Hughes was a native of Montgomery county, Pa., born Aug. 20, 1817, 
in Upper Marion township, son of John Hughes, a man of wealth for his 
generation and one of the important citizens of his locality. He had large 
agricultural interests, and was a gentleman farmer, leasing most of his land 
to tenants. The Hughes family had settled upon the estate before the time 
of William Penn. and in Colonial and Revolutionary days had held prominent 
positions of honor and trust. John Hughes married Hannah Bartholomew, 
eldest child of Benjamin Bartholomew, who was of French Huguenot stock, 
and served through the entire Revolutionary war as captain of a cavalry com- 
pany. 

Mr. Hughes in his early childhood gave evidence of the remarkable ability 
which rendered him so successful at the bar. Although he had the natural 
fondness of a boy for outdoor sports and exercise, he manifested an aptitude 



42 SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 

for study which an intelligent father observed and encouraged. Rev. David 
Kirkpatrick, of Milton academy, at that time deservedly enjoyed the reputa- 
tion of being one of the best teachers in the State. To his instruction young 
Hughes was confided. At this academy he acquired a good classical and 
mathematical education. In the fall of 1834 he commenced the study of law 
with the late George W. Farquhar, in Pottsville. The following winter he 
entered the law office of John B. Wallace, of Philadelphia, under whose able 
guidance a broad, practical knowledge of the law was acquired. The knowl- 
edge of pleading gained at that time Mr. Hughes often in the trial of causes 
displayed to the wonder and astonishment of the court and bar. After the 
death of Mr. Wallace, which occurred in the latter part of 1S36, he entered 
the law school at Carlisle, then under the direction of Hon. John Reed, the 
president judge of that judicial district. Here he met a number of his old 
schoolmates at the Milton academy, among them Andrew G. Curtin, afterwards 
famous as the war governor of Pennsylvania. The same avidity of learning 
previously displayed Mr. Hughes manifested at the law school, and his fellow 
students testified to the extent of his learning, the facility with which it was 
acquired, and his brilliancy and clearness of expression. He was admitted as 
an attorney in August. 1837, and immediately commenced the practice of his 
chosen profession in Pottsville. His practice, which from its commencement 
was lucrative, became extremely varied, his business important as a class, and 
his suits in all of the courts. It is said he tried, probably, more causes than 
any other man in the State of Pennsylvania. He was familiar with, and at 
home in, all branches of the profession. In 1839 he was appointed deputy 
attorney general by Hon. Ovid F. Johnson, then attorney general, and thovigh 
he resigned this office three several times he was subsequently reappointed, 
and held it altogether for eleven years. His knowledge of criminal law was 
consequently thorough, but his practice was mainly in the civil courts. He 
ranked among the first of the few great land lawyers of the country; was a 
fine equity practitioner ; and understood, in all its branches, patent as well as 
commercial law. He had few equals as a nisi priiis lawyer in the country. 
He prepared a case rapidly, but with great skill and accuracy ; examined and 
cross-examined a witness with great ability ; argued with force, law and 
fact to court and jury, and in the general management of his cause enlisted 
the admiration of all. Although naturally impulsive, he held himself under 
complete control during the trial of a cause, rarely lost his temper — never his 
balance. His most extended reputation, perhaps, was gained in the argument 
of cases in the superior courts on appeal. As a lawyer and a gentleman he 
was universally respected by bench and bar. 

But while Mr. Hughes led a wonderfully busy life as an active practitioner 
at the bar, he always took a personal interest in politics, as well as in subjects 
pertaining to the general welfare. In 1843, when but twenty-six years of 
age, he was elected to the State Senate by the Democratic party, by a large 
majority, there being in this county only 149 votes against him. He resigned 
his office as senator in 1844, and returned to the practice of the law. Whilst 
in the Senate he formed close friendly relations with Hon. William Bigler, 
who when elected governor of Pennsylvania, in the fall of 185 1, appointed 
him secretar}' of the Commonwealth. In March, 1853, he was appointed 
attorney general of the State, which office he filled until the early part of the 
year 1855. Although deeply interested in politics, Mr. Hughes's tastes and 
business cares prevented him from holding many political offices. He was 



SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PEXNSYLVANL\ 43 

one of the presidential electors in 1856, and had heen a delegate to many 
county, State and national conventions, over many of which he presided. He 
was, however, a politician of the old school; believed in the power of organ- 
ization, and regarded parties as representatives of principles, not as mere 
machines for personal advancement. In February, iSfii, he was a member 
of the State convention at Harrisburg, known as the Peace convention, and 
was a prominent member of the committee on resolutions. When the war 
broke out his support of the Lhiion was prompt, energetic and valuable. He 
aided in fitting out one of the first five companies that reached Washington. 
He maintained, with voice and pen, the legal right of the government to put 
down rebellion with force of arms. He aided in the raising of regiments, and 
one regiment was familiarly known as his regiment. But he was a Democrat ; 
was chairman of the Democratic State committee in 1862, and in the unrea- 
soning political zeal of the times was denounced by his political opponents. 
Efforts were made by them to have him arrested, which would probably have 
been successful had it not been that Hon. Edwin ]\I. Stanton, then secretary 
of war, was his personal friend. Secretary Stanton telegraphed him that 
there should be no order for his arrest without first granting him a hearing. 
As there were no charges affecting his loyalty to the government, except such 
as were manifestly founded on malice, no order was ever issued. 

Eminent as Mr. Hughes was as a lawyer and politician, his operations as a 
business man were extensive. He originated and aided in many enterprises ; 
in the purchase and improvement of lands ; in the opening and working of 
coal and ore mines ; in the establishment of factories and iron works. He was 
essentially a man of enterprise, and his county and his State have been 
enriched through his eiTorts. He embarked in a scheme for the reclamation 
of marsh lands about Long Island and Staten Island, and in this he lost many 
thousands of dollars. Eminent as a lawyer, disinterested and earnest as a 
politician, in his death, which occurred at Pottsville Oct. 22, 1885, the borough 
not only lost one of her most beloved citizens, but the State one of her most 
distinguished sons. 

E. F. C. DA\'IS was at the time of his death president of the American 
Society of Mechanical Engineers, and one of the most deserving men ever 
chosen for that honor. That the greater part of his professional career was 
spent at Pottsville, Schuylkill county, and some of his most important work 
executed in the improvement of her industrial plants, is a proper occasion for 
pride on the part of the community. Mr. Davis came here a young man, full 
of ambition and, as it proved, the practical ability to bring his plans to fulfill- 
ment. Here he remained, progressing steadily in the work of his choice, 
until a few years before his death, when he left to assume greater responsi- 
bilities. He had the most coveted reward of the true scientific man, the recog- 
nition of his fellow workers in the same field. 

Mr. Davis was born in 1847 ^^ Chestertown, Md., and was well educated, 
taking a classical course at Washington College, from which institution he 
was graduated in 1866. His parents intended him for the legal profession, 
but his tastes were all in the line of mechanics, for which, indeed, he showed 
great aptitude even in his early years. He was a mere boy when he con- 
structed a small oscillating steam engine. For several years after his college 
days he was in the Ignited States merchant marine service, which he left to 
enter upon an apprenticeship with Brinton & Henderson, machinists, of Phila- 



44 SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENNSYLVANL\ 

delphia, Pa. His preparation included thorough training in both the machine 
and drafting departments. The first position that Mr. Davis held thereafter 
was with Hoy, Kennedy & Co., of New Castle, Del., and he assisted in trans- 
ferring their plant from that city to the Atlantic Dock Iron Works, at South 
Brooklyn, N. Y. While with that concern he was engaged in making the 
drawings for the Mutual Gas Works of New York City. It was from there 
he came to Pottsville, Pa., to take a place in the drafting department of the 
Iron & Steel Company, and in the course of his connection therewith he 
worked out many improvements in the older machinery, and eventually designed 
the new plant of the company. He was next in the offices of the George W. 
Snyder foundry on Coal street, following with some experience as draftsman 
and assistant to S. B. Whiting, then superintendent of the Colliery Iron Works, 
at Pottsville. Meantime the Philadelphia & Reading Coal & Iron Company 
came into existence, and Mr. Davis entered its service in 1879, in the capacity 
of mechanical draftsman. A year later he was made superintendent of the 
shops, filling that position for the ten years succeeding, during which the 
duties originally assigned him increased greatly in scope and importance. In 
1883 the Colliery Iron Works were added to the plant, and their reorganiza- 
tion, to fit them into eftective cooperation with the Philadelphia & Reading 
works, was manipulated principally by Mr. Davis. In 1887, when j\Ir. Whiting 
resigned as mechanical engineer, i\Ir. Davis succeeded him, and proved most 
capable in the discharge of his "manifold responsibilities, which called for 
executive as well as mechanical ability. He was the pioneer in the intro- 
duction of electricity into Pottsville, and the first to apply it for use in the 
mines. 

In 1890 ^Ir. Davis resigned his superintendency of the Philadelphia & 
Reading Coal & Iron Company to become the general manager of the Rich- 
mond Locomotive Works, of Richmond, Ya. There his talent, employed in a 
special line, brought about some noteworthy improvements in railway loco- 
motives. In April, 1895, he severed his connection with the Richmond works 
to take the presidency of the Hunt Iron \\'orks, of New York, and at the 
time of his death he was also connected with the Brighton Iron Works on 
Staten- Island. His accomplishments in these various associations are known 
to mechanical engineers everywhere. In January, 1895, the dignity of presi- 
dent of the American Society of iMechanical Engineers was conferred upon 
him, and he was deeply appreciative of the significance of his election to that 
position, which he filled worthily. 

Mr. Davis died Aug. 6, 1895, being instantly killed when thrown from his 
own horse, in Central Park, New York City. His remains were brought to 
Pottsville for interment in the Charles Baber cemetery. He married Joanna H., 
a daughter of the late Col. John Potts Hobart, of Pottsville, and she survives 
him with four children: John Hobart, George Lynn Lachlan, Meredith and 
Mary Clare. 

JOHN POTTS HOBART, late of Pottsville, generally known as Colonel 
Hobart, was a citizen of that borough from the time it became the county seat 
of Schuylkill county. He was a lawyer, and made a distinguished record in 
his profession, and his citizenship was what might have been expected from a 
member of the Hobart and Potts families, for he was a son of the late 
Nathaniel Potts Hobart and his mother was a member of the Potts family. 



SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PEXXSYL\^'\NL\ 45 

after whom Pottstown was named. His grantlfather was Robert Enoch 
Hobart and his uncle the well known Uishop Hobart of New York City. 

Nathaniel Potts Hobart was bom in Philadelphia, and became prominent 
as an attorney, being well known throughout the State of Pennsylvania. He 
practiced his profession in both Philadelphia and Pottstown, Pa., serving as 
auditor general under Governor Ritner, and was an old-line Whig in political 
connection. He died when past middle age in Schuylkill county, in the town 
of Pottsville. jMr. Hobart married Joanna Potts, of Alexandria, Va., who 
belonged to the family which founded Pottstown during the Revolutionary 
period. They were the first to engage in the iron industry in Pennsylvania. 
Seven children were born to Mr. Hobart and his wife, namely : John Potts, 
Sarah Potts, Eliza Ramsay, Anna Sophia, Robert Henry, Nathaniel Potts 
and Ellen Goodin. 

John Potts Hobart was born Aug. 22, 1814, at Pottstown, Montgomery 
Co., Pa. His edtication was begun in the private schools there and at Reading, 
and he also attended a militai">' school at Mount Airy. He read law with 
AMlliam Bidtlle at Carlisle, Pa., and was admitted to practice in the courts of 
Cumberland county. Settling at Orwigsburg, which was then the seat of 
Schuylkill county. Pa., he remained there until Pottsville became the county 
seat; moving to the latter place at that time. His professional ability, gained 
him enviable standing in the law, and he became a prominent citizen in other 
associations also, serving one term, 1858-61, as sheriff of Schuylkill county. 
He was colonel of a regiment of militia and was generally known in his home 
community by that title. Mr. Hobart continued in the practice of his profes- 
sion until his death, which occurred on March 24, 1892, at Pottsville. He is 
buried in the Charles Baber cemetery there, formerly the old Mount Laurel 
cemetery. His religious connection was with the Episcopal Church, and he 
was a Republican in politics. A man of sterling personal qualities, strong 
and well-trained intellect, high principles and courageous in the expression 
of his opinion, he was admired and esteemed by all with whom he came in 
contact. 

On April 5. 1838. Colonel Hobart was married in Philadelphia to Anne 
Amelia Smith, who was born March 13, 1816, at Huntingdon, Pa., daughter 
of \\'illiam Rudolph Smith, and died July 4, 1890, at Pottsville. Of the ten 
children born to this union two died in infancy, the survivqrs being: Eliza 
Smith: Julia Biddle ; Joanna Holland; Mary; Nathaniel Potts; John Potts; 
Cecil Willig, and David McKnight. 

WILLL\]\I SPENCER. Through a period of seventy years and more 
there flourished at Minersville or in the nearby Pennsylvania coal territory 
George and William Spencer, father and son, who in turn held a prominent 
place among coal operators in this section, from the early thirties until after 
the opening of the present century. Many of the most profitable collieries 
in this region were opened and worked under their management. Each was 
counted among the ablest citizens of his generation, and William Spencer was 
influential in the commercial and municipal development of IMinersville, where 
his name is held in honored memory bv his contemporaries in everv walk of 
life. 

George Spencer, the father, was of English birth and ancestry, a son of 
George and Hannah (Hearst) Spencer. Born in 1806 in Yorkshire, he spent 
his early life there, coming to America in 1828. He was soon at work as a 



46 SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 

miner in Schuylkill county, Pa., settling at the village of West West, near 
Minersville, was promoted to mine boss at the old North America mines near 
Pottsville, and in the early thirties began mining on his own account, being 
a successful operator until his death. Moving to Minersville in 1837, he 
acquired an interest in the Wadesville mines in that vicinity, and was later 
associated with others in the operation of a colliery at Beaver Meadow and 
the opening of a new one in Carbon county, where they founded the village of 
Jeanesville, located over the line in Luzerne county. For a few years ^Ir. 
Spencer was located at Jersey City, N. J., removing there in 1850 to take 
charge of the coal shipments for the mines in which he held interests, returning 
to Minersville in 1853. After that he opened the Peach Orchard colliery 
and subsequently the Oak Hill colliery, in the southern part of Cass township, 
this county. Following this he leased the Harper colliery at jMinersville, 
operating it until his death, Jan. 4, 1862, caused by a gas explosion there. He 
had also operated the old Spohn vein, at Fishbach, where the Williams colliery 
is now located. A pioneer in the Schuylkill county anthracite fields, he was 
one of its most prosperous operators, the mines he started and worked com- 
paring well with the best producers in the territory. Mr. Spencer showed 
the same good judgment in the conduct of all his affairs that he did in busi- 
ness, and though he acquired ample means retained always the good will and 
confidence of his fellow men, a tribute to his upright character which gratified 
him greatly. As a member of the community he was progressive, ready to 
give his encouragement to local movements and liberal in his support of 
worthy enterprises of all kinds. 

By his marriage to Mary Williams, daughter of John and Mary Williams, 
Mr. Spencer had a family of seven children who reached maturity : William ; 
Thomas, deceased; Hannah, widow of Edward Cooke, of West Bethlehem; 
John, deceased; George, agent for the Dupont Powder Company at Ashland, 
Pa. ; Rachel, widow of Dr. Thomas Patterson, of Mahanoy City ; and Mary, 
deceased, who was the wife of William Taylor, manager of the stores of the 
Forest Improvement Company at Heckscherville and Forestville, Schuylkill 
county. 

Mr. Spencer was a Whig in politics until the organization of the Repub- 
lican party, which he supported during his last years. He held membership 
in the Methodist Episcopal Church and took a sincere interest in its work, 
which he assisted generously. 

William Spencer was born Aug. 7, 1830, at West West, in Norwegian 
township, Schuylkill county, and received his early education in convenient 
academies, later attending Lafayette College, Easton, Pa., from which he was 
graduated in 1847. When ready to commence work he joined his father, for 
whom as soon as able he acted as superintendent at the Oak Hill collieries, 
and later at Buck Mountain, near Hazleton. His career as a coal operator 
had two interruptions, the first in 1849, when he joined the rush to California 
in search of gold. He made the voyage around the Horn to San Francisco, 
but did not spend much time in the coast region. On his return to the East 
he was located for a time at Paterson, N. J., conducting coal yards run in con- 
nection with his father's mining business in Schuylkill county. Later he was 
out of the coal business again during the Civil war, in which he served under 
two enlistments. He first entered the 5th Pennsylvania \'olunteer Infantry, 
under Col. Benjamin C. Christ, the regiment spending most of its three months' 
term in camp duty at Harrisburg, Washington, D. C, and Alexandria, \'a., and 



SCHfVLKlLL COUNTY, PEXXSYLVANIA 47 

never coming into direct contact with the enemy. After heing mustered out, 
July 25, iSbi, j\lr. Spencer reenHsted at once, in the Pennsylvania cavalry 
service, in which he served honorably to the end of the war, attaining the rank 
of major. 

The war over, Mr. Spencer resumed his old calling, being superintendent 
and general manager of the Buck ^fountain colliery and company store, near 
Hazleton, where he continued for a period of eighteen years, returning to 
Minersville to live in the fail of 1885. Though particularly well experienced 
in anthracite mining he joined xAndrew Robertson, of Pottsville, about 1881-82, 
in the development of bituminous coal fields in West Virginia, under the name 
of the P.ottom Creek Coal and Coke Company, and retained his interests there 
to the close of his life. The property increased in value under their efficient 
management and intelligent exploitation, and as president, corresponding secre- 
tary and general manager Mr. Spencer took an active part in superintending 
the operation of the mines, which are located near Vivian, McDowell county. 
He was there attending to business while stricken with pneumonia, dying Dec. 
13, 1904, after a brief illness. His remains were brought back to Minersville 
and interred in the Union cemetery. 

Mr. Spencer's experience in mining, begun in boyhood, and varied by the 
different operations he superintended, was so extensive and intelligently 
applied that he was looked upon as an authority in the business. But he was 
not so thoroughly wrapped up in it as to ignore other interests or neglect his 
duties of citizenship, and he assisted in the establishment of business institu- 
tions and public utilities which were necessary to stimulate the growth of his 
town and county, or whose support seemed assured by their advancement. 
He was one of the organizers of the Minersville Electric Light Company, a 
director of the Minersville Water Company, and connected with the First 
National Bank. He was also interested in the manufacture of sewer pipes 
in Alabama. The ability so admirably demonstrated in the direction of his 
private concerns gained all his opinions the respectful consideration of his 
associates in ever\' relation, and was never turned to any but the most com- 
mendable use. His name and reputation live on in the good movements which 
received their impetus largely through his encouragement. The large numbers 
who turned out to pay their last respects at his funeral showed how generally 
he was beloved in the community where he had been known from boyhood. 

On Nov. 3, 1853, Mr. Spencer was married to Amelia J. Prevost, daughter 
of John Prevost, and they had one child, Mary E., who died in infancy. Mrs. 
Spencer continues to occupy the fine old home on Front street where she and 
her husband spent so many happy years, and where cordial hospitality has 
always been assured their many friends. She is now one of the oldest resi- 
dents of the town, and deservedly held in tender regard by a wide acquaintance- 
ship. 

John Prevost, in his day a citizen of note at Minersville, was a native of 
Pennsylvania, born about 1788 near Phoenixville, Chester county, where his 
parents settled on their removal from Canada. They came to America from 
France. In his early life Mr. Prevost learned the saddler's trade. About 
1828 he settled at Minersville, where he made a permanent home, dying in 
1863, at the age of seventy-five years. For several years previously he had 
lived retired, but during the greater part of his residence at ]\Iinersville he was 
in the hotel business, and his strong character and uprightness made him very 
influential in local aft'airs, in which he took a leading part. He served a long 



48 SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 

term as postmaster, was school director and treasurer of the borough, and 
officially and unofficially did his share towards its advancement. Politically 
he was an old-line Whig. 

At Phoenixville Mr. Prevost married Mary Jones, a native of Wales, by 
whom he had eight children, namely: Etta died when twenty years old; 
Susanna died at the age of five years ; Louis W., a prominent physician for 
many years at Tremont, died at Minersville in 1900 ; Charles C, who was 
employed in various stores at JMinersville, died at the age of thirty-one 
years ; Hiram W., a druggist at Minersville, died at the age of sixty-eight 
years; Amelia J. is the widow of William Spencer; Elizabeth married Dr. L. J. 
Hale and lived in Minersville for some time after her marriage, and then 
removed to the vicinity of Jenkintown, where she still resides; Mary P. is now 
Mrs. Jacob Serrill, of Philadelphia, where her husband is a coal operator. 

JUDGE GEORGE J. WADLINGER, who died a few months after his elec- 
tion as judge of the courts of Schuylkill county, was a man of such unusual at- 
tainments that although he barely lived to reach his prime his name will have a 
permanent place in the records of this bar. In the few months of his service 
on the bench he gave every indication of the possession of true judicial qualities, 
and though he interpreted the law with the utmost fidelity his strong personal- 
ity injected itself into all his decisions with a tone of sincerity which he could 
not disguise. Keenly alive to his obligations in the administration of the law, 
and yet with a sensitive comprehension of a strong man's sense of responsibil- 
ity towards his fellows, he had a proper conception of the duties of his office 
which with his legal fitness made him highly competent for their performance. 

Judge Wadlinger was a native of Schuylkill county, of German descent. His 
grandfather, George J. Wadlinger, was born in Bavaria, Germany, and passed 
all his life in that country. Francis W'adlinger, the Judge's father, was born 
in Germany in 1836 and spent his early years there. He lived in Schuylkill 
county. Pa., from the time of his immigration to America, in 1854, first settling 
at Minersville, where he lived until 1865. Thereafter he resided at Mahanoy 
City, where he was engaged in the mercantile business until his death, which 
occurred there in 1879. During his later years he was associated with the opera- 
tion of various collieries, as superintendent, acting in that capacity at the 
Diamond colliery, at Forestville, and the Anchor colliery, at Heckscherville. It 
was while thus occupied that he received the injuries which eventually caused 
his death. With his brother John he was interested in the Phoenix Park col- 
liery, as F. Wadlinger & Co. Though an ardent Democrat and active in politics 
he never had any aspirations for office. He married Anna M. Schaub, and of 
the children born to them the following lived to maturity : Frank, John A.. 
Jacob, Michael M. and George J. 

George J. Wadlinger was born July 10, 1857. at Minersville, began his edu- 
cation there, and continued it in the public schools at Mahanoy City. Afler 
clerking in his father's store for a time he became a student in St. \^incent's 
College, in \Vestmoreland county. Pa., where he obtained the degree of master 
of accounts, in 1873. Then for a time he was in the mercantile business at 
Mahanoy City, meantime engaging also in newspaper work and beginning his 
preparation for the legal profession. In 1879 he gave up merchandising and 
entered the office of Hon. Charles N. P.rumm, at Pottsville, where he carried 
on his law studies until admitted to the bar. March 4, 1881. From that time 
until his death he devoted practically all his time to practice. Recognition of 




j^^y-^it:;^02^.^^^^^f 




SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 49 

his aliilitit's and the confiilence he insjiired came early. In 1891, when but 
thirty-four years of age, he was nominated for tlie i^osition of additional law 
judge of Scliuylkill county, but was defeated by his opponent, David B. Green. 
On July 10, 1899, he received the nomination for juds^e of the court of Com- 
mon Pleas of Schuyll-cill county, and was elected the November following with 
a majority of 1,872 over Judge D. C. Henning, the Republican candidate. He 
presided over the January and March terms, lyoo, and although very ill during 
the latter obeyed his stern sense of duty rather than the advice of his physi- 
cian, attending to his work at the expense of his health. His death, which 
occurred May i6th following (1900), at his home, No. 514 Mahantongo street, 
Pottsville, showed how serious the need for rest was. 

Though he had been on the bench but a few months Judge Wadlinger had 
begun to "do things" in dispatching the business of the court as well as in dis- 
pensing justice, inaugurating changes of great importance in the economical 
administration of his oftice. He had delivered several opinions in important 
cases which drew favorable comments from all interested by reason of the ex- 
ceptional ability they showed. All his work on the bench was done in the 
clearest and most concise manner. In his action in the case of the Culm dam- 
age suits he blazed a new path, and his utterances in this connection have since 
been quoted as the clearest exposition of the law upon the subject rendered up 
to date. Twelve hundred actions were to be disposed of at one time by his 
decision in this case, with the cost to the public of one suit — an immense sav- 
ing to the county. Judge Wadlinger's conduct of the whole affair was char- 
acteristic of his attitude towards the possibilities he could see for efficient service 
to his community. He had decided to attempt to put an end to petty litiga- 
tion with which the court had been burdened and hampered in its operations, 
and in all such cases tried before him indicated his position clearly and fol- 
lowed with an opinion. His charges to the jurymen were models, clear and 
urgent, and left no room for doubt in their minds as to their duty so far as 
the law was concerned. His judgment upon cjuestions of the law was admired 
by all his associates in the profession, and he had every prospect of a brilliant 
career of usefulness when death took him. There was unanimous expression 
of sorrow at his untimely demise, which left a vacancy in many circles and 
was regarded as a loss to the whole county. 

Judge Wadlinger was secretary of the Schuylkill County Bar Association 
for about fourteen years, from the time of its organization in 1887 until the 
close of his life, and kept closely in touch with its various activities, serving 
six years as member of the committee for the examination of students for 
admission to the bar, and as one of the staff' of reporters for the District 
Reports, a series of legal records which since 1891 have had a very important 
place in the law literature of the State. In 1889 he published his treatise on 
the "Law of Costs in Pennsylvania," a creditable work on one of his favor- 
ite themes and well received by lawyers and judges all over the State. At the 
time of his death he was preparing another work, on "Fraudulent Debtors," 
and had mapped out one on "The Law of Libel." Judge Wadlinger made a 
study of the finer points of jurisprudence, and his painstaking investigations 
showed conscientious research and an earnest desire to master fundamentals 
in all proceedings. He was thoroughly familiar with court routine, a fact 
which gave his clients a distinct advantage over those who had less accom- 
plished counsel, and his unimpeachable integrity was too well understood to 
need comment. His whole life was ordered on a high plane, and though he 



50 SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENNSYLVANL\ 

gave his best to the community while he hved his friends generally shared the 
opinion of his fellow lawyers that he had not gained the summit of his powers. 
His name will live among the leaders of the Schuylkill County Bar. 

Judge Wadlinger was one of the original stockholders and organizers of 
the Union National Bank of Mahanoy City, now the leading financial institu- 
tion of that place. He was at one time president of the American Democratic 
Club (now out of existence) and always a valued and influential worker in the 
Democratic party, consulted as one of its ablest advisers. In 18S3, the first 
time he had the honor of being a delegate to the State convention, he presented 
the name of B. B. McCool as nominee for State treasurer. He was a dele- 
gate to several subsequent State conventions. Though often urged to accept 
candidacy for office he invariably declined except in the instances already cited, 
which were in the line of his chosen work. Socially he belonged to the Alumni 
association of St. Vincent's College, and served as president of that 
organization. 

On Aug. 29, .1882, Judge Wadlinger married Margaret D. Jones, daughter 
of David N. Jones, a native of Wales, who resided in Luzerne county. Pa. 
They had children as follows: (i) Mary Louise, bom June 5, 1883, died Dec. 
25, 1884. (2) Charles Vincent, born Dec. 5, 1885, attended public school at 
Pottsville, and after graduating from high school, in 1904, entered the Medico- 
Chirurgical College, at Philadelphia, graduating in 1908. He was then located 
at St. Agnes hospital, Phoenix, for ten weeks, and at the Pottsville hospital 
seven months. He practiced at Tower City, Pa., for twenty-two months, and 
on Sept. 25, 191 1, located at Port Carbon, Schuylkill county, where he is now 
engaged at his profession. He married Jan. 12, 1910, Edyth May Moore, 
daughter of Peter F. J. Moore. The Doctor is a member of Pottsville lodge 
of Elks, No. 207, the Loyal Order of Moose (No. 411) and the I. O. O. F. 
lodge at Port Carbon. (3) George William, twin of Dr. Charles V. Wad- 
linger, was born Dec. 5, 1885, and received his early education in the public 
schools of Pottsville, graduating from high school in the class of 1904. He 
then entered the Philadelphia Dental College, from which he graduated with 
honors in 1907, and. is now practicing his profession at Pottsville, having his 
office in Market street. On Sept. 22, 1915, he married Maude Elizabeth Muehl- 
hof, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Edward Muehlhof. (4) Francis Raymond, 
born Sept. 12, 1890, began his education in the public schools of Pottsville, grad- 
uated from the high school, and then entered Franklin and Marshall College, 
at Lancaster, Pa., where he graduated with honors after studying there only 
one year. Then he took a course in the law department of the University of 
Pennsylvania, at Philadelphia, graduating in 1912 with honors, and became 
associated with T. D. Finletter, Esq., of Philadelphia (now Common Pleas 
judge). When a student of the University of Pennsylvania he was a member 
of the Mask and Wig Club and of the Glee Club, having a fine tenor voice 
which is in great demand. (5) Herman David, born May 14, 1893, was edu- 
cated in the public schools of Pottsville and Bellefonte Academy. He resides 
at home. (6) Helen Margaret, born Feb. 22, 1896, is at home. 

PATRICK J. FERGUSON is remembered in Shenandoah as one of the 
most notable characters among its early citizens. He settled there about two 
years before the town was incorporated as a borough, and continued to live 
there for fifty years, during most of which time he exercised great influence 
in the direction of business activities and the establishment of public institu- 
tions. With an original mind and unlimited enterprise, though he began with 



SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENNSYLVAXL\ 51 

limited means, he worked his way to prosperity. His faith in the future of 
the town, as indicated by his investments and even by his losses, was a strong 
factor in its development. The fact that he was known as the "iron man" 
evidences the unusual strength of character he displayed in so many ways. 
He was an excellent judge of men, and never hesitated to show his confi- 
dence in the worthy. His own early struggles made him sympathetic with 
the efforts of others, and he aided many to turn failure into success by timely 
and liberal loans, in several instances without security. Plain and unassum- 
ing in manner and dress, he was approachable and loved by all, and his name 
will endure in the hearts of many who knew and admired him. 

^Ir. Ferguson was of Irish extraction, though his branch of the family 
was formerly established in Scotland and a distinguished clan in that country, 
of ancient and noble ancestry. But they have always been stanch Catholics, 
and because of their refusal to support the Church of England lost their lands 
in Scotland, hence the emigration to Ireland. John O'Hart, in his Irish Pedi- 
grees, mentions the Fergusons among the leading families descended from 
Heremon, the youngest of the three sons of Alilesius of Spain who left issue. 
According to this author the name has been .Anglicized to Ferguson from 
MacFergus. Fergus is derived from "fear," a man, and "gus," strength, and 
signifies strong warrior. It is a very ancient Pictish Irish name, handed down 
from the early Pictish Irish and the Scoti. On page 206, in Hanna's Scotch- 
Irish, we find the following, which shows that the family name is very old: 
"King Alpin-Xechtan, who resigned his rule to Druxot in order that he 
himself might experiment with monastic life, now returned to contest the 
claims of Alpin, the Dalriadic aspirant who had driven out Nechtan's legatees. 
Angus of Forlrenn, son of Fergus, also appeared as a claimant ; Alpin was 
defeated by Angus in a battle fought in 728 at Monash-Cracbi (now Mon- 
crieff), and the territory west of the river Tay was lost to him in consequence. 
Not long afterward Xechtan met Alpin in battle at Scone, completely over- 
threw his forces, and partially recovered the Pictish (Irish) and title for 
himself. In 729 Angus and Nechtan met and contested for supreme leader- 
ship, which resulted in the defeat and rout of Nechtan's forces and the 
assumption of kingly authority and title by Angus. Angus ruled Pictland 
for thirty years. In 730 Angus destroyed the Scots city of Creic. Angus 
died in 734." 

Thomas Ferguson, father of the late Patrick J- Ferguson, had a history 
of the family and a representation of the family arms in his fine library, 
which was burned many years ago. The crest of several of the Irish Fer- 
gusons and Scotch Fergusons is given thus : On a thistle, leaved and flowered, 
proper, a bee, or. Several other Scotch and Irish Ferguson crests show 
enough similarity to indicate that the branches had a common origin, viz. : 
A dexter hand grasping a broken spear in bend, all proper. A naked hand 
couped below the elbow, holding the upper part of a broken lance proper, 
headed or. An arm in armor, grasping a broken spear. A dexter hand 
issuing from a cloud, grasping a broken spear in bend proper. A dexter hand 
grasping a broken spear bendways proper. The motto, "Vi et arte," is also 
common to several branches. 

On page 141, "Handbook of Heraldry," by John E. Cussans (third edition, 
London, England), we find: "About the time of Queen Elizabeth, the custom 
of wearing badges began to fall into disuse : there are at the present time but 
few of our noble families which retain it. In Scotland, however, the custom 



52 SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENNSYLVANL^ 

still in a great measure survives; a branch of a tree, a sprig, or a flower, in 
every instance constituting the distinguishing badge of the various clans, as 
exemplified by the following list: Buccleuch — Heather; Grant — Cranberry 
Heath; Gordon — Ivy; MacDonald — Bell Heath; MacDougal — Cypress; Alac- 
Donell — Mountain Heath ; Ferguson — Poplar ; Campbell — Myrtle ; Stewart — 
Thistle; Murray — Juniper;" etc. "The last personal royal badge was that 
devised by Queen Anne, in which the Rose of England and the Thistle of 
Scotland appeared growing from one stem imperially crowned. The Rose, 
Thistle and Shamrock, however, still constitute the national emblems of Eng- 
land, Scotland and Ireland." 

The Ferguson coat of arms of Ulster: Azure, a'fess, between a star of 
eight rays in chief and a lion rampant in base, all or. 

In Irish Pedigrees (by O'Hart), No. zy among the chiefs and clans of 
Brefney ( comprising the present Counties of Cavan and Leitrim ) and the 
territories they possessed in the twelfth century : Several clans in the County 
Leitrim, not mentioned by O'Dugan; as the MacGloin of Rossinver; the 
MacFerguses, who were hereditary "erenachs" of the churches of Rossinver, 
and whose name has been Anglicized Ferguson, etc. On page 189, Hanna's 
Scotch-Irish, we find : "The district comprising tiie Counties of Lanark, 
Renfrew, Ayr, Dumfries, A\'igtown, Kirkcudbright and Dumbarton, an area 
about the same as the State of Connecticut, and the most of which was for- 
merly included in the Celto-British kingdom of Strathclyde, has produced a 
very large proportion of the men and families who have made the name of 
Scotland famous in the world's history. Elderslie in Renfrewshire is said to 
be the birthplace of Scotland's hero, William Wallace. Robert Bruce, also, 
son of .Marjory, Countess of Carrick, daughter of Neal (or Niall, ^who was 
himself the Celtic Earl of Carrick and the grandson of Fergus, Lord of Gallo- 
way), was according to popular belief born at his mother's castle of Turn- 
berry, in Ayrshire." Dumbartonshire is the reputed birthplace of St. Patrick, 
Ireland's teacher and patron saint. 

On page 84, in Hanna's Scotch-Irish: "Among the British and Tory 
leaders during the war of the Revolution there was Col. Patrick Ferguson." 
Page 194: "A. D. 592, Feargus mac Farca the Great held a part of Britain 
with the Dalriadic tribe and died, there." Page 532 : "Robert Ferguson, 
tenant to John Hamilton in 1617. County Armagh." Page 145. \'ol. I, under 
the heading "Scottish Achievements": "The only poets that Ulster can boast 
of are Samuel Ferguson, the author of 'Forging the Anchor,' \\'illiam Ailing- 
ham, the author of 'Lawrence Bloomfield.' and two or three of lesser note." 

Patrick Ferguson, grandfather of Patrick J. Ferguson, had a blacksmith 
shop at Ballyhain (or Ballyhane), in County Mayo, four miles from Castlebar. 
He was a gentleman of fine appearance, and wore knee breeches and silver 
shoe buckles. One of his brothers was an officer in Napoleon's army. His 
wife was a W'alsh, and they had five children, Thomas, Rev. Stephen, Nellie, 
Kitty and Bridget. As it is known that Thomas Ferguson had sisters who left 
the old country and settled in Canada, all or most of this family came to 
America. 

Thomas and Bridget (Christopher) Ferguson, parents of Patrick J. Fer- 
guson, were natives of County Mayo, in the Province of Connaught, Ireland. 
She was a daughter of Michael and Bridget (Flannery) Christopher, the 
former an innkeeper at Ballyhain, having an inn noted to this day. Mr. and 
Mrs. Thomas Ferguson were well educated, not onlv in English, but able to 



SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PEXNSYLVANL^ 53 

read and write Irish as well. Thomas Ferguson wrote a beautiful hand, and 
his writings show evidence of culture. Indeed, he and his brother Stephen, 
who accompanieil him and his wife to America in 1842, were among the 
privileged few allowed in their day the advantages of a university training. 
This alone would indicate that the family was influential, and it is known that 
they stood in favor because of distinguished services their military grand- 
father rendered to the crown. The Fergusons were fourteen weeks on their 
voyage across the Atlantic, a storm driving the vessel into Nova Scotia. 
While she was at anchor oft' that place there was a request for a priest, to 
baptize a child, and Stephen Ferguson, who had taken orders, responded, 
going ashore, with several others, among them Thomas Ferguson and wife, 
who left their children aboard. A favorable wind arising the ship sailed 
away, and when the father of the child who had been baptized learned that 
she had left he took the Fergusons in a swift sailing vessel and followed, 
overtaking the larger boat after a day and a night of skillful sailing and 
tacking. Mrs. Ferguson was nearly frantic, fearing that she would never see 
her children again, and indeed when they boarded the ship siie found they 
had been adopted by people whom they had met coming over, and who like 
themselves had left Ireland for Canada. Father Stephen Ferguson had an 
appointment as priest in Canada, but on leaving Nova Scotia they went to 
New Y'ork City, whence the Father proceeded to his church. At New Y'ork 
they met Mrs. Ferguson's brother, Henry Christopher, and brother-in-law, 
James Quinn (who had married her sister Margaret), both of whom were 
settled at Minersville. Schuylkill Co., Pa., where Mrs. Ferguson persuaded 
her husband to locate, instead of accompanying his brother to Canada. 
Another sister, Julia, wife of Michael Bradigan, lived in the nearby village of 
Jonestown. Henry Christopher was tax collector at Minersville ; James Quinn 
was a butcher. 

Thomas Ferguson was possessed of some means, a fortune for his day, 
but he lost his money by going security for a friend. Fortunately he had 
learned a trade in Ireland, but he never followed it until after meeting with 
this reverse at Minersville. His home was the favorite rendezvous for the 
most excellent of his countrymen here in the early days, and his descendants 
have so carried themselves as to merit the same degree of esteem. It was 
said that those who came from County Mayo would invariably ask where 
Thomas Fergtison lived. He and his wife were devout members of the 
Catholic Church. They were the parents of the following children : Stephen, 
who was a soldier in the Civil war, married Mary Birne, and died in Mexico 
(he left no children) ; Mary, who died at the age of sixteen years; Patrick J.; 
Margaret, who died when four years old ; Henry J., who married a Miss 
Gillespie, and lived at Tamaqua, Pa. (no family) ; Thomas J., who married 
Theresa Tobin, of Shenandoah (three of their children are living, Thomas, 
John and Theresa); Christopher P.; Hilary Ellen, born in February, 1856, 
who died in 1863; and Bridget, who married James J. Franey, a business 
man of Shenandoah, engaged in the furniture trade and undertaking. 
Mr. Franey died in 191 3, and his widow is living in Shenandoah. They 
had children as follows: Martin J., Martha, Ella, Fergus (deceased), 
Irene, one that died in infancy, James J. and Agnes C. Mrs. Franey and her 
brother Christopher are the only surviving members of the family of Thomas 
F'erguson. He is buried at Alinersville. 

Patrick J. Ferguson was born in 1842 in County Mayo, and was a child in 
arms when the family arrived at Minersville, where he was reared and 



54 SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PEXXSYLVANL\ 

received his early education in the common schools. Later he had a course 
in the normal school at Port Carbon, under County Superintendent Newlin, 
and completed a course in the Quaker City business college at Philadelphia. 
\Mien a boy he did breaker work at Minersville, but his ambitious spirit was 
even then active, and he decided to get away from that occupation as soon as 
possible. So for a time he clerked evenings in a grocery, before long was 
employed as a regular clerk, and meantime continued his studies with his 
father's assistance. During his early manhood ]\Ir. Ferguson taught school 
for three years in Cass township and Minersville, but though his labors in 
the profession were appreciated he soon found the possibilities of a business 
career more attractive. John Anspach & Company, of Philadelphia, were 
then operating a colliery near Ashland, this county, and the young man found 
a position to his liking there, remaining at the colliery two years. At the 
end of that connection, in 1864, he settled at Shenandoah, w'hich though but 
a small town seemed to him to have so promising a future that he was encour- 
aged to start business there for himself, as a merchant. He was not mis- 
taken about the possibilities of the place, and continued his store for five 
years, throughout which period he did well. Meantime Shenandoah had 
become incorporated as a borough, and the advantages of the new form of 
government drew men looking for business opportunities. Foreseeing the 
advancement in property values, Mr. Ferguson bought considerable town 
property in the early years of his residence here, and set the pace for enter- 
prise in improving it. It took a number of years for local development to get 
far enough to help him realize his ambitions in this line, but he held on, and 
time showed that his estimate of the future of Shenandoah was correct. He 
not only advocated the erection of substantial and adequate business struc- 
tures, but put up a number himself, content to wait for his profits as long as 
he knew that the foundations of prosperity were wisely laid. 

Mr. Ferguson's services with the Lehigh \'alley Railroad Company began 
when he was a young man. He was one of the early telegraph operators, and 
in 1868 was appointed ticket agent of the railroad company and Adams 
Express agent at Shenandoah, and held both positions for nearly forty years, 
during the latter part of that period also acting as claim agent for the railroad 
company. He resigned in 1910 because of poor health. As claim agent he 
settled some of the largest accident claims ever preferred against the Lehigh 
Company, including those occasioned by the Mud Run catastrophe, in which 
almost one hundred people lost their lives. These claims were all adjusted 
without a single lawsuit. Meantime Mr. Ferguson continued his independent 
business operations, and a number of business blocks (including the "Hotel 
Ferguson") and residences remain at Shenandoah to show the extent of his 
activities during those years, as well as the high standards he set and main- 
tained in the matter of local improvements. He filled a number of public 
offices, borough and county, but in this line was particularly prominent as a 
friend of popular educational facilities, co-operating with the best element in 
this section in securing a school system for Shenandoah which is considered 
model in every respect and superior to that enjoyed in most towns in the 
county. He was chosen a school director two years after he settled at Shenan- 
doah, as one of the first board w^hen the district was organized, and continued 
to hold the position for twenty-two years. Much of the credit for the high 
standing of its schools is attributed to his intelligent and zealous efforts and 
those of the progressive men with whom he was associated. 



SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 55 

i\Ir. Ferguson had valuable holdings of railroad and bank stocks. When 
the I'lrst National Bank of Shenandoah was organized, in 1884, he became 
its vice president, and upon the retirement of its first president, John R. 
Leisenring, succeeded him, about twenty years ago, and filled the office from 
that time until his death. Though of recent years he did not take so active a 
part in business as formerly, he continued to look after his interests personally 
and kept in close touch with current operations. To the end of his days he 
kept large real estate holdings at Shenandoah and also at Pottsville. In his 
home town, the many structures which testify to his faith in the endurance 
of local prosperity, as well as his willingness to aid in sustaining it, include 
the first theatre in Shenandoah. It was he who introduced electric lighting 
there, long before Reading had that convenience. Committees, in fact, were 
sent to Shenandoah from various other towns for information regarding the 
system he installed. The construction of the first electric car line in this 
part of the State, that laid between Shenandoah and Mahanoy City, was 
brought about by his efforts. Gas, also, was brought into the town through 
his exertions, and he was largely instrumental in having the supply furnished 
to surrounding cities from a central plant at Harwood, near Hazleton. Many 
other worthy enterprises were made possible by his co-operation and encourage- 
ment. 

Throughout his career Mr. Ferguson held the unqualified respect of the 
community. His transactions were above reproach, his citizenship unselfish, 
his dealings with all men characterized by scrupulous honesty and regard for 
the rights of others. His likable personality made him popular and trusted, 
and his spirit of good fellowship inspired confidence in all. Devoid of pre- 
tense, and courageous in advocating what he considered right, he commanded 
a following large enough to insure the success of anything in which he 
developed a real interest. He was a Democrat in political allegiance. 

Among Mr. Ferguson's properties at Pottsville was the Woolworth build- 
ing, which was burned Dec. 17, 1914. The illness which ended in his death 
really began with the trip he made to the county seat to look over the ruins. 
He would never wear an overcoat, and the severe cold he contracted on that 
occasion aggravated an ailment of long standing. On Jan. 2d he took to his 
bed, his physical constitution no longer able to withstand the terrible strain 
which his strong and active mind imposed upon it. With characteristic vigor 
he rallied, and his mind was as clear as ever during the three remaining 
months of his life. He directed all the details of his private business affairs 
and the conduct of the bank after his partial recovery, bearing his physical 
sufferings with fortitude and never wavering in cheerfulness and resignation. 
He passed away April 6. 191 5, at his home on the corner of White and Oak 
streets, Shenandoah, and is buried in the Annunciation cemetery there. 

Mr. Ferguson's work will live in the community whose interests were 
always nearest his heart. His memory will be gratefully cherished by the 
many whom he aided on life's journey, whether with advice, or encouragement, 
or pecuniary assistance. Having himself started out as a poor boy, he learned 
the value of money and its proper use. With remarkable ability and inherited 
mental qualities of a high order, backed by the physical endurance which 
enabled him to handle many responsibilities, he made his way by sheer force 
of character, showing the trust in his own powers which is a true mark of 
greatness. He had the faculty of communicating this feeling to others, and 
his sincere confidence in his fellow men attracted friends among all classes. 



56 SCHUYLKILL COUxNTY, PEXNSYLVAXL\ 

His early experience, never forgotten, kept him in sympathy with those who 
were honestly trying to get on in the world and willing to work for their 
advancement, and to all such he was a ready and willing adviser. When he 
is spoken of as the best citizen Shenandoah ever had, the praise has as much 
reference to the high, example he set as to his actual accomplishments. 

In 1874 Mr. Ferguson married Mary Agnes O'Connor, who died in October, 
1889, and Daniel J. is the only child of this union surviving. Two daughters 
died in infancy. Mrs. Ferguson's brother, Father Daniel O'Connor, who died 
in June, 191 1, in Philadelphia, while rector of St. Agatha's parish there, was 
very well known both in church circles and in this section, having been pastor 
at Mahanoy Plane and Girardville for many years. On Sept. 6, 1894, Mr. 
Ferguson married (second) Alary A. Dillon, of Mahanoy City, daughter of 
Patrick and Bridget (Conry) Dillon, who had a family of three children that 
lived to maturity: Gertrude, who died unmarried June 30, 1915; Margaret, 
wife of James O'Hara, undertaker and liveryman at Mahanoy City; and Mary 
A., Mrs. Ferguson. Mrs. Dillon died July 19, 1905, and Mr. Dillon and his 
daughter, Mrs. O'Hara, live together. Four children were born to Air. Fer- 
guson's second marriage : Joseph T. died when ten months old ; Thomas, 
born Sept. 11, 1897, is attending school; Harry died when six months old; 
James, born May 10, 1903, is attending grammar school in Shenandoah. In 
religion Air. Ferguson was a Catholic, he and all the family belonging to the 
Church of the Annunciation, of which he was one of the oldest members, and 
all the activities of the church and parish benefited by his generous support. 

DANIEL J. FERGUSON was born at Shenandoah Sept. 15, 1877. He 
acquired his early education in the public schools, graduating from the gram- 
mar school and then attending high school one year, after which he became a 
student in the Georgetown (D. C.) University, where he took his college 
course, graduating in 1898 with the degree of bachelor of arts. He then 
entered the law department of Columbia University, New York City, and on 
the completion of his course there returned to Shenandoah, where he was 
occupied as agent of the Adams Express Company for one year and as 
manager of the Ferguson opera house for one year. For a time thereafter 
he read law with Guy E. Farquhar, Esq., of Pottsville, and on Oct. 10. 1904, 
he was admitted to the bar of the State of Pennsylvania, by the Supreme Court. 
He has since had a law office in Shenandoah. Mr. Ferguson had unusual 
preparation for his profession, in the way of general education as well as 
legal tuition. He traveled in Europe for four months before entering college, 
visiting the British Isles and Continent of Europe, and besides the instruction 
already mentioned had the privilege of study under Hon. John A. McCarthy, 
of the Philadelphia bar, in 1904. As an independent practitioner he has had 
the patronage of the most exacting element in the community, and the fact 
that his business has increased steadily shows how well he has served his 
clients. He is a past exalted ruler of the Elks lodge at Shenandoah, and a 
Catholic in religious connection. In public matters he gives his support where 
he thinks it is best deserved, regardless of party. 

On Aug. 18, 191 5, Air. Ferguson was married to Joanna D. Reese, daugh- 
ter of Isaiah (Jr.) and Anna Alary (Snodgrass) Reese, who reside in Harris- 
burg, Pennsylvania. 

Air. P. J. Ferguson was the first vice president of the First National Bank 
of Shenandoah, which began business April 14, 1884, and is the oldest banking 



SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PEXXSYL\ANL\ 57 

institution in that city. W itli him were associated as incorporators men of 
prominence all along the Lehigh \alley, such as the Leisenrings, Wentzs, 
William Lilly, T. M. Kighter, Charles Kaier and others. The bank had almost 
instantaneous success. On Jan. 15, 1894, Mr. Ferguson was elected president, 
and served as such until the time of his death. Under his guidance it reached 
a high standing, and it ranks among the strongest tinancial organizations in 
Pennsylvania, having a capital of $100,000 and surplus and profits of over 
$270,000. Upon his demise, his son Daniel J. Ferguson was elected president 
to succeed him. 

CHRISTOPHER P. FERGUSON was born in Minersville March 15, 
185 1, and began his education in the public schools there. He later attended 
at Shenandoah, and had high school privileges. He commenced work in the 
employ of his brother, as a clerk in the mercantile business. Then he was 
with the Lehigh \'alley Railroad Company for a time as telegrapher, first 
learning the use of the machine and later becoming a sound operator. Follow- 
ing that he went to learn boilermaking and the machinist's trade, and preferring 
the former served three years, during which period he became a competent 
workman. He went as a journeyman to Centralia, Pa., and there became 
agent for the Lehigh \'alley Railroad Company. A year later he had the 
western fever and went out to Illinois, living for a year at Peru, Lasalle 
county. Then he traveled down into Texas and New Mexico for a month, 
and contracted agtie. Returning to Peru for a short time, he came home, and 
soon afterwards found employment at his trade in Delano, Schuylkill county, 
where he remained for one year. At the end of that time he went to Albany, 
N. Y., and enlisted in the regular army, in ^larch, 1882. He was ordered to 
I join the company at Fort Sisseton, in Dakota Territory, where four com- 
panies were maintained, and during the two years of his service there had a 
few skirmishes. He was next stationed at Fort Totten, Dakota Territory, on 
DeviTs Lake, and after another two years was transferred to Fort D. A. 
Russell, near Cheyenne, Wyoming Terrritory, where the company took part 
in the operations against Sitting Bull, in 1890, at the time he v^'as killed. Prior 
to this, in 1883, Mr. Ferguson had met and become acquainted with the old 
chief personally. From Cheyenne he came home after an absence of thirteen 
years, during which time his family did not know where he was. He has lived 
at Shenandoah since Alarch, 1893. For a time after his return he clerked 
with his brother Patrick in the Lehigh Yalley railroad office. After three 
years he gave up these duties to assist his brother in looking after his property 
and other interests, and he now devotes all his time to caring for the family 
property. Like all of the Fergusons he is a Catholic, belonging to the Church 
of the Annunciation at Shenandoah. 

JOHN D. BERGER, manufacturer and financier, is at the head of two 
of the leading concerns in Schuylkill Haven, and in his executive capacity has 
been instnunental in promoting the fortunes of both to an appreciable degree. 
He has been associated with the factory now conducted by 'Berger Brothers 
since its foundation, in 1889, and with the Schuylkill Haven Trust Company 
as president throughout the four years of its existence. His operations in 
these connections have been always open to the closest scrutiny, his position 
among the foremost men of the day being established on a foundation of honor 
and substantial business qualities which fully entitle him to the esteem and 



58 SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENXSYL\'AXL\ 

contidence of his fellow men. He is a native of Schuylkill county, born 
Oct. 17, 1865, at Cressona, son of the late Harrison Berger, and though the 
family has been in this section for three quarters of a century it is of old Berks 
county stock. 

Heber Berger, the first ancestor of this line in America, came to this coun- 
try from Germany in company with a brother, and settled among the Blue 
mountains in upper Berks county, Pa. The brother died unmarried, and both 
are buried at the Blue Mountain Church. Heber Berger had the following 
children: Elizabeth, born Feb. 8, 1760; George W., Sept. 20, 1761 ; Tobias, 
Jan. 21, 1765; Catherine, July 9, 1766; Maria B., April 8, 1768; Johannes, 
June 24, 1769; Maria M., June 9, 1771 ; Diana Maria, April 27, IJTZ; Maria 
Magdalena, Sept. 18, 1774: John Christian, Nov. 5, 1/77; Johan Ludwig, Jan. 
28, 1779 ; Johan Philip, June 3, 1782. 

Tobias Berger, son of Heber, married Catherine Shoemaker, and they lived 
in the Tulpehocken section of Berks county, where he died when a compara- 
tively young man. His widow later came to Schuylkill Haven, Schuylkill 
county, where she passed the remainder of her days, and she is buried in the 
old cemetery of that borough. 

John Berger, son of Tobias, was born at the homestead in Berks county and 
was reared in the environments of the farm. Coming to Schuylkill Haven 
shortly after his marriage, he did hauling for the Mine Hill Railroad Company, 
having a four-horse team, was also a boatman on the old Schuylkill canal, and 
later engaged in hauling coal between Pottsville and Schuylkill Haven. He 
married Hannah Bellman, daughter of Jacob Bellman, of Berks county, and 
they had a family of five sons, namely: Samuel, Harrison, John (who died 
at the age of fifty-four years, unmarried), Daniel (who married Matilda 
Schappell and resides at Cressona) and Jacob. Mr. Berger died at Schuylkill 
Haven when seventy-nine years old, his wife passing away there at the age of 
eighty-one years, and they are buried in the Union cemetery at the borough. 
They were members of the Reformed Church. 

Jacob Berger, son of John, was born June 28, 1844, and is still a resident 
of Schuylkill Haven. On March 18, 1876, he married Louisa Buehler, and six- 
children have been born to them : Mamie, who died when twenty-one years 
old, was the wife of Joseph ]\Iichel : Harry died when five and a half years old : 
Alma married Arthur Gerber; Walter died when three and a half years old: 
Laura is unmarried : a son died in infancy. 

Samuel Berger, son of John, was born Dec. 24, 1835, in L'pper Bern town- 
ship, Berks Co., Pa., and came with his parents to Schuylkill Haven when 
but three years old. He has since made his home in the borough. On Jan. 29, 
1862, he married Christy Buehler. daughter of Peter and Catherine (Gretzin- 
ger) Buehler, and of the seven children born to their union six died young, the 
only survivor being Alice Amanda, now the wife of George H. Michel, a well 
known shoe manufacturer of Schuylkill Haven. 

Harrison Berger, son of John, was born in L4:)per Bern township. Berks 
countv, and was a small boy when the family settled at Schuylkill Haven. 
During his young manhood he was engaged in boating on the Schuylkill canal, 
following this occupation until about 1867, and then engaging in the general 
mercantile business at Cressona. He returned to Schuylkill Haven in 1870, 
and continued in the general store business, on Dock street. On ]\rarch 4. 
T889. in company with his brother Daniel Berger, and his brother-in-law, 
Elvin Deibert, he organized the Spring Garden Knitting Mills, for the manu- 
facture of hosiery. Two years later Daniel Berger withdrew, his interest 



SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENNSYLVANLV 59 

being taken by John D. Berger, son of Harrison Berger. Another three years 
and Mr. Deibert sold his interest to the Bergers, who then continued it under 
the name of H. Berger & Son. In the year 1899 the manufacture of under- 
wear was added to the original line, the manufacture of hosiery being discon- 
tinued in 1903 to give increased facilities for the later departure, which had 
proved a complete success. Harrison Berger retained his association with the 
business luitil 1907, when he retired from active pursuits, and two of his 
younger sons then joined John D. Berger, taking an interest in the company, 
which has since been known as Berger Brothers. John D. Berger is manager, 
Harry L. and Thomas B. Berger looking after important details of the opera- 
tion of the factory and the disposal of its product. Harrison Berger died, 
June 4. 1913, and until then served as a trustee of St. John's Refonned Church 
of Schuylkill Haven. He was always considered a trustworthy and estimable 
citizen, and at one time filled the office of councilman. To his marriage with 
Amanda Deibert, daughter of George and Susan (Reed) Deibert, were born 
nine children, three of whom died yoimg ; Sallie A. is the widow of Milton 
Butz : John D. is mentioned below ; George A., of Schuylkill Haven, is engaged 
in the general mercantile business at his father's old stand ; Tillie is the wife 
of Edward H. Borda, of Schuylkill Haven ; Harry L. and Thomas B.^are 
members of the firm of Berger Brothers; the deceased were Hannah, Gertrude 
and Helen. 

John D. Berger attended public school at Schuylkill Haven until sixteen 
years old. There he clerked in his father's store for several years, at the age 
of twenty-three joining him in the manufacturing business, with which he has 
since maintained active connection. Since the present organization, under the 
name of Berger Brothers, he has been general manager, and under his guid- 
ance the trade has grown steadily, the output of ladies' and children's under- 
wear having a regular demand in the market. The concern is now the largest 
of its kind in the borough, employing at times as many as one hundred and 
fifty hands, over one hundred regularly. Its expansion has called for increased 
and improved facilities, economizing time and facilitating operations, and the 
plant has been altered as necessary, being thoroughly up-to-date in every par- 
ticular. The Bergers have demonstrated their public spirit and interest in the 
welfare of the town as well as in the development of their own affairs, which 
have been conducted along solid lines, having a permanent influence on commer- 
cial conditions in the locality. 

When the matter of establishing the Schuylkill Haven Trust Company was 
broached !Mr. John D. Berger took a live interest in its promotion, served on 
the organization committee, and was elected first president after the bank 
obtained its charter. May 19, 1910. It opened for business June 6th, and has 
a fine banking house on Main street. Though a comparatively new institution 
it has inspired deserved confidence by the stability of its backers and the con- 
servative business methods followed. Mr. Berger has usually limited his part 
in the public affairs of the town and county to exerting his influence in favor 
of good men and measures, but he served a short time as councilman to com- 
plete the unexpired term of Robert Jones. Politically he is a Republican. He 
is a Mason, belonging to Page Lodge, No. 270, F. & A. M., of Schuylkill Haven, 
is also a member of the Jr. O. U. A. M., and in religious connection adheres 
to the church of his forefathers, belonging to St. John's Reformed congrega- 
tion at Schuylkill Haven. 

Mr. Berger married Alice E. Palsgrove, a daughter of C. B. Palsgrove, of 



60 SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PEXXSYLVAXL\ 

Schuylkill Haven, and they are the parents of four children: Eugenia A., 
Clift P., Alice E. and Mary Charlotte. 

JATiIES KELLER SILLIALA.N, late of Mahanoy City, exhibited in his 
career the distinctive characteristics of a race whose members have been fore- 
most in the general progress as well as in the development of the material 
resources of Schuylkill county. The Sillimans came to this section from Berks 
county, vi'here the early generations were prominent, James Silliman, the 
grandfather of James K. Silliman, serving as sheriil of that county, to which 
office he was elected in 1832. 

Edward S. Silliman, father of James K. Silliman, was born June 20, 1820, 
at Bern, Berks Co., Pa., and received a common school education. He spent 
all his life in this part of the State, coming to Pottsville in young manhood 
and residing there for a time. His observations and investigations led him to 
believe that there were rich coal deposits in the Alahanoy valley which could 
be profitably developed, and he determined to test his ideas. Accordingly he 
purchased a large tract of land in the vicinity of Mahanoy City from Biddle, 
Troutman & Dundas, of Philadelphia, and coming to Mahanoy City about the 
beginning of the Civil war undertook operations on his own account, being one 
of the first to start mining in this part of the anthracite district. In all he 
operated seven collieries in this section. In 1861 he sank the first shaft and 
built the first breaker in the Mahanoy valley, opening what was then known as 
the Silliman colliery — now the North Mahanoy colliery, and the property of 
the Philadelphia & Reading Coal & Iron Company. The nearest coal operators 
at that time were ten miles away, at Girardville. The first shipment of coal 
for the new breaker was made Jan. 14, 1862, and it was also the first shipment 
sent from the territor}' within a radius of eight miles around ]\Iahanoy City. 
The annual production of this mine was 100,000 tons, and three hundred and 
fifty men were employed ; and Mr. Silliman and his father were profitably 
engaged in its operation for a period of eight years, selling out then to the 
Crane Iron Company, of Catasauqua, Pa. A little later a strike occurred 
among the workmen and the breaker was burned, and not long afterwards the 
present owners acquired the property, which became one of the best paying 
collieries in the region. 

Mr. Silliman's next venture was the construction of an iron furnace at 
New Ringgold, but the time was not auspicious, there being a general depres- 
sion in the iron market at the time which accounts for the fact that the indus- 
try did not prosper. The coal fields offered the best promise for the emplov- 
ment of his enterprise and capital, and he began operating in soft coal, having 
a large mine at Houtzdale, Clearfield Co., Pa., in that district, as at Mahanoy 
City, being one of the first to engage in the development of coal properties. 
But his main interests were always in Schuylkill county, where in time he 
became owner of 1,600 acres of valuable coal lands near Sheppton. Though 
so thoroughly interested in exploiting one of the most important of the natural 
resources of this region, Mr. Silliiuan did not neglect its incidental commer- 
cial and financial activities, and he allied himself with many of the most 
ambitious projects tmdertaken for material betterment, and exercised a friendly 
influence in the aid of every movement in that direction. Through his efforts 
the First National Bank of Mahanoy City was established Sept. 27, 1864. and 
he was one of the most active members of its board of directors until within 
a few months of his death, serving as president of the institution from 1866 to 
the close of his life — a period of nearly forty years. It is situated at the 



SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENXSYLVANL\ 61 

northeast corner of }ilain and Centre streets. He organized the Mahanoy City 
W ater Company, which furnishes the water supply for many neighboring col- 
Heries as well as for the city, and served as president of the concern from the 
beginning, until his death; he was one of the incorporators of th^ Mahanoy 
City Electric Light, Heat and Power Company and of the Mahanoy City Gas 
Company (serving as president of both ) — all enterprises which needed men of 
courage and administrative skill to launch them into successful operation. 
Moreover, his character and judgment attracted local capital, and he never 
betrayed the confidence thus shown. Even as a young man he showed the 
traits which when developed made him a trusted leader, and he was taken 
seriously as one of the forces which were to mold the destiny of the county. 

Though practical by nature Mr. Silliman did not narrow his interests to the 
accumulation of the profits of his industrial operations. While promoting 
business schemes he did not overlook the importance of establishing high 
standards of community life, and helped plan its educational and moral insti- 
tutions, the conservation and protection of all those interests which affected 
the everyday life of his fellow citizens, tie used his large means wisely in 
his liberal support of public enterprises and his generosity to those less for- 
tunately situated than himself. Without vanity or undue pride in his personal 
achievement, he was easily approached and kindly in manner, with no disposi- 
tion to hold himself aloof from men in any walk of life. 

]\Ir. Silliman was a charter member of the Humane Hose Company, and the 
organizer, in 1875, of the Silliman Guards (mustered in Xov. 27th of that 
year), which still continue their existence as Company E, 8th Regiment, 
P. X. G. He belonged to the Episcopal Church, and on political questions 
supported the Republican party. 

In 1858 Mr. Silliman married Siraha Keller, a native of Berks county, who 
died in 1894 at Mahanoy City. His death occurred May i, 1904, and they are 
buried in the Charles Baber cemetery at Pottsville. Six children were born to 
this marriage : Mary Ellen, who married George H. Jackson, of Philadelphia; 
Edward S. ; Howard, who died in infancy; James Keller; Emily A., deceased 
in infancy; and Charles, of Mahanoy City. 

James Keller Silliman was born March 29, 1869, in Mahanoy City, where 
he was reared, receiving his education in the public schools. Except for a brief 
residence in Reading, Pa., he was a lifelong resident of his native borough, 
where he attained a position in business and social circles to which he was 
fully entitled by his personal qualities, irrespective of any advantages attach- 
ing to the prominence of the gifted family to which he belonged. He was a 
worthy representative of the name, and though a man of retiring disposition 
and unassuming habits was thoroughly appreciated by those who had the privi- 
lege of familiar acquaintance. His business connections' were principally with 
the institutions his father established, he and his brothers continuing the work 
which Edward S. Silliman, Sr., laid out so well. When a young man he 
became a clerk in the First Xational Bank, and after nine years' service in 
that capacity became paying teller, in 1896, filling the position until obliged to 
resign, Aug. i. 1903. because of impaired sight. He was a director of the 
bank, and a stockholder in the Mahanoy City Water Cotripany. Mr. Silliman 
died June 26. 1914. in his forty-sixth year, after a brief illness. Though 
modest and devoid of pretense in any relation of life, his straightforwardness 
and sincerity made so deep an impression that he was regarded with feelings 
of genuine friendship by all who came into personal contact with him, and his 
death drew impressions of honest regret from every quarter. Sympathetic and 



62 SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 

helpful in his dealings with all his fellows, ideal in his family life, he is held in 
loving memory in every circle in which he moved. He was laid to rest in the 
Charles Baber cemetery at Pottsville. He was a member of the Church of 
Faith, Episcopal. 

Mr. Silliman married Catharine Morscher, daughter of Jacob and Christina 
(Scherr) Morscher, and they occupied a beautiful home at No. 37 North 
Main street. The three children of this union survive and reside with their 
mother in -Mahanoy City, viz. : Florence, Edward and Kathryn. 

Jacob Alorscher, father of Mrs. Silliman, was born June 5, 1844, in 
Austria, came to America in young manhood, and settled at Mahanoy City, 
Schuylkill Co., Pa., where he died Feb. 5, 191 1. He is buried there. Mr. 
Morscher followed mining, and became very well known. He married Mrs. 
Christina (Scherr) Weber, a native of Baden, Germany, who was born March 
3, 1839, in Baden, Germany, daughter of John and Catherine (Bobarker) 
Scherr. When seven years old she came to America with her parents, the fam- 
ily settling at St. Clair, Schuylkill Co., Pa., where Mr. Scherr found employ- 
ment at the mines. He was killed at the powder works in St. Clair. George 
Weber, Mrs. Morscher's first husband, was a miner ; he died in 1874, and is 
buried at IMahanoy City. To this union were born ten children : Catherine 
died when eleven months old ; Mary died when eleven months old ; a son died in 
infancy; Lewis died when six weeks old; Peter lives in Philadelphia; Lena 
married \ alentine Krauter ; Joseph was killed in the mines at IMahanoy 
City when forty-eight years old ; Elizabeth is the wife of Albert Heberley, 
and resides in Philadelphia; Frances, wife of Michael Cahill, lives in Mahanoy 
City ; Christina, wife of Henry Kneib, lives in Mahanoy City. After Mr. 
Weber's death Airs. Weber married Jacob Morscher, whom she survives, still 
making her home in Mahanoy City, at No. 228 East Mahanoy avenue. Though 
advanced in years, she is very bright. Seven children were born to her second 
union : Philip, who died when four years old ; Barbara, who died when four 
months old ; Catharine, widow of James K. Silliman ; Mary ; Jacob ; a son 
that died in infancy; and Michael. 

GEORGE W. BROWN, M. D., was a resident of Port Carbon for over 
forty-five years, and throughout that period a force for progress in the com- 
munity. Best known in his professional capacity, he also took considerable 
part in public affairs, and in business as founder of what is still known as the 
leading drug store at Port Carbon, now conducted by his son, John K. Brown, 
under the name of the Brown Drug Store Company. 

The branch of the Brown family to which he belonged has had a line of 
professional men who have been noted for intelligence and high citizenship 
in every generation. The Doctor's grandfather, John Brown, known as Elder 
John Brown, died in 1818, at the age of seventy-nine years. His wife, Mar- 
garet, died Jan. 24, 1801, aged forty-nine years. They are buried at the Old 
Stone Church in White Deer valley. Union county, Pennsylvania. 

Dr. George W. Brown, son of John and Margaret Brown, was born in 
1784, and died at the early age of thirty-five years, April 19, 1819. He was 
reared on a farm at Allenwood, Union county, and highly educated, graduating 
from the LIniversity of Pennsylvania with the degree of M. D. and from Prince- 
ton Theological Seminary. He preached his trial sermon, but because of ill 
health he never followed either of the professions for which he prepared. Own- 
ing a large quantity of land, he was engaged in general farming. At the time of 
his death he was prothonotary of Northumberland county, at Simbury, and was 



SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PKXXSYLX'AXLV 63 

buried at Milton. For a time he was tutor in the family of Dr. James Dougal, 
at Milton, and he married the Doctor's daughter JMargaret, by whom he had 
three children: John, who married Lucy Ludwig and had children, Jane, 
Helen, John, Abram, James and Charles; James, who was married three times, 
to Helen Wright (by whom he had two children, Lizzie and Margaret), Ann 
Walker and Alary Groves (by whom he had one daughter, Helen) ; and George 
W., the father of John K. Brown. Dr. Brown, the father of this family, was 
a Presbyterian and a \\ big. Dr. James Dougal and his wife, Jane (Starrett). 
were from Ireland. 

Dr. George W. Brown, son of Dr. George W. Brown and his wife Margaret 
(Dougal), was born July 2, 1818, at Sunbury, Pa., and received his early educa- 
tion in the common schools. In his boyhood and youth he lived and worked 
upon his father's large farm at AUenwood, Union county, later began the 
study of medicine with Dr. David Hunter, at Tamacjua, and finished the course 
at Jeft'erson Medical College, from which institution he was graduated. In 
the spring of 1844 he settled at Port Carbon, where he practiced medicine and 
carried on a drtig store the remainder of his life. In the year 1847 he built 
the Brown mansion, now one of the landmarks of the borotigh, and at this 
home his death occurred in 1890. Dr. Brown became a Republican on political 
questions, and in his close connection with public affairs exercised an appreciable 
influence in the commimity, leaving a permanent impress for good in the wide 
circle of his acquaintance. For many years he was a member of the council, 
and president of that body during most of that time. At one time he was a 
member of the school board. He founded what is now known as the Mid- 
vale cemetery at Port Carbon, and is btiried there. Like his father he was 
a Presbyterian in religious connection, and he filled the office of elder in his 
church. 

Dr. Brown married Rebecca Tindall, daughter of Elijah and Rachel Tindall, 
of near IMount Holly, N. J., in which State the Tindalls were landowners ; 
the family came to this cotnitry from England. Six children were born to Dr. 
and Mrs. Brown : Annie S. married Dr. W. T. Beach, who was born in 
Wales about 1840 and died some years ago (they had two children, George 
B , who married a !Miss Uhler, of Gordon, Pa., and William Starrett, who died 
young) ; Margaret married Dr. T. J. Birch, who was born in Ohio in 1838, 
and died in June, 1912, aged seventy-four years (they had no children; she 
resides at Port Carbon); Emily W. married Edmund Erdman ; George W. 
married ]\Iary Knittle ; Maria H. married T. R. Beddall ; John K. married 
Minnie A. Weaklim. 

John K. Brown was born April 27, 1856, at Port Carbon, Schuylkill 
county, which has always been his home. He attended school there, and had 
one winter's tuition at Media, Pa., after which he learned the drug business 
under his father's instruction. At the time of his father's death he was thirty- 
four years old, and he then succeeded to the business, which he has continued 
on his own account for the last twenty-five years. His business and private 
life has been such as to make him an honored representative of the name he 
bears, and to maintain the high standards of citizenship it has upheld for the 
last seventy years in the town. He is a Presbyterian and a Republican, as 
the members of the family generally have been. 

Mr. Brown married Minnie A. Weaklim, daughter of William T. and Caro- 
line (Davenport) Weaklim, and to them have been born two children: David 
B., Sept. ig, 1893, and ]\Iargaret D., July 23, 1903. 

William T. \\'eaklim, father of Mrs. John K. Brown, was born on ship- 



64 SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PEXXSYLVANL\ 

board when his parents were coming to America. He settled at St. Clair, 
Schuylkill Co., Pa., and for many years was engaged in the paperhanging and 
painting business. He was elected justice of the peace at St. Clair, and filled 
that office several years. His death occurred at St. Clair in September, 1914, 
and he is buried there, in the Odd Fellows cemetery. He married Caroline 
Davenport, who now resides at Pottsville. They had the following children : 
Laura, Minnie A. (Mrs. John K. Brown), William T., George, Carrie, ^lay, 
Oscar, Bertha, and Harry (who died young). 

COL. DAXIEL NAGLE, a venerable resident of Pottsville, has the dis- 
tinction of being one of the few surviving veterans whose military experience 
included service in both the Mexican and Civil wars. A youth of eighteen 
when the Mexican war broke out, he entered the service as a member of a 
company commanded by his brother James, and subsequently he served over 
two years in the Civil war. 

Colonel Xagle was born April i, 1828, in Womelsdorf, Berks Co., Pa., and 
his ancestors were among the early residents of that county. His grandfather, 
Philip Nagle, was a native of Reading, Berks county, where he died in 1840, 
at the age of eighty-four years. He served as a drummer in the Revolutionary 
war. By occupation he was a stonemason. 

Daniel Xagle, son of Philip, was born in 1803, and before he reached his 
majority removed to W'omelsdorf, Berks county, and thence in 1830 to Pine 
Grove, Schuylkill county. Five years later he removed to Pottsville, where 
he died in 1851. By trade he was a cabinetmaker, and in connection with that 
work did painting of various kinds. He voted with the Whig party, and in 
his religious belief adhered to the doctrines of the Lutheran Church. He 
married Mary Rorig, and they had eight children who grew to maturity, three 
daughters and five sons : James, Eliza, Daniel, Ellen, Mary, Philip, Levi and 
Abraham. Philip enlisted in Capt. D. A. Smith's company for a temi of three 
months, becoming first lieutenant. This company was among the first at 
Washington, and belonged to the troops known as the "First Defenders." 
At the expiration of this term of enlistment he was promoted to the captaincy 
of Company G, 48th Pennsylvania \'olunteer Infa^t^\^ and was stationed at 
Hatteras Island. He died in March, 1891, at the age of fifty-three years. 
Levi enlisted as a musician in the 48th Regiment band, and after his 
term of service remained in Washington as a clerk in the pension bureau. 
Abraham served in Company D, 6th Pennsylvania Regiment, for three months, 
and afterwards in Company D, 48th Regiment, Pennsylvania \'olunteers, for 
a temi of three years ; he is now deceased. 

Daniel Nagle, second son of Daniel and Mary (Rorig) Nagle, was edu- 
cated in the public schools of Pottsville, Pa., where his father settled, and 
learned the painting and paper hanging trade with his father. At this he 
continued to work until the year 1846, when he enlisted, on Dec. 5th, in 
Company B (his brother's company), ist Regiment, Pennsylvania Volunteers, 
Col. F. ]\I. Wynkoop commanding. He originally entered the service as a 
drummer, but carried a musket through the siege of \'era Cruz, at Atlixco, 
Huamantla, Natural Bridge and Lajoya Pass ; was in the battle of Cerro 
Gordo, and on the march to Puebla, and then returned to headquarters at 
Perote Castle. At this juncture he was compelled to return home on account 
of some imperative business and family affairs : not, however, imtil the city 
of Mexico had been taken and hostilities ceased. He received his discharge 
at Perote Castle, Mexico, Oct. 30, 1847. During this service he won the 



I 




/^A^riyL^ 



OLoyC^ 



SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 65 

esteem and regard of his officers, and in the engagements in which he carried 
a musket bore himself bravely. After his return he resumed his former 
business, which he continued until the beginning of the Civil war. Again he 
went into the service of his country, enlisting April i8, 1861, at Pottsville, in 
Captain Tower's company. Upon their arrival at Harrisburg he was ap- 
p)ointed second lieutenant. The company, having more than the legal number 
of men, was then divided, and Daniel Nagle was elected captain of one of the 
two companies formed. This "Xagle Guard of Pottsville" was Company D, 
6th Regiment, under the command of Col. James Nagle. During the first 
three months he served in the Cumberland valley, and took part in the skir- 
mishes of that campaign. After the reorganization of the 48th Pennsylvania 
Regiment by Colonel Nagle, his brother, he was elected captain of Company D, 
of that regiment. lie first proceeded to Fortress Monroe, \'a., under General 
\\'ool, and thence to Flatteras Inlet, N. C, where they relieved an Indiana 
regiment, there garrisoned, until General Burnside organized an army corps. 
Daniel Nagle then took part in the capture and reduction of Newbern, having 
some time prior been promoted to the rank of major of his regiment. The 
troops remained there until General McClellan arrived in front of Richmond, 
when they were ordered to reinforce him. Before they reached him hostilities 
there had ceased, and his command was stationed at Newport News, where 
he resigned in July, 1862, and returned home on account of sickness and death 
in his family. During the invasion of Pennsylvania by General Lee he re- 
enlisted, in September, 1862, and was commissioned lieutenant colonel of the 
19th Emergency Regiment. He was out two weeks in service when he was 
appointed by Governor Curtin as colonel of the 173d Regiment, drafted 
militia. In this capacity he served the full term of nine months. His com- 
mand was first ordered to Norfolk, \'a., where it was used to guard the 
approaches to the city — Kempville, Intrenched Lines, Sewell's Point, Indian 
Pole Bridge, Great Bridge, Cape Henry Lighthouse, Fort Norfolk and Tan- 
ners' Creek. Their headquarters were at Camp Viele. In May, 1863, he was 
ordered to Norfolk to relieve a Wisconsin regiment, and then performed pro- 
vost duty in the city and suburbs. On July 10, 1863, he received orders from 
General \'iele to report to General Meade at Gettysburg, but meeting General 
Meade at Boonsboro, Md., was sent by him to the nth Army Corps, under 
charge of Gen. O. O. Howard. His regiment reached the corps at Berlin, 
and was assigned to service in Virginia on the Orange & Alexandria railway, 
with head(|uarters at Manassas Junction. While stationed here he guarded 
this road from Broad Run to Manassas Junction. He was stationed at Kettle 
Run and other points until Aug. 18, 1863, when he was discharged from fur- 
ther duty, his term of service having expired. 

After his return to Schuylkill county Colonel Nagle became a coal agent 
for a short time and then engaged in the flouring business for a few years. In 
1876 he retired from that line of work, and returned to his original business 
of painting and paper hanging, which he carried on very successfully until his 
retirement, in i8go. 

Colonel Xagle has always been a Republican in politics, and at the breaking 
out of the Civil war was a member of the borough council, which office he 
filled until the expiration of his three months' service, but resigned when he 
reenlisted. He is a prominent member of Pulaski Lodge, No. 216, F. & A. M., 
of the ^Mexican \'eteran Association, and of the Schuylkill County Historical 
Societv. In religious faith he is a Lutheran. Though in his eighty-eighth 
A'ol. 1—3 



66 SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 

year, he is in excellent health and continues his interest in the affairs of the day. 
He is well known in the borough and has the affection and esteem of a wide 
circle. 

On July 6, 1848, Colonel Nagle was united in marriage with Hannah 
Kantner, a daughter of John Kantner, of Potts ville, Pa., and their union was 
blessed with eight children : Edwin Seculas, who died in Massachusetts, mar- 
ried Nellie Sicerott, and was chief clerk for Riley & Company, importers of 
machinery, of Boston, Mass. ; Daniel Winfield, who married Valeria Koons, 
was formerly head bookkeeper in the Lutheran Publication House, of Phila- 
delphia, and is now living at Auburn, Schuylkill county, with his only daugh- 
ter ; Millard Fillmore, who married Jennie Meek, is in the wholesale lumber 
business at Shamokin, Pa. ; Harry Clay, deceased, married Katie Sterner, and 
was a clerk in the Lutheran Publication House, of Philadelphia; George W. 
was next in the family ; Bessie is deceased ; two died in childhood. The mother 
died Jan. 8, 1877, aged forty-six years, and Colonel Nagle was again married, 
on July 20, 1880, to Mrs. Rebecca Loose, of Pottsville, Pa., daughter of Joseph 
Muthard, of Berks county, Pa., and widow of Nathaniel Loose, by whom she 
had four daughters. Mrs. Nagle died Feb. 14, 191 1. 



Gen. James Xagle, eldest son of Daniel and Mary (Rorig) Nagle, was 
born April 5, 1822, at Reading, Pa. He was given a few years in the public 
schools at Reading, but most of his education was obtained in the school 
of experience and through self effort. He usually worked during the day 
and went to school at night. In his youth he learned the trade of painter and 
paper hanger, which he followed throughout his active business life, taking 
his father's business after the latter's death. He showed decided military 
talent from early manhood, and became a member and later captain of a 
company of Pennsylvania State militia. In 1844 he organized the Washington 
Artillery, of which he was captain, and left Pottsville on Dec. 5, 1846. to enter 
the Mexican war. This company was known as Company B, ist Regiment, 
P. V. I., Col. F. M. Wynkoop commanding. During the course of the war 
he took part in the siege of Vera Cruz, and at the battle of Cerro Gordo was 
acting major of his regiment. On Jan. 20, 1847, li's command routed a force 
of guerrillas at LaJoya, and on Oct. 14th and 19th he took part in engage- 
ments at Huamantla, Puebla, and Atlixco, each of which resulted in an over- 
whelming victory for the LTnited States troops. Subsequently he was with 
his regiment in the triumphal entr}' into the city of Mexico and was finally 
stationed at San Angle until the war formally closed. He was mustered out of 
the service with his company at Philadelphia, July 27, 1848. 

After his return to Pottsville he was, in 1852, elected sheriff of Schuylkill 
county, and shortly thereafter was appointed brigade inspector of Pennsyl- 
vania, with the rank of colonel. He remained closely identified with the 
military affairs of the county and State until 1861, when, at the beginning of 
the Civil war, he was commissioned colonel of the 6th Pennsylvania, and 
ordered out for service, taking part in the skimiish at Falling Water. In 
AugT.ist, 1 86 1, he organized the 4Sth Pennsylvania Regiment, with a view to 
serving three years, and commanded same. His regiment did service at 
Fortress Monroe, Hatteras Inlet and Newbem, and at the second battle of 
Bull Run General Nagle commanded with gallantrj' and judgment the ist 
Brigade, 2d Division, of the 9th Army Corps. Soon after the battle he was 
recommended for promotion by General Reno, and was subsequently com- 



SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENNSYLVANL\ 67 

missioned by rresident Lincoln as brigadier general. In this capacity he 
commanded at the battles of Chantilly, South Mountain and Antietam, in each 
of which engagements his brigade bore itself with credit and distinction. At 
Antietam his command took an important part in carrying the xAntietam 
bridge, which was considered by General ^IcClellan as the one event that 
saved the day. For this service General Nagle received the highest compli- 
ments. At Annisville and Fredericksburg his brigade was in the thickest of 
the tight and sustained heavy losses in both killed and wounded. From this 
time until 1863 he was stationed in Kentucky. In consequence of heart disease 
he was compelled to resign his command, much to the regret of his men and 
General Sturgis, who was chief in authority. While at home, rest and absence 
from the excitement- and arduous duty of war soon acted as a restorative, and 
his general health improved to such an extent that when General Lee began 
his invasion of Pennsylvania he organized the 39th Regiment, Pennsylvania 
Militia, for the emergency, and was placed in command. The troops were 
mustered out Aug. 2, 1863, and the next year he organized the 194th Penn- 
sylvania for one hundred days' service, was commissioned commanding colonel 
July 21. 1864, and ordered to Baltimore, Md.. where he was placed in com- 
mand of eight thousand troops at ^ilonkin's Woods, to gtiard the approach to 
the city. On Nov. 5, 1864, he was finally dismissed, and on Aug. 22, 1866, 
died of heart disease at his home in Pottsville, Pennsylvania. 

General Xagle was married to Elizabeth, daughter of John and Catharine 
Kaercher, of Pottsville, Dec. 15, 1852. To them were born nine children, 
seven of whom grew to maturity: Emma is the widow of James A. Bowen, 
former superintendent of the Pottsville Gas Works ; James W., of Philadel- 
phia, married to Josephine Hutchinson, is at present advertising agent for the 
Philadelphia Inquirer; John D., who died in 191 1. was secretary and treasurer 
of the Textile Record, Philadelphia, and was married to Alary Crosland ; Laura 
was the wife of John Dooley, conductor on the Philadelphia & Reading rail- 
road, and both are deceased ; Marcus H., of Pottsville, married Sallie Helms, 
of Pottsville ; Frank L., of Boston, Mass., connected with the Textile Record 
of Philadelphia, and principal agent, married Laura Rosengarten, of Potts- 
ville, Pa. : Kate A. is the wife of Lincoln Phillips, a jeweler of Jamestown, 
N. Y. The mother of this family died Aug. 17, 1900. 

In politics General Nagle, in the earlier part of his life, supported the Whig 
party, and upon the organization of the Republican party transferred his 
allegiance to the same. At the time of his death he was a member of the 
borough council of Pottsville. He held membership in the Lutheran Church. 

General Nagle -was preeminently a military man, and a patriot. His life 
was permeated with the military spirit, and broadened and devoted citizenship. 
After his return from the Mexican war the citizens of Schuylkill county, in 
token of his eminent services and the good will they bore him, presented him 
a valuable sword. He is still remembered by many of his townsmen, and 
will ever occupy a place in their afifections and esteem. 

EDWARD S. SILLIMAN, without question the foremost citizen of 
]\Iahanoy City, has been prominent in every avenue of local progress since he 
entered business life. But it is as the chief promoter of important public utilities 
in the borough that he has been most helpful to his fellow citizens. In this 
field his influence and large means have been employed to the best advantage, 
affording benefits to all in the community and enabling it to maintain success- 



68 SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 

ful rivalry with others in this section. In this regard Mr. Silliman has lived 
up to the traditions of a name associated with the forward march of Schuyl- 
kill county ever since its earlier members came here. 

The Silliman family has an interesting history, the members of its several 
branches in this locality showing characteristics of mental and moral strength 
which have come to be expected of them. The original spelling of the name, 
Sillyman, has been changed by some of the family to Silliman, and it is also 
found in the form "Selhman." The Schuylkill county family here treated is 
allied with several others of the locality, and they are descended from a Berks 
county family of honorable standing. James Sillyman, great-grandfather of 
the present Edward S. Silliman, lived at Hamburg, in Bern township, Berks 
county, where he spent all his active years. His sons having established them- 
selves at Pottsville, he removed to that place late in life and ended his days 
there. He is buried in the Presbyterian cemetery. He married Susanna 
Hughes, of Bucks county, Pa., and children as follows were born to them: 
Alexander, who served in the war of i8i2; Thomas, who was the first post- 
master of Pottsville, appointed Jan. ii, 1825, sensed until succeeded by George 
Snyder, who was appointed June 7. 1825, and died there (at one time he 
owned most of the land upon which the borough of Cressona now stands, 
and he sold a valuable farm there to the Philadelphia & Reading Railway Com- 
pany) ; James, who died in Pottsville; Samuel, late of Pottsville, mentioned 
elsewhere in this work; John, deceased at Pottsville, who was the grandfather 
of H. I. Silliman, well known in the borough and Schuylkill county as editor 
of the Tamaqua Evening Courier; Mary, who married Jeremiah Kirk, and 
died at Pottsville; Susan, Mrs. Fister; and Jane, who died unmarried. 

James Silliman, son of James and Susanna (Hughes) Silliman, lived at 
Bern, Berks county, and at one time served as sheriff of that county, to which 
office he was elected in 1832. Later in life he removed from Berks county 
to Pottsville, Schuylkill county, where he was engaged in the coal business, 
being one of the early operators. He also carried on a general store in the 
borough, where he died. His wife's maiden name was Schotz, and they had 
children as follows : Alexander; Eliza, Mrs. Henderson ; Morgan ; Edward S. ; 
and five daughters who died unmarried, Mary, Amanda, Sarah, Ellen and 
Matilda. 

Edward S. Silliman, son of James, above, was born June 20, 1820, at Bern, 
Berks Co., Pa., and received a common school education. He spent all his 
life in this part of the State, coming to Pottsville in young manhood and resid- 
ing there for a time. His observations and investigations led him to believe that 
there were rich coal deposits in the Mahanoy valley which could be profitably 
developed, and he determined to test his ideas. Accordingly he purchased a 
large tract of land in the vicinity of Mahanoy City from Biddle, Troutman & 
Dundas, of Philadelphia, and coming to Mahanoy City about the beginning of 
the Civil war undertook operations on his own account, being one of the first 
to start mining in this part of the anthracite district. In all he operated seven 
collieries in this section. In 1861 he sank the Jirst shaft and built the first 
breaker in the Mahanoy valley, opening what was then known as the Silliman 
colliery — ^now the North Mahanoy colliery, and the property of the Philadelphia 
& Reading Coal & Iron Company. The nearest coal operators at that time 
were ten miles away, at Girardville. The first shipment of coal for the new 
breaker was made Ian. 14, 1862, and it was also the first shipment sent from 
the territory within a radius of eight miles around Mahanoy City. The 



SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENNSYLVANLA 69 

annual production of this mine was 100,000 tons, and three hundred and fifty 
men were employed, and Mr. Silliman and his father were profitably engaged 
in its operation for a period of eight years, selling out then to the Crane Iron 
Company, of Catasauqua, Pa. A little later a strike occurred among the work- 
men and the breaker was burned, and not long afterward the present owners 
acquired the property, which became one of the best paying collieries in the 
region. Mr. Silliman leased this land, the company leasing the land to indi- 
vidual operators with the understanding that each was to mine and ship a cer- 
tain amount of coal during the year, and "E. S. Silliman was the ■only one of the 
lessees that carried out his contract in full." Some houses were built about 
this time down Spruce street, and Silliman's men lived in them. They are 
still known as "company houses," the Silliman houses at the North Mahanoy 
colliery. 

Mr. Silliman's next venture was the construction t3f an iron furnace at New 
Ringgold, but the time was not auspicious, there being a general depression in 
the iron market at the time which accounts for the fact that the industry did 
not prosper. The coal fields oti'ered the best promise for the employment of 
his enterprise and capital, and he began operating in soft coal, having a large 
mine at Houtzdale, Clearfield Co., Pa., in that district, as at Mahanoy City, 
being one of the first to engage in the development of coal properties. But his 
main interests were always in Schuylkill county, where in time he became owner 
of 1,600 acres of valuable coal lands near Sheppton. Though so thoroughly 
interested in exploiting one of the most important of the natural resources of 
this region, Mr. Silliman did not neglect its incidental commercial and financial 
activities, and he allied himself with many of the most ambitious projects un- 
dertaken for material betterment, and exercised a friendly influence in the aid 
of every movement in that direction. Through his efforts the First National 
Bank of Mahanoy City was established Sept. 2-j, 1864, and he was one of the 
most active members of its board of directors until within a few months of his 
death, serving as president of the institution from 1866 to the close of his life 
— a period of nearly forty years. It is situated at the northeast corner of Main 
and Centre streets. He organized the Mahanoy City Water Company, which 
furnishes the water supply for many neighboring collieries as well as for the 
city, and served as president of the concern from the beginning, until his 
death; he was one of the incorporators of the Mahanoy City Electric Light, 
Heat and Power Company and of the Mahanoy City Gas Company (ser\Mng 
as president of both) — all enterprises which needed men of courage and 
administrative skill to launch them into successful operation. Moreover, his 
character and judgment attracted local capital, and he never betrayed the con- 
fidence thus shown. Even as a young man he showed the traits which when 
developed made him a trusted leader, and he was taken seriously as one of 
the forces which were to mold the destiny of the county. 

Though practical by nature Mr. Silliman did not narrow his interests to 
the accumulation of the profits of his industrial operations. While promoting 
business schemes he did not overlook the importance of establishing high 
standards of community life, and helped plan its educational and moral insti- 
tutions, the conservation and protection of all these interests which afifected the 
every-day life of his fellow citizens. He used his large means wisely in his 
liberal support of public enterprises and his generosity to those less fortunately 
situated than himself. Without vanity or undue pride in his personal achieve- 



70 SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 

ments, he was easily approached and kindly in manner, with no disposition to 
hold himself aloof from men in any walk of life. 

Mr. Silliman was a charter member of the Humane Hose Company, and 
the organizer, in 1875, of the Silliman Guards (mustered in Nov. 27th of 
that year), which still continue their existence as Company E, 8th Regiment, 
P. N. G. He belonged to the Episcopal Church, and on political questions 
supported the Republican party. 

In 1858 Mr. Silliman married Siraha Keller, a native of Berks county, 
who died in 1894 at Mahanoy City. His death occurred May i, 1904, and they 
are buried in the Charles Baber cemetery at Pottsville. Six children were bom 
to this marriage : Ellen, who married George H. Jackson, of Philadelphia ; 
Edward S.; Howard, who died in infancy; James Keller; Emily A., deceased 
in infancy; and Charles, of Mahanoy City. 

Edward S. Silliman, son of the late Edward S. Silliman, was born Nov. 
4, 1S64, at Mahanoy City, where his education was acquired in the public 
schools. In early manhood he manifested an interest in business and other 
activities, and an intelligent comprehension of their relative importance which 
foretold the leading part he was to play in the development of local resources 
and the introduction of the conveniences which are the feature of modern 
municipal life. His large investments in home enterprises have not only indi- 
cated his own faith in their paying qualities and the cooperation to be expected 
from the community, but have had the effect of keeping other capital in use 
here instead of seeking attractive propositions elsewhere. For several years 
he was the owner of the gas works. He was interested in the establishment 
of the electric light plant, and also of the water company, and is still presi- 
dent of the latter, succeeding his father in that position, as also in the presi- 
dency of the First National Bank. This is the oldest national bank in Schuyl- 
kill county. Every good cause can count upon him for friendly assistance 
and substantial encouragement when needed. The various social organizations 
of the borough and county have had his loyal support. He is a member of the 
Pottsville Club ; Outdoor Club ; Central Republican Club of Pottsville ; Wash- 
ington Hook and Ladder Club of Mahanoy City; of the Manufacturers' Club 
of Philadelphia and the Union Republican Club of Philadelphia ; of the Schuyl- 
kill County Historical Society ; was a charter member of the Pottsville lodge 
of B. P. O. Elks, and now affiliated with the Elks lodge at Mahanoy City; and 
he is a vestrymaji of the Protestant Episcopal Church. 

On Dec. 7, 1905, Mr. Silliman married Mabel S. Beck, daughter of William 
and Matilda (Strauch) Beck, of Beckville, North Manheim township, this 
county. They have had four children: Mary B., born in September. 1906; 
Sarah, who died in infancy; Edward S. 3d; and Jane. The family home is 
one of the most modern and conveniently appointed to be found in Schuylkill 
county. 

GEORGE ROBERT PATTERSON, at the time of his death Alember of 
Congress representing the Twelfth district of Pennsylvania, was a resident 
of Ashland, Schuylkill county, for twenty years. His achievements during 
that period have a place in the history of the city and county. But however 
imi)ortant his public work, whatever he accomplished in business, it would 
seem to be his sterling character and sympathetic attitude towards his fellow 
men which ha\e left the deepest impression. Among his colleagues in all the 
associations of life appreciation of his abilities went hand in hand with admira- 



SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PEXi\SYLVAXL\ 71 

tion for his personal traits. Mr. Patterson was a native-born Pennsylvanian, 
the only child of Rev. James A. Patterson, a Presbyterian minister. The 
father was born in Juiiiala ciDunty, this State, and from an. early age lived at 
Lewistown, in Aliftlm county. He graduated from Princeton University, and 
for a time had charge of a parish at Lewistown, his first regular charge being 
at Lawrenceville, where he died in 1864. He married Anna G. Patton, who 
survived her son as well as her husband, living in Washington (D. C.) for a 
number of years. The Patterson family is of Revolutionary stock. 

George Robert Patterson was born Nov. 9, 1863, in Lewistown, Mifllin 
county, where he was reared, receiving all his education in the public schools 
and academy there. Leaving school in 1880, he entered the employ of a large 
hardware house, and continued in that line of business until 1894. After 
several years' employment in his first association, during which time he had 
risei: to the responsibility of traveling salesman, he came to Ashland in March, 
1886, and formed a connection with the wholesale and retail hardware concern 
of Peter E. Buck & Sons, with whom he remained for several years. The 
last twelve years of his life he traveled as flour and feed salesman, first for 
a large firm at Lewistown and later for one of the big Minneapolis mills, 
covering territor)- in central Pennsylvania. Such is a brief record of his busi- 
ness career. It was prosperous and had greater possibilities for him. But he 
had lived a broader life than the routine of his business aft'orded. 

Always a Repitblican, Air. Patterson was actively interested in politics from 
young manhood, served a number of times as delegate to local and State con- 
ventions, and during his Congressional career as delegate to the National con- 
vention, held in Chicago, in June, 1904. Meantime, in 1900, he was elected 
to represent his district (the Twelfth) in the Fifty-seventh Congress, where 
his services met with such popular favor that he was reelected in 1902 and 
again in 1904, filling his third successive term at the time of his sudden death, 
the election statistics showing that he was chosen each time with increased 
support, on the last occasion by the largest plurality (5,414 votes) ever given 
to any candidate for any office on any ticket in the district, where Democratic 
officials have always been the rule. Such records tell more forcibly than words 
how much general approval his actions had won. On March 20, 1906, 
Mr. Patterson returned to Washington — after a visit home to Ashland — in 
response to a call from the speaker to be present at the next day's session. 
Arriving at the capital shortly after nine o'clock, he went direct to his mother's 
home at No. 1745 O street, N. W., where he met his private secretary, Burd W. 
Payne, with whom he spent a couple of hours going over the mail and talking 
on business matters. Beyond being tired after his long trip he was apparently 
in his usual health and spirits, and his mother was surprised to hear him 
astir about five the next morning. On going to his room she found him taking 
a dose of medicine, as he was not feeling well, but it seemed to be nothing 
alarming, and she left him after a few moments. Half an hour later she 
heard him moaning, and hurrying to his room found him in so serious condition 
that she summoned medical aid at once. Mr. Patterson passed away within a 
few moments, taken thus suddenly in his forty-third year and at the very 
height of his usefulness. 

The outpouring of sympathy and grief which Mr. Patterson's unexpected 
demise occasioned, in \\'ashington as well as in his home place, was the sincere 
expression of regret that one so beloved, so useful, so anxious to serve, should 
be cut ofif in the midst of a busy career, whose possibilities were only beginning 



72 SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 

to be realized. Mr. Patterson's remains were taken back to Ashland for 
burial, and the funeral services were conducted by Rev. Francis S. Hort, 
formerly of Ashland, at that time pastor of the Presbyterian Church of South 
Bethlehem, Pa. The services were simple, in accordance with Mr. Patterson's 
known tastes, and the profusion of beautiful floral tributes brought kindly 
messages of sympathy from his associates in all the walks of life — the various 
fraternal bodies to which he belonged, social, business and political friends in 
many parts of Pennsylvania, Washington and elsewhere. Hundreds of citizens 
of Ashland and other sections of Schuylkill county turned out to pay the last 
tribute of respect. Senator Penrose, and a number of members of the lower 
house, besides those appointed, came on a special train from Washington to 
attend the services. His colleague in Congress, Mr. Samuel, expressed the 
general feeling of the district in his address at the memorial services of the 
House of Representatives when he said : 

"The Twelfth Congressional district of Pennsylvania has no more popular 
and respected citizen than George R. Patterson. His long residence there has 
made him known to all the people. He was the kind of a man whom people 
liked. His good nature was spontaneous and always put those about him in 
good humor. He was very bright and cheerful, and gloom never had a part 
in his composition. He always had a good story and he knew how to tell it. 
And he was always a gentleman, ever courteous and agreeable. Kindness was 
one of his marked traits. It was never too much trouble for him to do a 
favor for a friend, and no one will ever know of his innumerable acts of kind- 
ness, both in his political and private life. Wherever he was he was the life 
of the party. His goodness of heart and mind fully covered any fault, if 
there was any fault in him. George R. Patterson was a clean man. There 
was no blot or stain on his character, private or public." 

It was Mr. Samuel who announced to the House the death of Mr. Patterson 
on the morning of March ar, 1906, and offered tl\e following resolutions: 

Resoh'ed, That the House has heard with profound sorrow of the death of Hon. 
George R. Patterson, a Representative from the State of Pennsylvania. 

Resolved, That a Committee of thirteen Members of the House, with such members 
of the Senate as may be joined, be appointed to attend the funeral. 

Resolved, That "the Sergeant-at-Arms be authorized and directed to take such steps 
as may be necessary for carrying out the provisions of these resolutions ; and that the 
necessary expenses in connection therewith be paid out of the contingent fund of the 
House. 

Resolved, That the Clerk communicate these resolutions to the Senate and transmit 
a copy thereof to the family of the deceased. 

After agreeing to the resolutions and appointing a committee the House 
adjourned until the next day as a mark of respect. On March 27th it was 
ordered that Sunday, April 15th, be set aside for "addresses on the life, 
character and public services of Hon. George R. Patterson," but on April 5th 
this was aiTiended, appointing April 22d for said services, which were accord- 
ingly held, the House meeting at twelve o'clock, noon. Mr. Cannon designated 
Hon. John Dalzell, of Pennsylvania, as speaker pro tempore, and resolutions 
were at once offered and adopted suspending the business of the House, to 
make opportunity for the services, and to adjourn immediately at their close. 
Mr. Samuel spoke fittingly of the work and worth of his distinguished col- 
league, of his signal fidelity and loyalty, of the honored respect in which he 
was held in his home community, and of his last hours and the many marks of 



SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 73 

esteem shown at the obsequies. "It is a great pleasure to-day to hear the 
candid and sincere praise bestowed upon our departed friend, even by those 
who sometimes differed with his judgment and convictions. He always fought 
a fair tight in the battle of life. It is not a difficult task to speak of him on 
this occasion, but he deserves a better eulogium than the writer is able to 
pronounce. We can comfort ourselves, however, with the fact that his life and 
character speak forcibly and eloquently for him. Death has made more vivid 
that which we felt was strong and symmetrical in him. It throws sunlight in 
among the shadows, so that we now appreciate him the more thoroughly." 

The address of Mr. Kline, of Pennsylvania, touched on so many points of 
Mr. Patterson's character with sympathetic understanding that we quote it in 
full: 

Mr. Speaker: 1 had not designed to take any part in these proceedings, but upon 
reflection I have thought that by reason of the contiguity of the respective districts 
represented by the deceased and myself it was due to the memory of the gentleman 
who has so recently and unexpectedly died that I should make a few observations. 

I had no acquaintance with George R. Patterson, who formerly represented the 
Twelfth Congressional district of Pennsylvania, known as the "Schuylkill district," until 
a considerable period after my election to the Fifty-eighth Congress. The intercourse 
I had with him from and after my first introduction in Congress and outside of these 
walls was of a most agreeable and delightful character. In coming to and returning 
from Washington I frequently met him on the train, and found him to be a frank, 
hospitable, happy, and open-hearted gentleman. I found him to be a good companion, 
genial, and of high and fascinating social qualities. 

His sudden and unexpected demise was a surprise and shock to every member of the 
House, and the great esteem in which he was held was evidenced by an adjournment 
immediately after the reading of the Journal and announcement of his death. To 
know him was to love him. 

Chosen to fill the honorable public position as a Representative in Congress for three 
consecutive terms, which he held at the time of his decease, he continued to discharge 
the obligations imposed with firmness and fidelity to the last, ever enjoying the con- 
fidence, esteem, and affection of his constituency. 

He represented a district in the heart of the anthracite coal region. His consti- 
tuency represented numerous nationalities, engaged in numerous and diversified kinds 
of trade, occupation, and business, and by reason thereof the political sentiment of his 
people had been for many years of a fluctuating character. Whilst a large majority of the 
county offices of his district, including the judges of the several courts, are now and 
have been filled by men of Democratic faith, the popularity and esteem of the deceased 
was so great and manifest that he was for three consecutive terms elected over his 
Democratic competitors by increasing majorities. 

His death was mourned by a large circle of friends, as was evidenced by the large 
number in attendance at his funeral, coming in froin all stations in life and from all 
parts of his district, in friendship's tribute to the memory of their deceased friend, 
neighbor and Representative. Had you been in attendance at his funeral, in his home 
town of .Ashland, in a mining locality, and witnessed the throng of thousands of his 
friends, neighbors, and those bound by fraternal union, who came from far and near 
to pay tlie last mark of respect to their deceased Representative; had you observed the 
profound impression which the recollection of his life and many good traits and virtues 
left upon an entire community, you would have concluded that there was something 
to live for beyond the attainment of political position. You would have realized that it 
is not all of life to live, nor all of death to die. 

The deceased was engaged in business before his entrance in public life and election 
to Congress. He did not make any pretense of oratory, leadership, or statesmanship. 
He was faithful and diligent in committee work, conscientious and active in the per- 
formance of the work assigned to him. He was always ready to help a friend or 
colleague if it was right and consistent and the request was just and reasonable. He 
would never consent to become compromised or commit an act of which he couldn't 
approve at the time or ratify in the future. Neither the railings of a partisan press nor 
the taunts of political opponents could swerve or deter him from the performance of 
such official duty as conscience told him he ought to do, nor could such influences 



74 SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 

compel him to tlie performance of what conscience taught him ought not to be done. 
He was a man of most kind and generous impulses, firmly and warmly attached to his 
family, friends, and acquaintances ; he was not vindictive, and these qualities combined 
to render him a most faithful Representative. 

It is true, as was said by a gentleman on the floor of this House a few days ago, 
that "e.vperience teaches us that the most effective work is done, not upon the floor 
of the House by the perpetual talkers, but by the quiet, active, and earnest members 
who attend strictly to their committee work ani;! give their thought and lime to such 
legislation as properly comes before the committees to which they are assigned." Such 
a meml>€r was the deceased. He was not a perpetual talker in the House, but did his most 
eff^ective work in the committee room and in attending faithfully and promptly to the 
demands and requests of his constituents. In this manner he gained his popularity 
among the membersliip of the House. 

Now, Mr. Speaker, it has frequently, through the later series of years, occurred to 
my mind that the man who is acknowledged by the community in which he lives to be 
an upright, conscientious, liberal and honest man, enjoys the best reputation that a man 
can have. A man _ who has qualifications and ability may connect himself with public 
life; he may come into your legislative halls and establish a reputation as an orator or a 
statesman; he may pursue some literary calling; he may win a reputation that is 
coextensive with the world ; but after all, when you come to form your estimate of 
the man, you must rely upon the character that he has established about his own 
threshold, at his own hearth, in his own family, and among his own neighbors. 
There is the standard by which we must measure a man after all is said and done. 
That is the cornerstone of 'his building: that is the groundwork of his fame, let it be 
what it may, and no fame is worth having that is not based upon a reputation for social 
and moral virtue| in the community where it is the man's destiny to live and perhaps 
his destiny to die. In his home, in his own community, among his neighbors and 
friends, George R. Patterson acquired and enjoyed his first fame and great popularity. 
There the foundations were laid for his entrance into public life, where he equally 
acquired and enjoyed the confidence and good will of all who knew him. He was 
strong and robust, active, busy, and energetic in life, but, like all who have preceded 
him, he, too, was mortal. 

We who survive the deceased and who for a brief hour continue to strut upon this 
our public stage find it hard to stop and think, to realize that we, too, are mortal, and 
that our hearts 

"Like muffled drums, are beating 
Funeral marches to the grave." 

It is but a bubble we are blowing. No matter how largely we swell in our conceit, 
how magnificent we e-\-pand our proportions, the bubble will 'finallv burst for us, as it 
has done in the case of our illustrious predecessors, and we shall return to the obscurity 
frorn which we came, unhonored and unsung. And even if we succeed in securing 
public attention for more than one or two or three or more terms of our Congressional 
life, by a most persistent effort or efforts in blowing our bubble, others will soon crowd 
us off the scene of action and strut their brief hour of fancied greatness and renown. 
"This is the state of man: to-day he puts forth 
The tender leaves of hope ; to-morrow blossoms, 
.^nd bears his blushing honors thick upon him; 
The third day comes a frost, a killing frost, 
-'\nd when he thinks, good easy man. full surely 
His greatness is a-ripening, nips its root." 

My object has been accomplished if I have succeeded in arresting the attention of 
my fellow-members by this brief contemplation of the life and death of our late friend 
and colleague. Let us emulate his good qualities and realize that it is not all of life 
to reach public station, nor all of duty to distinguish oneself in the fitful notoriety of 
the passing hour. 

Following- Mr. Kline's address were the tributes from Mr. Hog-g-, of 
Colorado ; Mr. Dale, Mr. Lafean and Mr. Schneebeli, all of Pennsylvania : 
Mr. Aiken.of South Carolina; and Mr. Goulden. of New York. It is reniarkr 
able that his personality, viewed from so many different angles, made at least 
one impression comtnon to all — the kindliness of nature of which his courtesy, 
his helpfulness to new members, and his willingness to do a favor at whatever 



SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 75 

sacrifice of his own time and interests, were but the everyday expressions. 
We have not space for all, but some remarks typical of the animating spirit of 
all deserve a place here. 

Mr. Hogg: "He came from the field at noontime, and did not return to his 
task. The plow was left in the furrow when the darkness came . . . and 
he left his work unfinished, as we would measure it. I had not known him 
long, but I knew him well, all that was worth knowing — the soul of him — and 
admired him much. Our view of him was not obscured, for it was a pleasing 
landscape, with the sunshine resting on it. His nature was so open, generous, 
and manly that we instinctively gave him our tribute of sincerest friendship. 
. . . Honest, just, and generous, with a great heart overflowing with warm 
human sympathy, George Patterson left the only fortune worth while, the 
memory of his kindliness." 

Mr. Dale, after speaking of his love for his native State, referred particu- 
larly to his unselfishness : "For his friends, no task was too heavy for him to 
attempt, no work too onerous for him to perform, no favor too great for his 
generous heart to grant. Surely his unselfish devotion to others, his ready 
willingness to sacrifice his own time and his own pleasure in the interest of 
others, entitled him to wear the princely motto, Teh dien' — I serve." 

Mr. Lafean: "He carried sunshine with him wherever he went and always 
had a good word for everybody. His genial disposition made him popular at 
home and in Washington, particularly among the Members of the House. At 
the time of his death he was one of the dominant forces of the Pennsylvania 
delegation. To know him intimately as I knew him was a privilege which I 
shall always treasure. Association with him was a pleasure, not only because 
of the brilliancy of his wit and statesmanship, but for the mellowing and 
gladdening influence of his kindly geniality. . . . 

"During the latter part of last fall I invited Mr. Patterson to meet me at 
Gettysburg for the purpose of going over several tracts of land owned by the 
Gettysburg Springs and Hotel Company, which the Gettysburg Battlefield 
Commission was desirous of purchasing. Notwithstanding the fact that he 
was exceedingly busy shaping up his private business aft'airs in order that he 
might assume the more active of his Congressional duties, and that his time 
was more than occupied in~-his endeavor to retain a friend in office whose 
removal was urged by others, he kindly came and spent two days in going 
over that famous field, in order that he might assist in bringing the matter of 
that purchase of this property before the House Committee on Military Affairs, 
of which he was a member. Self-sacrifice such as this is what has endeared 
Mr. Patterson not only to his constituents, but to his many friends and 
colleagues. . . . 

"While a Republican, and a stanch one, Mr. Patterson was by no means a 
bitter partisan. His first thought was for his constituency and the welfare of 
the country. On all public questions he took lofty grounds and was liberal in 
his views. I could go on extolling his good qualities, but in my opinion they 
can be svmimed up in a few words : He was a man and a friend." 

Mr. Schneebeli : "His dear family has reason to be proud of his achieve- 
ments in Congress, and his name will be handed down to his posterity enshrined 
in honor. Yet, aside from all the glamour of temporary greatness, we revere 
the memory of George Patterson as a man whom we admired, respected, and 
loved." 

Mr. Aiken: "The deceased came not from the ranks of the professional 



76 SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PEXXSYL\"AXL\ 

class, so overwhelmingly represented in Congress, but he came from the people, 
elevated from amongst them, with the glow of popular demands fresh upon 
his mind and with a sympathy of interest that the formalism of professional 
life would almost make impossible. In this day of action rather than words, 
even in the American Congress, his usefulness may not be discounted by the 
most profound constitutional lawyer of this body. Legislation is as much the 
result of the hand touch of the committee as the hair splitting of the forum. 
We recognize the general proposition that education gives its possessor an 
advantage o\er illiteracy, and professional education tends to emphasize that 
advantage. But he who, with a simple English education, in a body largely 
dominated by professional men, can set at naught legal quibblings and fully 
maintain the rights of his constituents, must possess those qualities of mind 
less lustrous, but no less valuable in the attainment of results, than polished 
oratory. Such were the qualities of mind and heart with which our friend was 
endowed. Genial always, he was aggressive, yet unobtrusive ; quiet, yet ever 
alert and untiring in the discharge of his duty to his constituents; a strict party 
man in so far as that obligation bound in reason, yet tolerant and reasonable 
in his dealings with the opposition." 

Mr. Goulden : "A Pennsylvanian by birth, he was thoroughly American 
in education and training, a product of the school system which is so distinctive 
a mark of our civilization. If in these days it be a reproach to be rich, then 
he was free from taint, for the worldly goods he possessed were obtained by 
hard work, by a strict attention to duty, and by honesty and fair dealing. He 
was a typical American business man, and was a valiant soldier in the ranks 
of that army which has won such creditable victories for American prosperity. 
That he was respected by his friends and neighbors is attested by their selection 
of him to represent them in party councils and the nation's legislative halls; 
and as it is safe to say that the most reliable testimony to any man's worth is 
that of the people who live closest to him, then he needs no greater eulogy than 
the record of his three successive elections to Congress, the last by the greatest 
majority ever given to a candidate for any office in the district. . . . He 
had been long enough in Congress to have thoroughly mastered its traditions, 
its intricate machinery, and its possibilities, and was therefore in a fair way 
to become one of its leaders and a credit to his State and the nation. He was 
constantly growing in power and influence, but used it in the simple, old- 
fashioned American way which endeared so many of our elder statesmen to 
the hearts of their followers." 

Resolutions were also passed by the Senate, which adjourned for the day, 
March 21st. 

Besides the duties referred to Mr. Patterson served as member of the 
House committee on Pensions. 

Mr. Patterson was a member of the Presbyterian Church at Ashland and 
especially interested in its Sunday school, which he served as librarian. He 
was prominent in the local fraternal organizations, belonging to Ashland Lodge, 
No. 384, B. P. O. Elks; Shenandoah Aerie, No. 129, F. O. E. ; Sheridan 
Council, No. 128, R. A. ; and Washington Camp No. 84, P. O. S. of A. 

On Oct. 27, 1892, Mr. Patterson was married in Philadelphia to Mary A. 
Cleaver, a native of Ashland, daughter of James R. and .Adeline (Clayton) 
Cleaver, of Ashland, and they had two children, Granville P. and Esther M. 
The son is now taking a course at Bucknell University, Lewistown, Pa. ; the 
daughter is at home with her mother. The family home was at No. 119 Centre 



SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENNSYLVANLA. 77 

street, Ashland. After the death of her liusband Mrs. Patterson was appointed 
postmistress at Ashland, and she continued to hold the position until the early 
part of 1914, discharging its important duties with intelligent appreciation of 
the requirements. 

Jesse B. Cleaver, Mrs. Patterson's grandfather, was an early settler in 
Columbia county, Pa., where he ended his days.. By occupation he was a 
farmer. His son, James R. Cleaver, born in Columbia county in 1820, came 
to Ashland when quite young, and learning the trade of carpenter followed it 
for some time. Later, however, he became interested as a coal operator and 
developed the business until he rankeil among the most extensive operators of 
his day in the State, becoming quite wealthy. This was during the period 
that the Molly ALigviires were active. He was prominent in public affairs in the 
city and county and active in politics, being the first treasurer of Schuylkill 
county. In 1877 he removed with his family to Kansas, but returned to Ash- 
land in 1880. Then he engaged in the lumber business, on an extensive scale, 
carrying it on until his removal to Philadelphia in 1892. In that city he passed 
away May 20, 1898. His wife, Adeline (Qaytonj, survived until Jan. 20, 
1909. Her parents, William and Elizabeth (Metz) Clayton, were natives of 
Columbia county. Pa., and farming people. Six children as follows were born 
to Mr. and Airs. James R. Cleaver; Emma C. is deceased; Harriet is the 
wife of I. R. Reifsnyder, of Philadelphia; Henry is deceased; Clara, deceased, 
was the wife of George M. Krause, of Milton, Pa.; Mary A. is the widow of 
George Robert Patterson ; Edith is engaged in teaching in Philadelphia. 

DANIEL FRACK, the first settler at what is now the borough of Frack- 
ville, Schuylkill county, was deservedly honored in having the place named 
for him, and though a quarter of a century has elapsed since his death his 
memory is still cherished by many of its residents. A man of enterprise, 
energy and progressive nature, he had a long and successful business career 
in Schuylkill county, and in the pursuit of his private interests also gave 
valuable assistance to the advancement of the community wherever he was 
situated. His activities during almost forty years were centered at Frackville, 
in whose present prosperity may still be found traces of his influence. 

Mr. Frack was born Sept. 23, 1803, in Northampton county. Pa., of which 
county his father, Michael Frack, was also a native. Michael Frack was a 
farmer and passed his life in Northampton and Lehigh counties. Pa., dying in 
the latter county. By his marriage to Hannah Ruch he had eight children, 
four sons and four daughters. Daniel, the eldest son, was a boy when the 
family settled in Lehigh county in 1810, and he worked on his father's farm 
there throughout his boyhood, in fact until he was almost twenty-five years 
old. The only schooling he had was obtained in three months' attendance at 
the small county school near home, and he did not have this privilege until 
just after he was twenty-one. He continued to reside in Lehigh county until 
1832. In 1825 he married, and three years thereafter lived on the home farm, 
which was near Ironton. In 1828 he became interested in the hotel business 
at Ruchville, being engaged there for three years, and in the spring of 1832 
he brought his family to St. Clair, Schuylkill county, where he kept hotel for 
the next twenty years. Meantime, in 1836, he and Michael Seltzer, under the 
firm name of Seltzer & Frack, had started a powder mill at St. Clair, the first 
one above Pottsville, for the manufacture of blasting powder. In 1838 he 
was a member of the firm of Frack, Schaeffer & Co., of St. Clair, who 



78 SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENNSYLVAXLA. 

embarked in the coal business that year, his partners being Daniel Schaeffer 
and Frederick Frey, and they operated a colliery at \\'adesville, this county. 
Mr. Frack also kept a general store at St. Clair. In 1849 he bought a tract of 
166 acres from James C. Stephens, part of which is now included in the 
borough of Frackville, and moved his family thereon from St. Clair in the 
year 1852. The only building on the place was a sawmill, which Mr. Frack 
converted in 1852 into a dwelling and hotel, conducting the same himself 
until 1861. In the latter year he laid off part of his land into town lots, 
including all that part of the present borough lying east of the north and 
south alley between Balliet and Nice streets, and at once opened up all the 
streets now in that portion of the borough. It was known from the beginning 
as Frackville. For a few years after his removal to this locality he engaged 
in farming, but he retired from arduous labor in 1861, and spent the rest of 
his life at Frackville in comparative leisure. He died there Nov. 7, 1890. 
From early boyhood Mr. Frack was a member of the Lutheran Church, and he 
was a leader in religious activities as in everything else which interested him, 
being a prominent worker in Zion's Gennan Lutheran congregation at Frack- 
ville, serving as elder and trustee. 

On Aug. 21, 1825, Mr. P>ack married Mary M. Balliet, who was bom 
Aug. 2, 1803, daughter of Joseph and Margaretta (Burger) Balliet, and died 
Jan. 23, 1886. They had three children: Leonora, born Oct. 26, 1828, who 
married John S. Meredith; Samuel, born July 22, 1832; and Daniel B., born 
March 13, 1842. Samuel was born in North Whitehall township, Lehigh 
county, and married Mary Harriet Welker, of Oil City, Pa. Daniel B. Frack, 
born at St. Clair, Schuylkill county, began his education there, and came to 
Frackville with his parents in 1852. He was twice married, his first wife being 
EHsabeth Seitzinger, after whose death he married her sister, Sarah A. Seit- 
zinger. 

JOHN S. MEREDITH was born April 7, 1826, at Thompsontown, 
Juniata Co., Pa., eldest of the family of John and Elisabeth (Stauft'er) Mere- 
dith. He spent his mature life in Schuylkill county, worked at Derr's foundry 
at Pottsville, and was recruiting officer at Pottsville and St. Clair during the 
Mexican war. In 1852 he moved with the Fracks to Frackville. In 1862 he 
joined the 137th Pennsylvania Volunteer Regiment, belonging to Company K, 
of Ashland, Schuylkill county. He died of typhoid fever in the Emery 
hospital, at Washington, D. C, on March 11, 1863. 

On April 8, 1848, Mr. Meredith was married, at Pottsville, Pa., to Leonora 
Frack, and they had a family of seven children, bom as follows: Mary 
Ehzabeth, Sept. 13, 1849; Samuel Frack, Dec. 3, 1850; James C. S., Aug. 2, 
1852; Joseph Balhet, Jime 28, 1854; John Gilbert, May 14, 1856; Asa Balliet, 
Sept. 28, i860; Margiieretta Caroline, Jan. 11, 1863. Mary E. is unmarried 
and lives with her mother at Frackville. Samuel Frack Meredith married 
Mrs. Emma Flynn, at South Easton, Pa., Dec. 22, 1878; he died Nov. 15. 1896, 
in Colorado. James C. S. Meredith was married Aug. 25, 187 1, to Lena Miller, 
who died Feb. 13, 1890; he lives in Jersey City, N. J. Joseph Balliet Meredith 
married Mary Ann Curtis on May 6, 1882, and they live in Cedar Rapids, 
Iowa. John Gilbert married Margaret Augtista jMerkert on Oct. 30, 1890; 
he died Dec. iq, 1901. Asa Balliet Meredith married Mayme Riley, antl they 
live in Jersey City, N. J. Margueretta Caroline Meredith married Aaron W. 



i 



SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA • 79 

Houtz on Jan. 23, 1887; they live in Orwigsburg, Schuylkill county, Penn- 
sylvania. 

RICHARD K. LE\'AN, though one of the older citizens of Minersville, 
is still taking a leading part in the administration of municipal alTairs there, 
being at present tiie chief burgess. Pie is a native of Minersville, born Nov. 
20, 1838, son of Joseph Leyan, through whom he traces his descent from one 
of the very oldest families of this Commonwealth. 

The Levans are of French Huguenot ancestry. Daniel Levan, the first 
ancestor of whom we have record, fled from Picardy, France, to Amsterdam 
during the Huguenot persecution. He was married in France to Marie Beau. 
The family in America of which we write was founded by three of his sons, 
Jacob, Isaac and Abraham. A fourth brother accompanied them when they 
started for this country, one, however, dying before their arrival. The other 
three settled in Berks county, Pa., one in Oley township, one in Maxatawny, 
and one in Exeter. 

Records show that Isaac Levan, the brother who settled in Exeter, came 
to that section about 1730, this fact being established by the dates on the land 
grants made to him — 1731, 1734 and 1737-38 — there, as well as grants made 
him along the Schuylkill river, aggregating in all over one thousand acres, 
most of which was in Exeter township. Some of the property has remained 
in the family ever since. He built a tannery on the second land grant, on 
the site of Brumbach Brothers woolen mill in St. Lawrence, and in 1758 sold 
it with nine acres to John Fisher, and aftenvards conveyed the first grant 
and the remaining 123 acres of the second grant to his son Jacob. He was 
engaged in farming until the latter part of his life, in 1770 moving to Reading, 
Pa., where he died in August, 1786. He was born in Holland in 1700. To 
him and his wife, Mary Margaret, were born the following children : Abraham, 
Isaac, Daniel, Jacob, Mary (wife of Peter Feathers), and Judith (wife of 
Samuel Weiser). 

Jacob Levan, another of the three brothers, is said to have come to America 
in 1717 with his two brothers. He became the owner of large tracts of land 
in and around Kutztown, his residence being at the old Levan mill, near Eagle 
Point. He was a man of great prominence, was a judge of Berks county for 
ten years, and during the French and Indian war was directed by the English 
to provision Fort Allen. In 1742 he was visited by Cotmt Zinzendorf, the 
distinguished Lutheran missionary, who preached from the balcony of the 
old mill to a large concourse of people. Sebastian Levan, elder son of this 
immigrant, was the most distinguished man in all northeastern Berks, serving 
as a colonel in the Revolutionary war, and as a member of the Committee of 
Safety, and of the Executive Council. He lived on the old mill homestead. It 
is known he had a son Jacob. 

Joseph Levan, father of Richard K. Levan, was born in Kutztown, Berks 
Co., Pa. He followed farming in his native county. Coming to Minersville in 
1828 he was one of the pioneers of that town, which then consisted of only a 
few houses, and wolves were still plentiful in the region. Here he engaged in 
the butcher business, being the first in that line at the place, and he continued 
it for several years. For some time he was employed at the foundry located 
on the site where the residence of his son, Capt. James H. Levan, afterwards 
stood, and he also followed various other occupations. He had the misfortune 
to injure one of his knee caps in an accident, having had a fall at the corner 



80 SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 

of Second and Sunbury streets, Alinersville, and he was always lame after- 
wards. He lived to the advanced age of ninety-three years, dying at Miners- 
ville, and he is buried in the Miners\-ille cemetery. His wife, Martha (Russell), 
a native of England, died two years later, at the age of eighty-four years. 
Of the seven children bom to them, four grew to maturity, namely: Richard 
K. ; James H., born Eeb. i, 1841, a well known resident of Minersville, now 
deceased ; Addie, widow of Theodore Roerigh, residing at Minersville ; and 
George, living at Altoona, Pennsylvania. 

Richard K. Levan was reared at Minersville, and in his boyhood had the 
advantages of the local schools, later attending the militarj' school at Reading 
for two terms, 1850-51. Returning to Minersville, he taught school one term 
in Mahanoy \'alley, and then began an apprenticeship to the machinist's trade, 
which he followed in all for the long period of thifty-eight years, for twenty- 
two years in the employ of the Philadelphia & Reading Coal & Iron Company, 
at Pottsville, this county. 

Mr. Levan has been a trusted worker among the borough officials. He 
served one term as a member of the borough council, and a few years ago was 
appointed chief burgess by the courts of Schuylkill county. He was then 
elected to succeed himself, receiving a large majority, and his conscientious 
service in the furtherance of the best interests of the community has made 
him deserving of the confidence which his fellow citizens have shown in him. 
When a young man Mr. Levan served three months as drimi major of the 
5th Pennsylvania Infantry, and during the Civil war he served as dnmi major 
of the 129th Pennsylvania \'olunteers. He was one of the organizers of 
George J. Lawrence Post, No. 17, G. A. R., of which he has been adjutant 
for the last twenty-eight years ; he has also been post commander. Mr. Levan 
was one of the organizers of the Sons of Veterans Camp at Minersville, and 
he is an honored member of same. For a number of years he was active in 
the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and is a past officer. Mr. Levan has 
led a life of unquestioned probity, and he holds the unqualified esteem of his 
fellow citizens in and around Minersville. 

Mr. Levan married Hannah Reed, daughter of Alexander Reed, and she 
is deceased. Of the six children born to this union three survive : Willard, 
now located at Shamokin, Pa., as assistant master mechanic for the Philadel- 
phia & Reading Coal & Iron Company; Richard L., at home; and Sadie, the 
wife of Harry Atkinson, living at Alinersville. 

DILLMAX FAMILY. Eli.vs Dihlmann was born in 1686 in the town of 
Nussdorf, Wurtemberg, Germany. In the early part of the eighteenth century 
he moved to Illingen, Germany — two miles from Nussdorf. He died there in 
1756. Elias Dihlmann or Diehlmann had a son Jacob Dihlmann, who in turn 
had three sons, namely, Jacob Dillmann, Jr., Andrew Dillmann, and Elias Dill- 
mann, Jr. These sons changed the spelling of the name to Dillmann and after 
their emigration to America they dropped the final "n." 

In 1725 Jacob Dillman, Jr., and Andrew, his brother, came to the English 
colonics in America, Jacob settling in \'irginia and Andrew in W'esteni Penn- 
sylvania, in what is now Adams county. Louis M. Dillman, of New York City 
(who is president of the American Book Company), and his son Louis C. 
Dillman, of Chicago ( secretary of the Dillman Family Association of the 
United States), are descended from Jacob Dillman, Jr. 

On Sept. 24, 1737. the sons of Elias Dillman, Jr., Hans George Dillman 



SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 81 

ami lleinrich Jacob Dillman, landed in Philadelphia, having crossed the Atlantic 
in the ship "X'irginius Grace." On a September day fourteen years later 
(Sept. i6, 1751) Hans George Dillman, Jr., sailed on the ship "Brothers," 
presumably with his widowed mother and younger brother Anthony. They 
settled in Heidelberg township, Berks Co., Pa. Having heard of the successes 
of his relati\es in the Colonies, George Frederick Dillman set sail in the ship 
"Neptune" Oct. 7, 1755, to try his fortunes in the New World. He settled 
in what is now known as Northumberland county, Pa. Hans George Dillman, 
Jr., eventually settled in what is now known as Perry county, Pa. His great- 
great-grandson is Prof. A. D. T. Dillman, of Antis township, Blair Co., Penn- 
sylvania. 

The Dillmans were represented in the Fatherland by Dr. Theodore Dill- 
mann, of Berlin, Germany ; and by Dr. Christian Frederick August Dillmann 
(a German Orientalist), who was born at lUingen, Wurtemberg, April 25, 
1823. He became a Protestant Theologian and Orientalist, and an authority 
on the Ethiopian Language and Literature and Old Testament Criticism. He 
was professor at the Berlin University from 1869 until the time of his death, 
in 1894. 

The branch of the family known to Schuylkill countians are descended 
from Anthony Dillman, who came to this country with his widowed mother in 
175 1. He married Susanna Kalbach, of Berks county, and had the following 
children: Anthony Dillman, Jr., Susanna Dillman (married a Mr. Ball), 
Sabilla Dillman (married a Mr. Koch, of Schuylkill Haven), Peter Dillman 
(married Susanna Krause), Barbara Dillman (married a Mr. Saltzer, of 
Lykens), and Adam Dillman (married Katherine Krause). Not much is 
known of Anthony Dillman, Sr., except that he was an ardent patriot, aiding 
the Continental soldiers when they passed his home on their march to relieve 
the distress of those who had suffered during the Wyoming massacre. He was 
a farmer and a trapper. 

Peter Dillman was the fourth child of Anthony Dillman. He was bom 
in Heidelberg township, Berks county, in 1781, and followed the occupations 
of farming, lumbering, fishing and trapping. Pie married Susanna Krause in 
1807, and they had seventeen children, eight of whom grew to maturity. We 
have mention of: Margaret Dillman (married Jacob Kruger, of Ringtown), 
Daniel Krause Dillman (married Katherine Dunkelberger), Mary Dillman 
(married John Schneider, of Ashland), George Dillman (died young), Jarnes 
Dillman (married Agnes Brocius, of Shenandoah), Lucyanna Dillman (married 
thrice — Jeremiah James, James Boyle, Philip Powell), Sarah Dillman (married 
James Connelly, of Barry), Charles Dillman (married Elizabeth Rice, of, Ash- 
land) and Peter Dillman, Jr. (married Lydia Neff, of Tamaqua). 

After his marriage in 1807 Peter Dillman, Sr., and his wife came to the 
site where Pottsville now stands to make their home; but his wife, feeling too 
lonely so far from kindred and friends, persuaded her husband to sell their 
land to John Pott (who subsequently founded Pottsville in 1809), and they 
moved to Fountain Springs. The ground upon which the present State 
Hospital now stands was the site of the Dillman homestead. Here he reared 
his large family and spent his declining years, which were years of affliction. 
Having been struck in the eye by a piece of timber in his young manhood, his 
sight became impaired, so the last ten years of his life were spent in total 
blindness. He served his country bravely in the second war with England and 
received an honorable discharge. He died in 1858 at the old homestead at 

Vol. 1—6 



82 SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PEXNSYLVAXL\ 

Fountain Springs. His wife Susanna (Krause) Dillman was born in Chester 
county in 1786 and came to Berks county in 1800 with her father, George 
Krause. She was a woman of superior abihty and attainments, noted for her 
straight-forward and outspoken manner — a quality inherited by many of her 
descendants. Her advantages for educational and social culture were limited 
in her day by the condition of the country when she was a girl, born with the 
generation immediately succeeding the Revolutionary war in America, when 
the land was impoverished in resource, and no schools had been established. 
If it was a period of poverty then, it was one of energy and heroism, when men 
and women were struggling into prosperity. She had the ordinary acquire- 
ments of a rudimentary education, but was especially gifted in needle and 
embroidery work — accomplishments of high order in that day. She lived to 
the age of ninety-three years, dying in November, 1879. Her pastor at her 
funeral services stated that she had been the mother of seventeen children 
and at the time of her death she had one hundred and seventy-two grand- 
children, fifty-two great-grandchildren and ten great-great-grandchildren. She 
is buried in the Barry Evangelical Church yard. 

Daniel Krause Dillman. the eldest son of Peter Dillman, Sr., was born 
at Fountain Springs in 1809. He received his education in the district schools. 
Inheriting the self-reliance and fortitude of his mother, Susanna (Krause) 
Dillman, he early learned to work and toil, finally attaining success in the 
battle of life. He taught school at Fountain Springs, Wadesville and Port 
Carbon in their early days. When he was not employed at teaching, he 
followed the occupations of farming and lumbering in the thickly wooded 
sections of Schuylkill and Northumberland counties. In 1833 he became 
captain of the canalboat which plied its way between IMount Carbon and 
Philadelphia. It was at this time that he met Katherine Dunkelberger, as his 
boat passed her home on the canal. They were married in 1835, living for a 
while in Maiden-creek township, Berks county (at the Dunkelberger home- 
stead). They then took up their residence in Schuylkill county, residing at 
Wadesville and Port Carbon. In 1848 Daniel K. Dillman became outside 
foreman at the Phoenix Park colliery, and was employed there until 1859. At 
this time he purchased a farm at Llewellyn, where he continued to live until 
1890. The last two years of his life were spent with his daughter, Catherine 
(Dillman) Starr. He was a tall man, strong both mentally and physically, 
stern — one of the old school. His motto seemed to be : 

"But to him who bareth his arm to the strife. 
Firm at his post in the battle of life, 
The victory faileth never." 

He died Sept. i, 1892, and is buried at Clouser's Church, by the side of 
his wife. Mrs. Katherine (Dunkelberger) Dillman was born in Maiden-creek 
township, Berks county, in 1814, and died in 1888. She was endowed with 
superior mental abilities. In her day the advantages for educational and social 
culture were limited, but she was fond of reading on all subjects. She was an 
adept with the needle and embroidery — accomplishments of high order in her 
time. Her tenderness and self-sacrificing spirit were beautiful, and all the 
motherly instincts of a noble woman were developed in her character. She 
was a member of the Reformed Church. There were ten children bom to 
Daniel K. and Katherine (Dunkelberger) Dillman, six girls and four boys, as 
follows: Amelia J. Dillman (1835-1914) married John Hubler, of Barry, 



SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENNSYLVANL\ 83 

Schuylkill county; Daniel Dunkelberger Dillman (1836-1872), a lawyer of 
Pottsville, married Isabel Catherine Bowman; Susanna Dillman (1840-1908) 
married David Johnathan Evans, of Gilberton, formerly of Minersville, Pa., 
ant! Ithaca, N. Y. ; William Dillman (1842-1912), of New Brunswick, N. J., 
married Marietta Purnell; Henry Clay Dillman (1844), ff Parkersburg, W. 
\'a., married Mrs. Mary O'Donnell ; Catherine Magdelina Dillman (1846), of 
Llewellyn, Pa., married Jacob Starr; Emma Mary Dillman (1848-1849) died 
of croup; Elizabeth Anna Dillman (1851) married Henry Christ, of Pine 
Grove; John Dillman (1855-1856) died of croup at the village of Phoenix 
Park; Mary Anne Dillman (1857) married Joseph Boden, mine superintendent 
at Donaldson, and later moved to Shamokin. 

Daniel D. Dillman, the eldest son of Daniel K. Dillman and Katherine 
(Dunkelberger) Dillman, was born in Maiden-creek township, east of Mohrs- 
ville, Berks Co., Pa., Dec. 26, 1S36. When six years old he attended his father's 
school at Fountain Springs, and later went to the schools at Wadesville and 
Phoenix Park, also taught by his father. At the age of twelve he entered the 
company store at Phoenix Park (Schuylkill county). During the winter 
months he taught school, studying at night in the store room loft where he 
slept. He entered the Poughkeepsie Law School in 1859 and graduated with 
merit. After leaving college he taught school, and was admitted to practice 
at the Schuylkill county bar in i860. At the outbreak of the Rebellion he 
responded to the call of Abraham Lincoln for the first 75.000 troops to serve 
for three months. He enlisted April 22, 1861, becoming a private in Company 
H under Capt. Charlemagne Tower, of the 6th Regiment, Pennsyhania 
Volunteers, Col. James Nagle commanding. Some of the companies of this 
regiment were the first troops at the capital, immediately entering into active 
and strenuous ser\'ice. At the expiration of the term of service the regiment 
was mustered out, on July 22, 1861. The regiment was complimented by the . 
brigadier general for "their excellent and gallant service. He also served in 
the 2d Regiment, Pennsylvania Militia, in 1862, and the 27th Regiment, Penn- 
sylvania Volunteer Militia, in 1863, during the Emergency. In 1864 he sailed 
around Cape Horn, South America, and located in San Francisco, practicing 
law there and in the vicinity for several years. Returning to Schuylkill county, 
he located in Mahanoy City in 1867, and in 1868 he went to Pottsville and 
formed the law firm of Dillman and Seltzer. He also engaged in the coal 
business near Llewellyn in 1871. 

Daniel D. Dillman was a charter member of Camp No. 72, P. O. S. of A., 
of Mahanoy City, and also a charter member of Camp No. 36, P. O. S. of A., 
of Pottsville. He also was a charter member of the Humane Fire Company 
and Severn Post, G. A. R., of Mahanoy City; was a member of Pulaski Lodge, 
F. & A. M., Pottsville, and General Grant Lodge, I. O. O. F., Mahanoy City. 
He was an attendant of the Episcopal Church, although leaning towards 
Universalism. In politics he was a Republican, and the year he died he was 
chairman of the Republican county committee. 

On March 4, 1869, Daniel D. Dillman was united in marriage to Miss 
Isabel C. Bowman, daughter of Peter Bowman, coal operator of Mahanoy City. 
Three children were born to them : Daniel Walter Dillman, civil engineer, of 
Altoona, Pa.; Robert John Dillman (died 1876); Anna Augusta Dillman 
(Mrs. T. L. Thomas), of Mahanoy City. Daniel D. Dillman died Sept. 7, 
1872, of smallpox contracted during the epidemic of that year, and is buried 
in the Charles Baber Cemetery at Pottsville. 



84 SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 

D. Walter Dillman, eldest son of Daniel D. Dillman, is a civil and mining 
engineer, located at Altoona, Pa. He was born at Pottsville Dec. 9, 1869. 
After his father's death he came with his mother to Mahanoy City, where he 
received his education in the public schools, graduating in the class of 1887. 
He entered the Lehigh Valley engineer corps at Lost Creek, and afterwards 
was located at Mauch Chunk, Sayre (Pa.), Buffalo and Rochester, N. Y. He 
then went with the Harbison-Walker Company, of Lock Haven, afterwards 
locating at Altoona. He is borough engineer for Lilly, Cresson, Mount Union 
and Gallitzin, Pa. He was the surveyor that constructed the sanatorium for 
tubercular patients at Cresson, Pa. Fraternally he belongs to Mahanoy City 
Lodge, No. 357, F. & A. M., and Camp No. 124, P. O. S. of A., Mahanoy City. 

AtTGUSTA A. DiLLM.\N, Only daughter of Daniel D. Dillman, Esq., was born 
in Pottsville, but with the exception of the first three months of her life has 
lived in Mahanoy City. She graduated from the Mahanoy City high school 
in the class of 189 1, and from the West Chester State Normal School in the 
class of 1893, having taught one year before going to Normal School. She 
taught for a number of years in the grammar grades of Mahanoy City. She is 
a Chautauqua graduate of the class of 1898, having sixteen Chautauqua seals 
attached to her diploma. She is a member of the board of directors of the 
Visiting Nurses' Association of Mahanoy City, a member of the Geographic 
Society at Washington, D. C, first treasurer of the Equal Franchise Party of 
Mahanoy City, member of Liberty Bell Chapter, Daughters of the Revolution, 
at Philadelphia, also a member of the Daughters of the .\merican Re\olution 
at W'ashington, D. C, and is historian for the Dillman, Bowman and Thomas 
families. She has traveled extensively in the United States and Canada, 
having been in twenty-seven States of the Union. On Feb. 21, 1901, she was 
united in marriage to Thomas Lewis Thomas, a wholesale grocer of Mahanoy 
City. Three daughters and one son were born to them, two of whom survive. 
Muriel Isabel and \"ivian Mary Thomas ; both are members of the Junior 
Daughters of the Revolution. 

Amelia J. Dillman, eldest daughter of Daniel K. Dillman, was born Oct. 
30, 1835, in Maiden-creek township, Berks county. She married John Hubler 
May 29, 1852. They were among the first settlers at Barry (near Gordon), 
owned 132 acres of farming land there, and built a fine homestead on it. She 
was a charter member of the Barry Evangelical Church and was of a faithful, 
kind, cheerful and generous nature. Her children are: Howard H. Hubler, 
of Gordon: Esther A. Hubler ( 1854-1880), who married John Weiss; Daniel 
O. Hubler ( 1856-1882) ; Emma M. Hubler, who married "Oliver I. Frey; Sil- 
vester J. Hubler (1861-1909) ; William Ellsworth Hubler ( 1863-1863) ; Edgar 
D. Hubler; Arthur S. Hubler ( 1867-1871) ; Uphama A. Hubler, who married 
William P. Eifert; Charles W. Hubler, of Barry; Laura A. Hubler, married 
to William Hunter ; and Allen E. Hubler, of Barry. 

Hozvard H. Hubler was born in Branch township. Schuylkill county, Nov. 8, 
1852. He attended the schools in Butler township, and started to work as 
errand boy with his father on the train at the age of twelve. He was promoted 
to brakeman in 1872. and then to conductor in 1875. On June 4, 1878. he was 
promoted to the position of fireman, and on Jan. 23. 1882, he became engineer, 
which position he has held ever since. He is a member of F. & .\. M. Lodge 
No. 294, of Ashland, Griscom Chapter, R. A. M., and Prince of Peace Com- 
mandery. No. 39. of Ashland. Rajah Temple, A. A. O. N. M. S., of Reading, 
and the .\. A. S. R., of Williamsport ; a member of the Royal Arcanum of 



SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 85 

Ashland ; of the Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers at Tamaqua ; of the 
P. & R. R. Association, and a member of the P. and R. R. Veteran Association 
of Philadelphia. He also belongs to the Knights of the Golden Eagle at 
Gordon and is their treasurer. Howard H. Hubler is a member of the 
Methodist Episcopal Church of Gordon, being its secretary, and is also a 
trustee. He has been a school director four terms and is secretary of that 
organization. On Dec. 25, 1880, he married Selina J. Klinger, of Deep Creek 
\'alley, and they have had three children: Annie M. Hubler (i88i-i88s), 
Arthur Alvin Hubler and Mabel R. Hubler. 

Arthur A. Hubler graduated from the Gordon high school, spent one year 
at the Millersville State Normal School, graduated from the Franklin and 
Marshall Preparatory School, and took a four-year course at Pennsylvania 
State College, graduating with honors in the class of 1908. He married Amy 
Duncan, of Gordon. He is a member of the F. & A. M. Lodge of Ashland. 
Arthur Hubler resides at Atlantic City, N. J., being instructor in electrical 
engineering in the high school of that city. 

Mabel R. Hubler is a graduate of the Gordon high school and at present 
is taking a course in McCann's Business College at Mahanoy City. 

Esther A. Hubler { 1854-1880) married John Weiss and had three children : 
Emma Weiss (married Wilmor Quay, of Spring City and has two children, 
Lemar and Laveni Quay), George Weiss and Clara Weiss. Esther A. Hub- 
ler's death was caused by her clothing becoming ignited while attending to 
home duties. 

Daniel 0. Hubler was born in Butler township Feb. 2, 1856. He belonged 
to Camp No. 62, P. O. S. of A., at Gordon. He was employed at railroading. 
Contracting typhoid-pneumonia, he died March 17, 1882. 

Emilia M. Hubler married Oliver I. Frey, of Cressona, and has had five chil- 
dren : Wilford Frey (1893-1893), Laura Frey (a graduate of the Cressona 
high school), Mary Augusta Frey, Charles Walter Frey and Edith Frey. 

Silvester John Hubler (1861-1909) was the third son of Amelia J. (Dill- 
man) Hubler. By trade he was a locomotive fireman. He belonged to the 
Independent Order of Locomotive Firemen, at Delano, Pa., the Independent 
Mechanics of Reading, P. & R. Relief Association, and was a charter member 
of the P. O. S. of A. Camp of Lavelle, Schuylkill county. He married Mary 
E. Clus, who lives at Reading. His children are : Esther Hubler (1889-1891), 
Raymond Hubler (married Bessie Young and has two children, Marion and 
Leroy Hubler), and Alma E. Hubler, of Reading. 

Edgar D. Hubler, fifth son of Amelia J. (Dillman) Hubler, is a merchant 
at Ashland. He attended the Island School at Barry, Pa., the public schools 
at Gordon, Pa., the academies at Gratztown and New Berlin, Pa. He married 
Clara E. Yost, and has one child, Florence Hubler. 

Uphauia A. Hubler, the ninth child of Amelia J. (Dillman) Hubler, married 
W'. P. Eifert, of Cressona. She has had fourteen children : Norman Eifert 
(married Caroline Schaffer, and has one child, Aven Russel Eifert), Grace 
Amelia Eifert (married Robert Brinich), Gertrude Eifert (married Raymond 
Ramsey, and has one child. Lemar Raymond Ramsey), Ruth Eifert, Carrie 
Eifert, Henry Eifert, Albert Eifert, Lulu Eifert, Arthur Eifert (1903-1903), 
Ralph Eifert (1905-1906), Chester Eifert, Emanuel Eifert, Leroy Eifert and 
Edwin Enerd Eifert. 

Charles Walter Hubler, the sixth son of Amelia J. (Dillman) Hubler, is a 
farmer at Barry, living at the old homestead. He belongs to the following 



86 SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 

lodges at Lavelle: The Improved Order of Redmen, No. 297; I. O. O. F., 
No. 972, and the Degree of Pocahontas, No. 172. 

Laura G. Hubler, the youngest daughter of AmeHa J. (Dillman) Hubler, 
married William Hunter and lives at the old homestead at Barry. She is a 
member of the P. O. S. of A. Camp No. 55 of Lavelle. She has six children : 
Minna Hunter, Ruth Hunter, Cora Hunter, Mary Hunter, Allen Hunter and 
Charles Walter Hunter. 

Allen E. Hubler lives at the other farmhouse on the Hubler estate. He is 
a member of the Improved Order of Redmen, Lodge No. 297, at Lavelle. 
He married Louisa Mader, and has four children : Lemar, Esther, John, and 
Arthur Hubler. 

Susanna Dillman, second daughter of Daniel K. Dillman, was born Jan. 
28, 1840, in Maiden-creek township, Berks county. She was educated in the 
district schools of Wadesville and Phoenix Park. She was an adept at 
embroidery and crocheting — accomplishments very highly valued in her day. 
In November, 1858, she married David J. Evans, of Minersville, formerly of 
Ithaca, N. Y. They resided at Llewellyn, Phoenix Park, York Tunnel, William 
Penn, Gilberton and Scranton. She was the most affectionate of mothers. 
Possessed of much natural refinement, she found pleasure in the society of 
her children and kindred. She died July 20, 1908, at her home in Scranton, 
and is buried in the Odd Fellows Cemetery at Frackville by the side of her 
husband. She had ten children : Daniel Dillman Evans, Eleanor Evans 
(married George H. Williams), Minnie Evans (married George Ludwig, Jr.), 
William Evans (1865-1870), Harriet Evans (1867-1870), B. Franklin Evans 
(1870-1907), D. Edgar Evans, W' alter W. Evans, Carrie Evans (married 
Jacob Kuhlman), and Augusta Dillman Evans. 

Daniel Dillman Evans was bom at Llewellyn in 1859. He was educated in 
the schools of Llewellyn and Phoenix Park and at Port Carbon Normal 
School. He was engineer at the Shenandoah colliery for two years and for 
eight years at the Gilberton colliery. In 1892 he became engineer at the P. & R. 
colliery at Maple Hill, which position he has occupied ever since — twenty-three 
years. Fraternally Daniel D. Evans belongs to Shenandoah Lodge, No. 511, 
F. & A. M. At present he resides at Mahanoy City. In 1887 he married 
Hannah Fox, daughter of William and Mary (Yoder) Fox, of Gilberton. 
They have three children: Dr. Harriet Evans, Florence Evans (Mrs. Paul L. 
R. Snyder) and Walter D. Evans. 

Dr. Harriet Evans was born at Gilberton and graduated from the Mahanoy 
township schools in the class of 1903. The same year she entered Brown 
Preparatory College, graduating in 1904. In 1908 she graduated from the 
Woman's Medical College. Having spent one year in the hospital of the 
Woman's Medical College, Dr. Evans located in Mahanoy City in 1910, and 
has been very successful in her chosen profession. She belongs to the Alpha 
Omega Delta (medical fraternity), organized the Puritan Chapter of the 
Eastern Star at Mahanoy City, and is also the first vice president of the Equal 
Franchise Club of Mahanoy City, organized in 1915. She is a member of 
the Daughters of the Revolution. 

Florence Evans graduated from the Shenandoah high school in the class 
of 1910 and completed one year at the Woman's Medical College at Philadel- 
phia. She is a gifted pianist. In October, 1914, she married Paul L. R. 
Snyder, of Hagerstown, Md. (formerly of Mahanoy City), and they have 
one child, Roger William Snyder, born Nov. 26, 191 5. 

Walter D. Evans is a high school student at Mahanoy City. 



SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 87 

Eleanor Ezviis, eldest daughter of Susanna (Dillnian) Evans, received her 
education in the schools of Llewellyn and Phoenix Park. She early learned to 
he self-reliant, hecoming proficient in needlework and embroidery. She is an 
attendant of the Evangelical Church. In 1893 she married George H. Wil- 
liams, a merchant of Shenandoah. She now resides in Frackville. She had 
two daughters, both deceased; Viola, born in 1S94, lived to the age of four 
years. 

Aliniiie Evans, second daughter of Susanna (Dillman) Evans, received her 
education in the schools of Llewellyn and Gilberton. She taught school for 
six years at Gilberton and one term of night school at Mahanoy City, and also 
taught in the suburbs of Scranton. In 191 1 she married George Ludwig, Jr., 
of Scranton, who is now engaged in farming. 

B. Franklin Evans, third son of Susanna (Dillman) Evans, was born at 
Phoenix Park, Schuylkill Co., Pa., in February, 1870. He received his educa- 
tion in the Gilberton schools. He early manifested a disposition towards 
mechanics and became very proficient in that line. He worked at Gilberton 
for some years, and then entered the American Locomotive Works at Scranton, 
Pa., where he attained a high place in his chosen trade. His untimely death 
cut ofl: a promising career. Having contracted typhoid fever, he died in April, 
1907, and is buried in the Odd Fellows Cemetery at Frackville, Pa. Fraternally 
he was member of Camp No. 284, P. O. S. of A., at Gilberton, and the I. O. R. 
M. of Scranton. He was school director at Gilberton for a number of years. 

D. Edgar Evans, of Gilberton, was born at Glen Carbon, Schuylkill county, 
in July, 1873, the fourth son of Susanna (Dillman) Evans. He attended the 
schools of Gilberton. At present he is employed as machinist at Boston Run 
colliery, near Gilberton. In 1899 he married Mary Fellows, of Gilberton, and 
has four children, Myrl, Ruth, Wilbur and Morgan Evans. 

Walter Webster Evans, the fifth son of Susanna (Dillman) Evans, was 
born at New Philadelphia in 1875. He attended school at Gilberton. Going 
to Scranton he worked for a time in the steel mills, and afterwards took up 
farming as his chosen occupation. At present he is living in Indiana. 

Carrie Evans, the ninth child of Susanna (Dillman) Evans, was born and 
educated at Gilberton. She is a musician of some ability. In 1902 she married 
Jacob Kuhlman, of Scranton, and has had two daughters, Eleanor Kuhlman 
(1902-1907) and Anna S. Kuhlman (bom 1908). 

Augusta Dillman Evans, the youngest child of Susanna (Dillman) Evans, 
was born at Gilberton, receiving her early education in the public schools of 
that borough and afterwards entering the Scranton high school, from which 
she graduated in the class of 1907. She taught school for a term and then 
entered Smith College, graduating in the class of 1912, and becoming instruc- 
tor at Urbana College, of the LIniversity of Illinois. She enjoys the distinction 
of being the only woman instructor of agriculture in the United States. At 
present she is lecturing in Bozeman, Montana. 

WiLLi.^M Dillm.JlN, the second son of Daniel K. Dillman, was bom at Port 
Carbon Feb. 8, 1842. He received his education in the district schools taught 
by his father. He married Marietta Purnell (died 19 10) and lived in 
Mahanoy City, New Philadelphia and New Brunswick, N. J. He was an 
engineer by trade. He ser\'ed in the 5th Regiment, Pennsylvania Cavalry, for 
ten months, having enlisted in the fall of 1864, and was wounded during his 
service. In politics he was a Republican. He died at New Brunswick, N. J., 



88 SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENNSYLVANLA. 

March 14, 1912. William Dillman was of a genial, lovable disposition, and 
wherever he went he had hosts of friends. 

Henry Clay Dillman, third son of Daniel K. Dillman, was born at 
Wadesville May 4, 1844. He received his education in the district schools at 
Wadesville and Phoenix Park, and assisted his father on the farm at Llewellyn. 
He served his country in the "War for the preservation of the Union," having 
enlisted Feb. 20, 1864, in Company F, 48th Regiment, Pennsylvania Infantry 
Volunteers. He was discharged June 30, 1864, having been wounded at 
Tolopotomy, Va., May 30, 1864. Henry Dillman married Mrs. Mary 
O'Donnell, of West \'irginia, in 1887, and in 1890 moved to Parkersburg, 
W. Va., where he now resides. He is a member of the Methodist Episcopal 
Church. Politically Mr. Dillman is a Republican. 

C.\THERiNE M. Dillman, third daughter of Daniel K. Dillman, was born at 
Wadesville, Pa., May 4, 1846. She attended the schools of \\'adesville and 
Phoenix Park and assisted her mother in the home, also becoming an adept 
with the needle and an expert embroiderer and crocheter. Her life has been 
full of cares and afflictions, which she has met with characteristic energy, 
courage and faith. In her loyalty to the Reformed Church she has no superior. 
After teaching school one year Catherine M. Dillman married Jacob Starr, 
of Llewellyn. (He served his country four years during the Civil war. in Com- 
pany A, 50th Regiment, P. V., having fought in the battles of Spottsylvania 
and the Wilderness.) Their children are Jennie Starr (married Henry Fox), 
Harry E. Starr, Laura Augusta Starr, Emma M. Starr, Ella M. Starr (married 
Andrew O'Donnell), Daniel Dillman Starr (1876-1884), Robert C. Starr 
(1878-1884), Mathilda C. Starr (1880-1884), Howard Ellsworth Starr (1883- 
1884), Calvin F. Starr (married Mrs. Bernadetta Van Derdoes). Frederick L. 
Starr (married Cena Bainbridge), and Myrtle S. Starr (married Irvin Starr). 
Catherine M. (Dillman) Starr is living at Llewellyn, in the same house she 
entered as a bride so many years ago. 

Jennie Starr, eldest daughter of Catherine Dillman Starr, received her early 
education in the Llewellyn schools. She lived for a time with her grand- 
mother, Mrs. Daniel K. Dillman, from whom she readily assimilated a kindly 
disposition and Christian character. In 1890 Jennie Starr married Henry 
Fox, of Gilberton. She has had four children: Robert Fox (1891-1892), 
Blanche Fox (1893-1895), Clyde C. Fox (the well known telegraph operator 
at Gilberton) and Howard S. Fox (a graduate of Gilberton high school, class 
of 191 5, a student of the ministry at Conway Hall, Carlisle, Pa., and a talented 
musician). Both young men are members of Camp No. 284, P. O. S. of A. 
The family are of the Refomied faith. 

Harry E. Starr, the eldest son of Catherine M. (Dillman) Starr, was born 
at Llewellyn, receiving his education in the public schools of that town. 
He is a carpenter by trade, and for many years has followed the occupation of 
bridge building. He is located at Detroit, Mich. He is a Republican in 
politics. 

Emma M. Starr was born and educated at Llewellyn. At present she is 
employed at the University of Pennsylvania, at Philadelphia. 

Ella M. Starr was educated in the Llewellyn schools. She married Andrew 
O'Donnell, of Parkersburg, W. Va., and has had the following children: Earl 
O'Donnell (a school teacher of Parkersburg), Dwight O'Donnell, Winifred 
O'Donnell, Amber O'Donnell, Ouanita O'Donnell, Leighton O'Donnell (died 
1908), Harold O'Donnell, and Chalmer O'Donnell. 



SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENNSYLVANL\ 89 

Calvin F. Starr graduated from the Llewellyn high school in the class of 

1909. He became a telegrapher and afterwards was employed on many United 
States vessels as wireless operator, having several times been on the coast of 
Norway and the western coast of South America. At present he is stationed 
at Dallas, Texas. Politically he is a Republican. He married Mrs. Bernadetta 
V'an Derdoes, of New Orleans, Louisiana. 

Frederick L. Starr, the youngest son of Catherine M. ( Dillman) Starr, 
graduated from the Llewellyn high school in the cfass of 1910. At present he 
is employed at Llewellyn. F-raternally he belongs to Camp No. 63, P. O. S. 
of A. He is a musician of ability, playing violin in Professor Gerhard's 
orchestra of Pottsville. Mr. Starr is a Republican, leaning towards Progres- 
sive ideas. He married Cena Bainbridge, of Llewellyn. 

Myrtle S. Starr graduated from the Llewellyn high school in the class of 

1910. She married Irvin Starr, of Llewellyn, and has two children: \'iolet 
Starr (born May 15, 1912) and Walter Dillman Starr (born Aug. 11, 1913). 

Laura Augusta Starr received her education in the schools of Llewellyn. 
After graduating from the high school she taught school for one term at 
Friedensburg, and subsequently at Llewellyn. At present she is assistant high 
school teacher at Llewellyn, and is one of the most successful educators in that 
section of the county. She has devoted her time to the study of literature and 
music, and is well informed on all related subjects. Her stimmer vacations are 
spent profitably in travel and study. She is a member of the Reformed Church. 

Eliz.mseth a. Dillm.vx was born at Phoenix Park Sept. 6, 1851. She was 
educated in the schools of Phoenix Park and Llewellyn, and taught school for 
a number of years prior to her marriage to Henry Christ, of Pine Grove. Her 
children are Robert, Amy (married a Mr. Hill), Nellie (1884-1892), Victor 
(1886-1894), Ralph, Roy and Rose (married Mr. Simm, of Donaldson). She 
has several grandchildren. 

M.\RY A. DiLLM.\N. youngest child of Daniel K. Dillman, was born at 
Phoenix Park March 17, 1857, and was educated in the Llewellyn schools. 
She is a member of the Reformed Church. She married Joseph Boden (a 
mine superintendent at Donaldson). Nine children were born to them: Wil- 
liam H. Boden, Martha Boden (1877-1878), Frederick Boden ( 1880-1880). 
Charles Boden (1882- 1882), Carrie E. Boden, Clyde Daniel Boden, Edith M. 
Boden, George Raymond Boden and Mary A. Boden. 

William H. Boden, eldest son of Mary A. (Dillman) Boden, was born at 
Donaldson and was educated in the schools of Llewellyn and Shamokin. 
Having graduated from the Shamokin high school in the class of 1892, he 
taught in the grammar grades of the Shamokin schools until 1903, when he 
commenced to work for the International Correspondence Schools as district 
superintendent, and was located at Lock Haven, Williamsport, Lewistown, and 
Johnstown. At present he is employed by the Equitable Life Assurance 
"Society of the United States at Johnstown. On June 18, 1903, he married 
Nora Wagner, of Shamokin. They have four children, Ruth, Madge, Paul 
and Louise Boden. William H. Boden is a member of the Methodist Episcopal 
Church. In politics he is a Republican, leaning towards Progressive principles. 
Fraternally he is a member of the Royal Arcanum, Council No. 959, of 
Shamokin, Pennsylvania. 

Clyde D. Boden was born at Shamokin, and was educated in the public 
schools of that town, graduating in the class of 1905. After leaving school he 
worked as bookkeeper for Riley & Co., of Centralia. At present he is business 



90 SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 

manager for the Shamokin Daily News, having previously been with the Herald. 
In pohtics he is a RepubHcan. He is a member of the Methodist Episcopal 
Church and the following fraternal organizations: I. O. O. F. and P. O. S. 
of A. He has recently been elected auditor for Shamokin. 

George R. Boden is a graduate of the class of 191 1, of Mount Airy, near 
Philadelphia. He is a tailor by trade, and employed as tailor at Leader & 
Hamilton's store, in Shamokin, Pa., but has decided leanings towards agri- 
culture. He is a member of the Reformed Church. In politics he is inclined 
to Republican principles. 

Edith M. Boden was born at Shamokin and graduated from the high school 
in the class of 1908. She is a teacher in the public schools and also an 
enthusiastic Sabbath school worker. She is an attendant at the Reformed 
Church. 

Mary A. Boden, a native of Shamokin, graduated from the high school 
at that town in 1914. At present she is employed in the telephone exchange. 
She is quite a musician, and is a member of St. John's Reformed Church of 
Shamokin. 

Carrie E. Boden is at home assisting her mother. 

Margaret Dillman was the eldest child of Peter Dillman, Sr., and 
Susanna (Krause) Dillman. She married Jacob Kruger, of Ringtown, and 
had the following children: Susanna married Mr. Walters; Daniel Kruger 
married Mary Eisenhut ; William Kruger married Mary Maderi ; David 
Kruger married Mary Mitchel; Rebecca Kruger married John Brady; Francis 
Kruger married Mary Yocum ; Henry Kruger ; John Kruger. 

Mary Dillman was the third child of Peter Dillman, Sr., and Susanna 
(Krause) Dillman. She was bom in 181 1, and died in 1893. She married 
John Schneider (1813-1898), of Ashland, and had the following children: 
(i) Mary Emma Schneider (married George Slatterbach, who was killed in 
the Civil war, and they had one son, Frederick Slatterbach, formerly of Ash- 
land, but who now resides in Philadelphia) ; (2) Elizabeth Schneider; 
(3) Henry Schneider (killed in the Civil war) ; (4) Josephine Schneider 
(married Cornelius Eister, of Shamokin, Pa., and has the following children 
and grandchildren : William Elmer Eister married Annie Flannagan and has 
one child, James Cornelius Eister; Mathilde Ada Eister married Samuel 
Watkins, of Lansford, and has two children, William J. Watkins and Ethel 
M. Watkins ; Katherine Eister died at the age of thirteen years ; Charles E. 
Eister married Florence Mclntyre and has the following children, Lester, 
Myrtle, Ethel, and a baby) ; (5) Mathilde Schneider (married Peter Featheroff 
and has the following children, Mathilde Featheroff — married Henry Walter 
and has had six children, John, William, Ethel, Mildred, Emma and Helen 
Walter, Dr. Daniel Featheroff' — married Lottie Schall and had one baby girl 
who died, Elizabeth Featheroff — died at the age of seven years, Margaretta 
Featheroff, Mary Featheroff' — died at the age of two years, John Featheroff, 
Henry Featheroff — married Rose Hodges and resides in Philadelphia, and 
has five children, Edward, Ethel. George, Wilber and Dorothy, Herbert 
Featheroff', and Clarence Featheroff — married Agnes Mohr and has one child, 
Alice Featheroff) ; (6) Margaretta Schneider (1848-1914) ; (7) Ada Schneider 
(married Manuel Straub, of Shamokin, and has several children, and grand- 
children). 

LucYANNA Dillman, bom in 181 5, was the sixth child of Peter Dillman, 
Sr., and his wife Susanna (Krause) Dillman. She married thrice, first, 



SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 91 

Jeremiah James ; second, James lioyle ; third, I'hihp Powell. Her children are : 
Lucyanna James (married Jacob Everhardt, and had ten children, Jacob 
Exerhardt, Peter Everhardt, Solomon Everhardt — married Ida Derr, and has 
one child Thelma Everhardt, David Everhardt, Mary Everhardt, Darius and 
Jeremiah Everhardt, twin boys — both of them died, Adam and Eve Ever- 
liardt, twins, and Robert Everhardt) ; Mary James (married George Liske) ; 
John James (died young); Martha James (died young); Katherine Boyle; 
and Philip Powell. 

S.\R.ui DiLi..M.\N was the seventh child of Peter Dillman, Sr., and Susanna 
(Krause) Dillman, and was bom in 1817. She married James Connelly, and 
resided at Shenandoah, Pa. She had the following children : Catherine Con- 
nelly; Susanna Connelly (married Robert Potter and had four sons and one 
daughter, Joseph, James, Robert and Charles Potter, James moving to Tennes- 
see, where he died) ; and James Connelly (married Agnes Behr). 

James Dillman (1819-1895) was the eighth child of Peter Dillman, Sr., 
and his wife Susanna (Krause) Dillman. He resided at Shenandoah, Pa., and 
married Agnes Brocius. They had nine children, viz. : Mary, wife of a Mr. 
Oliver; Emina, wife of Johti Rhoads; Susanna, wife of a Mr. Sherman; Peter 
Dillman, 3d; Alice Dillmaii, wife of a Mr. Lindemuth; Jane, wife of a 
Mr. Dunn; Sarah, wife of a Mr. Hawley; Clara, wife of John George; and 
Dora Dillman. 

Charles Dillman was the sixteenth child of Peter Dillman, Sr., and wife 
Susanna (Krause) Dillman. He was educated in and around Fountain 
Springs, Pa., and followed the occupation of farming. In his later years he 
lived at Ashland, Pa. He married Elizabeth Rice, and their children are : 
Peter Dillman, 4th, an Elder in the Mormon Church at Whitewater, Cochise 
Co., Ariz.; Joseph D. Dillman, residing at Rock Dam, Pa. (married Sarah 
Wolfgang, and had seven children) ; James Dillman, Jr. (married Sarah 
Betz) ; Sarah Dillman (died an infant, twelve months old) ; and Robert Dili- 
man, of Bethlehem, Pa. (married Christine Kaw). 

Peter Dillman, Jr., was the youngest son of Peter Dillman, Sr., and his 
wife Susanna (Krause) Dillman. He was born at Fountain Springs Sept. 
30, 1830, and followed the trade of locomotive engineer, residing at Palo Alto, 
Port Carbon, and Tamaqua, Pa. He married Lydia Nefif (born March 5, 
1837 — died Sept. 29, 1886), and had four children: Emma Dillman (married 
William Walker, of Tamaqua) ; Andrew Curtin Dillman (married Amanda 
Sherman, and resides at Pottstown, Pa.) ; Richard Dillman (died at the age of . 
four vears) ; and Hannah Dillman (married Frederick Francis, of Reading, 
Pa.)." Peter Dillman, Jr., died Sept. 8. 1888. 

Einiiia DiUinan married William Walker Oct. 21, 1876. They have the 
following children and grandchildren : Lydia B. Walker married Claude C. 
Rhodes, and they have had one child, William Claude Rhodes; Howard Dili- 
man Walker, bom 1877, died 1879; William Walker, born 1878, died 1904; 
Estella Walker married Alexander Thompson and has two children. George 
and Irene Thompson ; Claude Walker married Annie Kinsel who died Oct. 
II, 1909. and had three children, Howard, Earl and Bertram Walker, and in 
1914 Claude Walker married (second) Josephine Rimbach ; ClifTord Walker 
married Estella Singlv and has one child. Theodore Walker; Mary Josephine 
Walker, born 1891, died 1892; Esther Walker married Raymond Morgan and 
has two children, Frederick and Louisa Morgan ; and George Dillman Walker 

Andrew Curtin Dillman, of Pottstown, Pa., has the following children and 



92 SCHUYLKILL COUxNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 

grandchildren : William Dillman, who has three children, William, Helen and 
Marian Dillman ; Howard Dillman, who has one child, Andrew Howard Dill- 
man; Raymond Dillman; Reba Dillman, who married Samuel Lawton ; and 
Marian Dillman. 

Hannah Dillman married Frederick Francis, of Reading. They have had 
the following children and grandchildren : Mary Emma Francis married 
James S. Hill, of Poughkeepsie, N. Y., and they have two children, Agnes and 
Francis Hill; F^sther Lydia Francis, born Dec. 15, 1882, died April 23, 1883; 
Frederick Dillman Francis married Edna Sewars, and they live at No. 951 
Birch street, Reading, Pa. ; Howard Jacob Francis married Blanche Nunna- 
macher, and they reside on Park avenue, Hyde Park, Pa.'; Margaret and 
Martha Francis are twins ; Leah Francis, born Nov. 5, 1894, died April 5, 
1895; Elsie May Francis lives at No. 714 North nth street, Reading, Pa.; 
Andrew Thomas F"rancis was born in 1903. 

WILLIAM H. WALTERS, of New Philadelphia, has been the chief 
executive of that borough for so many years that he may without exaggeration 
be referred to as its leading citizen. He is now ( 191 5) serving his sixth term 
as chief burgess, and there is no doubt that his popularity has endured by 
reason of the fact that throughout his long administration he has shown no 
lessening of public spirit or of desire to serve his townsmen to the extent of 
his abilities. Their continued support, on the other hand, has enabled him 
not only to inaugurate many ideas which promised well, but to carry them 
out most advantageously. Though Mr. Walters has well deserved the com- 
plimentary attitude of his fellow citizens towards him, it is only just to say 
that he has endeavored to merit it. 

Mr. Walters is a son of Edmund Walters and grandson of Henry Walters, 
who came to this country from England. He was a machinist by trade, a 
skilled mechanic, and first located at Philadelphia, Pa., where he found employ- 
ment in the Baldwin Locomotive W'orks. He brought the first railroad train 
into Pottsville, as engineer ; the engine had broken down at Port Clinton, and 
Mr. Walters made the repairs and ran it from that point to Pottsville. Later 
he settled at Port Carbon, this county, and afterwards had a foundry at 
Tuscarora, where he made car wheels for the Philadelphia & Reading Com- 
pany, being so engaged for about ten years. His next location was at Tamaqua, 
where he founded the well known Eagle iron works in 1868, building stationary 
engines and all kinds of mining machinery, for which he found ample demand 
in the immediate vicinity. The establishment was very successful under his 
management, and after his death his three sons, William, Henry and Edmund 
Walters, took over the business and continued it under the name of Henry 
Walters' Sons. 

Edmund Walters, son of Henry Walters, learned the trade of molder in 
his father's shop, of which in time he became a part owner. However, when 
his eldest brother, \\'illiam, died, the business was sold to the latter's widow. 
Edmund Walters married Harriet Cox, a native of Mechanicsville, Schuylkill 
county, and children as follows were born to them : John, William H., Edmund, 
Ambrose, Frank, George, Annie (wife of Allen Barton) and Dora (deceased). 

William H. \^'alters was born Oct. 11, 1865, at Tamaqua, Schuylkill 
county, where he acquired an excellent education in the public schools. During 
the summer season he picked slate at the Hanto colliery. In his youth he 
beo-an to learn the molder's trade in his father's shop, but after eighteen 



n 



SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENNSYLVAKUA 93 

months at that work turned to cigarmaking, serving his apprenticeship with 
ex-Sheriff Monroe Boyer, at Tamaqua. He followed this trade ten years in 
all in Schuylkill county, for eighteen months being engaged in the manufacture 
of cigars on his own account at Tamaqua. He then took charge of the new 
slope at the Palmer colliery, at New Philadelphia, for three years, after which 
he spent a short time at railroad work with the Philadelphia & Reading Rail- 
way Company, until he received the appointment of private detective for the 
Lehigh Coal & Navigation Company. The next change he made was to 
Bethlehem, Pa., where he was employed at the government works for a year 
and a half, during which time he ran the first machine that cut armor plate. 
Returning to Schuylkill county, he took charge of the boilers at Silver Creek 
colliery for about two years, at the end of that time becoming special officer 
and assistant to the real estate agent of the Lehigh Coal & Navigation Com- 
pany. 

Mr. Walters has been a resident of New Philadelphia since 1886, and he 
has shown himself worthy of his honorable ancestry in his sense of responsi- 
bility towards the other members of the community and his high ideals of duty 
in the ofhce of mayor, which he is now holding for the sixth term. His services 
began in 1895. Three times he was appointed by the court, and he has been 
chosen three times by popular vote. Such a tribute to worth deserves notice, 
and it is also remarkable that Mr. Walters is becomingly modest in presenting 
his opinions, though courageous in the support of his convictions when he 
thinks it necessary. He is a member of the Methodist Church, and for eight 
years served as superintendent of the Sunday school. 

Mr. Walters married Catherine Boyer, daughter of Cornelius Boyer, and 
they have three children : Cornelius B., now chief supply clerk for the Phila- 
delphia & Reading Company, resides at St. Clair, this county ; he married 
Sarah Zimmerman, daughter of Robert, and they have a daughter, Emma. 
Harriet is the wife of Harry F. Schulze, a contractor and builder, of New 
Philadelphia, and they have two children, Edna K. and Wilda C. Edna is 
living at home. 

HENRY A. WELDY (deceased) lived at Tamaqua for about fifty years, 
and filled a place of conspicuous usefulness in the upbuilding of several of its 
most valuable business institutions. During all but the first decade of his 
residence there he was one of the proprietors of what grew to be a large 
industrial establishment, the powder mill which early in the present century 
became absorbed by the trust. This was always his chief interest and held 
first place in his attention, his best efforts being devoted to the improvement 
of the plant and the expansion of the trade. But it did not prevent him from 
seeing the necessity for other enterprises, some in the class of private business, 
some in the nature of public utilities, with which he associated himself to the 
advantage of the community as well as the profitable employment of his own 
capital. His judgment was esteemed so much that his sanction of any under- 
taking was sufficient to make it considered worthy the favor of local investors 
generally. 

Mr. Weldy spent his early life at Reading, Berks Co., Pa., and when he 
retired returned to that city, passing his closing years there. He was born 
there Sept. 19, 183 1, and his father and grandfather were also natives of that 
place, the latter born in 1768. deceased in 1853; he was married in 1797. The 
grandfather was a carpenter by occupation. John Weldy, father of Henry A. 



94 SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENNSYLVAi\L\ 

Weldy, started work in the hardware trade at Reading when fifteen years old, 
and was engaged in that hne until his death, which occurred in 1877. His 
wife, Margaret, died in 1S35. They had three children: Catherine, born in 
1827, 'who died in 1829; Joseph, born in 1829, who died in 1833; and Henry A. 

Henry A. Weldy acquired a thorough common school education, having 
the best advantages the town afforded in his day, and when seventeen years 
old commenced an apprenticeship at the cabinetmaker's trade with B. & H. 
Rhein. But when he completed his term he turned to pattern-making, working 
at that for the Little Schuylkill Railroad Company, at Tamaqua, Pa. He was 
so occupied from 1853 until March, 1862, at which time he joined C. F. 
Shindel in the purchase of a small powder mill located on the Little Schuylkill 
river, from H. Huhn. The lirm was known as H. A. Weldy & Co., and they 
engaged in the manufacture of blasting powder. The name remained the same 
after the admission of E. F. Shindel to the partnership, the next year, and 
they continued the business until April, 1871, when one of the mills was blown 
up, entailing considerable loss. Mr. Weldy remained with the business, but 
the Shindels sold their share to Du Pont, de Nemours & Co., with whom 
Mr. Weldy was associated until his retirement, at the time the Tamaqua busi- 
ness was merged into the powder trust. Throughout that time it was carried 
on under the name of H. A. Weldy & Co., and had a record of constant growth 
under Mr. Weldy's capable management. As the trade increased the mill was 
enlarged to meet new requirements and equipped with modern facilities for 
operation, and the progressive policy followed was substantial evidence of 
Mr. W^eldy's wide-awake spirit, always on the alert for new contrivances or 
improved methods and quick to see their defects or advantages. He had 
personal oversight of the mill until 1901, when it became part of the property 
of the nation-wide concern, and from that time had no active connection with 
business affairs. Among other Tamaqua concerns with which he was identified 
we may mention the Edison Electric Light Company, which he helped to 
organize, and of which he was president and a director for some years; and 
the Tamaqua Boot & Shoe Manufacturing Company, which he established in 
1888. The latter business attained such proportions that forty-five persons 
were employed in the factory, and the annual output was valued at $50,000. 
The shoe factory was closed out in 1898, on account of the illness of C. S. 
Weldy, who died April i, 1900. The powder mill was dismantled in 1908, 
the real estate being sold to the Anthracite Water Company. 

Along with business ability, Mr. Weldy had qualities of confidence and 
perseverance which brought him success. But he was modest in bearing and 
agreeable in manner, and his pleasant relations with his business associates 
and social companions were the basis of a feeling of good will which made 
him generally liked, regardless of class. It was conceded by all who knew 
him that he did well because he deserved to do well, and that in making his 
own success he helped, not hindered, others in attaining theirs. For a number 
of years he served his townsmen as a member of the borough council. Politi- 
cally he gave his support to the Republican party. In 1902 Mr. Weldy returned 
to Reading, where he made his home afterwards at No. 135 Windsor street. 
He had a fine summer home in Spring township, Berks county, where he spent 
part of each year. His death occurred at his home in Reading Oct. 18, 1909, 
and he is buried in the Odd Fellows cemetery at Tamaqua. 

On Nov. 19, 1854, Mr. Weldy married Ann Lambert, daughter of George 
and Kate Lambert, of Sinking Spring, Berks Co., Pa., and her death occurred 



SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 95 

in 1900. Four children were born of this marriage: Charles H.; Kate G., 
now the widow of George Hursh, living at Newville, Pa. ; John E., who died 
in 1912; and Clarence S., who died in 1900. 

Charles H. Weldy, son of Henry A. Weldy, was born Aug. 10, 1855, at 
Taniaqua, and there received his education in the public schools. Most of his 
business life has been spent in the powder manufacturing business, with which 
he was connected from 1875 to 1904. After the plant was sold to the larger 
concern Mr. Weldy continued with it in their employ until 1904, and he is 
now devoting himself to agricultural pursuits, having a fine ii6-acre farm in 
Rush township, Schuylkill county, in whose development he has found agree- 
able and profitable occupation. He has built a comfortable bungalow on that 
property and lives there during the summer months, spending the winter season 
in the borough of Tamaqua. Mr. Weldy has a find herd of Jersey cattle on 
his farm, and makes a specialty of the production of butter, finding a steady 
demand for the fine qttality for which his dairy has become noted. He has 
been keenly interested in the proper administration of municipal affairs in 
Tamaqua and has shown his willingness to do his share in obtaining good 
government, having served three years as councilman and twelve years as 
school director, with commendable efficiency. In fraternal connection he is 
an Elk, belonging to Tamaqua Lodge, No. 592. 

Mr. Weldy married Henrietta Smitham, daughter of the late James 
Smitham, of Carbon county. Pa. They have two children : Annie S., now 
the wife of Guy Ellick, of Tamaqua ; and Harry A., living at home. 

HARRY R. carl, of Auburn, has shown versatile ability in business, 
having met with equal success in all the various lines he has followed. Most 
of his interests are in Schuylkill county, where he has the esteem and confidence 
of the best element. Business, financial and social affairs and the duties of 
public office have all claimed their share of his attention, and increased respon- 
sibilities have only been the means of developing his executive talent and 
bringing out the substantial qualities which he has so generously placed at 
the service of his fellow citizens. 

Mr. Carl belongs to a family of old standing in Schuylkill county. The 
first of the line in this county was a native of Ireland. Henry Carl, his great- 
grandfather, lived and died in Hubley township, Schuylkill county. His 
children were : Moses, Edward, Conrad, Elias and Katie. 

Elias Carl, grandfather of Harry R. Carl, was also a resident of Hubley 
township, where he died. He married Mary Hoffa, of near Pine Grove, 
Schuylkill county, daughter of John Hoffa, and she survived Mr. Carl, after 
his death becoming the wife of Dewalt Faust, of southern Schuylkill county. 
By her marriage to Mr. Carl she had six children : Amanda married Adam 
Shuey ; Emanuel was the father of Harry R. Carl ; Elizabeth married James 
Hand ; IMary married Harry Bomberger ; Katie married Fred Schuffler ; Alice 
married Jonathan Wagner. 

Emanuel Carl, son of Elias, was bom in Hubley township, and for some 
years lived at Tremont. Schuylkill county, where he died in 1879. He is 
buried at that place. By occupation Mr. Carl was a miner. He married 
Malinda Rebuck, and three children were born to them, Mamie, Harry R. and 
Monroe. 

Harry R. Carl was born Dec. 14, 1875, at Tremont, Schuylkill county, and 
was but three years old when his father died. He was reared by his grand- 



96 SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 

mother, Mrs. Faust, and had ordinary educational advantages, attending the 
Tremont and Jefferson schools. In his youth he was employed for four years 
in a printing estahlishment at Philadelphia, after which he attended a business 
college. Subsequently he became engaged in the lumber business at Auburn, 
Schuylkill county, and has been especially active in the development of this 
line, being now very extensively interested in the business. He owns large 
tracts of land in \'irginia, Delaware and Maryland. Mr. Carl has also acquired 
large land holdings in the vicinity of Auburn, where he has five farms, and 
he also owns the light plant at that place. He was one of the organizers of 
the Auburn Board of Trade, serving as president of that body, and he is 
indisputably one of the first leaders of business progress in the southern end 
of Schuylkill county. ^Nlr. Carl was one of the organizers of the First National 
Bank of Auburn, in September, 1908, becoming vice president at the time of 
its organization, and continuing to hold that position until the death of the 
president, William H. Diefenderfer, in 1914, when he succeeded to the chief 
executive position. The other officers in 1914 are : L. C. Robinhold, vice 
president ; John H. Fahl, W. B. Ketner, F. A. Faust, J. H. Adams and Joseph 
Frederici, directors; H. H. Koerper, cashier. Mr. Carl is a member of the 
Pottsville Club, and his religious connection is with the Reformed Church. 
He has taken a hand in the local government, having served several years 
as a member of the borough council. Few men are better entitled to be called 
self-made, for he has worked his way up unaided, taking due advantage of 
his opportunity without infringing on the rights of* others. 

Mr. Carl married Bessie K. Nagle, daughter of Daniel W. Nagle and grand- 
daughter of Col. Daniel Nagle, of Pottsville. Mrs. Carl died July 26, 1914, 
leaving two children, Harry D. and Bessie J. 

HIESTER S. ALBRIGHT, of Orwigsburg, head of the firm of H. S. 
Albright & Company and president of the First National Bank of that place, 
has demonstrated his fitness for the manipulation of large interests by his 
success in the direction of both these institutions. The firm of H. S. Albright 
& Company now is the largest shoe manufacturing concern at Orwigsburg, 
and in the expansion of its activities has also established plants at Landing- 
ville and New Ringgold, having thus been instrumental in promoting industrial 
prosperity in various sections of Schuylkill county. 

The Albrights are an old established family of this county, where Peter 
Albright, great-grandfather of Hiester S. Albright, was born, on the farm 
in West Brunswick township afterwards the birthplace of his son Joseph and 
grandson William S. Albright. Peter Albright lived upon that farm, engaged 
in its cultivation, and died there May 5, 1836. He is buried in the Reformed 
cemetery. Among his children were Abraham, Jonathan, Joseph, Peter, Daniel, 
Rebecca, Sarah, Diana, Susanna, Esther and Catharine. 

Joseph Albright, son of Peter, lived and died on the homestead in West 
Brunswick township, reaching the very advanced age of over eighty-four years. 
He was a lifelong agriculturist and prospered in his work, and an active and 
devout member of the German Reformed Church. With his wife he is buried 
in the Reformed cemetery at Orwigsburg. In 1834 he married Esther Shara- 
din, daughter of Jacob Sharadin, and she died April 5, 1883. They were the 
parents of seven children, namely: William S. ; Thomas S., who lived on the 
old homestead ; Susanna, who became the wife of Solomon R. Mover, a 
prominent business man of Orwigsburg; Morgan S., who is now steward of 




^.<S. Ciu^^i^ . 



SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 97 

the Schuylkill County Home; Joseph, who died young; Benneville, deceased; 
and Lucian, deceased. 

\\'illiani S. Albright was born May 31, 1836, on the old homestead in West 
Brunswick township, where he passed his early life. About i860 he moved 
thence to Orwigsburg, where he spent the remainder of his days, dying Sept, 
5, 1868, when but thirty-two years old ; he is buried in the Reformed cemetery. 
While on the home place he followed agricultural pursuits, and for two years 
was also engaged in milling, after his removal to Orwigsburg carrying on a 
stock business as a drover and horse and cattle dealer. lie married Amanda 
Bodey, who still makes her home at Orwigsburg. Five children were born 
to them, viz.: Hiester S. ; Bella Virginia, who lives with her mother; Pauline, 
deceased in infancy ; and Minnie and Nellis S., who died young. 

Mrs. .Amanda (Bodey) Albright was born Jan. 11, 1837, in Manheim town- 
ship, Schuylkill Co., Pa., daughter of Benjamin and Mary M. (Heffley) 
Bodey, who had the following children : Esther, who died at the age of six 
years; Elizabeth, who died in infancy; Susanna, Mrs. Samuel Bossard, de- 
ceased ; Catherine, Mrs. William ISrook, deceased ; Benjamin ; Charles, 
deceased: .Vmanda, now the only survivor of the family; and Mary, who died 
young. 

Hiester S. Albright was born June 20, 1856, on the old Albright farm in 
West Brunswick township, and was only a young child when the family 
removed to Orwigsburg. There he attended public school regularly up to the 
time of his father's death, when, though a mere boy of twelve, he had to start 
earning his own living. Entering the employ of Moyer & Son, general mer- 
chants at Orwigsburg, he remained with them one year, until offered a better 
position with another merchant of the town. He was with him for two years, 
until his employer sold out, when he entered the factory of the Orwigsburg 
Shoe Manufacturing Company, first in the packing and shipping department. 
But he soon began to learn the shoe business, serving an apprenticeship in the 
cutting department, in which he continued for two years after mastering the 
business. In the late seventies he decided to try his fortune in the West, but 
after a brief experience concluded that the advantages in his old home were 
fully equal to those afforded in the undeveloped part of the country, and he 
has never had any reason to regret his return. In the autumn of 1879 he took 
a position with the Philadelphia & Reading Express Company, by whom he 
was employed until the spring of 1880, since when he has been doing business 
on his own account. At that time he formed a partnership with A. E. Brown, 
under the firm name of Albright & Brown, and they carried on the manufac- 
ture of shoes until July i, 18S3, when George C. Diefenderfer acquired Mr. 
Brown's interests, and he and Air. Albright have been closely associated ever 
since. They are engaged in the manufacture of shoes imder the name of 
H. S. Albright & Company, and do a large business in that line at Orwigsburg. 
Their plant has been thoroughly modernized to meet the development of their 
trade, and in accordance with the latest ideas which have met with approval 
in this line of manufacture. The factory, located on Market street, is 64 by 
140 feet in dimensions, two stories in height, and there are one hundred 
employees at Orwigsburg, engaged in the production of ladies', misses' and 
children's shoes. By judicious salesmanship a wide demand for the product 
has been created, the territory over which the goods are sold extending as 
far as the Pacific coast. In 1896 the firm established a plant at Landingville, 
and in i<)i3 another at New Ringgold, both of which are in full operation at 
Vol. 1—7 



98 SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENNSYLVAXLA. 

the present time. H. S. Albright & Company have set the pace for shoe 
manufacturers in Orwigsburg for many years, and have never lacked initiative 
and enterprise of the most commendable order, their influence in the business 
and in its relation to the community having always been a positive force for 
good. 

Mr. Albright has always given his principal attention to the furtherance 
of his manufacturing interests, but he has also supported other local enter- 
prises which promise to be of benefit to the community, and it is to him more 
than to any other one person that the establishment of the First National Bank 
of Orwigsburg should be credited. When it was opened, in September, 1890, 
he became the vice president, and for several years he has been its president. 
He has been a director and vice president of the Edison Electric Light Com- 
pany of Pottsville, Pa. Mr. Albright has always been an interested member 
of the Republican party, and in his early manhood frequently served as dele- 
gate to county, State and national conventions, but he has not of late years 
taken much part in politics. He is a thirty-second-degree Mason of the North- 
ern jurisdiction of the United States, belonging to Schuylkill Lodge, No. 138, 
F. & A. M., Mountain City Chapter, No. 196, R. A. M., Constantine Com- 
mandery. No. 41, K. T. (of Pottsville), Harrisburg Consistory and LuLu 
Temple, A. A. 0. N. M. S. (of Philadelphia) ; at the present time he is vice 
president for Pennsylvania of the National League of Masonic Clubs. His 
religious connection is with the German Reformed Church. 

On Jan. 6, 1886, Mr. Albright married Virginia F. Newhard, of Lebanon, 
Pa., daughter of the late James J. Newhard, a jeweler of that place. Mrs. 
Albright died in February, 1899, at the age of thirty-two years, leaving one 
child, Nellie Virginia, bom April 17, 1887. The daughter is a graduate of 
the Allentown College for Women, class of 1905. 

REV. JOSEPH McCOOL, a member of the Presbytery of Lehigh, died in 
Pottsville, Pa., April 15, 1884. Mr. INIcCool was born in Philadelphia, on 
the 1st of May, 1804. His father died when he was very young, and he 
was brought up with great religious care by his pious mother, who was a 
devoted member of the Fourth Presbyterian Church in Philadelphia, under 
the pastoral care of Rev. George C. Potts. After his mother's death he joined 
the Methodist Episcopal Church, and being a youth of decided piety and ' 
intellectual ability he soon felt himself called upon to take a public stand for 
Christ, that he might warn those around him to flee the wrath to come. He 
was therefore carefully examined by Rev. James Bateman, presiding elder 
of the district, in the presence of the Quarterly Conference. His examination 
being entirely satisfactory, the Conference proceeded to license him to preach 
the gospel. He continued preaching in the city of Philadelphia and its vicinity 
until the spring of 1826, when he was placed on Dauphin circuit as assistant 
minister, under the auspices of Rev. Joseph Lybrand, presiding elder of the 
Schuylkill district. In April, 1827, "he was received into the Philadelphia 
Annual Conference. In 1828 he was appointed pastor of the First Methodist 
Episcopal Church in the city of Lancaster, Pa. In 1830 he was appointed 
pastor of the First ]\Iethodist Episcopal Church in the borough of Pottsville, 
Pa. In 1832 he was appointed pastor of the First Methodist Episcopal Church 
in the borough of Easton, Pennsylvania. 

In the spring of 1833 ^f^- McCool changed his ecclesiastical connection and 
returned to the church of his fathers. After a thorough and searching ex- 



SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 99 

amination on the doctrines and qualifications necessary to the Presbyterian 
ministry he was unanimously received by the Presbytery of Newton. He 
immediately took charge of the Presbyterian Church in Allentown, Pa., as 
stated supply, and in the summer of 1835 received a unanimous call from the 
First Presbyterian Church in Pottsville, which he accepted, in October of the 
sahie year being installed pastor by a committee of the Third Presbytery of 
Philadelphia. He continued pastor of this church for nearly thirty years, 
when his health declined and he voluntarily resigned his pastorate. From 
that time to his departure he was a great bodily sufferer, but bore his afflictions 
with perfect resignation and submission to the divine will. He was a man of 
strong convictions, determined purpose, clear judgment and consistent 
character. 

PROF. FREDERIC GERHARD, late of Pottsville, did much for musical 
interests in the community, and his work as leader of the Third Brigade band 
and the Gerhard Symphony Orchestra was particularly appreciated. He was 
a son of Charles and grandson of Frederic Gerhard, the latter a Frenchman 
by birth and a soldier under Napoleon in the ill-fated Moscow campaign. 

Charles Gerhard was a native of Alsace-Lorraine, born when it was under 
French dominion. He came to America when seventeen years old and located 
at IMinersville, Schuylkill Co., Pa., for a short time, afterwards living at Girard 
jManor, this county, but soon moving thence to Hummelstown, Dauphin Co., 
Pa., to assist his father-in-law in building a bridge at that place. He next 
located at Gratz, Dauphin county, and from there went to Ashland, Schuylkill 
county, and later in turn to Ringtown and Shenandoah. Most all the time he 
was employed at his trade, as a wheelwright and wagonmaker. In 1881 he 
came to Pottsville, where he lived until his removal to Philadelphia in 1890, 
following his trade and also devoting considerable time to the musical profes- 
sion, in which, though self educated, he made a decided success. During 
1875-1876, when at Shenandoah, he was the leader of the well known Grant 
band, with which he attended the Centennial at Philadelphia. This band had 
a very fine reputation in its day and was considered the leading organization 
of the kind in this part of the State. After he came to Pottsville Mr. Gerhard 
played cornet in the Third Brigade band under his son, Prof. Frederic Gerhard. 
From Philadelphia he removed to Scull's Hill, N. J., where he followed 
farming until his death, which occurred there Oct. 8, 1909. He is buried in 
Mount Peace cemetery, at Philadelphia. Mr. Gerhard was a soldier in the 
Union army during the Civil war. He married Jane Bickel, a direct descendant 
of Simon Sallada and Margaret Everett, whose names are associated with the 
early history of Schuylkill county. Five children, two sons and three daughters, 
were born to Air. and Mrs. Gerhard: Frederic; Annie, Mrs. Adelbert S. 
Jordan, of Philadelphia : Julia M. ; Margaret, and Edward C. Mrs. Gerhard 
"died in Philadelphia May 30, 1903. 

Frederic Gerhard, son of Charles, was born Jan. 17, 1864, at Hummels- 
town, Dauphin Co., Pa. His early years were spent at Ashland, Ringtown and 
Shenandoah, all in Schuylkill county, and he attended the public schools in 
those places. But he was still a young boy when he commenced to support 
himself, working first as a slate picker at the Shenandoah mines. Afterwards 
he was emploved as a coremaker in a foundry. In his nineteenth year he 
came to Pottsville to begin work in the foundry of the Philadelphia & Reading 
Coal & Iron Company. While thus engaged he spent his evenings in the 



100 SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENNSYLVANL\ 

systematic study of music and played in theatre orchestras. His aptitude 
for music had been apparent from boyhood, but his ability as a performer was 
a surprise even to great critics. Under competent instruction he improved 
rapidly, so much so that he soon decided to become a professional musician. 
In 1889 he went to New York City, where he spent a year studying under 
Dr. Eugene Thayer and Gustav Dannreuther, taking theory and composition 
from the former and violin lessons from the latter. Returning to Pottsville 
in 1890, he was elected leader of the Third Brigade band, with which organiza- 
tion he had been playing for some eight years before he went to New York. 
It had been founded Oct. 19, 1879, and is composed entirely of residents of 
Pottsville. A success from the start, it has been one of the most popular 
bands in this section. Its service has been called upon for many State and 
national functions, including the inaugurations of presidents and governors, a 
Dewey jubilee, and State encampments of the National Guard. Though an 
act of the Legislature did away with the band as a military organization it has 
continued in existence to the present time with unabated popularity. Besides 
acting as its leader Prof. Gerhard organized his symphony orchestra and also 
a string quartette, which fills concert engagements during the season. Though 
these obligations took considerable of his time he also had many pupils, taking 
care of large classes in violin and piano instruction. Prof. Gerhard's struggles 
to obtain a thorough musical education probably increased his appreciation 
and love for his chosen profession, in which his unbroken success proved that 
he made no mistake in choosing his life work. His sudden death from 
apoplexy, Oct. 7, 1913, was mourned deeply by thousands, and it was an 
unusual mark of the great respect and admiration of his friends in the 
community that all places of business were closed during the funeral ceremonies. 

Socially Mr. Gerhard was a Knight Templar Mason, belonging to Pulaski 
Lodge, No. 216, F. & A. M.; [Mountain City Chapter, No. 196, R. A. J\I. ; and 
Constantine Commandery, No. 41, K. T. With his wife he was a member 
of the English Lutheran Churchy which he joined when sixteen years old. 

On Oct. 30, 1888, Professor Gerhard married Minnie G. Brown, daughter 
of the late Charles Brown, a merchant of Pottsville and member of one of 
the oldest families established there. Two children were born to this union, 
Grace Jane and Charles William. 

ISAAC G. BECK has extensive interests at Beckville, in North Man- 
heim township, Schuylkill county, where he resides on the old homestead 
in the settlement founded by his grandfather, Jacob Beck, nearly one hundred 
years ago. 

Jacob Beck was born in 1789 in Reitlingen, Wurtemberg, Gennany, where 
he grew to manhood and married. The year of his marriage, 1817, he came 
to the United States, and settled in the Schuylkill valley in Pennsylvania. For 
a number of years he was employed on the Schuylkill canal, between French 
Creek and Pottsville, and he was afterwards engaged in constructing and 
repairing canal locks, acting as a carpenter foreman. He had considerable 
knowledge of civil engineering and drafting, and was engaged to some extent 
in railroad surveying in his locality, acting as assistant engineer in the survey 
of the Mine Hill railroad, which was constructed in 1828-30. In 1818 Mr. Beck 
made his home at Pottsville, in 1822 removing thence to Manheim township, 
where he purchased a farm of 100 acres, soon erecting a sawmill upon that 
place, and in 1829, a gristmilL (The latter came into the possession of 



SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 101 

William Beck in 1861.) His activities became the nucleus of the settlement 
which came to be known as Beckville, and he was one of the leading men 
of the locality up to the time of his death, which occurred in 1850. l>uring 
his later years he devoted himself entirely to farming and milling. Mr. Beck 
was a prominent member of the Lutheran Church, and a devoted worker in 
all of its enterprises, tilling many of the important offices and at the time 
of his death holding the position of treasurer. He was a Democrat in his 
political convictions. His principal connection with public affairs was in the 
interest of the free school system, which he advocated from the beginning, 
and he showed his sincerity by serving as one of the first board of school 
directors in his township, filling the position until his death, when he was 
succeeded by his son Frederick, and in 1872 William, another son, was elected 
to the position, which he held for over twent}' years. 

As previously mentioned, Mr. Beck was married in 1817 to Anna Maria 
Beider, who was born in 1794, and died in 1870. In 1851, the year following 
his death, she erected the substantial brick residence which still stands upon 
the homestead place ; the bricks were wood burned, and were made by Abraham 
Bertolet near Schuylkill Haven. The place has been thriftily cared for up 
to the present, and though over sixty years old is still a handsome and 
attractive residence. Nine children were born to the marriage of Mr. and 
Mrs. Beck, of whom we have the following record : ( i ) Elizabeth married 
Joseph Wilde, whom she survived, her death occurring at Hazleton, Pa. Their 
children were: George (deceased), William, Joseph, Bide, Tillie, John J., 
Charles and Libby, the last named deceased. (2) Jacob died young. (3) 
Frederick, born Dec. 6, 1S24, died in North ^Nlanheim township. He married 
Magdaline Hurleman, and they had three children : George J., who is de- 
ceased; Mary L., who married Dr. J. W. Weist, of Schuylkill Haven; and 
Charles F., a well known merchant of Cressona. (4) George, who died in 
North Manheim township, had the following family : Mary J., who married 
George Coover (he is deceased) ; William H., living at Hazleton, Pa. ; Barbara, 
wife of Charles Smith; George, who died leaving no family; Edward, living 
at Schuylkill Haven; David, deceased, and Katie, Mrs. Bonner. (5) Edward 
was the' father of Isaac G. Beck. (6) John, who died at Beckville, had a 
family of three children: William J., who lives at Beckville; Blanch; and 
Maria, deceased. (7) Mary married Emil Stecker, and died at Mount 
Carmel, Pa. She had children as follows : George, who lives at Mount 
Carmel ; Henry, deceased : Naomi, ]\Irs. Lord; Joseph, living at Blount Carmel ; 
Ada. wife of Dr. George Wentz, of Scranton, Pa.; and Katie. Mrs. Sement, 
who died at Frackville. Pa. (8) Catherine, who married David Clark, is 
the only survivor of this family, and is eighty years old. She resides at 
Hazleton. Her five children were : Jennie, Mrs. Engle ; George, deceased ; 
Catherine, Mrs. Samuel Price ; Frank, who lives at Chambersburg, Pa. ; and 
Potter, deceased. (9) W'illiam, who was a miller by occupation, lived and 
died at Beckville. His children were as follows: Ada, widow of George 
Dechert; John J., of Reading, Pa.; Catherine, Blanche and Annie, all un- 
married; Alabel. wife of Edward Silliman, now of Mahanoy City, Pa.; Clar- 
ence, who lives at Kingston, Pa. : and Effie, deceased wife of George Stichter, 
of Pottsville. Mr. and Mrs. Jacob Beck, the parents, are interred in the old 
burial ground at Schuylkill Haven. 

Edward Beck, son of Jacob, was born March 11, 1829, on the old home- 
stead, where he died in 1904, spending all his life in North Manheim township. 



102 SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PEXNSYLVAXL\ 

He received his education in the local public schools, and assisted his father 
at home until twenty-one years of age, when he engaged in lumbering, also 
carrying on a sawmill. Milling was always his principal industry, but in 
connection therewith he carried on farming rather extensively, and his inter- 
ests in both lines brought him into a number of business transactions in his 
vicinity. His lumber operations quite naturally led to various land deals, and 
at one time he owned 600 acres in North Alanheim and Wayne townships. As 
executor of his mother's estate, a large share of his attention for some years 
was devoted to its management. Air. Beck gave evidence of unusual business 
ability in everything he undertook, carrying on his own afifairs intelligently 
and managing a number of concerns intrusted to him by others with the 
utmost integrity and regard for their best interests. Though he took no 
special part in public affairs, he was well known throughout his section of 
the county. Like his father he was a Democrat in politics, though he did not 
invariably support the measufes of the party. His religious connection was 
with the Reformed Church. On May 2, 1857, Air. Beck married Mary Ann 
Strauch, daughter of Isaac and Kate Strauch, of Cressona, this county, and 
Isaac G. was the only child of this union. Mrs. Beck died in March, 191 1, 
and is buried with her husband at Cressona cemetery. 

Isaac G. Beck was bom Sept. 28, 1865, at Beckville, and attended public 
school in the home locality until he was si.xteen years old. For the three 
years following he was a clerk in the store of Charles F. Beck, at Cressona, 
but returned home to help his father, and gained an excellent business training 
in the management of his family interests. He did teaming and other work 
until 1895, and for the next five years carried on a hotel at Beckville, now 
operated by William J- Beck, in 1900 returning to the home place, where he 
has since been variously occupied. He was associated with his father until 
the latter's death, and has settled on the homestead, being in the lumber 
business, and retaining the ownership of much valuable property, his holdings 
being the most extensive individual interests in the vicinity. Like his fore- 
fathers he has done much to promote the industrial prosperity of his section, 
having the characteristic energy, ability and resource of the thrifty family to 
which he belongs. For years Mr. Beck did considerable teaming, at one period 
giving most of his time to hauling for the Cressona Powder Mills. Air. Beck 
has been associated with local public affairs to the extent of giving his services 
as school director and supervisor, holding the former office for four years. He 
is a Democrat in politics, and like his father connected with the Reformed 
Church, he and his family belonging to St. Mark's Congregation, of Cressona. 
Socially he is a member of Cressona Lodge, No. 426, F. & A. M., of which 
he is a past master. 

In June, 1889, Mr. Beck married Kate L. Rubert, daughter of Michael 
Rubert, of North Manheim township, and she died in August, 1906; she is 
buried at Cressona. They had one child, Dorothy, now the wife of George 
Knecht, of Scranton, Pa., and the mother of one son, George Isaac. Mr. 
Beck's second marriage was to Catherine Paule, daughter of John and Catherine 
Paule, of Schuylkill Haven. 

CHARLES DOUGLAS MILLER, AI. D., is a physician whose work has 
been conducted along the broadest lines of medical practice. His father was 
in practice in Schuylkill county from 1867 until his death as a physician and 
dentist, and few families have a more creditable record of long continued 



SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 103 

service to their fellow men than the Millers have gained in Schuylkill county. 
They are an old Berks county family, Joseph Miller, the grandfather of Dr. 
Charles D. Miller, having been born in the vicinity of Hamburg, that county, 
where he followed farming. His children were as follows: Joseph; Jacob; 
Alexander M., who was a graduate of the University of Pennsylvania and a 
successful physician; Richard A. M., now the only survivor of the family, 
living at Hamburg, Berks county; George Merkel; Mrs. John Swoyer; Mrs. 
Reuben Kolback, and ^Irs. Peter D. Hottenstine. 

George Merkel Miller, M. D., D. D. S., was born at Hamburg, Berks Co., 
Pa. He received his literary education at Franklin and Marshall College, 
Lancaster, Pa., subsequently taking a course in dentistry at the Philadelphia 
College of Dental Surgery. He also graduated from the Eclectic Medical 
College of Philadelphia. During the Civil war he served as a surgeon in the 
Union army. In 1867 Dr. Miller removed with his family from Hamburg to 
Mahanoy City, Schuylkill Co., Pa., where he practiced his professions until 
1885. That year he located at Pottsville, in which borough he passed the 
remainder of his life, dying at the age of sixty-two years. From the time of 
his settlement there he confined his attention to the practice of dentistry. He 
was a pioneer. in the use of ether in the. extraction of teeth, a departure from 
the customs of his time typical of his progressive nature and his freedom from 
prejudices of any kind; in fact, he gave much of his time to the study of 
anaesthetics and their practical application, and did much to promote their 
proper use in both of his professions and to remove the opposition which the 
pioneers in their use had to meet in many cases in spite of the advantage 
which would seem to need no defense. As early as the sixties he was enthu- 
siastic in this particular work of the medical profession, and in 1872 he 
published a pamphlet on anaesthetics, discussing the subject in popular language, 
''giving the origin, history, etc., of the most popular and useful anesthetics, 
designed to prove to the masses their harmless character." The arguments 
he presents are interesting, showing the fear of anaesthetics entertained by 
many people in that day. 

Dr. Miller married Elizabeth A. Geiger, daughter of Charles R. Geiger, 
of Pottstown, Pa., and they became the parents of children as follows : Anna 
E. died wdien four years old; Ida, deceased, was the wife of J. P. German, 
a Lutheran minister ; Charles Douglas is mentioned below ; Mary S. is the 
wife of Dr. A. L. Gillars, a physician of Pottsville, Pa.; Harvey Harris died 
when six years old. 

Charles Douglas Miller was born Oct. 17, 1861, at Hamburg, Pa., and 
was but a young boy when the family moved to Mahanoy City. There he 
received a public school education, and was graduated from the high school 
in 1880. Meantime, during school vacations, he had served an apprenticeship 
in the office of the Mahanoy Gazette, where he was employed from 1874 to 
1877, and from 1877 until 1882 he spent his time out of school in his father's 
drug store. He also began his medical studies under his father's tuition, during 
which time, in 1881 and 1882, he taught school. In September, 1882, he 
became a student at the Jefferson Medical College, Philadelphia, graduating 
from there March 29, 1884. In 18S6-87 he took a post-graduate course at 
the same institution. In April, 1884. he commenced practice at Mahanoy 
City, and shortly after his father's removal to Pottsville followed him to the 
borough, settling there permanently Nov. 9, 1886. It was not long before his 
professional work had drawn him into the larger activities of service to his 



104 SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 

fellow men. In January, 1887, he was appointed outdoor physician for the 
poor of Pottsville and vicinity, serving as such until 1889. His large private 
practice has not shut him out from general usefulness as a citizen, whether 
in his professional capacity or otherwise. For several years he was on the 
medical staff, as visiting physician, of the Pottsville Hospital. Since 1907 
he has been physician to the Children's Home of Pottsville, located near the 
borough, at Mechanicsville. He is a prominent member of the Schuylkill 
County Medical Society, of which he was secretary in 1888-89 and treasurer 
in 1890, and is also a prominent member of the medical society of the State 
of Pennsylvania. He has served as medical examiner for several life insur- 
ance companies, and is a member of the board of pension examiners for 
Schuylkill county. His thorough command of German as well as English has 
aided him greatly in his work. Dr. Miller has his office and residence at No. 
204 West Market street, Pottsville. He has made a number of contributions 
to medical literature, his writings including a Thesis on Rheumatism ; a "Dis- 
cussion of Bergeon's Treatment for Consumption" published in the "American 
Medical Digest" of September, 1887 ; an article entitled "Diphtheria Antitoxin 
Employed in the Treatment of Scarlet Fever," published in the "Pennsylvania 
Medical Journal" in August, 1904; and an article which appeared in the "Penn- 
sylvania Medical Journal" on typhoid fever, in which he proposes the use of 
carbolic acid and iodine as a specific treatment. Dr. Miller has published in 
pamphlet form three of his essays, the first being his graduation essay, written 
on the completion of his high school course in Mahanoy City, "First Darkness, 
Then Light" ; the subject of the second, "Acute Articular Rheumatism," his 
graduation thesis on completion of his course in the Jefferson Medical College; 
the third, on "Laws of Nature," was delivered at the annual meeting of the 
High School Alumni Association of Mahanoy City, June 4. 1885. Dr. ^Miller 
is also one of the editors of "Modern Researches" by Bayer, United States, 
having charge of the volume (285 pages) published in 1904. 

Dr. Miller is a member of the board of directors of the Pottsville Y. M. 
C. A., and has done splendid work for the borough in that connection. He 
belongs to the English Lutheran Church, of which he has been treasurer for 
fifteen years, and has also held the positions of deacon and elder, giving his 
best efforts to the promotion of its interest and work. Socially he belongs 
to Lily of the \'alley Lodge, No. 281, I. O. O. F., to Franklin Encampment 
(Odd Fellows), to the Modern Woodmen of America, and to the Improved 
Order of Heptasophs. 

On Jan. 5, 1889, Dr. Miller married Alice S. Wagner, daughter of F. B. 
Wagner, a rnerchant of Mahanoy City. They have had two children, Eliza- 
beth Caroline and Charles Douglas. 

ADAMS. Several decades ago the late George Adams settled in North 
Manheim township, in the southern part of Schuylkill county, at what is 
now known as Adamsdale. A carpenter by trade, he engaged in the building 
of boats at that point, branching out into other lines of business as opportunity 
offered, and practically laid the foundations of the thriving comnuinity which 
has since borne his name, and whose principal activities are still conducted 
by the members of the Adams family. He was a member of the fifth genera- 
tion of his family in this country, and we give herewith the record of the 
early generations. 

Anthony Adam, as the name was then spelled, was born in the Fatherland 



I 



SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENNSYLVANL'\ 105 

in the year 1716, and emigrated to America in the year 1741. He sailed from 
Rotterdam on the snow "Molly," commanded by Capt. John Cranch. His vessel 
arrived at Philadelphia, and the passengers, having taken the oath of allegiance 
to the English so\ereign, were qualified to land Oct. 26, 1741. Anthony 
Adam's age is entered on the passenger list as twenty-five .years. On Feb. 7, 
1748, he received from the proprietaries of the Province of Pennsylvania a 
warrant for a tract of 136 acres, 146 perches of land in Albany township, then 
a part of Philadelphia county. This land was surveyed for him by the 
surveyor general of the Province June 6, 1752. The farm is now in the 
possession of Jacob W'eisner, of Round Top, Albany township, Berks county. 

Anthony Adam, or Andoni Adam, as he wrote his name, received a warrant 
for a tract of 135 acres and 47 perches "above Maxatawny," Feb. 7, 1748. 
In 1 761 he sold 140 acres of his land in Albany township to John Reinhard. 
He was administrator of the estate of Albrecht Stimmel, of Albany township, 
in 1766, being the chief creditor. His administration account was audited and 
approved in December of 1768. The date of death of Anthony Adam, of 
Albany township, is not known. 

Anthony Adam (2), son of Anthony of Albany township, was born about 
the year 1736, and was a resident of the adjoining township of Windsor in 
1758, described on the tax list of that year as a single man. He married 
Rosina Dunkel, widow of Mncent Lesher, of Richmohd township. Anthony 
Adam served during the Revolutionary war as a private in Capt. Jacob Ladich's 
company. Col. Samuel Ely's battalion, of Berks county militia, as appears 
from a muster roll showing that this company was in the service of the 
United States from Oct. i to Oct. 17, 1781 (Pennsylvania Archives, 5th Series, 
^'ol. y, pp. 279-281). In 1799 Anthony Adam (2) received from the State 
of Pennsylvania a patent of 307 acres of land called "Manheim" on Briar 
creek, in Northumberland (now Columbia) county, Pennsylvania, and in 
1806 received a patent for another tract of 426 acres called "Quincy," on the 
same creek. These lands he conveyed to his four sons. Anthony Adam died 
some time after April 27, 1809. He had at least four children, as follows: 
Peter was a resident of Windsor township, Berks county; Anthony (3) was 
of Briarcreek township, Columbia county ; Jacob Adam, of Richmond town- 
ship, Berks county, married Susan Kline ; Abraham, of Briarcreek, born Oct. 
7, 1799, died in Briarcreek July 6, 1855, married Sarah ]\Iiller. 

Peter Adam, grandfather of George Adams, born Oct. i, 1765, died July 
I, 1849. He lived in Windsor township, Berks county, and was a farmer all 
his life. He was a consistent member of the Reformed Church, and a Demo- 
crat in politics. He married Catharina Hausknecht. 

Samuel Adams, son of Peter, lived and died at Windsor Castle, in Windsor 
township, Berks Co., Pa. He was born in that township in the beginning of 
the nineteenth century, and lived to be only twenty-five years old. He \vas 
engaged principally at the carpenter's trade. To his marriage with Catherine 
Stausser. daughter of Henry Stausser, were born three children, Hannah, 
George and Catherine (who died at the age of eighteen years, unmarried) : 
and by his second marriage there was one child, Hettie, Mrs. Neiswender, of 
Tildeii township, Berks Co., Pa. Hannah was twice married, first to Edwin 
Skeen and second to John Carl. She died Sept. 12, 1905. at Pottsville. 

George Adams was born March 3, 1828, in Windsor township, Berks 
county, and had somewhat limited educational opportunities, attending the 
common schools there in his early boyhood. He early learned the trade of 



106 SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 

carpenter. Upon coming to Schuylkill county in 1847 he first located at 
Ashland, thence removing to Middleport, where he became engaged by the 
Philadelphia & Reading Railway Company at his trade, as foreman in charge 
of the building of bridges and stations. He built a number of breakers for 
individual coal operators. When he gave up work for the railroad company 
he became employed in one of the boat works at Landingville, in 1S58 begin- 
ning the building of boats on his own account, meeting with such success that 
he did the principal business of the county in his day and locality. He often 
had as many as fifty men working for him and si.x boats under construction 
at one time. In 1866 he purchased a fine farm at what is now Adamsdale, 
owning a tract of 200 acres, and here he established his business, which was 
practically the center of the life of the town. He continued boatbuilding for 
over thirty years, until the canal between Schuylkill Haven and Port Clinton 
was abandoned — the only outlet for the larger type of boats built during the 
later years of the industry in this section. The first boats built for the Schuyl- 
kill canal were of eighty tons capacity, but those of later construction, used 
in the trade to New York and Baltimore and New Haven, could carry cargoes 
up to three hundred tons. Though the decline of industry on the canal meant 
great loss to a number of business men, it was not so with ^Ir. Adams, who 
had acquired other interests in the meantime, and he turned his energies into 
other lines when he gave up boatbuilding. He had done considerable as a 
cattle dealer; in 1875 he erected a hotel, and later he put up a store, establishing 
the general merchandising business which is still carried on by his estate ; 
he also established a wheelwright shop, repairing and building carriages, and 
ran a sawmill and paint factor)'. He sometimes operated the brickyard located 
on his property, at other times leasing it. On Jan. i, 1891, in partnership with 
G. W. Hubler and A. H. Preuzel, he established the Adams Shoe Company, 
at Adamsdale, for the manufacture of infants' and misses' shoes of the McKay 
and Goodyear styles, and Air. Adams acted as general supervisor and man- 
ager. The factory was first located in the rear of his general store, but in 
1900 a three-story frame building was erected for the purpose, 40 by 100 feet 
in dimensions, providing commodious quarters for the business, which had 
attained considerable importance. About forty hands were employed in his 
day, and the business has been carried on continuously since, his son, John H. 
Adams, being now president of the Adams Shoe Company, his son, Franklin 
P. Adams, vice president, and a third son, Robert W. Adams, secretary. To 
the original products have been added a line of ladies' and children's shoes, 
and thus for over twenty years the business has maintained its place as a 
most important industry in that section of the county. The employees now 
number one hundred. George Adams built up a fine trade as a general 
merchant, carrying an excellent stock, which attracted customers from a wide 
territory, and his heirs have been no less successful in keeping up to the 
high standards of the establishment. The farm land he owned at Adamsdale, 
consisting of two valuable tracts, was highly developed under his able man- 
agement, and he gave his attention to its cultivation for nearly forty years. 
Mr. Adams showed surprising versatility in the management of his numerous 
interests, combining his various operations to their mutual advantage, and he 
was one of the important figures of his day, much of the local prosperity 
depending upon his enterprises. Personally he was a man of the highest char- 
acter, honorable in all his dealings, and his death, which occurred March 



'.' 



SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 107 

5, 1901, was universally mourned in this section. Fie is buried in the cemetery 
of the Red Church. 

Air. Adams married Eliza Deiner, daughter of Peter Deiner, of West 
Brunswick- township, Schuylkill county, and of the children born to this 
marriage four died in infancy, the survivors being: George C. ; Richard S., 
at one time foreman in Bradley's agricultural works at Chicago, 111., now 
on the homestead at Adamsdale ; Catherine E., wife of Alorris Runkel, of 
Landingville, a dispatcher in the employ of the Philadelphia & Reading Com- 
pany; Franklin P., agent for the Pennsylvania Railway Company at Adams- 
dale ; Charles S. ; John H. ; and Robert W. The second union was to Mrs. 
Diana Schall. daughter of Rev. Philip Mayer, who for forty-nine years was a 
minister of the Reformed Church. Air. Adams also belonged to that denomina- 
tion. He was a Democrat in his political convictions. 

George C. AD.\iis, eldest surviving son of the late George Adams, was 
born Dec. 31, 1858. He received a public school education, and an excellent 
business training in his father's employ. After following fanning for some 
time he became manager of the store at Adamsdale, and on Alay 24, 1892, 
was appointed postmaster there, which office he has held continuously since. 
He married Alary AI. Kramer, daughter of Jacob Kramer, and they have one 
daughter, Hannah. 

Ch.\rles S. Adams, born Aug. 11, 1870, at Adamsdale, is clerking in the 
general store there now conducted by his father's estate, and also acts as 
assistant postmaster. He married Emma J. Snyder, daughter of Lewis Snyder. 
They have no children. 

JoHX H. Adams, now president of the Adams Shoe Company of Adams- 
dale, was born at that place April 10, 1S72. After attending the local schools 
he took a course at the Keystone State Normal School, at Kutztown, -Pa., 
graduating in 1901, and for three terms taught school in North Alanheim 
township, Schuylkill county. For a time he had charge of the office work 
of his father's shoe company, and he took advantage of his opportunity to 
learn the business thoroughly. When the Adams Shoe Company was incor- 
porated he was made secretary and treasurer, being associated with the concern 
in this capacity until he became the executive head, in January, 1913. Like 
his father and brothers he is a man of unquestioned business ability, and the 
upbuilding of the business had gone on steadily under his able direction. 
He makes his home at Adamsdale, and gives all his attention to the management 
of the shoe business. Air. Adams married Charlotte R. Haeseler, daughter 
of John T. Haeseler, of Orwigsburg, a member of one of the old established 
families of Schuylkill county. Air. and Mrs. Adams have one child, Alarvin L. 
In religious faith this family adheres to the Reformed denomination. 

RonERT W. Adams, youngest surviving son of George Adams, was born 
April 7, 1875, at Adamsdale. He attended school at Pottsville, this county. 
For a number of years he was variously employed, being with the Pennsyl- 
vania Railroad Company at Pottsville, and with the Eastern Steel Company, 
and for a time was employed at clerical work in New York City. On Nov. 
10, 1910, he returned to Adamsdale, where he has since been giving his 
attention to the business of the Adams Shoe Company, of which he is now 
secretary and treasurer. He has proved a vital factor in the administration 
of its affairs, which have been gaining in measure yearly, the high grade of 
its product maintaining its popularity with the dealers and public generally. 
Air. Adams married Clara \'on Fleet, of Alauch Chunk, Pa., and they make 



108 SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PEXXSYL\'ANL\ 

their home at Adamsdale. He is an Odd Fellow, belonging to the lodge at 
Pottsville, this county. 

The Adams Shoe Company, so modestly started, now has a thoroughly 
up-to-date plant, conveniently appointed, and equipped with modem shoe 
machinery, for the manufacture of ladies', misses', children's and infants' shoes. 
It was incorporated under the present title in June, 1903, and since Alarch, 
1913, all of the stock has been owned by the sons of the late George Adams. 
The conduct of the business, jobbing as well as manufacturing, is now entirely 
in their hands, and judging from the favorable reputation of the company 
and its product is most capably managed in every department. 

WILLIAM HENRY ROBINSON, M. D., was not only one of the most 
successful private practitioners of his day in Pottsville but also one of the 
most useful members of the profession who have lived in the community. 
Availing himself unselfishly of the opportunities for service to his fellowmen 
which came to him daily in the course of his duties as a physician, he saw the 
need for wide plans to benefit them which now form part of the record of 
his helpful life. He was a native of Schuylkill county, born May i, 1845, 
son of Morris L. Robinson, who was a coal operator in the county. After 
reading medicine for a time with the late Dr. Andrew Howell Halberstadt, of 
Pottsville, he entered the L'niversity of Pennsylvania, at Philadelphia, graduat- 
ing in 1868. Returning to Schuylkill county, he at once began practice at 
Pottsville, where he established a position among the leading physicians of the 
borough and vicinity. Before long he became proprietor of a drug store in 
the town, and by combining irreproachable service to his patrons with up-to- 
date methods developed the business until it ranked with the most prosperous 
in its line. 

Dr. Robinson's various activities were mostly such as his profession led 
him into. For several years he was secretary of the board of health, and he 
took a deep interest in the success of the Pottsville hospital, serving on its 
staff and in other capacities rendering service of great value to the institution. 
He was an honored member of the County Medical Society, and fraternally 
was a Mason and an Odd Fellow, being a member and past master of Pulaski 
Lodge, No. 216, F. & A. AI., and a member of Miners' Lodge, No. 20, I. O. 
O. F., both of Pottsville. As a sincere Republican he gave his support to 
the party, and he did his share towards promoting good government in the 
town, serving as member of the town council and acting as president of that 
body. He lived in the home at No. 17 North Centre street occupied by 
his widow until January, 1914 — a valuable piece of property. His death 
occurred Nov. 4, 1912, and he is buried in the Charles Baber cemetery. 

Dr. Robinson had one son, Z. Webster, by his first wife. Alary .•\. (Trout). 
On Jan. 18, 191 1, he married (second) jNIary Mrginia Smith, daughter of 
William Emery Smith. No children were born to this marriage. 

WiLLi,'\M Emery Smith, father of Mrs. Mary \". Robinson, was born in 
Canada, and came to Schuylkill county when yet a boy. In his earlier man- 
hood he was employed as a stationary engineer, and later engaged in the coal 
business, being one of the early operators in this region. He lived retired 
for several vears before his death, which occurred Sept. 16, T013, at the home 
of his daughter, Mrs. Robinson, in Pottsville. His wife, Elizabeth (Ansty), 
was bom in England, and come to America when a young girl. She died 
March 7, 1904. Their children were as follows : Alfred J., Charles E., Agnes 



, SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 109 

A., E. Clare, Robert L. (deceased), William E., Jr., Jennie E. (deceased), 
Mary V. (Mrs. Robinson) and John S. (deceased). 

JACOB D. REED, of Schuylkill Haven, is the leader in a leading industry 
of the borough and all southern Schuylkill county, where the Union Knitting 
Mills have tilled a large place in promoting and maintaining prosperous condi- 
tions, permanent in value and influential also by aif'ording practical demonstra- 
tion of the advantages of this region from the manufacturer's standpoint. 
Mr. I-ieed's personal success has borne good fruit for the community in which 
his ambitions have been realized. He himself has always been a man of 
zealous public spirit, doing a good citizen's share in the furtherance of projects 
which need substantial support for their realization, and sharing the responsi- 
bilities of local religious and social enterprises. Mr. Reed was born May 9, 
1857, at Reedsville,-in Wayne township, this county, son of Elias Reed. 

Elias Reed, father of Jacob D. Reed, was a native of Wayne township, 
Schuylkill county, was a lifelong farmer, and died in 1889 at the age of 
fifty-seven years. His wife is still living on the old homestead in Wayne 
township. He married Christiana Deibert, and they had a family of ten 
children, four sons and six datighters, of whom Wallace, the eldest son, died 
when four years old ; Emma, the eldest daughter, died when about six years 
old; the rest attained maturity, viz.: John H., born Dec. 2, 1855, now living 
in South Manheim township, Schuylkill county ; Jacob D. ; Annie R., the wife 
of A. D. Super, living in \\'ayne township; Elizabeth A., the widow of Francis 
M. Luckenbill, of Wayne township ; Mary E., who married Louis Stabler and 
died June 3, 1895 ; George C. ; Sallie G., who married Howard S. Mengel, of 
\\'ayne township; and Susan P., married to Howard D. Becker, of Wayne 
township. 

lacob D. Reed attended the public schools of his native township, and 
remained at home until nineteen years old, working for his father on the 
home farm. In the year 1876 he came to Schuylkill Haven, where he learned 
the shoemaker's trade with William Becker. It was his calling for nearly 
twenty years, until he engaged in the knitting business with John A. Bowen in 
1895. In 1900 a third partner was admitted to the firm, the late Moses 
Leininger. of Orwigsburg, and six weeks after his admission to the business 
Mr. Bowen withdrew, Mr. Reed and Jvlr. Leininger buying his interest in the 
business. They continued it with increasing trade until Mr. Leininger's death, 
and on April i, 1914, Mr. Reed purchased the Leininger estate interest, 
becoming sole proprietor. The establishment is conducted under its old name, 
the Union Knitting Mills. The plant is 40 by 115 feet in dimensions, located 
on William street, and there is a large bleach house doing custom work, with a 
capacity of four thousand pounds per day. One hundred and fifty people 
are emploved, a fact which brings it into the class of important establishments 
in the thriving town of Schuylkill Haven. The product is ladies', misses' and 
children's underwear, in ribbed light weights, and llr. Reed has a patent on 
ladies' closed union suits which are a special feature at this factory. The 
mills are always busy, and never known to close down for want of orders. 
The output is sold to the jobbers and ]\Ir. Reed also takes the output of another 
mill, at Manheim. Lancaster Co., Pa. His sincere desire to see business 
advantages on a good basis in the borough led him to cooperate in the organi- 
zation of the Schuylkill Haven Trust Company, one of the substantial bank- 



110 SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 

ing institutions of this section, of which he was an original director, and is 
still serving as such. 

On Jan. 8, 1885, Mr. Reed married Emma E. Wommer, a daughter of 
Jacob Wommer, of Wayne township, where he was a well known farmer. 
They have two sons : Ivan W., who is now assisting his father at the mill, 
and Willis E., a pupil in the local schools. 

Mr. Reed has filled all the offices in the United Evangelical Church, being 
at present a class leader, and when the new church was erected acted as a 
member of the building committee. Socially he is a member of the Royal 
Arcanum. In political opinion he is a Republican, but he has never taken 
an active part in such affairs. He served fourteen successive years as 
assessor, the length of his service showing how highly his labors were prized. 

ALBERT W. SELTZER. As treasurer of the Seltzer Packing Company 
and vice president of the ^^lerchants' National Bank of Pottsville Albert W. 
Seltzer is a leader in the business activities of Schuylkill county. The former 
enterprise, in which his principal interests center, was founded over forty years 
ago by his father, Conrad Seltzer, and has been maintained ever since by 
members of this family, whose business ability and other substantial qualities 
entitle them to be classed among the leaders of this part of Pennsylvania. The 
firm at present includes Albert W. Seltzer and his brother, William H. Seltzer. 

Conrad Seltzer, the father, was a native of Germany, born Sept. 17, 1817, 
in JMarburg, Hesse. He came to the United States when a youth in the year 
1832, accompanying part of his parents' family. Locating in Fishbach, a sub- 
urb of Pottsville, Schuylkill Co., Pa., he began to work as a butcher, following 
the occupation in which most of his immediate ancestors had been engaged. 
He was one of the earliest men in that business at Pottsville. His first inde- 
pendent business venture was as proprietor of the meat market located in 
Pottsville, on Centre street, opposite the "Exchange Hotel." For several 
years he also followed his business at Minersville, Schuylkill county, in 1858 
giving it up and retiring to his farm, which was known as the "Bull's Head." 
There he continued in practically the same line, as a general breeder of and 
dealer in live stock, being thus engaged until his retirement in 1889. In this 
branch of the business also his careful plans and energetic methods made him 
successful, and his steadily increasing interests formed the basis of the exten- 
sive packing business which his sons have developed and still conduct. Mr. 
Seltzer proved his value to the community in other relations as well. He was 
recognized as a financier of notable ability, a fact which his election as treas- 
urer of the county in 1864 attested. He served one term of two years in that 
position. As a conscientious member of the Lutheran Church he was devoted 
to its welfare, and served for many years as elder and trustee. Though he 
began life humbly, his first home at Fishbach being a small log house near the 
site of the eastern steel mill, he came to be one of the most substantial business 
men of Schuylkill county, and the industry which has grown out of the begin- 
nings he made is now one of the largest of its kind in eastern Pennsylvania. 
His death occurred at Pottsville Sept. 2, 1890. He was a Democrat in politics. 

On Dec. 10, 1839, Mr. Seltzer was married in Schuylkill county to Doro- 
thea E. Roehrig, like himself a native of Germany, and now also deceased. 
Twelve children were bom to their union, namely: William H., now president 
of the Seltzer Packing Company and a resident of Pottsville, married Anna B. 
Thumm ; Albert W. is' next in the family ; Amelia is the widow of Dr. R. F. 



SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENi\'SYLVANL\ 111 

Krebs, late of Reading, Berks Co., Pa.; Charles F. is engaged in business as a 
saddler and harnessniaker at Pottsville ; Josephine is the wife of Charles R. 
Kear, of Minersvillc, Pa., president of the First National Bank of Minersville 
and of the JNIinersville Water Company; John C. lives at Reading, Pa., where 
he is connected with the Farmers' National Bank; Clara is the wife of F. P. 
Mortimer, a prominent merchant of Pottsville ; Frederick is carrying on a 
livery business in Pottsville; Dolly died at the age of twenty-six years; 
Edward L. is engaged in farming and fruit growing in Shelltown, Md. ; Henry 
H. is serving as register of wills of Schuylkill coumy ; Bertha E. is the wife of 
Frederick E. Zerbey, superintendent of the Lehigh \'alley Railroad Company, 
residing at Wilkes-lJarre, Pennsylvania. 

Albert W. Seltzer was born July 7, 1843, ^t Pottsville, Schuylkill county, 
and was given a public school education in that town. He had been working 
for a time when he enlisted for service in the Civil war in August, 1862, becom- 
ing a member of Company A, 129th Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantr>', which 
he joined at Harrisburg. After serving his term he received his honorable 
discharge I\Iay 26, 1863. He saw considerable active service, taking part in 
all the engagements of the Army of the Potomac during that period, and twice 
received tlesh wounds. Subsequently Mr. Seltzer studied for a term at the 
Eastman business college at Poughkeepsie. N. Y., graduating in July, 1864. 
As early as 1S66 he went into the live stock business on his own account, his 
natural aptitude for this line no doubt being responsible for much of his early 
success. However, the expansion of the business along modem lines has 
progressed steadily. In 1887 he became associated with his brother William 
in the pork packing business. They erected a plant on Water and Temple 
streets (the one still occupied), having a main building 200 by 200 feet in 
dimensions, with wing 175 by 175. three stories high. Within five years the 
business had attained stich proportions that employment was given to thirty- 
five men, and fifty thousand hogs were slaughtered annually, besides fifteen 
hundred head of cattle, about six hundred calves and a large number of sheep 
and lambs. The firm name, originally Seltzer & Bro., is now the Seltzer 
Packing Company. The present organization was effected in 1891, the officers 
being: William H. Seltzer, president; A. W. Seltzer, treasurer and secretary. 
The business has continued to gain in size and importance until it is now the 
leading industry of the kind in this section of the State. 

The Seltzers are worthy successors of their ambitious father and their 
many sterling qualities have placed them among the most valuable citizens 
of Pottsville from early manhood. Besides his interests as a packer, Albert W. 
Seltzer is particularly well known as vice president of the Merchants' National 
Bank of Pottsville, which position he has filled ever since he became a director 
of that institution in 1909. He is also a director of the Pottsville Mutual 
Fire Insurance Company. His numerous personal interests, however, have 
not prevented his serving his fellow citizens more than capably as member 
of the city council for thirteen years and of the school board for thirteen years, 
the community thus having the benefit of his counsel and judgment in the 
management of local affairs. His public spirit has been demonstrated in many 
instances. Though a Democrat in politics he is independent of party when 
loyalty to his principles is at question. Fraternally he is a Mason, belonging to 
Pulaski Lodge, No. 216, F. & A. M. He is a member of the German Lutheran 
Church, and has long served as elder and deacon, forty years in the former 
office. 



112 SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PEx\x\ SYLVAN LA. 

Mr. Seltzer was married Feb. 22, 1866, to Emma R. Kohler, whose father, 
Jacob Kohler, was a pioneer resident of Pottsville. Five children were bom 
to this marriage: Dorothea Elizabeth is the wife of William T. Knight, clerk 
in a silk mill, and they have two children, Albert and Dorothea; Charles A., 
who is clerking for his father, married Effie Scott, and their two children are 
Karl Luther and Ruth E. ; JMarie is the wife of W. J. Schmidt, who is em- 
ployed by the Seltzer Packing Company (they have no children) ; Alice A. is 
the wife of Daniel IMiller Foster, of \ oungstown, Ohio, and they have three 
children, Amie Louise, Dorothea Elizabeth and Emma Kohler; Amie Louise 
lives at home. 

COL. WILLLAAI THOMPSON was born .May 22, 1834, at Pottsville, 
Schuylkill Co., Pa. He was of Scotch lineage, and his American ancestry dates 
to 1735, when John and James Thompson, whose forbears had been among 
the Scotch Covenanters who removed to Ireland early in the eighteenth cen- 
tury, left County Antrim, and landing in Pennsylvania took up their residence 
in Chester county. William Thompson, the grandfather of Col. William 
Thompson, served in the Revolutionary war. His father, Samuel Thompson, 
was born in 1792, and died in Pottsville, Pa., in 185 1. His mother was Eliza- 
beth Cunningham, of Newton Hamilton, JNIifflin Co., Pennsylvania. 

As a youth Colonel Thompson received a most careful training, and to 
this fact may be attributed that combination of ability and integrity which in 
early life secured him positions of honor and trust, and in later years brought 
to him a large financial reward. W hen the war of the Rebellion broke out 
he had not reached the age of twenty-seven, yet he had already taken high 
rank as a business man in the town of his birth, and was at the head of a well 
established and profitable banking concern. Full of patriotic ardor, his im- 
pulse was to go at once to the front, but the exactions of his position were 
such that in justice to others, as well as himself, some months of delay were 
unavoidable before he felt that he could follow the trend of his inclinations 
and become an active defender of the Union. In September, 1862, War 
Governor Andrew G. Curtin gave him authority to recruit a cavalry company 
in Schuylkill county, and on Nov. ist he was mustered into the service as 
captain of Company H, 17th Pennsylvania Cavalry, which belonged to the 2d 
Brigade, ist Cavalry Division, and served under the successive commands of 
Generals Pleasanton, Buford, Merritt and Devin, with the greatest efficiency 
and distinction. For several months, commencing in May, 1863, Captain 
Thompson commanded Gen. George G. Meade's escort — Companies D and H, 
and later was with Gen. P. H. Sheridan in his battles ; his active service, in 
fact, included participation in nearly every engagement in which the Lhiion 
cavalry took part in the operations of the Army of the Potomac during the 
last two years of the war. He was severely wounded in the right shoulder 
at Kearneystown, \'a., when three divisions of Union cavalry made a charge 
upon General Early's entire force, to divulge its strength and plans. He was 
elected major Feb. 13, 1865, and a month later, March 13th, was brevetted 
lieutenant-colonel "for meritorious and distinguished services." It was only 
when incapacitated by his wounds that he was ever absent from the front ; 
and, with these exceptions, he never lost a day's duty while he was in the 
service. He was mustered out on June 20, 1865. His army career involved 
the numberless hardships in camp and field to which an impetuous and truly 
patriotic soldier is suliject. but from the hour in which he secured his first 



SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 113 

recruit under Go\'eriior Curtin's commission to the prouder one when he was 
first in command of his regiment in a reconnoissance towards Appomattox 
Court House, at michiight. April 8, 1865, which demonstrated the presence of. 
the Army of Northern \'irginia in force, every responsibihty was promptly 
taken, every duty cheerfully performed, every discomfort uncomplainingly en- 
dured. His record as a soldier, from first to last, was a brilliant one and 
brought with it its own immediate reward. 1 le was loved by his command, 
respected by his superior officers, and honored by all. 

Colonel Thompson's interest in his companions in the army did not end 
with the war. His regiment claimed the honor of firing the first gun in the 
great confiict at Gettysburg, and to him to a great extent is due the erection, 
on that historic field, of a grand monument to the memory of those who gave 
up their lives in the struggle. In private life, the old soldier of whatever rank 
was a comrade; the widows and orphans of the war the object of his tender 
and generous solicitude. 

Upon the close of his service in the field. Colonel Thompson again turned 
his attention to the calling for which his early education an'd experience had 
so thoroughly fitted him. Possessed of a fair competence by inheritance from 
his father, he became a large stockholder in the Miners' National Bank of 
Pottsville, one of the oldest and most substantial banks in the State. He was 
elected a director of this institution on Jan. 13, 1882, and thereafter made its 
interests his life work, his long and honorable connection with it ending only 
with his death. He served as cashier from May 23, 1S82, until Jan. 25, 1893, 
when he was elected vice president, and became president on Jan. 12, 1894. 
His dealings in real estate were judicious and profitable, and his property 
holdings included some of the finest business blocks in Pottsville. An attendant 
at the Presbyterian Church, Colonel Thompson was one of its most open- 
handed supporters, his contributions towards the successful efforts to secure 
the splendid pipe organ of that church being an example of his generosity. 
With the sterling and impregnable characteristics of the early Covenanters 
which came to him as an inheritance, he remained steadfast to his patriotic 
principles throughout a long and eventful life, and as a citizen his dealings 
were fair and equitable, his business transactions open and honorable. 

Although Colonel Thompson never married, he was most genial and 
companionable, pleasant in all social relations, and fatherly and tender towards 
those endeared to him by ties of consanguinity. He died July 9, 1903, at Potts- 
ville, Pa., and was buried there in the Thompson family plot in the Charles 
Baber cemetery. 

LEWIS C. THOMPSON. No name in Pottsville is more highly respected 
than that of Thompson, where through several decades of honorable associa- 
tion with business and social life its standing has been maintained without 
qualification. Various representatives of the family to which Lewis C. Thomp- 
son belongs have been notably successful, and he himself has the distinction 
of being at present the oldest business man in town. He has completed almost 
sixty years of continuous activity in the same line and at the same location. 
In company with Harry P. Stichter he established the first hardware concern 
in Pottsville, now incorporated under the name of Lewis C. Thompson, and 
he has been at the head for fifty years. The business is both wholesale and 
retail and the house is one of the best known in this part of the State, with 
substantial standing gained during a long career of reliable transactions. This 
Vol. 1—8 



114 SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENXSYLVAXL\ 

has been Mr. Thompson's principal interest, but he has other connections which 
show his sympathy with local conditions and willingness to assist them to 
prosperity whenever possible. 

The early records of the Thompson family are of interest in this connec- 
tion. Its first ancestors in America came to this country from County Antrim, 
Ireland, about 1730-35. The family, however, is of Scotch lineage, of old Scotch 
Covenanter stock, which early in the eighteenth century moved from their 
home in Scotland to Ireland, residing temporarily in that country. John 
Thompson, Sr., and his brother James, upon their arrival in America located 
at Cross Roads, Chester Co., Pa. Then they removed to Hanover township, 
same county (now in Lebanon county), and later to a farm near Derry Church, 
about ten miles distant from Harrisburg. Here John Thompson married his 
second wife, whose maiden name was Slocum, and" shortly afterwards removed 
to a farm three miles from Thompsontown, which was inherited by his sons 
Peter and Thomas, to whom he willed it ; when Thomas died his interest went 
by bequest to Peter, who in turn left it to his son John Peter, who died in 
1882. John Thompson, Sr., married for his third wife Sarah Patterson. By 
his first, whose maiden name was Greenleaf (or Greenlea), he had four chil- 
dren, one of whom, \VilIiam, was the grandfather of Lewis C. Thompson. 
James Thompson, a brother of John Thompson, Sr., settled along South 
Mountain, Franklin county, where his descendants still reside. 

William Thompson, grandfather of Lewis C. Thompson, was born in 1754 
in Thompsontown, Hanover township, Dauphin Co., Pa. He followed farming 
and merchandising. During the Revolutionary war he served as a soldier in 
the Colonial cause, and participated in the battles of Brandywine and Ger- 
mantown. He married Jane Mitchell at Chambersburg, Pa., and they had a 
family of nine children, six sons and three daughters. 

Samuel Thompson, son of William, was born in 1792, in Thompsontown, 
Dauphin county, and died March 7, 185 1, in Pottsville, Schuylkill county. On 
Nov. 6, 1827, he married Ann Alricks, of Harrisburg, Pa., who died Aug. 27, 
1828, aged twenty-nine years, ten months. On Aug. 6, 1833, he married 
(second) Elizabeth Cunningham, of Newton Hamilton, ^lifflin Co., Pa., who 
was born JNIarch 3, 1805, and died in her seventieth year, Oct. 5, 1874, at Potts- 
ville. Four children were born to this union: Col. William, bom !May 22, 
1834, served through the Civil war in the 17th Pennsylvania Cavalr}^ and was 
mustered out at its close as lieutenant-colonel of his regiment ; he became a 
prominent man of Pottsville, particularly in his connection with the Miners' 
National Bank, of which he was president. Lewis C, born Nov. 7, 1835, is 
mentioned below. Emily J., bom July 21, 1838, died Nov. 17, 1880; on Oct. 
II, 1866, she married Maj. Edward Carey Baird, who died Nov. 14, 1874, 
and they had one child, Bessy Carey Baird, born in Depere, near Green Bay, 
Wis., who was married to Joseph Archibald, of Scranton. Heber Samuel, who 
completes the family, is fully mentioned elsewhere in this work. 

Lewis C. Thompson was born Nov. 7, 1835, at Pottsville. where he obtained 
his early education in the public schools, later attending school at Chambers- 
burg. Franklin county, and continuing his studies at the Bolmar Academy, 
West Chester, Pa. His business Hfe began early. In April, 1855. in partner- 
ship with Harry P. Stichter, he established a wholesale and retail hardware 
business at the' corner of Centre and Market streets, Pottsville. the firm of 
Stichter & Thompson being the pioneer in the town in that line. This associa- 
tion lasted until the spring of 1865, when Mr. Thompson purchased ]\Ir. Stich- 



I 



SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 115 

ter's interest and associated with him his brother, Heber S. Thompson, the 
firm becoming L. C. Thompson & Company. Later Heber S. Thompson with- 
drew, and from that time the business was carried on by Lewis C. Thompson 
himself until Alay i, 191 1, when it became incorporated, as previously stated, 
with the following officers : Lewis C. Thompson, president ; William M. 
Thompson, vice president ; J. Harry Benner, secretary and treasurer, and 
L. C. Thompson, William M. Thompson, J. Harry Benner and W. K. Wood- 
bury, directors. Though Air. Thompson's time and attention have been 
directed principally to the affairs of this concern, he has formed other asso- 
ciations, and is at present a director of the Miners' National Bank of Potts- 
ville, and a director of the Union Hall Association. He has always taken an 
active interest and part in the life of the borough as a member of the Potts- 
ville Club, and a prominent worker in the First Presbyterian Church; he served 
as president of its board of trustees when the present church building on 
Mahantongo street was erected, in 1874. Mr. Thompson's cordial manner in 
business as well as social circles has won him the friendship of all he has met, 
and he had made his success with the interest and good will of his associates. 

During the Civil war Mr. Thompson enlisted in Company A, 27th Emer- 
gency Regiment, raised when Lee invaded the State in 1863. 

C)n June 10, 1862, Mr. Thompson married Rebecca Frances Bruner, who 
was born in Chester county, Pa., near the line of Berks county, daughter of 
John and Maria (Jones) Bruner. The following children have been born to 
this union : Elizabeth May was educated at Bradford, Mass., and on Feb. 
20, 1890, became the wife of Frank Bailey Parsons, of Northampton, Mass., 
who died March 16, 191 1, his widow now residing at Pottsville, Pa.; Mary 
Louise married, Jan. 24, 1900, Henry T. Blodgett, of New York City, and they 
reside at East Paget in the Bermudas; Carrie Frances, born in 1866, died in 
infancy ; W'illiam Mitchell was educated in the local schools and the Hill 
school at Pottstown, also spending a year in Phillips Academy, at Andover, 
and since 1892 has been in business with his father (he was married Jan. 7, 
1902, to Mary Jane Sturman, daughter of Joseph T. Sturman and Sarah E. Go- 
lightly) ; Elsie received her education in "the select schools, and is now living 
at home. In 1875 jMr. Thompson began the erection of his beautiful residence 
at No. So I West Mahantongo street, which he and his family have occupied 
since July 4, 1876. 

The Bruners, Mrs. Thompson's family, have been in Pennsylvania since 
Provincial days. Her great-grandfather, Ulrich (or Owen) Bruner, a native 
of Switzerland, was born on Whitsunday, June 4, 1730. He sailed from 
Rotterdam to America, via Cowes, England, on board the ship "Mercury," 
]\Iay 29, 1735, in company with a number from the Palatinate, among them 
Henry Brunner (the name being variously spelled). In 1755 Ulrich was mar- 
ried to Fronica Gross (or Bross), a native of Pauls, Germany, who had settled 
in Bucks county, Pa., in 1744, and they had born to them six sons and five 
daughters, of whom nine names are on record, viz.: Maria. John, Isaac, 
Fronica, Ulrich (or Owen), Barbara, Isaac, Jacob and Ivlagdalena. The 
mother of this family died Feb. 27, 1796, and the father Feb. 19, 1821, at the 
advanced age of ninety-one years. 

Owen Bruner, one of the above named children, was born July 5, 1762, 
and on March 2, 1787, married Elizabeth Weaver, daughter of John and 
Barbara Weaver, prominent and wealthy Mennonites of Earl township, Lan- 
caster Co., Pa. He died Nov. 29, 1843. Mrs. Elizabeth Bruner died March 



116 SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PEXXSYLVAXL\ 

12, 1853, at the age of eighty-five years. She bore her husband ten children: 
John, born Jan. 7, 1788, died Jan. 15, 1814; Barbara, born Dec. 4, 1789, was 
married to John Good; Abraham, born Sept. 24, 1791, married, Dec. 15, 1814, 
Rebecca Evans, and died Alarch 3, 1870; Owen (or Ulrich), born Oct. 24, 
1794, died April i, 1845, the husband of Ann Martin; Jacob, born June 20, 
1796, married Ruth A. Talbot; John, born Dec. 29, 1799, married Maria 
Jones; Isaac, born April 2, 1802, was a physician, and died Dec. 29, 1828; 
Elizabeth, born Sept. 30, 1804, was married to Dr. William Happersett ; Daniel 
I., born June 22, 1807, was also a physician, and died in 1888, the husband 
of Elizabeth Davies ; and Fronica (or Frances), born June 23, 1810, was mar- 
ried to John Kenega. 

ANDREW B. COCHRAN, late of Pottsville, one of the foremost civH 
and mining engineers in this section of Pennsylvania, had a career of over 
forty-nine years in that profession. Practically all his life was spent in the 
same line of work. A man of unpretentious disposition, yet with marked 
ability and high ideals, he was a quiet force for progress and the establishing 
of lofty standards in the community where he lived during the greater part 
of his active years. Of Scotch-Irish descent, he was a son of Andrew Coch- 
ran, a native of County Derry, Ireland, who came to the Uinted States about 
1820 and passed the rest of his life in Pennsylvania. His first location was at 
Lancaster, whence he subsequently moved to Philadelphia, dying there at an 
advanced age. He was extensively engaged in the lumber business, having 
interests both at Philadelphia and at Williamsport, Pa., at the latter place 
erecting the first sawmills built there. During his later years he also dealt in 
real estate and was engaged in conveyancing. He married Sarah Bovd, who 
was born at Lancaster, Pa., and they had a family of six children : Sarah, 
Eliza, Martha, Mary, Andrew B. and Richard, all deceased. 

Andrew B. Cochran was born July 14, 1836, in Philadelphia, and obtained 
his early education in the public schools there, taking a four years' course at 
the Central high school. Then he learned the business of conveyancing. In 
February, 1859, he came to Pottsville to take a position with P. W. Sheafer 
and began the study of mining engineering. Remaining with ]\Ir. Sheafer until 
1862, he then went to New York City and became associated with his father, 
who was in New York at that time looking after mining speculations in which 
he was interested. On his return to Pottsville, in September, 1866, Mr. 
Cochran entered the employ of Harris Brothers, with whom he continued 
until 1868, that year forming a partnership with George B. Strauch, their 
business being civil and mining engineering. This association lasted until 
1873, in which year Mr. Strauch retired because of failing health, and for a 
number of years afterwards Mr. Cochran did business alone, until he took 
his son into partnership in 1889. The firm name then became A. B. Cochran 
& Son, and when Andrew B. Cochran died, IMay 14, 1908, the son succeeded to 
his interests, which he is still conducting. 

Andrew B. Cochran was quite prominent in the Republican party, serving 
as county chairman and frequently as delegate to the State conventions. The 
only public office he held was that of borough surveyor of Pottsville, which he 
filled from 1871 to 1889 continuously. Socially he was well known in the 
Masonic and Odd Fellows fraternities, having been a member of Pulaski 
Lodge, No. 216, F. & A. M.; Mountain City Chapter, No. 196, R. A. M. ; 
Constantine Commandery, No. 41, K. T., of Pottsville, and Lu Lu Temple, 



SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENNSYLVANL\ 117 

A. A. O. N. M. S., of Philadelphia; he was also a member of Lily of the 
Valley Lodge, No. 281, L O. O. P., of Pottsville. In every association his 
high character and consistently honorable methods won him the unqualified 
esteem of those with whom he came into contact. 

Andrew i!. Cochran married ^laria Gould, daughter of William and 
Catherine (Hill) Gould, of Pottsville, and they were the parents of two 
children, William A. and Kate G. Cochran. ^Irs. A. B. Cochran died Feb. 
26, 1907. 

WiLLWM A. Cochran married Ella G. Carey, daughter of Daniel J. and 
Ellen A. Carey, of Philadelphia, and they have one child, Catherine Carey 
Cochran. 

CHARLES EDWARD QUAIL, M. D., late of Auburn, Pa., practiced 
medicine at that place and in the surrounding territory of Schuylkill county 
throughout his professional career. He was a successful physician in the best 
sense of the word, leading a life of busy helpfulness in that capacity, yet he 
also found time to be of service to his fellow citizens in various public relations, 
and his life story is replete with the record of duties well done, many of 
them voluntarily assumed and many of tliem undertaken at the request of 
those who recognized his ability and respected his admirable character. Dr. 
Quail was a native of Baltimore, Md., born Oct. g, 1841, son of Conrad Quail. 

Conrad Quail was born in Alsace, Germany, of German parentage, and 
when he came to the United States, about 1825, settled at Baltimore. He 
was a contractor and builder, and followed that business on an extensive scale, 
having worked at St. Louis and other places as well as his home city. In 
1843 he was engaged to superintend the erection of the arsenal for the 
government at Harper's Ferry, and while so employed met with an accident 
which caused the rupture of a blood vessel, resulting in his death, at the age 
of forty years, in 1845. Mr. Quail was a charter member of Columbia Lodge, 
I. O. 0. F., the first body of that kind organized in Baltimore. He married 
Mary Ports, who was bom in Carroll county, Md., and died at Hampstead, 
that county, in 1887, at the age of seventy-seven years. She is buried at Man- 
chester, Carroll county, but ]\Ir. Quail was interred at Baltimore. Six children, 
four sons and .two daughters, were born to Mr. and Airs. Conrad Quail, 
namely: George W., deceased; Margaret, deceased; John H., a farmer near 
Hampstead, Md. ; William U., who died in Philadelphia in April, 1893; Charles 
Edward ; and Susan, wife of Joseph Little, of Hampstead, Md., deceased 
about 1905. 

John Ports, father of Mrs. Conrad Quail, was born in southern Pennsyl- 
vania, but spent his later years at Manchester, Md., where he died, in 1853, 
at the age of eighty-four years. He was a carpenter and contractor, and 
besides carrying on that business operated a large farm. Politically he was a 
Democrat, of the Jacksonian type, and his religious connection was with the 
Lutheran Church. He married Mary Wentz, and they had a family of eleven 
children, five sons and six daughters. 

Charles Edward Quail began his education in the schools of Baltimore, 
and later attended Mount Irvin College, at Manchester, Md. He had begun 
his medical course at the Alaryland University when the Civil war came on, 
and feeling that his first duty was to his country he enlisted, Aug. 2, 1862, in 
Company D. 8th Regiment, Marjdand \'olunteers, commanded by Col. Andrew 
Denison, and attached to the brigade of Maj. Gen. John R. Kenly, Army of 



118 SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENNSYLVANL\ 

the Potomac. During his service of two years and ten months, until the 
surrender of Lee at Appomattox, he was in many actions, and was wounded 
at Spottsylvania Court House. The war over, he returned to his medical 
studies, was graduated from the Medical College at Alaryland University, and 
for a year was an interne in the Baltimore Infirmary. Then he came to 
Auburn, Pa., in March, 1867, when he began independent practice, and he 
remained at that location until his death, which occurred Dec. 21, 1910. In 
connection with his practice Dr. Quail began the drug business, in 1892. Aside 
from general practice he had a number of professional connections, having 
served two terms as coroner, to which office he was elected in 1873 ; and a 
number of years as pension examiner, holding that position under Presidents 
Harrison and McKinley, and continuing to serve in that capacity until his 
election to the State Senate. He was a member of the Schuylkill County 
Medical Society and the Pennsylvania State Medical Society. 

In his professional career Dr. Quail not only came into contact with citi- 
zens of every class of the community, but also acquired a close familiarity 
with local conditions, which wdth his practical character made him peculiarly 
fitted for public service. Though he measured up to larger responsibilities he 
was equally zealous in the performance of such duties as affected the home 
community only, and for thirty-three years he served as a member of the 
Auburn school board, of which body he was also treasurer. In 1900 he was 
honored with election as representative of his district in the State Senate, 
and was reelected in November, 1904. He was one of the active members 
of the Republican party in this section of the State, and was honored with 
the chairmanship of the county, which he held for two years. Dr. Quail 
from time to time had business interests also, being one of the organizers, in 
1887, of the company which operated the plant known for five years as the 
Auburn Bolt & Nut Works, and he was president of that concern almost all 
of that period. He had a fine farm in West Brunswick township, lying one 
mile southeast of Auburn, as well as valuable real estate within the corporate 
. limits of the borough. 

Dr. Quail always maintained a sincere interest in the welfare of his old 
comrades of Civil war days. He was a member of Jere Helms Post. No. 26, 
G. A. R., of Schuylkill Haven, served some years on the Soldiers' Orphans' 
commission, and was an active member of the Gettysburg Battlefield ]\Iemorial 
Commission, his fellow officers being : St. Clair A. Mulholland, Philadel- 
phia, president ; George P. Morgan, Philadelphia, secretary ; H. H. Cumings, 
Tidioute, Pa. ; Henry S. Huidekoper. Philadelphia : E. A. Irwin. Curwensville, 
Pa. ; Charles F. McKenna, Pittsburgh, Pa. ; J. C. Stineman, South Fork, Pa. ; 
E. L. Whittlesey, Erie, Pa. After the dedication of the State Monument at 
Gettysburg he went to Harrisburg to see Governor Stuart with reference to 
reimbursing the railroad companies for transporting the old soldiers to Gettys- 
burg to attend the dedication. He died suddenly in the Capitol, his death being 
the first to occur there after the completion of the building. His religious 
connection was with the Church of God, and he was a trustee and elder for 
many years and otherwise active in its work. 

On June 4, 1867, Dr. Quail married Emma Catherine Weishampel, and 
their five children were born at Auburn, as follows: Charles Edward, bom 
May 10, 1868 (died Dec. 22, 1872) : Foster Koehler, bom June 23, 1869 fdied 
Dec. 21, 1892) ; Emma Luella, born Nov. 18, 1873; Flora juanita, born March 
23, 1877; Charles Edward, born May 28, 1879 (died April 3, 1902). Emma 



SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 119 

Luella was married Nov. i6, 1899, at Auburn, Pa., to Frederick Victor Filbert, 
Esq., of Pine Grove, Pa., the ceremony being performed by Rev. J. F. Meixell 
and Rev. H. F. Kroh. Four children have been born to this union : Marion 
Louise, Aug. 28, 1901 ; Frederic Quail, July 30, 1903; Edward Stuart, Nov. 6, 
1906; and Margaret Luella, Jan. 24, 1915. Flora Juanita was married April 
' 9, 1902, at Auburn, Pa., by Rev. S. M. Good, to Amos Yerkes Lesher, and 
they have had three children : Charles Quail, born May 7, 1904 ; James Edgar, 
Oct. 19, 1905; and Richard Yerkes, March 4, 1911 (died Sept. 15, 1912). 

Foster Koehler Quail, M. D., was born June 23, 1869, at Auburn, Pa., 
and obtained his early education in the public schools there. His studies were 
continued at the Pottsville high school, which he attended for six years, gradu- 
ating in 1887, after which he taught school for one year in East Brunswick 
township. He then began the study of medicine with his father, and in 1888 
entered the Medico-Chirurgical College, at Philadelphia, from which he was 
graduated April 16, 1891, with high honors, being awarded the gold medal 
offered by Dr. W. F. Waugh, professor of medical practice. Then he was 
elected resident physician of the hospital of his alma mater, and while serving 
as such took the competitive examination for a position at the Philadelphia 
hospital, being one of the sixteen successful young men out of seventy. He 
took his position there Dec. i, 1891, and remained there until appointed to 
the position of physician for the Turkey Gap Coal & Coke Company, at Ennis, 
W. Va. Nine months after his arrival he was taken ill with typhoid fever, and 
died sixteen days later at Ennis. McDowell Co., W. Va., Dec. 21, 1892. He 
was buried Dec. 27, 1892, at Auburn, Pa., and Professor Thurlow of the 
Pottsville high school delivered an appropriate address at the funeral services. 
At a special meeting of the Alumni Association of the Medico-Chirurgical 
College proper resolutions were ofifered, and the large numbers of sorrowing 
friends who paid their respects at the funeral ceremonies testified to the high 
regard that this young man had already attained. 

Charles Edward Quail, sou of Dr. Charles Edward Quail, was born May 
28, 1879, at Auburn, and after attending public school there was a student 
for five years at the Pottsville high school, from which he was graduated. He 
then iiegan a course at the Medico-Chirurgical College, Philadelphia, but he 
died April 3, 1902, of nephro-typhoid fever, just three weeks before graduation. 
He was a member of the Church of God, and in fraternal connection of the 
Junior Order of L'nited American Mechanics. Like his brother, he was a 
young man of the highest promise, and his untimely death was widely and 
sincerely mourned. 

Mrs. Emma Catherine (Weishampel) Quail was born May 14, 1843, in 
Shiremanstown, Cumberland Co., Pa., and received her education in Baltimore, 
Md. She is a daughter of Rev. John Frederick Weishampel. and a grand- 
daughter of Christian Weishampel, who was born near the town of Hirsch- 
berg. Silesia, Prussia, about the year 1770. (Relatives of his family are be- 
lieved to be still living — 1912 — in that vicinity.) He married Catherine Bank- 
ard, daughter of Peter Bankard, in Baltimore, about 1802. He was drowned 
in Chatsworth run, during a freshet, in 1810, close by his residence, then in the 
suburbs, near what is now called German street, between Greene and Pine 
streets. He left three children : Barbara Ann, John Frederick and Christian. 
His widow married Andrew Uhl, who died about 18 16, leaving two sons, 
Francis Adam and Andrew. She married a third husband, Jacob Miller, who 



120 SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENNSYLVANLA. 

died about 1852. She survived until 1862, and died at the age of seventy- 
seven years. 

John Frederick Weishampel, son of Christian Weishampel, was born in 
Baltimore, April 4, 1808. He learned the printing business with John T. 
Hansche; published several newspapers, among which were the H'orkiiigmcn's 
Advocate, in support of the ten-hour system and other refomis, and The 
Experiment, the first daily penny paper issued in Baltimore (1834J ; removed 
to Shippensburg, Pa., in 1836, to publish a paper there ; removed to Circle- 
ville, Ohio, in 1838, to print the "Religious Telescope" for the United Brethren 
Church; removed to Harrisburg in 1840, and to Shiremanstown, Pa., 1841, 
to conduct the "Gospel Publisher," organ of the Church of God, by which 
denomination he was licensed as a minister of the gospel, and preached fre- 
quently on circuits and as a missionary in both the English and German lan- 
guages during his life. He removed in 1843 ^'^ Marietta, thence in 1844 to 
Lancaster, in 1845 to Philadelphia, and thence in 1846 to Baltimore. On July 
3, 1831, he married Gertrude Dorothea Koehler, who was born March 20, 
1807, in Germany, and came to America when eleven years old. She died 
Feb. 14, 1871, and is buried in Green Mount cemetery, Baltimore. They had 
six children who reached maturity, viz.: (i) John Frederick, who married 
Mary E. Addison; (2) Dorothy, who died in infancy; (3) Gertrude Dorothy, 
who married Robert Westley; (4) Benjamin Franklin, who married Cora L 
Richards; (5) Mathilde Otillia, who married Lieut. Edward Francis Foster, 
First Lieutenant Quartermaster, Maryland Yolunteers, Purnell Legion, on 
Dec. 13, 1864, at Baltimore, Md. (Lieutenant I-'oster died Sept. 5, 1880, and 
was interred in the National cemetery at Loudon Park, Baltimore, Md. ; 
Mathilde O. Foster died in Philadelphia, Pa., July 14, 1910; buried in Robert- 
son family lot, "Rose Hill," Loudon Park, Baltimore) ; (6) Emma Catherine, 
who married Dr. Charles E. Quail ; (7) Howard Washington, who died young; 
and (8) Howard Burritt, who married Alice M. Uppercue and (second) Lelia 
Kratts, of Baltimore. 

SAMUEL SILLYMAN (deceased) filled a large place in Schuylkill 
county for the thirty years and more of his residence in Pottsville. Though 
possessed of large private interests, he never allowed selfish considerations to 
impair his public spirit or blind him to the rights of his fellow citizens, which 
he respected as only a man of sterling conscience and liberal mind could do. 
His sympathies were not held within the limitations of business or family ties, 
but extended into all the activities of his adopted place, and his qualifications 
for leadership were so apparent that the influence of his example carried 
weight in many circles. It is worthy of note that his widow and daughters 
condugted the post office at Pottsville for a period of twenty-five years. All 
the representatives of the name have stood for a high order of citizenship, 
ranking with the best element in the community for moral, intellectual and 
social worth. 

The Sillyman family has an interesting history, the members of its several 
branches in this locality showing characteristics of mental and moral strength 
which have come to be expected of them. The original spelling of the name, 
Sillyman, has been changed by some of the family to Silliman, and it is also 
found in the form "Selliman." The Schuylkill county family here treated is 
allied with several others of the locality, and they are descended from a Berks 
county family of honorable standing. James Sillyman. father of Samuel 



SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENXSYLVANLA. 121 

Sillyman, lived in Bern township, Berks county, where he spent all his active 
years. His sons having established themselves at Pottsville, he removed to 
that place late in life and ended his days there. He is buried in the Presby- 
terian cemetery. He married Susanna Hughes, daughter of Thomas Hughes, 
of Bucks county, Pa., and children as follows were born to them: Alexander, 
who served in the war of 1812 ; Thomas, who was the first postmaster at Potts- 
ville, appointed Jan. 11, 1S25, served until succeeded by George Taylor, who 
was appointed June 7, 1825, and died there (at one time he owned most of 
the land upon which the borough of Cressona now stands, and he sold a valu- 
able farm there to the Philadelphia & Reading Railway Company) ; James, 
who died in Pottsville ; Saipuel ; John, deceased at Pottsville, who was the 
grandfather of H. L Silliman, well known in that borough and all over Schuyl- 
kill county as editor of the Tamaqua Evening Courier and Pottsville Journal; 
Nancy, who married Jeremiah Kirk, and died in Pottsville; Susan, ^Irs. 
Fister ; and Jane, who died unmarried. 

Samuel Sillyman, son of James, was born Sept. 26, 1797, at Hamburg, 
Berks Co., Pa., and came to Pottsville to live in 1825. In 1820 he and his 
three brothers, Thomas, James and John, had been engaged in this region as 
contractors in the construction of the turnpikes between Reading and Sunbury. 
Following the completion of this work they turned their attention to the tim- 
ber business for a time, later acquiring extensive interests as mine operators. 
They were among the pioneers in that line in the local field, opening the 
mines on the "America" tract at Pottsville. Samuel Sillyman followed the 
mercantile business at Pottsville for a number of years, being associated in 
that line with his brother Thomas and with George Fister, and was highly 
successful. However, from 1839 until his death he devoted practically all his 
energies to the coal business, and he started a number of profitable collieries, 
and was owner or part owner of several of the best paying properties in the 
Schuylkill district. The Bear Ridge tract, in the Schuylkill valley, the Saint 
Clair shaft. Crow Hollow, and collieries at Middleport, Patterson and Tus- 
carora, were all included in the good producers he operated. But he shared 
the common fate of coal operators in meeting with heavy losses, though it 
was characteristic with him that financial reverses even more than prosperity 
served to bring to the surface the true worth of the man. He could meet 
adversity bravely, and apropos of this we quote a sentence from his obituary: 
"In this emergency his prominent characteristics stood out in bold relief, and 
that honesty, not of policy but in principle, which had marked his entire life, 
gained its appreciative admiration in the spontaneous expressions of regret 
for his misfortunes which came from all who knew him." Such was the esteem 
in which he was held by those well able to judge him. At one time Mr. Silly- 
man was a large landowner at Pottsville. 

Mr. Sillyman was always looked up to as a trustworthy adviser, and in 
numerous instances the weight of his approval alone was sufficient to win the 
confidence of investors and the public in enterprises which needed their sup- 
port. No act of his ever caused a reversal of this opinion, the unquestioned 
honesty marking all his own transactions proclaiming his principles plainly. 
His success was based upon continued perseverance and activity, coupled with 
the application of sound methods, and not the result of sharp practices or the 
manipulating of unfair advantages. J\Ir. Sillyman endeavored to tise his 
wealth wisely and unselfishly. A number of men who attained prosperous 
position were kept on their feet during their early struggles by the financial 



122 SCHUYLKILL COLXTY, PENNSYLVANIA 

assistance he extended, and his wise counsel was always to be had for the 
asking. The worthy poor, also, the unfortunate of all classes, found in him 
a friend whose sympathy took the most practical turn, his generosity relieving 
the distress of many a family. In expression of public spirit he was excelled 
by none. He understood the value of fostering high ideals and setting up 
worthy standards, whatever the undertaking, and thus the material growth 
of the town bore the impress of his good judgment. The town hall was erected 
under his superintendence ; he was a prominent member of the building com- 
mittee in charge of the construction of the Schuylkill county courthouse; sev- 
eral of the largest hotels, and a number of stores, offices and private residences, 
including many of the most creditable structures of the day, were erected 
through his encouragement and set an example for the future which is still 
in effect. He was one of the first to agitate the erection of the Henry Clay 
monument at Pottsville, the first Clay monument erected in the country, and 
himself contributed over three thousand dollars to the fund, the largest 
single donation. He was one of the prime movers in securing the removal of 
the county seat from Orwigsburg to Pottsville. jNIr. Sillyman was the first 
captain of the local military company, having been commissioned captain of the 
Pottsville Guards, Volunteer Infantry, Aug. 3, 1828; he resigned this com- 
mission in 1 83 1. His support was never withheld from any good cause. In 
all his intercourse with his fellowmen he so won their affection as well as 
respect that it was truly said he had many friends and no enemies. About 
four years before his demise the citizens of Pottsville gave him a public dinner, 
for the purpose of expressing appreciation of his value as a citizen, and pre- 
sented him a handsome service of plate. 

Mr. Sillyman died Oct. 19, 1859, after a long and painful illness, at his 
residence in Pottsville, and was buried in the Presbyterian cemetery ; the 
remains were later removed to the Charles Baber cemetery. Citizens from all 
parts of Schuylkill county and many from beyond its limits came to attend the 
funeral services, and seldom have all the elements of the community been so 
united in showing respect to one man. At one o'clock on the day of the 
funeral the stores, hotels and other places of business closed. The bells of 
the First Presbyterian, Trinity Episcopal and St. Patrick's Catholic Churches, 
as well as the courthouse bell, were tolled while .the funeral procession moved. 
There was genuine grief in the many circles affected by his departure, and 
the inspiration of his well spent life kept his influence alive long afterwards. 
Mr. Sillyman was a member of the Episcopal Church. 

Mr. Sillyman married Margaret Shelley, a native of Orwigsburg. this 
county, who survived him, dying at Pottsville in 1882. Children as follows 
were born to this union : Alexander S. ; Amanda S. : Rebecca ; Susan J. ; 
Thomas H., a resident of Nevada (he served on the Union side during the 
Civil war, and was brevetted captain of Company H, 48th Pennsylvania Regi- 
ment) ; Elizabeth H. : George F., now of Altoona, Pa.; Joseph S., also of 
Altoona ; Samuel, for many years a mail carrier in Pottsville, who died in 
1914 : and Fannie, wife of Tilghman Johnston, of Wilmington, Delaware. 

Thomas Sillvman, a brother of Sa"muel, was the first postmaster at Potts- 
ville, the office being established Jan. 11, 1825. He served only a few months, 
being succeeded in June by George Taylor. On April 6, 1861. Mrs. Margaret 
Sillyman, widow of Samuel Sillyman, was appointed, and she and her daughters 
continued to fill the position for the quarter of a century succeeding, discharg- 
ing its duties so satisfactorily as to merit the substantial approval their services 



SCHUYLKILL COUxNTY, PENXSYL\'ANL\ 123 

received. The Miners' Journal of Pottsville, issue of June 22, 1886, devoted 
almost a column of its editorial page to a review of their work, and the account 
is of sufficient value to be quoted here in full: 

Yesterday, June 21, completed the term for which Miss Ehzabeth H. Sillyman was 
commissioned Postmaster at Pottsville, her appointment having been made by President 
Arthur, June 21, 1882. Miss Sillyman still continues in charge of the office pending the 
announcement of her successor, but as it is understood that this will transpire within a 
few days her administration may be regarded as virtually terminated. The eve of a change 
which cannot but be regarded as fraught with deep interest to this entire community, is 
deemed by the Miners' Journal a fitting occasion for a cfarsory review of the history of 
the office, and more particularly of its administration under the auspices of various mem- 
bers of the Sillyman family. 

The Pottsville post office was established January 11, 1825, the first Postmaster being 
Thomas Sillyman, an uncle of the present incumbent. His successors, in chronological 
order, were as follows : George Taylor, appointed June 7, 1825 ; Charles Boyter, September 
20, 1827; Enos Chichester, August 18, 182S; Joseph Weaver, February 21, 1839; John 
T.. Werner, September 8, 1841 ; Michael Cochran, August 16, 1844; Daniel Krebs, February 
15, 1847; Andrew Mortimer, May 2, 1849; John Clayton, April 18, 1853; Henry L. Acker, 
June 14, 1858; Mrs. Margaret Sillyman, April 6, 1861 ; Miss Amanda S. Sillyman, May 17, 
1882; Miss Elizabeth H. Sillyman, June 21, 1882. It will thus be observed that, in addition 
to the first five months of its existence, the office has for a period of more than a quarter 
of a century past been continuously in the hands of the Sillyman family. It is, therefore, 
with no purpose to disparage the efficiency or fidelity of former incumbents, but for the 
reason that the administration of Mrs. Margaret Sillyman and her successors is more 
familiarly identified with the experience of the present generation of the community, that 
the Journal at this time confines its reflections to a resume of the admirable record made 
by these ladies in the conduct of the office. Mrs. Margaret Sillyman, who was the widow 
of the late Samuel Sillyman, one of Pottsville's earliest and most honored citizens, 
was the first female tn the United States appointed to office by President Lincoln, and 
entered upon the duties of the office on April 20, 1861. The clerical force installed by her 
consisted of her two daughters, Amanda S. and Elizabeth H. Sillyman, her two sons, 
Alexander S. and George F. Sillyman. and Daniel L. Krebs, son of the former Postmaster, 
Daniel Krebs. Mr. .-Mexander S. Sillyman in time retired from the office to engage in 
other business, and Mr. Krebs subsequently became cashier of the Pennsylvania National 
Bank, although never wholly severing his connection with the post office, in which his 
valuable services have been esteemed as practically indispensable. How efficiently and 
satisfactorily, both to the department and the community, the business of the office was 
conducted under the control of Mrs. Sillyman, is perhaps best attested by the fact that 
she received commissions from four successive Presidents — Lincoln, Johnson, Grant and 
Hayes — continuing to hold the office until her death, which occurred April 15, 1882. Mrs. 
Sillyman was succeeded by her daughter, Miss Amanda S. Sillyman, who first served as 
Acting Postmaster and was regularly commissioned May 17, 1882. Her administration, 
which was characterized by the same efficiency as had prevailed under the incumbency 
of her mother, was of brief duration, her death occurring five days after her appointment. 
The duties of the office then devolved upon her sister. Miss Elizabeth H. Sillyman, who 
was regularly appointed Postmaster on June 21, 1882. The clerical force then and still 
on duty consisted of Mr. George F. and Miss Sue J. Sillyman, Miss Alice A. and Mr. 
Daniel L. Krebs. Under this regime the high standard of efficiency attained by the office 
suflfered no depreciation, but it fully maintained its record as without a superior among 
offices of like grade in the L'nited States. Since the accession of Mrs. Margaret Sillyman 
the business and importance of the Pottsville post office has vastly expanded. The letter- 
carrier system w-as introduced during this period, greatly augmenting the labor and 
responsibility of the Postmaster, and although perhaps few deliveries from offices of the 
same class cover a wider field or involve the handling of a greater number of pieces, so 
intelligent and faithful has always been the force of carriers employed that errors or 
delinquencies have been wholly unknown. , A high standard of capacity, coupled with 
strict fidelity to duty and a hearty spirit of accommodation, have uniformly characterized 
the conduct of the Pottsville post office during the past twenty-five years, and have 
combined to render it the model establishment which it is conceded to be by the Post 
Office Department authorities as well as by all who have enjoyed its facilities. Miss 
Silly man's successor must expect to be judged by this high standard, and although he 
will enter upon his responsible duties with the best wishes of the Journal and the com- 



124 SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 

munity of Pottsville, and doubtless with a determination to relax no effort to that end, 
he will be fortunate, indeed, if he shall succeed in maintaining the honorable distinction 
handed down to hirri by his immediate predecessor in the office. 

THOMAS GORMAN, late of Pottsville, was a resident of Schuylkill 
county for over seventy years, most of that period having his home at Port 
Carbon. The reputation he gained in his energetic business career, however, 
was not limited to this vicinity. After a few years' experience on the canal 
he became interested in coal mining, and as one of the earliest individual 
operators in the anthracite fields, and owner and operator of numerous 
collieries during the twenty years that followed, he was an active figure in 
the industry and highly successful until the -panic of 1873 swept away the 
results of his persevering exertions. His life was full of activity and his 
various interests brought him into contact with many coal men and others 
connected with the development of the oil and mineral resources of the state. 

Mr. Gorman was an Irishman, born in 1822 at Cashel, Ireland, and his 
father, Thomas Gorman, brought his wife and family to America from that 
country when the son Thomas was six years old. About one year after their 
arrival in this country the parents settled at Port Carbon, Schuylkill Co., 
Pa., and there made a permanent home. The son Thomas was consequently 
reared and educated there. In his earlier days the boating industry afforded 
occupation for many in that location, and Mr. Gomian began to follow it, on 
the Schuylkill canal, about 1840. Within a few years he was the owner 
of a boat, and during the fifties, when the canal trade was flourishing, he 
owned several boats, btiying and shipping coal by the canal to New York 
and other points. This line he developed to such an extent that for two 
years he took the prize from the canal company as the largest individual 
shipper. About 1857 he began the mining of coal, in which he achieved his 
greatest success and became widely known. His first operations were below 
Alill Creek and St. Clair, in Schuylkill county. Mr. Gorman would develop 
mines and sell after the operations were well established, buy again and work 
up another operation, and thus at dift'erent times he had mines at Wolf 
Creek, east of St. Clair ; one near Glen Carbon ; a small one near Tuscarora ; 
at Mahanoy City the following — the "Hartford Colliery," the "Delano Col- 
liery" and (in partnership with Benjamin Eshleman) the "East Mahanoy 
Colliery." He and James Carter had one at Locust Gap. Associated with 
Andrew Robinson and Henry Ginterman he had two near Shamokin, the 
"Greenback" and "Henry Clay" collieries, which they conducted under the 
firm name of Robinson, Ginterman & Gorman. As an individual operator 
Mr. Gorman was a pioneer in the anthracite fields. Like most operators he 
suffered reverses from time to time which somewhat ofi^set his great suc- 
cesses, but he was nevertheless very prosperous. 

In 1870 Mr. Gorman started to prospect iron ore lands and take options. 
He had an idea that the condition of aft'airs would warrant the establishment 
of an iron works on the Htidson river near tidewater, and his attempt to 
realize on this, in connection with other speculations, had him involved 
badly when the panic of 1873 came. He lost everything he had. If this 
panic had not occurred the story of his life would no doubt have had a 
different turn. He mined ore at Staten Island and Lake Champlain as well 
as in western Pennsylvania, and was also interested in oil lands in the latter 
region. He had offices at New York, Boston and Philadelphia, I~or about 



SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 125 

twelve years before his death Air. Gorman was practically an invalid, and 
during his last years was so incapacitated that he was unable to leave the 
house. His closing days were spent at Pottsville, whither he moved from 
Port Carbon in 1896, and where he died at the age of seventy-eight years, 
March 13, 1900, at the home of his son Joseph, No. 413 East Mauch Chunk 
street. He was buried in St. Stephen's cemetery, at Port Carbon, after 
High Mass at St. Stephen's Church, which was tilled to overflowing with 
sympathizing friends come to pay their last respects. Many attended from 
other points of the State, and the si.x officiating priests represented churches 
in various parts of Schuylkill county. Such was the esteem which Mr. 
Gorman, in a life of faithful endeavor, gained wherever his interests called 
him. His equable temperament, modest in prosperity and unruffled in adversity, 
endeared him to every associate, and his reputation for integrity was never 
sullied by questionable dealing or sharp transactions. His sympathy for those 
less fortunate than himself, and his desire to alleviate the lot of the poor, 
were unostentatiously but conscientiously expressed. Every Christmas he 
remembered the poor of his home town generously, and for many years the 
recipients never knew the source of the gifts. 

Air. Gorman was survived by the following children : Owen J., now a 
resident of Dallas, Texas, is a mechanical engineer, especially interested in 
the construction of waterworks, septic tank sewer systems and similar work; 
Dennis F. is a resident of New York City ; Joseph H. is mentioned below ; 
Mary, who died in 1897, was the wife of James P. Donahue, a machinist, 
and left three children, Mary, Anna and Martha, who reside with their 
aunts in Pottsville ; Annie M. and Julia T. are unmarried and occupy the 
Gorman home at No. 413 East Mauch Chunk street. 

Joseph H. Gorm.\n, son of Thomas Gorman, was born at Port Carbon, 
this county, and was one of the prominent business men of that place and 
Pottsville, where he resided during the last sixteen years of his life. He 
was reared at Port Carbon and educated in the public schools of that place, 
and at St. Francis College and Villa Nova. For a number of years after 
commencing work Mr. Gorman was associated with his father, whom he 
assisted in operating collieries, one near Shamokin and another in the Schuyl- 
kill valley. Later he was manager for his father of an ore mine in Lehigh 
county. Then he entered the contracting business on his own account, and 
when water was brought into the town of Port Carbon laid the first pipes. 
His work as a contractor took him all over his own county and into many 
other sections of the State. For several years he followed mining near 
Tuscarora, and he also engaged in the insurance business. Though he formed 
a wide acquaintance in his various other associations, he was probably best 
known as the proprietor of the famous Gorman boat and bathing pier, being 
one of the first to obtain a lease on the Tumbling Run upper dam. His 
genial manner and sincere friendliness won him such popularity that numer- 
ous patrons of the pier never failed to call on him when visiting Tumbling 
Run. For the last ten years of his life he ran his business there with steady 
success, hundreds coming to hire his steam launch and rowboats during the 
season. He had a genuine interest in all his patrons, never failing with 
cheerful manner and kindly words to make them feel a welcome. Like his 
generous father, he was charitable and liberal in all his benefactions, and the 
news of his death called forth many expressions of sincere regret in all the 
circles where he was known. He never held any public offices except for 



126 SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PEXNSYLVANLA. 

his services as clerk during the term of his uncle as poor director. Mr. 
Gorman died in the Pottsville hospital Sept. 23, 1912, at the age of sixty-two 
years, following an operation. He had been ill about three weeks. 

Mr. Gorman was a Catholic, a member of St. Patrick's Church at Potts- 
ville and a charter member of Schuylkill Council, No. 431, Knights of 
Columbus. His funeral services at St. Patrick's Church were largely attended ; 
he was buried in No. 3 cemetery. 

Mr. Gorman married Katherine M. Brennan, daughter of Thomas F. 
(deceased) and Elizabeth (Logue) Brennan, and a descendant of one of the 
oldest and most respected families of Pottsville, where she was born and 
reared. She received her education in the parochial and public schools of 
the borough. Mrs. Gorman died four years before her husband, and less 
than five years after their marriage. She passed away unexpectedly, after 
an illness of four weeks' duration, and her death came as a shock to the 
many friends she had made during her happy and useful life. Her pleasant 
disposition and friendliness endeared her to all included in the circle of her 
acquaintance. She was a lifelong member of St. Patrick's Church, and 
held membership in the Daughters of Isabelle. After her decease Mr. Gor- 
man resided with his sisters at the home on Mauch Chunk street. 

PROF. H. H. SPAYD, of Minersville, has been established in that 
borough since he came to take the position of principal of the school there 
in 1871. In that connection, and in his subsequent responsibility as superin- 
tendent of schools, he accomplished so much for educational progress that 
his name will have a prominent place in the history of public schools in 
Schuylkill county. Though he gave up the superintendency several years ago 
he is still connected with the work in an active capacity as a member of the 
Minersville school board, in the operations of which body his practical advice 
and comprehensive experience have been of the highest value. He takes a 
special pleasure in his services on the board, which keep him in close touch 
with the interest to which over forty years of his life were entirely given. 

Mr. Spayd was bom at Myerstown, Lebanon Co., Pa., Oct. 26, 1845, son 
of John and Catherine (Haak) Spayd and grandson of George Spayd. His 
early ancestors were German, and the founders of the family in this country 
settled here before the Revolution. George Spayd was born at Ephrata, 
Lancaster county, and about 1826 settled in Lebanon county, this State, near 
Minerstown. In his youth he learned the trade of cooper, but as he did not 
care for the work he followed farming most of his life, and he died in the 
vicinity of Myerstown, about 1875. His religious connection was with the 
German Baptist Church. He and his wife, whose maiden name was Conrad, 
had a family of eight children. 

John Spayd, father of H. H. Spayd, was born in 1819 at Ephrata, Pa., 
and died in 1891 at Schaeft'erstown, Lebanon county. lie followed farming 
throughout his active years. Originally a Whig in politics, he was one of 
the organizers of the Republican party in his vicinity, and took an active and 
intelligent interest in public affairs. To his marriage with Catherine Haak, 
who was born at Myerstown, daughter of William Haak, of that place, was 
born a family of ten children. Mrs. Spayd survived her husband for a num- 
ber of years. 

H. H. Spayd had excellent advantages in his early life. He attended 
public school at Myerstown, and the academy there, and subsequently studied 



SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENNSYLVANL^ 127 

at the Rlillersville State Normal School and at Palatinate College, Myerstown. 
He also had a course at the business college at Klmira, N. Y. Early in the 
Civil war he entered the Union army, joining Company C, 149th Pennsylvania 
Volunteer Infantry, for three months. His regiment was attached to the 
Amiy of the Potomac, and took an active part in many of its severe battles, 
including Pollock's ]\Iills, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, Laurel 
Hill, North Anna River, Spottsylvania, Cold Harbor, Todd's Tavern, Toto- 
potomy, Six Mile House, Boydtown Road, Petersburg (battle and siege), the 
W'eldon Railroad engagement intended to shut off the enemy's source of sup- 
plies, and the two battles of Hatcher's Run. Besides the engagements men- 
tioned they were in numerous skirmishes and other important field service. In 
the campaign from the Wilderness to Petersburg the soldiers at the front 
were within range of the enemy continuously. Air. Spayd was wounded three 
times, first on July i, 1863, at Gettysburg, where he was left on a part of the 
field which afterwards fell into the hands of the enemy. He was unable to 
walk and he was allowed to be recaptured by his own comrades and was 
under treatment in the hospitals at Gettysburg, Baltimore and Germantown 
for nearly six months before returning to the field, in December, 1863. He 
was twice wounded during the activities of the Wilderness campaign, having 
been actively engaged in the operations which began in May, 1864, and ended 
at Appomattox Court House. Air. Spayd served as corporal and sergeant 
and was discharged as color bearer of his regiment. 

At the conclusion of the war Mr. Spayd was occupied in the mercantile 
business for a short time in Philadelphia, but soon returned to his old home 
and took up educational work. He was only nineteen years old when he 
began teaching, his first position being in Lebanon county, whence he changed 
to Rush township, Schuylkill county. For three years he was a member of 
the committee on permanent certificates for Schuylkill county, and served as 
chairman of same. For two years he was principal of the schools at Llewellyn, 
Schuylkill county, and resigned to accept the principalship of the Minersville 
grammar school, and for forty years following was connected with the schools 
of that borough, either as principal or superintendent, being chosen to the 
latter position in 1883 to succeed Dr. J. \\'. Danenhower. He acted as super- 
intendent until 1908. Mention of the various educational associations with 
which Air. Spayd maintained active connection is sufficient to show the breadth 
of his interest and the earnestness with which he continued the work of his 
choice. As a life member of the State Teachers' Association, a member of 
the National Educational Association, one of the councilors of the American 
Institute of Civics, member of the National Geographic Society, of the Ameri- 
can Association for the Advancement of Science, the History Teachers' Asso- 
ciation of the Aliddle States and Alaryland, and of the Schuylkill County 
Historical Association (he is a charter member of the last named), he had 
opportunities for observation of the trend of the finest thought in his profes- 
sion and he has contributed materially to its progress. He was always active 
in the work of the local institutes, and left such an irreproachable record for 
practical work that since giving up the superintendency he has been chosen 
to continue his efforts in behalf of the schools as member of the local board. 
In 191 1 he was elected to that body, and is still serving, being now vice 
president and chairman of the health and sanitary committees. Mr. Spayd 
is well entitled to the high place he holds among educators-, and his high 
personal character has won him the esteem of all who have come under his 



128 SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENNSYLVANL^ 

care as well as the confidence of his fellow citizens who have had the oppor- 
tunity to judge the excellent work he has done. 

Professor Spayd was one of the organizers and original directors of the 
Union National Bank at Alinersville, and for two years after his withdrawal 
from school work he was engaged as a clerk in that institution. He served 
as a member of the building committee when the present home of the bank 
was being constructed. In 1910 he became engaged in business with Mr. 
George F. Bowman, under the firm name of Spayd & Bowman, and they 
have since dealt in books, stationery, wallpaper, etc., having a well stocked 
and well conducted store at Minersville. 

Professor Spayd has not confined his eflforts for the betterment of society 
to his duties in the schools. He is also interested in other public aiTairs. 
including politics, and though a Republican in his political views has acted 
independently whenever he considered it necessary for the best interests of 
the community. However, he has been a loyal party worker, having served 
as a member of the county executive committee, and being one of the valued 
representatives of the party in Schuylkill county. The Baptist Church of 
Minersville has counted him among its most efficient workers for many 
years. He has been associated with that denomination all his life and has 
been a licentiate for many years, holding official position in his home church 
when called upon to assist in its activities. He has also been an efficient worker 
in the Sunday school, which he has served as teacher and superintendent. 
By reason of his services in the Civil war Professor Spayd belongs to the 
G. A. R., holding membership in Post No. 17, and he lias not only held 
practically all the positions in that organization, but has also filled appoint- 
ments on the staff of the department and National commanders. For a 
number of years he served as inspector at large for Schuylkill county. In 
fraternal affiliations he is an Odd Fellow, belonging to ]\Iyerstown Lodge, 
No. 358, and to Encampment No. 149 at that place. 

Mr. Spayd married Sarah Donaberger. daughter of David D. and Sarah 
Donaberger, of Alyerstown. Mrs. Spayd died in February, 1910. They had 
no children of their own, but reared and educated their nephew, A. Bond 
Warner, who for a time was engaged in business as a shoe merchant. He is 
now a professional accountant in Philadelphia. 

HON. SAMUEL ALFRED LOSCH, late of Schuylkill Haven, will live 
in the history of his time as one who improved many opportunities for use- 
fulness in an exceptionally active career. At the time of his death he was 
representing his district in the State Senate, and his demise was deplored as 
untimely by all classes in Schuylkill county. No exaggeration is necessary to 
set forth the qualities which he possessed or the value of his life in its relation 
to the general advancement. Born Dec. 19, 1842, in L'niontown, Dauphin 
Co., Pa., he was of English descent, and the record of his ancestry shows that 
he came of a family of vigorous mentality and executive gifts. His great- 
great-grandfather in England was associated with George Stephenson, the 
famous inventor of the locomotive. J-icob Losch, the great-grandfather, came 
to America and established himself as a manufacturer of gunpowder at Ger- 
mantown. Pa. \Mien the struggle for independence came on he was a zealous 
patriot, and remained loyal to the Colonial cause though it cost him his fortune, 
his works and property being destroyed at the time of the battle of German- 
town. Many interesting things concerning him are preserved in the Pennsyl- 





^^^^^^ 



SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 129 

vania archives. Jacob Losch (2), son of Jacob, settled in the Lykens valley, in 
Dauphin county. Pa., and there two sons were born to him. 

George Losch, youngest son of Jacob (2), was the father of the late 
Samuel Alfred Losch. He followed milling, and though industrious met with 
so many reverses that he was unable to accumulate any property, as he died 
when comparatively a young man. When the Mexican war broke out he went 
to lialtimore, and assisted in recruiting an independent company, with which 
he sailed for Vera Cruz, but the ship foundered on the way and all perished. 
Mr. Losch had married Eliza Gessner, and of the four children born to them 
two died young, Samuel A. and another son being left to the care of their 
widowed mother. Her father. Dr. Frederick Gessner, of Hanover, Germany, 
served as an army surgeon in his native land, and afterwards came to America, 
first settling at Bethlehem, Pa. There he married into the Zeigenfus family, 
and subsequently removed to Gratz, in Dauphin county, Pa., where he built 
up an extensive practice and passed the remainder of his days. Mrs. Losch 
died only a few years before her son Samuel. 

Samuel Alfred Losch had to face the realities of life at an early age. His 
"was the poverty that develops the noble traits and enduring virtues in one ; 
that brings him in contact with experiences that enable him to master in life's 
highway of duty all struggles and circumstances so, looking back, he views 
with worthy pride the obstacles to his progress that he has overcome. It was 
the poverty — that blessing in disguise — that made the martyr Lincoln, the 
Moses of emancipation to enslaved millions, the poverty that developed Grant 
into a hero, the most brilliant military genius in history, the poverty that 
enlivened ambition in Garfield, and made him the chief magistrate of this 
great nation. He received such education as the common schools of his town 
could then afford, during a few winter months each year." He began to work 
before he was eleven years old, being employed on a farm for one year, and 
afterwards in a brickyard for a year. In the summer of 1857 or 1858 he 
worked on the Schuylkill canal, feeing ambitious to acquire an education, he 
had attended school whenever possible, and he had one term under W. A. 
Fields, who worked for the Schuylkill Navigation Company during the sum- 
mer season and in the winter taught what was known as the "boat-boys' 
school." 

Though not of age when the Civil war broke out Mr. Losch, true to the 
spirit inherited from his father, entered the service in the summer of 1861, 
his mother giving her consent for him to join the L^nion army. Becoming a 
member of Company C, 50th Regiment, Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, he 
was soon sent to the front, and he served until after the close of the conflict, 
being mustered out July 30, 1865. His active service included over thirty 
engagements, among them Port Royal, the second battle of Bull Run, South 
Mountain, Antietam, Fredericksburg, siege of Vicksburg, Jackson (Miss.), 
siege of Knoxville, Wilderness, Cold Harbor, Petersburg, as well as others 
of lesser importance down to the final surrender of General Lee at Appomat- 
tox. From the address of Senator Magee, a feature of the memorial services 
held by the State Senate at the time of Mr. Losch's death, we extract the 
following account of the services of the 50th Regiment : "Little more than 
a month after his enlistment his regiment was sent on the expedition to Port 
Royal, S. C. The vessel on which it sailed, the 'Ocean Queen,' encountered a 
terrible storm, was nearly wrecked, part of its officers and crew deserted, and 
but for the efforts of the soldiers on board, who had been left without food 
Vol. 1—9 



130 SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENNSYLVANL\ 

or water, the angry sea would have claimed her and them as its prey. 
Escaped from that peril, the 50th was the first regiment to occupy Beaufort, 
and in the succeeding January had a baptism of fire at the battle of Coosaw. 
Remaining in the South in the active discharge of duty until the following 
summer, the 50th was sent North and joined General Pope in Virginia. It 
fought at second Bull Run, Centreville, Chantilly, Turner's Gap, Antietam 
and Fredericksburg, and then went South to share in Grant's great victory at 
Vicksburg. A month later the 50th went to Knoxville, Tenn. Disease had 
wrought havoc in its ranks, and at one time only eight men were able to report 
for duty. In the following campaign it encountered many vicissitudes. It 
made a winter march during which many of its members, like their sires 
at \'alley Forge, 'tracked the snow with their bleeding feet.' Participating in 
the siege of Knoxville, it was furloughed in February, 1864, and returned home 
to re-enlist as a veteran regiment. It returned to the front and fought at the 
Wilderness, Spottsylvania, North Anna, Cold Harbor and Petersburg, and at 
the famous explosion of the mine in the siege of the latter city was one of the 
regiments which charged upon the 'Crater.' From that time on it shared in 
all that led to the final triumph and was among the first regiments to enter 
Petersburg after its fall. Thus, from Port Royal to Antietam, Fredericks- 
burg, \'icksburg, Knoxville, Wilderness, Petersburg and Appomattox, all 
along the hard and bloody path that lay between these milestones on the road 
to victory and Union, the 50th Regiment did its duty with honor and renown. 
Nor did it fail of just recognition, for, the war ended, the 50th Pennsylvania 
Regiment on the recommendation of Gen. Ulysses S. Grant was sent to repre- 
sent the infantry of the armies of the IJnion at the laying of the corner- 
stone, on July 4th, 1865, of the monument on the battlefield of Gettysburg 
inscribed with the deathless declaration of Abraham Lincoln, 'That govern- 
ment of the people, by the people, and for the people shall not perish from 
the earth.' In all this Samuel A. Losch bore a manful part. He aided in 
these achievements and shared in the glory. His patriotism and his valor 
won their reward. The private of Sept. 9, 1861, became successively corporal 
and sergeant, was promoted to second lieutenant on March 17. 1865, and to 
first lieutenant on April ist of the same year. ''' ''^ * While we were 
together he often dwelt upon the past and, among other reminiscences, told 
me of his regiment and its achievements. In the almost four years of its 
service it had never been in winter quarters. In summer duty called it to 
the northern extreme of the conflict; in the winter it was transferred to the 
South. Its history is perhaps unique in the roll of the regiments of Pennsyl- 
vania Volunteers." Mr. Losch was specially honored on the occasion of the 
laying of the cornerstone of the Soldiers' National Monument at Gettysburg, 
July 4, 1865, by the Grand Lodge of Masons of Pennsylvania : his regiment, 
the 50th Pennsylvania Veteran Volunteers, as above mentioned, was selected 
by General Grant to represent the Union infantry in recognition of conspicu- 
ously honorable service during the war, and Lieutenant Losch was chosen by 
the commanding officer. Col. Samuel Schwenk, to command the color company. 
When the war with Spain broke out he again offered his ser\'ices, and was 
one of the first to undertake the organization of volunteers in Schuylkill 
county. 

Upon his return to civil life in 1865, Mr. Losch found employment in the 
yard of the Schuylkill Haven & Mine Hill Railroad Company, and while 
working there acquired a practical knowledge of telegraphy, so that before 



SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PEXXSYLVANL\ 131 

long he was given a position as timekeeper and night operator. Later he was 
made material agent for the company at Cressona, and then for a time was 
engaged as baggagemaster between Schuylkill Haven and Glen Carbon, con- 
tinuing in the employ of the railroad company until 1873. Aleanwhile, in 1871, 
he had been aj^pointed by Governor Geary commissary of the 6th Division, 
N. G. P., on (.ieneral Siegfried's staff, with the rank of major. When the 
National Guard was reorganized Governor Hartranft commissioned him major 
of the 4th Division, and he declined reappointment when the term of his com- 
mission expired. General Hartranft had been elected governor in 1872, and 
when he took office Major Losch was appointed clerk inider Mr. Quay, then 
Secretary of State. He held this position until 1874, when he became a can- 
didate for the State Assembly and was elected, serving in that body during 
the sessions of 1875 ^'i<^ 1876. L^pon the expiration of his second term he 
was again appointed a clerk under Governor Hartranft, and served as such 
in different departments at the Capitol. During the last year of Hartranft's 
administration — 1887 — he was promoted to chief clerk, and he was> retained 
in that position throughout the administration of Governor Hoyt, who suc- 
ceeded Governor Hartranft. In 1S84 Mr. Losch was chosen to serve on a 
special mission in the Southern States as post office inspector, and the same 
year was appointed by President Arthur as secretary to the Territory of New 
Mexico, in which position he served with honor and credit to the Territory 
and to himself. A portion of the time he acted as governor of the Territory. 
During Cleveland's administration he was removed because of "offensive 
partisanship." and returned to Pennsylvania in September, 1885. In 1887 the 
State Legislature elected him chief clerk of the House of Representatives, 
and his services were duly appreciated by all the members without regard to 
party ties. At the close of the session they presented him a handsome gold 
watch and chain as a token of their regard and esteem. 

In 1892 Mr. Losch was again chosen to represent the Fourth district of 
Schuylkill county in the Lower House of the State Legislature, and he con- 
tinued to be a member of that body until he assumed the duties of State sen- 
ator, to which position he was elected in 1896, from the Twenty-ninth district. 
He served in that branch of the Assembly until his death, at which time he 
was the chosen candidate for auditor general. Mr. Losch endeavored to 
represent the interests of his constituents faithfully. During his earlier service 
in the Assembly he had the distinction of introducing and advocating the first 
labor arbitration bill ever presented to an American legislative body. Governor 
Hartranft thought so favorably of it that he commended it in his annual mes- 
sage. Throughout his career Mr. Losch continued to be known as one of the 
most effective workers enlisted in the cause of devising means of adjusting 
the differences between capital and labor. He was particularly popular in this 
connection because of his fairness, having no unreasonable prejudices, but 
anxious to get justice for both sides, his attitude winning him the respect and 
trust of all concerned in this vital matter. His work always was done with a 
conscientious regard, for the responsibilities of his office, the securing of wise 
legislation. His familiarity with the conditions in the mining regions was of 
great assistance to him in his labors in this connection, and his personal interest 
became so strong that he used his influence to further the movement which 
resulted in the founding of the Aliners' Hospital at Ashland, one of his most 
creditable achievements. Upon his return to the House, in 1893, he resumed 
his activities in behalf of the legislation to which he had given special atten- 



132 SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 

tion during his former terms, and he had the satisfaction of having the Act 
signed by Governor Pattison in 1893, "^n ^'^t to estabhsh boards of arbitra- 
tion to settle all questions of wages and other matters of variance between 
capital and labor." Mr. Losch served on the following cominittees in the 
Assembly : City Passenger Railway, Counties and Townships, Legislative 
Apportionment and Railroads, and was chairman of the committee on Coal 
and Iron and of the special committee to investigate the Electrical Trust Com- 
bine of Philadelphia. The bill to form a new county out of a part of Luzerne 
and Schuylkill counties was referred to the committee on Counties and Town- 
ships, of which Mr. Losch was a member. Through his influence the bill was 
negatived by the committee after having passed the Senate; thus he saved 
the dismemberment of the county of Schuylkill. 

Mr. Losch was a prominent worker in the Republican party for years, and 
from the time he began to take an interest in politics he attended almost all 
the State conventions as a delegate. In 1880 he was one of the 306 who sup- 
ported Grant at the National convention. In 1885 he was chosen chairman of 
the Republican county committee by acclamation, and reelected in 1886 and 
1887. 

Mr. Losch was one of the incorporators of the Schuylkill Electric Railway 
Company, organized in 1889, which built the main line and important exten- 
sions of the trolley system in and around Pottsville. Later it became the 
Pottsville L'nion Traction Company, controlled by outside capital. 

Major Losch never lost his interest in his Civil war comrades, was one of 
the organizers of Post No. 26, G. A. R., of Schuylkill Haven, and in 1876 was 
honored with election as senior vice commander of the Department of Penn- 
sylvania. He also joined Encampment No. 19, LTnion Veteran Legion, of 
Pottsville, and was a charter member of Washington Camp No. 47, P. O. S. 
of A., of which he was a member before the war. He was a Mason, member 
of Page Lodge, No. 270, F. & A. M., at Schuylkill Haven, and Mountain City 
Chapter, No. 196, R. A. M., of Pottsville; and was a charter member of Peace 
Tribe, I. O. R. M. 

On Oct. 14, 1879, Major Losch was united in marriage to Fidelia Sum- 
mers, a daughter of Henry Summers, a wholesale merchant of Zanesville, 
Ohio. Seven children were born to this marriage : Amy Summers is the 
wife of Byron Ouigley and lives in New York City ; Helen Gessner is living at 
home ; Henry GrafJen is at home ; Ruth Eliza A. is the wife of Nelson Run- 
nion, and resides in New York City ; Christopher L. Magee is at home, engaged 
as manager of Losch's Opera House at Schuylkill Haven, which his mother 
owns ; Naoma Palmer, who lives at home, is an expert teacher of all the modem 
dances and conducts private classes in Schuylkill Haven and Pottsville ; 
Charlotte Marie died in infancy. Mrs. Losch continues to reside at the home- 
stead in Schuylkill Haven, No. 306 Main street. 

Mr. Losch died Sept. 11, 1900, at "Galen Hall," Atlantic City, N. J., and 
was buried in the LInion cemetery at Schuylkill Haven, on the hillside along 
the Schuylkill river. The funeral services, held at the time in Schuylkill 
Haven, were attended by one of the largest assemblages ever gathered here 
on such an occasion, and few citizens have been shown such honor at any time 
As he was serving as president of the school board when he died the schools 
closed on the day of his burial. The societies in which he held membership 
took part in the ceremonies, and the Third Brigade Band of Pottsville con- 
tributed the music. It would seem that he was equally beloved in all his 



SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 133 

numerous associations, for his companions in all vied in expressions of esteem. 
Ilis unselfish nature had manifested itself in courteous intercourse with all 
those he met, and his own wide experience enabled him to sympathize with 
every class. His sincerity impressed them and gained their confidence, which 
he never betrayed. He neither catered to wealth and position nor despised 
their advantages, endeavoring to give all things their true value in the general 
economy. The breadth of his spirit enabled him to capture friends in all the 
ranks of life and hold them, and his memory is honored wherever he was 
known. 

On Jan. 22, 1901, on motion of Senator Quail, the following resolution was 
twice read before the Pennsylvania Senate, considered and agreed to : 

Resolved, That a committee of eight be appointed to draft suitable resolutions on the 
death of the late Senator Samuel A. Losch, who died Sept. ii, 1900, while a member of the 
Senate, and present the said resolutions at a special meeting of the Senate, Wednesday, 
Feb. 6th next, at twelve o'clock M. 

On Feb. 6, 1901, the Senate convened in special session. Lieutenant 
Governor Gobin in the chair, and Mr. Quail presented the following report 
from the special committee : 

Whereas, Since the last session of the Legislature through the divine will of the 
Creator of all things, Hon. Samuel A. Losch, a member of the Senate of Pennsylvania, 
from the Twenty-ninth district, was called from his life work to rest; and 

Where.\s, Senator Losch was known as an active member of the Senate, a patriotic 
citizen, a loving husband and indulgent and affectionate father ; therefore, be it 

Resolved, That the Senate profoundly regrets the death of Hon. Samuel A. Losch, 
late a member of this body, and extends to the family of the deceased Senator sincere con- 
dolence in their bereavement. 

Resolved, That we are deeply conscious of the loss sustained by his death and desire 
to bear witness to his sterling worth as a man, his integrity and ability as a legislator and 
his courtesy and fidelity towards those with whom he was associated. 

Resolved, That a copy of these resolutions, with the action of the Senate thereon, be 
forwarded to the family of the deceased by the Clerk of the Senate, and as a further 
tribute of the respect to his memory the Senate do now adjourn. 

Charles E. Quail, 
James C. Vaugha-n, 
Henry H. Cumings, 
D. S. Lee, 
Jno. M. Scott, 
Wm. Flinn, 
J. C. Stine'man, 
Jno. F. Higgins, 

Committee. 

At the exercises which followed many were the sincere tributes of affection 
and respect paid to the inemory of one whose ambition to do right was recog- 
nized as the keynote of all his endeavors. Addresses were made by Lieutenant 
Governor Gobin, Charles E. Quail, Senator Alagee (read by Mr. Snyder, 
Senator IMagee being absent because of illness), D. S. Lee, Mr. Weller, Mr. 
Wentz and Mr. Heinle. We quote from the addresses of Mr. Gobin and 
Mr. Magee in part. 

Mr. Gobin : "Samuel A. Losch was a farniliar figure in the halls of legis- 
lation for many years, whether in a clerical capacity or as a member of the 
House or the Senate. He recognized all duty devolving upon him and filled 
it to the full measure of his judgment. Many of us knew him well as a 
senator, and still better as a citizen, and as a comrade in arms, whose heart 



134 SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 

was ever open to the appeals of his fellow man, and whose devotion to the 
interest of the soldiers was apparent in all legislation pertaining to their 
welfare and honor. His was a rugged manliness. He thoroughly appreciated 
the value of friendship, and also the inevitable fact that life was filled with 
opposition, and he dealt with both as with the conflicting elements which a 
man of his positive nature must necessarily combat. He was an excellent 
judge of human nature, and was able to impress his personality, not only upon 
legislative bodies with which he was associated, but also upon his constituency 
to a remarkable degree. Measures which he approved found in him an earnest 
advocate ; those which he disapproved a bitter opponent. And yet with it all 
there was a tenderness of heart which never failed to manifest itself upon all 
occasions." 

Mr. Magee : " 'Of the dead say nothing but good,' was a proverb of the 
ancients. It had its spring in the noblest and kindest impulses of the human 
heart. It covered with the mantle of charity the frailties and faults of our 
fellows. But when, in recalling the memory of the departed, we find in 
justice that good, and only good, leaving mere imperfections to the realms of 
forgetfulness, can be said, there is then a melancholy pleasure in dwelling upon 
qualities which endear their possessors to those who have known and esteemed 
them. Of Samuel A. Losch. only the captious and hypercritical could say 
anything but good. His life was so open, so plain to view, that nothing was 
hidden or concealed. He was what he seemed to be. No man had cause to 
doubt where he stood or what the reasons impelling him to take that stand. 
His whole life was an exemplification of a purpose as honest as it was stead- 
fast. During that life he played his part in many fields of human endeavor. 
* * * The whole life of Samuel A. Losch was a battle. No adventitious 
aids were his in the struggle. He carved his own way. Plain in speech and 
direct in manner, he scorned subterfuge and despised deceit. As a fighter he 
was brave, as a foe he was fair, and as a friend he was true, and being brave 
and fair and true he was also tender and kind. I speak these words from 
personal knowledge, based upon a friendship existing for more than a quarter 
of a century. Human aiifection can offer its tribute to the memory of no more 
loyal soldier, citizen and friend than was Samuel A. Losch." 

On April 2, 1901, a resolution was passed in the Senate ordering that one 
thousand copies of the memorial proceedings be printed and bound in cloth for 
the use of the Senate. 

KEAR. Shortly after the incorporation of Minersville, Schuylkill county, 
which took place in 1831, the Kears became established in the village, 
attracted hither by the mines. They emigrated from South Wales, where 
they had been engaged in mining, the brothers William and Richard Kear 
arriving first, and their father soon afterwards. Beginning as mine workers, 
they had the qualifications of experience and industry which soon drew 
them into the operation of coal workings on their own account, and from 
that period until the middle seventies, when the Philadelphia & Reading Coal 
& Iron Company bought up the combined Kear coal interests, they were in 
the field as operators or managers of coal properties. In the forty years or 
more of their mining activities they also branched out into other channels of 
industry in this section, and all the representatives of the name have evinced 
versatility and adaptability to conditions which make it apparent that thcv 
are of tlie element which insures prosperous conditions in any locality. AJl 



SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 135 

of the sons of ^\■illiam Kear found their opportunity and field of labor where 
their father settled, and their personal prosperity has been shared by the 
community, their energies and capital being devoted to the promotion of useful 
enterprises and projects which have developed the local resources with the 
direct etYect of increasing local revenues. Reference to their various enter- 
I)rises will suggest how important a place they occupy in the economy of this 
part of the State. 

Richard Kear, father of Richard and William Kear, was of English lineage 
and born in the Forest of Dean, England. Subsequently he settled in the 
mining district of South Wales, where he was employed in the mines until 
his emigration to America, in the year 1830. The sons landed at Philadelphia 
and continued their journey to Pottsville, Schuylkill Co., Pa., by way of the 
Schuylkill canal. The father joined them a little later, and lived at Minersville, 
Schuylkill county, until his death, which occurred in 1836, when he was sixty- 
four years old. His family consisted of five children : William, Mary, Francis 
(who died in \^'ales), Thomas and Richard, Jr. The last named was a very 
successful coal operator. For some time he was associated with his brother 
William in the conduct of the Little Diamond colliery, and they then branched 
out more extensively, in 1847 beginning independent operations in the Wolf 
Creek district, where he continued to be engaged until his death, which 
occurred May 4. 1864, at jMinersville. He had succeeded his father in the 
conduct of the Little Orchard plant on Oak Hill. 

\\ illiam Kear, son of Richard Kear, Sr., was born in Blaen Avon, South 
\\'ales, in 1808. Like his brother Richard he was engaged at mine work for 
a time before becoming an operator, the brothers, in 1832, undertaking the 
operation of the Little Diamond colliery, which has now long been abandoned. 
They carried it on until about 1835. After the death of the father he and his 
brother Richard carried on the Little Orchard colliery on Oak Hill until 18..17, 
when William Kear turned to the operation of the Peach Orchard colliery, 
selling his coal retail at Minersville and in the surrounding territory. In 1856 
he became overseer at his brother Richard's colliery at Wolf Creek, and was 
there engaged until he retired from active mine work, in i860. After dissolv- 
ing his early association with his brother he did business under the name of 
William Kear & Company. Mr. Kear lived at Minersville from the time this 
region was practicall}' a wilderness, was one of the leading spirits among its 
pioneer citizens, and had intimate association with the establishment of a num- 
ber of important enterprises. He was president of the First National Bank 
at Minersville until his resignation. May 28, 1877, when he was succeeded by 
Jacob S. Lawrence, and he by the present president, Charles R. Kear, in 
January, 1887. William Kear was a member of the borough council and gave 
public-spirited service in that office. He was a leading member of the !Meth- 
odist Episcopal Church, opening his home for services before the congregation 
had a church building, held a number of offices in the church, and was acting 
as treasurer at the time of his death. Politically he was a Whig in his earlier 
years, changing to the Republican party upon its organization. His death 
occurred at Minersville in February, 1890. 

'Mr. Kear married Elizabeth Gregg, whose father, Francis Gregg, was bom 
in South Wales and came to the United States in 1850. In 1859 he moved out 
to Missouri, where he died a few years later, at the age of seventy-seven. 
Ten children were born to this union, two of whom died in infancy, eight 
growing to maturity, namely; A\'illiam G., Mary (deceased), Margaret, Rich- 



136 SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 

ard C, Edward G., Charles R., Harrison A. and Frank G. Of these, Richard 
C. Kear, bom in Minersville, lived there nearly all his life. He graduated 
from Dickinson Seminary in 1856, and in 1864 became associated with his 
brothers in the coal business as a member of the firm of Kear Brothers & 
Company, with which he was connected until they sold to the Philadelphia & 
Reading Coal & Iron Company. Then with a partner he operated the Wolf 
Creek colliery until 1874, when it was abandoned, after which he was a mem- 
ber of the Minersville Coal & Iron Company for two years. Meantime he had 
also been interested in the manufacture of brick for one year, and then went 
West, locating at Salina, Kans., where he was engaged in banking and the 
real estate business until his death. He was accidentally drowned in 1892. 
Mr. Kear was a veteran of the Civil war. in which he served under General 
Rosecrans. He married Elizabeth Bartholomew, and they had two children. 
Margaret Kear, the only surviving daughter of William and Elizabeth (Gregg) 
Kear, was married in 1852 to Stephen Dando, a native of England, who came 
to the United States in 1846 and settled at Minersville. He became a promi- 
nent business man of the borough. He died Sept. 21, 1883, and his widow is 
now residing near Philadelphia. They had a family of six children : Mary, 
deceased; Franklin, deceased; Jennie, Mrs. Straub; Mary (2), wife of Charles 
E. Steele ; William and Minnie, both deceased. 

William G. Kear, late of Minersville, Pa., was the eldest son of William 
and Elizabeth (Gregg) Kear, and the only member of the family born in 
South Wales. His birth occurred May 9, 1830, and he was only a young child 
when he and his mother joined the father at Minersville, Schuylkill Co., Pai 
His educational advantages were very limited, for he was only nine years old 
when he began to work at a coal breaker, picking slate, and was so employed 
until he reached his seventeenth year. He then began an apprenticeship at the 
blacksmith's trade, which he continued to follow until 1853, in which year 
he made a trip to the Pacific coast. In California he was employed by Benja- 
min Haywood in the manufacture of fireproof building equipment and sup- 
plies, and remained with him until 1856. in which year he returned home and 
resumed his trade, which he then followed for about a year. The next 
year he was in the butcher business, and then took the position of outside 
foreman at the Mine Hill Gap colliery, at that time operated by his uncle. 
There he also continued for a year, and in i860 became engaged in the shipping 
of coal for that colliery to Schuylkill Haven, but he soon resumed charge of the 
outside operations of the colliery, remaining there until his vmcle's death, in 
1864. After that he became associated with his sister, Mrs. Dando, and 
Charles, Edward, Harrison and R. C. Kear, under the firm name of Kear 
Brothers & Company, who took control of the Mine Hill Gap colliery. They 
were together until 1872, when the property was sold to the Philadelphia & 
Reading Coal & Iron Company, following which change William G. Kear 
became one of the organizers of the Minersville Coal & Iron Company, to 
which he devoted his energies principally until 1880. In the meantime he 
became interested in the mercantile business, which he carried on in connection 
with his olher afTairs until 1888, in which year he retired from active business 
life. The remainder of his years was given to the management of his exten- 
sive private interests. His home was on Kear's Hill, at Minersville, where 
he had a farm, which has been divided into building lots and sold for residence 
property, the locality still retaining the name of Kear's Hill. He died at his 



SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 137 

home Dec. 28, 1906, and is buried in the M. E. cemetery at Minersville. Pohti- 
cally Mr. Kear was a Republican, hke most of the name. 

On Dec. 26, i860, Mr. Kear married Sarah Borda, daughter of Joseph 
Borda, of Schuylkill Haven, and she still occupies the homestead at Kear's 
Hill, at what is now No. 117 Spruce street. Of the eight children born to 
this union six died young, namely : Mary, William O., William P., Joseph, 
Jessie and Jessie (2) ; Bertha married Howard M. Jones, a salesman for the 
Ulmer Packing Company, of Pottsville, and they have one son, Jesse Kear; 
Mary is the wife of William W. Jones, of Minersville, dealer in stationery, 
toys, etc., and they have three children, Dorothy M., William G. and Mary E. 

Charles R. Ke.-\r was born Sept. 22, 1846, at Minersville, and received 
his education there and at Dickinson Seminary, Williamsport, Pa. Soon after 
leaving school he joined the Union army, enlisting in July, 1862, in Company 
K, 39th Pennsylvania \'olunteer Infantry, Emergency Troops, for three 
months. He had commenced work at a very early age, and upon the expira- 
tion of his army service retin-ned home and became employed as a shipper 
at the Mine Hill Gap colliery, which was operated by his uncle, Richard Kear. 
He was in this employ until he becaiue a member of the firm of Kear Brothers 
in 1864, he and his brothers succeeding their uncle in the conduct of the colliery, 
which they carried on until it was sold to the Philadelphia & Reading Coal & 
Iron Company. During these years he had acquired other interests, in 1867 
becoming a director of the First National Bank of Minersville, of which in 
time he became vice president, about 1886 succeeding his father as president. 
He has ever since been the executive head of this financial institution, the 
leading one in Minersville. Other local associations of importance include his 
connection with the Minersville W^ater Company, in which he owns the con- 
trolling interest, and of which he was elected secretary and superintendent in 
1883. At one time he was the principal stockholder in the Minersville Coal & 
Iron Company and one of its board of directors. He has also been one of the 
chief forces in the Minersville Building & Loan Association, which he formerly 
served as director and treasurer. He has been otherwise connected with the 
real estate interests of the borough, as agent for a large tract of land in the 
vicinity. His public service, as member of the borough council, came up to the 
best expectations of the citizens who supported him for that office. Politically 
he is a Republican. Mr. Kear is a member of Capt. George J. Lawrence Post, 
No. 17, G. A. R. 

On Feb. 6, 1869, Mr. Kear married Josephine Seltzer, daughter of Conrad 
and Dorothea Seltzer, of Pottsville. and they occupy a handsome home at 
Minersville. They have had a family of eight children, seven sons and one 
daughter : 

( I ) Charles F. Kear was born at Minersville, attended the public schools 
there, and later took a course at the Bryant & Stratton College of Commerce, 
Philadelphia, in 1889. For a short time he was assistant secretary to his 
father for the Minersville Water Company, and in 1890 was appointed station 
agent and Adams Express agent at the Lehigh A^alley station, where he re- 
mained in that capacity until 1902. He was then elected to his present posi- 
tion, as teller in the First National Bank of Minersville. He has been interested 
in the insurance business since 1897, represents several of the old-line com- 
panies, and controls the largest business in the borough in that line. He has 
been manager of the Opera House since 1891, treasurer of the Water Com- 
pany since 1894, and served ten years as town clerk, in every connection prov- 



138 SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 

ing himself typical of the capable stock to which he belongs. In 1891 he 
married Emma Moll, daughter of Henry Moll, of Pottsville, Pa., and they 
have two children, Richard C. and Collier Harrison. Mr. Kear is a member of 
the Mercantile Club and of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. 

(2) Conrad A. Kear, now engaged as assistant foreman in the pattern 
shop of the Philadelphia & Reading Railway Company, at Pottsville, Pa., 
married Katie Bender, and they have two children, Josephine and Bertha. 

(3) Albert Seltzer Kear was bom July 28, 1873, ^^ Minersville, and 
obtained his education in the public schools of the borough. He has been 
connected with the Minersville Water Company throughout his career, begin- 
ning his association therewith in boyhood, and the broad experience he 
acquired at the different stations and in various capacities has well fitted him 
for the office of superintendent and secretary which he has held since January, 
1903. The other officials of this company are: Joseph Gerz, president; 
and Charles F. Kear, treasurer. The Minersville Water Company is noted 
for its efficient service and is fortunate in having a supply not only abundant 
but remarkably pure. Mr. Kear served the borough two years in the capacity 
of tax collector. He is well known socially, being an active member of the 
Mercantile Club and a Mason of high standing, connected with Minersville 
Lodge, No. 222, F. & A. M. ; Schuylkill Chapter, No. 154, R. A. M. ; Caldwell 
Consistory, thirty-second degree ; and Rajah Temple, A. A. O. N. M. S., at 
Reading. Mr. Kear married Sarah Dress, daughter of Jeremiah and Anna 
Dress, of Shamokin, Pa., and they have two children : Carl Irvin and Alice 
Elizabeth. 

(4) Robert S. Kear is an electrician for the Philadelphia & Reading Coal 
& Iron Company, and makes his home at ^Minersville. 

(5) George S. Kear, who died in Kentucky, was engaged as a steam 
tester for the Baldwin Locomotive Works at Philadelphia. 

(6) William Kear is employed in the pattern department of the Phila- 
delphia & Reading Railway Company, of Pottsville, Pa., where he resides. 

(•y') Mary Kear is the wife of Dr. J. E. Pickett, of 3ilinersville. 

(8) Frank Kear is a resident of Minersville. 

Edward G. Kear, late of Minersville, was born there Feb. 22, 1842, son of 
William Kear, Sr., and had the advantages afforded by the local public 
schools. During his young manhood he ran an engine for his father at the 
mines for a short time, and in the course of his active business career he was 
connected with the First National Bank at Minersville and the Minersville 
Water Company, being a stockholder in both. For a period of six years he 
carried on the shoe business at ]\Iinersville, retiring at the end of that time. 
His death occurred Sept. 5, 1913, and he is buried in the Charles Baber ceme- 
tery at Pottsville. His religious connection was with the Methodist Church, 
and he was thoroughly respected by his fellow members in the congregation, as 
he was wherever else his activities carried him. On ]\Iay 10, 1862, Air. Kear 
married l\Iary Borda, daughter of Joseph Borda. and they had a family of 
four children, namely: Edward H., now foreman in the office of the Shamokin 
Dispatch, a daily newspaper, married Susan Mealing, and they have one child. 
Mary: Irene May is the wife of George Scott, of Minersville, and they have 
two children, Bessie and Mary ; Irvin B. attended the Pottsville business 
college and later became engaged in the jewelry business at Minersville, where 
he died Sept. 25, 1903, and is buried in the Charles Baber cemetery at Potts- 
ville (his widow, whose maiden name was Prilla Beddou, resides at Miners- 



SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENNSYLVANL\ 139 

ville) ; Joseph B., now engaged in the cigar business at Minersville, married 
I\Iary Rupp, and they have one son, Edward G. 

Airs. Kear still resides in the old Kear homestead on Front street, and is 
one of the most esteemed residents of the borough. Joseph Borda, her father, 
was a native of France and came to America when nineteen years old, the 
trip, which was made in a sailing vessel, occupying forty-two days. He 
settled at Schuylkill Haven, Schuylkill Co., Pa. By trade a millwright and 
carpenter, he acted as foreman for the canal company, taking charge of the 
work from Port Clinton to Auburn. He continued to work for the canal 
company throughout his active years, dying at the age of eighty-three, and he 
is buried in the LInion cemetery at Schuylkill Haven. He married Mary 
Runkle, of Schuylkill Haven, and they had a family of seven children : 
Priscilla, Henry, Mary (Mrs. Edward G. Kear), Joseph, Sarah (Mrs. William 
G. Kear), Albert and Louisa. 

Harrison A. Ke.vr has maintained all the traditions of the fine stock to 
which he belongs in his well rounded career. At present he is the executive 
head of the school board, a director of several important local concerns, and 
active in everything which promises to stimulate the growth of the borough 
along the most desirable lines. He was born Jan. ii, 1849, at Minersville, where 
he received all of his early education, attending the high school. Later he 
was a student at Dickinson Seminary. His first business position was as teller 
in the First National Bank of Minersville. and he was afterwards appointed 
deputy collector of internal revenue for the Fifteenth division of the First 
district, comprising Schuylkill county, holding that position for about nine 
years. For a number of years he was active in real estate circles, selling build- 
ing lots for the Kear estate on what is known as Kear's Hill. He is now a 
director of the First National Bank and of the Home Building and Loan 
Association, of Minersville, which latter he helped to organize. He is also 
a member of the board of directors of the Minersville Water Company. For 
many years Mr. Kear has given loyal service to his fellow citizens as a member 
of the school board, of which body he has been president for the last ten years. 
Socially he is well known in the Masonic bodies, belonging to Minersville 
Lodge, No. 222, F. & A. M., of which he is a past master; to .Schuylkill Chap- 
ter, No. 159, R. A. M., of which he is a past officer; to Constantine Com- 
mandery. No. 41, K. T., of Pottsville. He has always taken an active interest 
in politics, associated with the Republican party. 

Mr. Kear married Annie Scott, daughter of Robert Scott, the latter a 
native of England. Mr. Scott was superintendent of the East Pine Knot Coal 
Company, whose mines are near Minersville. Two children have been born 
to Mr. and Mrs. Kear; Harrison W. and Margaret D., both at home. 

F"rank G. Kear, youngest son of William and Elizabeth (Gregg) Kear, 
was born at Minersville Alarch 10, 1854, and like the rest of his family was 
educated there and at Dickinson Seminary, Williamsport, Pa. Then he further 
prepared himself for his business career by a course in civil and mining engi- 
neering at the Philadelphia Polytechnic Institute, completing his studies there 
in 1879. For a few years afterwards he was engaged in the brewing business 
in partnership with Daniel Frieler, under the firm name of F. G. Kear S: 
Company, doing a successful business vmtil 1883, when he withdrew. In 1878 
he became a director of the First National Bank of Minersville, and is still 
serving on the board ; and he has also been a director of the Minersville Water 
Company since early in 1878. As a member and director of the Minersville 



140 SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 

Coal & Iron Company, a director and president of the Minersville Fire Insur- 
ance Company, he has been intimately connected with local business matters, 
and he is the owner of the Mountaineer Opera House, of which he was 
formerly manager, his nephew, Charles F. Kear, now holding that position. 
His only public position has been that of member of the borough council. He 
supports the Republican party. Socially Air. Kear has been associated with 
a number of local bodies, Umatilla Lodge, No. 287, I. O. R. M., of which he 
was a charter member; Washington Camp, No. 46, P. O. S. of A., and the 
Mercantile Club of Minersville. 

On Oct. 23, 1878, Mr. Kear married Kate Hoenich, daughter of Henry and 
Catherine Hoenich, of Minersville, and to this union were born three children, 
of whom Cara and Harvey are deceased ; Laura C. is the wife of Harry H. 
MacKirgan, and they reside at Jacksonville, Fla. The mother died July 21, 
1889, at the age of thirty-one years, and Mr. Kear subsequently married (sec- 
ond) Kate Snyder, daughter of Jacob and Sarah Snyder, of Minersville, on 
April 23, 1890. They have had two children: Helen, who graduated from 
the Minersville High School and is now a student at Walnut Lane School, 
Philadelphia ; and Frank J., a public school pupil at Minersville. 

MOSES S. STEIN, senior member of the firm of Stein & Co., of Potts- 
ville, Schuylkill county,' wholesale and retail dealers in flour, feed, hay and 
straw, has been a business man of that place for over fifty years and at his 
present location for the last twenty years. ^ 

The Steins are an old family of this part of Pennsylvania, having been 
settled in the adjoining county of Berks since 1742. The name Stein is 
German, meaning stone or rock, but the family is known to have been French 
as far back as 1688 and originally called Pierre, which name appears among 
those of the French nobility. It is supposed the 'family changed the name 
upon removing from France to Germany. 

During the year 1742 Jacob Stein and his wife came to America from 
Germany, and they settled in what is now Richmond township, Berks Co., Pa., 
wher^ he took up the large tract of land, to whose cultivation he devoted the 
remainder of his life. Here he and his wife died. They had children: Hein- 
rich, who was born at sea while the parents were coming to America ; Michael ; 
Peter; Jacob, and Jonas. 

Jonas Stein, son of Jacob, the emigrant, was born Aug. 16, 1766, in Rich- 
mond township, and followed farming in Greenwich township, Berks county, 
being a well known resident of that locality in his day. He lived to the age of 
seventy-five years, dying Jan. 16, 1842. His wife, Alaria (Berk), bom 
about 1774, died about 1848. To them were born children as follows: Jacob, 
Peter, Benjamin, Daniel, Solomon, Hannah (married Joseph Brownmiller), 
Elizabeth, Hetty, Mrs. Zeare, Mrs. Seitler and Mrs. Gramer. Of these, Jacob, 
born Feb. 16, 1794, became engaged in farming and distilling on an extensive 
scale, owning five hundred acres of land, which he divided into five farms, 
erected substantial buildings thereon, and made other improvements. He was 
public-spirited and built a schoolhouse near his home for the township. He 
died March 2, 1874, in his eighty-first year, long surviving his wife, Sarah 
(Sunday), who had passed away in February, 1846. They had the following 
children, all born in Greenwich township, Berks county: Solomon, Adam, 
Nathan, Annie (who married William Schaeflfer), Lavina (married Daniel 
Deisher), Lucinda (married Henry K. Seigfreid), Jacob and Henry. 



SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 141 

Peter Stein, son of John and Maria (Berk) Stein, was born Dec. 28, 1797, 
in Richmond township, Berks Co., Pa. He followed the carpenter's trade 
for some time, and carried on agricultural pursuits there most of his life. He 
died on his farm Feb. 28, 18O5, and his wife, Elizabeth (Spohn), daughter 
of Conrad Spohn, born in Greenwich township, Berks county, Nov. 8, 1807, 
died on the farm in 1864. They are buried at the Dunkel Church in Green- 
wich township. Fifteen children were born to this marriage, and we have 
the following record of this family: Nathan S., born Jan. 5, 1832, died Jan. 
4, 1914, in Oskaloosa, Iowa; Adam S., born Aug. 15, 1833, died in infancy; 
Jonas S., born Aug. 29, 1834, died March 22, 1906; Moses S. is mentioned 
below; Lelia S., born Aug. 28, 1838, died Jan. 8, 1840; Daniel S., born Dec. 
23, 1839, is living at Orwigsburg, Schuylkill Co., Pa.; Maria S., born Jan. 
31, 1841, is the widow of P. W. Woliver, and resides at Lafayette, Ind. ; 
Solomon S., born Jan. 30, 1842, lives at Newark, N. J. ; Noah S., born March 
25, 1S43, is living at Bristol, Ind.: Anna S., born Nov. 11, 1844, died Feb. 3, 
1879, was the wife of Ephraim H. Mattern, who died Nov. 14, 1907; Joel 
S., born Sept. 16, 1846, is living in Mitchell, S. Dak. ; Samuel S., born July 
14, 1848, died Aug. 9, 1848 ; Lavina S., born Aug. 14, 1849, died Sept. 23, 
1849; William S., born July 30, 1852, died March 7, 1853; Florenda S., born 
Feb. 25, 1854, died Aug. 6, 1854. 

Moses S. Stein was born Aug. 26, 1836, on the homestead in Greenwich 
township, Berks county, and received his early education in the local public 
schools. Later he was sent to a select school, at Collegeville, Montgomery 
Co., Pa., and he taught school for three years in his native township. Mr. 
Stein came to Pottsville April 9, i860, and engaged in the grain and feed 
business. After a year in that line he became interested in tlour milling in 
the old John Pott mill at Pottsville, and was there established until 1893, in 
which year he erected his present place of business at the corner of Coal 
and Washington streets. Since 1893 ^^^- Stein has had his son, Franklin 
M. Stein, associated with him, and the firm was known as Stein & Co., Limited, 
until Aug. 23, 1913, when the style was changed to Stein & Co. They carry 
a general line of flour, feed, hay and straw, being engaged in both the wholesale 
and retail trade. Mr. Stein has always done business along the most progress- 
ive lines possible, and his foresight and good judgment have prompted him 
to make departures from old established customs which he felt have out- 
grown their usefulness and retarded the expansion of trade rather than 
promoted it. He was the first man to ship solid carloads of grain from the 
West into Pottsville, commencing in 1863. Until that year no grain ship- 
ments in carload lots came to Pottsville or other points in this section from 
the \\'est. all grain from that part of the country being reshipped. Mr. 
Stein undertook to arrange for through shipments, and the change proved a 
great convenience to dealers in this part of the State. He is now one of 
the oldest men in his line in the town and vicinity, and has a substantial 
position among the most successful merchants of his section. He is thor- 
oughly respected by all who have had dealings with him. Mr. Stein has 
always been one of the active men of the community in advancing matters 
that tend to promote its welfare, and he was one of the organizers of Trinity 
Reformed Church of Pottsville. in which he still retains membership. He 
is the only surviving member of the original consistory of that church. His 
participation in the local government has been confined to several years' service 



142 SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PEXXSYLVANL\ 

as councilman. Socially he is a member of Pulaski Lodge, Xo. 216, F. & A. 
M., and of the Sphinx Club. 

On June 4, 1864, Air. Stein married Fiannah B. Myers, daughter of 
Michael E. Myers, of Bethel township, Berks Co., Pa., and she died Oct. 14, 
191 1, the mother of these children: Catherine E. ; Franklin M.; Emma 
E., who is deceased ; Alinnie M., and Anna M. 

Franklin M. Stein was born in Pottsville Nov. 11, 1866, and acquired 
his education in the public schools there. After commencing work he was 
employed by the Pennsylvania Railroad Company for a period of six years, 
at the end of that time changing to the Philadelphia & Reading Company, 
in whose employ he remained for eight years. Since 1893 h^ has been 
interested in dealing in flour, feed, hay and straw with his father, though he 
did not give all of his time to the business until 1900. From that year to 
the present he has been manager for Stein & Co., for whose steady success 
he deserves considerable of the credit. He is a member of Lily of Valley 
Lodge, I. O. O. F., and of Trinity Reformed Church. He is unmarried. 

JEREMIAH CHARLES LAUTENBACHER is one of the leading men 
in an industry for which the borough of Schuylkill Haven has become famous, 
employing on an average about ninety people in the manufacture of knitted 
underwear. He has been engaged in this line for almost thirty years, having 
begun as a manufacturer of hosiery, and from a modest start he has attained 
a position among the large employers of labor in the borough. The output 
of his establishment is in popular demand in all parts of the country. As 
the founder of the first factory in the borough Mr. Lautenbacher deserves 
much credit for taking the initial step in the introduction of the business 
which has proved of great value in maintaining prosperous conditions in the 
borough and vicinity. 

Mr. Lautenbacher is a native of Kutztown, Berks Co., Pa., which place 
was so named in honor of his maternal ancestors. His father, the late 
Charles Lautenbacher, was born July 15, 1832, in Germany, being a native 
of Ballafengen, in the grand duchy of Baden. Coming to America when 
nineteen years old, he first located at Philadelphia, Pa., living there for some 
time, and he was employed in the construction of the stone work of the well 
known "Continental Hotel" in that city. Thence he removed to Baltimore, 
Md., and subsequently to Alexandria, Va., and Camden, N. J., his next location 
being at Kutztown, Pa., where he remained some time and married. From 
there he came to Schuylkill Haven, Schuylkill county, where he made a 
permanent home, engaging in his calling of marble and stone cutter until his 
death, which occurred Aug. 9, 1881. At Kutztown he met and married Sarah 
Ann Graeff, who was born Dec. 17, 1831, daughter of John and Mary (Kutz) 
Graeiif, and died Aug. 17, 1904. To Mr. and Mrs. Lautenbacher were born 
seven children: Jeremiah C, Irvin L., Flora, Mamie (deceased), Charles 
(deceased), and two who died in infancy. 

Mrs. Lautenbacher was a native of Kutztown, Berks county, which place 
was so named in honor of her maternal ancestors, who were early pioneers 
of that county. They experienced the usual hardships and dangers of that 
day when the Indians were numerous and hostile, and there is a well-established 
tradition in the family that her great-grandfather had a secret cave to which 
he would retire in emergency with his family, and that the Indians never 
succeeded in locating this hiding place. George Kutz bought a tract of 130 



SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, rEx\'XSYLVANL\ 143 

acres from Peter Wentz in 1755, and there in 1779 laid out the town which 
has developed into one of the important boroughs of Berks county and still 
bears his name. The first tax list of the borough, made in 1817, records 
the lollowing Kutzes : Peter, a tinsmith; Adam, carpenter; Jacob, mason; 
John, tailor; Peter (who was a Revolutionary soldier) ; Daniel; and Solomon, 
butcher. 

Solomon Kutz, the last named, was the grandfather of Mrs. Lautenbacher. 
He was long engaged as a butcher at Kutztown, and lived to the age of 
nine^ty-two years. Among his children were the following: Mary, Mrs. 
John Graeff, died at Kutztown when seventy-nine years old ; her children 
were Daniel, John, Catherine (Mrs. John Stickman) and Sarah Ann (Mrs. 
Charles Lautenbacher j. Lydia, who died at West Penn, Pa., was the wife 
of Oscar Sheetz and mother of Oscar, Buchanan, Tillie and Sara. Reuben 
lived and died at Kutztown. Louisa married Daniel Kutz, son of Benjamin, 
and lives at Kutztown, now (1914) aged eighty-six years. Susanna married 
Harry Shide and lives at Kutztown, now aged eighty-four years. 

Jeremiah Charles Lautenbacher was born June 26, 1857, and was three 
years old when the family settled at Schuylkill Haven, where he received his 
education in the public schools. \\'hen little more than a boy he commenced 
to learn the trade of marble cutter, which he continued to follow until ready 
to enter the manufacturing field, when twenty-eight years old. As previously 
intimated, he then established the first factory in Schuylkill Haven, beginning 
with the manufacture of hosiery, and when conditions warranted enlarging 
his plant and equipment with facilities for the production of underwear. 
The factory now is devoted exclusively to the knitting of underwear, including 
all kinds of ladies' garments, union suits, etc. Mr. Lautenbacher has pro- 
ceeded along conservative lines, but the market for his goods has been so 
constant that he has been able to keep enlarging his business steadily, and 
though he has attempted to anticipate its expansion and the increase of trade 
he has never found his facilities too large for the accommodation of his 
orders. His enterprise is considered one of the stable assets of the borough, 
which for many years has benefited by its prosperous career. 

Mr. Lautenbacher has been called upon to exert his ability and executive 
qualities for the good of the municipality, and that his eiTorts have met with 
approval and appreciation is shown in the fact that he has been retained as 
councilman of the borough for eighteen years, and has served eight years as 
president of the body. In political faith he is a Republican. He has numer- 
ous fraternal associations, being a thirty-second-degree Mason, a past master 
of Page Lodge, No. 207, F. & A. ]\L, of Schuylkill Haven ; member of Moun- 
tain City Chapter, No. 196, R. A. M., of Pottsville ; of Constantine Com- 
mandery, No. 41, K. T., of Pottsville; of Philadelphia Consistory (third-second 
degree), and of Rajah Temple, A. A. O. N. M. S., of Reading. Besides, 
he holds membership in Pottsville Lodge, No. 207, B. P. O. Elks, the I. O. 
O. F. lodge. Junior Order United American INIechanics, Improved Order of 
Red Men, and Royal Arcanum, all of Schuylkill Haven. He and his family 
belong to the United Evangelical Church at Schuylkill Haven, in which he 
has been an interested worker for years, at present -serving as trustee and 
president of the board. He has also been class leader, teacher in the Sunday 
school, and superintendent of the Sunday school, in all these positions 
performing his duties with the ability which has made him so successful in 
everything he undertakes. 



144 SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 

On Sept. 6, 1877, Mr. Lautenbacher married Angella Emerich, daughter of 
Elijah and Sarah Ann (RaudenbushJ Emerich, of Schuylkill Haven, old 
residents of Schuylkill county. Four children have been born to this union, 
namely: Irene E., wife of Thomas Tindall, of Schuylkill Haven; Mary 
Flora, wife of Howard Hirleman, of Schuylkill Haven; Sarah May, wife of 
Samuel Teter, of Philadelphia; and Charles Elijah, deceased. 

CHARLES A. SNYDER, of Pottsville, at present representing his district 
in the State Senate, has been one of the foremost attorneys of Schuylkill 
county, and for a number of years one of its most faithful servants. His 
earlier services to his fellow citizens were in the lineof his professional work, 
and the record he made in the conscientious discharge of their responsibilities 
commended him to the further attention of his constituents, who have chosen 
him to both branches of the State Legislature, of which body he has been a 
member almost continuously for ten years. 

Mr. Snyder is a descendant of old Pennsylvania stock. His ancestors in 
both paternal and maternal lines were among the early settlers in the Tulpe- 
hocken section of Berks county. They have always been patriotic, being found 
among the defenders of their country in the Indian and Colonial wars and the 
Revolution, as well as in all the subsequent wars in which the country has been 
involved. William Herb Snyder, father of Charles A. Snyder, was a Union 
soldier during the Civil war, serving in two companies, in the 108th and I72d 
of the Pennsylvania Volunteer Regiments. He was a native of Schuylkill 
county, born Oct. 6, 1844, and married Leah Hoefter Brua, who was born at 
Pillow, Dauphin Co., Pa., Dec. 23, 1843. 

Charles A. Snyder was born at Pillow April 16, 1867. After receiving 
public school advantages and attending private schools for several years, he 
entered upon the study of law, and began practice at Pottsville upon his admis- 
sion to the bar, in 1889. He has continued to make his home in that borough, 
and has built up an extensive legal business, his clientage being drawn from 
a wide range of interests, which speaks well for the confidence he has gained 
wherever engaged. He is now, and has been for the past twelve years, 
county solicitor. Early in his legal career he became cily solicitor, subsequently 
becoming deputy district attorney and then county comptroller. In 1903 he 
took his seat in the lower house of the State Legislature as representative of 
the Fourth district of Schuylkill county and continued to serve until 1907 — 
for three consecutive terms. In November, 1908, he was elected State 
senator, and has been serving as such ever since, having been reelected in 
November, 1912. Mr. Snyder's sincere interest in all matters affecting the 
public welfare has given him a sympathetic insight into the needs of his 
comnuinity and questions of importance to tliis section in general, and hehas 
been particularly zealous in affairs relating to the public schools, especially 
in obtaining justice for the common school teachers, having secured the legis- 
lation advancing their salaries and establishing a new school code for Penn- 
sylvania. He has been a tireless worker in promoting the welfare of his 
home community, not only in such things as aft'ect its internal interests, but 
those which concern its position with relation to the State, and the wisdom of 
his actions in the State Legislature has had the hearty approval and substan- 
tial indorsement of the larger majority of his fellow citizens. 

On May 21. i8qi, Mr. Snyder married Laura Arters, daughter of Charles 
D. and Ellen (Hoffman) Arters, of Churchtown, Lancaster Co.. Pa. In the 




<:^^< ^ SzCw*'^^^^ 




i 



i 



SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 145 

early seventies Mr. Arters came to Schuylkill county, where he made a high 
reputation as an educator in a long and successful career as a teacher. Mr. and 
Mrs. Snyder have two children, Ruth, born Oct. 9, 1892, and Droz Brua, bom 
April 12, 19QO. The family belongs to the Methodist Episcopal Church. 
Mr. Snyder's social connections are with the Improved Order of Red Men, 
the Knights of the Golden Eagle, the Patriotic Order Sons of America, B. P. 
O. Elks, Royal Arcanum and I. O. of A. He formerly belonged to the National 
Guard of Pennsylvania. 

JOHN WOOLCOCK, of Pottsville, retired coal operator, has spent most 
of his life in Schuylkill county, though his important business interests for 
the last si.xteen years have been in West \'irginia, where he still has heavy 
investments in soft coal properties. Mr. Woolcock was born Aug. 8, 1844, 
in County Waterford, Ireland. His parents, William and Grace (Jobe) 
Woolcock, were both natives of the County of Cornwall, in England. In 
1845 they came to America with their family and settled in Schuylkill county. 
Pa., first at Aliddleport, later at Forestville, where they lived for a short time, 
and then at Heckscherville. There Mr. Woolcock was employed at the 
mines imtil his death, in 1865, caused by an explosion in the mines. His 
wife continued to live in this section until her death, which occurred at Shamo- 
kin. They are buried at Alinersville. Eleven children were born to them, 
nine of whom attained maturity : Edward, Elijah, Thomas, Elizabeth A. 
(married George Robinson), William, Mary Jane (married Eli Lee), John, 
Joseph and Amelia. 

John Woolcock was reared in Schuylkill county, and obtained his educa- 
tion in the schools of Cass township. He has indeed been self-made so far 
as his business success is concerned, for he commenced work at the mines 
in the humblest position. Later he ran an engine, and he advanced steadily 
through sheer merit, unassisted by influential connections, proving himself 
competent for the various responsibilities which were intrusted to him. He 
was engaged at difl:'erent workings in Schuylkill county, holding the position 
of boss at the Phoenix colliery, No. 2, in Cass township, after which he was 
boss for the Reading Company at Middle Creek for about fifteen months. 
For the ne.xt few months he had a small operation at Minersville, and he 
continued here until 1886, when he began operations in the Pocahontas region 
of \\'est ^ irginia. taking an interest in the Elk Horn Coal & Coke Company, 
of which he was manager as well as part owner. He soon opened a colliery 
for the Gillen Coal & Coke Company, with whom he was associated for two 
years, at the end of that time going to Bottom Creek, where he remained a 
few months. For about three years following he was stationed at the Grape 
Vine colliery. Meantime he had been making his home in West Virginia, for 
sixteen years in all, in 1904 returning to Schuylkill county and establishing 
a permanent residence at Pottsville. His beautiful home in that borough, at 
No. 1609 Mahantongo street, was erected in 1907. Though he has withdrawn 
from active participation in the conduct of his coal properties Mr. Woolcock 
still retains valuable holdings, all in West Virginia, having stock in the Arcona 
Coal Company, the Gillen Coal Company, the Roanoke Coal Company and 
the Red Jacket Coal Company. Mr. Woolcock takes a good citizen's interest 
in local politics and uses his influence in behalf of measures intended to 
promote the general welfare, without regard to the political party which spon- 
sors them. While living in West Virginia he served as a member of the school 
Vol. T— 10 



146 SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 

board of his home district. In fraternal connection he is a Mason, belonging 
to Mount Carmel Lodge, No. 378, F. & A. M. 

In 1877 j\Ir. Woolcock married Jennie Dolbin, daughter of Goodman and 
Mary (Thomas) Dolbin, of Forestville, in Cass township, Schuylkill county. 
Mr. Dolbin, who was a pioneer coal operator in this county, is mentioned 
elsewhere in this work. Three children have been bom to Mr. and Mrs'. 
Woolcock: Wilbur T. studied at the University of West Virginia and is 
now engaged as a mining engineer, located at Logan, W. Va. ; Goodman D., 
who is also at Logan, W. Va., employed as an electrician, received his educa- 
tion at Pottsville; Sarah lives with her parents. Mr. Woolcock and his family 
are members of the Protestant Episcopal Church. 

DARIL^S D. COLDREN, of Schuylkill Haven, has made his success in 
the line of manufacture which for a number of years has formed the backbone 
of industrial prosperity in his borough, probably affording employment to 
more people than any other one kind of occupation. Mr. Coldren has built 
up his business from modest beginnings. He had previous experience as a 
manufacturer before entering his present field, in which he has displayed 
much enterprise, keeping his factory up to the modern standards in every 
respect and its operation according to the most approved system, with highly 
satisfactory results, both as to the conditions under which his employees 
work and their consequent efficiency. Mr. Coldren himself is a native of 
Berks county, Pa., born at Reading, June 15, 1863, son of Samuel P. Coldren. 
The family has been in this country for several generations. 

According to a member of this family, James J. Coldren, at present chorister 
and sexton of the Muddy Creek Church at Denver, Pa., the Coldrens originally 
came from Scotland. He said that the name was formerly "Caldwolatter," 
and has come down to the present era in the form Coldren — at some places 
Colden. As far as he could ascertain the branch of the Coldrens in which 
we are interested lived in Oley township, Berks county, until 1780, after which 
its members scattered, one removing in that year to Snyder county and one 
to Northumberland county. One had been lost trace of, and it seems likely 
that this member was Mathias, who settled in Lancaster county, and was 
the ancestor of Darius D. Coldren. When they settled in Berks county is 
not known. The first record of a baptism of the Coldrens at the JMuddy 
Creek Church (whose Reformed congregation was organized in 1743, the 
Lutheran in 1733), under date of 1785, is that of Mary Coldren. The family 
record given below of Mathias Coldren and his immediate descendants was 
taken from an old Bible which James J. Coldren received from his grand- 
mother when he was a boy. On the lid of this Bible is inscribed in a bold 
hand, evidently written with a quill pen: "John Coldren His book 1790." 

Mathias Coldren married Nancy Neethawk (or Neathawk), and we have 
the following record of the children born to them : John was born Dec. 28, 
1781 : William, born Aug. i, 1783, is mentioned below; Mary, born April 
2, 1785, Abraham, born April 19, 1787, and Elizabeth, born March 3, 1789, 
had no families as far as known; Jacob, bom May 5, 1791, left no family; 
Susan, born Dec. 19, 1794, married Samuel Coldren, but we have no record 
of a family; Mathias, born April 6, 1796, died Nov. 27, 1839, leaving two 
sons, one of whom died without issue, the other moving years ago to Miffiin- 
burg or Mifflinville, Pa.; Hannah, born Dec. 31, 1798, married a Miller, and 
their children were, Jacob, Isaac, Mrs. Gable, Mrs. Sanders and Mrs. Cooser; 



1 



SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENNSYLYANL\ 147 

Jacob, horn Ajiril 5, 1800, was the father of eleven ehildreii, Lydia (horn 
Nov. 7, 1824, married a Rohland and had a family), John (born Jan. 17, 
1826), Isaac (born Oct. 20, 1827), Franna (born May 23, 1831, married 
a Roth and had a large family), Henry (born March 9, 1834), Eli (born 
Oct. I, 1836), Jacob (Alarch 14, 1839), Levi (born July 24, 1841), Edward 
(born Dec. i, 1844), Mary (Mrs. Weinhold, May i, 1849) and Elizabeth 
(Mrs. W'einhold, born Dec. 29, 1851). 

William Coldren, bora Aug. i, 1783, was the grandfather of Darius D. 
Coldren. He lived in Lancaster county, about three miles south of Adams- 
town, and followed farming. He owned a tract of seventy-five acres, upon 
which he lived and died. His death occurred when he was about seventy-five 
years old, and he is buried in the cemetery at Muddy Creek Church. His 
wife, whose maiden name was Frankhouser, also lived to the age ot seventy- 
five years. They were the parents of a large family, namely: Peter, born in 
1802, married, and all his children were girls; John, born in 1804, had a 
large family; Isaac, born in 1806, is mentioned below; Abraham, born in 
1807, had a family ; Mary or Polly, born in 1809, married Henry Steiner, and 
one daughter of this union is still living; Lydia, born in 181 1, died unmarried; 
Samuel, born in 1814, had a large family; Rachel, born in 1816, married Levi 
Steffy, and had one son; Jacob, born in 1818, had no children; William, born 
in 1 82 1, had a family, all sons. 

Isaac Coldren, born Jan. 16, 1806, on his father's farm at Stone Hill', 
Lancaster county, died Aug. 10, 1867, on his farm, two and a half miles 
south of Adamstown. He owned fifty acres of land there and followed general 
farming and the hotel business. He and his wife, ]\Lary ( Pennypacker). are 
buried at the Muddy Creek Church before mentioned. She was born April 
30, 1803, daughter of Daniel Pennypacker (his wife was a Musser), and died 
June 16, 1878. Mr. and ]\Irs. Coldren had the following family; Samuel 
P. is the father of Darius D. Coldren ; Elizabeth married Henry G. ^lohn, 
and lives at Adamstown, Lancaster county ; Jesse is deceased ; Harrison is 
deceased; Mary married Christian Messner, and lives in Lancaster county. 

Samuel P. Coldren was born Dec. 6, 1833, in West Earl township, Lan- 
caster county, and attended public school in that neighborhood. He was 
taught by Squire Henry Becker. His school days over, he helped with the 
work on the farm, and later learned the trade of blacksmith, which he fol- 
lowed for a period of thirty years. Coming to Schuylkill Haven in 1881, 
he was employed as a blacksmith at the rolling mills for twenty-four years, 
after which he assisted his son, Darius D. Coldren, for eight years before his 
retirement. He still makes his home at Schuylkill Haven. On Sept. 10, 
1856, he married Elizabeth Matz Dewees, who was born Jan. 16, 1837, daughter 
of John M. Dewees. To this union was born a large family, viz. : John, 
born Feb. 20, 1858, married Catherine Becker; Lyman, born Sept. 21, 1859, 
married Carrie Harner; Augustus D., born April 12, 1861, died April 25, 
1914, married Elizabeth Mengle ; Darius D. is mentioned below ; George D., 
born Oct. I, 1865, married Katie Justace ; Elizabeth D., born July 13, 1867, 
married Evan Thomas, a manufacturer, of Schuylkill Haven ; Pierce D.. born 
May 26, 1870, married Rebecca Drumheller; Mary Jane, born Jan. 11, 1874, 
married Samuel Bast ; Robert D., born May 6, 1875, married Bertha Clemens ; 
Chester, born March 21, 1877, '^ unmarried, and is now in the West; Harry, 
born April 19, 1879, who lives at home, married Margaret Miller. 

The Dewees family, to which Mrs. Coldren belongs, has long been settled 



148 SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENNSYLVANLA. 

in Pennsylvania, and \\'illiam Dewees, her grandfather, was born in Denver, 
Lancaster county. He was a carpenter by trade, and followed that calling 
for many years. In his later years he removed to Stark county, Ohio, to 
make his home with his son George, and died there at the age of eighty-two 
years. His wife, Elizabeth (Martin), died at Womelsdorf, Berks Co., Pa. 
They had three children: John M., Mrs. Coldren's father; George M., who 
moved to Stark county, Ohio ; and Jacob, who died young. 

John M. Dewees was born Feb. 26, 1807, at Reamstown, Lancaster county. 
He followed the same trade as his father, that of shop carpenter, making all 
kinds of household furniture. He was also an undertaker, making his own 
coffins. In 1835 he was commissioned captain of the 12th Company, 55th 
Regiment, of the Militia of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, in the 2d 
Brigade, of the 6th Division, composed of the counties of Dauphin, Lebanon, 
Berks and Schuylkill, his commission bearing date Aug. 3, 1835, and good 
until Aug. 3, 1842, given and signed by Gov. Joseph Ritner. He was also a 
surveyor, and he served as justice of the peace, his first commission bearing 
date of 1840. He was a justice from the aforesaid date until 1879, having 
held the office for nearly forty years. Legal papers made and issued by him 
are noted for their neatness, accuracy and excellent penmanship. Lawyers 
and court officials often complimented him on his elegant' penmanship, which 
he did mostly with the quill. In 1834 he married Leah G. ^latz (born Feb. 
II, 1812), daughter of George Matz. They had three daughters and two 
sons, the sons dying in infancy. Of the daughters: Elizabeth M. married 
Samuel P. Coldren ; Sarah M. married Adam M. Grill; Rachel M. married 
Jere H. Miller. John M. Dewees was a man of ordinary means, but proved 
himself to be of great usefulness in this section between 1840 and 1875. He 
was intensely interested in the educational system provided by the act of 
1834, and in 1835, when an effort was made to repeal this law, he labored 
hard to interest the people and explain to them the importance of the edu'ca- 
tional advantages provided for by this act. He was a lover of music, especially 
of the fiddle, zither and accordeon. He was the owner of a small tract of 
land in Spring township. He died Dec. 14, 1881, and is buried at Alohns Hill 
burying ground. 

Darius D. Coldren attended public school at Reading and Port Clinton, 
Pa. When sixteen years old he began work in the rolling mill at Port 
Clinton as a rougher, and followed this kind of employment for a period of 
seven years, becoming a master roller. In 1887 he engaged in the manufacture 
of paper boxes at Schuylkill Haven, carrying on the business for one year, 
until he decided to enter the hosiery manufacturing line at Pine Grove, this 
county. He had a large knitting factory at that place which he operated 
for one year, transferring his business then to Harrisburg, where he also 
conducted it for one year. Returning to Schuylkill Haven, he engaged in the 
men's furnishings and merchant tailoring business, which occupied him for 
about ten years following, until he embarked in the manufacture of underwear, 
in igoo. Mr. Coldren was at first associated with Walter F. Meek in this 
business, under the firm name of Meek & Coldren, the partnership being 
dissolved in 1902, when Hariy A. Reber bought Mr. Coldren's interest. The 
same year, 1902, Mr. Coldren established the plant which he has since carried 
on as sole proprietor, and he is giving employment, at this writing, to between 
fifty and sixty hands. The business is located at St. John and Union streets, 
Schuylkill Haven. Within a few years, by 1906, it had already given such 



I 



SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 149 

promise of expansion that Mr. Coldren enlarged his plant, opening another 
mill which connects with the old one, the two mills giving eight thousand 
square feet of floor space. The product is tine-ribbed underwear for ladies 
and children, and the Snow White brand has achieved such wide reputation 
that the goods are shipped, not only to all parts of the United States, but to 
Australia and Africa as well. The business is in thriving condition, owing 
to J\Ir. Coldren's admirable methods, for he has given close attention to its 
requirements. However, it has not claimed all of his time. He was one of 
the organizers of the Schuylkill Haven Foundry Company, and he is still 
secretary of the board of directors of that concern, as well as a director of 
the Schuylkill Haven Board of Trade. Though he has assisted his town 
greatly in the building up of its manufacturing interests, he has not felt that 
his responsibility endAl therewith. He has served as councilman of the 
borough, and has been particularly active in church work as a member of 
the ^Methodist Episcopal denomination, being at present a trustee of his church 
and a teacher in the Sunday school; he served as superintendent of the Sunday 
school during the first four years after its organization. Fraternally Mr. 
Coldren is a Mason, belonging to Page Lodge, No. 270, F. & A. M., of Schuyl- 
kill Haven, and to Reading Lodge of Perfection (fourteenth degree). He'is 
also a member of the Royal Arcanum. In political conviction he is a Republi- 
can, though he favors the doctrines of the Prohibition party. 

On ]\Iarch 28, 1890, Mr. Coldren married Harriet G. Kerkeslager, daughter 
of Alexander W. and Mary Elminda (Miller) Kerkeslager, of Schuylkill 
Flaven. Three daughters have been born to this union, namely : Helen K., 
Mary Roth and Harriet Elizabeth, the last named dying when two and a half 
years old. 

The Kerkeslager family, to which Mrs. Darius D. Coldren belongs, is of 
German ancestry. John Kerkeslager, Mrs. Coldren's great-grandfather, was 
a native of Lancaster, Pa., born Feb. 17, 1766, and married Eva Christian 
Spayd, born Feb. 17, 1762, at Lancaster, daughter of Peter and Anna Spayd. 
They subsequently removed to Hummelstown, Dauphin Co., Pa., and he owned 
a large farm near that town, giving his time to agricultural pursuits, and also 
to his trade, that of tailor. He and his wife both died there, Mr. Kerkeslager 
April 26, 1824, his wife April 19th of the same year. They had three chil- 
dren: John Peter, born Nov. 15, 1790, who died in infancy; Michael, born 
Sept. 12, 1793; and Rebecca, born Aug. 15, 1800, who died in infancy. 

Michael Kerkeslager spent his yottth and early manhood at Hummelstown, 
and learned his father's trade. He was also a well known school teacher in 
his day, following the profession for a number of years in Dauphin county, 
and later at Schuylkill Haven, to which place he removed about 1822. He 
was a pioneer resident of the borough, and spent the rest of his days there, 
living retired during his closing years. On Jan. 10, 1816, he married Catherine 
Cider, who was born Jan. 15, 1796, and died March 11, 1873. He survived 
her only a few months, dying July 7th, and they were buried in the Union 
cemetery at Schuylkill Haven. They had a large family, born as follows : 
Jeremiah, Nov. i, 1816; Sarah, Sept. 4, 1818; George W., April 25, 1820; 
iRebecca, Nov. 21, 1821 ; Noah, Sept. 9, 1823; Michael, May 15, 1825; Elijah, 
April 19, 1827; ]\Iartha, June 24, 1829; William, June 27, 1831 ; Joseph, July 
8, 1833; Catherine, Jan. 28, 1836; Alexander W., June 26, 1838; and Peter, 
Jan. 26, 1 841. All of this family are now deceased. 

Alexander W. Kerkeslager was born at Schuylkill Haven, and was one 



150 SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PExXXSYLVANIA 

of the most prominent citizens of his generation in that borough. When 
only fourteen years old he began to learn the trade of butcher, and he con- 
tinued to follow that calling throughout his life, becoming one of the best 
known men in Schuylkill county, i'or several terms he served his fellow citi- 
zens as chief burgess. He was a Republican in politics, and a charter member 
of the Knights of Pythias, Sr. O. U. A. M., and Sons of America lodges in the 
borough, and belonged to St. Peter's Evangelical Church. His death occurred 
Jan. 1, 1886. He is buried in the Union cemetery. 

On July 13, 1861, he married Alary Elminda ]\Iiller, who was born at 
Schuylkill Haven, Eeb. 27, 1840, daughter of Conrad and Mary (De Long) 
Miller, and still resides there, making her home with her daughter, Mrs. 
Darius D. Coldren. Mr. and Mrs. Kerkeslager had two children: Harriet G., 
born April 4, 1863, wife of Darius D. Coldren; and Minnie Eva, born Feb. 18, 
1866, now the wife of J. V. Poley, of Royersford, Montgomery county, Penn- 
sylvania. 

F. P. MORTIAIER, Sr., leading dealer in ready-to-wear and ready-to-use 
goods at Pottsville, Schuylkill Co., Pa., is a member of the third generation of 
his family to reside at that place, where its representatives have been promi- 
nent as merchants for over three quarters of a century. A number of the 
family are still counted among the prosperous business men of the town. 

The family is of English extraction and has long been settled in Pennsyl- 
vania, since before the Revolution, during which period its members were 
associated with the Colonial cause. John IMortimer, great-grandfather of 
F. P. Mortimer, Sr., lived and died in Robeson township, Berks Co., Pa. 
His children were : William, Michael, Washington and Morgan. 

W^illiam Mortimer, grandfather of F. P. Mortimer, Sr., was an early 
settler in Schuylkill county, coming from Valley Forge, Chester Co., Pa., in 
1826. He became one of the most prominent citizens of this county, which 
he represented in the State Senate, refusing reelection. He owned the prop- 
erty now belonging to J. Miehle & Son, Inc. (the site of the past Mountain 
City building), conducted a hotel where the Miehle Sons, Inc., are now situated, 
and in connection also carried on a mercantile business for many years. 
Politically he was a strong Democrat, and one of the local leaders of the party. 

William JMortimer, Jr., son of William, above, also became a prominent 
business man of Pottsville. He was a dry goods merchant, owning and 
occupying the corner where his son, F. P. Mortimer, does business, Xo. i 
Centre street. For many years he was a director of the -Miners' National 
Bank of Pottsville. He was a native of \'alley Forge, born in 1810, and 
died Aug. 14, 1875, in Pottsville. His wife, Susan Frances Simpson, daughter 
of John Simpson, died March 18, 1898. Fourteen children were born to 
this union, namely: Mary Frances, who died May 25, 1898, aged about sixty 
years, was the wife of William H. Robinson, of Schuylkill Haven; Sarah 
Matilda is the widow of John Engle, of Pottsville; Emma I., who died Aug. 
14, 191 3, one hour after her brother Charles, was the wife of James I. Muir, a 
prominent dealer in powder and mining supplies of Pottsville, whose death 
occurred a few years before hers ; Susan J. is the widow of Dr. Charles T. 
Palmer, and lives at Los Angeles, Cal. ; Charles W., who died Aug. 14, 191 3, at 
Atlantic City, N. J., was a prosperous business man of Pottsville, engaged as a 
dealer in men's furnishings; George Wesley, who died Nov. 21, 191 1, was a 
prominent real estate and insurance man of Pottsville; F. P. is mentioned 



SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 151 

below; \\'illiam Horace is in the jewelry business in Pottsville ; Minnie Allen 
married John J. Garvin, of Pottsville, photographer and dealer in photograph 
supplies; Joseph Gilmore is a jeweler of Pottsville; Walter, William John, 
Ellen W. and James died in infancy or early childhood. 

F. P. Mortimer, Sr., was born Jan. 20, 1853, at the corner of Centre and 
Norwegian streets, Pottsville, on the site of his present dry goods store. He 
had public school advantages in his early life and also attended a private school. 
His first work was as messenger boy for the Western Union Telegraph 
Company, he being the first boy employed in that capacity at Pottsville, and 
his salary was ten dollars per month. After that for some time he was 
employed as a messenger between Pottsville and Philadelphia. He learned 
telegraphy and was employed as a telegrapher by Focht & Co., of Philadelphia, 
for one year. In 1872 he entered the employ of the firm of Richard & Morris, 
of Pottsville, who conducted a general store, and with whom he obtained his 
first experience as a merchant, remaining with them one year. He was next 
employed by Mr. Althouse, who had a dry goods and notion store, and with 
whom he continued only a short time, however, going from him to Mr. 
Junkerth. Mr. Junkerth later failed, and Mr. JVIortimer had charge of the 
s'elling of the stock. On April 16, 1874, he established the business which 
he has ever since successfully carried on. It has grown with the development 
of the town, how much may be judged from the fact that his first store had 
less than five hundred square feet of floor space, while his present store is 
just twenty times as large. He began very modestly, doing all his own work 
as well as buying and selling. Now there are twenty-five clerks employed in 
his up-to-date store, and his business occupies a three-story and basement 
building, as well as a storage house. His business is conducted along modem 
lines, Mr. Mortimer engaging New York buyers, who are constantly in the 
market picking up attractive things for the house, and he is well known to 
many of the large eastern firms as well as in his home community. On April 
16, 1913, when the thirty-ninth anniversary of the opening of the business 
in Pottsville was celebrated, he received many congratulatory letters and 
telegrams from various large firms with which he has done business, and 
his clerks presented him a loving cup filled with roses. He is one of the 
best known men in Pottsville and one of the most popular, and is not only 
working hard to promote the success of his own business aflairs but also 
in the interest of the locality. We quote from an article in a recent paper: 
"He represents a strong cog in our business and civic machinery. He is a 
man who has made good for himself and such men always add great strength 
to a community." Air. Mortimer is a Democrat in politics, and in religious 
connection a member of the First Presbyterian Church. 

On Feb. 11, 1878, Mr. Mortimer married Clara H. Seltzer, daughter of 
the late Conrad Seltzer, of Pottsville, mentioned elsewhere. Five children 
have been born to this union : Marion, now the wife of Harry Williams, 
resides at Gothenburg, Nebr., where Mr. Williams has a ranch of 14,000 acres ; 
F. Pierce is mentioned below; Marguerite is the wife of Dr. lohn W. Free- 
ston, dentist, and they reside at Pottsville ; Norman and Elizabeth are at 
home. 

F. Pierce Mortimer, Jr., has the honor of being the first mayor of the 
new city of Pottsville, and was one of the leaders in the movement to have 
the new form of government established. This yoimg man was born at Potts- 
ville, July 20, 1S83, and there received his education. Pie graduated from 



152 SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 

the Pottsville high school, class of igcx). After leaving school he at once 
took up active work in his father's store, and in this modern establishment 
has obtained a thorough business training. There are few young men of 
the community who have been more active in its interests. Independent in 
politics, he was the first nominee for the office of city comptroller of Potts- 
ville, in 191 1, nominated on three tickets. Republican, Democratic and Key- 
stone, but as the city charter was not granted at that time he was not elected. 
On Nov. 4, 1913, when the first election for city officers was held, he was 
the leading candidate for mayor, and won by a large majority, carrying seven 
of the ten precincts. L^pon him and his fellow officials devolves the task of 
organizing and inaugurating the commission form of government in the new 
city of Pottsville, and the responsibility for its proper introduction. The cam- 
paign was one of the most vigorous in the history of Pottsville, the activities 
of the workers resulting in bringing out an unusually large number of voters, 
and the interest aroused will undoubtedly extend over the present administra- 
tion, which is expected to demonstrate the value of the new plan for which 
so many citizens have been fighting. Mr. Mortimer took office Dec. ist, and 
has the distinction of being the youngest mayor in Pennsylvania. He has 
been an active member of the local fire company. Athletics have always 
claimed much of his time and attention. For seven years he was especially 
interested in basket-ball, has played baseball as a semi-professional, and has 
served as president of the Baxter Association, one of the leading athletic 
organizations in this part of the State. Socially he is a member of the B. P. O. 
Elks, Business Men's Association, Rotary Club, Historical Society and Y. M. 
C. A. He belongs to the First Presbyterian Church, and is a member of its 
choir, of which he is soloist. He has sung considerably for charity. 

On March 25, 1908, Mr. Mortimer married Edna C. Umbenhauer, of Pine 
Grove, Schuylkill Co., Pa., daughter of Capt. J. W. Umbenhauer, borough 
treasurer. 

FRANK BROWN has been prominent in the business circles of Schuyl- 
kill Haven in several associations, notably the manufacture of shoes, in which 
he has been engaged for twenty-five years. He is now president of the Walkin 
Shoe Company, which was organized in 1910. ^Ir. Brown is a native of North 
Manheim township, this county, born near Landingville March 10, 1868, son 
of Edwin Brown. 

Edwin Brown was born Dec. 7, 1835, near Kutztown, in Berks county. 
Pa., and was only a young man when he settled in Schuylkill county, making 
his home near Minersville. He became very well known as a boatbuilder, which 
business he followed for some years, and in which he was associated with the 
late George Adams at Landingville. Later he became engaged in farming in 
North Manheim township, in the same vicinity, and spent the rest of his life 
at that calling, dying April 30, 1872, at the early age of thirty-six years. He 
is buried in the Union cemetery at Schuylkill Haven. Mr. Brown had served 
in the Civil war, and he was a member of Post No. 26, G. A. R. He married 
Elizabeth Deibert, daughter of William Deibert, and member of a pioneer 
family of that county. She subsequently married William S. Zuber, of 
Orwigsburg, Pa., where she died and is buried. Her children by Mr. Brown 
were as follows: Mary, who married William B. Heim ; Hannah, who died 
in infancy; Susanna, wife of John Gangloft (both are deceased): Amos, 
deceased; Katie, who married Manden Zuber, of Landingville; Frank; and 



, SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENNSYLVANL\ 153 

William, who lives at Chester, Aid. By her second marriage she had four 
children: Henrietta, who is deceased; Alice, wife of R. S. Luckinbill ; Emma, 
deceased ; and Harvey, who lives at Haddon Heights, New Jersey. 

Frank Brown attended school in a log building near Landingville in his 
native township, and was reared upon the farm. When eighteen years old 
he began to learn the shoe business at Landingville, being employed in the 
factory there for three years, and became thoroughly familiar with all its 
details. For the next four years he traveled as a shoe salesman, and mean- 
time, in 1889, became interested in the manufacture of shoes at Schuylkill 
Haven, as a member of the firm of Berger, Brown i!t Company. Twelve years 
later some changes were made in the ownership, and the business was con- 
tinued under the name of the G. H. Gerber Shoe Company, Inc. In 1910 
the present organization was eif'ected under the name of the Walkin Shoe 
Company, with the following officers : Frank Brown, president ; G. H. Michael, 
treasurer; F. B. Keller, secretary. The product consists of infants', chil- 
dren's and misses' turn and welt shoes, which have a reputation in the trade 
throughout the district east of the Rocky Mountains and in the South and 
Southwest. The equipment has been improved and enlarged as the increase 
of the business necessitated, and the plant now occupies a building 40 by 165 
feet in dimensions, with a wing 26 by 30 feet. Two hundred and fifty hands, 
including a large number of skilled workmen, are steadily employed, which 
means that a large proportion of the industrial workers in Schuylkill Haven 
depend upon this establishment for occupation. The goods are of such 
excellent quality as to keep up the demand, and they are handled in the market 
according to the most up-to-date system and manner, for every department 
of the Walkin establishment is operated along the most modern lines, the 
executive, manufacturing and other divisions being in the most competent 
hands. Mr. Brown, himself, is a skilled workman, and keeps track of all 
the work at the plant, being able to instruct his employees in the practical 
work as well as the principles of his business, and his thorough knowledge of 
its requirements has been a factor of inestimable value in the growth of the 
concern. 

Though his principal attention has been given to the shoe business, Mr. 
Brown has naturally taken on other responsibilities in the course of his active 
career. He was one of the organizers and an original director of the First 
National Bank of Schuylkill Haven, and is still a member of the board ; is a 
director of the Textile Alutual Fire Insurance Company of Schuylkill Haven ; 
of the Schuylkill Haven Fire Company, and several other important local 
concerns. His achievements entitle him to a place among the foremost busi- 
ness men of the county. 

On July 10, 1894, Mr. Brown married Alice Ehly, whose parents died 
when she was very young. Six children have been born to this marriage, 
namely: Madeline S., Stanley H., F. Alfred, Hamilton. Paul (deceased) and 
Frederick. The family is associated with the Reformed Church. 

THOAIAS J. DA\TS, of Minersville, is an extensive coal operator and 
still engaged in the business, though his interests have been in outside fields 
for some time. His early training, however, was gained in the local territory, 
where he began in the humble capacity of slate picker, and made his way 
up through the various stages of mine work to important duties. At present 
he is one of the owners and general manager of the Kohinoor Coal & Coke 



154 SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 

Company, operating near Logan, in Logan county, W. Va. He has also had 
valuable interests in the borough, but he has given them up since outside 
activities occupy so much of his time. 

Mr. Davis is a native of Wales, born Aug. 21, 1843, ^'''d came to America 
from that country in 1848, with his father, Jacob Davis, who settled at 
Minersville, Schuylkill Co., Pa. The father was a miner by occupation, and 
lived and died at Minersville. After picking slate at the breaker for a time 
Thomas J. Davis did inside work of various kinds at the collieries, cutting 
coal for a short period, and finally becoming foreman in the Potts Coal 
Company, in whose employ he rose to the position of superintendent. Sub- 
sequently he was similarly engaged by Kane, Haggert & Cook, and then with 
Miller, Graeff & Company, being one of the first to hold that position with the 
concern named. Following several months of prospecting in the South, he 
began operating in the soft coal fields in Tennessee, where he continued for 
thirteen years, at the end of that time selling his interests there and turning 
his attention to West Virginia, where he has heavy investments. About one 
hundred men are employed in the operations of the Kohinoor Coal & Coke 
Company, and there is a steady demand for the output. 

Mr. Davis has also encouraged local enterprises, and for a time was vice 
president of the Union National Bank, of Minersville, but he resigned from 
the position when he found that frequent absences from the borough were 
necessary. He continues to hold membership in Swatara Lodge, No. 267, 
F. & A. M., of Tremont, Schuylkill county. 

Mr. Davis married Anna Dando, daughter of Edwin Dando, of Miners- 
ville, and they have two children: Esther, wife of Matthew Beddou ; and 
Thomas J., Jr., who is engaged in the manufacture of paper boxes at Schuyl- 
kill Haven. Edwin Dando, father of Mrs. Davis, was a native of England. 

FREDERICK H. HAUSE is taking a place in the business circles of 
Pottsville thoroughly in keeping with the reputation attaching to the honored 
name he bears. A son of the late Frank Hause, he has continued the tobacco 
business which the latter established so many years ago, and his association 
with other local institutions of importance to the community shows him to be 
in active sympathy with everything affecting the well-being of the place. 

The Hause family was founded in Pottsville by Emanuel Hause, grand- 
father of Frederick H. Hause, who was born May 14, igoi, in Chester county. 
Pa., and when a young man settled at Pottsville. At that time there were 
only a few houses in the town and he was the pioneer blacksmith here, 
continuing to follow his trade until his death, which occurred Feb. 20, 1859. 
His wife was born Aug. 21, 1808, in Reading, Berks Co., Pa., and died 
Jan. 4, 1884. They are buried in the Odd Fellows cemetery at Pottsville. 
Their family consisted of the following children: Catherine married Henry 
Miller ; Mary A. married Henry Shomo ; Henry, who died in Pottsville, mar- 
ried Charlotte James ; Lewis, who died in Ashland, Pa., married Joanna 
Wilson : Charles died unmarried in Pottsville ; Frank is mentioned below ; 
Edward, who died in Pottsville, married Clara Zweibel ; Sarah married Andrew 
Turnbull : Isabella married Edward Lebold. 

Frank Hause was born May 7, 1838, at Pottsville, and was given such 
public school advantages as the town then afforded. In early manhood he 
began dealing in tobacco, and built up his business so successfully that he 
became one of the leading men in his line in this part of Pennsylvania, having 



SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PExXNSYLVANIA 155 

a large wholesale as well as retail trade. He established himself at the corner 
of Centre and Norwegian streets. Mr. Hause was the first in Pottsville to 
handle the popnlar Miners' Extra tobacco, and for many years had the sole 
agency here for that brand. He also dealt in leaf tobacco, making large 
purchases in Lancester county, Pa. In fact, he carried on his business with 
all the resources of a keen intellect to make the most of its possibilities. His 
other affairs received the same efficient care, and he had a part in the promo- 
tion and establishment of several enterprises of genuine service to the com- 
munity. He was a prime mover in the organization of the I^ottsville Steam 
Heat & Power Company, as well as active in the inception of other important 
enterprises for which he and various progressive associates saw the need. 
He was a director of the Pennsylvania National Bank of Pottsville and con- 
tinued to serve as such until his death. He gave valuable service to the 
borough as a member of the school board, and was also known in his con- 
nection with the Union \'eteran Legion and the Society of First Defenders. 
\\'hen twenty-two years old he enlisted for the defense of the Union and 
after serving a three months' term reenlisted, for three years. With his family 
Mr. Hause attended the Second Presbyterian Church. He built the substantial 
home at No. 315 West Market street where Mrs. Hause still resides, and 
where his death occurred June 6, 1900. He is buried in the Charles Baber 
cemetery. 

On Feb. 4, 1868, IMr. Hause married Louisa S. Haeseler, daughter of 
Frederick and Catherine (Swalen) Haeseler, and children as follows were born 
to them: Ralph E., who is a clerk in the Merchants' National Bank of 
Pottsville; J. Florence, living at home; Frederick H. ; and Dorothy H., wife 
of Gustav A. Muehlhof, of Pottsville. Mrs. Hause takes an active part in 
matters of general interest in the borough. She is a member of the Historical 
Society of Schuylkill county and vice president of the Pottsville Mission. 

Frederick Haeseler, father of Mrs. Hause, was a resident of Pottsville 
from the early sixties. A native of Germany, he came to America with his 
parents in early life, and subsequently returned to the Fatherland to study, 
receiving a thorough education. He also had a comprehensive military train- 
ing. Coming back to America he engaged in the manufacture of woolen 
goods at Orwigsburg, Schuylkill Co., Pa., before his removal to Pottsville, 
where he carried on a real estate business and organized several insurance 
companies. His learning and high principles gained him many friends. To 
his marriage with Catherine Swalen were born children as follows : John, 
Frank, Albert, Louisa S., Anna A., Emma S., Sarah and Catherine. Mr. 
Haeseler died in 1880, his widow in 1893, and they are buried in the Charles 
Baber cemetery. 

Frederick H. Hause was bom in 1880 at Pottsville, and received his educa- 
tion in the public schools of the borough. He began work with his father 
when a boy, and though only twenty years old when his father died continued 
the business, which was conducted under the name of the Frank Hause Estate 
until 1906. That year Frederick H. Hause bought the business for himself, 
and has since carried it on under his own name. The stand is one of the 
oldest in the city, and Mr. Hause not only commands a large wholesale and 
retail trade in the tobacco business, but also manufactures cigars, having 
factory No. 398. Among the well known brands which he produces are the 
".Agord" and "Ryo Hondo." Besides dealing in leaf and manufactured tobacco 
and cigars, he carries a large stock of snuff, pipes, etc., and small goods. 



156 SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENNSYLVANL^ 

Mr. Hause is associated with the Pennsylvania National Bank of Pottsville. 
one of the leading banking houses in this section, of which he has been a 
director since 191 1. ^Nlr. Hause is a valued member of the Central Republican 
Club, and of the Schuylkill County Historical Society. His interests have 
been managed with acumen and good judgment, and he is justly regarded as 
one of the most competent business men of the borough. 

Mr. Hause married Alverta Kehler, of Shenandoah, and they have one 
child, Marion. 

JONATHAN HENRY WALBORN, now living retired at Orwigsburg, 
has been one of the leading men of his section of Schuylkill county for a 
long period. Diligent and enterprising during the years he was engaged in 
farming, he became associated with the live interests of the locality. For a 
number of years he has been active in the Farmers' Mutual Fire Insurance 
Company of Schuylkill County, serving as secretary for the last twenty-two 
years. Mr. Walborn is a native of the county, born March 15, 1853, in West 
Brunswick township, son of Daniel Walborn and grandson of John Walborn. 

John (or Johan) Walborn, the grandfather, was born near Myerstown, 
Lebanon Co., Pa., June 30, 1799, and died Aug. 13, 1872. By occupation he 
was a farmer. Coming to Schuylkill county he settled in West Brunswick 
township, about two miles east of Pinedale, there continuing to farm until 
his death. Pie is buried at the historic Zion's (Red) Church. His wife, 
whose maiden name was Susanna Albright, was born Dec. 4, 1804, and died 
Oct. 30, 1884. They had children as follows: Daniel, born Sept. 19, 1825, 
died March 29, 1906; Urias, born Sept. 22, 1827, died Dec. 15, 1913; William, 
born June 28, 1831, died Sept. 17, 1914; Peter, born July 6, 1834, died Oct 
16, 191 1; Rebecca, born Sept. 21, 1837, married Daniel O. Mohl, who is 
deceased ; Catharine, born Aug. 2, 1845, married John Ketner, who is de- 
ceased ; Cyrus, born Aug. 28, 1839, died Aug. 29, 1858; and Diana, born Oct. 
21, 1848, died Nov. 20, 1912, married Martin Moyer. Of these children. 
Rebecca and Catharine are still living. 

Daniel Walborn, son of John, was bom Sept. 19, 1825, in Lebanon county. 
Pa., settling in West Brunswick township, Schuylkill county, where he came 
into possession of the old homestead. He was one of the prosperous farmers 
of his day and a trusted official of his township, serving for several years 
as member of the school board and as assistant assessor. During the Civil 
war he and Daniel Alspach were appointed to look for recruits for the army 
in West Brunswick township. As a devout member of the Lutheran denomina- 
tion, he was an active worker in the old Zion's (Red) Church, served on the 
church council, as church treasurer, and was a member of the building com- 
mittee when the present chinxh building was erected in 1883. He reached 
the age of eighty years, dying March 29, igo6, and is buried at the Red 
Church. His wife, Christiana, daughter of Jonathan Albright and Molly 
(Berger) Albright, was born Aug. 18, 1822, and died Sept. 26, 1892. They 
were the parents of five children, of whom Lewis, Henry and Henrietta died 
young. Jonathan Henry and Joseph /\lbright are the survivors. 

Jonathan Henry Walborn obtained his early education in the public 
schools, later attending the Keystone State Normal School, at Kutztown, Pa. 
For ten terms he was engaged in teaching in West Brunswick township, fol- 
lowing farming during that period, and for five years he conducted a mercantile 
business at Drehersville, Schuylkill county. Retiring to the homestead place 



SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 157 

in West Brunswick township, he resumed farming. In 1901 he moved with 
his family to his present residence on the farm which he purchased from the 
Thomas Hoy estate, the Hoy homestead, in Orwigsburg. For one year, 191 3, 
he was engaged in the manufacture of shoes, but sold out his interests, and 
lias not since engaged actively in business pursuits. However, he still retains 
his connection with the Farmers' Mutual Fire Insurance Company, which he 
serves as secretary ; for twenty years he was secretary of the West Brunswick 
Horse Insurance Company. Like his father, Mr. Walborn has taken part 
in the administration of public afifairs. For several years he served as member 
of the school board of West Brunswick township, and for one four-year term 
as director of the poor of Schu\-lkitl county, to which office he was elected 
in 1897. His duties were discharged with the utmost fidelity and with due 
regard to the best interests of his constituents, and his services were a credit 
to the community as well as himself. Politically he has been identified with 
the Democratic jjarty. He is a leading member of Zion's (Red) Church, in 
which he has held the offices of deacon and elder, giving the same conscientious 
attention to the duties of this position as he has to every other responsibility 
assumed. 

On Jan. 7, 1881, Mr. Walborn married Sarah Elizabeth Hoy, born Jan. 7, 
i860, daughter of the late Thomas Hoy and Mrs. Sarah (Faust) Hoy, of 
Orwigsburg. Two sons were born to this union: Ira Guy, Oct. 20, 1881, and 
Maurice Daniel, Nov. 29, 1892, both born in West Brunswick township. Mrs. 
Sarah E. (Hoy) Walborn died Nov. 10, 191 1, and is buried at the Red Church. 

Ir.\ Guv Walborn attended the public schools of West Brunswick town- 
ship, the Orwigsburg high school, and Keystone State Normal School, at 
Kutztown, Pa., and taught two terms in the public schools of West Brunswick 
township. In 1899 he entered Muhlenberg College, Allentown, Pa., and after 
completing three years' work entered the University of Missouri, Columbia, 
Mo., in 1902, as a student in electrical engineering and the College of Arts, 
graduating with the degrees of bachelor of arts in 1904 and bachelor of science 
in electrical engineering in 1906. After graduation he followed his profession, 
electrical engineering, in Utah and Idaho. In March, 1908, he was employed 
by the Eastern Pennsylvania Railways Company, Pottsville, Pa., and has served 
as electrical superintendent for that company since April, 19 12. On June 16, 
1909, he married Frances Gary Mountjoy, born Aug. i, 1881, daughter of the 
late Rev. John Mountjoy and Mrs. Rebecca (Shannon) Mountjoy, of Colum- 
bia, Mo. Two children were born, in Pottsville, Pa., to this union : One 
daughter, Rebecca Shannon, Oct. 21, 1912, and one son, Jonathan Mountjoy, 
Jan. 23, 1915. J\Ir. \\'alborn is a member of the Lutheran congregation at 
the old Red Church. Fraternally he is connected with Schuylkill Lodge, No. 
138, Free and Accepted Masons; Black Diamond Commandery, No. 466, 
Ancient and Illustrious Order Knights of Malta ; and the Alpha Tau Omega 
college fraternity. He is a member of the Pottsville Club and an associate 
member of the American Institute of Electrical Engineers. 

M.MTRiCE Daniel Walborn attended the public schools of West Brunswick 
township and Orwigsburg. From the Orwigsburg high school he entered 
the First National Bank of Orwigsburg in April, 1909, and has served since 
as teller. He engages in writing various lines of insurance. On May 7, 1913, 
he married Stella Heist, who was born April 30, 1892, daughter of Oscar 
Heist and the late Louisa (Boettger) Heist, of Orwigsburg. He is a member 
of St. Paul's Lutheran Church of Orwigsburg and is serving as a member of 



158 SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PEXXSYLVAXLA 

its church council and as secretary. Fraternally he is connected with Schuyl- 
kill Lodge, No. 138, Free and Accepted Masons; Bethel Commandery, No. 319, 
Ancient and Illustrious Order Knights of Malta, of which he is recorder; 
Grace Lodge, No. 157, Independent Order of Odd Fellows; Industrial Coun- 
cil, No. 437, Independent Order of Americans ; and Washington Camp, No. 
86, Patriotic Order Sons of America. 



Joseph Albright Walborn, son of Daniel Walborn, was born July 8, 
1857, in West Brunswick township, and obtained his early education there 
in the public schools. He also attended select school at Shoemakersville and 
Port Clinton, and during his young manhood taught school for six years in 
West Brunswick township. He then turned his attention to farming, which 
he followed for a period of twenty-one years, in 1908 removing to Pinedale, 
Schuylkill county, where he is engaged as a huckster. He has been a leader 
in church work, and as a public official of his locality served fifteen years as 
assessor of West Bnmswick township ; twenty-one years as school director, 
during all of which time he was secretary of the board ; eight years as town- 
ship clerk, and subsequently as member of the election board. Politically he is 
a Democrat. In religion he is a devout Lutheran, and has been deacon of his 
church for the last thirty years, and for forty years an official of the Sunday 
school, of which he was superintendent for eight years. 

Mr. \\'alborn married Sallie A. Boyer, daughter of Daniel C. and Kate 
(Breisch) Boyer, and two sons have been born to them: Claude Daniel, now 
living at home, taught two terms of school after graduating from the Key- 
stone State Normal School, at Kutztown, Pa., in igob; and Guy Franklin, also 
a graduate of the Keystone State Normal School (1908), has been teaching 
school in District No. 7, West Brunswick township, since his graduation. Both 
sons are members of the Lutheran congregation at Zion's (Red) Church, in 
which they have been active workers. 

CONRAD WEISER was the most prominent historical character in the 
county of Berks (which originally included Schuylkill) to 1760. His great 
prominence arose from his intimate connection with the Provincial government 
of Pennsylvania for thirty years. He was the principal judge of Berks county 
from 1752 to 1760. He was bom Nov. 2, 1696, at Afstaedt, a small village in 
the county of Herrenberg, in Wurtemberg, (Germany, and there he acquired a 
general education, which included the principles of the Christian religion 
according to the catechism of Martin Luther. Whilst in his fourteenth year 
he emigrated with his father and family (which included himself and seven 
other children) to New York, landing June 17, 1710. At that time several 
thousand Germans were sent to America by Queen Anne. Shortly after their 
arrival they were removed to Livingston Manor by the governor of New York, 
to burn tar and cultivate hemp to defray the expenses incurred by Queen 
Anne in conveying them from Holland to England and from England to 
America. They labored until 1713 in this employment under the direction of 
commissioners ; then, finding they were existing under a form of bondage, 
they ]M-otested against the treatment and thus effected their release. About one 
hundred and fifty families of them, including the \\'eiser family, removed to 
Schoharie, forty miles west of Albany. Whilst s{>ending the winter of 1713-14 
at Schenectady, the elder Weiser was frequently visited by an Indian chief of 
the Mohawk tribe, and during one of these visits the chief proposed to Conrad 




GRAVE OF CONRAD WEISER 
Heidelberg Township, Berks County, Pa. 



SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENNSYLVANL\ 159 

to visit the Mohawk country and learn the language of the Mohawk tribe. 
This proposition was agreed to. 

Conrad Weiser was in his eighteenth year when he went to live with the 
Indians. He was a strong young man, but all his strength was necessary to 
endure the sufferings which he was compelled to undergo whilst living with 
them. Lie had scarcely clothing sufficient to cover his body during the winter 
of that trying year. Besides much suffering, he was frequently threatened 
with death by the Indians during a state of intoxication. In July,'i7i4, he 
returned to his father's home at Schoharie. In this time he had acquired a 
considerable knowledge of the Mohawk language, and while, at home he in- 
creased this knowledge by acting as interpreter between the German settlers 
of that vicinity and tlie IVIohawk Indians. The settlers having been disturbed 
in their possessions, Conrad Weiser's father and a number of others migrated 
to Pennsylvania. They located in Tulpehocken in the spring of 1723, in the 
midst of the Indians ; and there they also commenced improvement of the land 
without permission of the land commissioners. The Indians complained, but 
the settlers were not disturbed. Subsequently the Indians released their rights, 
and about 1733 they removed beyond the Blue mountains. 

In 1720 Conrad Weiser was married to a young woman of Schoharie. He 
continued at that place until 1729, when with his wife and five children he 
removed to the Tulpehocken settlement, locating on a tract of land near the 
present borough of Wonielsdorf. Shortly after his arrival, his ability and 
success as an Indian interpreter became known to the Provincial government, 
and the governor employed him in negotiation with the Indians. His first serv- 
ices in this capacity were performed in 1731, and from that time for nearly 
thirty years he was constantly engaged in this important work. He assisted 
at numerous treaties, and in the published proceedings of these treaties his name 
appears prominently. His integrity was particularly recognized and publicly 
complimented. He was one of the most prominent men in the French and 
Indian war. His numerous letters indicate his zeal, courage and patriotism. 
He served in the war as a colonel, and his services were of great value to the 
government and to the people of Berks county. 

The first proceedings for the erection of Berks county were instituted in 
1738. In this behalf Mr. Weiser was very active, and he continued active until 
the county was established, in 1752, The town of Reading was laid out by the 
Penns in 1748, and in the sale of the town lots Air. Weiser acted as one of the 
commissioners. He was prominently identified with the first movements in 
building up the town, and in developing the business interests of the place. 
The governor of the Province appointed him as the justice of the peace in 
1741, and he filled this office for a number of years. When the county was 
erected, in 1752, he was appointed one of the first judges. He acted as presi- 
dent judge of the courts till his decease, in 1760. He lived at Reading mostly 
during the latter part of his life. 

Conrad Weiser died on his Heidelberg farm July 13. 1760, and his remains 
were buried in a private burying-ground on the place, where they have re- 
mained since. He left a widow and seven children : Five sons. Philip, Fred- 
erick, Peter, Samuel, and Benjamin; and two daughters, Maria (married Rev. 
Henry Melchior Muhlenberg) and Margaret (married a Finker). He was 
possessed of a large estate, consisting of properties at Reading, and lands in 
Heidelberg township and in the region of country beyond the Blue mountains. 
In Heidelberg he owned a tract which included the privilege of a court-baron, 



160 SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 

I 
granted to him in 1743, the tract having originally contained 5,165 acres as 
granted to John Page in 1735. and having then been erected into a manor called 
the "Manor of Plumton." At Reading one of his properties was a business 
stand, and it has continued to be a prominent business location from that time 
till now, a period embracing over 150 years. 

For upw^ard of fifty years, various unsuccessful efYorts were made in behalf 
of erecting a suitable memorial to Conrad W'eiser. In 1892 and 1893, Prof. 
M. L. Montgomery delivered a lecture before local teachers' institutes in 
different parts of the county entitled "Life and Times of Conrad Weiser" for 
the purpose of securing a memorial, and the Reading Board of Trade led the 
school authorities of the county to set aside November 2, 1893, for observance 
by the teachers and scholars as "Weiser Day," and to facilitate this observance 
3,500 copies of the lecture were distributed gratuitously to all the schools of 
the city and county. It was not until October 30, 1907, that a modest tablet 
was placed in the west wall of the Stichter Hardware store on Penn Square by 
the Historical Society of Berks county, which reads as follows: 

PosTERiTV Will Not Forget His Services. — Washington. 

In Memory of 

COL. CONRAD WEISER, 

PIONEER, soldier, DIPLOMAT, JUDGE. AS INTERPRETER AND 

INDIAN AGENT HE NEGOTIATED EVERY TREATY 

FROM 1732 LINTIL NEAR THE CLOSE OF 

THE FRENCH AND INDIAN WAR. 



THE WEISER BUILDING WHERE HE OFTEN MET 

THE INDIANS 

IN CONFERENCE, WAS ERECTED BY HIM 

ON THIS SITE IN 1751. 



BORN IN GERMANY IN 1696, ARRIVED 

IN BERKS IN 1729, DIED 

IN 1760, NEAR WOMELSDORF, WHERE 

HIS REMAINS ARE BURIED. 



HIS UNSWERVING HONESTY SET A SHINING 
EXAMPLE TO 

FUTURE GENERATIONS. UNDER THE AUSPICES OF THE 

HISTORICAL SOCIETY OF BERKS COUNTY THIS 

TABLET WAS ERECTED IN I9O7 BY THE 

SCHOOL CHILDREN OF THE COUNTY. 

SAMUEL H. SHANNON, M. D., was preeminent among the popular 
physicians of his day in southern Schuylkill county, and though thirty-five 
years have elapsed since his death his name is still affectionately spoken 
among the older residents of that section. A professional man first, last 
and always, he never held any public office or attempted to control any of 
the affairs of the community in which he made his home, yet his influence 
wherever his duties called him was so strong that his opinions and ideas had 
an appreciable effect in the wide circle of his acquaintances and friends, who 




^^:^^^l.--r9^i^^^^^^:^^^j<^::^^^^^ 



SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 161 

regarded him as a competent adviser in the ordinary concerns of Hfe as 
much as in his capacity of physical healer. 

The Doctor was a native of Montgomery county, Pa., and a member 
of the family from which the town of Shannonville, in that county, derives 
its name. His great-grandfather settled there upon his emigration from 
Ireland, and his homestead remained in the possession of his descendants 
for several generations. Robert Shannon, son of the emigrant, was one 
of the live connnissioners appointed by the State authorities to tix upon a 
site for the seat of justice and organize the county of Montgomery, which 
was done in 1784. Their judicious selection of Norristown, and the hand- 
some borough which has grown up as the result, make it apparent that the 
early generations of the family were as conspicuous for intellectual qual- 
ities and good sense as the later representatives. The Shannons have always 
been counted among the most respected families of their section of Pennsyl- 
vania. 

Robert Shannon, son of Robert, and father of the late Dr. Shannon, 
was born in 1785, and was a farmer and merchant in Montgomery county 
throughout his active years, dying in 1S44, ^t the age of fifty-nine years. 
His wife, Elizabeth (Porter), was of Revolutionary stock, a niece of Gen. 
Andrew Porter, and of a family also associated with the early history of 
Montgomery county. She was a most estimable woman, possessed of strong 
traits of character which made a deep impression for goo"d in the family 
circle and in the community, and led a life of exemplary usefulness. Her 
death occurred in 1865, when she was eighty years of age. Nine children 
were born to Mr. and Mrs. Robert Shannon. 

Samuel H. Shannon was born April 27, 1814, at Shannonville, and spent 
his youth upon the homestead farm. After attending the local schools and 
obtaining the best education possible in the home neighborhood, supple- 
mented with a limited amount of tuition under private instructors, he 
entered JelTerson Medical College, at Philadelphia, where he completed the 
course, graduating in 1836, with honor. The same year he located at 
Schuylkill Haven, Schuylkill county, which was his field of labor through- 
out his medical career, fhe scene of a busy and successful life which ter- 
minated Jan. 17, 1879. In these forty years he achieved prosperity as well 
as fame. His skill, developed in the varied round of duties which fall to 
the lot of the general practitioner whose patronage is scattered over a country 
district, made him no more welcome than the warm sympathy, tender solici- 
tude and sincere interest which he always seemed to feel for the afflicted, 
and his generosity never allowed him to withhold his services because of 
any inability on the part of his patients to recompense him. He loved his 
work, and though it was often arduous continued in it with practically 
unabated zeal almost to the close of his life. His unremitting attention to 
its demands, indeed, is believed to have shortened his days. Though in his 
sixty-fifth year at the time of his death, he had never seemed to realize 
his age, being physically and mentally as sound as men years his junior until 
a few months before his decease. But he overtaxed himself by turning out 
in inclement weather to look after a critical case several miles from his 
office, when he himself should have been under a doctor's care, and he never 
recovered from the strain. It was typical of his unselfishness, and not 
regarded as anything unusual at the time, for he treated all with the same 
devotion, regardless of his own inclinations. Dr. Shannon made friends 
Vol. I— 11 



162 SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 

wherever he went by his undeviating affabihty and courtesy, and he was 
no respecter of persons, esteeming those with whom he came into contact 
for their real worth, and judging no one by his worldly circumstances. 
Although he acquired wealth by his able management of the income from 
his profession he never made the acquisition of means his object in life, and 
his donations to religious and benevolent purposes, together with the private 
charities of which only the recipients were aware, proclaimed broad sympathy 
with all his fellows and an intimate understanding of their needs. His 
hospitable mansion was always the stopping place of the non-resident min- 
isters of his church. For several years Dr. Shannon was physician at the 
county almshouse, resigning the position in favor of his brother. Dr. Ben- 
jamin Franklin Shannon. 

Dr. Shannon became the owner of several valuable farms in Schuylkill 
county, besides other real estate, and for many years he was a director of 
the Miners' National Bank of Pottsville. In 1856 he was offered the Demo- 
cratic nomination for Congressman in his district, but declined, having no 
aspirations for the publicity or power of political prefemient. 

Soon after beginning practice Dr. Shannon married Esther IMannon, 
who was a most devoted helpmate, and four daughters were born to this 
union: Jane Elizabeth, who died in infancy; Mary Kathryn; Elizabeth 
Tamzen, Mrs. Willis L. Bryant ; and Harriet Esther. Dr. Shannon is buried 
in the Episcopal Churchyard in Schuylkill Haven, and a fine monument 
marks his grave. Mrs. Shannon died April 19, 1888. 

Willis L. Bryant, late of Schuylkill Haven, a resident of that borough 
for twenty years, was a native of Pittsburgh, Pa., and for a number of 
years engaged extensively in the lumber business in Jefferson county, this 
State. In 1889 he located at Schuylkill Haven, and became well and favor- 
ably known in the borough and surrounding territory during the score of 
years he maintained his home there. He died at his residence in Schuylkill 
Haven, Oct. 31, 1909. ]\Ir. Bry-ant married Elizabeth Tamzen Shannon, 
daughter of the late Dr. Samuel H. Shannon, and she survives him, occupy- 
ing the old family homestead in the borough which as in the days of her 
father is noted for its open hospitality. She and Mr. Bryant always lived 
there. 

Benjamin Franklin Shannon, M. D., late of Schuylkill Haven, was 
the youngest child of Robert and Elizabeth (Porter) Shannon, and was 
born at Shannonville, Feb. 9, 1829. He attended the district schools there 
until twelve years old, at which time he entered West Chester Academy, in 
Chester county, Pa., following his studies at that institution for four years, 
after which he took the medical course at Pennsylvania College, Phila- 
delphia, graduating with the degree of M. D., April 7, 1849. Locating at 
Schuylkill Haven, he was engaged in practice there to the close of his life, 
becoming well beloved in the wide territory over which his work called him, 
and prominent among his fellow physicians in this section. For more than 
twenty years he was attending physician at the county almshouse, and he 
and his brother, practicing here at the same period, made the name of 
Shannon as well known and esteemed in Schuylkill county as it has been 
for generations in Montgomery county. His death occurred Aug. 8, 1878. 

Dr. Shannon was twice married, his first wife being Sally Reed, daughter 
of Mark and Sarah Reed. She died in 1863, and he subsequently married, 
Oct. 3, 1867, Mary Elizabeth Bast, daughter of Gideon and Mary Bast. 



SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENNSYLVANL\ 163 

BENJAMIN BANNAN, journalist and political economist, was bom in 
Union township, Berks Co., Pa., April 22, 1807, and died July 29, 1S75. His 
father was a fanner and teacher, occupied in agricultural pursuits during the 
spring, summer and fall, and teaching in the winter. He died when his son 
was but eight years old. Benjamin went to school only about two years alto- 
gether during the next seven years; for at that time schools were open for 
onlv three or four months a year, during the cold weather. It was at Union- 
ville that he became inspired with the idea of becoming a printer and editor, 
from reading the Village Record, to which the teacher subscribed. Having 
acquired the utmost that was taught in the schools of that day, at the age of 
fifteen he was indentured to learn the printing business in the office of the 
Berks and Schuylkill Journal, of which George Getz was proprietor, remaining 
there six years. During his term the same industry and honesty of purpose and 
action which characterized his whole life won the regard of his preceptor, who 
eventually asked him to become his partner and associate in business. Mean- 
while, at the close of his apprenticeship, he had repaired to Philadelphia, where 
he worked in several printing offices, finally in the establishment of Lawrence 
Tohnson, the celebrated type founder, where he added the art of stereotyping 
to his already thorough knowledge of printing. After a visit to Reading, where 
he received the offer already noted, he thought it advisable to decline it, and 
directed his steps to Pottsville. On his arrival there he found the office of the 
Miners' Journal in the hands of the sheriff; and, believing that this was a fair 
opportunity and a field for future operations, concluded to purchase it. Almost 
all his ready funds were invested in this enterprise, and the subscription list 
numbered but 250. This took place in April. 1829, and he was connected with 
this one paper nearly forty- four years. On July i, 1866, he disposed of a half 
interest in the establishment, and, wishing to retire from business, in January, 
1873, sold the other moiety; nevertheless his attachment to the Journal was so 
great that he continued writing for the paper and attending to the coal sta- 
tistics, as when he was sole owner. The number of subscribers had increased 
to over four thousand, and its weekly circulation was only exceeded by that 
of three other political journals in the State, outside of the larger cities. 

Mr. Bannan's first vote was cast for John Ouincy Adams for presi- 
dent, in 1828, and he voted at every succeeding presidential election as long 
as he lived, and always in opposition to the Democracy. Indeed, during his 
whole life he never voted for a Democrat when there was a contest between 
the political parties. He was always a firm and undeviating supporter of pro- 
tection to American industry, and proposed and organized the first tariff league 
in 1840, after the disastrous effects of the first compromise bill had become 
apparent ; which led to the adoption of the tariff of 1842, the most beneficial 
measure, in many respects, ever passed by Congress. In 1841 and also in 1861 
he collected signatures to the longest petitions ever laid before the national 
legislature, praying for protection to home industry. For fifteen years he 
held the position of school director, and for fourteen years was president of 
the board. During this period he suggested to Governor Pollock the present 
admirable normal school system of the State, in all its details, which was 
afterwards adopted. It is justly claimed for him that he was the first to 
propose a plan for a national currency ; as far back as 1857 he first originated 
it and published a series of articles on the subject. His views were commu- 
nicated to several prominent bankers, who acquiesced in his suggestions and 
admitted that such a currency as he proposed would be the best obtainable, but 



164 SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 

thought his scheme could not be carried out, as the States had usurped from 
the general gxjvernment the power to issue money and as the latter had so long 
acquiesced in their action the States would never surrender it. He even pre- 
pared circulars embodying his views and distributed them among the two 
houses of Congress, but they received very little attention from any of the 
members. Four years elapsed and the war of the Rebellion broke out, and 
the national currency became a necessity. He communicated with and after- 
wards visited Secretary Chase, recalled the circular, and compared it with the 
bill Secretary Chase had prepared, and the latter was found to be in perfect 
accordance with Mr. Bannan's plan of 1857, except in a few unimportant 
particulars and one important feature not incorporated in the bill — the intro- 
duction of an expanding limit. This was not done, as it was impossible to 
foresee what the exigencies of the country might demand. The idea of hav- 
ing an issue of currency in proportion to the wealth of the country and ex- 
panding it on that basis seems to have been original with him. It was sub- 
mitted to the late Stephen Colwell, of Philadelphia, who was also a writer on 
currency, and who had collected all the works written on currency and money, 
in all languages, from all countries, numbering more than seven hundred vol- 
umes and pamphlets, and in none of them had he observed the expression of a 
similar idea. 

As a thinker and writer on important public matters Mr. Bannan belonged 
to an advanced school, and earned for himself an honored and respected 
name ; and wherever he was known, either at home or abroad, his opinion and 
advice were solicited and made use of. As a practical man he was farseeing and 
liberal, and was ever among the foremost in proposing and carrying out ideas 
and projects tending to the improvement and advancement of his fellow men, 
particularly of the laboring classes. As a writer on matters pertaining to the 
coal trade, his experience of over twoscore years in the anthracite region fitted 
him with special and peculiar qualifications. As a coal statistician he was the 
foremost in the country. The trade grew up with himself, and in reality it had 
almost become second nature to him ; particularly on account of the use he 
made of the opportunities that fell in his way in the matter of statistics. On 
coal his figures and tables are made use of in every publication in the country 
and abroad. In two large works he is not only quoted, but highly complimented, 
and his tabular statements given are conclusive. As a high test of the value of 
the statistics he collected in the coal trade, we need only refer to the fact that 
the Bureau of Statistics at Washington on several occasions honored him by 
asking him to furnish them with information on this important subject. The 
great work which he undertook to publish, and which he had prepared for 
publication principally by Samuel H. Daddow, mining engineer, Mr. Bannan 
only furnishing the statistics and outlines for the same, is entitled. "Coal. Iron 
and Oil." It was the most expensive single volume issued by any publisher 
during the Rebellion, reflects great credit upon him. and elicited from the 
London Mining Journal the statement that no single ^■olume ever published 
in England affords so much information on the subjects treated of in that 
publication. 

Influenced by the peculiar circumstances of the time, Mr. Bannan eventually 
published a monograph on "Our National Currency and how to improve it," 
which takes the ground, as originally suggested in his first circular in 1857, 
of adopting an expanding limit to its issue, keeping the paper issue uncon- 
vertible into coin on demand hereafter, but allowing a proportion of it to be 



I 



SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 165 

received in payment of duties ; the legal tenders of the government to he re- 
ceived in payment of taxes and debts due to the government ; the issue of 
national banknotes to be apportioned to the several banks in proportion to their 
wealth ; the fractional currency to be cancelled and a debased silver coinage 
substituted which would, therefore, always remain at home ; this was done in 
England nearly fifty years ago, and as a consequence England has always 
retained her silver. These features may strike the average reader as being 
somewhat novel and startling at first, but Mr. Bannan discussed his proposi- 
tions so clearly and forcibly that by many it is believed they will be received 
with more favor as they are studied and comprehended by impartial and un- 
biased minds. 'Sir. Ilannan was a worker all his life; it was only when he 
could no longer hold the pen that he at last suffered it to drop from his fingers. 
In losing him the country lost a man whom it cannot replace, and whose merits 
will always be acknowledged. 

THOMAS FOSTER was ]5rominently identified with the business and 
political affairs of Schuylkill county and Pottsville. He was born in Ports- 
mouth, N. H., July 20, 1819, and came to Pottsville in 1830, at the age of 
eleven years, making his home with his uncle, Solomon Foster, who had pre- 
ceded him by several years. At the age of fifteen years Mr. Foster removed to 
Philadelphia with his imcle, Solomon, and for the next two years was engaged 
with him in the whip manufacturing business. At the age of seventeen 
he returned to Pottsville, and was apprenticed to Haywood & Snyder, machin- 
ists, builders of engines and mining machinery, but did not follow the trade, and 
engaged in the dry goods and grocery business in partnership with James 
Focht. After several years the firm of Focht & Foster was dissolved, and Mr. 
Foster entered the retail shoe business with Frederick L. Foster, on South 
Centre street, Pottsville. In 1858 Mr. Foster bought out the shoe business 
of his uncle, Solomon Foster, at Centre and Market streets, Pottsville, and 
engaged in that business until his death. 

Politically Mr. Foster was a Democrat, and took a keen interest in politics 
all his lifetime. Elected county commissioner in 1851, Mr. Foster was to a 
great extent personally instrumental in the building of the present County 
Jail, successfully opposing the erection of a smaller building, as contemplated 
by his colleagues, having a firm belief that Schuylkill county was destined to 
become one of the most populous counties in the State. 

In 1862 Mr. Foster was married to Amanda M. Ruch. To this union six 
sons and one daughter were born. Mrs. Foster, who was born Aug. 25, 1822, 
is still living. Mr. Foster died at Pottsville, Dec. 13, 1886. 

CHARLES D. KAIER, deceased, was long accounted the chief animating 
spirit of business and social progress in Mahanoy City. Many undertakings 
aft'ecting the public welfare inaugurated by him, or guided to successful 
issue through his efforts, have become permanent institutions of the borough 
and vicinity and keep alive an influence which it was his pride to exercise 
always for the benefit of his fellow citizens. The ability he developed with 
increased responsibilities carried him far beyond his early ambitions. With 
their realization he found himself in important business relations with the 
community, and he assisted in advancing its affairs in many ways. His judg- 
ment was so favorably regarded that his faith in an enterprise was sufficient 
to guarantee its success, and he aided many local projects as much by the con- 



166 SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PEXXSYL\'AXL\ 

fidence his personal investments engendered as by the investments themselves. 
The thoroughness characteristic of his race was apparent in everything he 
undertook. 

Mr. Kaier was born March 6, 1839, in Baden, Germany, and there spent 
his early life, coming to this country at the age of about fifteen with his par- 
ents, Andrew and Crescentia (Witmer) Kaier. The family lived at Morris- 
town, Pa., for a couple of years after their arrival in the United States, 
Andrew Kaier finding work at his calling, that of blacksmith, and Charles be- 
ginning to learn the trade of baker and confectioner, at which his early years 
were spent. In 1856 they removed to St. Clair, Schuylkill Co., Pa., where 
the youth finished his apprenticeship in the bakery of Fred Epping and remained 
until his enlistment as a Union soldier, in the spring of 1S61. He responded 
promptly to President Lincoln's call for 75,000 men, becoming a private in 
Company H, 9th Pennsylvania \'olunteer Infantry, for three months, and served 
out the term, being discharged Aug. 21, 1861. The next year he married and 
moved to Mahanoy City, which was the center of all of his interests from that 
time on. Forming a business association with Frederick Gantert, he was so 
engaged until he began the bottling of ale and porter, on his own account, 
erecting a building for the purpose at No. 113 East Centre street. It was in 
this venture that Mr. Kaier made his first notable success and gave evidence 
of the ability which continued to carry him forward until he was the acknowl- 
edged leader in the borough and all of upper Schuylkill county. His large 
brewery was the outgrowth of the comparatively modest bottling establishment. 
In time he took the local agency for Bergner & Engel, the great brewing 
firm of Philadelphia, which he represented in Schuylkill, Columbia, Carbon 
and Northumberland counties. Pa., and he developed the possibilities of the 
territory so effectively that the business experienced a surprising expansion, 
the agency becoming one of the best paying in the State. Meantime Mr. Kaier 
was working towards his particular ambition, to start a brewer}^ of his own, and 
while doing his utmost in behalf of his employers was acquiring the necessary 
familiarity with the details of the business in which he hoped to find his road 
to fortune. In 1883 he erected a brewery at Mahanoy City which was the 
beginning of the great plant now operated by the Charles D. Kaier Company, 
Limited, who are also engaged as wholesale dealers in liquor and tobacco. The 
plant has had an interesting history during the thirty years and more of its 
existence. The founder laid his plans well and executed them so skillfully 
that by 1890 the business needed better accommodations, and the brewery was 
rebuilt and enlarged to afford the facilities required to keep pace with its 
growth. The equipment was brought thoroughly up-to-date. Nothing was 
left undone which the increase of trade warranted, in fact preparations were 
confidently made for its further extension. The mere statement that the 
plant of the Kaier Company is still the leading industrial establishment of the 
borough shows how well this was accomplished. Mr. Kaier conducted it alone 
until Sept. i, 1892, when a partnership was formed under the name of Charles 
D. Kaier Brewing Company, Limited, and he remained at the head of the 
concern until his death, several years later. By that time it ranked with the 
largest breweries in the State, with an annual production of over 100,000 bar- 
rels, and affording employment to 150 men. 

While Mr. Kaier's main interest was always in the business which bore 
his name he harvested rich rewards in other fields as well, for the most part 
in his home county. Looked up to as a judge and an authority on matters 



f 



SCI-IUYI.KTLL COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 167 

of prime importance in the material evolution of this region, it was his pleas- 
ure to gi\e his encouragement and support to the various enterprises incidental 
to the broadening of the life of the community. He was connected with sev- 
eral banks, at Shenandoah, Girardville and Mahanoy City, at the time of his 
death being vice president of the Union National Bank of Mahanoy City. 
Originally as an accommodation for the brewery business, he founded the Broad 
Mountain Ice Company, of which he was virtually the head to the end of his 
days. He also controlled the Anthracite Light, Heat & Power Company, which 
is still doing business at Mahanoy City. Many of the most desirable improve- 
ments of the borough originated with him or counted upon his sanction for 
their favorable reception. But nothing indicated more unmistakably his pub- 
lic spirit than the beautiful opera house which he erected, and which "in the 
completeness of its appointments and the elegance of its decoration is unsur- 
passed in the State." Such was the comment made in a Mahanoy City paper 
at the time of his death. It was burned a few years ago, and at the time of her 
death his widow was planning to replace it with a structure even more splen- 
did, for it was her pride as well as his. Much other property was accjuired by 
Mr. Kaier in the course of his prosperous career, and there was never anything 
questionable about its acquisition or indeed about the business methods he used 
in accumulating any part of his large fortune. 

Mr. Kaier's liberality was not confined to generosity in his business transac- 
tions and open-handedness in connection with public enterprises. He gave 
freely to church work and charities, without regard to the religion or national- 
ity of the recipients, but though many of his gifts were known there were many 
unknown except to the beneficiaries. His death, which occurred in Philadelphia, 
May 31, 1899, was mourned in many circles in the town and surrounding ter- 
ritory whose vital interests had been so close to his heart. He had been in poor 
health for several years prior to his decease, and had gone abroad in the hope 
of obtaining relief, but the most skillful medical aid in this country and Europe 
was employed in vain. Mr. Kaier was a member of Severn Post, No. no, 
G. A. R., of Mahanoy City, and of the Friendly Sons of St. Patrick, of Philadel- 
phia. He was buried in the family lot in St. Fidelis cemetery at Mahanoy 
City, having been a member of the Catholic Church. Politically he was a 
Democrat. 

In 1862 Mr. Kaier married, at Pottsville, this county, Margaret Curry, a 
native of that place, the ceremony being performed in St. Patrick's Catholic 
Church. She survived him until Dec. 4, 1913, and it is a singular coincidence 
that like him she did not close her life in the beautiful home at Mahanoy City, 
her death taking place in New York City, where she was visiting. Mrs. Kaier 
rests beside her husband in St. Fidelis cemetery. Their family life was ideal. 
Companions in the truest sense, they cooperated in works of benevolence, and 
after her husband's death Mrs. Kaier kept up the home at Mahanoy City and 
continued to take a zealous interest in everything that concerned the welfare 
of the town, where she had the loving friendship of the many who were ptDud 
to be in her circle of acquaintance. A member of St. Fidelis German Catholic 
Church, she gave bountifully to all its enterprises, but she did not stop there, 
having the same broad sympathies which characterized her husband's life and 
character. Her spirit of helpfulness will keep her memory alive among the 
residents of Mahanoy City for many a day. From the time of Mr. Kaier's 
death she was the head of the Charles D. Kaier Company, Limited, and nowhere 
were her tact and kindliness more apparent than in her relations with her 



168 SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENNSYLVANL^ 

employes, all of whom entertained the highest regard for her. Her whole- 
some, intelligent mind saw opportunities for usefulness everywhere, and was 
reflected in a life so well rounded and harmonious that her memory is a bene- 
diction to all who knew her. Mrs. Kaier was always proud of having had the 
honor of presenting the first American flag to the first company of soldiers 
organized in Pottsville for service in the Civil war. 

Of the ten children born to Mr. and Mrs. Kaier six are still living, and she 
was survived by twelve grandchildren and one great-grandchild. The daugh- 
ter Ella married John B. Leiberman and is deceased ; Josephine is the wife of 
M. J. Haughney, of Mahanoy City ; Margaret became the second wife of John 
B. Leiberman, whom she survives (she lives at Mahanoy City) ; Crescentia is 
the wife of Charles Kirby, of Harrisburg, Pa.; Amelia is the wife of Henry 
Schreyer, a merchant of Mahanoy City; Mary, who is unmarried, lives at the 
old home in Mahanoy City ; Charles F., the only son, is manager of the Kaier 
estate. He lives with his sister Mary at the old home in Mahanoy City, at 
Sixth and Centre streets. It is one of the landmarks of the borough, having 
been occupied many years by I>r. Philip Weber, one of the first physicians here. 

CHARLES NAPOLEON BRUMM is the son of George Reinhardt 
Brumm, of Zweibruecken or Du Pont, Rheinpfalz, Bavaria, and Salome Zem- 
holdt, of near Strasburg, Alsace-Lorraine, France ; both parents were of 
Huguenot stock. He was bom at Pottsville, Schuylkill Co., Pa., on the gth 
day of June, A. D. 1838; acquired all his education in the common schools with 
the exception of one year at Pennsylvania College, at Gettysburg, Pa. ; served 
an apprenticeship and worked for four years as a watchmaker; studied law 
two years in the office of the late Howell Fisher, Esq. He left his studies 
and enlisted in the Civil war, entering the service as a private under the first 
call of President Lincoln for three months" men, and was elected first lieutenant 
of Company I, 5th Pennsylvania Volunteers. After the expiration of his 
term he reenlisted, Sept. 15, 1861, for three years; was elected first lieutenant 
of Company K, 76th Pennsylvania Volunteers, Nov. 18, 1S61 ; was detailed on 
the staff of General Barton, as assistant quartermaster and aide-de-camp, which 
position he held under Generals Barton and Pennypacker, until the expiration 
of his term of service ; resumed the study of law under the late Judge Parry. 

Mr. Brumm applied for examination for admission to the bar in iSC)S. but 
was not permitted to be examined, because of an order of court as follows : 
"The Court having learned that the applicant has been instrumental in spread- 
ing reports derogatory to the dignity of the Court, at Harrisburg, we there- 
fore appoint John W. Ryon, Frank Dewees, Decatur Nice, John W Roseberry, 
and Christopher Little a committee to investigate his actions, and report their 
findings to Court." These reports were based on the following facts : During 
the Civil war the anthracite coal fields, and especially Schuylkill county, had a 
large element of disloyal citizens known as "Copperheads" and "Buckshots." 
So violent did they become that the government found it necessary to draw a 
number of regiments of infantry, artillery and cavalry from the front and 
quarter them in this locality to prevent rioting, and to enforce the draft, among 
the troops so employed being the loth New Jersey Infantry, Dana Troop 
Cavalry, Durell's Battery, Hawkin's New York Battery, and several regiments 
of the Invalid Corps. After these troops had been recalled, lawlessness reigned 
supreme in this section, and gave rise to the organization known as the Molly 
Maguires. Criminals charged with murder and other high crimes could not be 



^ SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENNSYLVANL\ 169 

convicted. The better citizens organized themselves into a society known as 
the Loyal Legion, by means of which a move was started to have certain legis- 
lation passed at Harrisburg, for the protection of our citizens, among' which 
were: 1st, the State Police bill, known as the "Snapper jiolice bill;" 2d, the 
Jury bill, requiring minority representation on the board of jury commissioners; 
3d, the Criminal Law Judge bill, which created a criminal court having juris- 
diction over Schuylkill, Lebanon and Dauphin counties, with exclusive criminal 
jurisdiction in this county. To aid and bring about the passage of these bills, 
Benjamin Ilannan, editor of the Miners' Journal, and Charles N. Ilrumm were 
selected by the Union League to go to Llarrisburg. They got the bills passed 
through the Legislature, and the then governor, John N. Geary, signed the 
bills. Mr. Brumm's successful efforts in the passage of these bills were the 
acts complained of by the court. The committee appointed to investigate these 
acts never reported tO' court ; or if it did, no action was ever taken on such 
report. 

In the meantime, the applicant presented his petition for examination to 
Judge Pearson of Lebanon and Dauphin counties, who made the following 
order: "Whereas, the applicant, Charles N. Brumm, was refused admission 
to the Schuylkill county bar, for reasons unknown to the law, and contrary to 
any rules of court in this Commonwealth, we therefore appoint Messrs. Funk, 
Miller and Weidman, as a committee to examine said applicant for admission." 
After the examination they certified him to the court for admission, whereupon 
he was sworn in as a member of the Lebanon county bar. Application was 
then made in the Schuylkill county court, by Hon. Owen Parry, ex-judge, for 
admission on this certificate, but the court still refused to take any action, 
until some time in 1871, when "the gang" was about to submit the bill known 
as the Additional Law Judge bill. Brumm and his friends opposed the passage 
of said bill, when Brumm's former preceptor, Howell Fisher, Esq., was notified 
that if Brumm and his friends would withdraw their objections to the passage 
of that bill they would admit him to the Schuylkill county bar. This being 
agreed to, he was sworn in without any further examination, or report ever 
having been entered. 

During this time \lr. Brumm was appointed deputy revenue assessor. The 
Income Law bill was then in force, and as many of the miners were earning 
sufficient to require them to make a return of their incomes it was very danger- 
ous to go through the outlying districts to make the assessments. Many threats 
and attacks were made upon the assessor by the lawless element, but through 
his determined, fearless conduct he escaped without serious injury. 

Mr. Brumm was always very much interested in all public questions, and 
took a leading part in politics even in his early days. He stumped the county 
during the Fremont campaign in 1856, although only eighteen years of age, 
and has been on the stump in the States of New York, Ohio, New Jersey, 
Maryland, Virginia and West Virginia. He has always been a bitter enemy 
of ring rule and political bosses. In 1878 he was elected to Congress, to rep- 
resent the Thirteenth district of Pennsylvania, but was counted out by 192 
votes. President Harrison appointed him deputy attorney general, but he 
declined to accept the appointment. He was tendered the post of minister to 
Brussels by President McKinley, but declined that position also. He was 
counsel for District No. 9, United Mine Workers' Association, before the 
strike commission appointed by President Roosevelt in 1902, and was the 
author of the basis upon which the strike was settled, viz. : that the tolls should 



170 SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENNSYLVANLA. 

be eliminated from the sliding) scale, and wages regulated exclusively on the 
price of coal. He was elected to the Forty-seventh, Forty-eighth, Forty-ninth, 
Fiftieth, P'ifty-fourth and Fifty-fifth Congresses, and to fill the unexpired term 
of Hon. George R. Patterson, deceased, in the Fifty-ninth Congress, and to 
the Sixtieth Congress, serving nearly fifteen years. Mr. Brumm became so dis- 
gusted with the autocratic rulings of Joseph Cannon, speaker of the House, and 
the conduct of the political bosses at that time, that he refused to run for Con- 
gress again, but became a candidate for judge of the Common Pleas and Quar- 
ter Sessions and Equity courts of Schuylkill county, and was elected in 1908. 
So bitter was the gang against him that an official elected on the same ticket 
filed exceptions to his election account ; and, notwithstanding that said excep- 
tions were entered and dated after the time limit for the filing of any excep- 
tions, yet proceedings went on for some time, until finally they were withdrawn 
upon motion of petitioner. 

The Judge had not been long on the bench when the famous ballot-box stuff- 
ing cases were all brought before him for trial, and petitions were filed on 
affidavit of various citizens, asking the court to impound the ballot-boxes, which 
was done in every instance, and resulted in the Sheriff, Capt. Clay W. Evans, 
securing the boxes before the custodians knew the order had been issued. The 
result was that some twenty-odd ballot-box stuffers and election officers were 
convicted and punished, with the effect of putting a number of the professionals 
out of business and securing fairly honest elections. 

Some time after this the old opposition showed again, when "the Judge's 
enemies, headed by the official who filed exceptions to his account, got a man 
whom he had restrained from inciting to riot to have articles of impeach- 
ment preferred against him before the Legislature at Harrisburg. After the 
taking of considerable testimony the majority of the committee, consisting of 
Hons. Judson W. Stone, D. Lloyd Claycomb and Donald Glenn, reported 
against the impeachment, while Hons. Morris J. Speiser and A. W. Mitchell 
reported in favor of it ; but when it came to a vote of the House on the minority 
report there was but one vote cast in its fa^t)r, after which the majority report, 
exonerating the Judge, passed unanimously." 

Mr. Brumm was married to Virginia James, a daughter of William James, 
one of the pioneer coal operators of Schuylkill county, and his wife. Susan 
James, who is a descendant of the old Pennsylvania Schindel and Marlin fam- 
ihes, and a sister of J. Harry James, ex-district attorney. They had nine chil- 
dren of whom six are living: Howell Lincoln, Charles Claude, Susan Ida, 
Joan Lily, George Franklin and Seth Arthur. 

JOHN POTT, Sr., the founder of the city of Pottsville, Schuylkill county, 
was a member of a distinguished family of English descent. A well authen- 
ticated tradition has it that during the Masonic disturbance in England the 
older representatives were forced to abdicate the rights of citizenship and take 
refuge in Holland. The original founders of this numerous family in Amer- 
ica were Wilhelm and his two sons, John \\'ilhelm and Johannas, and his 
brother Dagenhart, who settled at Germantown, Pa., in 1734. One of these 
sons, John Wilhelm, who died in Oley township, Berks Co., Pa., in 1767, 
married Mench Hoch on Dec. 28, 1755. To them were born two sons: Wil- 
liam, who married late in life and removed to Franklin county, where he died 
without issue ; and John. 

According to the account in a recent history of Berks county, John Pott 




1 OFFIct 






t^ ^- 






BUILT BY JOHN POTT. 1810— DESTROYED BY FIRE, 1896 








SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 171 

(or Potts, as the name was then) had settled in Amity township, that county, 
prior to 1754, in which year he paid a federal tax there of fifteen jioimds, 
which is evidence of the fact that he was a large landowner. At the same time 
John Potts' brother "Thomas" Potts lived in Colebrookdale township, that 
county, where he paid a tax of forty-five pounds. It is traditional that these 
brothers emigrated together from Breisen (Preussen), Germany, but this is 
uncertain, as it is also claiSjned they are Welsh. One of the sons of the 
brothers in later years settled across the Blue mountains, now Schuylkill 
county, and became the founder of Pottsville, the county seat and prominent 
mining town of the anthracite coal district. Pottstown, a flourishing city of 
Montgomery county, near Amity township, was also founded by a member of 
this family, which was prominent in Berks and surrounding counties during 
the latter part of the eighteenth century. 

From the beginning of their residence in Oley township, Berks county, 
the Potts were engaged in the mining and manufacture of crude iron. John 
Potts, Sr., learned the iron business with his father, and in 1790 purchased an 
old forge near Pottsville, Schuylkill county, since known as the "Pioneer Fur- 
nace," which he modernized and converted into a plant better suited to his 
purjjoses. This enterprise was from time to time added to and enlarged until 
it grew into one of the most important industrial institutions of Schuylkill 
county. It also became the nucleus around which sprang up a village, which 
in honor of the proprietor of the furnace was named Pottsville. Such was 
the beginning of the present capital of Schuylkill county, whose existence is 
due to the energy and courage of John Pott, Sr., who, when the county of 
Schuylkill was still an unbroken wilderness, pushed out into its frontiers and 
established an industry which carried with it all the concomitants of civilized 
life. Mr. Pott continued in the conduct of his furnace until the time of his 
death, in the year 1827, and lived to witness the partial growth of the city 
which he had founded. He was not wedded exclusively to his private affairs, 
but spent equally as much time in bringing about proper municipal regula- 
tions and conditions in the community. He was public-spirited, possessed un- 
usual energy, and was endowed with broad intelligence, together with the 
somewhat rare gift of organization. To these essential qualities of a progress- 
ive man in pioneer times, were also added the subtler and more humane qual- 
ities which are requisite to the rounding out of the complete man. He was 
kind and generous in the extreme, one whose life apparently was not for self, 
but for the common interest and the common good of those he had attracted 
to himself. 

John Pott, Sr., was united in marriage with Maria Lesher, and to them 
was born a family of nine children: John, Jr., Magdalina, Benjamin (born 
June 10, 1793). James, Abraham, Mary, Catherine, William and Jacob. He 
and his family were members of the Lutheran Church and gave it the support 
of not only material means, but also of a consistent and constant devotion. 
After the death of John Pott, Sr., his sons John (Jr.) and Benjamin succeeded 
to the management of the iron business, but conducted it for a short time only, 
when it was disposed of to other parties. 

FRANKLIN BENJAMIN GOWEN, railroad manager and financier, was 
bom in Philadelphia Feb. 9, 1836. Mr. Gowen was educated at Emmitsburg, 
Md., and in the ^loravian Seminary at Lititz, Pa. In 1858 he entered the 
business of mining coal near Pottsville, at what is now known as the Beech- 



172 SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PEXXSYL\'AXL\ 

wood colliery, but soon abandoned this enterprise, and took up the study of 
law. Mr. Gowen was admitted to the bar in i860, rising to distinction in his 
profession. In 1862 he was elected to the office of district attorney of Schuyl- 
kill county, conducting the affairs of his office with a vigor hitherto unknown 
in the county. On resuming the general practice of his profession, he was 
retained as counsel for the Philadelphia & Reading Railway Company and for 
the Girard Coal Trusts in connection with their large interests in the mining 
region. In 1869 he was elected to the presidency of the Philadelphia & Read- 
ing Railway Company, and filled the office until 1881, when, because of opposi- 
tion to his plans for the relief of the finances of the road, he failed of reelec- 
tion, but was again chosen as president in 1882. 

In 1877 Mr. Gowen went to England to promote the finances of the Phila- 
delphia & Reading Railroad, and presented the affairs of the railroad in all 
the details in such a masterly manner as to convince the English creditors 
fully. A pamphlet issued in London, containing a full report of a meeting, 
states : "At a general meeting of the share and bond holders of the Philadel- 
phia & Reading Railroad Company and of the Perkiomen Railroad Company," 
held at the City Terminus Hotel, Cannon street, London, June 6, 1877, at 
which Mr. Gowen met the English creditors of his company and obtained, 
their acquiescence in the proposition for its relief, which he went abroad to 
promote, Mr. Thomas Wilde Powell, of the firm of Haseltine, Powell & Co., 
a gentleman largely interested in the Reading Railroad, was called to the 
chair, and opened the meeting with a short speech, in which he introduced the 
subject to be considered, and paid a high compliment to the integrity of the 
management of the road and to the efficiency and ability of Mr. Gowen per- 
sonally. After fully presenting his plan, and satisfactorily answering all ob- 
jections presented, the meeting adopted resolutions of acquiescence, and 
tendered Mr. Gowen a vote of thanks "for the able and interesting address 
which he has given to this meeting." 

In 1872 Mr. Gowen was elected a member of the Constitutional Conven- 
tion of Pennsylvania, and ranked as one of the ablest members of that body. 

Mr. Gowen conceived and established the Philadelphia &• Reading Coal & 
Iron Company in 1871, as the Laurel Run Improvement Company. In less 
than a year the name was changed to its present form. It is now the largest 
land and mining company ever organized in this country. 

Mr. Gowen in 1873 conceived, organized and put into effect the movement 
against the famous organization known as the "Mollie Maguires," which had 
maintained a reign of terror in the coal regions for twenty years, and which 
the ordinary machinery of the law had been unable to suppress. In the trials 
which followed this movement, in 1876, Mr. Gowen was one of the counsel for 
the Commonwealth, and was the first attorney to break down the ever ready 
"alibi," the invariable refuge of the "Mollies." ^Ir. Gowen was an orator 
of force and eloquence, as well as eminent as a financier and railroad man- 
ager. His famous argument in the case of the State vs. Thomas Munley. in 
one of the Mollie Maguire trials, was published (Pottsville. Pa., 1876). After 
retiring from the presidency of the Philadelphia & Reading Railway Com- 
pany Mr. Gowen resumed the practice of the law, which he followed until 
his death, which occurred in Washington, D. C, Dec. 14, 1889. 

GEN. HENRY PLEASANTS, soldier and civil engineer, was bom in 
Buenos Ayres, South America, Feb. 17, 1833. son of John Pleasants, of Phila- 



SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENNSYLVANL\ IT^ 

clelphia. lie arrived from South America in 1846, and entered the Philadel- 
phia high school, where he graduated in 185 1. He pursued the practice/- of 
railroad engineering with the Pennsylvania Railroad Company. In 1857 he 
hegan to practice mining engineering at Potts ville. Pa., and continued to fol- 
low that branch of the profession until he entered the army in 1861, being 
mustered in on Sept. nth. He was j)ronioted from captain of Company C 
to the rank of lieutenant-colonel of the 4Sth Pennsylvania \'olunteer Infantry, 
Sept. 20, 1S62. In June, 1864, he was commanding the 2d Brigade of the 
2d Division, 9th Army Corps, then stationed in front of Petersburg, and there 
he rendered a most efficient ser\'ice, which became memorable in the annals of 
the war as the Petersburg Aline Explosion, the details of which are well known 
to every reader of history. It was said by General Meade and Major Duane, 
chief engineer of the Army of the Potomac, to be the first work of the kind 
ever attempted. For this act he received a letter of congratulation from Gen- 
eral Meade himself. On Oct. ist he was promoted to the rank of colonel and 
on Dec. i8th he was mustered out, his term of service having expired; but 
on March" 13, 1865, he was advanced to the rank of brevet brigadier general. 
On^iis return to Pottsville he resumed the practice of his profession, and 
at the organization of the Laurel Run Improvement Company, afterwards 
the Philadelphia & Reading Coal & Iron Company, in 1871, he was made 
the chief engineer of the company, which position he held till the time of his 
death, in 1880, at the age of forty-seven years. General Pleasants anticipated 
deep mining by twenty years, by sinking the Pottsville Shafts to a depth of 
1,576 feet, from the surface to the rail of the Primrose gangway, the bottom 
of the shaft. The work was begim in 1S72, and completed in 1877. 

JAMES A. XOECKER has been practicing at the Schuylkill county bar 
since 1897, and during that period has devoted practically all of his time to 
his profession, even his public duties having been principally within the field 
of legal work. The important connections he has established among his 
fellow citizens are a reliable indication of his standing, which places him 
among those who have brought honor and distinction to the community, where 
in the earnest pursuit of his own interests he has found many opportunities 
for service of great value, particularly in his home borough. He resides in 
Schuylkill Haven, and maintains law offices in Pottsville. 

The Noecker family is one of long residence in Pennsylvania. The first 
of the line to come to America located originally in New York State, and 
later moved to Pennsylvania with several othef families, settling in the Tul- 
pehocken valley, in Berks county, with Conrad Weiser. They were pioneers 
in that section. John Noecker, the great-grandfather of James A. Noecker, 
lived in Manheim township, Berks county, in the portion later known as 
South Manheim township. Schuylkill county, where he had a farm of one 
hundred acres upon which he lived until his death. He had two children, 
John and Elizabeth, the latter the wife of John Dewalt. The farm was divided 
between the two children, each receiving fifty acres. 

John Noecker, grandfather of James A. Noecker, spent all his life on the 
homestead place, died there, and is buried at the Summit Church. He mar- 
ried Sarah Reed, and they became the parents of the following family: Lewis 
was the father of James A. Noecker : Sarah married Jared Berger, and they 
removed to South Bend, Ind., where she is still living, at the age of eighty-two 
years; Fiartha married a Mr. Schenck, of the State of Indiana; Emma mar- 



174 SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 

ried a Mr. Dewalt, and resides in Indiana ; Catharine, who married Hiram 
Berger, Hves in Nebraska ; Mary married Wilham Reber, and resides in Schuyl- 
kill Haven. 

Lewis Noecker was born on the old homestead farm in South Manheim 
township, which is situated two miles south of the borough of Schuylkill 
Haven, and always made his home there, following farming all his life. He 
died on that place Aug. 15, 191 5, and is buried in the Union cemetery at 
Schuylkill Haven. His widow, Mary (Moyer), has resided in the borough 
of Schuylkill Haven since his death. She is a daughter of Philip Moyer, 
and member of an early family of the Tulpehocken valley in Berks county. 
Ten children were born to I\Ir. and Mrs. Lewis Noecker, namely: Kate L. ; 
William H.; Franklin M. ; James A.; Sallie A., wife of Frank IVIatz, of Har- 
risburg. Pa. ; Charles, M. D., who is practicing his profession in Scranton, 
Pa.; George A., of Pottsville, Pa.; Carrie A., wife of Harry Nissley, of 
Lebanon county. Pa. ; Lewis S., who now owns the old homestead farm in 
South Manheim township; and Mary, married to William Repp, of Harris- 
burg. 

James A. Noecker was born Sept. 20, 1868, on the old Noecker homestead 
in South Manheim township, and began his education in the local public 
schools, later attending at Schuylkill Haven. Then he took a course at the 
Keystone State Normal School, at KiUztown, Pa., from which he was gradu- 
ated in 1891, after which he was engaged in teaching until 1896, meantime 
commencing to read law, under Judge Marr and George Gerber. He was 
admitted to the Schuylkill county bar in September, 1897, and shortly after- 
wards to practice also in the Supreme and Superior courts of the State and 
in the United States District court. The next few years were occupied chiefly 
in the public service. Having been elected to represent his district in the 
State Legislature in 1898, he served one term in that body with credit to him- 
self and his constituency, and on Jan. i, 1900, he was appointed deputy district 
attorney of Schuylkill county under District Attorney M. P. McLaughlin, 
giving able service in this capacity for the next three years. During that 
period, in 1902, he was elected borough solicitor of Schuylkill Haven, in which 
office he has been retained continuously since, a fact which speaks well for the 
public spirit and integrity he has displayed in the discharge of his duties. His 
private practice has shown a steady gain from the beginning, not only in vol- 
ume but in the importance of the work intrusted to him, and the high char- 
acter of his clients is sufficient evidence of the standards which have guided 
him. Mr. Noecker organized the First National Bank of Schuylkill Haven, 
for which he has been solicitor ever since its establishment, in 1899. In frater- 
nal affiliation he is a Mason, holding membership in Page Lodge, No. 270, F. & 
A. M., of Schuylkill Haven, and he also belongs to the Pottsville Lodge of 
Elks. 

Mr. Noecker married Ethyle I. Hancock, daughter of Samson Hancock, 
of Carbon county. Pa., and they have one daughter, Margaret, now five years 
old. Mr. and Mrs. Noecker are members of the Reformed Church at Schuyl- 
kill Haven. 

WILLIAM ELLIOTT was one of the oldest residents of Tower City and 
for years held a high place among the most influential citizens of that borough. 
Though he had been living retired from business pursuits for some years before 
his recent death his interest in the progress and prosperity of the community 



SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PEXNSYLVANL\ 175 

had not lessened, and his judgment was esteemed by all his old-time associates. 
For a number of years he was one of the leading merchants of Tower City, 
attaining substantial success in business though he started with little means, the 
solid position he made for himself being entirely the result of his own exer- 
tions. 

Mr. Elliott was of English birth and parentage, his parents, George and 
Isabella (Taylor) Elliott, having spent their entire lives in England. They 
had two children. William and Isabella, the latter deceased. The father fol- 
lowed mining. After his death the mother remarried, becoming the wife of 
Richard Bainbridge, of Yorkshire, by whom she had four children : Ellen, 
Thomas, Richard and George. The last named was a soldier in the Crimean 
war. 

William Elliott was born Aug. 19, 1S30, in Durham, England, and had 
few advantages in his youth, having been but seven years old when he com- 
menced working in the mines, at the old operation known as the Kalloe shaft. 
He was variously employed about the collieries until the year 1857, when his 
stepfather was killed in a mine accident and he gave up his work there. In 
May, 1857, he came to this countiy, making the voyage from England to 
New York City in a sailing vessel, which was five weeks on the trip. Com- 
ing at once to Schuylkill county. Pa., he located at Donaldson and went to 
work in the mines ■on Middle creek, later finding employment at East Franklin. 
Turning to railroad work, he was in the employ of the Philadelphia & Reading 
Railway Company for a number of years, meantime, in 1875, settling at 
Tower City, which was ever afterwards his home. When he arrived here 
there were but a few houses on the site, and less than one hundred inhabitants, 
but he felt that the place had a future, and about two years after his arrival he 
gave up other work and made an independent business venture, starting a gen- 
eral merchandise business, which until his retirement, in 1903, was conducted 
by the firm of William Elliott & Son. In 1877 he put up a substantial build- 
ing for store and residence, living there until his retirement, and by close 
application to his growing trade made it steadily profitable, gaining credit for 
himself and holding an honorable place among the most reliable merchants of 
the borough. Mr. Elliott also took a good citizen's part in the administration 
of the municipal government, in which his cooperation was welcomed by his 
townsmen, who elected him a member of the council for eight years, and he 
was president of that body for several years. For almost half a century Mr. 
Elliott was a member of Swatara Lodge, No. 267, F. & A. M., and he was also 
a Royal Arch Mason. 

In 1852 Mr. Elliott was united in marriage with Jemima Little, who was . 
born on the Isle of Man, and died in i860. Of the children born to this union 
two grew to maturity, Richard and Mary. The son, who died Oct. 14, 191 1, 
lived at Tower City and was his father's business associate for many years. 
The daughter is the wife of Joseph Salem, of Tower City, wdio has been for 
fifty years an engineer at the East Brookside colliery. They have a family 
of five children, Frank, Maggie, Joseph, Bella and Lester. In 1862 Mr. 
Elliott married (second) Mary Tobias, of Donaldson, who died without issue. 
On Nov. 14, 1875, he married (third) Mrs. Matilda Dietrich. No children 
were bom to this marriage. When Mr. Elliott retired from active business 
Mrs. Elliott purchased the residence on Grand avenue. Tower City, w'hich was 
his home until his death, Jan. 16, 1916. No residents of the borough have been 
held in higher estimation. 



176 SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 

George Boyer, Mrs. Elliott's grandfather, was a native of Germany, but 
was only a boy when he came to Schuylkill county. Pa., and he settled near 
Orwigsburg, dying upon his farm there. He married Maria Freed, and they 
had the following children: Henry, David, William, Peter, Catherine (who 
lived to the age of eighty-five years) and Leah. 

David Boyer, Mrs. Elliott's father, was born in Schuylkill cqunty. and 
established his home at Orwigsburg, where he died. By calling he was a gun- 
smith. His wife, Hannah (Beck), a native of Carbon county. Pa., also died 
in Orwigsburg. Their children were: Molet, who married Henry Schuck; 
Matilda, wife of William Elliott ; Lawrence, who lives in the State of Wash- 
ington ; George, who died in New Jersey ; William, who lives at Easton, Pa. ; 
Charles, who died when twenty-one years old ; and Annie, who married 
Phoenes E. Gerber, of Lehighton, Pennsylvania. 

Mrs. Elliott first married Frederick C. Jenkins, a native of Wales, who 
was for some time superintendent at the Tamaqua gas works. He entered the 
Union service during the Civil war, and died from the effects of a wound 
recei\-ed at the battle of Cold Harbor. All her children were born to this 
union : Violet Hannah, wife of Isaac AIossop, who is a manufacturer of 
Wiconisco, Pa., president of the Lykens Bank, and a director of the Tower 
City National Bank; Annie B., wife of Albert E. Schoener, of Orwigsburg, 
Pa.; and Mary, wife of James Thompson, of Monroe county, Iowa. For her 
second husband Mrs. Jenkins married John Dietrich, and lived on the site 
where now is the village of Johnstown, Schuylkill county. 

WILLIAM S. PUGH, of Pottsville, is achieving deserved reputation 
in a busy career whose divers interests he has handled with impartial success. 
He has always been considered an able man in his profession, civil and 
mining engineering, but he has taken hold of everything else intrusted to 
him with such evidence of being equal to its responsibilities that his asso- 
ciates have come to have unlimited faith in his powers. He is a native son 
of Pottsville, and the city has reason to be proud of his accomplishments, 
for much of his best efifort has been given directly to her development. As 
municipal engineer continuously since 1892, most of the progressive evolu- 
tion of her public works of modern origin is due to his foresight, and the 
economical adaptation of local facilities to local needs has been looked after 
systematically under his care. Aside from his profession he is best known 
as one of the most popular Masons in Schuylkill county, at present serving 
as Deputy Grand Master in his district, a position he has held for six yea»"s. 

Mr. Pugh was born June 27, 1871, son of John Pugh and Rosanna 
Beidelman. His father was born in Manchester, England, in 1835, came to 
this country in 1836, and resided in Pottsville until his death in 1902. He 
served during the Civil war as a member of Company G, 48th Regiment, 
and was severely wounded in the battle of Antietam. In 1866 he married 
Rosanna lieidelman, who survives him, making her home in Pottsville. 

\\'illiam S. Pugh was reared in Pottsville and had the public educational 
advantages afforded here, graduating from high school in 1888. From 
1888 to 1902 he was a student in the office of A. J. Womelsdorf, the well 
known civil and mining engineer of Pottsville, meantime preparing verv 
thoroughly for his chosen calling, taking a full engineering course in the 
International Correspondence School of Scranton (of which he was one 
of the very first students) supplemented with a variety of practical work 



SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 177 

which has been invaluable as experience and in developing his talents. In 
1892 he was elected borough engineer, and filled the position without inter- 
ruption until the city government was inaugurated in 1913, when he was 
chosen city engineer by the unanimous vote of the city council; during all 
that time he also acted as Commissioner of Highways. 

For the last twenty-one years, from 1894, Mr. Pugh has been also engaged 
in independent work in his profession, in which he has acquired an extensive 
practice, doing special work for many of the large corporations in the coal 
region. Incidentally he has been called ujion for testimony in court in many 
' important cases in his own and neighboring counties, and he is frequently 
consulted as an expert engineer. 

There is hardly a member of the Masonic fraternity in Schuylkill county 
better known than Mr. Pugh, and in the six years of his service as District 
Deputy Grand Master he has been widening his circle of acquaintances 
steadily. He is a past master of Pulaski Lodge, No. 216, F. & A. M. ; a past 
high priest of Mountain City Chapter, No. 196, R. A. M. ; a past eminent 
commander of Constantine Commandery, No. 41, K. T. ; a member of Phila- 
delphia Consistory, A. A. S. R., and a member of Rajah Temple, A. A. O. 
N. M. S., of Reading. 

In 1896 Mr. Pugh married Jennie J-une Edwards, daughter of Hon. Joseph 
J. Edwards, of Saint Clair, who was a member of the State Legislature from 
Schuylkill county in 1882-83. 

MAJ. PETER A. FILBERT, of Pine Grove, had a long and prosperous 
business career at that place before his retirement some twenty years ago, and 
has been enjoying a life of honorable leisure among the scenes of his early 
activity. He is a man of substantial qualities and forceful personality, and 
few residents of Schuylkill county are better known. 

The family name of Filbert is one of the oldest in the Teutonic language, 
being derived from "fiel brecht," which means very bright or illustrious. This 
appellation was borne by many of the old Tetttonic chieftains, whose descend- 
ants carried it into all the countries of western Europe in their early con- 
quests. Formerly the name was spelled "Philbert" and "Philibert," and in 
England it exists in both the forms "Philbert'' and "Filbert," while in France 
and Italy it has survived as "Philibert." 

St. Philibert, who founded the Abbey of Jumieges, on the north bank of 
the Seine, and died in 683, had been an Abbot at the Merovingian court. He 
was so greatly beloved by the peasantry that at his death they took his day, 
Aug. 22d, to gather the hazel nut which ripened in that locality about that 
time, and called it St. Filbert's nut. The admiral of the French fleet that 
made the demonstration against Morocco several years ago belonged to the 
French branch of the family. Philibert, Prince of Orange, was one of the 
generals of Charles V., and fell in the Italian campaign of 1529; several counts 
of the name ruled over Savoy in the twelfth century, and the descendants of 
Emmanuel Philibert of Savoy became kings of Sardinia, and later kings of 
Italy. 

The American branch of the family traces its ancestry to the great-great- 
grandfather of Mr. Filbert, (I) John Samuel Filbert, who was born in Wur- 
temberg, Germany, Jan. 8, 1710, and who with his wife Susanna came to the 
New World on the ship "Samuel," Hugh Percy, master, sailing from Rotter- 
dam, and took the oath of allegiance to the Crown of Great Britain and the 
Vol. 1—12 



178 SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENNSYLVANL\ 

Province of Pennsylvania at Philadelphia Aug. 30, 1737. He spelled the name 
"Filbert," but Rev. John Caspar Stover, who kept the baptismal records of 
the family, spelled it "Philbert." The children of John Samuel Filbert were: 
John Thomas, 1737- 1784, married to Catherine Batteiger; Maria Catrina, born 
1739, married to John Heinrich Ache; Anna Elizabeth, born 1741, married to 
John Henry Webber, a captain in the Revolutionary war; John Phillip (1743- 
1817) ; John Peter, bom 1746, who was a delegate from the ist battalion of 
Berks county militia to the convention held in Lancaster July 4, 1776, to elect 
three brigadier generals for the Pennsylvania and Delaware militia, and who 
was elected sherifif of Berks county in 1785; and Maria Christina, born 1749, 
married to Jost Ruth. As the father and three sons had the first name "John" 
in common they dropped it in active life, and the only places it can be found 
are on their baptismal records and tombstone. 

Samuel Filbert and his wife Susanna settled immediately on coming to this 
country in Bern township, Lancaster (now Berks) county, at the present site 
of Bernville. Samuel Filbert and Godfried Fidler each gave an acre of ground 
to the North Kill Lutheran Church at Bernville, and a log church was built 
in 1743 on the part donated by Samuel Filbert. Tradition says that he paid 
half of the cost of the building, which was used as a church on the Sabbath 
and as a school on weekdays. In 1791 the log church was replaced by a brick 
building, at which time his son Phillip acted as president of the building com- 
mittee. In 1897 the present handsome brownstone edifice was erected on the 
same ground. Back of the chancel in the new building is a beautiful stained 
glass window dedicated to "Samuel Filbert, Founder, 1743.'' He died Sept. 
25, 1786, and is buried in the center of the old churchyard. 

(II) John Phillip Filbert, son of Samuel and Susanna, was born Dec. 7, 
1743. He was commissioned as a captain of the 8th Company of the 6th 
Battalion of Berks county militia June 14, 1777, and was recommissioned in 
1780, 1783 and 1786, so that he served as an officer of the Pennsylvania militia 
during the whole period of the Revolution. Capt. Phillip Filbert's battalion 
was mustered into the Continental service on Dec. 13, 1777, for sixty days, 
and was engaged under General Washington in the Schuylkill valley, between 
Valley Forge and Germantown. He was married to Anna Maria Meyers and 
had three children : Samuel, mentioned below ; John, married to Anna Maria 
Leiss ; and Catherine, married to William Machimer. He died Aug. 20, 1817, 
and is buried at Bernville. 

(III) Samuel Filbert (about 1770-1795), eldest son of Phillip and Anna 
Maria, married Sibylla, daughter of Francis Umbenhaur, a captain in the 
Revolutionary war. He left two sons: Joseph, who died in 1804, and Peter. 

(IV) Peter Filbert, son of Samuel and Sibylla, was born at Bernville, 
Berks county, in 1794. His father died when he was about six months old, 
leaving his two sons to the guardianship of their grandfathers Phillip Filbert 
and Francis Umbenhaur. In 1S14 he enlisted with the troops called out for 
the defense of Baltimore against the British army, and marched under Cap- 
tain Smith to Springfield camp, near that city, and after the retreat of the 
British was honorably discharged from the service. In 1818 he married Eliz- 
abeth, daughter of John Stoudt, and the next year removed to Pine Grove, 
Schuylkill county, to take charge of the Pine Grove Forge. Peter and Eliz- 
abeth Filbert had the following children : Samuel P., married to Lavina 
Lamm ; Edward T., married to Mary Clayton ; Peter A. ; Leah, married to Dr. 
John Kitzmiller; Rebecca, married to F. W. Conrad, D. D. ; Sarah, married 



SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENXSYLVANL\ 179 

to Richard Musser; John Q. A., who married Mary Beltzhoover; and Wil- 
liam H., the youngest, who also served as a private from the State of Penn- 
sylvania under the first call, in the loth Regiment, and later in the 96th Regi- 
ment, three-year troops. 

Peter A. Filbert, son of Peter and Elizabeth (Stoudt) Filbert, was born 
Nov. 20. 1833, at Pine Grove, and there received bis early education in the 
public schools. Later he took a course in a commercial college at Baltimore, 
Md., returning to Pine Grove, where he was engaged in merchandising and 
milling throughout his business career. In 1868 he became engaged in the 
milling business as a member of the firm of Filbert & Bro., and in 1869 be- 
came interested in merchandising. For some time he was a member of the 
firm of Miller, Filbert & Co., and after the death of D. J. Kitzner, of that 
company, was associated with Mr. Miller, operating a general store until his 
retirement from active business. He retired in the year 1896 from active 
pursuits, with a record remarkable for success attained by the exercise of his 
ability and sound judgment. During the Civil war Mr. Filbert volunteered 
for the Union service under the first call, and was elected lieutenant of Com- 
pany D, loth Regiment, Pennsylvania \'olunteers, sening under Colonel 
Meredith. He was mustered out in July. Reenlisting in August, he was 
mustered into the service Sept. 2d as senior captain of the 96th Pennsylvania 
Regiment, commanding as lieutenant colonel after the seven days' fight at 
Harrison's Landing, on the James river, in Virginia, and he was in command 
of the regiment during the advance on Fredericksburg. Upon the last call 
he again enlisted for the third time, and was mustered in as major under Col. 
James Xagle. was in command during his term, and was discharged with that 
rank. He is a Mason in fraternal connection. 

Mr. Filbert married Theodocia Reitzel, daughter of Jacob Reitzel, of Clear 
Spring, Washington Co., Md., and they have two daughters, Corinne and 
Augusta. 

PETER ORWTG, son of George Gottfried and Glora Orwig, was born at 
Sculp's Hill, a short distance south of the site of Orwigsburg. where his par- 
ents settled in 1747. Peter married in 1773, but there is no record of the 
maiden name of his wife, Hannah. Two children were born to them : Maria 
Rebecca, April 17, 1774, and Johann Heinrich. Dec. 27, 1775. 

Mr. Orwig served as justice of the peace for a number of years. In 1786 
he owned 504 acres of land in the immediate vicinity of the present site of the 
borough of Orwigsburg. On Sept. 20, 1778, he purchased from the Webb 
estate the present site of ]McKeansburg. On Feb. 20, 1795, Mr. Orwig re- 
ceived a patent deed for the site of Orwigsburg from the Commonwealth of 
Pennsylvania, for 309 acres, 26 perches, with allowances of six per cent for 
roads. The deeds of the first lots purchased in Orwigsburg are dated April 
7, 1795. Seven deeds bearing that date are recorded, from Peter Orwig, of 
Brunswick Township, in the county of Berks, in the Commonwealth of Penn- 
sylvania, Esq., and Hannah his wife. 

REV. GEORGE MIXNIG was one of the pioneer Lutheran ministers 
of Schuylkill. His name appears frequently also as Mennig and Muench, the 
last being probably the original German form of the name. He succeeded 
Rev. John Knoske, in 181 1, coming here when the county was organized, and 
continued in his labors down to a time within the memory of persons now Hv- 



180 SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENXSYLVANL\ 

ing. Rev. George Alinnig was born in August, 1773. He studied under the 
Rev. Dr. Lochman, at Lebanon, and was licensed in 181 1, and ordained in 
1816. He resided near Friedensburg, and preached in all the Lutheran 
Churches in the lower end of the county, except Frieden's and West Penn. 
He organized Clouser's Church near Llewellyn. Later it appears he moved 
to Orwigsburg, and, it is said, was at the time the only Lutheran minister in 
the county. It seems he also preached, at least occasionally, south of the Blue 
mountains, as there are two different paths across the mountains, each known 
as "Minnich's Path," from the circumstance of his crossing there frequently 
on foot or on horseback. He labored in this field about twenty years. In 
1833 he moved to Bernville, Berks county, where he served a number of 
congregations. He died of apoplexy, at Bernville, April 7, 1851, aged seventy- 
eight years. 

W. B. ROCKWELL, of Pottsville, has for some years been associated 
with the operation of two public utilities most important in the development 
of the city. Since 1910 he has been manager of the Eastern Pennsylvania Rail- 
ways Company and of the Eastern Pennsylvania Light, Heat & Power Com- 
pany, both of which have been powerful elements in extending the reputation 
and influence of the section which they serve, the former operating seventy 
miles of trolley road, centering at Pottsville, and reaching to Mauch Chunk. 
The Light, Heat & Power Company has interests in the towns of Pottsville, 
Palo Alto, Mount Carbon, Port Carbon, MinersA'ille, Orwigsburg, New Phila- 
delphia, Cumbola. Middleport, Tamaqua. Frackville, Gilberton, Girardville 
and Ashland, in Schuylkill county, and Centralia borough and Conyngham 
township, in Columbia county. The two companies have over four hundred 
employes, and the gross yearly receipts are in excess of eight hundred thou- 
sand dollars. 

Since settling in Pottsville. upon assuming the duties of his present posi- 
tion, Mr. Rockwell has been extremely public-spirited in furthering the in- 
terests of other concerns in the city having in contemplation the material 
advancement of the municipality, and his attitude has been thoroughly appre- 
ciated by its citizens. 

Mr. Rockwell was born Jan. 19, 1858, in New York City, son of H. B. 
Rockwell, one of the pioneer citizens of Scranton, Pa., in whose upbuilding 
he took a conspicuously useful part. The family has been one of the most 
prominent in Lackawanna county, this State, for many years. 

MONCURE ROBINSON, a civil engineer of national reputation, was 
born in Richmond, Va... in 1802, and completed his education at William and 
Mary College. In 1821 he was employed by Governor Pleasants, of \'irginia, 
to locate an extension of the James River canal. About 1825 he visited 
England to become familiar with the construction of canals, and as the 
Darlington & Stockton Railroad was then in operation he s]ient considerable 
time there in acquiring a knowledge of railway business, and doubtless while 
there became acquainted with the great English railway engineer, George 
Stephenson. Having carefully studied the nature of these improvements, 
he returned to the United States, and was at once employed by the Canal Com- 
missioners of Pennsylvania. At this time he made survey of the portage 
road over the Allegheny mountains, and his plan was largely adopted. In 



SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PEXXSYL\'ANL\ 181 

1833 the rennsylvania Legislature was considering- whether the Philadelphia 
& Columbia railroad should continue the use of horse power or adopt locomo- 
tives. This action resulted in fa\or of the latter through the requested advice 
of Mr. Robinson, who stated "that it would take four days to transport 
merchandise from Philadelphia to the Susquehanna river by horse power 
when it could be effected in six hours by locomotive power." While under 
the employ of the Commissioners he made the survey for the Danville & 
Pottsville railroad, and later built the eastern part, with its many well planned 
planes. About this time he also built the Little Susquehanna railroad. The 
next w-ork which Mr. Robinson was called upon to do was that of the Phila- 
delphia & Reading railroad, which is regarded as his great achievement. 
While with this company, he was sent to England with his estimates and 
plans, to be submitted before capitalists there. His efforts here were emi- 
nently successful, he having secured from one individual a loan of two mil- 
lions of dollars. In 1840 the Czar of Russia sent word to Mr. Robinson to 
take service as head engineer over the great system of railways he was devis- 
ing in his empire. This he declined, but gave him much valuable advice. Mr. 
Robinson died at his home in Philadelphia in i8g2. aged ninety years. 

JUDGE CYRUS L. PERSHING was born in Westmoreland county. 
Pa., in 1825. When he was five years old the family residence was changed 
to Johnstown, Pa., where his father died in 1S36. Thrown on his own re- 
sources, by means of money earned by teaching school and clerking in the 
offices of the State canal and railroad, he paid his own way at Jefferson 
College, Pennsylvania, from which institution he graduated. After leaving 
college he entered as a student at law the office of Hon. Jeremiah S. Black, 
in Somerset. Pa., when he was admitted to the bar, shortly after which he 
commenced the practice of the law at his home in Cambria county. Pa. In 
September, 1856, 'Sir. Pershing was nominated as the Democratic candidate 
for Congress in the district of his residence. The district was Republican 
by a clear majority of 2,500, and in 1854 had been carried by the Republicans 
by over 5,000 majority. After an energetic canvass in the limited time be- 
tween the nomination and the election in October, Mr. Pershing was defeated 
by the small majority of 284. In 1858 he was again nominated and defeated. 
The dissensions growing out of the Kansas slavery excitement that year 
brought disaster to the Democratic ticket. State and Congressional. 

Mr. Pershing represented Cambria county in the State Legislature in 1861, 
1862, 1863, 1864, 1865, ser\-ing on important committees during the whole 
period. At the session of 1863 he was chairman of the committee on Federal 
Relations, and in 1864 was the nominee of the Democrats for speaker of 
the House. In 1866 Mr. Pershing represented his district in the Union Na- 
tional convention, which met in Philadelphia in August of that year. In 
1868 he was placed on the Democratic electoral ticket in the presidential 
contest of that year. In 1869 Mr. Pershing was nominated as the Demo- 
cratic candidate for judge of the Supreme court, but was defeated by a small 
majority. In 1872 he was nominated for president judge of the judicial dis- 
trict composed of Schuylkill county by the conventions of the Labor Reform- 
ers and Republicans : his election necessitated his removal from Johnstown 
to Pottsville. In 1875 Judge Pershing was nominated for governor by the 
Democratic State convention. Governor Hartranft was elected by the large 



182 SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENNSYLVAKL\ 

majority which his party commanded in the city of Philadelphia, but the 
State, outside of that city, gave Judge Pershing a handsome majority. 

Judge Pershing was reelected president judge of the Schuylkill district in 
1882, and again in 1892. In the years 1876 and 1877 he presided over the 
trials of the Mollie Maguire conspirators, which excited great interest through- 
out the country. 

Owing to ill health Judge Pershing resigned in 1898, and lived in retire- 
ment until his death, which occurred June 30, 1903. 

]\IARTIN M. BURKE, of Shenandoah, a lawyer of foremost place at 
the Schuylkill county bar, owes his standing to many elements in his character 
besides his professional ability. His concern for the common interests of the 
borough and its people has kept him in close touch with his fellow citizens, 
and his freely expressed sympathies with the most significant progress of the 
town have caused him to be regarded as a reliable friend of all good works, 
a dependable factor in their achievement and a champion of beneficial move- 
ments in whatever form they appear. 

Mr. Burke is of Irish origin, as his name would indicate, though it is really 
a corruption of (De) Burgo and was so written in the early days when it 
carried its original significance, i. e., from the fort, earth, hill, or city. The 
family went into England from Xormandy with the Conqueror, and after- 
wards into Ireland with Strongbow. 

John Burke, grandfather of Martin M. Burke, was born in County Mayo, 
Ireland, where he lived until 1866, in which year he came to America, joining 
his son Edward, who preceded him to this country by about a year and a half. 
Soon afterwards he located at Ashland, Schuylkill Co., Pa., thence removing 
to Lost Creek, this county, a village in West Mahanoy township, where the 
remainder of his life was spent. In the old country he followed farming, but 
during his residence in the United States he was a mine worker. 

Edward J. Burke, son of John Burke, was born in Ireland about 1840, and 
there passed his youth and early manhood. He did farm work, and was also 
engaged as a lighthouse-keeper. Coming to this country in the sixties, about a 
year and a half before his father, he lived with the latter at Ashland and 
removed with him to Lost Creek, where he has continued to reside ever since. 
He took up mine work upon settling here, and was not only successful on his 
own account, but has done much to improve the conditions in the mines and 
among miners by his intelligent and unselfish labors in their behalf. He has 
done responsible work in connection with the opening of new mines in the 
county, and his skill was given substantial recognition in his appointment as one 
of the first board of examiners of miners in the Fifth Anthracite district. All 
efforts for the betterment of the classes whose welfare has been so close to his 
heart, no matter whence they emanate, have had his indorsement and generous 
support, and he has won a deserved place in the affectionate esteem of all who 
know him. For seven years ]\Ir. Burke was a member of the school board of 
West Mahanoy township, in that position also giving his best energies to pro- 
mote the general good. He is a Democrat in politics and a Catholic in religion. 
Mr. Burke married Margaret L'Velle, daughter of Martin LA'elle, the latter a 
native of County Mayo, Ireland, and a prosperous farmer. Nine children 
have been born to this union, five sons and four daughters, viz.: Martin M.; 
Mary E., wife of Patrick J. Coyle, who is an assistant mine foreman at Shenan- 



SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 183 

doah; Catherine, wife of William J. Walsh, superintendent of the Prudential 
Insurance Company's office at iMahanoy City, Pa. ; Bridget L., wife of Matthew 
F. Giblon, justice of the peace, of Shenandoah, Pa. ; Rev. John F., priest of 
the Catholic Church at Frankford, Philadelphia; Patrick H., attorney; Margaret 
\'., at home; Edward J., merchant, of Shenandoah; and Michael L., who was 
killed at Philadelphia in 1910 while playing football (he was a third year 
student at the Medico-Chirurgical College, Philadelphia, at the time of his 
death). 

Martin M. Burke was born June 16, 1865, at Ashland, Schuylkill Co., Pa., 
where he spent his boyhood, acquiring a good education in the common schools. 
Like many young men ambitious to enter professional life, he taught school 
in his young manhood, following this vocation for a period of ten years, from 
September, 1880. His hrst school was in West Mahanoy township. In the 
fall of 1890, ha\ing given up teaching, he became a law student in the office 
of his uncle, M. ]\I. L'\'elle, Esq., of Ashland, and on Sept. 6, 1892, was 
admitted to the Schuylkill county bar, where he has been practicing ever since. 
He is a resident of Shenandoah, but has maintained offices in both that borough 
and in Pottsville, his patrons coming from a wide area. He now has a partner, 
being senior member of the firm of Burke & Burke, who have established offices 
in Shenandoah at the corner of Main and Centre streets. Mr. Burke's solid 
qualities have gained him the confidence of the best people in all his associa- 
tions, but they have been particularly valuable, of course, in holding clients, 
who have had no cause for hesitation about intrusting their interests to his 
care, and he has retained their respect through long years of close association. 
As to public affairs, educational progress has always had his special encour- 
agement. In religion he is a Catholic. He and his wife and son are members 
of the Church of the Annunciation, and he holds membership in the Ameri- 
can Catholic Historical Society of Philadelphia. Fraternally he belongs to 
the local lodge of the Ancient Order of Hibernians; to the Phoenix Fire Com- 
pany ; to the Pennsylvania Society of New York, and to the Elks lodge at 
Shenandoah, of which he is a charter member. For several years he has been 
city attorney, a position he still holds. 

On Sept. 12, 1893, Mr. Burke was married, by Rev. H. F. O'Reilly, in the 
old Annunciation Church at Shenandoah, to ]\Iary Ella Foley, second daughter 
of James and Margaret (Tobin) Foley. Her father, a retired miner, was 
during the latter years of his active life assistant mine foreman at the Indian 
Ridge mine of the Philadelphia & Reading Coal & Iron Company. Mr. and 
Mrs. Foley were natives of Queen's County, Ireland, and came to America 
when very young, with their parents, settling at Heckscherville, Schuylkill 
Co., Pa. Mr. and Mrs. Burke have one son, Clarence L'Velle, who was born 
Dec. 2, 1894; he is now a student in the Jesuit Fathers' LTniversity at Fordham, 
New York. 

P.VTRicK H. Burke, junior member of the law firm of Burke & Burke, 
was born near Shenandoah. After receiving ordinary educational advantages 
in the local township school he started work at the mines, beginning, like 
most boys, as a slate picker. Having given evidence of intelligence and ability 
he was later assigned to duty as colliery clerk with the Lehigh Coal Company 
of Shenandoah, being so employed until he gave up the position in 1899, after 
which for three vears he held a clerkship in the office of the county controller 
at Pottsville. Meantime he had taken up the study of law, having registered 



184 SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 

as a law student in 1899, and in 1903 he began to apply himself closely to pre- 
paring for the profession. He was admitted to the bar in 1906, and imme- 
diately joined his brother in the practice at Shenandoah, where they both 
reside, though their interests are by no means limited to that borough. 

Mr. Burke was married at Shenandoah Oct. 30, 1906, to Anna C. Watson, 
daughter of the late Hon. AI. C. Watson, State senator and a prominent mer- 
chant of Shenandoah. Her mother's maiden name was Anna Monaghan. 
Four children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Burke: John F., Joseph W., 
Edmund and Mary Eileen. The family belong to the Roman Catholic Church 
of the Annunciation at Shenandoah. 

Edw.ard J. Burke, youngest surviving son of Edward J. and Margaret 
(L'Velle) Burke, was born March 28, 1883, i" West Mahanoy township, 
Schuylkill county, and there received a public school education. He has had 
an active career, and by his success in business has shown that he possesses 
substantial qualities quite as strong as the traits which have made him so 
popular personally. The firm of E. J. Burke Company, of which he is senior 
member and manager, has one of the best patronized establishments of the 
kind in this part of Schuylkill county. The store at Nos. 113-115 North Main 
street, Shenandoah, is well stocked with house furnishings of all kinds selected 
with the view of giving the local trade an adequate choice of modern goods, and 
customers appreciate the unusual facilities afforded for supplying their wants 
as well as the obliging service rendered to every patron of the store. Mr. 
Burke has proved himself worthy of the esteem in which he is held, and he 
never misses an opportunity to show his interest in the town. Fie is a member 
of the Phoenix Fire Company of Shenandoah, an honorary member of the 
Shenandoah Fire Department, was the organizer of the Polish-American Fire 
Company of the borough, and is a member of the International Association 
of Fire Engineers; he also belongs to the Shenandoah lodge of the Knights 
of Columbus (No. 618) and B. P. O. Elks (No. 945). As a business man 
he holds membership in the National Efficiency Society of New York City 
and in the National Carpet Club, New York City. Like all the rest of his 
family, his religious connection is with the Church of the Annunciation in 
Shenandoah. 



The Burke and Alvord Memorial contains the following account of the 
name and family : 

The name of Burke, Bourke or Bourck. as it is variously spelled, was 
originally written De Burgh, and in that form is an ancient name and of 
much note in the Old World. It may be traced back to the eighth century, and 
has for its head Charles, Duke dTngheim, fifth son of the Emperor Charle- 
magne. In the fourth generation from him we find Baldwin de Bourg, his 
great-grandson, a renowned Crusader, whose son Baldwin founded the House 
of Blois in France, and was the (a) progenitor of the noble families of Burgh 
and Vesey in Ireland. 

Early in the fourteenth century lived and died John, Earl of Comyn, and 
Baron of Tonsburgh in Normandy, a descendant of the above, "who, being 
general of the king's forces, and governor of his chief towns, obtained the 
surname of de Burgh," a name particularly pertinent, not only on account of 
its meaning, which signifies "pertaining to a city," but also because the name 
had belonged to one of the earliest progenitors of the familv. Being, there- 



SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PE\.\SYLVANL\ 185 

fore, a prominent Norman family, it is not unnatural to sujjpose that they 
found their way to England when the connection between the two countries 
became so intimate that the first Norman kings of England passed a great part 
of their time in what was to tiiem their old home. Accordingly we find them 
mentioned in early English history from time to time, verifying their descent 
from the stanch old Crusader by deeds of piety and fidelity to their king. 

In the reign of Henry II a branch of the De I'urghs went over into Ireland. 
Prior, in his "Life of Edmund liurke," says, "The Burkes, or I'.ourkes, though 
now thickly strewn over the whole of Ireland, particularly the southern part of 
it, were not an aboriginal, or as their English invaders term them, a iiicrc Irish 
family ; but descended from the Norman Ihirghs, or De Burghs ( of which 
Burke is merely a corruption), who went thither as adventurers under Strong- 
bow, in the reign of Henry II ; not as temporary marauders, whose visits might 
soon be over, but to conquer an inheritance, seize upon such possessions as 
their strength would permit and permanently hold what they had thus seized. 
The name figures in Irish history from this time down until it is merged in 
other names equally famous, and perhaps more fainiliar to modern ears. Even 
then it is retained as the family name. It is frequently involved in the wars 
and struggles which pervaded that riotous kingdom, and in most cases is 
found on the side of law and order, when law and order was the dangerous 
and unpopular side. 

It was William Fitzaldelm (uncle of Hubert De Burgh, Chief Justiciary of 
England during the reign of Henry III) who accompanied Strongbow into 
Ireland, remained there with the little English colony, was appointed governor 
of Wexford by the king, and afterwards intrusted with the management of 
affairs in the kingdom. In 1177 he was appointed governor of Ireland and 
about that time founded the monastery of St. Thomas, near Dublin. He 
obtained a great part of the Province of Connaught ; died in England in 1204. 
His son, Richard De Burgh. Lord of Connaught and Trim, had the conquests 
of his father confirmed to him by King John in 1215, on condition of his doing 
homage therefor and paying the yearly rent of three hundred marks. He was 
made lord lieutenant of Ireland in 1227. Died on a voyage to France in 1243. 

His two sons, \\'alter and William, became incorporated into the two 
noble families of Ulster and Clanricarde, Walter, the elder, marrying Maud, 
daughter of the Earl of Ulster, and becoming Earl of Ulster in her right upon 
the death of her father. He died in 1271 and was succeeded by his son 
Richard. 

William, the younger brother, sened with his father in France, was in 
many battles with his brother, and died in 1270. His son \^'illiam was appointed 
Custos of Ireland and died in 1324. The descendants of William were gov- 
ernors of Connaught for many generations, and the one who was governor 
during the reign of Henry VHI was made by that king Earl of Clanricarde 
and Baron of Dunkellin. He died in 1544. His son and successor, Richard, 
was lord lieutenant of Ireland, a position later occupied by one of his descend- 
ants, in 1650. 

The Earls of Mayo are descended from a collateral branch of the De 
Burghs, having, with the Earls of Clanricarde, a common ancestor in ^^'illiam, 
who was Custos of Ireland in 1308. 



186 SCHUYLKILL COUxNTY, PENXSYLVAi\L\ 

CHARLES j\L KAUF^LAX occupies an important place in the business 
activities of Tower City, Schuylkill county, being at the head of several of 
the most valuable enterprises of the borough. His uniformly successful 
management of these various interests stamps him as a man of versatile ability, 
with keen insight for conditions and remarkable breadth of judgment. He 
belongs to thrifty old Pennsylvania stock of German origin, two brothers, 
Jonas and Christian Kaufman, natives of Wurtemberg, Germany, having come 
to this country in 1680. They were among the first settlers in Lancaster 
county, Pa., and their descendants located in the Lykens valley, in what is 
now Schuylkill county, when the Indians were still numerous in that region. 
Time and again the savages forced them to leave their settlements, but after 
taking their families to Pine Grove to safety they returned and held posses- 
sion of their homes. 

Samuel Kaufman, the great-grandfather of Charles M. Kaufman, was 
born in the Lykens valley, Schuylkill county, in what is now known as Hubley 
township, where he spent all his life engaged in agricultural pursuits, owning 
a large, fertile farm there. He died there when comparatively young, and 
is buried with his wife Eveline (Klinger) at Klinger's Church in that town- 
ship; she also passed away in Hubley township. 'Sir. Kaufman was a Whig 
in political sentiment, and a Lutheran in religious faith. His children were: 
Samuel, a civil engineer, served one term as county commissioner and repre- 
sented Schuylkill county in the Pennsylvania Legislature for one session, 
and he was long cashier of the First National Bank of Minersville ; Jonas 
was the grandfather of Charles M. Kaufman; Jacob, deceased, was a mer- 
chant in Lykens \ alley ; Emanuel followed merchandising for a time, went 
West, enlisted for service in the Civil war, and had been promoted to captain 
when he died, of typhoid fever; John, a farmer, is deceased; Henry is 
deceased ; Elizabeth married William Alspach ; Molly was twice married, 
first to a Mr. Reed and later to Jacob Becker, of Trevorton, Northumber- 
land county. 

Jonas Kaufman, grandfather of Charles M. Kaufman, was born in 1815 
in the Lykens valley. He learned the trade of millwright, at which he was 
profitably engaged for many years. For a fime he lived in Lancaster county, 
and afterwards built many mills in the west end of Schuylkill county, finally 
settling at Llewellyn, in Branch township, where his latter years were spent. 
He had been in the mercantile business at \'alley \'iew for a time, until 1845, 
when he removed to Llewellyn, at which place he was similarly engaged until 
1850. Then he sold out and de^•oted all his time to contracting, employing 
many men in the construction of breakers and houses. His death occurred at 
Llewellyn in 1859, and he is buried in the cemetery of Clouser's Church, in 
Branch township. Like his father, he was a Whig and a Lutheran. Mr. 
Kaufman married Sarah Boyer, daughter of Peter Boyer. who originally lived 
in Berks county. Pa., removing to Stone \'alley, Xorthumberland county, 
where he died. To this union were born the following children : John, 
deceased, was a merchant and postmaster at Wiconisco, Pa. ; Benjamin was a 
coal operator, one of the owners of the Brookside colliery, was a member of 
the State Legislature from Schuylkill county, and died at Tremont ; Elias is 
the father of Charles AL Kaufman; Sarah married Frederick Fulmer; Mary J. 
married Adam Miller; Esther married Lewis Beach; Catherine died unmar^ 
tied. ' ' i I 



SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 187 

Elias Kaufman was born May i6, 1838, at Valley View, Schuylkill county, 
learned the carpenter's trade, and in time became a boss carpenter. He was 
the pioneer at Tower City, where he settled in 1868, built the first breaker 
at the LJrookside colliery, and later became outside superintendent of that 
colliery, which was owned by Savage Brothers & Kaufman (the latter his 
brother) and later by Repplier, tjordon & Co. Mr. Kaufman continued 
with the latter company until its interests were purchased by the Philadelphia 
& Reading Coal & Iron Company, in whose employ he remained until the 
year 1885. He was one of the most competent mine men in this section, for 
three years winning a cash prize for good management at his colliery. In 
1885 he engaged in general merchandising at Tower City, where he opened 
a large, up-to-date store, which he carried on until 1912, since when it has 
been owned and conducted by his sons Frank H. and Edward H., who are 
doing business under the name of Kaufman Brothers. Elias Kaufman has 
always maintained a public-spirited interest in local affairs, especially the im- 
provement and progress of the schools. He has been a member of the school 
board, and was serving when the present fine high school building was erected 
in 1894, the other members of the board at that time being: W. F. Jones, 
president; B. F. Stuck, secretary; H. G. Lebo; W. L. Zerbe ; Jacob Searer. 

JMr. and Mrs. Elias Kaufman are the oldest residents of Tower City. He 
married Lydia Ann Haertter, who was born Sept. 25, 1839, in Jackson town- 
ship, Northumberland Co., Pa., and the following children have been bom 
to them: Jonas C, of Tower City; Charles M.; John N., deceased; Luther G., 
a merchant of Reinerton, this county; William J., of Floral Park, N. Y. ; 
Emma D., wife of Prof. David Detler, of Annville, Pa.; Lydia Ann, wife of 
Charles Boyer, of Atlanta, Ga. ; Sadie E., at home; Edward H., of the firm 
of Kaufman Brothers; Franklin H., of that firm; and three who died young. 
The family are Lutherans in religious belief. Mr. Kaufman is a Mason, 
belonging to Swatara Lodge, No. 267, F. & A. M., of Tremont. 

Charles M. Kaufman was born July 2, 1862, at Llewellyn, Schuylkill 
county, and for a few years during his early boyhood attended the public 
schools. In 1872, when but ten years old, he went to work as a slate picker 
at the Brookside colliery. In 1885 he took charge of a general store at Tower 
City. For a number of years he has been associated with big enterprises in 
his section. In 1891 he was one of the promoters of the Williams Valley 
railroad, and was one of the organizers of the company, of which he was 
elected president and general manager. On Jan. 22, 1902, the Tower City 
National Bank was organized, the original board of directors being: C. AI. 
Kaufman, president ; G. Schoffstall, vice president ; W. O. Schwalm, secre- 
tary; W. E. Kahler, cashier; original directors, W. F. Knecht ; J. I. Delaney ; 
F. J. Douden ; Isaac Mossop; W. O. Schwalm; I. A. Evans; A. Fortenbaugh, 
and Ellsworth Schwalm. Mr. Kaufman is still president of the bank, but the 
other officers have changed, Mr. Knecht being now vice president. A. D. 
Lewis is the cashier, and A. C. Schreiner, teller. The present directors are : 
Isaac Mossop. F. J. Douden, Ellsworth Schwalm, I. A. Evans, A. Forten- 
baugh, \\\ E. Kahler, C. M. Kaufman, W. F. Knecht, John Pfeiffer. Mr. 
Fortenbaugh, who is a resident of Harrisburg, Pa., is president of the Halifax 
National Bank and a director of the Harrisburg Trust Company. In 1904 
Mr. Kaufman assisted in the organization of the Williams Valley Bank, at 
Williamstown, Pa., and was the first secretary of the board. 



188 SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENNSYLVANL\ 

In 1900, ufHDn the organization of the Citizens' Water Company of Tower 
City, Mr. Kaufman was made president and is still serving in that capacity, 
and also as superintendent. In 1896 he established the Greenwood cemetery 
in Porter township, near Tower City, one of the finest burial places in Schuyl- 
kill county, which he still owns, and which is cared for in the manner typical 
of everything handled by him. Mr. Kaufman owns considerable real estate, 
timber and farming land, in the vicinity of Tower City. He is a member and 
past master of Swatara Lodge, No. 267, F. & A. AL, of Tremont, Penn- 
sylvania. 

EDGAR W. BECHTEL holds a foremost place among the practitioners 
at the Schuylkill county bar, with which the name has been long and honorably 
connected, several members of the family having distinguished themselves 
for eminent ability in the law. 

The Bechtels are of German descent, and have been settled in eastern 
Pennsylvania since Provincial days. Mr. Bechtel's great-grandfather was a 
native of Bucks county, this State. John Bechtel, the grandfather, was also 
born there, near Doylestown, Oct. 6, 1798. For a number of years he made 
his home in Berks county, this State, where he was well known as proprietor 
of the "Half-Way House" between Reading and Kutztown, and besides con- 
ducting the hotel he was a mail contractor and stage owner, transporting 
passengers and the mail between Easton and Harrisburg, by way of .-Mien- 
town and Reading, and from Reading to Pottsville. From Berks county he 
removed to Northumberland county. Pa., where he was settled for about a 
dozen years engaged in farming and hotelkeeping on what was known as 
"\\'arrior Run Farm.'' The stone tavern which stood upon that property, 
a few miles from Watsontown, was a popular stopping place in its day. 
Thence in 1847 Mr. Bechtel removed to Pottsville, Schuylkill county, and 
in 185 1 to MiddlepKjrt, same county. He became postmaster at the latter 
place and continued to hold the position during the administrations of Pierce, 
Buchanan and Johnson. Politically he was an ardent Democrat and main- 
tained an active interest in local. State and national campaigns. His death 
took place in the latter part of December, 1872. Mr. Bechtel was twice mar- 
ried, his second wife being Eliza S. Beiber, of Berks county, who was born 
in 1808, daughter of John S. Beiber, a native of Maiden-creek township, Berks 
county. Mrs. Bechtel died at Middleport in June, 1880. John Bechtel was 
the father of the following children: James B., who died in 1873, was a resi- 
dent of Reading, Pa., where he served as district attorney ; Louise became the 
wife of Samuel Young, of Reading, Pa. ; Alfred B., deceased, was a travel- 
ing salesman and clerk; Elmira, deceased, was the wife of George L. Medler, 
of Mahanoy City, Schuylkill county ; Francis W. was the father of Edgar W. 
Bechtel; Hettie became the wife of David F. Ritter, a resident of Middle- 
port, Schuylkill county ; O. P. was president judge of Schuylkill county for 
thirty years and was succeeded by his son H. O. Bechtel, the present incum- 
bent ; T. H. has been in the wholesale notions business for many years, 
belonging to the firm of Jones, Bechtel, Shibely & Company. 

Fr.ancis W. Bi'XHTEl, father of Edgar W. Bechtel, was born A])ril 11, 
1837, in Turbut township, Northumberland Co., Pa., son of John and Eliza S. 
(Beiber) Bechtel. His early education was acquired at Middlejwrt, where 



SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 189 

lie was later clerk in the post office, and during his young manhood he was 
engaged in teaching for some years, two years in Berks county, whence he 
returned to Middleport. where he taught three years. Then he became prin- 
cijuil of the schools at Schuylkill Haven, this county, continuing thus until 
1803, in which year he became freight and ticket agent for the Mine Hill & 
Schuylkill Haven Railway Company at Minersville, holding that position oite 
year. Meantime he had been appointed clerk to the county commissioners, 
and held that position four years. In the fall of 1862 he had registered as a 
law student in the office of Franklin B. Gowen, at Pottsville, where he studied 
for some time, completing his course in the office of another celebrity of that 
day, Hon. John W. Ryon. On May 18. 1868, he was aflmitted to practice 
in Schuylkill county, and in 1870 was admitted to the Supreme court of the 
State, before which body he prosecuted many cases to a successful con- 
clusion. His work took him into the courts of many counties of Pennsylvania 
besides his own, and he had a highly creditable career from the time of his 
admission to practice until his death, which occurred March 14. 1906. In 
1870 he was elected solicitor of Schuylkill county, and filled that office for 
three years, until 1874. For many years Mr. Bechtel was one of the most 
prominent Democrats in the county, serving as chairman of the county com- 
mittee, and was highly valued in its councils. During the Civil war his sym- 
pathies were with the Union, and in 1863, when southern Pennsylvania was 
invaded, he enlisted in Company B, 27th Regiment, Pennsylvania Emergency 
Corps, anil he was at Wrightsville in June of that year, when the Confeder- 
ates burned the bridge, .-\fter this engagement the regiment was sent to 
Carlisle, thence to Chambersburg, and from there to Hagerstown, IMd., being 
mustered out in the fall of 1863, after two months' service. 

On Aug. 6, 1863, Mr. Bechtel was married to Alicia Wilson, daughter 
of John ^\'ilson, and granddaughter of Alexander Campbell, founder of the 
religious sect bearing his name. They had three children, two sons and one 
daughter, namely: I\Iary A., deceased, was the wife of Philip E. Womelsorfif, 
a civil and mining engineer, of Philipsburg. Centre Co., Pa. ; Elmer F., a civil 
and mining engineer, now at Steelton, Dauphin Co., Pa., married Irene Scheu- 
man. daughter of William Scheuman, of Pottsville ; Edgar W. completes the 
family. 

Edgar W. Bechtel was bom Dec. 28, 1866, at Pottsville, where he received 
his early education in the public schools, graduating from the high school. 
Thereafter he taught for four years, one in Pine Grove and three at Mount 
Carbon, before taking up the study of law with his father. On Sept. 5, 
1892, he was admitted to the Schuylkill county bar, at which he has since 
been practicing, and during the early years of his independent practice he 
was deputy district attorney during Mr. Ryon's term and later for one term 
district attorney. He and his father had offices together in Pottsville until 
the latter's decease, and Mr. Bechtel is still established in the same quar- 
ters. He has shown the talents characteristic of the family in the legal pro- 
fession, and the nature of his clientele indicates that his personal standing 
is equal to the best in the county. 

On Nov. 28, 1894, Mr. Bechtel married Myra L. Whitehouse. daughter 
of David and Maria ( Shakespeare ") Whitehouse, natives of England, and 
sister of W. J. ^^'hitehouse. a well known attorney of Pottsville. Mr. and 
Mrs. Bechtel have had three children, born as follows : David W., Dec. 9, 
1895; -Mar)' -^•' F^b. 27, 1898; and \'irginia A., Jan. 18, 1900. 



190 SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENNSYLVANL\ 

GEORGE W. RYON is a representative of one of Pottsville's most 
honored families. He is a son of Hon. James Ryon, late a prominent lawyer, 
who served as president judge of Schuylkill county from 1862 until 1872, 
and represented the county in the State Legislature. He was also extensively 
interested in coal operations. In 1856 he was married to Charlotte A. W'oli, 
daughter of George Wolf, Lancaster county's largest iron manufacturer at 
one time, and of this union three children survived their parents, being George 
W. Ryon, Airs. Florence R. Patterson (since deceased), and John P. Ryon. 
Judge James Ryon was a brother of Hon. John W. Ryon, a prominent lawyer 
of this county. He was a native of Tioga county, and was the son of Hon. 
John and Susan (Tubbs) Ryon. His American genealogy is traceable beyond 
the French and Indian war, and he is a lineal descendant of Colonel Dorrance, 
who fell at Wyoming, while two other ancestors served On the American 
side during the Revolutionary war, one as a staff officer under Washington. 

Judge James Ryon and his brother, Hon. John W. Ryon, had their offices 
together, although not partners. Both were noted land lawyers, and when 
together were frequently engaged in important ejectment suits, both in the 
courts of Pennsylvania and in those of the United States. Just as frequently 
they were on opposite sides of a litigation, when the fight was equally interest- 
ing. Both were considered very able trial lawyers in any branch of the law. 
Judge Ryon died in 1900 from the result of an accident, while John W, Ryon 
died in 1901. 

George W. Ryon was born at Columbia, Lancaster county, on March 24, 
1862. He was educated in the Pottsville high school, and was graduated at 
Lafayette College in 1884, receiving the degree of bachelor of arts, and 
three years later that of master of arts. He was admitted to the bar of 
Schuylkill county in March, 1887, and has practiced law ever since. He early 
identified himself with the National Guard of Pennsylvania, having enlisted 
in 1887 as a private in H Company, 8th Regiment, and by various promotions 
he became lieutenant colonel and assistant commissary general on the staff of 
the commander-in-chief, Gov. Robert E. Pattison. Colonel Ryon retired 
from the service at the expiration of his term. He was married, Oct. 9, 1888, 
to Alary Bruner, a daughter of Dr. William and Jane (Woodworth) Bruner, 
of San Francisco. Four children have been born to this union, the eldest 
being James Bruner, born July 23, 1889, married to Emily Peck, of Lock 
Haven ; he is now a forester of the state, being a graduate of Mt. Alto Forest 
Academy. George Wolf, born June 18, 1892, a graduate of the agricultural 
course of Pennsylvania State College, is now engaged in that business ; he 
married Annette' Umbenhen, a daughter of Rev. J. H. L^mbenhen, of Potts- 
ville. Walter Greenland was bom July 5, 1894, and John Woodworth, born 
Sept. 20, iQOi. Mr. Ryon is a Democrat in politics and is a mem1)er of the 
First Presbyterian Church, being a member of the board of trustees. 

JOHN PERCY RYON, also a son of Hon. James Ryon, was bom at 
Pottsville, Sept. 25, 1866. He attended both Lafayette College and Lehigh 
University and was for several years connected with the engineer corps of 
the Pennsylvania and Lehigh \"alley railroads. He later resigned, entering 
the brick manufacturing business, having constructed the Auburn ^'itrified 
Brick plant, now a corporation, and later the Schuylkill Pressed Brick Corn- 
pany, both of which are in a flourishing condition. He has been active in 
street paving contracts in the East, and is a dealer in building materials of 
all kinds. In 1892 he was married to Blanche C. Silkman, of Scranton, and 



SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 191 

to this union were bom two children: John Leslie, bom Aug. 4, 1894, has been 
educated at Lawrenceville Academy and Lafayette College, where he is now a 
student, and is active in athletics; Helen was bom in 1908. Mr. Ryon is 
identified with several clubs of town, including the Pottsville club. 

FREDERICK PORTZ, Jr., belongs to a substantial German family of 
Pottsville, which has several members among the prosperous business men of 
the city. He started out on his own account as successor to C. F. Seltzer, 
carrying on the old established harness business at No. 117 East Norwegian 
street. Mr. Portz was born at Pottsville Oct. 24, 1874, son of Frederick Portz, 
Sr. His grandparents lived and died in Bavaria, Germany, the grandmother 
passing away in 1878, the grandfather in 1905. 

Frederick Portz, Sr., was born in Bavaria, Germany, Dec. 13, 1841, and 
there grew to manhood. He served in the 13th Infantry, in the war between 
Prussia and the South German States. I\Ir. Portz came to America in 1867, 
landing at New York City March 12th, after a voyage of nineteen days. For 
fourteen years he was employed at Yuengling's Brewery, Pottsville, Pa., in 
the position of foreman of the fermenting department, and in 1881 he engaged 
as a liquor dealer on his own account, at No. 122 North Centre street, where 
he has since been doing business. He has been a well known worker in the 
Democratic party for many years, and in 1892 was elected a member of the 
board of county poor directors of Schuylkill county, to fill a vacancy for one 
year. In 1903 he was reelected for a full term of three years, and in the fall 
of 1906 was a candidate, this time on the "Lincoln Party"' ticket, suffering its 
general defeat in the county. He is a member of Humane Fire Company, and 
fraternally belongs to Hayden Lodge, No. 44, I. O. O. F., of which he is a 
past grand. He and his family belong to the German Lutheran Church. On 
May 19, 1872, ]\Ir. Portz married at Pottsville Lucinda Klare. who was born 
in Pottsville in 1851, and seven children have been born to this marriage: 
Catherine E. married How'ard Manwiller and second Gustaf Zierle ; Frederick 
is mentioned below ; Emma L. married Fred Bernett, a merchant of Pottsville ; 
George A. married Martha Schwartz ; Harry K. married Hester Jones ; Edward 
and ^"alentine died within the same week. 

Henrj' Klare, father of Mrs. Frederick Portz, Sr., was born March 7, 
181 1, in Hanover, Germany, and learned the tailor's trade in his early life. 
Coming to America on a sailing vessel in 1849, he spent thirty-six days on the 
water, landed at Philadelphia, and after one day's stay in that city came to 
Pottsville, where he became employed at his trade. He continued to follow 
it throughout his active life, and died April 2, 1899, aged eighty-eight years. 
He is buried in the Odd Fellows cemetery. His wife, Catherine (Luther), 
like himself a native of Germany, accompanied him to America, and she died 
at the age of sixty-five years. They had a large family, namely: Catherine 
married Thomas Miller ; Christian W. is a resident of Pottsville ; Matilda 
married Fred Eberle, of Pottsville ; Lucinda married Frederick Portz, Sr. ; 
Henry A. is a resident of Pottsville ; William is deceased ; Charles lives at 
Pottsville; Mary is the wife of August Appelstadt, and resides at Pottsville; 
George A. is deceased ; Lewis is a resident of Philadelphia. Henry Klare's 
father served under Napoleon I, v\'as in the disastrous campaign of Moscow, 
and never returned home. 

Frederick Portz, Jr., attended public school at Pottsville, and when a youth 
of sixteen became errand boy for the firm of Bright & Company, hardware 
dealers, in their Pottsville store. As he grew familiar with the business he 



192 SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PEXXSYLVANLA 

was made clerk and he was employed by the same company for the long period 
of twenty-three years, during his last seven years with them having charge of 
the store. He withdrew from this connection when ready to enter business, 
on his own account on April 13, 1914, purchasing the stand of Charles F. 
Seltzer, whohad the oldest business of its kind in the city of Pottsville. The 
stock is large and complete, including light and heavy harness, foreign and 
domestic saddlery, equipment of all kinds in fact, for horses, stables, carriages, 
and a repair shop is also maintained. Mr. Portz also deals in trunks and bags, 
and has introduced a line of sporting goods, carrying a stock which is up to 
date in every particular and adequate for every demand of the local trade. 
He has made a promising start in the venture. 

Mr. Portz has a wide acquaintance in Schuylkill county and is well 
known in fraternal bodies, being a member of Pottsville Lodge of Elks 
(No. 207), the Independent Americans and Royal Arcanum, as well as of the 
Humane Fire Company. Politically he is a Democrat, in religious connection 
a member of the Trinity Lutheran Church. He married Clara Krebs, and 
they have three children : Frances Krebs, Marion Louise and Clara Jane. 

i 

THOMAS FAMILY. Henrv Thom.\s, son of Thomas Thomas, of ISTew- 
port, Monmouthshire, South Wales, was born in August, 1822. In 1852 his 
father emigrated to Australia, while the son came to America, locating in 
Minersville, Pa., where he followed the occupation of mining. On June 12, 
1855, he married Mary Lewis, of Minersville, Pennsylvania. 

Mary Lewis was born on a farm (the family homestead for many genera- 
tions) known as Pen-y-fan, near Abberbeeg, Monmouthshire, South Wales, on 
July 3, 1833. Pier father. Lewis Lewis, died when she was three years old. 
She continued to live at the farm with her mother, Cecilia ( Madoc) Lewis, 
and her several brothers and sisters until she was thirteen years old. In 1846 
Mary Lewis, with her mother and eldest brother, David Lewis, emigrated to 
America, landing at New York City in April. They came to Pottsville May i, 
1846, and subsequently settled in Minersville, afterwards moving to Tamaqua. 
Upon the death of her mother and brother David in 1852 she returned to 
Minersville, where she met Henry Thomas, and married him in 1855. 

On May 3, 1864, Henry Thomas moved to Mahanoy City, when it was yet 
a wilderness, taking up his residence on the site of the present Thomas home 
on East Centre street, where two of his sons still live. 

In 1871 Mr. Thomas met with an accident at the mines operated by C. B. 
Knevals & Co.. known as the Primrose colliery. The accident was so serious 
that for several months his life was despaired of. Reco\-ering from the injury 
and unable to work at the mines, he embarked in the tea and cofifee business, 
and later opened a store, selling dry goods, notions and groceries. In 1875 he 
again engaged in mining, with his son David, at Shoemaker's colliery, operated 
by Fisher. Hazard & Co. Owing to poor ventilation of the mines (prevalent 
in those days) he contracted miner's asthma, which was the cause of his death. 
Feb. 15, 1885. His health being impaired by work at the mines, he embarked 
again in business in 1878 and so continued until 1885. He was a member of 
the Welsh Congregational Church and also a member of the Ivorites — a Welsh 
organization — for a number of years. Politically he was a Republican in 
national politics, but in local politics he was independent, voting for the man 
rather than the party. He was assessor of the Fifth ward of Mahanoy City 
for several years prior to his death. His wife, Mary (Lewis) Thomas, survived 
him twenty-eight years, dying Feb. i, 1913. 





dr?^ 




SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 193 

Nine children were born to Henry and Mary (Lewis) Thomas, four of 
whom grew to maturity, as follows: David Madoc Thomas (married Rebecca 
Williams, of Providence, Pa.), Charles Thomas (1858-1886), Thomas Lewis 
Thomas (married Augusta A. Dillman, of Mahanoy City, Pa.), Johnathan 
(July 13, i8(i3-Noveniber, 1864) and Cecilia (July 13, 1863-July, 1864), John 
Thomas, infant daughter ( Alarch ii-March 14, 1869), Melanchthon (Oct. 5, 
1872-August, 1873), infant son (born and died same day, October, 1874). 

David M. Tiiom.vs, the eldest son of Henry and Mary (Lewis) Thomas, 
was born in Minersville April i, 1856. He came to Mahanoy City in May, 
1864, and attended the public scliools of that town. For a number of years he 
followed the occupation of mining, after which he embarked in the book busi- 
ness in Mahanoy City and Scranton, Pa. From igoi until 1908 he was 
employed by the International Correspondence School at Brooklyn, N. Y. At 
present, he is employed at the wholesale grocery store in Mahanoy City. 
Fraternally he belongs to Camp No. 124, P. O. S. of A., of Mahanoy City, and 
the Citizens' Band. David M. Thomas married Rebecca Williams, of Provi- 
dence, Pa., and they have had tive children: Lewis Orton Thomas, a resident 
of Philadelphia ; Mabel, wife of George G. Lewis, of Mahanoy City, Pa. ; 
Charles Allen Thomas, of Mahanoy City; Ronald Thomas (Nov. 19, 1893- 
Feb. 15, 1894) ; Mary M. Thomas, nurse in the Bellevue Hospital, New York 
City. David M. Thomas has had three grandchildren, Mary Theresa Lewis, 
Dorothy Lewis and Charles Joseph Lewis (March 28, 1915-April 10, 1915). 

Charles A. Thomas, the third child of David M. and Rebecca (Williams) 
Thomas, was born in Mahanoy City June 17, 1890. He attended the public 
schools of Scranton, Brooklyn and Mahanoy City, entered the Mercersburg 
Academy, at Mercersburg, Pa., in 1906, and graduated in 1910. Since then 
he has been employed as bookkeeper at the wholesale grocery store owned by 
T. L. Thomas. 

Ch.arles Thom.\s, the second son of Henry and Mary (Lewis) Thomas, 
was born at Minersville, Oct. 8, 1858. He came with his parents to Mahanoy 
City at the age of five years, and was educated in the public schools of that 
borough, after which he worked for a time at the mines. He learned the trade of 
painter and paper-hanger. Fraternally he was a member of General Grant 
Lodge, I. O. O. F., Camp No. 124, P. O. S. of A., and the Washington Hook 
and Ladder Company. Becoming ill with typhoid fever, he died Nov. 16, 
1886. 

Thom.\s L. Thomas, the third son of Henry and Mary (Lewis) Thomas, 
was born in the Delaware (now Duncott), near Minersville, May 11, 1861. At 
the age of three years he accompanied his parents to Mahanoy City, where he* 
has since resided. He was educated in the public schools. From 1871 until 
1876 he worked around the collieries ; the only education he received at that 
time was obtained by attending the night schools for working boys. In 1877 
he entered the high school, graduating in the class of 1880. In the fall of 1881 
he entered the Eastman Business College, graduating in January, 1882. From 
March to September, 1882, Mr. Thomas was employed by John M. Taylor 
i^- Co.. wholesale dry goods merchants, of Philadelphia. In September, 1882, 
he returned to Mahanoy City to enter the employ of David E. Focht as book- 
keeper. On Nov. I. 1890, David E. Focht was succeeded by Daniel Stull & Co., 
the new firm being composed of Daniel Stull and D. L. Van Horn, and Mr. 
Thomas remained with the firm in the same position that he filled with 
Mr. Focht. On Feb. i. iQOO. at the death of Mr. Stull, a co-partnership was 
Vol. 1—13 



194 SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 

formed, the interested principals being Mr. Van Horn and Mr. Thomas, who 
took over the entire business of Daniel Stull & Co., the firm name being changed 
to Van Hom & Thomas. On Jan. i, 191 1, Mr. Van Horn retired from the 
firm and Thomas L. Thomas became sole proprietor. He transacts a general 
wholesale grocery business, supplying the retail trade throughout a large area 
of surrounding territory, as well as in Mahanoy City. 

Fraternally Thomas L. Thomas belongs to Camp No. 124, P. O. S. of A., 
General Grant Lodge, No. 575, I. O. O. F., Mahanoy City Lodge, No. 357, 
F. & A. M., Mizpah Chapter, No. 252, R. A. M., Ivanhoe Commandery, No. 31, 
K. T., Rajah Temple of Reading, and the A. A. S. R. of Philadelphia. He is 
also a member of the board of education of Mahanoy City. Politically Mr. 
Thomas is a Republican, leaning towards Progressive principles. 

On Feb. 21, 1901, Thomas L. Thomas was united in marriage to 
Augusta A. Dillman, daughter of the late Daniel D. Dillman. a prominent 
lawyer of Schuylkill county, and his wife Isabel C. (Bowman) Dillman. Four 
children have been born to them: A daughter (born and died Nov. 24, 1901), 
Muriel Isabel Thomas, Harold Lewis Thomas (born Dec. 18, 1905-died Dec. 
28, 1905), Vivian Mary Thomas. Both little girls are regular attendants at 
the public schools. 

John Thom.-\s, the sixth child of Henry and Mary (Lewis) Thomas, was 
born at Mahanoy City March 11, 1866. He received his education in the public 
schools of that town and has since been employed in his father's store, in 
Williams' store at Gilberton, and as driver for the wholesale grocery store. 
Fraternally he is a member of Camp No. 124, P. O. S. of A. 

BOWMAN. The history of the Bowman family in America extends back 
for nearly two centuries and covers at least seven generations. Tradition 
regarded as strictly historical would add a period of several genera- 
tions more in the Fatherland. The family name was originally spelled 
"Bauman," meaning builder or architect, a spelling still preserved by the 
German cousins across the sea and by one branch of the family in America. 

The crest on the family coat of arms, in which an uprooted tree is borne 
over the right shoulder, would seem to indicate some significant relation to 
the family name. A German tradition relates that the early ancestors were 
German Swiss who emigrated to Alsace (a province ceded in 1870 to Germany, 
to which it anciently belonged), and that they finally settled in Prussia, first 
at Weisbaden on the Rhine, and subsequently at Ems, on the Lahn. The 
character and position in society of German Baumans have been ascertained 
from the trans-atlantic relatives, who represent that they were gentlemen of 
very considerable eminence ; that they were men of wealth ; that they built up 
villages and founded schools ; that they had many men in their employ to whom 
on occasion they issued letters which served as passports from province to 
province. In short, they appear to have exercised some of the rights and 
prerogatives which once belonged to the old feudal nobility, and, in fact, the 
family coat of arms is said (by heraldic authority) to denote the grade of 
earl. They owned a silver mine named Melbach, about fourteen miles south of 
Weilburg. ' 

There appear to be several branches of the family in this country, although 
the relationship is hard to trace. It is an interesting fact that from this original 
stock there have sprung in one generation four bishops in the church, in three 
different denominations, namely : the late Rev. Bishop Samuel Bowman, of the 



SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, rEXNSYLVANL\ 195 

Protestant Episcopal Church, resident of Lancaster, Pa. ; the late Rev. IHshop 
Thomas Bowman, D.D., LL.D., of the Methodist Episcopal Church, resident 
at Newark, N. J.; the late Rev. Bishop Thomas Bowman, of the Evangelical 
Church, at Lebanon ; and the Rev. Bishop Thomas Bowman, of the Evangelical 
Church, at Allentown, Pennsylvania. 

From 1727 to 1775 immigrants poured into the American colonies, due no 
doubt to the wars raging in Germany. The continual drafting of soldiers, and 
the desolation caused by the armies tramping down wheat and corn fields and 
pillaging, caused the justice-loving tillers of the soil to turn their longing eyes 
to the English colonies on this side the Atlantic. 

Hans Dieterich Bauman sailed to America in the ship "Adventurer" 
Oct. 2. 1727. His son, Capt. Henry Bauman, served in the war for American 
independence, and his grandson, Maj. Hans Dieter Bauman, served in the 
war of 1812. 

Peter Bowm.\n, the principal subject of this sketch, was the son of Maj. 
Hans Dieter Bauman and Margarethe (Newhard) Bauman. The Newhardt 
or Neihardt family had its origin in the village of Neihardt, in Odenwald, 
( iermany. In 1 140 Conrad Neihardt was an armorer, becoming so proficient 
in the art that Emperor Frederick Barbarossa elevated him to the dignity of a 
patrician and gave him a coat of arms. He settled in the province of 
Zweibruecken and was elected to the Senate. Flis descendants served in the 
Thirty Years' war. In 1737 Michael Newhardt came to America, settling on 
the frontier of Bucks county. Pa. His granddaughter, Margarethe Newhard, 
united her fortunes with the Bauman family in 1796. 

Peter Bowman's paternal grandmother was Catherine Dreisbach, whose 
grandfather, Simon Dreisbach, came to America in 1743 in the ship "Lydia," 
from Oberendrof, in Wittgenstein, along the Danube river, in Bavaria. Simon 
Dreisbach was very prominent in Colonial history in Pennsylvania. 

Peter Bowman was the eighth child of Alaj. Hans Dieter Bauman. He 
and his twin brother, Henry, were born July 10, 1814, in the old stone mansion 
built by his father in 1813 at Bowmanstown, Pa. (the mansion is still stand- 
ing). These twin boys were named for their grandfathers, Capt. Henry 
Bauman and Peter Newhard, the latter also an ardent patriot and a soldier of 
the Revolution. For three months every winter they attended the school which 
was provided by their father for the children of the district where he lived. 
The Yankee schoolmasters confused the German spelling "Bauman." and 
spelled the name Bowman ever after. Peter Bowman became a builder of 
railroads, collieries, street railroads and mine slopes, and later a prospector, 
owning extensive coal operations in Schuylkill county. He sank the second 
mine slope that was sunk in Schuylkill county, at Tamaqua, in 1848, known 
as the "Dunkirk Slope," operated by the Little Schuylkill Coal & Navigation 
Company. It was at this time, when engaged in the coal business at Tamaqua, 
that Mr. Bowman was closed in the mines for several days and his life was 
despaired of, but fortunately he was rescued in three days. In 1849 he was 
engaged in coal mining at Tuscarora and in 1858 he removed to Pottsville, 
having many collieries in that vicinity. In 1862 Peter Bowman came to 
Mahanoy City, when it was yet a wilderness, building the Bowman's colliery 
there and operating it for some years. He was also engaged in the mercantile 
business at Tamaqua in 1849. ^"^1 ^t Mahanoy City in the early sixties. 

Peter Bowman was the first treasurer of Carbon County, represented the 
legislative district of Carbon and Lehigh in the State Legislature in 1847, and 



196 SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PEXNSYLVANL\ 

was reelected in 1848. He served as tax collector of Mahanoy City in 1892, 
when he was seventy-eight years old — a vote of confidence for an old respected 
pioneer citizen of the town. Fraternally he was a member of F. & A. M. 
Lodge No. 238, of Tamaqua. He died at Mahanoy City Dec. 4, 1901, aged 
eighty-seven years, four months, twenty- four days, and is buried in the family 
plot in the German Protestant Cemetery at Mahanoy City. 

Mr. Bowman's first wife, Polly Romig or Romich, born Oct. 3, 1820, was 
the daughter of Conrad Romich, of Hanover township, Luzerne Co., Pa. Her 
parents were of the Moravian faith, their ancestors coming to the Province of 
Pennsylvania in the ship "Dragon" in 1732, from Ittlingen, Germany. She 
was a good wife and mother, remarkable for her intelligence and ambitious 
for the success of her children. She died in the prime of life, May 6, 1866. 

"And to her in holier welcome was the mystical meaning given 
Of the words of the Master, 'Of such is the kingdom of Heaven.' " 

In February, 1869, Peter Bowman married Margaret Carl, who was a good 
and faithful wife. She survived him nine months, dying Sept. 11, 1902, and is 
buried in the German Protestant Cemetery at Mahanoy City. Peter Bowman 
was a Lutheran in faith. 

Peter Bowman and his wife Polly (Romig) had eight children, five of 
whom grew to maturity. They were: Awilda (died in 1841, aged one' year), 
Isabel C, Milton M., Mark D., Robert J., Mary F., Monroe J. (died in' 1846, 
when six weeks old), and Lyinan (died in 1847, when three weeks old). 

Isabel C. Bowman married Daniel D. Dillman, a prominent lawyer of 
Schuylkill county. She was a school teacher, and is a musician and artist of 
soine ability, one of her oil paintings having been on exhibition at the New 
Orleans Exposition in 1885. She is a Chautauqua graduate of the class of 
1900 and a member of the Daughters of the Revolution at Philadelphia. 
Mr. and Mrs. Dillman have had three children: D. 'Walter Dillman, of 
Altoona, Pa.; Robert J. Dillman, who died in 1876; and Augusta A. (Mrs. T. 
L. Thomas, of Mahanoy City, Pennsylvania). 

D. Walter Dillman was educated in the Mahanoy City schools, having 
graduated from the high school in the class of 1887. He is a member of 
F. & A. M. Lodge No. 357, of Mahanoy City. He is located at Altoona, Pa., 
as a civil and mining engineer, is municipal engineer for the towns of Lilly, 
Cresson, Mount Union and Gallitzin, towns in the vicinity of Altoona, and is 
now constructing the hydraulic waterworks at Gallitzin. He was fonnerly 
with the Lehigh 'Valley engineer corps, located at Sayre, Bufifalo, Rochester 
anxl Mauch Chunk ; also with the Harbison-Walker Company, of Lock Haven. 

Augusta A. Dillman is married to Thomas L. Thomas, a wholesale grocer 
of Mahanoy City. She was born at Pottsville, but when three months old 
came with her mother to Mahanoy City, where she was graduated from the 
high school in the class of 1891. After teaching a year in her native town she 
went to the West Chester State Normal School for one year, graduating with 
honors in 1893. She then taught school for eight years in the grammar grades 
of her native town. She is a Chautauqua graduate of the class of 1898, a 
member of Liberty Bell Chapter, Daughters of the Revolution, of Philadelphia, 
and the first treasurer of the Suffragist Club at Mahanoy City. Mrs. Thomas 
has traveled quite extensively through the United States (having been in 
twenty-seven States) and Canada. Being very fond of children, she organized 
a sewing class for httle girls in 1910, which is still in existence, the children 
inakino- great progress with their needlework. She has two interesting little 



SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA ]97 

girls, Muriel Isabel and Vivian Mary Thomas. The family are Episcopalians. 

MiLTo.N! M. BowMAX (bom 1843-clied 1903) was an active, enterprising 
citizen, engaged with his father (Peter I'owman) in extensive coal operations, 
at one time mayor of Alahanoy City, and later employed at the Duquesne Steel 
Worlvs, at l)u(|iiesne, Pa., and the Edgar Thomson Steel Works, Braddock, 
Pa. He married Emma Hoffman (died 181X7), daughter of Rev. Erancis 
Hoffman, of Reading. Their one child, E. Lynn Bowman, of Cleveland. Ohio, 
is railroad editor of the Cleveland Plain Dealer. He was news editor of the 
Lorain Times-Herald from 1910 to 191 5. E. Lynn Bowman married Julia 
King, of Lorain, Ohio, and they have three children, Paul, \'irginia and Pris- 
cilla. Milton M. Bowman is buried in the Elmwood Cemetery at Lorain, Ohio. 
E. Lynn Bowman and his family are affiliated with the Congregational Church. 

M.ARK D. BowM.\N (bom 1844-died 1902) was superintendent of several 
coal operations, namely. Shoemaker's colliery at Mahanoy City, and Sandy 
Run colliery near L'pper Lehigh ; had charge of the construction of several 
collieries, and was borough engineer of Mahanoy City and Shenandoah for a 
number of years. He is buried in the German Protestant Cemetery at Mahanoy 
City, Pennsylvania. 

Robert J. Bowm.\.\ (born 1849-died 1912) was associated with his brother 
Mark D. Bowman in the engineering business, and was mayor of Mahanoy 
City for a term. He is buried in the German Protestant Cemetery at Mahanoy 
City. 

M.\RV F. Bowman married George F. Silliman and resides at Altoona. 
Her son Walter A. Silliman is a civil and mining engineer, and her daughter 
Margaret, and one granddaughter, Dorothea Silliman, constitute the family. 
They are Episcopalians. 



David Bowman was the sixth child of Hans Dieter Bauman and Margarethe 
(Newhard) Bauman. He was born May 18, 1808, in Towamensing Town- 
ship, Northampton (now Carbon) Co., Pa., and early attended the district 
schools provided by his father for the children of the district. He married 
Susan Lentz, daughter of John Lentz, of Mauch Chunk. He was engaged in 
hotelkeeping and the mercantile business at Parryville, Pa., and was also 
interested in the foundry at that place. In 1863 David Bowman came to 
Mahanoy City and entered the coal business with his brothers Jonas and Peter 
Bowman. Later he and his sons Oliver and John operated the Bowman's 
colliery. He was also engaged in the mercantile business at Mahanoy City at 
one time. David Bowman had seven children : Oliver Otis Bowman, Harriet 
(wife of James Jarard, of Mauch Chunk). John L. Bowman, Mary J. (wife of 
Dr. Phaon Hermany), Alexander Bowman, David A. Bowman, and Sallie 
(wife of Harry A. Swalm). David Bowman died Dec. 17, 1895; his wife 
Susan (Lentz) Bowman died April 27, 1898, and they are buried at Lehighton. 
They were Lutheran in religious faith. 

Oliver O. Bowman is engaged in the pottery business and the manufacture 
of porcelain ware at Trenton, N. J. He is a member of the Methodist Church, 
and a prominent citizen. He has two sons, William and Robert, and six grand- 
children, Oliver Otis Bowman, Jr., Robert Bowman, Elizabeth, Helen, Ethel 
and Eleanor. 

Harriet Bowman, born Oct. 10, 1840, married James Jarard, and was 
proprietor of the "American House" at Mauch Chunk for many years. She 



198 SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENNSYLVANLA. 

died May 8, 1905. Her only child, Oliver O. Jarard, married Mary Brown 
and has one son, D. Bowman Jarard (born Aug. 20, 1888). 

John L. Bowman was engaged in the photography business until 1872 at 
Mahanoy City. Then he was with his father in the coal business in different 
sections of Schuylkill county, finally locating at Aspen, Colo. He married 
JuHa May, of Mahanoy City, who died in 1882. His children are: Hattie 
Bowman, of Philadelphia ; Charles and John Bowman, of Aspen, Colorado. 

Mary J. Bowman married Dr. Phaon Hermany, a prominent physician of 
Mahanoy City, and has had four children : Dr. Horace D. Hermany, Robert 
K. Hermany (died in 1872), Susan L. B. Hermany (Mrs. William Dyatt) 
and Sallie B. K. Hermany. Dr. Horace D. Hermany is a graduate of Jefferson 
Medical College. He is a member of F. «& A. M. Lodge No. 357, of Mahanoy 
City, and Ivanhoe Commandery, Knights Templar, and is affiliated with the 
Methodist Church. He married Mary D. Mathias, the first president of the 
Suffragist Club of Mahanoy City. Susan Hermany married William Dyatt 
and has had two children, P. Hermany Dyatt and Margaret Dyatt (died in 
1912). 

Alexander Bowman has been married thrice, first to Lizzie Barlow, 
daughter of William Barlow, of Mahanoy City, who died in 1876. His second 
wife was Mary Radenbush, who died in 1890, the third Lizzie Marshall. He 
has had three children: Lizzie Barlow Bowman (died in 1879), Sophia Bow- 
man and Alexander Bowman (died in 1884). 

D.wiD A. BowM.\N was at one time a photographer at Mahanoy City, but 
is now engaged in the manufacturing business at Philadelphia. He married 
Isabel Henderson, of Port Carbon (died in 1904), and has three children. 
Pansy and twin boys, D. Jarard Bowman and W. Henderson Bowman. 

Sallie Bowman married Harry A. Swalm and resided for some years at 
Shenandoah and later in Philadelphia. At present they live in Mahanoy City. 
She has had two children: Estella (died in 1907) and Phaon H. Swalm, the 
latter a resident of Trenton, N. J. He married Muriel Townsend, of that city, 
on March 1 1, 1914. 



Jonas Bowman, the fifth child of Maj. Hans Dieter Bauman and Mar- 
garethe (Newhard) Bauman, was born in 1805. He was engaged in the coal 
business with his brothers Peter and David Bowman at Mahanoy City for some 
years, and then went into the millinery business. He died in 1876. On Nov. 4, 
1844, lie married Catherine Koons, and they had thirteen children: Ellen 
Bowman, a gifted musician (1846-1873) ; Lewis Wilson Bowman (1847-1848) ; 
Sallie Bowman (1849-1879); Alice Bowman (1851-1898), who married 
James Roscholar ; Emma Bowman, who married John Botz, of Wilkes-Barre ; 
Lizzie Bowman (1855-1874), who married Thomas Jackson; Jennie Bowman, 
who married Hiram Blodgett, of Delano; John Bowman; Frank and Jonas 
liowman, twins (born in 1861, in which year Jonas died) ; Howard Bowman; 
and twin daughters, Lillie ( 1 867- 1 873) and Laura Bowman (who married 
Dr. 1-:. J. Stou'dt, of Philadelphia). 

The grandchildren and great-grandchildren of Jonas Bowman are : Garrett 
Bowman (1871-1892) ; Bessie Botz ( 1884-1886) and Maude Botz (married to 
Walter Jones, of Philadelphia, and has one child), daughters of Emma Bow- 
man Botz; Lillie M. Blodgett (married Dr. John H. P.owman, of Berwick, and 
has tiiree children, Catherine, Dorothy and Jack Bowman), daughter of Jennie 
Bowman Blodgett; Katherine Bowman, daughter of Frank Bowman, of 



SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 19D 

Quakake; Lillie Bowman, daughter of John H. Bowman and hving in Phila- 
delphia; and Hilliary Bowman, daughter of Howard E. Bowman, of New 
Haven, Connecticut. 

WALTER E. i\IECK has various important connections in Schuylkill 
Haven, where he began business the year of his arrival as a manufacturer, the 
line in which he is probably best known. He has followed up the advantages 
at hand so ably for the widening of his interests and the building up of the 
industry which has received most of his attention, that he is given standing 
among the men who are looked to to maintain the activities of the borough 
which are of such vital importance to a large proportion of its residents. 

The ]\Iecks are of German origin. Jacob Meek, the great-great-grand- 
father, was a farmer in Oley township, Berks county, and Dewald Meek, the 
great-grandfather, was a farmer in Longswamp township, that county. The 
latter entered the United States service during the war of 1812, and gave up 
his life during that conflict. 

Benjamin Meek was born July 28, 1804, in Longswamp township, Berks 
coimty. When he was eight years old he lost his father in the war of 1812, 
and from that time was hired out among strangers until he was grown to 
manhood. In 1825 he was married to Elizabeth Ruth (daughter of Jacdb 
Ruth), who was born Feb. 6, 1808. in Spring township, Berks county. This 
couple resided in Spring and Lower Heidelberg townships until 1843, during 
which time he followed the trade of shoemaker, but having a longing for the 
fields he bought a farm of 175 acres in Bethel township, where he resided until 
his death, Jan. 19, 1889. His wife Elizabeth preceded him to the grave, dying 
June 15, 1885. He left an estate of $36,000 to his heirs. To Mr. and Mrs. 
Meek were born fourteen children, eleven of whom survived childhood : 
Richard and Reuben, the eldest two, died when quite young; Charles, born 
June 16, 1831, followed the store business for thirty years in Schuylkill Haven, 
and then engaged in the lumber business until his death, in the fall of 1901 ; 
Catharine married Jonathan Himmelberger, a miller and farmer of Hanover, 
and died in 1893 '< Daniel followed farming on the homestead until his death, 
in 1874 ; Rebecca married Edward Haas, a school teacher and farmer, who 
died Eeb. 21, 1900, and she now resides at Hamlin, Pa.; Elizabeth married 
Joel Strauss, a farmer, and died in 1874; Sophia passed away in childhood; 
Mary married William Werner, a farmer, and died in 1873 ; Benjamin engaged 
first in farming, later went into the store business at Mount Joy, and then 
removed to Muncy, Lycoming county, where he resided for thirty years, in 
1904 buying the old homestead, where he died in 1907; Jonathan met his 
death accidentally, being struck on the head by a piece of flying stone at the 
Miller stone quarry at Annville, in 1902 ; Franklin clerked in stores at Lebanon 
and Schuylkill Haven until reaching his majority, when failing health caused 
him to go to Colorado, and there he died April 30, 1872; James, who was in 
the insurance business at Harrisburg, died Aug. 30, 1910; Jacob R. was born 
May 4, 1859, in Bethel township. 

Jacob R. Meek received his early education in a country school and during 
1875-76 attended Palatinate College, Myerstown, Pa. His help being needed 
at home, he was called from school and assisted his father on the farm until 
1879, when he took up the store business for his life work, and has followed 
that line ever since, at the same place. In the fall of 1879, D. M. Key appointed 
Mr. Meek postmaster at Meckville, which was named in his honor, and in 



200 SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENNSYLVANLA. 

1884 he began the manufacture of cigars, which he continued until 1907, 
when other matters demanded so much of his time that he was obhged to 
abandon it. In the spring of 1891. seeing that his store room was entirely too 
small to enable him to render efficient service to his patrons, he built a three- 
story mansard building, 50 by 50 feet, on the opposite side of the street, which 
he occupied in the fall of that year. In the summer of 1902 he built a creamery 
and shirt factory, and in 1905 he bought the establishment of the Eagle Can- 
ning Company, at Fredericksburg, where he established a creamery and feed 
store in igo6. Mr. Meek is a very busy man and has been ever since his start 
in 1879, his business increasing every year, through his own efforts. Though 
he has been well occupied, ]\Ir. Meek has found time to attend the exhibitions 
of his government and of other countries. In 1876 he visited the Centennial 
at Philadelphia, in 1893 attended the World's Columbian Exposition at Chi- 
cago, in 1901 the Pan-American Exposition at Buffalo, and in 1907 the 
Louisiana Purchase Exposition at St. Louis. In politics Mr. Meek is a Demo- 
crat, and since his twenty-first year has been a stanch supporter of his party. 
In religious belief he adheres to the Reformed faith, and has been a member 
of St. Paul's Church, Hamlin, since his thirteenth year, being secretary of the 
church since 1880. Fraternally he is connected with Washington Camp No. 214, 
P. O. S. of A., which he joined Feb. 11, 1887. 

On Oct. 27, 1877, ]\Ir. Aleck was married to Hettie Esther Becker, daughter 
of Samuel Becker, and to this union there were born seven children : 
(i) Walter F. is mentioned below. (2) Cora, born in 1880, learned dress- 
making at Lebanon. She is married to Calvin A. Kline, who since i8qc} has 
clerked in his father-in-law's store. (3) Gertrude, born in 1882, married Galam 
Peiffer, and lives at home. (4) Howard, born in 1883. graduated from the 
Keystone State Normal School in the class of 1902, taught schdol for three 
years, graduated with honors from the bookkeeping department of the Eastman 
business college, Poughkeepsie, N. Y., in 1906, and from the dairy department 
of the State college in 1907, and now manages his father's creamery. In the 
spring of 1906 he married Annie Bensing. (5) Mary, born in 1885, married 
Harry Boltz, who is engaged in the bakery business at Lebanon. (6) Allan S., 
born in 1886, graduated in 1902 from public school with first honors, in 1905 
from the Keystone State Normal School with honors, and in the fall of that 
year entered the sophomore class of Franklin and Marshall College, from which 
he was graduated in the spring of 1908 with honors. During the summer of 
1908 he was a student in the divinity department of Chicago University, was 
graduated from the Eastern Theological Seminary in May, 191 1, and is now 
pastor of Bethany Reformed Church, Ephrata, Pa. (7) Mabel, born in 1891, 
is assisting her parents at home and at the same time taking a course in 
music. 

Walter F. Meek was born April 15, 1878, at Meckville. Berks county, and 
after attending the local public school and public schools at Schuylkill Haven, 
Pa., was a student at the Millersville State Normal School, in 1895-96. From 
that time until his removal to Schuylkill Haven, in 1900, he assisted his father 
in the store. That year, in company with D. D. Coldren and Milton Meek, he 
engaged in the manufacture of underwear as a member of the firm of Meek & 
Coldren, being thus associated until 1902. In that year he admitted Harry 
A. Reber, who purchased Mr. Coldren's interest, and the firm has since been 
operated under the name of ]\Ieck & Company, Milton Meek retaining an 
interest therein until 191 1, when his share was bought by ^Messrs. ]\Ieck and 



SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, TEXXSYLVANLA. 201 

Reber, who have continued to carry on the factory to the present time. They 
do a large business in the manufacture of knit underwear, their plant, which 
is 48 by 90 feet in dimensions, being modern in arrangement and equipment, 
fifty people being regularly employed. Air. Meek has become interested in 
other local enterprises, was one of the organizers of the Schuylkill Haven 
Trust Comptmy, and a member of its original board of directors, and is also 
a director of the Textile Mutual Fire Insurance Company, of Schuylkill Haven. 
He is a young man of conspicuous ability. 

On Nov. II, 1903, Mr. Aleck married Urie Klahr, daughter of Jacob and 
Amelia (Zurbe) Ivlahr, of Schuylkill Haven, and they are the parents of three 
children: Charles Jacob, Mildred E. and Dorothy Amelia. Mr. Meek is a 
prominent member of the Reformed Church, in which he holds the office of 
deacon at present, and is also a teacher in the Sunday school. 

PAXCOAST T. HOY, president and treasurer of P. T. Hoy & Sons 
Company, leading general merchants of Schuylkill Haven, is a typical member 
of a substantial family which has been settled in Schuylkill county from the 
early days. Irwin Hoy, his great-grandfather, was a pioneer resident of 
Orwigsburg, where he died in about the year 1840. He was a native of Berks 
county, but spent most of his life in Schuylkill county, obtaining a large tract 
of land in the vicinity of Orwigsburg, comprising several hundred acres, and 
with his sons another tract, of about 1,600 acres, where the city of Shenandoah 
is now located. 

Henry Hoy, grandfather of Pancoast T. Hoy, was born Feb. 10, 1798, at 
Orwigsburg, Schuylkill county, and passed all his life at that place and in 
X^orth Manheim township. He died at Orwigsburg April 14, 1859, and is 
buried there. By occupation he was a farmer, inheriting a tract of land from 
his father. He took some interest in the administration of public affairs, 
serving as poor director. He was a Republican in politics, and a member of 
the Evangelical Church, to which he belonged for many years. Henry Hoy 
was married five times, his first and second wives being sisters named Ley- 
meister. His third wife was Elizabeth Wiltrout, his fourth Elizabeth Dubbs, 
his fifth a Karchner. There was one child by the first union, and eight by the 
third, namely : Susanna married Charles Rickert ; Kate married John Swalm ; 
Elizabeth married AL D. Kline ; Alary married Henry Drine ; Sarah married 
George Body ; Reuben married Elizabeth Hammer ; Thomas is mentioned 
below; Harry married Elizabeth Albright. 

Thomas Hoy, son of Henry, was born Feb. 5, 1833, in North Alanheim 
township. He received his education at Orwigsburg, attending the common 
schools, and later for three months the Arcadian school, and was brought up 
to farming, in which industry he had interests all his life. A man of energetic 
disposition and executive ability, he was not afraid to tmdertake any ordinary 
business enterprise, and his capability was prominent in the success of every- 
thing he handled. He owned the Fairview farm at Orwigsburg, which consisted 
of about 117 acres, and was one of the finest improved farm properties in this 
part of Schuylkill county, and in addition to general farming he carried on stock 
raising, dairying and butchering there for a time. He had the distinction of 
starting the first industrial enterprise at Orwigsburg, he and his partner 
establishing the first shoe factory there in 1873. conducted under the name of 
the Orwigsburg Shoe Alanufacturing Company. Air. Hoy and his associate 
traveled over the East and visited a number of shoe factories in order to gain 



202 SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 

some knowledge of the business before starting up their own plant. The first 
move they made was to lease the old courthouse building at Orwigsburg for 
ninety-nine years, at one dollar a year. The concern was organized as a stock 
company, although this was against Mr. Hoy's wishes. He became general 
superintendent and treasurer, and it had a prosperous career under his able 
management. Eventually he sold his stock in this concern, and he was subse- 
quently engaged in the butchering business and the manufacture of phosphate 
for some time. He was also one of the moving spirits in securing the w-ater- 
works for the borough, although the idea met with great opposition at hrst. 
However, as the project was seen to be feasible, it met with more favor, and 
he was commended for his activity. Mr. Hoy acquired large property hold- 
ings. He had valuable timber and mineral lands in Lycoming county. Pa., 
and considerable property in Florida, five hundred acres, which included a 
valuable fruit farm and lots in various towns of the State; with Martin 
Sheafer and David Brown he was the joint owner of real estate in \'irginia 
containing granite quarries, and his real estate at Orwigsburg included the 
"Central Hotel" property. He organized the South Schuylkill Mutual Fire 
Insurance Company, and was its president for a number of years. Mr. Hoy's 
versatile ability gained him such confidence among his fellow citizens that 
he was chosen to the highest office in their gift, that of chief burgess, which 
he held for two terms. During his incumbency of this position he secured a 
new charter for the borough, under which a number of desirable ordinances 
were passed and made effective, and much good was accomplished in the 
repairing of streets and sidewalks and the placing of street crossings. He had 
also served as president of the town council, and as member of the school 
board for a number of years. Politically he was associated with the Repub- 
lican party, and was one of its most enthusiastic workers in his section. He 
was an Odd Fellow in social connection, belonging to Grace Lodge, No. 157, 
I. O. O. F. Mr. Hoy was indeed one of the most influential citizens of his day 
of Orwigsburg, and his death, which occurred in 1899, was considered a loss 
to the entire community. He is buried in the Lutheran cemetery at Orwigs- 
burg. 

On Sept. 3, 1854, Mr. Hoy married Sarah Faust, daughter of Daniel and 
Elizabeth (Fegley) Faust, of West Brunswick township. Schuylkill county, 
and she survives him, being now (1914) in her eightieth year. She resides 
at Orwigsburg with her daughter I\Irs. Deibert. Si.xteen children were born 
to this union, namely: Rosie married Frank W. Reed; Pancoast T. is men- 
tioned below : George W. is a resident of Waterloo, Iowa ; Annie M. married 
William A. Drayer, of Cleveland, Ohio; Sarah married J. H. Walborn, and 
is deceased ; Thomas F. died at Crystal River, Fla. ; Theodore is living at 
Schuylkill Haven; Elizabeth is the wife of Samuel D. Deibert, a merchant of 
Orwigsburg, Pa.; Celia married William Marberger and (second) Harry 
Berger, and is living at Philadelphia, Pa. ; Mary married Dr. C. R. Miller, and 
is living at Harrisburg, Pa. ; Albert died in infancy ; Katie married Lewis R. 
Shartle. and is living at Reading, Pa. ; Morris is living at GofT, Idaho ; Carrie 
married William Maxworthy, of AUentown, Pa. ; Ida died in infancy ; Edith 
died in infancy. 

Pancoast T. Hoy was born at Orwigsburg July 27, 1855, and received his 
education there in the public schools. He was reared on the homestead place, 
remaining with his parents until 1875, when he became clerk for the late 
W. D. Kline, who had a general store at Schuylkill Haven. In his employ he 



1 



SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENNSYLVANL'\ 203 

learned the details of the business, and eventually took it over on his own 
account, buying the Kline heirs out in 1894. His establishment is at No. 2 
East Main street, corner of St. John street, and in March, 1913, he purchased 
the adjoining property on Main street, 23-}i feet frontage, which will be used 
to accommodate the expanding business. This store has had a continuous 
existence of nearly forty years at Schuylkill Haven, and is housed in one of 
the finest business blocks in lower Schuylkill county, erected by Mr. Hoy in 
1894. The company was incorporated in March, 1910, with the following 
officers: Pancoast T. Hoy, president and treasurer; Lewis H. Hoy, vice presi- 
dent and manager ; Rudy ¥. Hoy, secretary. The store is known for its well 
selected and complete stock of dry goods, groceries, fancy goods, notions, 
crockery and chinaware, etc., and the length of time which many of its patrons 
have been dealing with it shows how thoroughly competent and accommodating 
the service is. It has gained its place as a leading store of the kind in Schuyl- 
kill Haven by honorable methods and sincere efforts to give the utmost satis- 
faction to all customers. ]\Ir. Hoy is also engaged in selling motor trucks 
and automobiles under the name of the P. T. Hoy Motor Sales Company. He 
and his sons are maintaining the highest reputation in business circles, and 
they are greatly esteemed by their associates in all the relations of life. 

Mr. Hoy married L. Cora Huntzinger, daughter of the late Lewis Hunt- 
zinger and his wife, Christy (Rudy). They have had four children, namely: 
Lewis H., now associated with his father as vice president and manager of 
the business, was educated at the Franklin and Marshall Academy, Lancaster, 
Pa., and is married to Esther Weiss, daughter of the late Prof. George W. 
Weiss, for many years county superintendent of the schools of Schuylkill 
county ; Rudy P., secretary of the P. T. Hoy & Sons Company, was educated 
at Gettysburg College ; Christine attended Mount Ida College, at Newton, 
Mass. : Helen is still in school. Mr. Hoy holds membership in St. Matthew's 
Lutheran Church. 

HARRY K. PORTZ, of Pottsville, has the honor of being one of the first 
set of officials chosen to administer the affairs of the government in Pottsville, 
and as city comptroller is doing his share towards putting the business of the 
municipality upon a sound basis. In private life he is engaged as a civil and 
mining engineer, following his profession in the employ of the Philadelphia & 
Reading Coal & Iron Company in Pottsville. Mr. Portz was born'at Pottsville 
Sept. 22, 1882, and he is of German extraction, his father, Frederick Portz, 
Sr., having been born in Bavaria, Germany, where the grandparents passed 
all their lives. The grandmother died in 1878, the grandfather in 1905, when 
eighty-seven years old. Their son, Valentine, died in Bavaria the same year 
as his father. Their daughter. Henrietta, continues to live at the old family 
home. 

Frederick Portz, Sr., was bom Dec. 13, 1841, in Bavaria, Germany, and 
there grew to manhood. He served in the Thirteenth Infantry in the war 
between Prussia and the South German States. Mr. Portz came to America 
in 1867, landing at New York City-March 12th, after a voyage of nineteen 
days. For fourteen years he was employed at the Yuengling Brewery in 
Pottsville. Pa., in the position of foreman of the fermenting department, and 
in 1 88 1 he engaged as a liquor dealer on his own account, at No. 122 North 
Centre street, where he has since been doing business. He has been a well 
known worker in the Democratic party for many years, and in 1892 was elected 



204 SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 

a member of the board of county poor directors of Schuylkill county, to fill a 
vacancy of one year. In 1903 he was reelected for a full term of three years, 
and m the fall of 1906 was a candidate, this time on the "Lincoln party" ticket^ 
and suffered its general defeat in the county. He is a member of Humane 
Fire Company, and fraternally belongs to Hayden Lodge, No. 44, I. O. O. F., 
of which he is a past grand. He and his family belong to the German Lutheran 
Church. On May 19, 1872, Mr. Portz married at Pottsville Lucinda Klare, 
who was born in Pottsville in 185 1, and seven children have been born to this 
marriage: Catherine E. married Howard Manwiller and (second) Gustaf 
Zierle; Frederick is a resident of Pottsville; Emma L. married Fred Bernett, 
a merchant of Pottsville; George A. married Martha Schwartz; Harry K. is 
ne.xt in the family ; Edward and Valentine died within the same week. 

Henry Klare, father of Mrs. Frederick Portz, Sr., was born March 7, 181 1, 
in Hanover, Germany, and learned the tailor's trade in his early life. Coming 
to America on a sailing vessel in 1849, he spent thirty-si.x days on the water, 
landing at Philadelphia, and after one day's stay in that city came on to 
Pottsville,. Pa., where he became employed at his trade. He continued to 
follow it throughout his active life, and died April 2, 1899, aged eighty-eight 
years. He is buried in the Odd Fellows cemetery. His wife, Catherine 
(Luther), like himself a native of Germany, accompanied him to America, 
and she died at the age of sixty-five years. They had a large family, namely : 
Catherine married Thomas Miller; Christian W. is a resident of Pottsville; 
Matilda married Fred Eberle, of Pottsville; Lucinda married Fred Portz; 
Henry A. is a resident of Pottsville ; William is deceased ; Charles lives at 
Pottsville; Mary is the wife of August Appelstadt, and resides at Pottsville; 
George A. is deceased; Lewis is a resident of Philadelphia. 

Harry K. Portz began his education in the public schools of Pottsville, 
later attended a business college in the borough, and then filled the position of 
bookkeeper for the Pottsville Ice Company, for one year. Then for two years 
he was in the employ of F. G. Clemens, as extra man, in this association gain- 
ing his first experience at civil and mining engineering. In 1904 he engaged 
with the Philadelphia & Reading Coal & Iron Company in a similar capacity, 
and for five years thereafter was detailed principally on outside work, at pres- 
ent in charge of one of the Philadelphia (Jt Reading Coal & Iron Company's col- 
lieries. He has applied himself earnestly to his profession and worked up a 
creditable reputation in that line. When the first city election took place, Nov. 
4, 1913, he was the candidate for city comptroller on the Democratic ticket, and 
won by a majority of 661 votes over his opponent, C. B. Tyson. The election 
was a significant honor for so young a man and a tribute to the merit by which 
he has advanced himself so early in his career. Mr. Portz is a member of Lodge 
No. 207, B. P. O. Elks, and of the Improved Order of Heptasophs. 

On Sept. 28. 1910, Mr. Portz married Hester Jones, daughter of William 
and Margaret Jones, of Ashland, this county, and they have two children : 
Margaret Lucinda, born March 29, 1913, and John Henry, born Dec. 20, 1914. 
They reside at No. 602 West Howard avenue. Mr. Portz is a member of the 
German Lutheran Church. 

JOSEPH O'DONNELL, of Forestville, is one of the most progressive 
business men of Schuylkill county. For about forty years he has been a very 
successful general merchant, and he is a stockholder in various banks of the 
county, being particularly well known in that connection. Mr. O'Donnell is of 



SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, rENNSYLVANL\ 2U5 

Irish birth and extraction. His father, Hugh O'Donnell, brought his family to 
this country from Ireland in the year 1850 and settled at Tamaqua, Schuylkill 
Co., Pa., where he continued to reside for many years. By occupation he was a 
shoemaker and as a tradesman was well patronized. He died at Mauch Chunk, 
Pa. To his marriage with Sallie Roaty were born children as follows : Joseph, 
John, Joachim, Gabriel, James, Alary and Veronica. 

Joseph O'Donnell was born Jan. 21, 1842, in Donegal, Ireland, and was 
a. boy. when brought to America. His education was obtained in the public 
schools at Tamaqua, and he began work there as a slate picker at the mines, 
later running an engine at the High mine, at Tamaqua, for Mr. Leban. Sub- 
sequently he was employed at the Greenwood colliery, running a breaker engine 
for a while, put in a short period of employment at Summer Hill, and then 
went to Phillipsburg, N. J., where he learned the trade of pipe molder. He 
was there about three years, on his return to Pennsylvania locating at Coplay, 
in Lehigh county, where he was employed at the furnaces about one year. His 
ne.xt move was to Janesville, Carbon county, where he ran an engine, and 
after leaving there he spent some time at Harleigh, in Luzerne county, where 
he was similarly engaged. After that he ran an engine at Philadelphia until 
the spring of 1864, on .April 4th coming to Forestville, Schuylkill county, and 
for several months thereafter running engines at the different collieries. In 
1865 he spent a short time in the oil region in Venango county, this State, 
returning, however, to Forestville, and for a number of years thereafter was 
engineer at the Phoenix colliery No. 2, holding this position until 1874. Fol- 
lowing that he was at Allentown and Hazleton, Pa., making only a brief 
stay at each of these places and returning to Forestville in 1876. During that 
year he visited the Centennial at Philadelphia, being there at the time General 
Grant formally closed the exposition. In 1876 Mr. O'Donnell engaged in the 
general mercantile business at Forestville, which he has carried on ever since. 
He carries a large stock of queensware and willow ware, besides flour, feed, 
groceries and provisions, and his store is a convenient trading center for many 
of the residents of that section of Cass township, being more quickly reached 
than the establishments in the borough of Minersville. Mr. O'Donnell has 
always been attentive to the wants of his customers, seeing that they had as 
good a selection as can be found in the vicinity and being thoroughly honorable 
about prices and his methods of dealing, facts which have not escaped the 
notice of his patrons. He laid the foundation of his fortune in his store, and 
still gives it all necessary attention, although his interests have widened con- 
siderably. He has valuable real estate holdings at Pottsville, and is a stock- 
holder in the ^^lerchants' National Bank of that borough. He was one of 
the organizers and original directors of the Schuylkill Haven Trust Company, 
and is still a member of the board of directors of that institution. He is also 
a stockholder in the First National Bank of Schuylkill Haven and in the Union 
National Bank of Minersville. 

Mr. O'Donnell is a Catholic in religious faith, and belongs to the church 
at Minersville, to which he contributes liberally. Socially he belongs to the 
Knights of Columbus. Though past threescore and ten years he still main- 
tains an active interest in business and in local affairs. A man of thrifty habits 
and honorable character, successful through his own efforts and carrying on 
business according to irreproachable standards, he commands the esteem of 
all who know him, and they are many in Schuylkill county. 

Mr. O'Donnell married Isabella Harkins, like himself a native of Ireland. 



206 SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PEXXSYLVAXL\ 

She died April 17, 1913, and is buried at Alinersville. Of the two children born 
to this union Mary died when seven years old, and the other died in infancy. 

SAMUEL KEITER, late of P*ottsville, where his widow still resides, 
was one of the substantial merchants of that borough in his day. He spent 
all his life in the same line of business. Mr. Keiter was born Dec. 22, 1847, 
in the city of Reading, Berks Co., Pa., son of Samuel Keiter and grandson of 
John Keiter. 

John Keiter was a native of Montgomery county. Pa., where he lived and 
died. He married Susan Munshower, and they became the parents of the 
following children : Amos lived and died at Spring City, Pa., his death occur- 
ring when he was ninety-nine years, six months, five days old (he was twice 
married there) ; Jacob also lived and died at Spring City, Pa.; Mary married 
George Deary ; Samuel was the father of the late Samuel Keiter, of Potts- 
ville; Elizabeth married John Royer, and died at Limerick, Pa.; John died at 
Spring City, Pa. ; and there was a daughter who lived and died in Columbia, 
Lancaster county, Pennsylvania. 

Samuel Keiter, son of John, was born near Spring City, Pa., and when a 
young man moved to Reading, where he passed the rest of his life, dying in 
that city when about twenty-eight years old. By calling he was a stonemason, 
and he became a boss on the canal in that capacity, following this work all his 
life. He married Sarah Griffith, who survived him many years, dying at 
Reading, Pa., when seventy-si.x years old, and they are buried in the Charles 
Evans cemetery. Four children were born to them: Mary, who died at the 
age of fifty-two years, was a school teacher in Reading for many years ; George, 
who married Sallie Wasley, died Feb. 28, 1913, at Bloomsburg, Pa., where 
he was well known as a prosperous miller ; Susan married Jacob L. Griffith, 
and they reside at No. 424 Benjamin street, Reading, Pa. (they have one child 
living, Elizabeth, wife of Samuel W. Wagner) ; Samuel completes the family. 
Samuel Keiter, Jr., was but twelve years old when he came to Pottsville, 
and his first employment was as clerk in the store of Mr. Morris for some 
time during his young manhood. As he acquired familiarity with the business 
he developed ability which made him a valuable employee, and he was manager 
for some time for R. C. Boone, at St. Clair, this county, in whose employ 
he continued twenty-seven years. Returning to Pottsville, he embarked in 
business in partnership with a Mr. Rishel, under the firm name of Keiter & 
Rishel, and was so engaged the remainder of his life, dying Feb. 8. 1899; he 
is buried in the Charles Baber cemetery. Throughout his residence here 
Mr. Keiter maintained an honorable place among the most respected merchants 
of the town, and he was also highly esteemed for his personal qualities. He 
was a Mason, belonging to St. Clair Lodge, F. & A. M. Mr. Keiter married 
Eleanor J. Lindenmuth, daughter of Jacob and Eleanor ( Phillips) Lindenmuth, 
and she resides at No. 1121 West Market street, Pottsville, making her home 
with her daughter, Mrs. AIoll. The family are Methodists in religious con- 
nection. Mr. and Mrs. Keiter had but one child, ]\Liry L.. now the wife of 
George R. Moll, who is a clerk in the Union Safe Deposit Bank at Pottsville. 
and also the owner of the People's Meat Market on Centre street, located in the 
Thompson building. He is a Mason, belonging to the blue lodge and chapter. 
The Molls are associated with the Methodist Episcopal Church, and :\Irs. :\Ioll 
has been especially active in Sabbath school work from her teens, having been 
a teacher in the Sunday school for the last twenty years. She has been a 



SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PEXNSYLVAXLV 207 

leading worker of the W. C. T. U. in her locaHty, having tilled the position of 
county president for the last five years, and is equally interested and active 
in other organizations important to the social well-being of the community, 
being a member of the board of managers of the PottsvilTe hospital, a member 
of the Y. M. C. A. auxiliary, and of the Civic Club. Mr. and Airs.' Moll have 
one son, Francis Keiter, born Nov. 2j, 1903. 

HARRY ALBERT REBER, of Schuylkill Haven, has already done so 
much to further the development of that borough that his career gives promise 
of unlimited usefulness. As a member of the firm of Meek & Company he 
is associated with one of the most successful manufacturing concerns of the 
place, and his elTorts in the direction of social betterment have already borne 
good fruit. His broad sympathies and alert intelligence have made him alive 
to the needs of the community in other channels, and his interest has found 
expression in the acceptance of numerous responsibilities, in all of which he 
has acquitted himself most honorably. 

George Washington Reber, father of Harry Albert Reber, was born in 
1835 in South Manheim township, Schuylkill county, and died Alarch 23, 1914, 
in Reading, Berks Co., Pa. During his young manhood he was engaged as 
a boatbuilder, later farmed for some years in South Manheim township, and 
eventually settled at Reading, where he lived retired until his death. IDuring 
the Civil war he served in the Union army as a member of Company K, 127th 
Regiment, Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, taking part in the battle of 
.Fredericksburg, and doing his duty faithfully. Though wounded he was 
able to continue with his regiment to the close of his enlistment period, and 
received an honorable discharge. He married Anetta Achenbach, who was 
born in 1836 in Wayne township, this county, and died in February, 1878. 
Ten children were bom to this couple, as follows : Leah, deceased, who was 
the wife of Albert Seigfreid; Rev. John E., a Methodist Episcopal minister, 
who was located at Port Clinton, Schuylkill county ; Elmira Jane, who died 
when fourteen years old; Catherine, the wife of John M. Brown, of Schuylkill 
Haven; George; William, Charles and Franklin, all three deceased; Lillie, 
wife of Thomas Murray ; and Harry Albert. 

Harry Albert Reber was born Nov. 27, 1874, at Schuylkill Haven, where 
he received his education in the public schools. Fie has found his life work 
at the place of his birth, and plenty of opportunity to work out his own 
ambitions as well as for the exercise of that spirit of usefulness which the 
progressive man of this generation holds necessary to a truly successful career. 
As a boy his first work was in the hosiery mills, where he remained one year, 
after which he learned the trade of painter and paper hanger, which he fol- 
lowed for a period of eight years. Then for two years he was engaged in 
railroad work, for the Philadelphia & Reading Company, in 1902 becoming 
a stockholder in the firm of Meek & Company. Since then practically all of 
his time has been given to the promotion of their business. He is one of the 
officials of the company and has been highly efficient in the expansion of its 
interests, much of the prosperity of the concern being due directly to his 
executive ability and capable management. Flis other business interests include 
connection with the Schuylkill Haven Trust Company, of which he was an 
organizer and original director. 

Though his success in business alone would entitle him to rank among the 
most desirable citizens of Schuylkill Haven, Mr. Reber has won special esteem 



208 SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 

for his unselfishness in devoting his best efforts to the improvement of local 
conditions. His sincerity in this cause has manifested itself in various ways. 
As an ardent believer in Prohibition principles he has given considerable time 
to bringing them before the public, and has taken an active part in the work 
of the party, which he served one term as chairman of the county board of 
executive officers and four terms as county treasurer; in 1904 he was a presi- 
dential elector on the Prohibition ticket of the State, and in 1912 was Prohibi- 
tion candidate for congressman. He has also been an active worker in the 
Sons of Temperance, has supported the work of the Young Men's Christian 
Association, and is a member in good standing of the Patriotic Order Sons of 
America and Modern Woodmen of America. Religious enterprises have also 
claimed their share of his attention. He is a leading member of St. John's 
Reformed Church, which he is at present serving as elder, as superintendent 
of its Sunday school and also as teacher; in 1905-06 he was president of the 
Schuylkill County Christian Endeavor Union, and 1914 became county presi- 
dent of the County Sabbath School Association. 

For several years Mr. Reber served in the National Guard of Pennsylvania, 
and on April 28, 1898, at the breaking out of the Spanish-American war, 
enlisted for service, being a private in Company F, 4th Pennsylvania Volun- 
teers, which regiment was attached to the 3d Brigade, ist Division, ist Army 
Corps. The command was sent to Porto Rico, but not called into any engage- 
ment, as the peace protocol was signed shortly after its arrival. 

On July 12, 1900, Mr. Reber married Emma Irene Fry, daughter of \'alen- 
tine and Amelia ( Liebensberger) Fry, of Schuylkill Haven, the former a 
native of Germany ; Mr. Fry came to Schuylkill Haven in boyhood and engaged 
in boating on the canal. Four children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. 
Reber: John William, Paul Valentine, June Sarah and Dawn Amelia. Mrs. 
Reber is an earnest member of the Lutheran Church. 

H. I. SILLIM.\N, editor of the Pottsville Journal, formerly the Mines' 
Journal, was born at Mahanoy Plane, Schuylkill Co., Pa., Dec. 15, 1876, and is 
a son of John H. Silliman and Hannah (Rhoads) Silliman. He is a grandson 
of John Silliman (he spelt his name Sillyman), who, with James, Thomas 
and Samuel Silliman, was am-ong the very earliest settlers of Pottsville. John 
"Sillyman" came to Pottsville in October, 18 17, with his oldest brother, 
Thomas. With Thomas he had charge of the Centre Turnpike Company, 
from Hamburg to Sunbury. The Sillimans claim to ha\e been the fifth family 
that came to Schuylkill county. 

On the maternal side, the subject of this sketch is a grandson of Andrew 
Jackson Rhoads, for many years a well known builder in Schuylkill county, 
he having located at Frackville, Gordon, Ashland and Shenandoah. The 
Rhoads genealogy stretches back to old Holland stock. 

John Silliman 2d was for many years prominently identified with the 
Philadelphia & Reading Railway Company, having been employed as train- 
master on the Shamokin division, with headquarters at ^lahanoy Plane. Sub- 
sequently he was transferred to Tamaqua, and later went South and engaged 
in contract business, not only there but also in Jamestown, New York City 
and Springfield, 111. He is now attached to the State Department of Public 
Health. At the age of sixteen years John H. Silliman, fired with a great 
patriotism, ran away and enlisted and served a three months' term. 

Tames I. Silliman, a hrotlier of Tohn H., was one of the "First Defenders," 



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SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 209 

and died soon after being discharged from a three months' service, in 1861. 
He was the first Civil war soldier buried in Pottsville, his remains resting in 
the Presbyterian cemetery. 

The subject of this sketch was etlucated in the Tamaqua public schools, 
and at the age of fifteen began his newspaper career. He was given prac- 
tical training, starting at the very bottom of the business and learning every 
detail. When he had been at the printing business about nine months he was 
made foreman of the office in which he was employed. In 1897 he started 
a small newspaper, the Tamaqua Herald, which he continued successfully up 
to the outbreak of the Spanish-American war, in 1898, when he closed his 
newspaper office and eidisted in Company B, 8th Regiment, P. V. I. Return- 
ing from the war. he associated himself with J. M. Harris, and with him 
edited the Tamaqua Evening Courier. Mr. Harris serving as editor and man- 
ager and Mr. Silliman as associate editor. He continued in this capacity until 
1909, when he became the editor and principal owner of the Pottsville Miners' 
Journal, the name of which he subsequently changed to the Pottsville Journal. 
The Journal had for many years been a morning paper, and in 19 10 it entered 
the evening field. 

Mr. Silliman is a director of the Merchants' National Bank of Pottsville, 
the Eastern Pennsylvania Light, Heat & Power Company, and the New City 
Building & Loan Association. He is a member of the Pottsville Club, which 
he has served two terms on the board of managers, and is also a member of 
the State Editorial Association, the Schuylkill County Historic Society, the 
Pottsville Rotary Club, the Pottsville Merchants' Association, the United Span- 
ish War A'eterans and the Knights of Malta. He was one of the founders of 
the State Hospital at Coal Dale, is a member of the board of trustees and 
vice president of the institution. In religion he is a Presbyterian and affiliated 
with the Second Presbyterian Church, at Pottsville. 

On May 10, 1913, Mr. Silliman was united in marriage with Miss Argenta 
Fay Jones, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. David E. Jones, of Pottsville. 

JOHN VEITH, deceased. In the course of more than thirty years' 
service with the Philadelphia & Reading Coal & Iron Company, much of the 
time as superintendent in control of the vast mining interests of that con- 
cern in Schuylkill, Northumberland and Columbia counties, the late John 
Veith became one of the most familiar figures in the coal region of this 
section of Pennsylvania. Having begun life as a miner he had a practical 
knowledge of the actual work which proved invaluable in the discharge of 
the important responsibilities of his later years. More than that, it was the 
basis of the sympathetic understanding which enabled him to handle large 
numbers of men so effectively, winning their respectful admiration by his 
thorough comprehension of their duties as well as his own. 

Mr. Veith was a native of Rhenish Bavaria, Germany, born June 3, 1832, 
son of John and Margaret (Keene) Veith. The father, born in the same 
locality in 1806, followed mining, and met with an accidental death in 1847, 
while driving a tunnel. His widow came to America and lived in Schuylkill 
county. Pa., making her home at Silvercreek, and she died at Patterson, this 
county, in the winter of 1890. We have record of five of her eight children: 
Christian, John, Peter, Valentine and ?ilani% all of whom lived in Northum- 
berland county. Pa., except Vafentine, who settled in Kansas City, Missouri. 

John ^'eith was reared and educated in Germanv, and came to this 
Vol. 1—14 



210 SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PEXXSYLVAMA 

country in his nineteenth year, landing at Xew York in 1850. After spend- 
ing about five weeks in that city he came on to Schuylkill county, Pa., Jan. 
17, 1851, and first located at Port Carbon, where he found work as a miner. 
His intelligence and fidelity brought him to the notice of his superiors, and 
in 1863 he was promoted to boss, holding that position for various companies 
during the succeeding years. In 1872 he entered the service of the Phila- 
delphia & Reading Coal & Iron Company, his first position in that employ 
being as superintendent of the North Franklin collieries, Nos. i and 2, where 
he was stationed one year. He was next in the Locustdale district, then 
comprising nine collieries, from 1874 to 1877, until called to the assistance 
of William Herman, of Pottsville. mine inspector for the county. When Mr. 
Herman died, in ]\Iarch, 1879, Mr. \'eith was appointed his successor, and 
he was known as mine inspector until 1887, in which year the title of the 
position was changed to "mining superintendent of the Philadelphia & Read- 
ing Coal & Iron Company." It required not only a wide knowledge of gen- 
eral mining work, but close familiarity with conditions in this immediate 
field, and that Mr. \'eith proved fully equal to its demands was an evidence 
of superior intelligence and executive ability of a high order. He served under 
four general managers. General Pleasants, F. B. Neiding, R. C. Luther and 
W. J. Richards, performing all his duties most satisfactorily until his retire- 
ment, during which period he received a pension. However, he did not have 
long to enjoy his leisure, his death occurring eight months after he was 
retired, Oct. 8, 1905. Mr. Veith was a faithful member of the German 
Catholic Church. His politics changed with conditions in the country. Orig- 
inally a Democrat, he subsequently adopted the principles of the Republican 
party, was again a Democrat in the Hayes-Tilden campaign, and in his later 
years supported the men and measures he considered best, regardless of party 
lines. He was a man of vigorous intellect, and his many years in a position 
of high authority gained him influential standing. 

Mr. \'eith married Anna ^laree Hartmann, who was born Nov. i, 1838, 
daughter of Peter Hartmann, a native of Rhine Prussia, who brought his 
family to America in 1848, settling first at Pottsville, Schuylkill Co., Pa., and 
later moving to Kaskawilliam, this county. Mr. Hartmann died in 1891 at 
Pottsville. Mrs. Veith's death occurred Aug. 3, 1905, shortly before her 
husband's, and they are buried in Yorkville cemetery. They were the parents 
of sixteen children, of whom we have the following record: Elizabeth, born 
Nov. 9, 1854, at Silvercreek, Schuylkill county, died Sept. 10, 1857; Susan, 
born Aug. '19, 1856, at Middleport, Schuylkill county, is the wife of Joseph 
P. Knapp, formerly of Yatesville, this county, now a well known mine super- 
intendent at Shamokin, Pa.; Mary, born Sept. 17, 1858, at Middleport, died 
May 5, 1896, was the wife of the late William T. Cooney. who was employed 
by the Philadelphia & Reading Coal & Iron Company, as private secretary: 
Peter, born May 30, 1861, at Silvercreek, is foreman for the Philadelphia & 
Reading Coal & Iron Company in the blacksmith department, at Pottsville, 
Pa. (he married Anna Hartmann) ; Margaret, born July 2, 1863, at Silver- 
creek, died in i868: Emma, born Aug. 19, 1865, at IMiddleport, is the widow 
of William H. Gibson, of Pottsville, Pa.: John, Jr., was born JNIarch 19. 1867. 
at Middleport: Catherine, born Tuly 9, 1868, at Middleport. lives at home: 
Clara, born April 26, 1870, at Middleport, lives at home: Callie, born June 
30, 1872, at Ashland, Pa., is the wife of Thomas A. Flanagan, of Pottsville, 
Pa., accountant for the Coal & Iron Company; Dr. Charles A., born Aug. 



SCHUYLKILL COUXTV, rEXXSYL\'AXL\ 211 

22, 1874. at Ashland, died Xov. 6, 1908 (he married Agnes ]. McGorman) ; 
Lena, born July 31, 1876, at Locustdale, died young; Agnes, born July 29, 
1878, at Pottsville, is the widow of Charles A. Fluehr, of Philadelphia, Pa.; 
Bertha, born March 11, 1882, at Pottsville, lives at home. 

John \'eith, Jr., attended public school in Pottsville and learned the 
machinist's trade in the Philadelphia & Reading Company's shop, continuing 
in the eniplby of that company for about thirty years. He is now living 
retired, he and his sisters occupying the homestead at Xo. 410 East Market 
street, Pottsville, where they are highly esteemed. 

EDWARD SH.\RADLX, of Schuylkill ILaven, is the manager of the 
Eagle L'nderwear Mills now conducted by the estate of Daniel Sharadin. 
The mills were established a quarter of a century ago, and the Sharadins 
have been connected with them ever since the beginning. As manufacturers 
and large employers of labor they have, during all that time, maintained a 
leading position in the industrial circles of the borough. They have kept pace 
with the progress of the business, being provided with the best of facilities, 
and having laid the operations of the factory upon a systematic basis which 
insures prompt service to their patrons and the best products in the market. 
Daniel Sharadin, father of Edward Sharadin, one of the founders of the 
business and its leading spirit until his death, in 1907, was a native of Schuyl- 
kill county and of old Berks county stock. The family has been in Pennsyl- 
vania for several generations. 

Jacob Scharadin, the grandfather of Daniel Sharadin, was born in Berks 
county. Pa., probably near Topton station on the East Penn railroad. Remov- 
ing to Schuylkill county about 1830, he settled at Pinedale, in West Brunswick 
township, and passed the remainder of his life at that location, dying in 1873. 
Throughout his active years he was engaged in farming. In political opinion 
he was originally a Whig, later joining the Republican party. His children 
were: William, Abraham, Daniel, Charles, Eliza (Mrs. Kerchner) and 
Susanna (Mrs. Moyer). 

Charles Sharadin, son of Jacob, was born in 1818 in Berks county, and 
was a boy when the family settled in Schuylkill county. He passed the 
remainder of his life near Pinedale, in West Brunswick township, and like 
his father was a lifelong farmer, owning a small tract of land, upon which 
he made his home. He served his fellow citizens for four years in the 
ofifice of township supervisor, but he did not aspire to public honors of any 
kind, being a man of modest, unassuming character. His industrious and 
useful life won him the respect of all who^knew him. He was a Republican 
in politics. Mr. Sharadin married Elizabeth Geiger, who was born in Orwigs- 
burg in 1821 and survived him a short time, dying at the age of sixty-six 
years. He died in 1885 when sixty-eight years old. They are buried at 
the old Red Church. Of the three children born to them, William lives at 
Hamburg, Berks county, where he was formerly extensively engaged in the 
manufacture of brick ; Mary Ann is the widow of David R. Fall, and resides 
in Schuylkill Haven ; and Daniel was the father of Edward Sharadin. 

Daniel Sharadin was born April 11, 1842, near Pinedale, in New Bruns- 
wick township, Schuvlkill county. He obtained a common school education 
in his home locality, and in his youth learned the trade of boatbuilder, at that 
time a profitable calling, owing to the activities on the canal. In 1866 he had 
made enough headway to engage in the canal transportation business on his 



212 SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 

own account, owning a line of boats which pHed on the Philadelphia & Schuyl- 
kill canal, between Schuylkill Haven and tidewater. To this business he gave 
his attention for over twenty years, giving it up in 1888, when he decided to 
enter the manufacturing field. In the spring of 1889, in partnership with 
Emanuel Baker, he established the knitting business which he and his estate, 
in turn, have since carried on. ISaker & Sharadin erected the present mill 
when they started business, and the association lasted until Oct. 31, 1891, 
when Air. Sharadin purchased his partner's interest and continued the Eagle 
Knitting Mills, as the factory was known, on his own account. He main- 
tained an active connection therewith until his death, which occurred luly 22, 
1907, building up the trade steadily by a high grade of work, for which the 
mills became noted. Since his decease it has been directed by the estate of 
Daniel Sharadin, and is now known as the Eagle Underwear Mills. The plant 
is a two-story frame structure, 2,2 by 80 feet in dimensions, and changes have 
been made in the equipment from time to time to meet the demands of the 
necessary increase of output, modern methods being employed in every 
department to facilitate operations and economize space. ' About fifty hands 
are regularly employed, which indicates the important relation of the business 
to the industrial situation of the borough. Though his business required close 
attention Mr. Sharadin found time for public service, for three years filling the 
office of borough auditor at Schuylkill Haven with his customary ability, and 
for years he was president of the coimcil. Politically he was assoc^iated with 
the Republican party, and his religious faith was that of the Refomied 
denomination. He is buried in the LTnion cemetery at Schuylkill Plaven. 
EXiring the Civil war he enlisted in the service for the Union cause, on Sept. 
15. 1862, joining the Pennsylvania \'olunteer service, and received his honor- 
- able discharge July 10, 1863, at the expiration of his term. ]\Ir. Sharadin's 
contribution to the business prosperity of Schuylkill Haven was one of 
material worth, and he was not only respected for his achievements in this 
world, but for his sterling character, which made his influence a power for 
good wherever he was known. 

On June 4, 1864. ]\Ir. Sharadin married Edith Catherine Wagner, and 
eleven children were born to this union, as follows : Charles, who lives in New 
York City ; Thomas, deceased, formerly a resident of New York City, later 
of Schuylkill Haven ; Henry, now of Reading, Pa., connected with the Key- 
stone Correspondence School of that city; Annie, wife of Dr. George H. 
Moore, a physician of Schuylkill H;aven, at present county coroner ; Elizabeth, 
wife of William Dress, a merchant of Schuylkill Haven : William, who now 
lives at Palo Alto, this county ; Daniel, of Jenkintown. N. J. ; Edward, men- 
tioned below ; Blaine, who is employed at the Eagle Underwear Mills ; George 
W., who died in infancy; and a daughter who died in infancy. 

Tobias Wagner, grandfather of Mrs. Sharadin, was engaged in farm- 
ing near Hamburg, Berks county, where he lived and died. His children were 
Benjamin, Jonas, George and Tobias. Of these Tobias was Mrs. Sharadin's 
father. For forty years he was engaged as a boss on the Schuylkill canal, 
in his later life removing to Landingville. Schuylkill county, where he died in 
1869. He married Marv Shirev, and they were the parents of the follow- 
ing children : Amelia married Closes Betz ; Edith Catherine married Daniel 
Sharadin: Rebecca married George Reber; Daniel is a resident of ^Mount 
Carmel. Pa. : Abbie married Amos Hoffman, and lives at Schuylkill Haven : 



i 



SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENNSYL\"ANL\ 213 

Priscilla married Frank Rchm ; Susanna married J. D. Kohdes; Alice is tlie 
wife of George M. Hoft'man. 

Edward Sharadin was born March 12, 1876. He obtained his education 
in the public schools of Schuylkill Haven, and throughout his business career 
has been connected with the knitting mills established by his father, with whom 
he began work when only a youth. He had the advantage of excellent business 
training, and since his father's death has had the management of the mills, 
which are suttering no deterioration under his direction. He is a young man 
of substantial qualities, and universally respected in the borough and wher- 
ever his business and social relations have made him known. He is a member 
of the Jr. O. U. A. M. and of the Schuylkill Fire Company. 

j\lr. Sharadin married Jan. 29, 1^98, JMary Alma Welsh, daughter of 
Joseph and Ella (Heinbach) Welsh, and they have a family of four chil- 
dren: Harold Edward, Elizabeth Catherine, Robert Irvin and ^lildred Alma. 

G. AL KEISER, of Minersville, Schuylkill county, formerly of Scranton, 
Pa., began work with the Hillside Coal & Iron Company, of Scranton, in the 
capacity of clerk. From there he became paymaster and foreman of the 
Forest City colliery. In 1904 he took charge of the Alinor colliery, whence he 
went to the Pine Hill colliery, of which he had charge for nine years. Mr. 
Keiser is also connected at present with the Emperor Coal Company, Cumbola 
Coal Company, Ellsworth Coal Mining Company and Wolf Creek Coal Com- 
pany. 

GEORGE R. DEIBERT, of Landingville, has been a lifelong resident of 
North Alanheim township, where he wa,s born on the old Deibert homestead 
Oct. 2, 1849. •'^s superintendent for over twenty years of the H. S. Albright 
& Co. shoe factory he has had intimate association with Schuylkill county's 
industrial development, the great need for which became apparent a quarter 
of a century ago. Since it was realized what the establishment of factories 
providing profitable employment for the people would do for this region local 
capitalists have entered heartily into manufacturing enterprises, with results 
which have paid them well from the financial standpoint, besides benefiting 
their section of the state. The men who have been instrumental in making 
a success of the new order of things deserve a permanent place on the records 
of progress in the county, and Mr. Deibert. is one of those whose work 
entitles them to such position. He is a worthy member of an old family 
which has beeil a credit to this region for many years. 

Richard Deibert, his great-grandfather, was the founder of this branch 
of the family in Schuylkill county. He was born in Germany, and came with 
his parents to America, the family settling in Bern township, Berks county, 
in the then Province of Pennsylvania, near Michael's church. There were 
five children, three sons and two daughters, Michael, Christopher, Wilhelm, 
Mrs. George Huntzinger and Mrs. John Gevert. When the sons were grown 
they moved to Manheim township, Schuylkill county, and married, Wilhelm 
to a daughter of John Renchler, from Bern township, Berks county, Michael 
to Elizabeth Waver. In the year 1744 the brothers Wilhelm and Michael 
bought in partnership three hundred acres of land in North Manheim town- 
ship, at the road leading from Schuylkill Haven to Landingville, Wilhelm's 
part' being at the location occupied by Edward Peale in 1884, and Michael's 
where |ohn Filbert lived at that time. The third brother, Christopher, went 



214 SCHUYLKILL COUx\TY, PENNSYLVANIA 

to \'irginia in his younger days, and the family did not hear from him after- 
wards. 

In the beginning Wilhelm and Michael Deibert had the Indians for their 
neighbors, and were molested considerably. Deer and bears were plentiful 
in the region at that day, and as they divided the meat with the savages when 
they shot any the Indians became more friendly. In the pamphlet published 
in 1884 by Daniel Deibert, a grandson of Wilhelm Deibert, we find this para- 
graph : "My grandfather said after the Indians went away, some of them 
came back again to rob them of their planting fruits. My grandfather and 
his brother Michael had to flee over the Blue mountains to their father's home. 
They buried their implements on the other side of the Schuylkill river, in the 
woods, that the Indians could not get them ; but when they came back they 
didn't find them any more. They didn't find them till the Schuylkill canal was 
made, then they dug them out again." 

Michael Deibert (according to the same pamphlet) had five sons and two 
daughters, Henry, Andrew, Alichael, Christian, John, Catharine and Elizabeth. 
Henry married Aliss Kriner; Andrew, Miss Luckenbill ; Michael, Miss Luck- 
enbill (they had no children) ; Christian, Miss Miller; Catharine, John Dewald ; 
Elizabeth, Daniel Repp. The father, Michael, died on his property in North 
Manheim township, and is buried at the Red Church in this county. 

John Deibert, son of Michael, was born in North Manheim township, and 
was a farmer by occupation. He is buried in the old cemetery at Schuylkill 
Haven. He was twice married, the maiden name of his first wife being Rench- 
ler, of his second Wagner. His children were as follows: Daniel, who lived 
in Schuylkill Haven; George; Jacob, who died at Schuylkill Haven; John, who 
died at Schuylkill Haven ; Benjamin, who died at Pottsville ; William, who 
died in the Upper Mahantongo valley in Schuylkill county ; Samuel ; Hannah, 
wife of John Hummel, of Selinsgrove, Pa. ; and Christine, who married Henry 
Shelly and lived at Pottsville. 

George Deibert, son of John and grandson of Michael, was born at the 
old homestead of his parents, and followed farming all his life, dying when 
a comparatively young man ; he is buried in the Union cemetery. He had 
many interesting experiences in the early days. His father owned a large 
tract of land where Fishbach is now located (near Pottsville), then thickly 
^wooded. When the timber was cut it was floated down the Schuylkill. One 
day, while going past what is now known as Mount Carmel, he was followed 
by a wolf, and hastened to reach the river so that the animal might lose his 
scent when he forded the stream. When somewhat older he had another 
exciting time while plowing on the homestead, on the Second mountain. A 
deer ran out and got into a pond, and Mr. Deibert, thinking he could kill it, 
went into the water after it, but the animal almost drowned him. He also 
had some adventures with panthers. 

Mr. Deibert married Amelia Susanna Reed, daughter of James Reed, and 
she survived him many years, living to the age of seventy-one. The following 
children were born to them: Charles V. B., of Schuylkill Haven : Sarah, who 
married Abraham Sharadin ; Mahlon, who died when nine years old ; Amanda, 
who married Harrison Berger; James, who died on the old homestead in North 
Manheim township ; Frank ; George R., mentioned below ; Hannah, who mar- 
ried Edward Schappell ; Elwin, living at Schuylkill Haven ; and William, who 
died when sixteen years old. 

George R. Deibert was educated in the public schools of his township, and 



I 



SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 215 

was reared a farmer, doing agricultural work until eighteen years old. For 
the next six years he was engaged as a clerk at Landingville, and then returned 
to fanning, which he followed for five years. Coming back to Landingville 
he became assistant agent of the Philadelphia & Readmg Railway Company 
at this point, in time being appointed agent, in which capacities he served for 
a period of fourteen years. In 1892 he became superintendent at Landingville 
for H. S. Albright & Co., whose shoe factory at this place is a branch of the 
Orwigsburg plant, and he has filled the position continuously since — which 
statement is the most fiattering comment upon his services which could be made. 
]\Ir. Deibert has given practically all his time to his duties at the factory, taking 
little part in outside aft'airs except for his social connections. He is a past 
master of Schuylkill Lodge, No. 138, F. & A. ^L, of Orwigsburg, and a mem- 
ber of I. O. O. F. Lodge, No. 157. Politically he is a Democrat, and in religious 
connection a Lutheran. 

Mr. Deibert married Mary A. Deibert, and of the children born to them 
two died in infancy ; William died when twenty-four years old ; George A. died 
September 26, 1913, at the age of thirty-seven years; Ella May is the wife of 
Charles G. Matz, a merchant of Landingville ; Carlton C. is agent at Kutztown, 
Berks Co., Pa., for the Philadelphia & Reading Railroad Company. 

Mrs. Deibert is a granddaughter of George Deibert, who owned the farm 
now the property of Rubens II. Peale, in North Manheim township. His wife 
Mary was a daughter of Daniel Faust. 

William Deibert, son of George and Mary (Faust) Deibert, was born on 
the homestead in North Alanheim township. Though he engaged in farming 
to some extent he was occupied principally as a builder of boats which were 
used in the Schuylkill canal trade. He died at Landingville when eighty years 
old. His wife, Henrietta (Kulp), lived to the age of eighty-nine years, and 
they are buried at Orwigsburg. They had children as follows : Rebecca, 
Henry, George, Elizabeth, Albert, Charles, Susan, and Mary A. (Mrs. George 
R. Deibert). 

SAMUEL STRAUSE has his home and business interests in the vicinity of 
Pottsville, and has lived in Schuylkill county from boyhood, but he belongs 
to Berks county stock. However, his father is a resident of this county and his 
grandfather lived here for some years. 

The name is found in various forms, being spelled Strause, Strauss and 
Strouse by different branches of the family, which is an old and honored one 
in this Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. Its members in their different genera- 
tions have been prominent in the public life of their local communities, and 
several of wider fame throughout the State and nation. Thrift seems to have 
followed the family history since its first coming to America from the Father- 
land, back in the eighteenth century, and many of its members have been men 
of wealth and influence in the financial world. 

On Sept. 26, 1732, there landed in the city of Philadelphia from W'urtem- 
berg, Germany, two brothers of the name of Strauss, Albrecht and John Philip. 
They were mere boys, the elder. Albrecht, swearing in his oath of allegiance, 
then necessary to take on landing, that he was but twenty, while John Philip 
left a record in the family Bible that he was born Sept. 13, 1713. They soon 
appeared in Berks county. Pa., where in the vicinity of what is now Bernville 
thev each took up large tracts of land, a part of the original acres still being 
held by members of the present generation. They were both Lutherans, so 



216 SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENNSYLVANL\ 

that their marriages, the births of their children, and indeed the whole Strauss 
family history, became a part of the records of the church. 

Albrecht Strauss, the elder of the brothers, took up a tract of 350 acres, 
upon which he settled, and reared a large family, eleven in all, their mother, 
whom he married in 1734, being Anna JVIargaret Zerbe, who came with her 
father, Martin Zerbe, from Schoharie, N. Y., in 1723. The children were as 
follows: (i) Maria Barbara, born Nov. 16, 1735, married June 2, 1754, John 
Kloss (now spelled Klohs), born in Brechkebel, Hanau, Germany, Dec. 6, 
1723, son of Thomas and JMargaret Kloss, with whom he came to America 
in 1738. They resided a little north of Reading, and were the parents of ten 
children, six of whom survived and left issue, viz. : Maria Elizabeth, married 
to Abraham Schneider; Maria Barbara, married to John Adam Spengler; 
Maria Christina, married to Conrad Scheop (Shepp) ; Alaria Magdalena, mar- 
ried to Philip Huyett ; Maria Catharine, married to Williani Diehm ; and 
Jacob — all leaving numerous descendants. (2) John Jacob Strauss, bom ^lay 
5, 1737, married Elizabeth Brecht, Aug. 21, 1759. They lived on a part of the 
homestead acres north of Bernville, and became the parents of nine children, 
viz. : Albrecht, who remained on the homestead ; John, who settled near Or- 
wigsburg, Schuylkill county; David; Elizabeth; Philip; Jacob; Samuel; Mich- 
ael, and Catharine. This branch also became very numerous. (3) Maria 
Elizabeth (twin of John Jacob), born May 5, 1737, married John Daniel 
Madery, May 4, 1760. So far as known three children were born to them, 
namely: Maria Eva Rosina, John Thomas and Michael. (4) Anna Elizabeth 
was born March 25, 1739. (5) John Casper, born Aug. 5, 1741, died in in- 
fancy. (6) Maria Eva Rosina, born Nov. 6, 1742, married Christopher 
Schaber, Nov. 9, 1762. The records of the old Red Church, near Orwigsburg, 
Pa., show the baptism of five of their children, viz.: JNIaria Elizabeth, March 
29, 1771 ; John, Oct. 4, 1772; John Philip, Feb. 9, 1775 ; Eva Rosina, April 4, 
1779, and Daniel, March 4, 1781. (7) Maria Catharine, born March 6, 1745, 
married John Long Nov. 9, 1762, and their son, John Jacob, was born Aug. 
7, 1763. (8) John Philip, born Jan. 4, 1748, married Sevilla, daughter of 
Benedict and Rlaria Salone Kepner, April 21, 1771. They moved to Cumber- 
land (now Juniata) county. Pa., before the Revolution, purchasing four hun- 
dred acres of land along the Juniata river, the homestead residence being at 
Mexico Station on the Pennsylvania railroad. They had eight children, viz. : 
John; Jacob, born Oct. 5, 1775, who walked out to Ohio in 1799 and settled 
in Pickaway county, and left numerous and influential descendants ; Polly ; 
Betsy ; Catharine ; David, one of whose descendants, Philip, still owns the 
ancestral homestead; Susannah, and Sidney. (9) Maria Christina was bom 
July 26, 1751. (10) Maria Susanna, bom Oct. 5. 1753, married Benjamin 
Kebner, May 24, 1774, and they also resided in the Juniata valley, near Mexico. 
(11) John Samuel is mentioned below. 

Albrecht Strauss was a prominent man of the locality during his time ; and 
his penmanship denoted that he was an educated man. He was naturalized 
by the "Supream Court" of the Province on Sept. 24, 1755, the certificate 
thereof now being in the possession of his great-great-grandson, B. Morris 
Strauss. He died a short time previous to May 7. 1787, which is the date of the 
filing of his administration papers. His wife died about the same time. 

John Philip Strauss, the younger of the emigrant brothers, took up about 
250' acres of land, including (1908) Rev. ]\Ir. Trexler's farm and the tract of 
Adam W. Strauss. On Feb. 28, 1744, he married Anna Margaret Reimer. 



SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENXSYLVANL\ 217 

He died shortly before Alay 2S, 1792 (the date of the probate of his will). 
His wife is mentioned in his will and must have been still living then. Their 
nine children were: (1) Anna i\lagdalena, born Dec. 21, 1744, married John 
George Thomas, born July i, 174b, son of John and Liarbara Long, 'i'heir 
children were: John, Anna Margaret, Maria Catharine, Christian, Maria 
Elizabeth, John Philip, Jacob, Thomas and Daniel. She died April 5, 1823; 
and he. May 20, 1823. (2) Anna Elizabeth, born Sept. 18, 1746, married 
George Daniel Gicker, Nov. 26, 1776. They had children. (3) Maria Chris- 
tina, born Fob. 20, 1749, married on June 3, 1773, Christian Zerbe, bom Dec. 
25> 1750, son of John and Catharine Zerbe. They moved to White Deer town- 
ship, Northumberland (now L'nionJ county. Pa. They had a family of eleven 
children: John George, John, Maria Catharine, Susanna, Jacob, ^laria Chris- 
tina, Henry, Mary Salome, Elizabeth, Anna Maria and Samuel. (4) Casper, 
born Jan. 27, 1751, married Elizabeth Schreck. They left issue, viz. : John 
(Dec. 2, 1780-April 7, 1876}, LudW'ig, Benjamin, Matilda, Susanna and .4nna 
Maria. (5) Maria Catharine was born Dec. 22, 1752. (6) John Philip, born 
Nov. 9, 1754, married Susanna Wenrich, Sept. 2;^, 1783. He obtained the home- 
stead and died there July 20, 1816. Their children as far as known were: 
John, Susanna, Joseph, Philip (Feb. i, 1790-May 12, 1885), Daniel, Elizabeth, 
Sybilla, Anna Margaret and Mary Magdalena. (7) John Jacob, born May 5, 
1757, married Barbara Zerbe, June 14, 1785. He died Oct. 22, 1822; his wife 
probably preceded him in death, as she is not mentioned in his will. They had 
the following children as far as known : Catharine, Barbara, Daniel, Magda- 
lena, Peter, Sarah, Adam and Susanna. (8) Christian, born June 16, 1762, 
married Catharine, daughter of Joseph Schneider. They had as far as known 
two children, Elizabeth and Catharine. (9) John Matthias, born April 16, 
1762, married (first) Magdalena Schneider, on May 25, 1790. After the death 
of his wife he married (second) Sept. 10, 1797, Frederica Gottel. He died 
March 4, 1819, and his wife survived him. 

John Samuel Strauss, youngest child of Albrecht, was born May 13, 1756. 
On Nov. 10, 1784, he married Catharine Elizabeth (born May 10, 1758), 
daughter of Balthaser and Maria Appalonia Umbenhauer, the owner of a large 
tract of land including the site of Bernville, Pa. On Aug. 5, 1784, he became 
the owner of the homestead by purchase, whereon they resided all their life. 
He, as also did his cousin, John Philip, son of Philip, served actively in the 
Revolutionary' struggle, and was an influential and useful citizen of his locality. 
He died March 25, 1835, his wife having preceded him, Dec. 16, 1821. They 
had a family of thirteen children, viz. : John, the founder of Strausstown ; 
Maria Alagdalena, married to Tobias Henne ; John l^hilip (Sept. 26, 178 — Feb. 
12, 1865) ; Samuel: Johanna, married to Samuel Greim ; John Jacob (Nov. 23, 
1788-N0V. 9, 1877) ; Elizabeth Strauss (Feb. 12, 1790-Aug. 19, 1875), mar- 
ried to Elias Redcay; Susanna; Joseph; John William (Oct. 26, 1795-Oct. 13, 
1885); Catharine; Benjamin (.^pril 30, 1800-Dec. 14, 1886); and Jonathan. 
This family was noted for longevity. 

Samuel Strause, grandfather of Samuel Strause, of Pottsville, was born 
in Bethel township, Berks county, and died in 1904, at Summit Station, 
Schuylkill county, aged eighty-four years, eighteen days. In early life he was 
a carpenter, in his later years a hotelkeeper. conducting a hotel in Berks 
county for twenty-two years, and one at Summit Station for four years. The 
latter part of his life was spent with his son Frank, who is still a business 
man of Summit Station; he is buried at the Blue Mountain Church at Strauss- 



218 SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENXSYLVANL\ 

town, Berks county. To his marriage with Susan Miller was bom a large 
family: Monroe; Adam; James; Charles; Frank, born Sept. 28, 1856, at 
Schubert, Berks county ; Mary, who married Simeon Weber, of Berks county ; 
Anna, who married Andrew Cottaman, of Myerstown, Lebanon Co., Pa.; 
Caroline (Callie), deceased, who was the wife of P. S. Kremer, of Summit 
Station; Susan, who married Charles Roeder, of Summit Station; Jane, who 
married George Krommes ; Matilda, deceased ; and Kate, deceased. 

^lonroe Strause was born in Bethel township, Berks county, and during 
his youth and early manhood followed carpenter work in Berks and Schuylkill 
counties. He is now located at Roeders, Schuylkill county, which is near 
Summit Station, and operates a gristmill, being one of the successful business 
men of his section. He married Hettie Emerick, who died in 1910, and is 
buried at the Summit Hill Church. She was a member of the Lutheran 
Church, to which Mr. Strause also belongs. They had four children: Katie, 
Wilson, Samuel and Robert. 

Samuel Strause, son of ^Monroe, was born Oct. 8, 1866, near Strausstown, in 
Bethel township, Berks county, and attended school in his native county and 
later in Schuylkill county. Reared on the farm, he followed agricultural work 
until about twenty-three years old, when he engaged in the hotel business in 
North Manheim township, Schuylkill county, conducting the "Fairview Hotel" 
for four years. After that he became interested as a dealer in implements at the 
same location, and he has continued that business to the present. In igoo he 
started there also what is now his principal line, the manufacture of all kinds of 
lumber, mining timber, ties and laggings, having a portable mil! and cut- 
ting timber in Schuylkill county, Berks and Chester counties. He has estab- 
lished a large trade for his product in the hard coal region, employing twenty- 
five to thirty men. Mr. Strause has acquired valuable property in the course of 
his energetic career, owning two fine farms in Schuylkill county, one of 167 
acres in Wayne township and another of 127 acres in North ^lanheim town- 
ship, the latter being the old Weissinger homestead, where he makes his home. 
He has his office in the Morris building (Room 11), in Pottsville. He is a 
public-sj)irited citizen, an independent voter who gives his support to good 
men and measures regardless of their political sponsors. Socially he is an Odd 
Fellow and Mason, in the latter connection holding membership in Cressona 
Lodge, No. 426, F. & A. M. 

Mr. Strause married Mary Ida Stoyer, daughter of Samuel F. Stoyer, and 
three children have been born to them, Amos, Emily and Anna. The family 
are Lutherans. 

Samuel Stoyer, of Greenwich township, Berks county, grandfather of Mrs. 
Strause, married Catherine Focht, of Windsor township, that county, and to 
this union there were born children as follows: Samuel F. is mentioned be- 
low ; Benneville married Catherine Raubenhold ; Daniel married z\nna Miller : 
Elizabeth married Jacob Kepner ; Hannah married William Kepner ; Catherine 
married John Billman ; Sallie married William Deisher. 

Samuel F. Stoyer, son of Samuel and now of Bethel township, where he 
has been a farmer for thirty-five years, was born and reared in Hamburg. 
He married Catherine Weidner, daughter of Jonathan Weidner, and to them 
were born twelve children : Henry married Catherine Dunkel ; Susan married 
Andrew Schmeltzer; Franklin married Mary Schreck ; Sarah married John 
Peififer- Charles married Clara Moore: Caroline married Warren F. Khne ; 
Amanda married George Snyder ; Mary Ida married Samuel Strause : Anna 



SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENNSYLVANLV 219 

married Charles Strause ; Samuel married Clara Rcsh ; Joel married Mame 
Reber; John died in infancy. 

W'lLLLAM M. WAGNER, of Orwigsburg, formerly a leading merchant of 
that borough but now retired from that line and devoting his time principally 
to financial interests, is a typical representative of a family whose substantial 
qualities have not only won them prosperity but contributed to the well-being 
of the community. Its connection with the history of Luzerne county dates 
back to the early days, when Christopher Wagner, the great-grandfather of 
William J\I. Wagner, came to this country from Germany. He was an early 
settler in what is now West IJrunswick township, where he acquired the own- 
ership of a large tract of land and followed farming. During the latter years 
of his life he removed to Orwigsburg, where he spent the remainder of his 
days; he is buried there. We have record of four of his children: William; 
Benjamin; Polly, wife of Benjamin Neff; and Rebecca, Mrs. Hoffman. There 
were several others who removed from Schuylkill county. 

William Wagner, son of Christopher, was born on the farm in West 
Brunswick township, Schuylkill county, and in the course of time took over 
that property, where he followed agricultural pursuits all his life. He died 
there at the age of fifty years, and is buried at Orwigsburg. His wife, Eliza- 
beth (Neft'), who was born at Kutztown, Berks Co., Pa., died at the age of 
sixty-five years. They were the parents of the following children : Franklin 
W. ; William P.; Levi N.; Morgan, who died young; Martha, who died young; 
Martha (2), wife of J. Henry Diefenderfer; Joanna, wife of Beneville 
Kimmel ; and Mctoria, who never married. The only survivor of this family is 
Martha, who is now a widow and resides at Auburn, Schuylkill county. 

Franklin W. Wagner was a native of West Brunswick township, and 
passed his boyhood in the usual manner of farmer's sons. When a young man 
he started to clerk for Mr. Huntzinger and after acquiring some experience 
engaged in the mercantile business on his own account at Orwigsburg, doing 
a successful business for twelve years, until succeeded by his son, William, in 
the ownership. After that he continued to assist about the store for twelve years 
longer. At present this old established business is being carried on by the 
firm of Wagner & Linder — the former George T. Wagner, son of Franklin 
W., the latter his brother-in-law, George R. Linder. The store is still main- 
tained as one of the leading mercantile establishments of the town. 

Mr. Wagner married Jemima Matz, daughter of William Matz, and five 
children were born to this union: Benjamin, Frank, William M., George T. 
and Kate (Mrs. George R. Linder). The father died March 25, 1910, the 
mother Feb. 19, 19 12, and they are buried in the Evangelical cemetery at 
Orwigsburg. 

William M. Wagner was born Feb. i, 1853, at Orwigsburg, where he 
obtained his education in the public schools. In his youth he assisted his father 
in the store as a clerk and eventually succeeded him in the business, taking in 
as a partner C. W. Diefenderfer, under the firm name of Wagner & Diefender- 
fer. After they had carried on the business successfully for twelve years Mr. 
Wagner bought ]\Ir. Diefenderfer's interest and took in as a partner his brother 
George, under the firm style of Wagner & Brother. They continued together 
as such until 1900, when William M. Wagner sold his share to his brother- 
in-law, George R. Linder, one of the present owners. William M. Wagner 
withdrew to give his attention to other interests. For a number of years Mr. 



220 SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENNSYLVANLA 

Wagner has been prominent in banking circles in the county. For the last 
fifteen years he has been one of the directors of the well known Miners' 
National Bank of Pottsville, a leading financial institution of that place, and 
he was one of the organizers of the Schuylkill Haven Trust Company, and a 
member of its original board of directors; he is still serving in that capacity. 
J\lr. Wagner's activities in these associations have made him one of the lead- 
ing figures in the financial situation in southern Schuylkill county, and he 
has been highly successful in the management of all enterprises with which he 
has been connected, whether of a distinctly personal nature or otherwise. 
His absolute reliability has commended him to the confidence of his associates 
in all affairs. 

Mr. Wagner married Emma R. Reed, daughter of Elijah B. Reed, of 
Schuylkill Haven, and the only child of this union, Harvey E., died at the age 
of twenty years. ;\Ir. and Mrs. Wagner are associated with the Reformed 
Church. 

Mrs. Jemima Wagner's grandfather was born in Berks countv. Pa. ( which 
at that time included Schuylkill county), and passed all his life there engaged 
in farming. Politically he was a Jeffersonian Democrat. His children were : 
Joseph: Daniel John; William; Gabriel; Susan, Airs. Moyer ; Mary, Mrs. 
Schellenberger ; and another daughter who first married Henry Ranch, at 
one time sheriff of Schuylkill county, and for her second hyisband Eli Hammer 

William Matz, father of Mrs. Wagner, was born Nov. ii, 1801, on the 
old homestead in West Brunswick township, then a part of Berks county. 
While he remained there he was engaged in farming, but when he removed 
thence to Pottsville, in 1848, he changed his vocation, having purchased the 
"Merchants' Hotel" (then known as the "White Horse"), which he carried on 
for a number of years. He became very prominent in public affairs, and in 
October, 1855, was elected sheriff, serving a three years' term. Politically 
he was associated with the Democratic party, with which the Matzes have 
long been prominently identified. His death occurred in July, 1865. He was 
a member of the German Reformed Church. By his marriage to Catherine 
Kerechner he had the following children : George W. ; Thomas H. : Daniel ; 
William J.; Jemima (Mrs. Wagner); Amelia, Mrs. Drumheller ; Mary E. 
Matz; Susan, Airs. Shellenberger ; Louis Wolf; Emma V., Mrs. Wieder; and 
one that died in infancy. Of this family William J. Matz served as deputy 
sheriff during his father's term as sheriff, was later prothonotary and sheriff 
of the county, and high in the councils of the Democratic party in this State. 

WILLIAM T. HAMILTON, of Pottsville, is leading a life of enjoyable 
leisure after a vigorous career. Those bearing the name of Hamilton have 
proved their worth in three generations of honorable connection with business 
affairs and the maintenance of desirable social conditions in Schuylkill county. 
The familv is of Scotch origin, the grandfather of William T. Hamilton having 
been a native of Scotland, whence he removed to the North of Ireland. He 
died in the latter country. 

Edward Hamilton, father of William T. Hamilton, was born and reared 
in the North of Ireland. When a young man he came to America, settling at 
Mount Carbon, Schuylkill Co., Pa., and for a number of years made his living 
on the canal, owning boats and following boating. Later he was engaged in 
the manufacture of powder near Tamaqua, this county, and subsequently 
carried on the ice business at IJottsville, before his retirement. He cleared a 



SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, TEXXSYLVAXLV 221 

tract of land in North Manheim township, above the borough of Mount 
Carbon, put up all the buildings on that place, and lived there until his death, 
in 1884. This property is now owned by a Mr. Edwin. Edward Llamilton 
married Jane Adams, who was born near Schuylkill Maven, and children as 
follows were born to this union: Isabella, who is deceased; John, deceased; 
William T. : ^lary ; Robert: Susanna, deceased; Edwaril, deceased; James B., 
and George. 

William T. Hamilton was born Oct. 3, 1844, at Mount Carbon, and had 
such advantages as the local schools of North Manheim township afforded. 
When a boy he was employed driving mules on the towpath during the summer 
season, continuing his studies in the winter time, and he feels especially 
grateful to two of his instructors. Miss Mary Ann Walker and Miss Sarah 
Ashley, whose memories he holds in respectful affection. They taught near 
where the first Tumbling Run dam is now located, in North Manheim town- 
ship, and were women of tine characters, who exercised a good influence over 
the many pupils who came under their care. After driving for a time Mr. 
Hamilton became employed as captain on one of his father's canal boats, 
being so engaged until the summer of 186 1. At that time the boat was char- 
tered by the government, and his father sent him South with it and he remained 
in charge of the commissary department while the boat was engaged in carry- 
ing provisions from Baltimore and \\'ashington to Norfolk, Newport News, 
Aqua Creek, Belleplaine, and to City Point, on the James river. lie was so 
engaged until the fall of 1864. when he returned home, and he continued 
boating on the Schuylkill canal until the fall of 1868, at which time he built 
a large river boat which he used in trading between Baltimore and New York 
City, up the Hudson to Troy, N. Y., east to New Haven and Hartford, Conn., 
up the Connecticut river, and down to the coast of South Carolina. In 1873 
he sold this vessel and returned to Pottsville, where he embarked in the ice 
business with his brother Robert, under the firm name of Hamilton Brothers. 
They took the business established by their father and carried it on until 
1884, and then sold it out, William T. Hamilton then buying the old home- 
stead place at Mount Carbon, in North Manheim township, where he lived until 
i8go. That year he sold the old homestead to Manassa Mi.chael, and then 
moved to Pottsville, where he put up a fine three-story building, for business 
and residence purposes, and began a general store. He carried this on until 
1898, when he turned the business over to his eldest son, Robert, who is still 
conducting it. Mr. Hamilton has since given his time to the management of 
his private affairs. He takes considerable interest in local politics, and is a 
member of the Schuylkill County Historical Society, of the Men's Club of 
the Episcopal Church^ and of the Central Republican Club of Pottsville. 

Air. Hamilton married Catherine Bell, daughter of Henry A. Bell, who 
was a boatman on the canal and a resident of Mount Carbon. Six children 
have been born to this marriage, namely : Robert, now a merchant at Potts- 
ville ; Henry H., of Philadelphia: William, deceased; a son that died in 
infancy; W'ilHam (2), a contracting engineer with headquarters at New York 
City; and Florence V., who lives at home. Mr. Llamilton and his family are 
members of the Episcopal Church. 

Mrs. Jane (Adams) Hamilton, mother of William T. Hamilton, was a 
daughter of John Adams, who came from the North of Ireland and settled 
in this section of Pennsylvania. He was one of the first lock tenders of the 
Schuvlkill canal, being stationed at Werners locks, above Schuylkill Haven. 



222 SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 

Later he settleil on a farm in North Manheim township, near the present 
location of the county home, and there spent the rest of his days. This farm 
was purchased by his son Robert, who bought it for his father. John Adams 
is buried in the Union cemetery at Schuylkill Haven. He and his wife had 
the following children; Robert, Plamilton, Esther (Mrs. Thomas Lynch), 
Rosanna (Mrs. Thomas Quinn), Jane (Mrs. Edward Hamilton), Ellen (who 
married Richard Dooley, and second Matthew Gibson), and Nancy, Mar- 
garet and Mary (all of whom died unmarried). 

Robert Adams, son of John, was one of the pioneer coal operators in the 
Schuylkill fields, working what was known as the Greenberry colliery. His 
brother Hamilton was his superintendent and general manager. 

HARRY H. KOERPER, of Auburn, made a high reputation as an edu- 
cator in that borough before he entered its business life. He is well qualified 
for its responsibilities and in his present capacity, as cashier of the First 
National Bank of Auburn, is gaining a solid place among the most respected 
business men of Schuylkill county. 

John Koerper, father of Harry H. Koerper, was a native of Gemiany. 
Coming to America in 1849 he settled at Tremont, Schuylkill Co., Pa., where 
he followed mining for several years, afterwards engaging in the hotel business, 
which he carried on for a long time. He died at Tremont in 1899 and is 
buried there. His widow, Margaret (Sunday), like himself a native of Ger- 
many, now lives on the old homestead at that place. They were the parents 
of ten children: George, John, Frank, Edward, Harry H., Elizabeth, ^linnie, 
Caroline, Mary and Annie. 

Harry H. Koerper was born Feb. 13, 1875, at Tremont, Schuylkill county, 
and began his education in the public schools there. Subsequently he took a 
course at the Millersville State Normal School, from which institution he was 
graduated in 1895, ^nd ^o^ two years thereafter taught school at East Pros- 
pect, York county, this State. His next experience w-as at Tremont, where he 
taught for six years, and he also taught four years at LTrsinus Academy 
while taking his course at Ursinus College, from which he was graduated in 
1907. The same year he became principal of the Auburn schools, holding 
that position for six years, and then for a year was principal at Frackville, 
this county. In February, 1914, he was elected cashier of the First National 
Bank of Auburn, in which responsibility he has acquitted himself very 
creditably. Mr. Koerper is an efficient and interested worker in local activities. 
He is a member of the Royal Arcanum, and of the Reformed Church, and for 
fourteen years has served as Sunday school superintendent at Tremont and 
Auburn. His obliging nature and sincere desire to be a helpful influence 
wherever he is located have made him respected as well as popular. 

Mr. Koerper married Maud Faust, daughter of Andrew and Sarah Faust, 
and they have two children, Sarah and Harry. 

ELIJAH EMERICH is one of the most honored as he is one of the oldest 
residents of Schuylkill Haven, where he is now living in retirement. In the 
fourscore years of his life he has not only witnessed most of the important 
changes which have taken place in this region, but has had a part in many 
of them, in his early manhood having followed the calling of boatman on the 
Schuylkill canal, and in the latter part of his active business career the manu- 
facture of underwear — the earliest and latest industries which have played a 



SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENNSYLVANL\ 223 

leading part in the welfare of the borough. For some time ^Ir. Emerich held 
the position of steward at the Schuylkill county almshouse, administering the 
duties of that office most efficiently. 

John Emerich, the grandfather of Elijah Emerich, was a native of Switzer- 
land, and came to this country in 1795. Lie first made a location in the Tulpe- 
hocken valley, in Berks county, i'a., after a few years' residence there removing 
to Schuylkill county, in the year 1801. Here he made a settlement in North 
Manheim township, purchasing a large farm which he cultivated until his 
death. There was an Indian camp upon this property, and he had many expe- 
riences with the Indians. Among other old residents of the vicinity who 
located here at the time of Mr. Emerich's settlement were Godfried Boyer, 
who was killed by the Indians ; Samuel Baber ; Andreas Straus, and the 
Deiberts. Air. Emerich was a member of the Lutheran Church. 

John Emerich, son of John, above, was born in 1791, in Germany, and 
was a child when his parents immigrated to America. He lived and died in 
North ]\Ianheim township, Schuylkill county, where he owned a farm of 190 
acres. His death occurred in 1862. One of the first members of the Evangeli- 
cal Methodist Episcopal Church in his locality, he was quite prominent in its 
work, serving ver}' acceptably as a trustee for a number of years. Politically 
he was a Democrat. By his marriage to Mary Emrod he had a family of 
eleven children, six sons and five daughters; we have mention of Frank, 
Philip, George, Elijah, Charles, Polly, Caroline, Louisa, Elizabeth and 
Catherine. 

Elijah Emerich was born Jan. 15, 1834, in North Manheim township, 
son of John and Mary (Emrod) Emerich. He received a common school 
education, attending in the building which formerly stood on what is now the 
Schuylkill county poor farm, and when a young man commenced boating on 
the Philadelphia and Schuylkill canal, for fifteen years owning and operating 
boats. For eighteen years, from 1870, he was in the livery business at Schuyl- 
kill Haven, and then engaged in the manufacture of hosiery there, afterwards 
making a change, to the production of underwear. He built up quite a large 
trade, employing over twenty hands, continuing in active business pursuits 
until igoS, since when he has been living retired, except for the management 
of his property. He has built seven houses in the town, which he rents. 

Mr. Emerich was elected steward of the county almshouse April i, 1892, 
and during his incumbency of that important position discharged its duties 
most faithfully. The details of the management of the institution, and of the 
farm of three hundred acres operated in connection therewith, call for the 
exercise of executive qualities, the work of the steward including supervision 
of repairs on buildings, fences, etc., and the proper maintenance of all the 
property as well as the care of the inmates, of which there were 436 during 
the winter of 1892-93. While he was in charge of the institution he made a 
creditable reputation by the excellent condition in which tlie grounds and 
buildings were kept, their cleanliness resulting in wholesome improvement of 
the health of the occupants and the excellent system making for economy and 
efficiency combined. 

Though he has always been a Democrat in politics ]\Ir. Emerich was a 
Llnion sympathizer during the Civil war, and enlisted twice for the defense 
of the State. In 1862 he became a member of Company I, 39th Regiment, 
Pennsylvania \'olunteer Infantry, and served out the term. In 1863 he 
served as a member of Company C, 90th Regiment, Pennsylvania Volunteers, 



224 SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 

for sixty days. He was witli his command at the battle of Antietam in Sep- 
tember, 1862, and was near Gettysburg at the time of the battle, July 1-3, 1863. 
Mr. Emerich married Sarah Ann Raudenbush, who was born at Schuylkill 
Haven, daughter of Daniel Raudenbush, of that place, the father a native 
of Orwigsburg, this county. They have had one daughter, Angela, who is 
now^ the wife of Jeremiah Charles Lautenbacher, an underwear manufacturer 
of Schuylkill Haven. Mr. and Mrs. Emerich are members of the Evangelical 
Methodist Episcopal Church, to which he has belonged for many years, and 
he has been one of its leading workers, having served as president of the 
board of trustees. 

WILLIAM WILHELM, of Pottsville, has been a member taf the Schuyl- 
kill county bar for over thirty years, and besides achieving success in his 
profession has been a highly influential worker in political circles. At present 
he is State chairman of the Progressive Leagues of Pennsylvania, and refer- 
ence to the recital of the movements he has advocated most heartily shows 
clearly that he is animated by the same unselfish spirit of patriotism which 
made his father an ardent antislavery man in the days before the Civil war. 
His vigorous intellect, high ideals and sincere desire to aid true progress 
have made him a leader of the best thought in his community, his own high 
example inspiring others to active effort. 

Mr. W'ilhelm is a native of Pennsylvania, born Sept. 6, 1855, at Greencastle, 
Franklin county, son of John Wilhelm and grandson of John Wilhelm. The 
grandfather was born in Bucks county. Pa., and removed to the Cumberland 
valley prior to the Revolution, passing the remainder of his life in Franklin 
county. He lived to the age of ninety-three years, dying in 1862. His life 
work was farming. 

John Wilhelm, father of William Wilhelm, was born Feb. 14, 1824, in 
Franklin county, and became one of its most prominent citizens Though he 
followed farming all his life, he was also actively interested in business, being 
president of the Turnpike Company of Franklin county and the first banker 
at Greencastle, where he was prominent in the organization of the First 
National Bank. As previously mentioned, he was an ardent abolitionist, and 
Franklin county being on the Maryland line he had considerable experience 
in the various phases of the slavery question. John Brown and his patriotic 
followers on the way to Harper's Ferry spent one night on the Wilhelm fann. 
Mr. Wilhelm was working for the slaves in what was known as the "Under- 
ground Railroad." , He married ]\Iary Dieffenderfer, who was born in 1832, 
at Winchester, \'a., daughter of William Dieffenderfer and member of an old 
Pennsylvania family, having been a direct descendant of one of the two 
Dieffenderfer brothers who settled at New Holland, Lancaster Co., Pa. 
Christian Diller, who settled in Lancaster county in 1717, is one of Mrs. 
Wilhelm's ancestors on the maternal side. Seven children were born to John 
and Mar}' Wilhelm, viz. : William ; Giarles E., who was a business man of 
Pottsville, member of the firm of Wilhelm & Kennedy, house furnishers : 
Gsorgia, Mrs. Houseworth, deceased (her husband was a druggist at Arbuckle, 
Cal. ) ; MacHenry Holliday, an attorney, who settled at Ashland, Schuylkill 
county, now judge of the Orphans' court of that county; Minnie, who died 
when five years old ; Sue D., who married Harvey Spessard, formerly agent of 
the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad Company, now secretary of the Wolf Manu- 
facturing Company, at Chambersburg, Pa. ; and Virginia D., unmarried. 



SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENXSYLVANL\ 225 

William Wilhelm grew up at Greencastlc and began his education in the 
public schools there. Later he attended the Millersville State Normal School, 
graduating in 1874. For two years he taught school, part of the time at Safe 
Harbor, Lancaster county, the rest at Millersville Normal, where at the 
same time he was studying to make his scientific degree. Then for three years 
he continued in educational work as principal of the school at Tremont, Schuyl- 
kill county, after which he began the study of law. After his admission to the 
Schuylkill county bar, in May, 1881, he opened an office at Pottsville, where 
he has since been in practice, and how highly esteemed may be judged by the 
quality of work intrusted to him, and the class of patrons which have sought 
his services. His specialty is practice in the Supreme and Superior courts, in 
which he has been eminently successful. He has served a term as deputy 
district attorney, taking office in 1885 and holding that position until 1887. 
He had the honor of being nominated for judge of Schuylkill county on the 
Greenback ticket in 1887, at the same time receiving the indorsement of the 
Republican party. 

In 1892 the commissioners of Schuylkill county appointed him to the 
formidable task of equalizing the value of all the coal lands in the county, 
and he increased the valuation one hundred per cent. So ably was this 
service performed that in 1895 he was invited to a similar undertaking in 
Carbon county, which employed him for the purpose. There the assessment 
value was increased two hundred per cent. The justice of the revaluation 
is apparent in that his findings in Schuylkill county have stood to the present, 
and the change was accomplished there without a single legal contest. 

Mr. Wilhelm has had the courage of his convictions in his political asso- 
ciations. When he first came to Schuylkill county, in 1876, the year he 
attained his majority, he supported the Republican party, changed his alle- 
giance to the Greenback party in 1877, and for the next ten years, from 1878 
to 1887, was one of its active campaign workers. In 1888 he again ranged 
himself with the Republican party, whose principles on the subject of tariff 
met his approval, and his allegiance was given thereto until 1910. In that 
year he was one of the organizers of the Keystone party, which merged with 
the Washington party, and in I9'i2 he was one of the electors on the Wash- 
ington ticket, receiving the largest vote of anyone on the ticket, the total vote 
being 444,894. He was made president of the Pennsylvania Electoral College. 
In fact, he has always been at the head of the organization since the birth 
of the party, and has been honored with the chairmanship of the State organ- 
ization of Progressive Leagues, which he holds at present. He was toast- 
master at the first annual banquet, held at the "Bellevue Stratford," Phila- 
delphia, March 15, 1913, with Roosevelt at his right and Beveridge on the 
left. Again, on June 30, 1914. at Pittsburgh, he officiated as toastmaster, 
where eleven hundred sat at board, and in the evening at the Exposition 
building he also presided. 

Mr. Wilhelm has been associated with many progressive movements, and 
he has been especially earnest in the interest of the laboring men of his own 
county, for whom he has been able to accomplish much which has affected 
labor conditions in every part of the State. He has always been a fighter in 
the political arena, and when he espouses a cause or candidate he usually 
follows it to victory. In 1909 he led the crusade in the probing of ballot box 
stuffing, and secured the conviction and pleas of guilty of twenty-four people 
in the county, acting on account of Morris Leahy, present jury commissioner 
Vol. I— 15 



226 SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 

of Schuylkill county, who had been counted out at the primaries, and winning 
out for his client. In this he accomplished something that had never been 
done before in the State of Pennsylvania, the opening of ballot boxes that 
fraud might be exposed. Mr. Wilhelm has always been allied with the reform 
element, and though he has met with opposition of the strongest kind from 
unexpected sources he always came off the victor. Personally he is respected 
and popular, and has a large following, though his independence in supporting 
good measures rather than party principles has been done at the expense of 
his own advancement. 

On April 29, 1885, Mr. Wilhelm married Emma F. Enzensperger, daugh- 
ter of the late Joseph Enzensperger, of 'Fremont, Schuylkill county, who died 
Jan. I, 1891. Mr. and Mrs. Wilhelm have had three children: Rose L., born 
Oct. 9, 1886; Anna, born Dec. 24, 1890; and John, born April 27, 1894, now 
a student at State College. 

JOHN W. LYNCH, gf Forestville, is a public-spirited citizen of Cass town- 
ship, Schuylkill county, where he has spent all of his life. He belongs to a 
family of Scotch extraction, which has long been established there, and in 
the maternal line is of Revolutionary stock. 

Williain Lynch, grandfather of John W. Lynch, was born on the border 
of Scotland, and lived and died in that country. His wife, Ella, came to 
America, and after living in Canada for a short time settled in Cass t6wnship, 
Schuylkill Co., Pa., where her death occurred. 

Abraham Lynch, son of William and Ella Lynch, was born in Canada, 
was brought by his mother to Schuylkill county. Pa., and here passed prac- 
tically all his life. During the Civil war he enlisted for the Union service, 
being enrolled in Company A, ist Battalion, July 2, 1863, for ninety days, and 
received his discharge Aug. 21, 1863. He was an early resident of Forestville, 
and one of the most respected citizens of that place. He was a successful mine 
worker, becoming a boss at the mines, and was in the employ of the Reading 
Company for several years. His death was caused by the kick of a mule at 
the mines, June 12, 1880, and he is buried at Minersville. He was survived 
by his wife, Catherine (McClure), who died'in June, 1913, and is also buried 
at Minersville. Their children were : Ellen, who died young ; Amelia, who 
died young ; William ; Samuel ; Amos ; John W. ; and Abraham. 

John W. Lynch was born Feb. 25, 1870, at Forestville, in Cass township, 
Schuylkill county, and grew up there, in his early boyhood being allowed the 
advantages of the public schools. When nine years old he began to pick 
slate at the old West breaker. No. 2. and he continued to work at the mines 
for a considerable period, advancing until he became a full-fledged miner. He 
was so employed imtil 1900, in which year he built his present hotel and resi- 
dence at Forestville, and he has since devoted considerable attention to operating 
his hotel, which is known as the "Bellmore." Mr. Lynch has built up a profit- 
able custom by the most commendable methods, paying the closest attention 
to all the details necessary to make his guests comfortable, and his success has 
been well deserved. His other business enterprises have also prospered. He 
has acquired extensive real estate holdings in Cass township and Minersville, 
and is a stockholder in the Union National Bank at Minersville ; besides he is 
a member of the Log Mountain Coal Company, whose property is located in 
Bell county, Ky., and has proved a valuable investment. Air. Lynch has 
always used his influence to further the best interests of his home community. 



SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENNSYLVANL\ 227 

and his activities in this respect are recognized and appreciated hy his fellow 
citizens. He holds memhership in the Foresters of America and the Improved 
Order of Red J\Ien, and his religious connection is with the Lutheran Church at 
Minersville. He is a Republican in political sentiment. 

On April 30, 1897, Air. Lynch married Margaret Jane Moore, daughter 
of Thomas and Eliza (Gilgour) Aloore. Her father, who was a fire boss at 
the Phoeni.x colliery, No. 3, in Cass township, died July 23, 1914. Her mother, 
a native of Philadelphia, has lived in Cass township from early life, being still 
a resident of Forestville. Mr. and Airs. Lynch have two daughters, Alma A., 
who is attending the Minersville high school, class of 1917; and Eleanor I., 
who attends the Cass township high school, at Forestville. 

George Washington AlcClure, maternal grandfather of John W. Lynch, 
lived and died in Branch township, near Phoenix Park No. 2. He owned a 
team and hauled timber for the collieries. He and his wife, Catherine (Rays- 
ter), who also died in Branch township, are buried there in the Clouser 
cemetery. We have the following record of their children : Amelia married 
Capt. John Williams, who served as a captain in the Civil war from Schuylkill 
county. Pa.: Catherine was the wife of Abraham Lynch; Utica died young; 
Clara married William Shultz ; Alatilda died unmarried : John, who served 
three years in the Civil war (he was in the battle of Gettysburg), was killed 
in the mines at the Wadlinger colliery, in Cass township ; Amos also met his 
death in the mines, at the Woodside, in Cass township; Elijah, who died in 
1907, in Branch township, married Kate Bradley, and now resides at Miners- 
ville. The AlcClure family has been established in America from the early 
days, and the ancestor of George W. McClure served on the side of the 
Colonies during the Revolution. 

DAVID G. SMITH withdrew from active association with business a few 
years ago and is enjoying himself in comfortable leisure after an honorable 
and busy career. For several years he took a hand in the municipal govern- 
ment of his town, Pottsville, serving as a member of the borough council, 
and he has always been a citizen who could be relied upon for cooperation in 
movements looking to the advancement of his community. He is a native of 
Lebanon county. Pa., where his father. David Smith, was a well known farmer 
for many years, eventually removing to Jonestown, that county, where he 
resided until his death. He married Lydia Gerberich, daughter of George 
Gerberich and member of a prominent Lebanon county family. Among their 
children were Amanda, Rebecca, David G. and Ellen. The last named married 
Moses F. Arndt, son of John Arndt and one of the leading men of Jonestown, 
Lebanon Co., Pa., engaged in the tanning business, and also vice president of 
the Jonestown Bank. 

David G. Smith was born Aug. 15, 1846, in Monroe Valley, and attended 
public school in his native county. He gained an excellent education and taught 
school during his young manhood, his first engagement being at Schneck, in 
Washington township, Schuylkill county, where he taught both German and 
English. He was next at the Conrad school, where all of the instruction was 
in English. Aleantime he continued his studies, attending summer school at 
Mount Joy Academy, in Lancaster county, at Annville, Lebanon county, and 
New Berlin, Pa., as well as other places. For five terms he taught in Lebanon 
county and then turned his attention to business, buying out the general store 
of John Phillips, at Monroe \"alley. After two years at that location he went 



228 SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PExXXSYLVANIA 

to Ono, Lebanon county, where he was also established for two years, was 
subsequently at Jonestown for a few months, and in 1872 came to Schuylkill 
county and took the position of clerk with George E. fioffman, at Cressona. 
He remained in ^Ir. Hoti'man's employ for ten months and then engaged in 
business on his own account at Pottsville, his first store being at the corner 
of Eleventh and Markets streets, where he did business for four years. At the 
end of that time he purchased the corner property at Twelfth and Market 
streets, where he was established until his retirement, building up a large trade 
as a first-class grocer. ^Ir. Smith was noted throughout his career for prompt 
attention to all his business obligations and reliability in all the relations of 
life, and he always had the confidence and respect of his patrons and em- 
ployees. The esteem of his fellow citizens was substantially expressed in his 
election to the borough council, of which he was a member for four years, 
giving the efficient service which had been expected of him. Politically he 
has been associated with the Republican party. He retired from business in 
April, 1908. 

In August, 1869, Mr. Smith was married to Sarah K. Moyer, daughter of 
Martin and Alary (Kreider) Moyer, of Lebanon county, who had a large 
family, only three of whom survive, namely : Fannie, widow of John Ebersole ; 
Daniel, retired, who lives near Annville ; and Mrs. David G. Smith. Martin 
Moyer, the father, was a large landowner near Annville, Lebanon county, and 
also had valuable limestone quarries. To Mr. and Airs. Smith has been born 
one child, Lillian AL, who married Otto Shuman, and after his death became 
the wife of Dr. J. G. Kramer, a well known physician of Pottsville, who has 
his office at Fourth and Alarket streets. Air. and Airs. Smith reside at No. 
1 124 West Alarket street. They are members of the First Alethodist Church 
of Pottsville, and he belongs to the P. O. S. of A. He has many friends in 
the borough and a wide acquaintanceship throughout this section of Schuylkill 
county. 

LYMAN D. HEIAI, AL D., of Schuylkill Haven, a physician of high stand- 
ing in his section of Schuylkill county, belongs to one of the oldest families in 
this portion of Pennsylvania and numerously represented here from Colonial 
days. 

This branch of the Heim family is descended from George Heim. one of 
three brothers from Wurtemberg, Germany, who settled in Pennsylvania on 
their arrival in America — John in Berks county, Andoni (or Andrew) in 
Buffalo valley and George in the Alahantango valley, in that section now em- 
braced in Schuylkill county. He is buried at Klingerstown, in Schuylkill 
county, his grave being in a garden, but unfortunately it has no marking. He 
was a man of more than ordinary intelligence and education, was one of the 
early schoolmasters of that region, and also followed surveying, doing all the 
surveying required in his section at that time. He purchased considerable land 
from the Indians, over which there was subsequently litigation with the Penns, 
they claiming title. Heim had a large strip of land which extended from the 
Himmel Church in the direction of Klingerstown. He resolutely opposed the 
window tax imposed by the English crown upon the pioneers during the Colo- 
nial days. He probably was single when he came to America. His wife, 
however, was of foreign extraction, being of Irish stock. They had among 
others these children: John, George, Paul (had a son Paul), Peter and 
Matthias. 



SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 229 

John Heim, son of George, was born in 1756, in Upper Mahanoy, Northum- 
berland county, and died in 1824, aged sixty-eight years. He is buried at 
Klingerstown, in a garden. He was a prominent schoolmaster of his day, and 
also followed farming, having considerable land. He was a leading and 
respected member of the community, doing all the writing and similar business 
for his section. In 1790 the Federal census records him as a resident of that 
section of Berks county now embraced in Schuylkill county, in the LIpper 
jMahantango valley, in which Klingerstown is now located. He then had four 
sons — all under sixteen years of age — and two daughters. He was twice mar- 
ried, and by his first union had seven children (another account says he had 
seven sons and one daughter by his first wife). His second wife was Sophia 
Kohl, who remarried after his death, and died about 1H63, at the ripe age of 
eighty-eight years; she is buried at St. John's Church, in Upper Mahanoy town- 
ship, Northumberland county. Eight children were born to this union, namely : 
]\Iolly married Peter Beisel ; Christina married a Straub ; John, a carpenter, 
located in Richfield, Snyder Co., Pa. ; George lived in Schuylkill county. Pa. ; 
Rev. William was an Evangelical preacher (he had an only daughter, Sallie, 
who married Dr. Hensyl, of Howard, Pa.) ; Peter lived at Watsontown, Pa. 
(he had a son John, who is deceased, and three daughters) ; Daniel married 
Alary Homberger ; Jonathan, who located in the West, had a large family, now 
located in Iowa and Indiana. 

George Heim, grandfather of Dr. Lyman D. Heim, was born in South Man- 
heim township, Schuylkill county, and always lived there, following farming. 
He died at the age of seventy-six years, and his wife, Susanna ( Lutz), daugh- 
ter of John Lutz. lived to the age of ninety-three years. Mr. and Mrs. Heim 
are buried at the Summer Hill Church. They had children are follows : Mary, 
wife of Daniel Reber; George L. ; Susanna, wife of Daniel Warmkessel ; Caro- 
line, deceased : and Joel, who lives in South Manheim township. 

George L. Heim, son of George and Susanna (Lutz) Heim, was born in 
South Manheim township May 24, 1842, and died Nov. 22, 1903. He is 
buried in the Summer Hill cemetery in his native township. Mr. Heim was 
reared to farming, and in his youth hired out to his uncle Daniel for some 
time. Eventually he became engaged in farming on his own account on the 
^^'illiam J. Berkheiser property, and in 1899 bought that fine property con- 
sisting of 128 acres, one mile west of Landingville, which he cultivated until 
his death. He married Lucy Ann Berkheiser, daughter of William J. and 
Esther (Bressler) Berkheiser, and they became the parents of seven children, 
viz.: Alvin W., Willoughby F., Emma A. (]\Irs. George Gangloff), Oscar A., 
Minnie E. (who lives at home), Lyman D. and George F. (who lives at home, 
managing the farm for his mother). 

Lyman D. Heim was born Feb. 14, 1877, at Landing^/ille, where he was 
reared. His education was begun in the public schools of the home district 
and his early training was well supplemented by a course at the Kutztown 
State Normal School. He taught school for one term in South Manheim 
township before taking up the study of medicine, which he began under the 
tuition of the late Dr. Dechert, of Schuylkill Haven. Later he entered Jefferson 
Medical college, Philadelphia, where he was graduated in- 1902, since when he 
has been established in practice at Schuylkill Haven. He has been a busy man 
throughout his career, his personal qualities combining with efficient attention 
to his patrons to gain him wide popularity, and his reputation among physi- 
cians, as well as with the laity, is irreproachable. He is a member of the 



230 SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENXSYLVAXL\ 

Schuylkill County ^Medical Society, the Pennsylvania State Aledical Society and 
the American Medical Association. Fraternally he is a Mason, belonging to 
Page Lodge, No. 270, F. & A. M., of Schuylkill Haven, and he also holds mem- 
bership in the Royal Arcanum. In all the relations of life he measures up to 
a high standard of manhood and citizenship set up by his worthy ancestors. 

Dr. Heim married Annie Wilson, daughter of Hugh Wilson, and they have 
two children, Emeline and Hugh. 

EDWARD CHARLES BROBST, at present serving as county commis- 
sioner of Schuylkill county, was a business man of Shenandoah up to the time 
he entered upon the duties of that office, to which he is now giving practically 
all of his attention. As a successful groceryman, he was one of the leading 
merchants of his town for almost thirty years, and his business talents were 
considered sufificient assurance by his fellow citizens that he would make an 
able public servant. His record has justified the confidence that they showed 
in him when he was elected to the office by a large majority. 

The Brobst family is of old Berks county stock. From the Pennsylvania 
Archives, \'ol. X\'II, pp. 75-77-81, it is learned that one Hans JMichael Brobst 
(or Probst) and his family emigrated from Switzerland or Germany on the 
ship "Samuel," which qualified at Philadelphia Aug. 17, 1733. This family 
was listed as follows: Michael Probst, aged fifty-four; Johan Michael, aged 
twenty-one; Barbara Brospts, aged fifty-three; and Barbara Brospts, aged 
eight. 

In 1759, in Albany township, Michael Brobst was tax collector, and on 
the list of taxes were: Michael Brobst. fourteen poimds (or $37.24) ; Martin 
Brobst, fourteen pounds (or $37.24) : and \alentine Brobst, sixteen pounds 
(or $42.56). These amounts were reckoned by allowing $2.66 United States 
money for a Pennsylvania pound. 

The will of Martin Brobst, of Albany township, was probated June 9, 1/66, 
and Anna Elizabeth Brobst was named as executrix. This document is in 
German script, and mentions several children. 

According to various accounts the early home of this family was in Wur- 
temberg or Lower Saxony, Germany, and Philip Brobst and his wife Cerine 
came to this country in 1720 from Germany or Switzerland. He settled in 
what is now Albany township, Berks Co., Pa., and there followed his trade of 
potter in connection with farming, the latter of necessity engrossing most of his 
time. He had three sons, Martin, Michael aqd \'alentine, and three daughters, 
who married respectively N. Kutz, C. Hechler and J. Fetteroft or FetherolfT. 
The will of Philip Brobst, made in 1747, and probated March 21, 1760, made 
provision for his children as follows : A'lichael, one hundred acres of land and a 
good gristmill belonging thereto; ]\Iartin, a tract of fifty acres and a good 
new gristmill; Valentine, his just portion of the estate: Eva Catharine, fifty 
pounds in money; and Dorothy (wife of Johannes Fetherolfif), fifty pounds 
in money. Michael and Martin each built for himself a mill in the same neigh- 
borhood. They were all devout believers in the doctrines of the Lutheran 
Church. 

"In 1740 Parson Muhlenberg gave them a small tract of land on which 
the three brothers, with the assistance of some new settlers, built a church and 
school-house which is occupied from that day to this for the worship of God, 
by the name of "Allimingle Church.' " Michael Brobst's wife was Elizabeth 
Albright. 



SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 231 

\'alentine Brobst, mentioned above as son of Philip and Cerine, emigrated 
with his brothers from the Old \\'orld. He lived in Reading for some years, 
and tradition says for a time in Albany township, where his brothers, Michael 
and Martin, were also large landowners, as indicated by the amount of taxes 
paid. The Christian name of \'alentine's wife was Catharine. He died prior 
to 1775, and his wife in 1775. The executors of the will of \'alenline Brobst 
were Frederick Hill, a brother-in-law, and Henry Brobst, a brother's son. 
Among the items were: "Cath. Snyder, my aforesaid wife's sister's daughter, 
shall have fifty pounds; Jacob Brobst shall have the plantation I bought from 
Jacob Gortner (Jacob was a son of Michael, the latter a brother of \'alentine) ; 
Catharine Stine (daughter of Martin, another brother of \'alentine) shall have 
fifty pounds; my sister Dorothy married to Johannes Fetherolff shall have 
fifty pounds." The witnesses to the will were: Philip Staumbog, George 
Kistler and ^Matthias Brobst. The will of Catharine, widow of V^alentine 
Brobst, is on record in Will Book 2, p. 236. Like his brothers, Valentine 
Brobst engaged in farming and milling. Among his children were X'alentine 
(2) and Martin, of whom the latter removed to Catawissa, Pennsylvania. 

Christian Brobst, grandfather of Edward C. Brobst, lived for a time in 
Orwigsburg, Schuylkill county, where he was engaged in business. By trade 
he was a hamessmaker. Moving thence to Pottsville, he was engaged in 
business there for several years, and put up the first buildings on Centre street — 
what is now the property of the Mortimers ; he owned this land back to Centre 
street. He was a man of recognized ability, was chosen commissioner of 
Schuylkill county back in 1817, at which time Orwigsburg was the county 
seat, and was one of the energetic figures in the life of his day. He had served 
as a soldier in the war of 1812, was a member of the Masonic fraternity, 
belonging to the blue lodge and chapter at Philadelphia, and took an active 
part in the work of the Evangelical Church, to which he belonged. In fact, 
he crowded much usefulness into a comparatively short life, for he died at 
Pottsville when forty-one years old. He was interred in the old Centre street 
burial ground there. Mr. Brobst married Sarah Zoll, of Orwigsburg, daughter 
of Jacob Zoll, who built the first iron works in Pottsville. She died two years 
after her husband. The following children were born to this union : Peramus, 
who married Mary Yeager, died in Pottsville : Mary married Michael McBride 
and died at the age of ninety-one years, in Sullivan county. Pa. ; Catherine, Mrs. 
Brewer, went to Minnesota, where her husband became a mail carrier, and 
on his third trip home was frozen and starved to death ; Benewell was drowned 
in the canal at Pottstown, Pa., when a young man; George died young; Annetta 
married Daniel Yeager, of Reading, and died at the age of eighty-three years, 
at No. 805 North Norwegian street ; Casper married Tamsen Stichter. 

Casper Brobst, father of Edward C. Brobst, was born at Orwigsburg, and 
like his father never reached his prime, dying at the age of forty-two years. 
He learned the business of saddler with his father, for a time conducted a 
boarding stable for horses at Pottsville, and was afterwards variously engaged 
until his death. He served in the LJnion army during the Civil war, enlisting 
from Pottsville. By his marriage to Tamsen Stichter, daughter of Mrs. Rebecca 
Stichter, he had five children, namely: Emma, deceased, wife of Henry 
Wamick ; Sarah, deceased, wife of Howard Jones, of Philadelphia ; Edward 
Charles; Cassilda, wife of John M. Bock, living at Shenandoah; and Annie, 
married to Morton Knox, of Pottstown, Pa. The mother of this family died 



232 SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 

at the age of forty-one years. The father was a Baptist in reHgious connec- 
tion. He is buried in the Presbyterian Church at Pottsville. 

Edward Charles Brobst was born Oct. 31, 1858, in Pottsville, and had 
common school advantages there, up to the age of nine attending throughout 
the school year. He then took employment in the mines during summer, con- 
tinuing his schooling during the winter season at William Penn, Schuylkill 
county. After doing work about the mines for seven years he began clerking 
for Thomas Bedford, in whose employ he remained three years, changing to 
work for Charles Bowman in a similar capacity. He was in ]\Ir. Bowman's 
grocery store for ten years before engaging in business on his own account, in 
1884. He began in a rented store at the corner of Jardin and Centre streets, 
Shenandoah, and the location proving satisfactory he purchased it in time, and 
continued there as long as he carried on the business, building up a fine trade. 
In 1910 he erected a fine up-to-date building on that site, a substantial three- 
story structure, which is a credit to the town and an indication of the pros- 
perity which marked his career. Mr. Brobst conducted the grocery business 
until Jan. i, 1912, when, having been elected county commissioner by a large 
majority, he gave up the business to devote himself to his new responsibilities. 
He has served as a member of the board of health of Shenandoah. Politically 
he is a Republican, and an influential worker for the success of his party in 
this region. Socially he belongs to the Royal Arcanum and the Masons, in 
the latter connection holding membership in Shenandoah Lodge, No. 511, F. & 

A. M., of which he was master in 191 1; in Mizpah Chapter, No. 252, of 
Mahanoy City; Ivanhoe Commandery, No. 31, K. T., of Mahanoy City; and 
Rajah Temple, A. A. O. N. M. S., of Reading. He also belongs to the 

B. P. O. Elks lodge at Shenandoah. 

Mr. Brobst married Annie Thomas, daughter of John Thomas, of Miners- 
ville, Pa., and five children have been born to them : Charles, now carrying on 
the grocery business at Shenandoah, is married to Jessie Loucks ; Eily is at 
home; Florence graduated from the Shenandoah high school in June, 1914, and 
later from the college at Lutherville, Md. ; George is attending \\'yoming ( Pa. ) 
seminary ; Margaret is at school. The family belong to the Methodist Episcopal 
Church. 

HEXRY B. ZULICH, late of Schuylkill Haven, was a familiar figure in 
and around that borough for many years, in his capacity of superintendent for 
the Schuylkill Navigation Company at this point becoming well known to the 
majority of his fellow citizens. His executive ability and upright character 
made him a valuable employee of the company in whose service most of his 
mature life was spent. Aside from that' connection he was principally inter- 
ested in the work of the Reformed Church, belonging to St. John's congregation, 
in which he was active for many years. 

The Zulich family is well known in southern Schuylkill county. It was 
founded in America by John Zulich, grandfather of Henrj' B. Zulich, who 
came from Germany and landed at Baltimore, Md., where he settled. Of his 
five children three died young, the two who reached maturity being Godfrey B. 
and Anthony. Godfrey B. Zulich was born at Baltimore, on the site where 
Fort McHeiiry is now located, June 22, 1802, the night his parents arrived 
there after their voyage from Germany. 

Anthony Zulich, son of John, removed to Philadelphia, where he lived for 
some time, later settling at Easton, Pa., where he died. He married Jane 



SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PEXXSYL\AXL\ 233 

Cumniings, of Philadelphia, who was a member of the Quaker family of that 
name, and to them were born the following children: Anna was the wife of 
William Guild, of Newark, N. J.; Mary married Thomas Rinek; Myer C, 
now living in Newark, N. J., attained the dignity of governor of Arizona; 
Henry B. is mentioned below ; Charles is deceased ; William H. is deceased ; 
Thomas is deceased ; Dr. Morton completes the family. 

Henry B. Zulich was born Dec. 15, 1832, in Philadelphia, and received an 
excellent education, attending Lafayette College at Easton. When a young 
man he came to Schuylkill Haven, where he soon found employment with the 
Schuylkill Navigation Company, and in a short time he had won recognition 
which gained him promotion to the position of superintendent. He continued 
to till this responsible position until his death, which occurred in January, iSyS. 
Mr. Zulich became very well known in this section and was especially popular 
with children, with whom he was always on terms of the greatest friendship. 
This interest was shown in his connection with Sunday school work, for which 
he was well fitted by nature, filling the office of superintendent of the Sunday 
school of St. John's Reformed Church for many years. He was an earnest 
member of that church and always concerned for its welfare. 

In 185S Mr. Zulich married Emma R. Hesser, who was born Aug. 22, 1840, 
daughter of the late Capt. Henry B. Hesser, and a large family blessed this 
union, namely: Samuel M., born July 4, 1859, is deceased; William, born Sept. 
30, i860, is an attorney at law, practicing in Ohio; Henry Hesser, born Aug. 
9, 1862, is cashier of the Ringtown National Bank, in Schuylkill county ; Jennie 
M., born Oct. 19, 1863, is at home; Ellen S., born July 23, 1865, is deceased; 
Albert A., born Sept. 16, 1867, is deceased; Elizabeth S., born April 27, 1869, is 
at home; Anna M., born Jan. 9, 1871, married William Abbott, of Pittsburgh, 
Pa. ; John G. K. was born Jan. 23, 1874; Ollie, born Feb. 5, 1876, is deceased; 
Thomas Renek, born June 7, 1878, is located in New Jersey; Persey, born May 
14, 1882, is deceased. The mother of this family is still a resident of Schuyl- 
kill Haven, where she is well known and held in the highest esteem. 

Henry B. Hesser, father of Mrs. Zulich, was born at Orwigsburg, Pa., son 
of Frederick Hesser, who served in the Revolutionary war as & drummer boy. 
For some years he lived at Germantown, Pa., removing thence to Orwigsburg, 
Schuylkill county, where he died and is buried. He was a well known man 
in his day in various connections, being the second to hold the office of sheriff 
in Schuylkill county, and a musician of ability both vocally and instnnnentally, 
being especially well known as a church singer. He and his wife Elizabeth 
were the parents of the following children: Frederick; Rev. Charles, a Meth- 
odist minister; John; Henry B. ; Rebecca, Mrs. Frailey ; Catherine, Mrs. John 
Shoener; Polly, Mrs. Harner; and Sallie. 

Henry B. Hesser spent practically all of his mature life in the employ of 
the Reading Railroad Company at Schuylkill Haven, attaining to a responsible 
position. His death occurred April 15, 1S92, when he was seventy-five years 
old, and he is buried at Schuylkill Haven. By his marriage. to Margaret Shoe- 
maker, also a native of Orwigsburg, he had the following children : Elizabeth 
Sarah, now living at the old homestead in Schuylkill Haven ; Emma R., Airs. 
Henry B. Zulich ; Albert A., deceased ; Charles Frederick, deceased ; William 
Reift, living at Reading, Pa. ; and Henry Addas, deceased. 

JOHN C. BITTLE and his sister, residents of Pottsville, are the only repre- 
sentatives of their line of this substantial old family established in Schuylkill 
county during the pioneer period. 



234 SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 

Christopher Bittle (or Bittel, as the name was then spelled), their first 
ancestor in America, came to this country from England Sept. 24, 1753, at 
which time he was only a boy, and first located at Ouakertown, near Phila- 
delphia, Pa. Rupp's Thirty Thousand Names of Immigrants in Pennsylvania 
from 1727 to 1776 says (pages 308-309 ) that the ship "Neptune" (John Alason, 
master), from Rotterdam, last from Cowes, arrived at Philadelphia Sept. 24, 
I753' a"d gives the name of Christoph Biittel among her passengers. For a 
time he was employed on a farm. Later he married a Miss Neiman, and settled 
at Pottstown, Pa., where he purchased a farm upon which he lived for a while. 
Selling out, he came to what is now Schuylkill county, locating on Summer 
mountain, about half a mile east of Schuylkill Haven, where he bought the 
farm later owned by the Henney and Reber families, situated in South Man- 
heim township. He sold that property and removed to North ]\Ianheim 
township, where he settled on a tract lying along the road leading from 
Schuylkill Haven to Cressona, later known as the old Bartolette farm. When 
he sold this he bought a farm property in what is now Norwegian township, 
near ^linersville (in the same locality as the old Thomas Shollenberger tract), 
and it was there his death occurred. The place afterwards became known as 
the James farm. Besides farming, Christopher Bittle was engaged to a con- 
siderable extent in cutting timber, owning and operating an old-time sawmill, 
cutting his timber and floating it down the Schuylkill river. He supplied the 
lumber for the first houses built in what is now the' city of Pottsville. He 
also sank a small shaft and obtained coal, he being one of the pioneers in this 
business. Christopher Bittle purchased a farm in Windsor township, Berks 
Co., Pa., April i, 1797, and for this tract he paid £66, 13 shillings, 4 pence, gold 
or silver, lawful money. Mr. John C. Bittle and his sister, now of No. 11 12 
Mahantongo street, Pottsville, have this paper. Christopher Bittle's wife, who 
was born in Hanover, Germany, was a sister to the grandmother of ex-Governor 
John F. Hartranft, who served as governor of the State in 1873-78. They 
had the following children : John ; Jacob, who was a farmer in Long Run valley, 
near Schuylkill Haven, and died there ; Henry, who was the owner of the well 
known Weissinger farm in North Manheim township, Schuylkill county ; Jona- 
than, who lived and died in Panther valley, Schuylkill county ; Maria, ^Irs. John 
Strauch: ]\Iolly, Mrs. John Pott; Kate, Mrs. Weaver; Elizabeth, Mrs. Weaver; 
Rebecca, who married Squire Jacob Reed ; Sarah, ]\Irs. Thomas Jennings ; and 
Eva, Mrs. Warner (she and her husband went by wagon to Ohio and were 
among the early settlers at Circleville, where they left descendants). 

John Bittle, son of Christopher, was the grandfather of John C. Bittle. 
Born in Chester county. Pa., he came to Schuylkill county with his parents when 
only nine years old, and here spent the remainder of his life. In his young 
manhood he learned the trade of weaver, but never followed that business for 
any length of time, being engaged with his father in his sawmill and lumbering 
operations. They took the rafts which they made down the Schuylkill river 
to Reading, being obliged to make the return trip on foot. In 183 1 John Bittle 
removed to Pottsville, where he had a tract of five acres at Yorkville, on what 
is now West End avenue. He was a large landowner in .Schuylkill county and 
the surrounding region, his holdings including the ground on Mahantongo 
street, Pottsville, where the First Presbyterian church now stands, and in com- 
pany with his brother Henry he owned half of what is now known as German- 
town, near Pottsville ; Henry owned what is now the Weissinger farm in that 
section. In 1838 John Bittle built the home now occupied by his grandchildren, 



SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PEXXSYLVANL\ 235 

at No. 1 1 12 Mahantongo street, Pottsville. He died there April 4, 1876, and 
is buried in the old I'resbyterian cemetery. His wife, Barbara (Alsbach), of 
Primrose, this county, a small place west of Minersville, was a daughter of 
Matthew Alsbach, who served under Washington during the Revolutionary 
war; he was the owner of all the valuable coal land at Primrose. To this union 
was born one son, Charles. Mr. Bittle married for his second wife Elizabeth 
Zimmerman. 

Charles Bittle was born Aug. 19, 1817, upon the Bittle farm, and was thir- 
teen years old when his parents settled at Pottsville. He was one of the live 
business men of that borough for many years. He had a colliery on Sharp 
mountain, and dealt in coal, supplying a large trade at Pottsville. For a few 
years he was engaged in the manufacture of railroad spikes, but was principally 
interested in the coal and lumber business and had a long and prosperous career. 
He died Jan. 17, 1899. at the residence on Mahantongo street, and is buried in 
the Presbyterian cemetery. Mr. Bittle was not associated with public affairs 
in any capacity, but gave his support to the Republican party. He married 
Christiana Lord, daughter of Frederick and Molly (Bensinger) Lord, and she 
survived him only one week, dying Jan. 24, 1899. Of their three children, 
Emma, the youngest, died when two and a half years old. The survivors are 
John C. and Eliza, who occupy the comfortable old residence erected by their 
grandfather in 1838. The parents were members of the German Reformed 
Church. 

John C. Bittle, only son of Charles Bittle, was born at Pottsville Nov. 25, 
1841. He had the advantages of the public schools, and entered business life as 
his father's assistant in the coal and lumber trade, in which he continued suc- 
cessfully until his retirement in 1903. He has never married. Successful but 
unassuming, Mr. Bittle has been a typical member of this fine old family, 
associated with Schuylkill county for four generations, and he and his sister are 
the last surviving members of the branch of the family to which they belong. 

DANIEL J. GENSEMER, present postmaster at Pine Grove, is an official 
whose abilities have been tested and not found wanting in various public 
responsibilities. Born in Pine Grove Dec. 26, 186 1, he is a son of Daniel and 
Catherine (Loos) Gensemer, and a member of a family of German ancestry 
whose founders in America came here in the ship "Glasgow" from Rotterdam. 
They were of the company which came to America with Conrad Weiser, down 
the Susquehanna and into Berks county, settling the place then in Lancaster 
county which became known as Schaefi^erstown, near Lebanon. There George 
Gensemer, the great-grandfather of Daniel J. Gensemer, was born, and there 
he was engaged in the tanning business. During the Revolutionary war he 
enlisted under General Washington, became a non-commissioned officer, and 
was with Washington during the trying winter at Valley Forge, and at the 
crossing of the Delaware and battle of Trenton, N. J. He died in Lancaster 
county, and is buried at Robesonia, in the Eck Church cemetery. 

Henry Gensemer, son of George, was a native of Blainsport, Lancaster Co., 
Pa., born Oct. 16, 1782, and died there in 1873. He is buried in the cemetery 
of what is known as the Swamp Church in West Cocalico township, that 
countv. During his boyhood, in 1793, he made a trip over the Blue mountains 
into Schuylkiir county with a party who were making a visit. Seeing some 
evidently hostile Indians on the top of the mountains the white people crawled 
into an old hollow log and waited for the savages to take their departure before 



236 SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 

proceeding. The incident is typical of the times and of the dangers which 
beset the pioneers who ventured to settle in this region. In his young manhood 
Henry Gensemer followed butchering for four years, and then for six years 
was engaged in droving. Then he learned the trade of tanner, serving his 
apprenticeship at Adamstown, Lancaster county, where he continued to work 
at that calling on his own account for a number of years, three of his sons, 
Daniel, John and Henry, succeeding him in the business. Meantime he was 
also interested in farming, acquiring the ownership of 250 acres in the same 
township, and giving considerable time and attention to the cultivation of his 
land. He was a Whig in political sentiment, in religion a member of the 
German Reformed Church. By his marriage to Elizabeth Fichtorn he had 
nine children : Levi, William, Henry, Daniel, John, George, Sallie, Catherine 
and Elizabeth. 

Daniel Gensemer, son of Henry, was born Sept. 23, 1S23, in what was then 
Cocalico township (now Blainsportj, Lancaster Co., Pa., and learned the trade 
of tanner from his father. He also helped with the farm work at home, until 
1849, when he and his brothers John and Henry joined interests under the 
name of D. Gensemer & Bros, and took over their father's tannery, which they 
carried on in partnership until Jan. i, 1856, when Daniel Gensemer came to 
Pine Grove. Renting the tannery of Levi Miller, he continued in the same 
line, and in April of the year named John and Henry Gensemer followed him, 
the three brothers resuming operations under their old style and conducting 
the Miller tannery until 1859. Then Henry sold his share to the other two 
and the name became D. & J. Gensemer, until 1863. In that year the three 
brothers united in the purchase of the John A. Bechtel tannery at Pine Grove, 
and operated both plants until 1866, when Henry Miller was taken into the 
firm and the name changed to D. Gensemer & Co. In 1876 Mr. Miller with- 
drew and Henry Gensemer sold his interest to his brother Daniel, he and his 
brother John continuing the business until 1883, when George W. Gensemer, 
son of Daniel, became a partner. A few years later, in 1S89, Harry L. Gen- 
semer, another son of Daniel, entered the business, with which the father 
remained until 1892. Then the two sons of Daniel took control as sole owners 
under the name of George W. and H. L. Gensemer. The business is still 
one of the most important at Pine Grove and is at present operated by the firm 
of Gensemer & Salen. In Daniel Gensemer's day the industry had developed 
to such proportions that the yearly output attained a value of one hundred 
thousand dollars, and as the executive head of the concern the principal credit 
for the growth is justly attributed to his enterprise. His active faculties also 
sought other outlets which contributed to promoting commercial conditions Jn 
this locality. He was one of the organizers of the First National Bank at 
Orwigsburg and one of its first directors; for twelve years treasurer of the 
Central Building & Loan and Savings Association ; and for eight years he held 
an interest in the Stanton colliery, at Mahanoy Plane. 

Mr. Gensemer was more than a capable business man. He had definite 
ideas on municipal affairs, and showed a commendable desire to serve the 
community unselfishly in the several important borough ofifices to which he 
was chosen, as town councilman for a number of terms, chief burgess one term, 
and school director. Originally a Whig in political sentiment, casting his 
first vote for Henry Clay, he afterwards adhered to the principles of the 
Republican party. Mr. Gensemer lived to the age of seventy-nine years, dying 
in 1902. He was a member of the Evangelical Church and active in its work. 



SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENNSYLVANL\ 237 

On April 6, 1857, Mr. Gensemer married Catherine Loos, who was born 
June 23, 1837, in Lancaster county, Pa., daughter of Joseph (Jr.) and Barbara 
(Schmidt) Loos, of that county, and of Cerman extraction, being a descend- 
ant of John George Loos, who arrived in America Oct. 2, 1753, coming to 
Philadelphia from Rotterdam in the ship "Edinburgh." Proceeding to what 
was then part of Lancaster (now Berks) county. Pa., he became the owner of 
a farm which is still in the possession of the Loos heirs. Joseph Loos, father 
of ]Mrs. Catherine (Loos) Gensemer, was born Nov. 20, iSio, in Lancaster 
county, where he passed all his life, engaged in farming, and died in 1898. 
His wife Barbara was the daughter of John Schmidt, who was born in 1762 
in Lancaster county. Mrs. Catherine (Loos) Gensemer died at Pine Grove, 
Pa. Seven children, four sons and three daughters, were born to Mr. and 
Mrs. Gensemer: Lizzie A. is the wife of John J. Krimmel, who is in the 
bakery business at Pine Grove; George \V. was engaged with his father and 
brothers in tanning at Pine Grove, being interested in two plants; Daniel J. 
is next in the family; Sevilla K., deceased, was the wife of Dr. Clell Bowman, 
at one time president of Lafayette (Oregon) College, now dean of Albright 
College, Pennsylvania; Annie B. is married to Benjamin Duncan, of Salt Lake 
City, Utah ; Harry L. was associated with his brother George in the tanning 
business at Pine Grove; Joseph L., a graduate of Pemisylvania College, 1892, 
and later a student at Madison College, in New Jersey, is now a aninister of 
the Methodist Church, stationed at Lancaster, Pennsylvania. 

Daniel J. Gensemer had such early advantages as the schools of Pine Grove 
oiTered, and later entered the Lebanon County College. His first independent 
venture was in the lumber business at Goodspring, Pa., which he carried on 
from 1884 to 1906, as a contractor for the Philadelphia & Reading Railway 
Company. Meantime he was also engaged in merchandising at Goodspring, 
Pa. Removing to Duncannon, Pa., he remained there a year, returning to 
Pine Grove. In 191 1 he was appointed postmaster of the borough of Pine 
Grove, and has since filled that position, giving unqualified satisfaction in his 
discharge of the duties of the office. He came to the work with a compre- 
hensive knowledge of its requirements, having served as postmaster at Good- 
spring for seventeen years. He was elected to the town council at Pine Grove 
in 1888 and in all his public service has given his fellow citizens the benefit 
of his best thought and executive ability. 

Mr. Gensemer has been particularly active in promoting the social and fra- 
ternal organizations of his choice. He is a prominent member of the P. O. S. 
of A., belonging to Washington Camp No. 49, and Commandery No. 22 (the 
latter of Tower City ), and he has not only passed the chairs in these bodies but 
also sen-ed as president of the Schuylkill district, 1897 to 1900, and as State 
vice president in 1902-03. He has also passed all the chairs in Lodge Xo. 148, 
L O. O. F., and is a member and treasurer of the local encampment of that 
order ; is a member of the commandery of the Knights of the Mystic Chain at 
Suedberg; of the Independent Americans at Pine Grove (at present serving as 
councilor) ; of the Improved Order of Red ]\Ien at Tremont ; of Pine Grove 
Lodge, No. 409, F. & A. M., and of the Sons of the Revolution. 

In February, 1883, Mr. Gensemer was married to Anna L. Stout, of Pine 
Grove, daughter of William H. and Matilda (^^'alters) Stout, the latter now 
deceased. ^Ir. Stout makes his home on a farm two miles east of Pine Grove 
and is widely acquainted among farmers throughout the State, giving lectures 
on agricultural tojjics all over Pennsylvania. Seven children, five sons and two 



238 SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PEXXSYLVANLA. 

daughters, have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Gensemer: George B. is a minister 
of the United EvangeHcal denomination, stationed at Columbia, Pa. ; Fred D. 
is a tanner by occupation; Paul B. is a resident of Boston, Mass.; S. Ruth, a 
trained nurse, is in the Presbyterian Hospital at Philadelphia ; Norman \V. is a 
student at Jefferson Medical College, Philadelphia ; Reba L. is at home ; Donald 
J. is a student and still at home. All the family belong to the United Evangelical 
Church. 

REESE TASKER, late of Pottsville, who for ten years was general mining 
superintendent at that point for the Philadelphia & Reading Coal & Iron Com- 
pany, closed his career as one of the most conspicuous figures in the anthracite 
region. He began as a humble mine worker, and attained to position and repu- 
tation through sheer merit, winning recognition as one of the ablest mining 
experts in the country. Unspoiled by success and honors, his likeable person- 
ality and sterling character made him one of the most popular officials of the 
great concern whose interests at Pottsville were in his care, enjoying the friendly 
esteem of all the men with whom his duties brought him into contact. The 
same was true of his social relations. His eminent executive ability, supple- 
menting the most comprehensive familiarity with his business, made him so 
valuable from the practical standpoint that he was not only intrusted with great 
responsibilities but frequently consulted when competent advice was necessary. 

Mr. Tasker was a Welshman and the son of a miner, born Sept. 29, 1846, 
at Glen Neath, Glamorganshire, South Wales. He spent the first eighteen 
years of his life in his native land. When but eight years old he began work 
in the mines and served an apprenticeship at anthracite mining under his 
father, later mining bituminous coal. When a youth of eighteen, in 1864, he 
came to America, first settling at Nanticoke (near Wilkes-Barre), Luzerne 
Co., Pa., where he worked a few years, part of the time as a contract miner. 
His next experience was in the soft coal mines in Kentucky, whence he returned 
to this section of Pennsylvania in 1875, from which time until his death he was 
in the employ of the Philadelphia & Reading Coal & Iron Company. He com- 
menced his service with this concern as a miner at Mahanoy City (in 1875) 
and won advancement steadily, having filled almost all the intermediate posi- 
tions when made general mining superintendent in 1905. 

A self-made man more successful, in the best sense of the term, would be 
hard to find. His first promotion was to the position of fire boss at a colliery 
at Wiggan, Schuylkill county. Then he became inside foreman at the Boston 
Run colliery, in 1886, and was later in the same capacity at the Suffolk colliery, 
to which he was transferred about 1890, residing at Gilberton while employed 
there. From there he went to the St. Nicholas district, being at the latter when 
the now famous Maple Hill colliery was opened. It was developed under his 
immediate management, and its highly profitable exploitation has always been 
attributed to his foresight and ingenuity. On April i, 1893, Mr. Tasker became 
superintendent of the St. Nicholas district, and on Dec. ist of the same year 
was made superintendent of the Gilberton and Mahanoy district. On March 
I, 1897, he became superintendent of the Mahanoy City division, succeeding 
the late John Skeath, continuing in that capacity until assigned as assistant to 
John Vieth, with headquarters at Pottsville, Dec. i, 1903. Mr. \'ieth, the 
mining superintendent there, was in poor health, and when he retired Mr. 
Tasker was appointed his successor, taking the position of general mining 
superintendent on Jan. i, 1905, and holding it until his death. May 31, IQ15. 



SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENNSYLVANL\ 239 

Mr. Tasker's rise to one of the most responsible positions in his chosen 
calhng was accomplished by the most painstaking attention to everything he 
undertook. Possessed of a mind of unusual keenness, iiis faculties of observa- 
tion coordinated well with the ability to apply what he knew to the task in 
hand, and in wide practical experience he acquired a facility in meeting emer- 
gencies which was of inestimable value. His work was always most intelli- 
gently performed, and he had a faculty for getting work through which could 
be depended upon. In times of trouble, fires, explosions, cave-ins, etc., he acted 
so promptly and effectively that he was looked to for aid whenever such emer- 
gencies arose. 

Mr. Tasker suffered a paralytic stroke on March 22, 191 5, and though he 
recovered somewhat he was not able to resume any of his duties, passing away 
at his home. No. 106 North George street, Pottsville, on May 31st following. 
The Potts\ille Republican of June ist paid a fitting tribute to his character: 
"In his passing one of the most kindly and considerate men has been called to 
the Great Beyond, followed by the blessing of a host of friends in all walks 
of life, for Mr. Tasker was a man who had risen from the ranks of labor and 

always maintained the same demeanor toward his fellow men The 

genial, kindly man is gone, but his memory will live long after him. He was 
an inspiration to many younger men whose emulation was aroused by his 
noble example." He was buried in the Odd Fellows cemetery at Tamaqua, 
and the funeral services were conducted by Alahanoy City Lodge, No. 357, 
F. & A. i\L, in which he held membership. A special Philadelphia & Reading 
train from Pottsville was provided for the occasion. Mr. Tasker was a thirty- 
second-degree Mason, a past high priest of Mizpah Royal Arch Chapter, No. 
252, of IVIahanoy City; a member of Ivanhoe Commandery, No. 31, K. T., also 
of Alahanoy City; and of Rajah Temple, A. A. O. N. M. S., of Reading. He 
also belonged to General Grant Lodge, L O. O. F., of Mahanoy City; the 
Royal Arcanum ; the Pottsville Club ; the Sphinx Club ; and St. David's Society 
of Philadelphia. 

Mr. Tasker married Mary A. Thomas, who died in 1910 and is also buried 
in the Odd Fellows cemetery at Tamaqua. They are survived by the following 
children : Catharine, wife of Lee Jones, of St. Nicholas, Pa. ; Phoebe, unmar- 
ried, who kept house for her father; Oliver C, of Pottsville, an auditor for 
the Philadelphia & Reading Coal & Iron Company; Thomas R., of Ashland, 
this county, a mining engineer, in the employ of the Philadelphia & Reading 
Coal & Iron Company; Harrison, who is engaged as mechanical engineer by 
the Buck Run Coal Company, and lives at home; and Taliesyn, a student at 
State College, Pennsylvania. 

JUDGE NICHOLAS SEITZINGER, late of Tamaqua, was one of the 
leading spirits of his generation in that borough, where his name is held by 
many in respectful memory. Several of his children still reside there. It falls 
to the lot of few men to receive such generous assurances of the confidence of 
their fellow citizens as were shown to Judge Seitzinger, and he proved him- 
self worthy of the many honors which came to him, entirely unsolicited. A 
native of Berks county, Pa., he was born Oct. 29, 1813, son of Nicholas Seit- 
zinger, an honored early settler of this section of Schuylkill county. 

The Seitzingers are one of the families descended from Hessian soldiers 
who remained in America following their services in the American Revolu- 
tionary war. Nicholas Seitzinger, the elder, was a German by birth. He came 



240 SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 

to this country as one of the Hessian soldiers hired by England, and thus took 
part in the Revolution, but his sympathies were with the Colonial cause, and 
after the war he did not return to the old country. For a time he lived in 
Berks county, Pa., removing thence to what is now Schuylkill county, where 
he took up 1, 600 acres of land. The region was then a wilderness, but he set 
bravely about the task of making a home for himself and family, and it was 
he who established the town of Fountain Springs, near Ashland, which was 
really named in his honor. He is buried in the cemetery there. His family 
consisted of children as follows: Catherine, who married Samuel Scott and 
(second) Henry Fisher; George; Peter; Samuel; Harry; Nicholas; Edward,; 
John, and Jacob W. Jacob built the "Exchange Hotel" at Pottsville. 

Judge Nicholas Seitzinger spent his boyhood in Berks and Schuylkill 
counties, and at an early date settled at Tamaqua, when the town was in its 
infancy. He engaged in the manufacture of screens and built up a profitable 
business, also acquiring much valuable local real estate, which is still in the 
possession of his children. His foresight made him a live influence in the 
advancement of the place, and he was elected to the position of school director, 
which he filled for many years. He was also one of the associate judges of 
Schuylkill county for five years, and was elected to the office of chief burgess 
of Tamaqua, but refused to serve. With a strong sense of moral obligation 
in everything he undertook, conscientious ideas regarding his duty to the 
community, unusual judgment and intelligence, he acquitted himself so satis- 
factorily in every trust that he might have remained continuously in the public 
service had he chosen. But he accepted office principally from a sense of 
responsibility, and when it was merely a question of personal compliment or 
power cared nothing for preferment. He was a Mason and an Odd Fellow, 
belonging to Pulaski Lodge, No. 216, F. & .A. M., of Pottsville, and to the 
I. O. O. F. lodge there. 

Judge Seitzinger married Catherine Reese, of Reading, Pa., who was born 
July 8, 1815, and died Dec. i, 1881. His death occurred July 14, 1879. They 
are buried in the Odd Fellows cemetery at Tamaqua. The following children 
were born of this marriage : Charles, who is deceased ; Alfred, deceased ; 
Nicholas, deceased ; Amelia, deceased ; Emma, who lives at Tamaqua : Jacob, 
of Tamaqua; Henry, of Tamaqua; Frances, of Bayonne, N. J.; Ella, of 
Tamaqua ; and Alice, widow of Roger Kinsel, of Tamaqua. 

WILLIAM FRANCIS DOYLE, M. D., is one of the leading physicians 
of Pottsville, where he has been in practice since he commenced on his own 
account, and, though his time is well occupied with his professional duties, he 
has also kept up interest in such local affairs as afl^ect the general welfare. He 
is a native of Schuylkill County, born June 25, 1874, in Blythe Township, 
son of Thomas Doyle and grandson of Michael Doyle. The grandfather was 
born in Queen's County, Ireland, and emigrated from that country in 1833, 
settling in Schuylkill County, Pa. By occupation he was a miner, and was 
employed at such work on his own account in Blythe Township. His death 
occurred in 1856 at New Philadelphia, this County. He married Mary Welsh, 
and they had a family of five children, two sons and three daughters. 

Thomas Doyle, son of Michael, was bom Dec. 19. 1838, in Norwegian 
Township, Schuylkill Co., Pa. He had few educational advantages in his 
early life, though he attended public school in Blythe Township for a time. 
However, he was but twelve years old when he left school to go to work at the 



SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PEKXSYLVANL\ 241 

mines. Though he began in an humble position, he rose steadily to one of 
great responsibility. It was often said that there was no work about a colliery, 
inside or outside, with which he was not familiar, as he had been employed 
in ever)' position about the mines. In i86y he became Inside Mine Boss at 
a colliery near Silver Creek, where he remained for four years. About 1873 
he entered the employ of the Philadelphia & Reading Coal & Iron Company 
as Mine Inspector of what was then known as the Pottsville District. Not 
long afterwards he became Superintendent of the Tremont District for the 
same Company, and held that position four years, in 1878 being transferred 
back to the Pottsville District as Superintendent, for one year. The next year 
he acted as assistant to Air. John V'eith, General Superintendent of all the 
mines of the Company, and in 1880 was made Division Superintendent of the 
Southern District, in which position he continued to serve until his death. The 
territory under his supervision was large, including all mines of the Company 
south of the Broad Mountain. Mr. Doyle's experience and his intelligent 
comprehension of all the needs of his work made his services valuable beyond 
the ordinary, and his ability, good judgment and devotion to duty were flior- 
oughly understood by his superiors, who appreciated them at their true worth. 
He was a man of the highest personal character and respected by all with 
whom he came in contact, either in his business or social relations. 

Mr. Doyle was twice married, and si.x children were born to his first 
union, with Julia Keane, daughter of Patrick Keane, namely: Michael, 
Julia, John, Mary, William Francis and Thomas. His second marriage was 
to Mrs. Margaret (Reilly) Branagan, daughter of Bernard Reilly and sister 
of Hon. James B. Reilly, representative of the Thirteenth Pennsylvania Dis- 
trict in Congress. To this marriage were bom two children, Margaret and 
James. By her first union Mrs. Doyle had one daughter, Ellen. Mr. Doyle 
died July 26, 1903, and is buried at Pottsville. 

Dr. \\'illiam Francis Doyle obtained the greater part of his preparatory 
education in the public schools of Pottsville, graduating from the Pottsville 
High School and later spending one year as a student at the Ufniversity of 
Pennsylvania. In 1893 l"*^ entered Hahnemann Medical College, at Philadel- 
phia, from which institution he was graduated in 1896. In December of that 
year he became Interne at the Metropolitan Hospital in New York City, where 
he remained until June, 1898, also taking a course of study at the College of 
Physicians and Surgeons of New York. He then opened an office at Tarry- 
town, N. Y., where he soon had a lucrative practice, which, however, he gave 
up to return to his native town, because of his father's permanent ill health. 
Locating at Pottsville in 1899, he has found his field of work there ever since, 
and has built up a large practice as physician and surgeon by unremitting atten- 
tion to his work wherever his services have been engaged. His office is at 
No. 416 Garfield Square, he being the third generation of homeopathic physi- 
cians to practice at this location — his predecessors having been an uncle and 
grandfather by marriage, the late Dr. Charles Herman Haeseler and his father, 
Dr. Charles Haeseler, one of the founders of homeopathy in this section of 
the State. 

Dr. Doyle holds membership in various medical societies : The Pottsville 
Medical Club, the Schuylkill County Homeopathic Medical Society, the Homeo- 
pathic Medical Society of Pennsylvania, the Schuylkill County Medical Society, 
the Pennsylvania Medical Society, and the American Medical Association, and 
has prepared medical papers on various subjects for these and other societies. 
Vol. 1—16 



242 SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 

Socially Dr. Doyle belongs to the B. P. O. Elks (Lodge No. 207), the Com- 
mercial Club, the Rotary Club and the Knights of Columbus of Pottsville. 
He is a member of St. Patrick's Catholic Church. 

Dr. Doyle's success has rested upon the solid foundation of hard work and 
close attention to the demands of his profession, his patients appreciating the 
devotion and skill which have gained him so large a share of the confidence 
of the community. As a citizen he can be relied upon to support the best 
interests of the community, whether in private or public enterprises. 

Dr. Doyle married Louise G., only daughter of the late Adolph W. Schalck, 
a leading attorney of Pottsville, and they have one son, Francis Schalck 
Doyle. 

ABRAHAM POTT SELIGMAN, M. D., of Alahanoy City, is descended 
in both paternal and maternal lines from honored old stock in Schuylkill 
county of which he himself is an honorable representative in the present gen- 
eration. Bom Feb. 14, 1870, at Port Carbon, this county, he is a son of Joseph 
Seligman and grandson of Solomon Seligman, and on the paternal side is of 
German extraction. 

Solomon Seligman came to Schuylkill county from Germany. His first 
settlement here was at Ringtown, whence he removed to Port Carbon in the 
early days of that borough, following merchandising during his residence there. 
Later in life he located at Mahanoy City, where he died when seventy-eight 
y&ars old. His wife, Elizabeth (Maurer), was born in Norwegian township, 
this county, and they had children as follows : Abraham, Laura, Joseph, Ben- 
jamin, Hannah, Emma, Albert, David A. and George. 

Joseph Seligman, son of Solomon, was born and reared at Port Carbon, 
but during most of his business career has been established at Mahanoy City. 
For a time in his earlier manhood he was engaged as a merchant at St. Clair, 
moving thence to Mahanoy City, where he became a mine superintendent. For 
the last thirty years he has been a timber contractor, supplying much timber 
for the mines in the district, and is still actively interested in this line ; he is a 
director of the LTnion National Bank of Mahanoy City. By his marriage to 
Emma C. Pott, daughter of Abraham and Elizabeth (Christian) Pott, he had 
four children, namely: Bessie, now the wife of Dr. James H. Hagenbuch, of 
Mahanoy City, Pa.; Bertha, deceased: Lettie : and Abraham Pott. Mrs. 
Seligman died in 1907. 

Abraham Pott Seligman obtained his preliminary education in the public 
schools of Mahanov City, and took his regular medical course at the Jefferson 
Medical College, Philadelphia, graduating in 1892. Being ambitious to make 
his preparation as thorough as possible he then took a post-graduate course 
at the Hahnemann [Medical College of Philadelphia, which he completed in 
1894, the same year beginning practice at Mahanoy City. He has remained 
here continuously since, giving his best to the community of his choice. While 
his professional labors among his private patrons have had first claim lie has 
combined them vev}' effectively with ser\'ices of general usefulness to his gen- 
eration. For the last five years he has been a member of the borough school 
board, and has been chosen president of that body. The Doctor is a member 
of the Schuylkill Medical Society, the Pennsylvania State Medical Society, 
and the .\merican ]\Iedical Association. His fondness for outdoor sports has 
led him into many pleasant associations, and fraternally he is an enthusiastic 
:\Iason, a past high priest of Mizpah Chapter, No. 252, R. A. M. ; member of 



SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENNSYL\'ANL\ 243 

Ivanhoe Chapter, K. T. ; of Caldwell Consistory, Bloomsburg; and Rajah 
Temple, A. A. O. N. M. S., of Reading; he is also a past officer in the local 
lodge of Elks. 

Dr. Seligman married Mary Matilda Shafer, daughter of David Shafer, 
of Mahanoy City, and they have two children. Bertha and James. 

In the maternal line Dr. Seligman traces his ancestry back to John Pott, 
who with his two sons, John Wilhelm and Johannes (minors), and his brother 
Dagenheart arrived in Philadelphia from Rotterdam, Holland, on the ship 
"St. Andrew," Capt. John Steadman, in 1734. He first settled in Germantown, 
afterwards removing to what is now Oley, Berks (then Philadelphia) county, 
Pennsylvania. 

John \Mlhelm Pott was born in 1725 in Europe (place uncertain), married 
Maria Hock, daughter of John Hock, and died in 1767. 

John Pott, son of John A\'ilhelm, was born in Oley township in 1757, and 
died in 1827. In 1786 he married Maria Lesher, daughter of John Lesher. 
She was born in 1768 and died in 1823. 

Abraham Pott, son of John and Maria (Lesher) Pott, was born in Potts- 
ville, and one of his daughters, Emma C, was the mother of Dr. Seligman. 
Another, Mrs. Elizabeth (Pott) Eshleman, born March 4, 1831, died in 
December, 1893; her daughter, Mrs. Cora L. Miller, was born April 11, 1848; 
tJie latter's daughter. Mrs. Annie (Miller) Melick, was born July 11, 1867, and 
had children, Joel ^^'illit and Jamie. 

!Mrs. Maria (Hock) Pott, wife of John Wilhelm Pott, was a granddaughter 
of Rudolph Hock, who emigrated to this countrjr with his brother Melchoir 
in 17 1 7, coming first to what was then Philadelphia county, in the Province 
of \'irginia. They finally settled in Oley. Pa., near Pikeville, and the old home 
there is still owned by the Hock family. Rudolph Hock had two sons, John 
and Samuel, John being the father of Mrs. Maria Pott. He had eleven 
children, born as follows: Deborah, May 6, 1721 ; Samuel, March, 1723; 
Rudolph, September, 1725; Daneal, May, 1728; Maria, December, 1730; Mag- 
dalena, December, 1730; John, March, 1733; Susanna, May, 1735; Jacob, 
December, 1738; Esther. September, 1742; Abraham, September, 1745. 

Through the Leshers Dr. Seligman is of Revolutionary stock, being a great- 
grandson of John Lesher, who was born in Holland Jan. 5, 171 1, and die^ 
April 5, 1794. He was buried at Oley, Berks county, where he had settled 
upon his immigration to America, in 1734. The territory was then Philadel- 
phia county. He was a freeholder and a leading man of his time, for a period 
of fifty years being prominently identified with the iron industry in Berks 
county, as proprietor of the "Oley Forge" and the "Mary Ann Furnace." 
His name is found on the records both Lesher and Leosher. In 1759, during 
the French and Indian war, he served as wagonmaster, being appointed because 
he spoke both English and German. When the struggle for independence 
was being waged in the Colonies he was one of the foremost men active in 
the cause of his section, useful in every branch of the service. Pie was 
chaplain in Colonel Patton's regiment of the Pennsylvania Line, with which 
he served in the Revolution, being in the campaign commencing with the battle 
of Long Island, Aug. 27. 1776. According to Montgomery's history of Berks- 
county (page 145) he was captain of the company from that county in Patton's 
regiment. On June 20, 1776. he was notified' of his appointment (which 
appointment was made March 2, 1778) as one of the commissioners for pur- 
chasing supplies for the Continental army (Pennsylvania Archives, Vol. VI, 



244 SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENNSYLVANL\ 

page 32). He was elected a member of the General Assembly of Pennsylvania, 
serving as such from 1776 to 1782; and was a member of the First Constitu- 
tional Convention of Pennsylvania, held at Carpenter's Hall June 18, 1776, 
and was one of the committee of ten chosen to draw up an essay for a form 
of government (Hughes' "American Constitution," Vol. H, page 217). 

Mr. Lesher was a member of the Reformed Church, "an active Christian 
gentleman," and on his application the courts granted him the privilege of 
building the First Reformed Church at Oley, Berks county, which he did in 
the year 175.=;. He suggested that the courts should direct five or six ministers 
to conduct divine services, and Dominies Weiss, Schalter and Steiner were 
appointed to supply the congregation. 

John Lesher was a native of Germany, born Jan. 5, 171 1, only son and 
heir-at-law of Michael Lesher. He emigrated to Pennsylvania in 1734, and 
first settled in the upper section of Bucks county, but later in Oley township. 
Berks county. He was naturalized in 1743. In 1744 he and two other mep, 
John Yoder and John Ross, erected a forge along the Manatawny creek, near 
the Oley Church, which became known as the "Oley Forge," and from that 
time on for fifty years he was prominently identified with the iron industry of 
the county. He represented the county in the Constitutional Convention of 
1776, and helped to prepare the "Declaration of Rights." He served in the 
General Assembly from 1776 to 1782. During the Revolution he acted as one 
of the commissioners for purchasing army supplies. He addressed an interest- 
ing letter to the Supreme Executive Council in 1778, relative to the taking 
of supplies from him. (See Berks County in the Revolution, page 181.) 
John Lesher died in Oley township, April 5. 1794, leaving a widow, two sons 
"and five datighters. namely: John (had a son Isaac). Jacob.' Barbara (married 
Jacob Morgan), Hannah (married George Focht), Maria (married John 
Pott), Catharine (married John Tysher) and Elizabeth. 

HORACE F. REBER. Among the citizens of southern Schuylkill county 
worthy of mention is Horace F. Reber. editor and one of the publishers of the 
Pine (irove Herald, a weekly paper, which has a strong clientele in western and 
southern Schuylkill county. It is one of the most influential weeklies in the 
county. 

Mr. Reber is the son of Franklin W. Reber and his wife Rebecca (Man- 
beck), and was born at White Horse, now Rock, in Washington township, 
Schuylkill county, on Feb. 25, 1866. His grandparents on his mother's side 
were John Manbeck, of the same place, and his wife Barbara (Katerman), 
from Strausstown, Berks county. 

On his father's side the grandparents were George Reber, of the Deibert's 
valley. South Manheim township, Schuylkill county, and his wife Maria 
(Rushy), of near Reading, Berks county. The great-grandparents of Mr. 
Reber were George and Katherine (Miller) Reber. both from near Reading, 
Berks county. 

The Rebers are of German descent. Between the year 1732 and the year 
of the breaking out of the Revolutionary war a number of the name emigrated 
to this country, landing at the ports of New York or Philadelphia. The 
family name is quite prominent in southern Schuylkill and northern Berks 
counties, including the city of Reading. The Rebers are identified with the 
business, profes.sional, manufacturing and social life of the counties of Schuyl- 
kill and Berks as well as the farming life of the two counties. Rebersburg, 



SCHUYI.KILL COUxXTY, PEXXSYLWAXIA 245 

in Centre county, is named after the family of Reber, a number having settled 
in that county. 

Franklin W. Reber was born Aug. 30, 1831, in the Deibert's valley, near 
Schuylkill Haven, and was the oldest of thirteen children: Franklin \V., aged 
eighty-five, is still living ; Sallie married Fred Hasler, and both are deceased ; 
Isaac, of Indiana, who fought in the Civil war in an Indiana regiment, is 
deceased; George, of Reading, is deceased; Elizabeth married Flenry Deibert, 
and both are deceased; Levi died of smallpox many years ago; Mary, widow 
of Jonathan Emerich, is residing at Port Carbon ; Jonathan is now residing 
in Philadelphia ; Giileon is residing at Reading ; Lewis, of Missouri, is deceased ; 
Albert lives in South Manheim township, on the'old homestead near Schuylkill 
Haven ; Amanda is a widow and lives at Schuylkill Haven ; Alexander, a Read- 
ing Railway conductor, resides at Reading. Five of the sons served in the 
Civil war, namely: George and Lewis in the 127th Pennsylvania X'olunteer 
Infantr}', the latter being captured at Fredericksburg, in 1862, and afterwards 
paroled ; Isaac served in an Indiana regiment ; Jonathan and Gideon served 
in Company E of the famous jth Pennsylvania \'eteran \'olunteer Cavalry, 
all having honorable records. 

Franklin W. Reber commenced teaching in the public schools at the age of 
eighteen, in 1849, ^t Long Run, and taught nine terms, being one of the 
oldest ex-school teachers in the county. The rest of his time was devoted to 
farming. He was wedded to Rebecca Manbeck on Oct. 21, 1854. by Rev. John 
Schell, of the Evangelical Association, on Mahantongo street, Pottsville, and 
on Oct. 21, 1915, they observed the sixty-first wedding anniversary, being the 
oldest married couple living in that section of the State. 

There were but two children born to Franklin W. Reber and wife, the 
eldest being Mary Alice, who married Charles F. Molly, of Pine Grove. She 
died at Reading Feb. 25, 1897. Horace F. Reber was thirteen years old when 
the family moved to Pine Grove, where the parents and the son and his family 
still reside, and where Mr. Reber attended the public schools. He served as 
clerk in the store of his father, who was associated with his son-in-law in 
the mercantile business in the Molly stand on North Tulpehocken street. 
Horace F. Reber graduated from the Pine Grove high school in the class of 
1885, under Prof. G. W. Channell, later of Port Carbon. For a short time he 
worked at the D. & J. Gensemer tannery, and later on the work train of the 
Reading railway, where he was advanced to the scale office in October of that 
year under weighmaster Samuel Morrett Helms. On May 12, 1887, he was 
wedded to Ella R. Hoffman, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John P. Hoffman, of 
Tower City, and this union was blessed with six children, namely: Florence 
v.. who graduated from the Pine Grove high school and later from the Millers- 
ville State Normal School, taught school at Irving, Pine Grove, and Lykens, 
and is at present teaching at Schuylkill Haven ; Norman Dean graduated from 
the Pine Grove high school and later from the Schissler Business College at 
Norristown, served as a page in the House of Representatives at Harrisburg 
in the session of 1903, and is now the head accountant for the two Gensemer 
& Salen tanneries at Pine Grove; Ferd. L. graduated from the Pine Grove 
high school, and the Peirce Business College, at Philadelphia, and is at present 
resort solicitor for the Philadelphia Record and identified with the Philadel- 
phia Oioral Society; Harold McM. graduated from the Pine Grove high 
school and later from the Lebanon Business College, and is at present clerk 
for Messrs. Simon & Sherman, slaughterers, at Reading (prior to serving with 



246 SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PEXXSYL\'ANL\ 

this firm he was a chauffeur for the Toms River, N. J., garage for a year, 
where he became an enthusiastic autoist and expert at the wheel) ; Esther E. 
graduated from the Pine Grove high school and is at present clerking in the 
health department at Harrisburg; I)'orothy is a member of the senior class of 
the Pine Grove high school and expects to graduate with the class of 1916, 
when the father and six children will have graduated from the same high 
school. 

The Reber family were first identified with the Whig party, the father 
of Horace F. Reber casting his first vote for the "Pathfinder," Gen. John C. 
Fremont, and later with the Republican party. When yet in his teens the 
subject of this sketch evinced an interest in politics and served in the many 
marching clubs that the town used to have in presidential and gubernatorial 
campaigns. After attaining his majority he was elected to the borough council 
and later to the board of education; while a member of the council and near 
the close of the tenn he resigned, having been elected to a county office ; sub- 
sequently he was elected to the school board and served with Edward Hummel, 
Joseph Schwalm, Frank Evans, Samuel Reinbold and Dr. F. J. Walter, all 
of whom were deadlocked on the election of teachers and ousted by the court. 
Mr. Reber was afterwards reinstated, and in November, 1915, was again 
elected to the school board under the new code, defeating his opponent, Joseph 
Schwalm, by a big majority. 

On June 8, 1891, Mr. Reber joined Company G, 4th Regiment, National 
Guard of Pennsylvania, as a private. He filled the position of company clerk 
under Capt. James W. Umbenhauer, and later was elected second lieutenant 
of the same company; he served in the riots at Homestead in 1892, and in 
1897 at Drifton and Hazleton, following the Lattimer riots. He tendered his 
resignation because of confliction with his civil duties and was honorably dis- 
charged on Feb. 19, 1898, by Col. David Brainerd Case, of Columbia. 

Fraternally Mr. Reber has been a member of Camp No. 49, P. O. S. of A., 
and Castle No. 124, Knights of the Golden Eagle, for many years; in the latter 
he served as one of the trustees for many years, and as one of the instructors 
for fifty-four terms ; also as representative to many State Grand Castle sessions, 
and was tendered the nomination to be advanced to State offices in Grand 
Castle, but declined. He has also, at some time or other, belonged to a 
number of political clubs in the county and elsewhere, including the Union 
Republican Club of North Broad street, Philadelphia. 

On Jan. i, 1894, Mr. Reber entered the office of the county commissioners 
as a second assistant clerk, under chief clerk Phil J. Connell. The commis- 
sioners at that time inducted into office were John P. Martin, of Pine Grove, 
Democrat ; Charles F. Allen, of Tamaqua, and Frank Rentz, of Ashland, 
Republicans, the latter the president of the board. On Jan. i, 1895, he was 
appointed first assistant clerk, or tax clerk, ser\-ing in this capacity until Jan. i, 
1897, when with the reelection of Frank Rentz and John P. Martin and the 
election of Charles F. Meyers he was appointed chief clerk, serving in that 
capacity until May, 1898, when the board was dropped from office as the 
result of a court trial, Frank R. Kantner, of Lofty, and John Stauft'er, of 
Schuylkill Haven, being appointed as commissioners. In November of that 
year Benjamin Kauffman, of Tremont. became the third member of the board. 
All the appointed officials of the board were dropped excepting Mr. Reber. 
who was appointed first assistant clerk under John F. Zerbey, and served until 
the end of 1899. Having become a candidate for the office during that year 



SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 247 

and elected by the highest majority of the commissioners for that year, he 
was inducted into office as a county commissioner with Frank R. Kantner and 
George Opie. of Donaldson, being one of the youngest men ever elected to 
that important oftice in Schuylkill county. He and his colleagues served for 
two terms, or during the years 1900, 1901, 1902, 1903, 1904 and 1905. 

In 1906 Mr. Reber formed a business partnership with John Reber, of 
Fourteenth and Market streets, Pottsville, for the manufacture of hosiery, 
and a plant was erected on a lot purchased from the P. & R. Railway Com- 
pany, on East Pottsville street, on which was erected a frame factory. In 
addition to the manufacture of hosiery the firm also operated a coal washery 
in the Swatara creek, which provided fuel for the plant. The latter part of 
1909 Mr. Reber sold out his interest to his partner, John Reber, and in Decem- 
ber of that year became associated with Charles F. Anderson in publishing the 
Pine Grove Herald, in which business he still continues. He is also engaged 
in reportorial work for a number of daily newspapers from his community. 
While in the hosiery manufacturing business he had installed his own little 
electric light plant, which was the first of its kind to be installed in that section 
of the county. Other industries in the town have since followed in the wake 
of electric liglit. 

Mr. Reber and his family are identified with the Methodist Church of his 
home town, in which he is one of the officials. Possessed of a genial disposi- 
tion, he is a man who makes friends readily and possesses the happy faculty 
of holding them. His political opponents have at various times tried their 
utmost to hang a political defeat over his head, but have not been able to do 
so yet. He has frequently of late years been appealed to by the leaders of his 
party at the county seat to consent to run for the State Legislature, being 
considered good timber. But though it would be desirable to place a candidate 
in the western end of Schuylkill county, he has shooed the legislative bee away 
thus far, being at present content to help run a newspaper and help his political 
friends when appealed to. 

WILLIAM R. ADAMSON. of St. Nicholas, is one of the most successful 
merchants in that section of Schuylkill county. Since 1904 he has been post- 
master at St. Nicholas and member of the firm of Noonan & Adamson, general 
merchants. He has just entered upon his duties as county treasurer. Mr. 
Adamson is a native of Schuylkill county and of Scotch descent, his father, 
David Adamson, and grandfather, W'illiam Adamson, having been born in 
Scotland, whence the latter brought his family to America in 1850. They 
settled at Branch Dale, Schuylkill Co., Pa., where he followed mining, and 
he died there Dec. 3, 1876. 

David Adamson was a boy when he accompanied, his parents to this country, 
and he had few advantages of any kind, for he began mine work as a slate 
picker. But he was intelligent, ambitious and trustworthy, possessing the 
strong mental, moral and physical characteristics typical of his race, and he 
rose to the position of foreman, acting in that capacity at the Excelsior colliery 
in Northumberland county, and Sufl'olk and Maple Hill collieries, in Schuylkill 
county, in turn. He became well known to many in the mining circles of this 
region. His death occurred when he was sixty-four years of age, and he is 
buried in the Charles Baber cemetery at Pottsville. Mr. Adamson married 
Jennie Pace, who was born in England and came to America when a young 
girl, and "she sur\-ives him, now living with her son William at St. Nicholas. 



248 SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 

Two children were born to Mr. and Mrs. David Adamson, William R. and 
John O. ; the latter is an attorney at law, and resides at Mahanoy City. 

William R. Adamson was born Oct. 4, 1876, at Branch Dale, Schuylkill 
Co., Pa., and spent most of his boyhood in Mahanoy township, this county, 
where he attended the public schools. He then took a commercial course at 
McCann's business college, and when a youth obtained a position as clerk at 
the Ellangowan colliery, where he remained continuously for a period of 
thirteen years, until he found his present business connection. Meantime, in 
1904, he had been appointed postmaster at St. Nicholas, and he has held the 
office ever since. In February, 1904, Mr. Adamson formed a partnership 
with Frank J. Noonan, under the hrm name of Noonan & Adamson, and he 
has since had the principal care of their store at St. Nicholas, which is well 
stocked and a popular trading center in that portion of the county. Mr. Noonan 
is a leading business man of Mahanoy City, vice president of the Union 
National Bank and member of the firm of Noonan Brothers, who started the 
establishment at St. Nicholas now conducted by Noonan & Adamson. Noonan 
Brothers transferred their business to Mahanoy City from St. Nicholas in 
1906, but the original store has continued to draw a profitable trade. Mr. 
Adamson is a man of sound business principles, diligent in looking after his 
interests and thoroughly honorable in all his transactions, qualities which have 
combined happily to place his atifairs on a substantial basis and win him high 
standing among all his associates. The office of postmaster has not been his 
only public trust. For the last thirteen years he has been a member of the 
Mahanoy township board of school directors, and is now secretary of that 
body. He has been prominent in the activities of the Republican party, and 
has been delegate to the county conventions on various occasions. At the 
primaries in the spring of 19 1 5 he was chosen as nominee for the office of 
county treasurer, and at the polls in November following was elected by the 
gratifying plurality of 8,548. He assumed the responsibilities of his new trust 
in January, 1916. Socially Mr. Adamson is a Mason, a member of Mahanoy 
City Lodge, No. 357, F. & A. M., Mizpah Qiapter, No. 252, R. A. M., and 
Ivanhoe Commandery, No. 31, K. T., all of Mahanoy City; he also belongs 
to Lodge No. 695, B. P. O. Elks, and Council No. iii, Jr. O. U. A. M., both 
of Mahanoy City. His religious connection is with the Slethodist Church. 

Mr. Adamson married Martha Cathers, of this district, and they are the 
parents of eight children : Jennie, David, Luther, Anna, Thomas, John, 
Martha and Agnes. 

JOHN HARRY FILBERT, a well known attorney of the Schuylkill county 
bar, is descended of a long line of ancestry whose beginning dates far back into 
antiquity. 

The family name of Filbert is one of the oldest in the Teutonic language, 
being derived from "fiel brecht," which means very bright or illustrious. This 
appellation was borne by many of the old Teutonic chieftains, whose descend- 
ants carried it into all the countries of western Europe in their early conquests. 
Formerly the name was spelled "Philbert" and "Philibert." and in England it 
exists in both the forms "Philbert" and "Filbert," while in France and Italy it 
has survived as "Philibert." 

St. Philibert, who founded the Abbey of Jumieges, on the north bank of 
the Seine, and died in 683, had been an Abbot at the I\Ierovingian court. He 
was so greatly beloved by the peasantry that at his death they took his "day, 



SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 249 

Aug. 22(1, to gather the hazel nut which ripened in that locality about that time, 
and called it St. Filbert's nut. The admiral of the French fleet that made the 
demonstration against Morocco several years ago belonged to the French 
branch of the family. Philibert, Prince of Orange, was one of the generals of 
Charles \\, and fell in the Italian campaign of 1529; several counts of the 
name ruled over Savoy in the twelfth century, and the descendants of Emman- 
uel Philibert of Savoy became kings of Sardinia, and later kings of Italy. 

The American branch of the family traces its ancestry to the great-great- 
great-grandfather of Mr. Filbert, (I) John Samuel Filbert, who was bom in 
Wurtemberg, Germany, Jan. 8, 1710, and who with his wife Susanna came to 
thr- New World on the ship "Samuel," Hugh Percy, master, sailing from Rot- 
tei dam, and took the oath of allegiance to the Crown of Great Britain and the 
Province of Pennsylvania at Philadelphia Aug. 30, 1737. He spelled the name 
"Filbert," but Rev. John Caspar Stover, who kept the baptismal records of 
the family, spelled it "Philbert." The children of John Samuel Filbert were: 
John Thomas, 1737- 1784, married to Catherine Batteiger; Maria Catrina, born 
1730, married to John Heinrich Ache; Anna Elizabeth, born 1741, married to 
John Henry Webber, a captain in the Revolutionary war; John Phillip (1743- 
181/) ; John Peter, born 1746, who was a delegate from the ist battalion of 
Berks county militia to the convention held in Lancaster July 4, 1776, to elect 
three brigadier generals for the Pennsylvania and Delaware militia, and who 
was elected sheriff of Berks county in 17S5; and Maria Christina, born 1749, 
married to Jost Ruth. 

As the father and three sons had the first name "John" in common they 
dropped it in active life, and the only places it can be found are on their bap- 
tismal records and tombstones. 

Samuel Filbert and his wife Susanna settled immediately on coming to 
this country in Bern township, Lancaster (now Berks) county, at the present 
site of Bernville. Samuel Filbert and Godfried Fidler each gave an acre of 
grovmd to the North Kill Lutheran Church at Bernville, and a log church was 
built in 1743 on the part donated by Samuel Filbert. Tradition says that he 
paid half of the cost of the building, which was used as a church on the 
Sabbath and as a school on weekdays. In 1791 the log church was replaced 
by a brick building, at which time his son Phillip acted as president of the 
building committee. In 1897 the present handsome brownstone edifice was 
erected on the same ground. Back of the chancel in the new building is a 
beautiful stained glass window dedicated to "Samuel Filbert, Founder, 1743." 
He died Sept. 25, 1786, and is buried in the center of the old churchyard. 

(II) John Phillip Filbert, son of Samuel and Susanna, was born Dec. 7, 
1743. He was commissioned as a captain of the 8th Company of the 6th 
Battalion of Berks county inilitia June 14, 1777, and was recommissioned in 
1780, 1783 and 1786, so that he served as an officer of the Pennsylvania militia 
during the whole period of the Revolution. Capt. Phillip Filbert's battalion 
was mustered into the Continental service on Dec. 13, 1777, for sixty days, 
and was engaged under General Washington in the Schuylkill valley, between 
'Valley Forge and Germantown. He was married to Anna Maria Meyers and 
had three children : Samuel, mentioned below ; John, married to Anna ]\Iaria 
Leiss ; and Catherine, married to William Alachimer. He died Aug. 20, 1817, 
and is buried at Bernville. 

(III) Samuel Filbert (about 1770-1795), eldest son of Phillip and Anna 



250 SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENXSYLVAXL\ 

Maria, married Sibylla, daughter of Francis Umbenhaur, a captain in the 
Revolutionary war. He left two sons : Joseph, who died in 1804, and Peter. 

(IV) Peter Filbert, son of Samuel and Sibylla, was born at Bernville, 
Berks county, in 1794. His father died when he was about six months old, 
leaving his two sons to the guardianship of their grandfathers Phillip Filbert 
and Francis Umbenhaur. In 1814 he enlisted with the troops called out for 
the defense of Baltimore against the British army, and marched under Captain 
Smith to Springfield camp, near that city, and after the retreat of the British 
was honorably discharged from the service. In 1818 he married Elizabeth, 
daughter of John Stoudt, and the next year removed to Pine Grove, Schuylkill 
county, to take charge of the Pine Grove Forge. Peter and Elizabeth Filbert 
had the following children: Samuel P., married to Lavina Lamm; Edward T., 
married to Mary Clayton; Peter A. (who was a major in the 96th Regiment, 
Pennsylvania Volunteers, in the Civil war), married to Theodosia Reitzel; 
Leah, married to Dr. John Kitzmiller; Rebecca, married to F. W. Conrad, 
D. D. ; Sarah, married to Richard Musser; and John Q. A., mentioned below. 
Mr. Filbert was the presidential elector chosen to represent this district in 
the election of 1840, and cast his vote for the successful candidate, William 
Henry Harrison. He died Feb. 14, 1864. 

(V) John Ouincy Adams Filbert, son of Peter and Elizabeth, was born in 
Pine Grove, Schuylkill county, Feb. 11, 1827. At the age of sixteen he served 
in the engineer corps of the late Col. Benjamin Aycrigg. Later on he removed 
to York, Pa., and then to Baltimore, Md., where he lived when the Civil war 
broke out. Mr. Filbert was a stanch Unionist and was one of the men who 
helped save Maryland for the Union. When it was reported that the Con- 
federates were going to seize the city, he stood in the trenches to help guard it. 
All the coal yards of the city were in the hands of Southern sympathizers, who 
would not coal the government vessels, and the government did not dare to 
confiscate them for fear of further inflaming sentiment. Mr. Filbert at the 
request of the leaders of the Union element in the city came up to Schuylkill 
county and made arrangements to procure coal for the national vessels. He 
returned to his native county in 1866, residing on his farm in North Manheim 
township, below Schuylkill Haven, for thirty-five years. On April 30, 1856, 
he was married to Mary, daughter of Michael G. and Mary (Harman) Beltz- 
hoover, of Boiling Springs. Pa., and they had the following children : Benja- 
min Aycrigg; May E. ; Helen B., married to Dr. Gaylord A. Hitch, of Laurel, 
Del. ; Charles B., married to Florence Saulsbury, and residing in Muskogee, 
Oklahoma; and John Harry. The father died at Schuylkill Haven, Dec. 4, 
1910. 

(VI) John Harry Filbert was born in the city of Baltimore, Oct. 19, 1865. 
When he was only a few months old his parents removed to Schuylkill county, 
where he has resided ever since. He is a graduate of the Pottsville high school, 
and attended Pennsylvania College, at Gettysburg, Pa., and Williams College, 
^^■illiamstown, Mass. He registered as a student at law under the late Judge 
David C. Henning, and was admitted to practice law in the courts of Schuylkill 
county on the first day of January, 1894. 

Mr. Filbert takes 'a deep interest in educational matters, having been a 
member of the Midwinter Educational Club of Pottsville^ for upwards of 
twenty years. He was one of the incorporators of the Schuylkill County 
Historical Society and is its first vice president, and is one of the best read men 
in the community on local historical matters. He resides in Schuylkill Haven, 



SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENXSYLVANIA 251 

Pa., and maintains a law office in Pottsville. He has filled many local offices 
of honor and trust. Fraternally he is a member of Page Lodge, No. 270, 
F. & A. AL, at Schuylkill Haven, and a member of the Masonic Grand Lodge 
of Pennsylvania. He has never been married. 

JOHN H. ANGST has aj^plied the best efforts of his business years to the 
institution of which he is now the head, the Pine Grove Bank, the oldest finan- 
cial house of the borough. But he has also been occupied with other things of 
interest to the municipality, performing public duties and carrying social obli- 
gations which indicate clearly his sincere desire to lead a life of service. His 
work has been attended with the success which shows that it has been laid 
on a solid foundation. 

Mr. Angst bears a name which has been respected in this section for several 
generations. His grandfather, John Angst, was born in Pine Grove township, 
and was a blacksmith by occupation, his son, William H. Angst, father of 
John H. Angst, also following that calling. The latter had a shop of his own 
here for many years. He was born in Pine Grove township, where he still 
makes his home. William H. Angst married Eliza Mars, who was born in 
Pine Grove township, of Irish ancestry; her father, William Mars, a cabinet- 
maker by trade, came to Schuylkill county from Lancaster county. Pa., settling 
in Pine Grove township at an early day and continuing to reside there imtil his 
death. Mrs. Angst died in February, 1905. the mother of four children, 
namely: Sallie, the eldest, is living at home; John LI. is next in the family; 
Mamie is the wife of John Wolf and is residing at Pine Grove; Clara is the 
wife of John Ansbach, a farmer of Pine Grove township. 

John H. Angst was born Feb. 24, 1873, in Pine Grove township, where he 
gained his early education. During his younger manhood he followed teaching 
for ten terms in Pine Grove township, in the year 1900 entering the employ 
of John F. \\'erntz, in the Pine Grove Bank, with which he has since been 
connected. The bank, which was established by Mr. Werntz in 1886, was car- 
ried on as a private bank until his death, in 1909. Mr. Werntz was the first 
president and continued to fill the office to the end of his life, when his widow, 
Mrs. Catherine (Mars) Werntz, succeeded him. Upon Mr. Werntz's death 
Mr. Angst was made cashier, and practically the entire responsibility is in his 
hands. The bank is in sound condition, with a paid-up capital of $93,000 and 
deposits of twice that amount, and the resources are placed at $223,000. 
Mr. Angst had careful training under Air. Werntz, and his ability has devel- 
oped with the increase of his responsibilities, which he has managed admirably. 
Under his guidance the affairs of the bank have been regulated intelligently and 
competently, and its prestige has risen accordingly. 

Air. Angst has been the choice of his fellow citizens for local office and has 
served satisfactorily as justice of the peace of Pine Grove and member of the 
board of school directors. He was again elected a school director, of Pine 
Grove borough, in November, 191 5. He is prominent in fraternal work at 
Pine Grove, being a member of the Blue Lodge, No. 409. F. & A. M., of Pine 
Grove; of the Royal Arcanum (trustee of the Pine Grove lodge) ; of the L O. 
O. F. lodge, which he has served as secretary for ten years ; and of the 
Improved Order of Red Men. He and his wife belong to the Lutheran 
Church. 

In 1896 Mr. Angst married Clara Boger, of Lebanon county. Pa., daughter 
of Adam and Anna (Dohner) Boger, farming people of that county, both now 



252 SCHUYLKILL COIJNTY, PENNSYLVANL\ 

deceased. Six children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Angst: Roy (a 
student), Minerva, Anna, Mabel, Mary and Delia. 

OSCAR KNIPE, of Orwigsburg, is the executive head of the firm of the 
Oscar Knipe Company, recently incorporated. He came to the borough in 
1892, and throughout the period of his residence there has been engaged in his 
present line, the manufacture of paper boxes, in the development of which he 
has shown commendable enterprise, taking advantage of conditions in the local 
manufacturing lield. The convenience of having a box factory immediately 
at hand was promptly recognized by the factory owners in the vicinity, and 
Mr. Knipe has adapted his output so thoroughly to their needs that he com- 
mands a large share of the patronage in this section. 

Mr. Knipe was bom Dec. 5, 1876, in Reading, Berks Co., Pa., son of Otto 
Knipe, a native of Dresden, Germany, who settled at Reading upon his arrival 
in America when a young man. By trade he was a printer, and he was employed 
on a German newspaper there. His death occurred in Oakland. Cal. He 
married Amelia Nebekind, and they had one son, Oscar. 

Oscar Knipe received his education at Reading, attending the public schools 
and Professor Stoner's business college, from which institution he was gradu- 
ated. Coming to Orwigsburg in 1892 he began work in his present line of 
business, and from modest beginnings has built up one of the most important 
industries of the kind in this region, the plant now operated by the Oscar Knipe 
Company being a two-story structure, 60 by 132 feet in dimensions. Thirty- 
five hands are employed in the production of paper boxes of all kinds, most of 
them for consumption in the local trade. The firm was known as Oscar Knipe 
& Company until July, 1914, when the Oscar Knipe Company was incorpo- 
rated with Air. Knipe as president, and Elwood L. Orwig. secretary and treas- 
urer. Though yet a young man Mr. Knipe has attained a foremost position 
among the live figures in the commercial life of Orwigsburg. and his coopera- 
tion in all the aflfairs of the borough is sought and appreciated. He is a mem- 
ber of Schuylkill Lodge, No. 138, F.' & A. M., and a past master of that body; 
he holds membership in the chapter and commandery at Pottsville. During 
the Spanish-.American war he was in the volunteer sen-ice as a member of 
Company F, 4th Pennsylvania Regiment (from Pottsville). 

Mr. Knipe married Florence Erb, daughter of the late Rev. I. N. S. Erb. a 
Lutheran minister of Or\vigsburg. They have had two children, Margaret 
and Marion, both of whom are now attending school. 

WILLIAM HOFF, Jr., has been at the head of the boroudi eovemment 
in Tremont for some years, and his competent administration of aflfairs is 
deeply appreciated by his fellow citizens, whose confidence is established on' his 
able perfonuance of all the trusts reposed in him. He is a creditable member 
of a family which has been resident in the borough for the last seventy years, 
and his maternal ancestors have been also identified with its progress for the 
same period. The family is one of long standing in Pennsylvania, Mr. Hofif's 
great-grandfather having lived and died at Reading, Berks county. His chil- 
dren were: William; Kate, who died in Reading; Eva, who married Paul 
Barr, of Pine Grove; Bright, Jacob and Henry, all deceased in Reading. 

William Hoff, the grandfather, was born in Reading, where he grew to 
manhood and married. He was the first of the family to settle in Schuylkill 
county, where he had a tanyard near Hegins and also a farm, being occupied 



SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PEXXSYL\\-\NL\ 253 

at his trade and agriculture for many years. In 1846 he moved with his 
family to Tremont, where he was a pioneer resident, and he became very 
successfully engaged in the real estate business here. His death occurred at 
Tremont, and he is buried in the Reformed cemetery. To his marriage with 
Esther Kimmel were born the following children: Catherine, who married 
Smion Fegley and (second) Conrad Buecher; Rebecca, who died unmarried: 
Rarbara, who died unmarried; John, who died unmarried; Sarah, wife of 
Hiram Pinkerton ; Eliza, wife of Sigmond Gardner; Emma, who died unmar- 
ried; Henry, who died unmarried; Richard; William; and Amanda, wife of 
Charles Graver. 

William Hoff, son of William and Esther (Kimmel) lloff, was born at 
Tremont and has passed all his life there. For some time he was employed at 
the mines in this section, but 'he is now doing business on his own account as 
a dealer in ice cream and confectionery, having established a very good trade 
in the borough. He married Sarah Bensinger, daughter of Charles IBensinger. 
and the following children were born to them: William, Jr.; Charles, who 
has been in the Philippine islands for the last eighteen years, being now in the 
government employ there (he served in the Spanish-American war) ; Carrie, at 
home; Bert: Arthur, and Harvey. Mrs. Hoff died Nov. 27, 1894. 

Charles Bensinger, Mrs. Hoft's father, was bom in the Mahantongo valley, 
and settled at Tremont about 1845, living there until his death, which occurred 
when he was o\er sixty years old. He was a carpenter, and was employed at 
that calling by the Philadelphia & Reading Railway Company. He married 
Justine Lengel, of Pine Grove, who survived him, living to the age of seventy- 
eight years ; she was at Tremont when there was but one house on the site of 
the town. To Mr. and Mrs. Bensinger were born the following children : 
Josiah, who is deceased ; Samuel, now living in Reading, Pa. ; Sarah, who 
married William Hoff ; and Jeremiah, a watchmaker, of Tremont. 

William Hoff, Jr., was born at Tremont July 10, 1877, '^"d obtained his 
education in the public schools of the borough. At the age of thirteen years 
he began work at the mines, being employed at the Brookside and Goodspring 
collieries, and for the last twenty years he has held the responsible position of 
coal inspector for the Philadelphia & Reading Coal & Iron Company. He has 
proved himself a man of reliable character, and worthy of the respect of his 
associates. Mr. Hoff has long been active in local public aft'airs, in which he 
has taken a leading part. In iqo8 he was elected to the office of chief burgess 
of Tremont. for a term of four years, which he completed, and he is now 
holding the office by appointment, having been selected for the honor by Judge 
Bechtel three years ago. His senices have been characterized by honorable, 
unselfish devotion to the best interests of the community, where his public 
spirit has won him esteem among the best element. He is one of the active 
members of the Tremont Fire Company, No. i, belongs to the I. O. O. F. 
lodge and encampment, and to the Royal Arcanum, and affiliates with the 
Democratic party on political issues. 

Mr. Hoff married Jennie Hepler, daughter of Benjamin and Rebecca 
(Koehler) Hepler, and they have two daughters: Carrie Rebecca and Mary 
Elizabeth. The family adhere to the Reformed faith in religion. 

THOiMAS C. O'CONNOR, of Mahanoy City, editor and manager of The 
Mahanoy City Record, is one of the most influential newspaper men in Schuyl- 
kill county and a power in the Democratic party in his county and State. Alert, 



254 SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENNSYLVANL\ 

aggressive and capable, he has gained flattering recognition in his section 
through the wholesome exercise of an energetic nature which could not help 
but be a live factor in any community where his lot might be cast. 

Mr. O'Connor was born in Heckscherville, in Cass township, Schuylkill 
county, June 9, 1863, son of the late Michael and Mary (Brennan) O'Connor. 
The father, a native of County Kilkenny, Ireland, born in 1829, came to this 
country when sixteen years old, and settled at Heckscherville, Schuylkill Co., 
Pa., where he found work at the mines as miner and foreman. He was so 
employed until his removal to Mahanoy City. His family consisted of nine 
children, seven sons and two daughters. Mr. O'Connor was always an inter- 
ested member of the Democratic party and bore a useful part in its local activi- 
ties. For a number of years he ser\ed as a school director in Cass township. 
He passed away May 29, 1896. 

Thomas C. O'Connor came to Mahanoy City in May, 1864, and here 
received his education, graduating from the high school in 1878. In his early 
manhood he followed the teacher's profession for fourteen tenns in Mahanoy 
City, being assistant in the high school when he gave up that work. On April 
15, 1894, he was appointed postmaster by President Cleveland, and served a full 
term of four years. Since June 17, 1899, he has been editor and manager of 
the Record, as well as one of the owners of the Record Publishing Company, 
which issues that publication, the most influential and widely circulated news- 
paper in northern Schuylkill county, and with no superiors in tlie southern part. 
Mr. O'Connor has been true to his original profession in the eitective work 
he has done in the interest of the public schools. His long experience gave 
him an insight into the needs of the schools and authoritative judgment regard- 
ing them, and he has exerted himself to the utmost in behalf of their welfare. 
He is considered one of the ablest members of the Democratic party in the 
county, where his personal following is large. He always took a prominent 
part in the county conventions of the days gone by, and his activities have also 
extended into State and national politics. 

Mr. O'Connor married Frances Bastian, daughter of Valentine and Mary 
Bastian, the former now deceased. Two daughters have been born to this 
union: Mary (aged nineteen) graduated from the Mahanoy City high school 
as valedictorian of the class of 1915, and is now a student at the Westchester 
Nonnal School; Ursula (aged twelve) is attending the St. Fidelis parochial 
school in Mahanoy City, and will enter the public schools in 1916. 

SAMUEL ERODE, at one time one of the most vigorous spirits in the 
business activities of Tamaqua, now living retired in that borough, has been 
a resident of that place practically all his life. Almost half a century ago he 
founded the butcher business now conducted by his son William Brode, con- 
tinued it successfully for many years, and as his original undertaking pros- 
pered made other ventures, assisting several progressive projects at their 
inception with his encouragement and capital. He has been throughout his 
career a citizen of substantial worth. 

The Brode family is of German ancestry, and on first coming to America 
settled in Lehigh County. Pa. Michael Brode, the grandfather of Samuel 
Brode, was a native of Pennsylvania, and in his later life became settled 
at White Haven, Luzerne Co., Pa., where he died. He was the father of a 
large family. 

Thomas J. Brode, father of Samuel Brode, was born in 1819 in Lehigh 



SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENNSYLVANL\ 255 

County, Pa., and was still a lad when the family removed to White Haven, 
where he attended school. He learned both grist and saw milling and followed 
that line of work for several years, giving it up on account of his health. 
In the early forties he came to Schuylkill county and located at what is now 
known as Hometown, in Rush township, near Tamaqua, living there -for 
fourteen months, and removing thence to Tamaqua, where he made a perman- 
ent home. Here he engaged in the butcher business, being one of the pioneers 
in that line at Tamaqua, and he followed it profitably until about six years 
before his death, passing his closing years in retirement. His death occurred 
in April, i8go, and he is buried at Tamaqua. For a long period he was a 
prominent member of the Evangelical Church at Tamaqua, in which he held 
office for many years, retaining his active association with the organization 
to the end of his life. In 1842 Mr. Brode married Sarah Olewill, who was 
born in Lehigh county, daughter of Andres Olewill, and of the ten children 
born to them we have record of the following: Samuel; Kitty, who is 
deceased; Thomas; Benjamin; Elmer; Charles, deceased; and Sarah, wife of 
Dr. C. B. Dreher, a prominent physician of Tamaqua and president of the 
Tamaqua National Bank. 

Samuel Brode was born May 27, 1844, at Hometown, the village in Rush 
township, near Tamaqua, where the family lived for a short time. He was 
very young when his parents settled at Tamaqua, where he was reared and 
educated and trained for the serious work of life, learning the butcher's trade 
with his father, with whom he remained until he reached his majority. He 
also clerked for Charles Schoener, under Walter Kirk, until he went into the 
emergency service during the Civil war. In 1863 he enlisted in Company B, 
27th Regiment, Pennsylvania Volunteer Militia, to reinforce the Union army 
at Gettysburg, and was out for six weeks. He was in the skirmish at Wrights- 
ville, his command arriving at the battleground just after the Union troops 
had gained their famous victory. Returning to Tamaqua when discharged 
from the ser\'ice, he was there until 1865, in which year he went South to 
Charlotte, N. C, to take the position of superintendent at a gold mine in 
which his father was a stockholder. He was in the employ of M. F. Ludwig. 
After fourteen months' work there he came back to Tamaqua and resumed 
the butcher business, which he followed for a short time at Audenried, Carbon 
county. In 1867 he began butchering on his own account, selling his meat at 
Summit Hill and in that vicinity, though he made his home meanwhile at 
Tamaqua. The business grew steadily under his thrifty management, and 
he retained his immediate connection therewith until 1875, after which he 
turned the actual work over to other hands, giving his time only to overseeing 
the various details. His attention thereafter was divided among the numerous 
interests he had acquired. In 1885 he was one of the group of five men who 
organized the Edison Electric Light Company of Tamaqua, and he served as 
a director of the company from that time until it sold out. He was also one 
of the organizers and directors of the Tamaqua Land & Improvement Com- 
pany, and many other local enterprises of vital importance to the advancement 
of the section have counted him among their influential supporters. He is a 
member of the Masonic fraternity, belonging to the blue lodge at Tamaqua, 
and in religion he adheres to the Reformed faith, belonging to Trinity Church, 
in whose work he and his family have taken an active part. • 

On May 27, 1866, Mr. Brode married Lucy ]\Tiller, who was born June 27, 
1846, daughter of Israel and Elizabeth ^liller, of Tamaqua. A large family 



256 SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 

has been born to this union, namely: Frank, born Aug. 9, 1867, is deceased; 
Cora May, born Feb. 3, 1869, is the wife of Dr. George W'. Dreher, of Shamo- 
kin. Pa.; WiUiam was bom July 28, 1S70; John E., born Dec. 31, 1872, is 
engaged as a machinist in Tamaqua ; Alburtus, born April 16, 1874, is 
deceased; Sarah E., born March 3, 1876, is deceased; Walter, born March 22, 
1878, is deceased; Thomas, born Nov. 9, 1879, is employed as an electrician 
in Tamaqua; Emily E., born Aug. 20, 1882, is deceased; Charles L. was born 
Feb. 14, 1886. 

\ViLLi.\jr Erode, eldest surviving son of Samuel Erode, was born at 
Tamaqua July 28, 1870, and during his boyhood acquired a practical education 
in the common schools of the borough. He learned the trade of butcher in 
his father's employ and has followed it up to the present time, with the 
success which has marked the operations of three generations of the family 
in this line. In 1895 he took the old stand where his father had started so 
many years ago. on Schuylkill avenue, Tamaqua, and has a well equipped 
meat market, supplying a large share of the best trade in the borough. Per- 
sonally Mr. Erode ranks with the most respected citizens there. He and his 
wife are members of Bethany Evangelical Church, in whose activities Airs. 
Erode has taken a helpful part. Mr. Erode belongs to the Independent Order 
of Odd Fellows, and his wife to the Rebekah degree. 

In April, 1892, Mr. Erode married Elizabeth Lane, daughter of William 
and Priscilla (Gallagher) Lane, the former a native of England, the latter 
born near Pottsville, Schuylkill Co., Pa. When he came to America Mr. Lane 
settled in Schuylkill county, where he followed mining ; he died at Tamaqua. 
He and his wife had a family of six children: Elizabeth (Mrs. William 
Erode), Margaret, Eliza, George, James and Jonathan. To Air. and Mrs. 
Erode has been born one daughter, Lucy, now the wife of Edw. Banner, living 
at Hometown, in Rush township. 

JOHN H. POLLARD, of Mahanoy City, Division Superintendent for the 
Philadelphia & Reading Coal & Iron Company since 1905, is a native of Schuyl- 
kill county, where his father, John Pollard, settled in the early forties. The 
latter was born in 1820 in Cornwall, England, coming to America when twenty- 
one years old. For a short time he was located at Schuylkill Haven, Schuyl- 
kill Co., Pa., thence removing to Pottsville, same county, where he resided con- 
tinuously to the end of his life, dying in 1903, at the age of eighty-three years. 

John H. Pollard was bom April 19, 1854, at Pottsyille, where he was edu- 
cated in the public schools. After a year's employment in the establishment 
of the Miners' Journal, under Eenjamin Eannan and Colonel Ramsay, he 
returned to the high school, and was a member of the class of 187 1. but quit 
school to take advantage of an opening in the office of the Harris Brothers, 
Civil and Mining Engineers, who were in charge of the Girard estate in Schuyl- 
kill and Columbia counties, and also conducting a general engineering business. 
He continued with the Harris Brothers until 1874, in which year the late 
Heber S. Thompson succeeded to the management of the Girard estate. He 
was with Mr. Thompson until May. 1878. when he was employed by the Phila- 
delphia & Reading Coal & Iron Company, as a member of the engineer corps 
at Ashland, covering the territory from Ashland to Shenandoah, and subse- 
quently having charge of the engineering department for the Mahanoy and 
Shenandoah districts of this company. On April i, 1905, he was transferred 
to Mahanoy City in the capacity of Division Superintendent of the Philadel- 



SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 257 

phia & Reading Coal & Iron Coinpany, his territory including the St. Nicholas 
and Mahanoy districts, a total of nine collieries. 

Mr. Pollard has been a director of the Pirst National Bank of Mahanoy 
City since 19 12. He is well known in fraternal and social bodies, belonging to 
Ashland Lodge, No. 294, F. & A. M., Griscomb Chapter, No. 219, R. A. M., 
and Prince of Peace Conimandery, No. 29, K. T., all of Ashland; and Rajah 
Temple, A. A. O. N. M. S., of Reading, Pa. He also holds membership in 
Ashland Lodge, No. 384, B. P. O. Elks, and Washington Camp No. 84, P. 
O. S. of A., at .Vshland, as well as in the Pottsville Club. 

PROF. CHARLES J. CARROLL, present principal of the Blythe town- 
ship schools, has made an excellent record in his long connection with the 
public schools of Schuylkill county. For almost thirty years practically all 
of his time and the best of his talents have been expended in their interest, 
but the reward is a worthy one. His work will stand as one of the most 
efficient units which have cooperated in the furtherance of educational progress 
in the county, whose standards compare with any in the State. 

Mr. Carroll was born in Blythe township May 20, 1863. His father, 
Charles Carroll, lived there for a number of years. He was a native of 
Ireland, came to this country in 1821, and for a short time after his arrival 
lived at Pottsville, Schuylkill Co., Pa. Thence he removed to Blythe township, 
where he followed mining and spent the remainder of his days, dying at 
Cumbola when sixty-five years old. He is buried at Port Carbon, this county. 
His wife, whose maiden name was Mary Creary, was also born in Ireland, 
and came to America when a young girl. Only two of their children survive: 
Catherine, who is the widow of James Armstrong; and Charles J. 

Charles J. Carroll attended public school at Port Carbon. He began mine 
work when a boy, but kept on with his studies as much as possible, so success- 
fully that in 1881 he was able to begin teaching. His first school was in 
Blythe township, in an independent district, and his salary was thirty dollars 
a month for a six months' term. Subsequently he taught two terms in the 
Tumbling Run \'alley, one term at Tucker Hill, in Blythe township, and 
several terms elsewhere in that township, until he was promoted to the 
principalship of the schools in the borough of New Philadelphia, filling that 
position for one term. In 1889 he resumed his connection with the Blythe 
township schools in the capacity of supervising principal, and was so engaged 
until 1897, doing notable work in developing the educational facilities of the 
township. At the end of that period he removed to Port Carbon, and soon 
assumed the duties of a government position in the agricultural department 
at Washington, continuing in the United States service for the next five years. 
Returning to Schuylkill county he resumed his profession, becoming principal 
at Palo Alto, where he added considerably to his reputation during the seven 
years he remained there, building up the schools of the borough and making 
the most of their possibilities, to the great satisfaction of the community which 
had the benefit of his labors. In 191 1 Mr. Carroll came once more to Blythe 
township, and has since been principal of the township schools, which have 
thrived steadily under his energetic management. In April, 1913, he removed 
to Cumbola, where he has since made his home. 

Professor Carroll's wide experience has broadened his judgment and given 
him a liberal outlook in his own field, and he has endeavored to adapt his 
work so as to make it most useful in its relation to the general affairs of the 
Vol. 1—17 



258 SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENNSYLVANL\ 

community, a basis for good citizenship and a preparation for honorable and 
intelligent participation in the conservation of the common welfare. He has 
many devoted pupils to testify to his success, and his continued popularity 
shows that he is not disposed to rest upon past achievements, but maintains 
the zealous spirit for which he became noted in his early years. While a 
resident of Port Carbon he was elected a member of the borough council and 
gave able assistance in the deliberations of that body. He votes independently, 
for principle and not for party. 

Professor Carroll married Sarah McDermott, who was bom at Shenan- 
doah, this county, and is of Scotch descent, being a daughter of Dennis and 
Mary (Paul) McDermott. They have a family of seven children: Charles, 
now in Philadelphia, where he is secretary of an insurance company; John. 
who is principal of the public school at Brockton, Schuylkill county ; Sarah ; 
Catherine; Mary; Daniel, and Helen. 

RICHARD COOMBE is engaged in the development of a fine farm in 
West Penn township and is doing his full share towards the promotion of 
modern agriculture in that section. But the greater amount of his property 
is in timberland and he is doing a large business as a lumberman, in which 
connection he has become widely known in his part of Pennsylvania. His 
enterprise and vigor have made him notably successful in both lines, and 
deservedly so, his prosperity being entirely the result of his own efforts. He 
is considered a valuable force for progress in the locality which he has chosen 
for his home and center of operations. 

The Coombe family is of English extraction. John Coombe, grandfather 
of Richard Coombe, was a native of England and a skilled mine worker, 
engaged in driving tunnels and similar operations. From his own country he 
went to Ireland, where he was employed at the copper mines for one year, 
and thence came with his family to America. They made the voyage in a 
sailing vessel, the "Monticello," and were on the ocean six weeks and three 
days, landing at New Yo'rk City, and arriving at Pottsville, Schuylkill county. 
Pa., July 4, 1840. Mr. Coombe did not spend much time at that location, 
moving to Woodside, near Forestville, Schuylkill county, and later to Middle- 
port, this county, where he did rock work in the mines. Thence he went to 
St. Nicholas, Schuylkill county, where he also followed mining. His children 
were: John, who is deceased; Thomas, deceased; William, deceased; Richard, 
deceased ; Ebenezer, who married Ida Raudenbush ; Caroline, widow of Josiah 
Gill; and Minnie, unmarried. The mother of this family is buried at Potts- 
ville. Their religious connection was with the Presbyterian Church. 

Richard Coombe, son of John and father of Richard, was born in Ireland 
Nov. 4, 1839, and was seven months old when his parents brought him to 
this country. He received his schooling at Middleport, Schuylkill Co., Pa., 
and began work early, and he was only a boy of nine when he met with an 
unfortunate accident, being run over by a mine car and losing an arm. Being 
thus incapacitated for some kinds of work he secured the best education 
possible, and he taught school for a couple of terms at Locust Valley, this 
county. But most of his days were spent at the mines. He went with his 
father when the latter removed to St. Nicholas, was slate picker boss for some 
time, and as he understood the work well was later made outside foreman at 
the individual colliery of John Phillips, holding that position for twenty-one 
years. Subsequently he held a similar position at the mines of the Reading 



SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 259 

Coal & Iron Company. In his later years he moved onto the farm in West 
Penn township now owned and occupied by his son Daniel, owning it for 
thirteen years before he lived on it. For ten years he and his brother-in-law, 
Mr. Gill, had lield the ])ro])erty in partnership and had several tenants thereon. 
The son Daniel operated the place for one year before his father moved there 
from St. Nicholas, the latter never domjj nnich in the work of its cultivation. 
It was dexoted to general farming, sixty-tive acres being under cultivation. 
The entire area was ninety-six acres, and Daniel bought it after his father's 
death. Richard Coombe passed away Sept. i, 1893, in West Penn township, 
and is buried at Pottsville. He was a Republican in politics and a Presbyterian 
in religion, especially interested in church work, to which he devoted much 
time. Pie was superintendent of the Presbyterian Sunday school at Mahanoy 
City for fifteen years. While residing in West Penn township he attended 
St. Peter's Reformed Church and also taught in the Sunday school there for 
a couple of years. 

Mr. Coombe married Ellamandia Raudenbush, who was born Aug. 2, 1844, 
daughter of Daniel Raudenbush, and now lives with her daughter, Mrs. 
Wallace Floppes, in West Penn township. Children as follows were born to 
this marriage: Daniel Oliver, born Oct. 15, 1871, now living on the home- 
stead farm, married Ida Hunsicker; a son born in 1872 died in infancy; 
Richard is next in the family; a son died at birth; Charles, born Nov. 22, 1877, 
married Kate IMiller, and they live in West Penn township ; Elmer, deceased, 
bom Oct. 27, 1879, died when about two years old; \^'illiam Henry, born 
Nov. 3, 1881, married Mame Adams and lives in West Penn township; Phoebe, 
bom July 10, 1887. is the wife of Wallace Hoppes, of West Penn township; 
Caroline Job, born April i, 1890, is the wife of Granville Dreisbach. 

Richard Coombe, son of Richard and Ellamandia Cx3ombe, was born Tune 
22, 1874, at St. Nicholas, Schuylkill county, and there spent his early life, 
obtaining a good education in the public schools. He also attended school 
one year in Shenandoah, and one year after the family removed to West Penn 
township, at which time he was fourteen years old. He worked on the home 
farm until his father died, married early the following year, and then bought 
the farm of his father-in-law, Daniel Reinert, which consisted of forty acres, 
all cleared. After residing on that place for nine years he leased and moved 
to the W. D. Zehner farm, taking a five-year lease with the privilege of giving 
up the place on six months' notice. He remained there two years, thence 
coming to his present location in West Penn township, which he had bought 
previously from the Thomas Neyer estate. This tract comprises 260 acres, 
eighty of which are cleared; later !Mr. Coombe purchased four acres adjoining, 
from Edwin B. Hoppes. In the spring of 1913 he bought another farm, 
eighty-four acres (of which forty are cleared, the remainder in good timber 
for sawed lumber^), from Lewis Hoppes, and he is farming altogether 160 
acres. His other holdings include a timber tract of thirteen acres in Strauss 
\'alley. Carbon Co., Pa., which he bought from the Charles Fritz estate; a 
400-acre tract in Rahn township, Schuylkill county, which he bought in part- 
nership with the late John E. Lauer, and which is covered with timber suitable 
for mining purposes: the perpetual timber rights on a 130-acre tract adjoining 
his 400-acre property, which he purchased from the Eastern Pennsylvania 
Coal Company; and sixty acres of leased ground. During the comparatively 
short time he has resided upon his present property Mr. Coombe has improved 
it greatly from the agricultural standpoint, following general farming syste- 



260 SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 

matically and profitably. He has also remodeled the dwelling and provided it 
with all modern conveniences. He markets his farm products at Summit Hill, 
Lansford and Nesquehoning. Mr. Coombe has a portable sawmill, traction 
engine and other equipment for conducting his lumber business, and is now 
building a permanent sawmill on his home place, to be operated by water 
power. He takes a good citizen's interest in the affairs of his locality, supports 
the Republican party on political issues, and is a member of the Reformed 
congregation of St. Peter's Church, with which his wife also unites. 

Mr. Coombe married Amanda L. Reinert, who was born May 26, 1876, in 
West Penn township, on property now owned by her husband, was reared 
there, and received her education in the local public schools. She remained 
at home until her marriage. Six children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. 
Coombe: Flossie May, born Dec. 28, 1894; Richard Daniel, May 12, 1899; 
Arthur Earl, June 7, 1905; Alfred Felix, March 26, 1910; Mildred Amanda, 
Oct. 16, 191 1 ; and Irene Reinert, Oct. 21, 1914. All the children old enough 
have attended school in West Penn township. 

Mrs. Coombe 's paternal grandparents were natives of Berks county and 
farming people. Their children were : Julia, John, David and Daniel. In 
religion they were German Lutherans. 

Daniel Reinert, Mrs. Coombe's father, was born in April, 1833, near 
Lynnville, Lehigh Co., Pa., and died Nov. 21, 1902, in West Penn township, 
Schuylkill county. He received his education in his native county, and in his 
early days worked for the local farmers and learned shoemaking. Coming 
to West Penn township, he opened a shoe shop near the "Mantz Hotel," and 
carried on business for a number of years at that location. Some time after 
his marriage he moved to near Mr. Coombe's present home, cultivating a 
tract of over one hundred acres for about two years. Then he bought the 
forty-acre farm Mr. Coombe now owns, and remained there until his death, 
following general farming. His wife, Polly (Guldner), born in 1838, died in 
September, 1889. They are buried in St. Peter's cemetery in the township, 
and were members of the Lutheran congregation of St. Peter's Church, in 
which Mr. Reinert was very active, holding the offices of elder and deacon. 
He was interested in all religious enterprises and the advancement of Christian- 
ity. In politics he was a Democrat. Mr. and Mrs. Reinert had two children: 
David, now a resident of Summit Hill, Carbon county, who married Nora 
Miller; and Amanda L., wife of Richard Coombe. 

RICHARD E. MILLER, Sr., of Hometown, Schuylkill county, is an old- 
time lumberman of this part of Pennsylvania, where he has been operating 
for forty-two years, during thirty-six of which he has been associated with 
the Lehigh Company, contracting. He still has large holdings of timberland 
in the vicinity, and he owns considerable farm land in Monroe county, this 
State. His father, Elias T. Miller, was also engaged in lumbering in this 
region, and his grandfather, John Miller, lived and died at Orwigsburg, this 
county. 

Elias T. Miller lived for several years at Tumbling Run, Schuylkill county, 
and thence removed to Middleport. this county, where he died at the age of 
eighty-nine. He was a large landowner, his holdings comprising five farms. 
By his marriage to Hannah Jane Evans he had the following family : Marv. 
Mrs. Bossier; John T. ; Joseph D. ; Richard E, ; Hannah Jane, who married 
John D. Derrick ; Charles ; William ; and Sarah, who married James Gillespie. 



I 



SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 261 

Evan Evans, father of Mrs. Hannah Jane (Evans) Miller, was born in 
Wales, and became a resident of Reading, Berks Co., Pa. He taught at the 
Blue Mountain school in Berks county, and died in that county when ninety- 
nine years old. His wife lived to the extraordinary age of loi years. Their 
children were: Jacob, James, Alartin, John, Evan, Jr., Thomas, Hannah Jane, 
Mary, Phoebe and Margaret. 

Richard E. Miller was born Nov. 29, 1849, at Tamaqua, Schuylkill county. 
His early education was received in the public schools, and later he attended 
the Keystone State Normal School, at Kutztown, Berks Co., Pa., from which 
institution he was graduated when eighteen years old. He assisted his father 
in the lumber business until he reached his majority, when he went to Cata- 
wissa. Pa., to build a breaker. For three years thereafter he was engaged in 
clerking in a store at Shenandoah, and was then in Philadelphia for a time, 
employed in a cedar factory. His next removal was to Hauto, Carbon Co., 
Pa., where he was foreman for a lumber company one year, at the end of 
that time buying the business for himself. He has since been doing business 
on his own account, and during most of the time as a contractor for the 
Lehigh Company. At one time he owned all of the town of Hauto, but 
disposed of four hundred acres to the Lehigh Company at one sale, and later 
sold 3,200 acres on the Broad mountain, where he still owns three thousand 
acres of woodland. He also has a 140-acre tract in Carbon county; another 
tract of loi acres; and leases 135 acres from the Reading Company. He 
operates two sawmills and has a large equipment for the lumbering business, 
having thirty-three head of mules, besides other stock, as well as all kinds of 
vehicles, including automobiles. In Monroe county he owns three valuable 
farms, containing 175, 280 and 180 acres, respectively. His energetic business 
policy and good judgment have made him one of the leading lumbermen in 
his section of the State. By square dealing and reliable transactions he has 
acquired a reputation for integrity and unswerving honesty which he prizes 
as dearly as his material success. On April 6, 191 1, Mr. Miller moved to 
Hometown, in Rush township, Schuylkill county, where he has a hotel and 
in connection therewith a fine tract of seventy acres, a desirable location with 
a beautiful view. The hotel has been very successful under his management. 

Mr. Miller married Mary A. Rice, daughter of George Rice, who lived at 
Minersville. Pa., later moving to William Penn, near Shenandoah, where he 
was employed by the Reading Company. He died there. Ten children have 
been born to Mr. and Mrs. ^filler : Charles is deceased; Richard E., Jr., is 
assisting his father in business (he is a Mason, belonging to Caldwell Con- 
sistory, at Bloomsburg, Pa., and to the Shrine at Reading) ; Howard is in 
the bakery business at Tamaqua (he is also a Mason) ; Prof. Heber is a 
graduate of the Keystone State Normal School, at Kutztown, Pa., and now 
superintendent of public schools at Lansford, Pa. ; Ralph Samuel is in the 
government employ at Washington, D. C. (he is also a Mason) ; Harrison is 
superintendent for a company at Hauto. Carbon Co., Pa. ; Arthur, William 
and Mary are at home ; Allen is deceased. In religious connection the family 
are Lutherans. Mr. Miller is an Odd Fellow, belonging to the lodge at Summit 
Hill, Carbon county. 

JOHN M. HARRIS, of Tamaqua, editor and proprietor of the Tamaqua 
Evening Courier, has found his life work in the conduct of that journal, 
with which the family has been associated for over forty years. 



262 SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 

The Harrises are of English extraction. John F. Harris, grandfather of 
John M. Harris, was born in Devonshire in 1823, and hved in his native 
country until after his marriage, coming to the United States in 1859. He 
spent the remainder of his life in Schuylkill county, Pa., first locating in the 
vicinity of Mahanoy City, where he lived for a number of years, and in 1874 
removing to Frackville, where he subsequently made his home. In England 
he had been a rock miner and contractor, and continued in practically the 
same line in this country, following mining. Though he was never actively 
associated with public affairs he took a keen interest in their progress. His 
convictions led him to support the Republican party, and when the Labor 
Reform party came into existence he followed its fortuues eagerly, its prin- 
ciples appealing to him, but he could never be prevailed upon to become a 
candidate for office. Mr. Harris married Mary A. Greening, daughter of 
George Greening, a native of Devonshire, England, and they became the 
parents of four children, three sons and one daughter. 

Robert Harris, son of John F. and Alarv' A. ( Greening) Harris, was bom 
June I, 1854, at Plymouth, Devonshire, England, and there passed his early 
years. His mother and the children did not join the father in America until 
1869. Meantime, in 1862, he was apprenticed to the printer's trade, at which 
he served two years in England. When he came to this country he found 
work at his trade with the Mahanoy Gazette, finishing his trade in that office 
in November, 1871. That year he came to Tamaqua and commenced his 
association with the Courier as foreman for Eveland & Shiiifert, the owners 
and editors at that time, who published the paper as a weekly under the name 
of the Saturday Courier. In February, 1872, he purchased Mr. Shiffert's 
interest, becoming a partner with Daniel M. Eveland in the ownership of the 
paper, and six years later he bought Mr. Eveland's interest therein, being sole 
owner thereafter until his death, which occurred when he was in his prime, 
Jan. 14, 1896. Mr. Harris's business ability was well evidenced in his com- 
petent management of the Courier, which gained steadily in popularity and 
circulation during his ownership, and his clear intellect showed itself in his 
vigorous editorials, which were looked up to as a guiding influence in many 
quarters. His estimable personality and unimpeachable integrity made him 
trusted wherever known, and his insight regarding current conditions was so 
well recognized that he was considered an authority by his fellow citizens in 
Schuylkill county. Though he did not seek office he never evaded the respon- 
sibility of securing good government in his locality, and he served four terms 
in succession on the school board, doing highly acceptable work. He was a 
prominent member of the Knights of the Golden Eagle at Tamaqua, belonging 
to Tamaqua Castle, No. 68, of which he was the first presiding officer; for 
five years he was its representative at the Grand Castle, and he was master 
of the historical records until December, 1892. 

On May i, 1874, Mr. Harris married Sophia M. Myers, who survives him. 
Her father, Marcus Myers, was a native of Bavaria, Germany. Of the 
children born to this union four reached maturity, two sons and two daughters, 
namely: Marie A. is a public school teacher: Ray F. is the wife of Edward 
C. Hiilegas, of Tamaqua ; Robert H. and John M. are engaged in the conduct 
of the Courier, the former as solicitor and collector. 

John M. Harris was born May 4, 1878, at Tamaqua, where he has spent 
all his life. His education was received in the public schools of the borough, 
and he learned the printer's trade in the office of the Courier, becoming so 



SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 263 

thoroughly familiar with the operation and requirements of the business that 
when his father died he at once assumed its responsibilities, although he was 
only in his eighteenth year at the time. It was published as a semi-weekly 
until iScK), when he began to issue it tri-weekly, and since June i, 19CX), it has 
been a daily. For a number of years it has carried over two thousand names 
on the subscription list, and during the year of the big strike the circulation 
reached 2,400. As it is the only daily between iMauch Chunk and Pottsville 
its patrons are not confined to the local field. Mr. Harris has evidently 
inherited his father's gifts as an editor and manager, and it is saying much 
to record that though he was a mere youth when he undertook the publication 
of the Courier he kept it going on a successful basis — a forecast of the pluck 
and self-reliance which are still characteristic of him. 

The Evening Courier is really the legitimate successor of the first news- 
paper established at Tamaqua, the Legion, founded in 1849 by J. M. and D. C. 
Reinhart. In 1855 it became the Tamaqua Gazette, and two years later the 
Tamaqua Anthracite Gazette, whose jniblication was suspended for two months 
in 1 861, in which year it was sold to R. N. Leyburn. He changed the name 
to the Anthracite Journal, and when he enlisted in the army the next year its 
publication was undertaken by Fry & Jones during his absence at the front. 
Later it was bought by the Monitor Publishing Company and appeared under 
the management of Albert Leyburn as the Saturday Courier until sold again, 
in the early seventies, to Eveland & Shift'ert. About that time Robert Harris 
became connected with the paper, succeeding Mr. Shiffert, and it was con- 
tinued by Eveland & Harris as the Tamaqua Courier until 1875, when the 
Anthracite Monitor was merged with it, the latter a labor journal which had 
been established in 1871 and was well received in the community. "Through 
various evolutions, the Monitor conveyed title to the old Legion, and thus the 
Courier became the oldest paper in the town,'' where it was then the only one. 
After Mr. Eveland's retirement, in 1878, the firm was Harris & Zeller until 
1881, after which Robert Harris was sole proprietor until his death. Except 
for a few months when Mr. Harris attempted its daily publication the Courier 
was issued weekly until 1893, when he began publishing it twice a week, and 
it was changed to a tri-weekly and then to a daily under the present editor, 
John M. Harris. It is independent in politics. 

ALEXANDER SCOTT, late of Frackville, was the leading merchant of 
that borough throughout the most important period of its development, in 
which, indeed, he was an influential factor. The enterprise which brought 
about the expansion of his own business had also far-reaching results in its 
effect on the general prosperity, and he was always looked to for progressive 
action in local affairs. His activities covered all of the territory in this section 
of Schuylkill county and were not confined to any one branch of trade, his 
imiform success in the diverse interests which engaged him betokening a rare 
gift for management and unusual insight into business principles. 

Mr. Scott was a member of a respected Schuylkill county family, being a 
son of George and Agnes Scott. His father, during his latter years a mer- 
chant at Glen Carbon, this county, was one of the best known men in the coal 
fields here, where his long and varied experience brought him into contact 
with hundreds of colliery employes. He was the first of this family to come 
to America, his father. John Scott, following him. The latter was a native 
of the County of Northumberland, England, and was a miner by occupation. 



264 SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 

finding work in that capacity at Mine Hill Gap, Schuylkill Co., Pa. He died 
at Germantown, near Ashland, where he is buried. By his marriage to Ann 
Shatton John Scott had four children: Robert, who died at Minersville, Pa.; 
George ; James, who died at Mount Carmel, Pa. ; and John, who died at Locust 
Gap, Pennsylvania. 

George Scott, son of John and Ann (Shatton) Scott, was born July 5, 1817, 
in the County of Northumberland, England, and spent his early life in that 
country, coming to the United States in the year 1837. He settled at Mine Hill 
Gap, Schuylkill Co., Pa., and like his father was a miner. His skill brought 
him responsible work and an enviable reputation. From Mine Hill Gap he 
removed to Heckscherville and thence to Llewellyn, this county, at the latter 
place becoming inside foreman for Marcus Heilner in 1850. After two years 
there he was changed to Coal Castle, as inside foreman for two years, and 
then became superintendent for Mr. Heilner, holding that position until i860. 
He was engaged during the following year at the Beaverdale colliery, and 
subsequently for two years at the Hazel Dell colliery, Centralia, from the 
latter place going to Yorktown, Carbon county, to take the position of superin- 
tendent of mines for George K. Smith & Co. Later for about five years he 
was superintendent for Heckscher & Co., at Heckscherville, transferring to 
the Otto colliery, where he was inside foreman for a period of nine years. 
During the two years following he was at the Beachwood colliery, at Mount 
Lafl^er, this county, at the end of that time retiring from mine work. There- 
after he was in the mercantile business, having a general store at Glen Carbon 
to the close of his life. He passed away Aug. 17, 1884. His wife, Agnes 
(Govan), born May 23, 1825, in Ayrshire, Scotland, died May 29, 1902. Mr. 
and Mrs. Scott had a large family, namely : John G., born Nov. 25, 1844, is 
now living at Girardville, Schuylkill county; Jane, born June 28, 1846, died 
July 4, 1846; Alexander, born April 16, 1848, died April 8, 1915; George, born 
Dec. 15, 1850, is a coal operator in Center county. Pa., living at Philipsburg; 
James G., born Dec. 24, 1852, is living at Minersville, this county; Jane Ann, 
born April 26, 1855, died Feb. 13, 1907; Agnes G., born Aug. 23, 1857, is the 
widow of Richard Moore and lives at Alden Station, Luzerne Co., Pa. ; Win- 
field W., born Nov. 13, 1857, died June 27, 1910; Grace, bom Oct. 4, 1861, 
died Oct. 15, 1861 ; Annie S., born Aug. 2, 1863, is living at Girardville, Pa. 
(she formerly made her home with her brother, Alexander) ; Hannah Deiter, 
born April i, 1866, died Oct. 28, 1908. 

Alexander Scott, the second son of the above family, was bom April 16, 
1848, and was associated during almost all of his active and successful career 
with Schuylkill county and her enterprises. He made his home at Frackville, 
where he conducted the principal general store and also carried on the grain 
and hay business, being president