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Full text of "73 Magazine (August 1984)"

Intematfonal Edition 



August 1984 issue #287 
$2.50 USA/$3.0O Canada 



T.M. 



Great 
Builders 
Projects! 



Unlimited Power 

Page 10 



Another 
Home-Brew 



W2NSD in Asia 

Page 6 

Easy H W-1 01 IVIods 

Page 46 

Load a 



Amateur Radio's 
lechnical Journal 




Two-Tone Tester— 21 

Top-Notch Tuner Time 

Can't get your signal out of the back- 
yard? Buiid KC2NT's antenna matcher 



H 



and hear what you've beenfnissing, 



KC2NT 8 



\ 



Cheap Power Ploy 

This rugged supply will give you more 
power than you ever dreamed possible 
Have we gone too far this time? . K9QLL 

Penn's Two-Tone Gadget 



sTH Clue one: We're talking about lab qual- 
k^ ity. Clue two: Get your junk boJt. 



Yaesu, Icom Graft Revealed 

Splice Icom's headset to Vaesu's talkie 
and discover handle happiness. 

K20AW 



\ 



Stare* Way to Heaven 



the sky's the limit 



-j^ 



^ « 



m H^ H^ ux t t. 



T8Qu 




-Ki^vmtninr^ 



51 cs: Part I 

_et K4IPVguide 

41s of frequency 

K4IPV 



Messing With Heath 

ir~1 This 101 control mod proves fun and 
iaiJ easy with freqiiency Your rig deserves 
it A17C 



10 



Wl BC 21 



32 



AJ9N 34 



40 



A CWC/I Publicatton 



AM TOR How To 

FEC? ARQ? Don t panic, Timely advice from 
tile father of AMTOR takes the confusion 
otil of our newest mode. W2J UP 62 

Picture-Perfect Audio Filters 

a Throw away that antique breadbcsard 
and scope Let your Apple J I peak and 
tweak a soft circuit Instead KILF 6fc 

Top-Band Power Punch 

Sick of S-2 reports on 160? Build this 

knockout kilowatt amp and make it 5^ 

every time WAaVNY 70 



\ 




46 



Amcibo— 34 

Never Say Die— 6 
73 International— 54 
Bartef 'N' Buy— 76 
Social Events— 77 
Ham Help— 
79*81,82,110 
Fun»-SO 
RTTY Loop— 81 
Satellltes— a2 
DX— 83 



Dr. DigHst— 84 
Confests- 85 
Conectiofis — 1 
ReacSef Service- 96 
Review— 100 
Letters- 102 
Awards— 102 
New Products— 104 
Dealer Directory- 114 
Propagation — 114 





igital Readout, Scanning, Memories and 



1 



^^H 


1 



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«ai 




ICOM introduces the new top-of- 
the-line IC-02A and IC-02AT to 
compliment its existing line of 
popular handheld transceivers and 
occessorres. The new direct entry 
microprocessor conf rolled IC'02A is 
a fulMeotured 2-meter hondheld. 

Scanning, 10 me' es. oupieK offset 
storage in memorv. odd offsets. 32 
keyboard setectoble PL tones which 
store in memory, and infernal lithium 
battery backup 

Keybo thiough th© 16 

button pad allows easy access of 
ffequencies. duplex, nnemories. 
memory scan, priofity. dial lock. PL 
tones ond DTMF in the tC-02AT 

An easy-lo^reod cuffoin LCD 
readout indteates frequency, 
memory channel, signal strength 
and transmitter output, PL tone, and 

scanning functions. 

The new I&02A has a battery 
lock, frequency lock, and lamp 

on/off switch. An 

aluminum case 
back Is 
provided 



!^ .A IS fun at the 
k ' ■ ■ 

pack) 

ore 

avunUs^it^ tuj u m iw-\>2A and IC-02AT, 
including the new lor '9 8 4 volt 
IC-BPB ar>d 1 3. 2 volt IC-BP 7 The IC- 
BP7 and BP8 may be charg- ^m a 
fop panel connector for 1 3 8 vo^ts 
which will also power tronsce^ver 
operation. 




ICOM's IC-2A(T) continues ^o be 

available.. .and its compiete line 
of accessories work with the 
new IC-02A, 




The IC*02A comes slandord with IC-BP3 NiCd 
battery pock. BC-25U woll charger, flexible 
antenna, wrist stfopand belt clip. 




ICOM 



TheWbrM System 



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INFO 



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Coniributiovia in tne tonn ol manih 
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No part of Ihis pLrbilcatlon may be re- 
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4 73 Magazine * August, 1984 



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73 Magazine • August, 1984 5 



W2NSD/I 

NEVER SAY DIE 




ARE YOU GAME? 

If you're into DXIng, you've 
read atK3ut the two recent DXpe- 
ditions to the Republic Of China 
(Taiwan). One was Italian and 
the other Japanese, . .so ( 
wasn't completely surprised 
when Tim Chen BV2A, for years 
the only licensed amateur on 
Taiwan, suggested that it was 
getting to be time for an Ameri- 
can DXpedltion to BV. 

Tinr> talked to me while I was 
attending a compoter show in 
Taipei. BV is still relatively rare, 
so I agreed that such an opera^ 
tion would be great fun... an 
opportunity for some American 
hams to experience the excite- 
ment of being on the business 
end of a DXpedltion, . ,but with* 
out the miseries you often have 
to go through, 

Taiwan Is a fantastic place 
to visit. There are friendly peo- 
ple, great food, incredibly low 
prices, and amazing sights. 
Even though I get there once or 
twice a year, I always look for- 
ward to it and enjoy it. Td sure 
like to get you to Taipei for a few 




days; you'd love it. It would be a 
DXpedition you'd remember the 
rest of your life. Before I go into 
details on the DXpedltion, let me 
tell yoy how I happened to be 
visiting Tim. 

Commerce Tours runs a two- 
week trip every spring which co- 
incides with computer shows in 
Tokyo, Seoyip and Taipei Since 
it*s Important for me to keep up 
with micro developments world- 
wide, i tfy to make this tour. 
Also, this time I was looking for 
some computer products which 
I might be able to import. 

Commerce was able to let me 
start a day late on the trip so 
that I could get an honorary doc- 
torate degree and give the com- 
mencement address at Central 
New England College In Wor- 
cester, Massachusetts. Readers 
of my editorials will not be suf- 
prised to learn that I gave a talk 
on my favorite subject: how you, 
yes you, can get rich. It seemed 
like a good message for the grad- 
uating class of this outstanding 
college. 

I was a bit intimtdated when L 



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Attn OSL of lUe Montn. Wlnnefs receive a onfr^ear subscrtption (or ^xtfinsion) to 73. Entries 
not in snwalopes cannot be accepted, 

6 73 Magazine • August, t984 



saw that my commencement 
predecessors had been Ted Tur- 
ner, Bob Hope, Malcolm Forbes, 
and Frank Perdue. While I hadnt 
heard their talks, I feH that mine 
might t:>e of more personal im- 
portance to the graduates and 
certainly right in line with the 
school motto: "Yes, You Can!" 
tt came off fine and the resuttmg 
enthusiasm got me started on 
an "1 Can*' book during my 
Asian trip; I wrote on my lap 
computer during flights, In wait- 
ing rooms, and on buses. 

When the graduation cere- 
monies were done I was whisked 
to the airport for a flight to Los 
Angeles , . , and then Tokyo. There, 
we went to both a microcomput- 
er show and an office-automa- 
tion show, getting a full dose of 
both the low and high end of 
Japanese microcomputers. 

The next step was Seoul, 
where the shopping Is great if 
you lEke $9.00 New Balance 
sneakers and $10.00 Hang Ten 
suitcases, but it was a bomb for 
computers. An American outfit 
had taken over the yearly com- 
puter show and apparently 
alienated just about everyone. I 
think the whote show took [ess 
than ten minutes to see. The 
hundreds of small Korean com- 
puter firms passed it by. This 
was hard on our group, many of 
whom had rather good budgets 
for buying computer products 
for US distribution. Oh well, 
maybe we would do better in 
Taipei. 

We did indeed. The Taipei 
computer show had over 200 ©x* 
hibitors and much business was 
done. I got some excellent 
quotes on products I want to 
have made. 

No trip to Taiwan is comptete 
without an update on the ham 

Continued on page 74 



^ STAFF 



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providing high performance 
and superior sound quality. 



Other TM-201A/TM-401A 
Optional Accessories: 

TU-3 Pfogramniabie two- 
frequency CTCSS encoder. 
KPS-7A fixed station power 
supply. MA-4000 duaFbander 
mobile antenna wtth duptejcer. 
SW-100A/B SWR/power meter. 
MC-55 mobile microphone 
with lime-out timer. 




KENWOOD 



.ClIKJfCB 



■ 


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- — -^^ -i^- 




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1 Oe^ " JOB ^-""^ h JUj 


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Optional FC-10 Frequency 
Controller 

Connects to the TM-201A or 
TM-401A. Convenient controf 
keys for frequency UP/DOWN 
MHz shift. VFO A/B. and MR 
(memory recall or change 
nnemory channel). A green 
LCD display indicates trans- 
mit/ receive frequencies, 
memory channel number, 
ALERT, and SCAN (with 
blinking MHz decimal). 



'>V* 



I 



TW-4000A 

FM ""Duat-Bander" 

KENWOOD S TW-4000A FM 

"Dual-Bander'' provides new 
■ ersatility in VHF and UHF 
peraUons, uniquely combining 
m and /0-cm FM functions 
in one compact package. It 
covers the 2'm band (142,000- 
148.995 MHz), including certain 
MARS and CAP (requencies, 
and the 70<m band (440. 000- 
449.995 MHz), all in a package 



only 6-3/8 W sc 2-3/8 H x 
8 '9/1 6 D inches. RF output 
power measures 25 waits on 
either band. The TW-4000A 
features a large, easy-to-read 
LCD display, front panel illumi- 
nation for night operations, 10 
memories with OFFSET recall 
and lithium batfery backup, 
progfammable memory scan, 
band scan in selected 1-MHz 
segments, priority watch func- 
tion, common channel scan, 
dual digital VFO*s, repeater 
reverse switch, GaAs FET front 
ends, rugged die-cast chassis, 



"beeper" through speaker, a station power supply. SP-40 

-mobile mounL and a 16-key compact mobile speaker, SP-50 

'autopatch UP/DOWN mic. compact mobile speaker 

I The new optional VS-1 voi MA-4000 dual-band mobile 

synthesizer has everyone antenna with duplexor, MC-55 

talking* A voice announces th^BHrnobile microphone with time- 
frequency, band, VFO A or B, out timer, and a SW-100B 
repeater offset, and memory SWR/power meter, 
►channel number when these More information on the 
functions are selected. .^__IM-201A/TM-401A and 

^rW-4000A is available from 
authorised dealers of 
Trio-Kenwood Communicatfons 
1111 West WBlmi Street 
Compton. California 90220. 



Other TW-4000A 
optional accessories: 

VS-1 voice synthesizer, TU-4C 
programmable two-frequency 
CTGSS encoder. KPS'7A fixed 




sr 



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KEN^;^OOD FM DU^L SANDfF? 





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A. Lsmendola KC2NT 
225 Kafmar Drrve 

Rochester NY 14616 



Top-Notch Tuner Time 

Can't get your signal out of the backyard? 
Build KCINTs antenna matcher and hear 

what youve been missing. 



This tuner has been used 
effectively to feed the 
hellcat antenna described in 
the May, 1983, issue of 73,' 
tt is a developmental out- 
growth of a random-wire 
tuner used successfully for 
many years with a 9.14-me- 
fcer (30-foot) whip placed 15.2 
meters (50 feet) above 
ground. The tuner has been 
employed with an endfed 
wire 19.5 meters {64 feet) 
long on 80 through 10 me- 
ters. It was recently used to 
load the house rain gutter 



pipe system to complete a 
Rochester NY/ Pittsburgh PA 
QSO on 40 CW with 20 
Watts output on my rig. 

In development of this 
tuner, my goal has been to 
create a system for coupling 
a transmitter with 52-Ohm 
or 75-Ohm output to any 52- 
or 75-Ohm coax-fed anten- 
na. The tuner assembly con- 
tains a couple of high-ca- 
pacity condensers and a 
12.7-cm-long (S-inch), 7.62- 
cm-diameter (S-inch) coil. 
However, this circuit is not 




Antenna tuner showing the tuning-coil system and the com- 
mon ground point for tuning capacitors. 

8 73 Magazine • August, 19S4 



the familiar pi coupler de- 
vice as will be evident later 
on in this article. A notewor- 
thy feature of the tuning 

unit is the greater selectivity 
exhibited on transmit and 
receive. 

Description 

The general tuner config- 
uration resembles some- 
what a pi coupler output 
with an LC series-tuned in- 
put in place of the pi input 
capacitor Filter tables de- 
scribe the input system as a 
low-pass m-derived series 
half section. The output sec- 
tion is listed as a low-pass 
constant-k output half sec- 
tion. The fundamental tuner 
design fs shown in Fig. 1. 
However, the tuner of Fig. 1 
is easily simplified by re- 
placing the series inductor 
as shown in Fig. 2. Note the 
optional capacitor bank of 3 
X 500 pF. This is necessary 
on the 75/80-meter band 
with some aerials, e.g., the 
helical antenna. Upon close 
inspection of Fig. 2, one can 
see that the shorted portion 
of the coil is really two in- 
ductances in parallel with a 
ground return by way of the 
500-pF tuning capacitor 

As the 500-pF capacitor is 

tapped at the various turns 
of the shorted inductance, 
the inductance of the paral- 
leled coils changes in value. 



This method has proven 
quite effective in helping 
get the proper antenna- 
matching impedance. The 
500-pF capacitor acts as a 
kind of band-spread device 
to cover small increments 
within the band from one 
end to the other. The output 
capacitor should require lit- 
tle trimming after it is set for 
the particular band. For 
some random antenna con- 
figurations, the tuner in- 
put/output connections are 
sometimes reversed; this 
seems to be especially true 
at the 20- through 10-meter 
bands* 

Construction 

My first tuner model used 
a length of B & W commer- 
cial coil, stock #3033, The 
unit is wound with #12 wire 
at 6 turns per inch. Coil 
length is 12.7 cm (5 inches) 
with a diameter of 7 62 cm 
(3 inches) My present tuner 
model has a very low cost 
homemade coil wound on a 
very simple and sturdy air- 
core form. Since #12 bus 
wire was unavailable at the 
local surplus outlet, 1 wound 
the coil with #14 bus wire* 
The coil was fitted on the 
form shown in Fig, 3. 

Please note that this coil 
size should allow its use 
with transmitters in the 150- 
Watt-output class. Howev- 
er, when using a helically- 



wound antenna wrth this 
power, a capacity hat must 
be installed at the antenna 
top. This eliminates corona 
discharge which will dam- 
age the aerial at the top end. 

Fig. 3 shows two pieces of 
acrylic plastic sheet 1/8 inch 
thick, 3175 cm, fitted as 
shown. All dimensions are 
listed in the drawing. Epoxy 
cement is applied at points 
where the sheets come to- 
gether at right angles to 
each other. This gives rigidi- 
ty to the coil fomi. The 
winding grooves are sepa- 
rated 4 mm apart The slits 
in both pieces should have 
the same width as the thick- 
ness of the plastic sheet. 
That will allow a secure fit 
for the two pieces. 

In wiring the tuner, I 
found that a common 
ground point return for the 
capacitors was important to 
efficient operation. Also, it 
would be a definite advan- 
tage to mount the tuner 
components so that they 
may be easily interchanged 
and interconnected in con- 
figurations other than the 
one described m this article. 
That will allow the tuner to 
be configured with any and 
alt antennas the user will 
ever encounter. However, 
my particular design has 
been used with random 
wires of varied types and 
has worked welL 

Operation 

Initial tuner settings 
should be determined with 
the aid of an antenna noise 
bridge The tuner will allow 
close to 1:1 swr match of an- 
tenna-to-rig output of 52 or 
75 Ohms. Since the device 
tuning is sharp, great care 
must be taken in using regu- 
lar tuning procedure to pre- 
vent overloading and dam- 
aging the final amplifier If 
an antenna bridge is unavail- 
able, the tuner may be ini- 
tially set by tuning the de- 
vice for maximum signal 
output on the receive por- 
tion of one's transceiver. 
However, on transmit, a 
slight retuning is generally 



necessary. This must be 
done with great care, again, 
to avoid overloading the 
final. 

With transceivers that 
have a continuously variable 
power-output control, e.g., 
Ten-Tec's Century 21, the fol- 
lowing procedure may be 
used: First adjust the rig's 
power output for indication 
of swr below 1 .5:1, e.g., start 
at 1.2:1 . Then peak tuner ca- 
pacitors for 1:1 output. In- 
crease power a bit more. If 
swr rises above 1:1, repeak 
the input capacitor and/or 
output capacitor. If an swr 
higher than 1:1 persists, e'K 
ther or both coil taps have 
to be varied. The variation 
of coil inductance may be 
as simple as sliding the clip 
along the turn in a plus or 
minus direction, or the varia- 
tion may have to be as much 
as a turn or two plus or 
minus. 

By way of further illustra- 
tion, let us say that we wish 
to tune up at 7.040 kHz- We 
will use either a noise bridge 
or the alternate method just 
described and the helical 
antenna. Proper match is 
achieved when the tuning 
coif is shorted from the in- 
put end of the coil to the 
fourth turn from the output 
end. The input capacitor is 
connected at the seventh 
turn from the output end of 
the coil. The input capacitor 
is meshed in at about 65% 
of total capacitance. The 
output capacitor is meshed 
in at somewhat less than 
50% capacitance. With 
these settings, the antenna 
bridge will indicate a deep 
null. This is the indication 
of a properly matched an- 
tenna. 

In moving from one end 
of the band to the other, set- 
tings of the tuner are sharp. 
This means that retuning of 
the matching device is usu- 
ally necessary every 5 or 10 
kHz to maintain swr down 
to 1:1. To make sure that 
power is indeed at the an- 
tenna, a fluorescent lamp is 
put at the aerial end without 
touching it If the antenna is 



[ 1 



w 



h 



m 



aO^JpT 



fh 



ITIKC I ^ 



Switch \ 



yrw^y^ 



J 



itDopr: 



-A, 



lOOoF 



rn 



fh 



m 



7^ 5006F 
1^1 



Fig, 1, Bask antenna-tuner Fig. 2, Simplified antenna- 
circuit tuner circuit 



loaded, the lamp will glow. 
Use of this aid is necessary 
only when determining the 
tuner's true settings It is a 
backup check in forestalling 
any false indication of power 
transfer from rig to antenna 

Conclusion 

Therefore, this tuner can 
match a rig to most any aeri- 
al and maintain an swr of 
1:1. Because this antenna- 
matching device tunes 
sharply, additional harmon- 
ic filtering is available. The 
sharp-tuning feature is also 
evident on receiving; signals 
are peaked loudly and clear- 
ly. For those having capaci- 
tors in their parts box. the 
only other investment nec- 
essary is about 75C for scrap 
clear Lucite^M and one dol- 
lar for bus wire. When high- 



capacity condensers are un- 
available, 365-pF capacitors 
with paralleled switched fixed 
condensers may be used. 

The tuner design has been 
in service for many years, 
over 15 in alL One proof of 
its utility has been the lon- 
gevity of the finals for my 
two rigs, one solid state, the 
other vacuum tube. The 
tubes are TV horizontal 
types. The transistors are 
+-Watt types operated with 
a very short duty cycle at 20 
to 35 Watts power output 
The tuner capability in 
maintaining a 1:1 swr has 
greatly enhanced the life of 
the final amplifiers H 

References 

1. A. Umendola KC2NT, 'TaJk 
Softly and Load a Big Stfck," 73, 
May, 1983. 



OWOOVES 




16-5 In. 1 



MOUNTING HOLES 

USE *in OR ILL 

FOR fe'J? SCHEWB 



Fig. 3. Clear plastic coil form, 

73 Magazine • August, 1984 



Bt6 Engle K9QLL 

RR2 

Frankiin IL 62t3B 



Cheap Power Ploy 

This rugged supply will give you more power than 
you ever dreamed possible. Have we gone too far this time? 



Looking for a 12-volt pow- 
er supply of moderate 
current ' found a schematic 
and information that prom- 
ised to be just what I need- 
ed. The supply was con- 
structed following the guide- 
lines and recommendations; 
upon completion, it was 
checked and put into ser- 
vice. Then the fun began. 

The supply was essential- 
ly the same as shown in Fig. 
1 and was to provide be- 
tween 3 and 20 Amps output 
(peak) at 12 volts. It did in- 
deed do this, but it also put 
out about 1/2 to 3/4 volts of 
assorted garbage tfiat drove 
the equipment that it was 
operating into fits of sulking 



and, even worse, almost 
proper operation. 

While some of the equip- 
ment that is designed for use 
with vehicular power sources 
is fairly immune to power- 
line noise, this is not the 
case with most dc-operated 
equipment Spikes, ripple, 
and assorted other garbage 
can cause tost memories, 
lousy audio, and a host of 
other problems. It makes no 
sense to attach a kilobuck 
piece of gear to an inade- 
quate supply. 

The supply to be described 
here is the result of solv- 
ing the problems of the orig- 
inal supply (Fig. IX While the 
original was not designed 




for ham gear, the five sup- 
plies built to this pattern 
(Fig. 2) have proven excel- 
lent for everything from 
high-power stereo gear to 
allband transceivers. 

The supply was designed 
to be built using parts that 
are cheap and readily avail- 
able. The use of surplus 
components dictates a cer- 
tain amount of caution but 
can result in an excellent 
product at a minimum price. 
With a little care and some 
improvisation with regard to 
transformers, the price of 
this supply should be under 
$50.00— considerably under 

$50,00 if you're a bargain 
hunter with a sharp eye. 

What about specs? This 



supply will provide [depend- 
ing on components chosen, 
of course) between 15 and 
30 Amps (or more) at 5 to 28 
volts with ripple and noise at 
about 5 to 10 mV p-p and 
regulation usually within .05 
volts or so. There is full ther- 
mal protection and the 
usual provisions for current 
limit and OVP (over-voltage 
protection). 

First, let's take a look at 
the supply in Fig, 1 and see 
where it goes wrong. Starting 
with T1, which provides 18 V 
ac to the bridge rectifier, 
and then to CI , which is 70k 
(iF, we have about 25 V dc to 
the pass-regulator circuit 
under no-load conditions. 
The regulator and pass tran- 
sistors require a voltage at 



Photo A. interhf of IS-Amp supply showing position of 
major components and airflow shrouding. 

10 73Magazifie • August, 1984 




PROTCCTrON 



frit 



\) 



Fig. 7. Original supply. 



least 5.6 higher than the out- 
put voltage to maintain reg- 
ulation 13-6 V + 5,6 V - 
19.2 V. If at any tinne the in- 
put voltage drops below 
19.2 volts, the regulator 
loses control and the output 
changes. 

The voltage across CI has 
a waveform as shown in Fig. 
3. As the current increases, 
the hump at the front in- 
creases This is the principle 
component of the output 
ripple and is due to the fact 
that the rectifiers conduct 
for a short period of time to 
charge the capacitor Increas- 
ing the capacitance simply 
increases the amplitude of 
this ''spike/' which makes 
the problem worse and in- 
creases the already high de- 
mands on the diodes in the 
bridge. 

In addition, the regulator 
was unstable at certain cur- 
rents and seemed to put out 
more hash than the spec 
sheet called for at this volt- 
age (about 10 times more!). 
Bypassing and rewiring the 
ground circuit got rid of the 
hash, and increasing the in- 
put voltage improved the 
regulation and ripple prob- 
lems. The supply proved OK 
for a 2-meter amp that didn't 
seem to care about the rip- 



ple (.2 V at 20 AI but it 
wouldn't serve the purpose 
it was originally built to 
serve. 

At this point I priced 
commercial supplies and 
immediately went back to 
the drawing board. After 
some research and experi- 
mentation, the supply shown 
in Fig. 2 was built and tested. 
It worked. The four supplies 
built to the same pattern 
have all worked. 

The belt-and-suspenders 
approach has proven to be 
well worth the time and 
slight additional cost. Ac- 
tually, with the price of 
2N3055s at three for a buck 
and the use of smaller and 
cheaper capacitors in what 
is really a simple circuit, the 
actual cost was not much 
more than the original sup- 

piv- 

Lefs now see the how and 
why of the "quiet" supply. 
The bridge rectifier uses 
surplus diodes rated at 100 
V and 50 Amps; this seems 
like overkill and perhaps it 
is, but the peace of mind 
bought for $1.25 each was 
worth it With CI at 25k ^F, 
the conduction spikes can 
get up to ten times the out- 
put current so they really 
don't represent that much 




Photo B. Load resistor for tesfmg. 



overkill after all. CI is 25k |iF 
at 75 volts because I got a 
box full for $1 .00 each, Rl is 
simply a bleeder and should 
draw about 100 mA at the 
peak no-load voltage across 

cr 

T1-T4, ZDl, R2, and C5 
form a circurt that thinks it is 
a multi-farad capacitor. The 
capacitance of C2 is multi- 
plied by the beta of the Dar- 
lington circuit formed by 
T1-T4. The current demands 
on T4 are not enough to re- 
quire a 3055, but they're 
cheap I simply selected one 
with a beta of about 60 for 
the driver. This particular 



circuit Is about 10 farads ef- 
fective capacitance and the 
output ripple to the regula- 
tor is less than .2 volte at 20 
Amps (p-p). ZD1 provides a 
clamp to keep the input 
voltage to the regulator at 
24 volts in this case. 

The regulator circuit is 
based on the 78C (or 78MG) 
because I like it. It is a good, 
flexible chip that is pro- 
tected four ways from Sun- 
day, and it is cheap. 

The 78C will provide over 
one Amp of output, with the 
average beta of a 2 N 3055 at 
40 or so. The circuit should 
be good for 40 Amps. Actu- 



Rsc ma 

fS££ Tf TtTI E«OT£ « 1 




r»MS iU PLACt OF TflS 



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L ALL flIESFSTOHS UZiiATT UNtESS SPCCIFltD 
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5 AU BtPASS C4P4CITSRS CFRAMtC 01 SC UNLESS 3PECJFIE0 

4 ItSH DEP£ND£ OH UmR 

5 RCAL USED. FQR 50#A UrET£R flSH> O04fl 



RCAi.* Z.5fl 






Fig. 2, Schematic (at! transistors are 2N3055). 



73 Magazine • August, 1984 11 




~%> 




Photo C IB-Amp supply on the breadboard 



ally, above 25 Amps or so, 

the use of the Darlington cir- 
cuit is a good idea. When us- 
ing the 7BMCp the Darling- 
ton circuit must be used. 
When using the Darlington 
circuit the current demands 
are so snnalj that the chip 
may need the slight load, 
RX. This value will depend 
on the individual chip and is 
usually 300 Ohms to Ik 
Ohms for a 13.5-V supply. 

R3, R4, and VR1 set the 
output voltage. R3 is used to 
set the maximum voltage 
and VR1 trims this to the de- 
sired lower output voltage. 
With R3 at 8.2k and VR1 at 
look, this will be about 14 V 
maximum. The connection 
point for R3 should be at the 
output connector or, if re- 
mote sensing is needed, it 
can go to the remote sense 
point. The resistors shown in 
the base and emitter leads 
of the pass transistors are 



absolutely necessary. They 

prevent one transistor from 
hogging all the current The 
base resistors are not partic- 
ularly critical as to value, 
and 10 to 22 Ohms will do 
fine (all the same value, of 
course). The emitter resistors 
should be about ,1 Ohms 
and 5 to 10 Watts, depend- 
ing on supply voltage, cur- 
rent, and the number of pass 
transistors. 

The number of pass 
transistors required will de- 
pend on several factors, the 
most important being the 
desired output current of 
the supply. 

The 2N3055 is rated at 15 
Amps and 117 Watts (TO-3 
case) at 25^ C Expecting 
one to provide both at the 
same time is an invitation to 
disaster, especially with sur- 
plus components. 

Let's take a realistic took 
at what the requirements 




wilt be for this supply pro- 
viding 13.6 volts at the 
20-Amp levet. The regulator 
will need approximately 6 
volts to work properly, so 
under a 20-Amp load it will 
have to dissipate about 120 
Watts. The capacitor multi- 
plier at 20 Amps will need 
about 5 or 6 volts, so we now 
have 240 Watts at full cur- 
rent This has to be dissi- 
pated as heat via the heat 
sink and is one good reason 
for derating the transistors. 
Derating surplus transistors 
to 8 Amps (or preferably 
less) and 50 or 60 Watts will 
make for a longer life and 
lessen the chance of cata- 
strophic failure. 

The output resistor, R5, 
provides a constant mini- 
mum load for the supply 
and helps with stability (100 
mA or so will be adequate — 
130 Ohms for the 13.6-volt 
supply). 

If you look at the circuit 
and remember your solid- 
state basics, it can easily be 
seen that we have an ampli- 
fier with quite a bit of gain. 
Certain steps must be taken 
to ensure stable operation 
and to prevent amplifica- 
tion of unwanted signals. As 
Elmer used to tell me, "Build 
it like you mean it," In this 
case it means bypassing 
everything, especially the 
78G. All those C points on 
the schematic mean that all 
grounds are brought to a 
single point on the chassis. 
More about this during the 
mechanics discussion. The 
ac line should be filtered 
and bypassed, and the case 
should be rf tight, in this 



case to keep ft out rather 
than in. Ferrite beads on the 
base leads of the Darlington 
driveifs) are not a frill if pow- 
ering VHF equipment is con- 
templated. 

The heat sink used Is one 
that seems to be common 
on the surplus market The 
ones that I bought came 
four TO-3 transistors 



w 

and miscellaneous parts and 
cost about $3,00 each. The 
heatsinkis12" X 4" X 2.5" 
with 10 fins for a total radi- 
ating area of 600 square 
Inches. Alt of the hot parfe 
are mounted on the heat 
sink using aluminum stock, 
as shown in the photos The 
bridge can be mounted on 
its own sink or on an exten- 
sion bolted to the pass sink. 
A muffin fan (105 cubic feet 
per minute) provides cooU 
ing, with cardboard shroud- 
ing to direct the air flow 
through the heat sink. The 
78G is mounted on the end 
of the heat sink farthest 
from the fan at the hottest 
point If thermal limits are 
exceeded, it shuts down the 
pass transistors. Many home- 
built supplies fail to take ad- 
vantage of this feature 
which is built into most reg- 
ulator chips. This is an 
oversight that can prove 
costly. 

ConstrucrtionfMechanicsf 
Testing Options 

This supply is a definfte 

breadboard project and 
should be approached as 
such (by the way, sink cut- 
outs make fancy, cheap 
breadboards). 1 prefer TO-3 
devices, used with sockets. 




Fig 3- 



POVdEH lUl'PLTr case: 



OSGtLLDSCDPE CASE 



m 

USE 3 T^ Z ^ 

^CUPTER TO 




Photo D. Heat'Sink assembly for lO-Amp 
12 73 Magazine « August, 1934 



Fig, 4. 





In Bumper Crop 



From the fertile grounds of Communications 
Specialists comes our fresh harvest of direct 
cress plug-ins to spade through valuable in- 
stallation time and cultivate profits, The/re 
available for most popular mobiles, portables, 
and repeater panels, and all incorporate our 
industry standari field programmable TS-32. 

^ See List ot Aitverttsers on p&g& 93 



Just caU our sales or engineering departments 
toll free from an>^here in the USA (includ- 
ing California) and reap what we've sown, 

COMMUNICATIONS 
SPECfAUSTS 

426 West Taft Avenue, Orange, CA 92667 
714/998-3021 Entire USA 800/854-0547 






VtSM 



73 Magazine • August. 1984 13 



whatever package style you 
use, special cam should be 
taken in mounting. All burrs 
should be removed and the 
best-possible contact be- 
tween the device and the 
heat sink nnust be ensured. 
This means using heat-con- 
ducting compound on all 
devices. As you install each 
device, verify that there are 
no shorts to the heat sink. 
The precision emitter resis- 
tors that I used were ham- 
fest specials, but the ceram- 
ic ones available at most 
parts houses will serve as 
well. Use #10 or #12 wire for 
the collector and emitter 
buses. 1 simply stripped out 
some scraps of Romex left 
over from rewiring the 
shack. The main run wiring 
used was #10 or #B THHN 
wire scrounged from an 
electrical contractor's scrap 
box. 

The heat sink is at ground 
potential but is insulated 
from the case. Grounding is 
accomplished by running a 
single wire from the com- 
mon connection of the 78G 
(the 78C is not insulated 
from the sink) to the ground 
common point All ground 
connections are brought to 
the common point using 
heavy wire that is as short as 
possible. The lines from the 
capacitors, the rectifier, the 
negative output post and 
the ac-line ground conduc- 
tor are connected to this 
point This prevents ground 
loops and helps to keep the 
output clean. 

Cardboard shrouds are 
used to focus the air flow 
through the sink and pro- 
vide for efficient use of the 
cooling air The case should 
be well ventilated. Transmit- 
ter techniques can be used 
for rf proofing, All of the 
usual transformer tricks can 
be used for your supply; 
buck/boost series, parallel, 
etc. I do have a couple of 
suggestions that might prove 
handy. 

First there are available 
surplus small transformers 
that provide 2 volts or so at 

■ 

up to 30 Amps (Fair Radio is 
one source). These are great 

1i 73 Magazine • August, 1984 



when the "main" transform- 
er is just a bit low. 

Second, an often-over- 
looked source for high-cur- 
rent transformers Is gas sta- 
tions. Really! Those old 
Tungar bulb chargers had 
some bodacious transform- 
ers in them with multi-tap 
primaries and secondaries. 
Many times they can be had 
for hauling them off. (Take 
help!) Newer ones also are 
available after the selenium 
bridges have blown. Those 



with aluminum secondaries 
will need some of the spe- 
cial grease for making good 
connections to aluminum 

wire. If you're using the sup- 
ply to power an SSB rig or 
for other low-duty-cycle a|> 
plications, you can push the 
transformer current ratings 
a bit but it is best to have a 
bit of reserve for good dy- 
namic performance. 

Protection circuitry is an 
absolute must for this sup- 
ply if used with voltage-sen- 



Parts List 

Note: This supply was designed to take advantage of surplus parts. 
Therefore, the prices listed will be dependent on the source and 
avaiilabjiity of each item. 

All bypass capacitors are ceranDlc disc unless otherwise specified 
All resistors are Vi Watt unless otherwise specified. 
Bypass— .01 , 1 -kV disc, 4 @ ,25 ea, $"1,00 

Bypass— J,200-Vdisc,2 @ .25 ea. .50 

K1— relay, 24-V-dc coil, 3PDT, all contacts in parallel 1.^ 

Fan— I05cfm muffin^ype fan 7.50 

Xfmf— any combination of transformers supplying the necessary 
voltage and current may t>e used. The surplus xfmr used In Fig. 2 was 

18.00 

5.00 

1.00 

.39 

.39 

.39 



24 volts® 25 Amps. 

D1-D4— 100 V @ 50 A used in this supply, 4 @ $1,25 ea, 

CI— 25,000 ^F@ 75 V 

Cs— 4300 fjF® 50 V 

C3— 1 ^F @ 50 V tantalum capacHor 

C4 — 3^F ® 50 V tantalum capacitor 

Resistors: 

R1— 350 Ohms. 20 W 

RC5— 130Ohms,25W 

R2— 330 Ohms, 1 W 

R3— 8200 Ohms. Vz W 

R4— 4700 Ohms, VsW 

R6— 1000 Ohms, VzW 

Base resistors— 22 Ohms^ Vz Watt,6 @ .05ea. 

Emitter resistors— .1 Ohms, 5 Walts, 6 @ ,35 ea. 



.39 
.39 
.15 
,05 
.05 
.05 
.30 
ZW 
,49 



VRl— lOOkOhm trimpot 
Rsc — current limit, see text 

Rsh and Real depend on meter used. For 50-uA meter used In Fig. 2, 
Rsh was .001 Ohms, and Real 2.5kOhm trimpot. 

Transistors— 2N3055, 8 @ ,33 ea. 2,64 

SCR— 200 V @ 5 Amps used here .29 

2D1 — 24-V, 1 -Watt zener diode ,24 
2D2— value depends on OVP desired, (16 V used for 13.8-V 

supply) 2.64 

7flG— Voltage regulator 2,95 
CHI— 14 toifilar turns #14 wire on ferrite rod approx. 14" diameter, 

AVi " length 2.00 

CH2— surplus 15-mH choke 25 

SI— 15-Amps @ 120 V toggle switch 149 

F1— 10'Amp fuse in clip-type holder 125 

Heat sink— surplus 2ya" x 4" x 12" 4.50 

Meter— 50 uAused in Fig. 2 supply, surplus 3,00 

Misc. case, hardware, aluminum stock, suitable wire (see text). The 
case shown in the photos is 5" x 12*' x 15" and was purchased at a 
ham fest for $100. 

Substitution: Since this project is designed to use surplus com- 
ponentSt reasonable substitutions are to be expected. When surplus 
components are used, derating should be the rula 03 and C4 must 
be tantalum capacitors for proper operation. The resistors used at 
R1 and R5 should be capable of dissipating at least twice the I x E 
power for safety and stability. 



sitive equipment Any of the 
popular OVP circuits may 
be used; the one used here 
crowbars the ac line using a 
Sinn pie circuit that costs less 
than a single high-current 
thyristor. 

Current limiting is nice 
also; the circuit used here is 
a common one and per- 
forms quite well. Rsc is set 
for a .7-volt drop at the de- 
sired current level. At this 
point the voltage will drop 
to hold the output current at 
this level Rsc can be built 
up by paralleling standard 
values. Rsc should be m the 
airstream to keep it cool 
The choke and capacitor on 
the gate of the SCR keep 
garbage on the line from 
causing false firing. Switch- 
ing high-current loads can 
cause this type of transient 
{I blew a few fuses before I 
figured that one out) 

This supply should be 
breadboarded and tested be- 
fore final construction. This 
is not a complicated pro- 
cess, and it will pay divi- 
dends when the supply is 
put to use. As with any home- 
brew project you are spend- 
ing time rather than money. 
This is time well spent 

The first step is to assem- 
ble the heat sink with all its 
components. Then a simple 
test to determine the neces- 
sary I/O differential voltage 
is needed. With a sensitive 
DVM and a light load on the 
output vary the input voltage 
until the output drops an 
mV or so. This is the voltage 
which must be supplied to 
the pass circuit to maintain 
regulation. You now know 
the necessary voltage that 
the transformer must supply 
under full load for proper 
operation. 

To test the supply under 
load you will need a load re- 
sistor (see photo). One is 
made by paralleling several 
short pieces of nichrome 
heating coil. (I got 10 feet for 
$3-00 at the local electrical- 
supply house.) By adding 
more pieces in parallel, the 
current increases. If you 
didn't build an ammeter into 
the supply, a 7-7/16" length 




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Se0 Usi of Advefffsets oft page 98 



73 Magazme • August, 1984 t5 




Photo E. Detailed view of 78C wiring (note short leads on 
bypass). 



of #12 wire will serve as a 
shunt, providing 1 mV per 
Amp. Using the setup shown 
in Fig. 4, look at the output 
under load. The setup pre- 
vents ac ground loops from 
showing up as false noise on 
the scope. If the scope is not 
more sensitive than d V 
per cm, the trace should 
barely widen under full 
load. Check at several out- 



put levels. If you have inor- 
dinate noise, make sure the 
setup is right before trouble- 
shooting. At the current-lim- 
it level, using the circuit 
shown, there will be a large 
increase in ripple — this is 
normal. If Rsc needs to be 
lowered, it can be paralleled 
with additional resistors. 

If the output behaves up 
to a certain current level 



and then falls off, more 
input voltage may be neces- 
sary. When testing the sup- 
ply on the breadboard with- 
out the fan, the heat sink 
gets hot quickly— cautioni 
If it gets too hot the 78G 
will shut down until things 
cool off. If you have high- 
frequency hash, it may be 
necessary to add .01 discs 
to the input and output of 
the 78C. In stubborn cases, 
you may have to change the 
layout around the 78C. If 
the supply is unstable at 
some current levels and 
stable at others [higher), you 
may have a ground- loop 
problem. Try changing the 
lengths of ground leads and 
if you're using the Darling- 
ton circuit for the regulator 
pass, try decreasing the 
value of RX. 

One of the supplies that I 
constructed is variable from 
5 to 20 volts (VR1 on the 
front panel and a switch to 
use all or part of the second- 
ary) at 20 Amps, It has prov- 
en to be one of the most 



often used bench tools I 
have. Another smaller (12 V 
at 1 5 A) supply provides the 
dc for a TV-studio installa- 
tion. This supply is, of 
course, a compromise; you 
pay back in lack of efficien- 
cy for a clean stable output 
"Build it like you mean it" 
and it should provide you 
with a long trouble-free per- 
formance—quietly. ■ 

References 

Application Note 90, "Perfor- 
mance Measurements,'* Hewlett 
Packard, 196B DC Power Sup- 
plies Catalog and Handix)<^, 

p. 72-73. 

73, "Exorcising Power Supply 

Demons: What to do When Mur- 
phy Visits," March, 1978, p. 
52-55, 

73, "A New Breed of Voltage 
Regulators: Throw Away Your 
Old 3095," March, 1977, p. 
62-64, 

73, "Four Terminals Are Better 
Thaf^ Three: Using the New Volt- 
age Regulators," Novemt)er, 
1978, p. 226-227. 
73, "Power Plus!— A 20-Amp Ad> 
Justable, Regulated Supply/' 
March, 1979. p. 42-44. 



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16 73 Magazine • August, 1984 



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Interface II is the unit for 
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UTU is Kantronics newest 
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UTU requires no additional 
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The UTU package includes; 

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18 73 Magazine * August, 1964 



^25 J 



National Communication Group 



. 10/160M HF TRANSCEIVER 
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. 40-15-6 TRI-BANDER NEW!!! 



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Operate the popular 40 and 15 meter bands and also have the 
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All Solid State Automatic Antenna Switching 

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73 Magazine • August 1^34 19 



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Announces: 

A User-Friendly Software Package 
Designed For Easy Operation of Morse, 
Baudot, ASCII, and AMTOR. A Feature- 
Packed Program Called: 

MAIN MENU SCREEN 

hh:mfTi;ss 

MBA'TOR™ 
COPYRIGHT 1984 BY AEA 

SELECT: 
M. MORSE 
A. ASCII 
R. RTTY 
T. AMTOR 
U. AUTO AMTOR 
X. AUTOCALL 
C. COMMANDS 
0. OPTIONS 



OPTIONS MENU SCREEN 





ht):mm:ss 


1. CALLSIGN ?????? 


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ON 


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OFF 


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WORD 


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M. MOVE 




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X. SET XMT BUFFER SIZE 


C. SET COLOR 




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MAP-64/2 Software with Self-Containad Interface S239.95 Retail 

Just Look At Some Of The Features: 



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-*- 5 bit Baudot, receive and transmit at 60, 67, 75, 100 or 132 wpm. 
-*^ TOR, receive and transmit ARQ (Mode A) or FEC (Mode B) and listen, 
-^ Beacon and WRU system, includes ORG check before XMT, won't QRM. 
-*- Message forwarding system, AUTO-AMTOR still functions in this mode. 
-^ Selects command menu. 
^*- Selects options menu. 



+ Complete precompose split-screen display with status information. 
+ Complete printer control including SELCALL/WRU printer control 

24-hour clock, shows time in hours, minutes and seconds. 

Allows entry of your callsign for auto operations. 

Derived from your callsign automatically, can be changed* 

Sets ARQ phasing calls from 1 to 99 seconds. 

Unshift on space, toggles on or off. 

Transmits Morse idle character during breaks in KB activity. 

Transmits RTTY idle character during breaks in KB activity. 

Sends short beep through your audio as any key is depressed. 

Sends carriage return the first space after 65 characters. 

Sends a line feed after each carriage return. 

Allows the beacon to be recorded to the QSO buffer for logging. 

Sends CR/LF H there is a space in the last 5 positions on the line. 

Automatic transmit/receive switching during QSO. 

Transmit in word mode (text sent on space) or character mode. 

+ Break-in buffer on alt modes, toggle QSD buffer on or off. 

+ CW speed lock and Farnsworth low-speed CW. 

+ 10 soft-partitioned^^ message buffers plus direct from disk or tape. 

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Allows transmission of QSO buffer without disk or cassette systems. 
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Set the transmit pre-type buffer to any size you like. 
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Lets you set the time ol day clock, 

+ Insert QSO station's call into any buffer while still copying. 
+ Includes a complete manual keyboard overlays and cables for 

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Penn's Two-Tone Gadget 

Clue one: We're talking about lab quality. 
Clue two: Get your junk box. 



Here's a professional- 
qualrty two-tone test- 
er designed tor easy dupli- 
cation. Using no precision 
parts and having only two 
easily set internal adjust- 
ments, it generates sine 
waves with less than 0.1% 

total harmonic distortion. 
This inexpensive project 
can be built with all new 
Radio Shack components 



for $30 to $40. The cost can 
be reduced significantly if 
you use a battery for power 
and your junk box for some 
of the parts. It's sure to be a 
valuable addition to your 
collection of test gear. 

If you've ever repaired or 
tested an SSB transmitter, 
then you've used or needed 
a two-tone test oscillator. A 
dependable source of high- 



Photos by W1GSL 




Small enough to be out of the way, this neat unit is big on 
quality and convenience. 



quality sine waves, the os- 
cillator can be used for any 
number of transmitter tests. 
Typical appi ications itv 
elude checking circuit 
gains, peaking tuned stages, 
adjusting phasing exciters^ 
checking or setting ALC 
thresholds, and measuring 
amplifier linearity. 

Unfortunately, many of 
the published two-tone cir- 
cuits are of limited use be* 
cause the output waveform 
is not pure enough for some 
tests. A good linear amplifi- 
er, for example, will have 
odd-order intermodulation 
products 35 to 40 dB down 
from the desired output. 
Obviously, the two tones 
used to measure such per- 
formance should be at least 
that good when they go in 
the microphone jack. Minus 
40 dB is only 1% distortion 
though, and many testers 
are incapable of generating 
waveforms that pure. 

The published circuits 
which do provide sufficient 
audio purity often attain it 
through the use of sharp au- 
dio filters. Those filters re- 
quire either high-quality 
components or several cir- 
cuit trims to keep them on 



the right frequency. Preci- 
sion parts work fine but are 
difficult to find and expen- 
sive to buy. Lower-quality 
components need to be se- 
lected or trimmed and even 
then may drift enough to re- 
quire frequent readjust- 
ment 

The oscillator described 
here has a number of fea- 
tures making it a better 
choice for the amateur test 
bench: 

• All distortion products 
are at least 60 dB (typically 
65 to 70 dB) below the pri- 
mary output. That's good 
enough for taking even a 
hard look at state-of-the-art 
equipment 

• The unit can be duplicat- 
ed using everyday parts 
(5% resistors and 20% ca- 
pacitors) because purity has 
been achieved by careful 
oscillator design and not 
heavy filtering, 

• Unlike most commercial 
equipment this unit is phys- 
ically small, rugged, and 
well shielded. When you 
need it it works; when you 
don't it isn't in the way. 

• The box plugs right into 
the transmitter microphone 
jack and includes a handy 

73 Magazine • August, 1984 21 



switch for keying the trans- 
mitter The adju stable (1 
vrms maximum} audio out- 
put is sufficient for driving 
rigs having either high or low 
impedance inputs. 
• Power drain is only 12 
mA at 9 volts, so you can 
run the unit from a single 
9-volt battery and not worry 
about limited battery life. 

The Circuit 

The two oscillators are 
designed around an LM324 
quad op amp as shown in 
Fig. 1. Each oscillator is fol- 
lowed by a simple peaked 
low-pass filter and the two 
signals are combined in the 
741 output amplifier. Switch- 
ing is provided for select- 
ing either or both tones and 
the output level is adjust- 
able over two ranges cov- 
ering to ,18 and to 1 
volt rms. 

The identical oscillators 
are carefully considered 
versions of the classic Wien 
Bridge oscillator circuit (see 
the sidebar, ''On the Trail of 
the Wien Bridge," else- 



where in this article). The 
sine waves produced by 
these oscillators have only 
about 0.5% distortion. The 
frequency of oscillation is 
determined by four compo- 
nents: the series capacitor 
and resistor between the 
op amp's output and its 
non-inverting input termi- 
nal, and the parallel capaci- 
tor and resistor between 
there and ground. The os- 
cillation frequencies with 
the components specified 
in Fig. 1 are 500 and 1750 
Hz (not the 440 and 1600 
Hz labeled on the photo- 
graphed unit). 

The remaining compo- 
nents in the oscillator circuit 
provide dc biasing and 
set the loop gain to unity. 
The trim resistor is used to 
adjust the small signal gain 
a little higher than required 
to sustain oscillation, and 
then the diodes and 470k re- 
sistor in the feedback path 
reduce the gain by 10% 
when the output signal 
grows larger than about 1 
volt peak to peak. Overall 




The 9-volt power supply takes up most of the room inside. 
Current drain is only 12.5 mA, so battery operation is an 
attractive space- and money-savir^g option. 



I|*<9t4|2| 






OUTPUT 
RJIMSE 




* AUDIO 

SHIELDED 
CA8LE T<f 

« GBOUWD) SUlTABLt 



I151MC 

li*f*UT 



Fig. T Two-fone oscillator schematic. Resistors are W W, 5%. tetfers shown where wires leave PC board [see Fig. 3]. 
22 73 Magazine • August, 1964 




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See List of AdvBftfsers on page 98 



73 Magazine • August, 1984 23 




Standing components on end lets evefYthing fit on the T* fay 
2.7" PC board. More real estate might be necessary if you 

build with peri or prototyping board. 



distortion is low because 
even this relatively minor 
gain reduction is applied 

gently as the diodes turn on. 
The distortion introduced 
by this type of gain con- 
trol is mostly at the third 
hamionic of the oscillation 



frequency* An additional 
5-dB reduction of that com* 
ponent is realized by driv* 

ing the diodes and 470k re- 
sistor from a point after the 
feedback capacitor instead 
of directly from the amplifi- 
er output as is usually the 




case. Even with this change, 
the third harmonic signal is 
still some 10 dB higher than 
the second harmonic. In a 
sense, this is desirable 
because the third-harmonic 
energy, being farther from 
the fundamental frequency, 
Is easier to filter off 

The oscillator outputs 
are dc-biased to half the 

supply voltage by a simple 
resistive voltage divider. 
That step maximizes the 
output ac level possible 
before the amplifiers satu 
rate. Each section of the 
quad amplifier is also dc- 
loaded with a 15k resistor 
The load resistor prevents 
crossover distortion by 
forcing the rather simple 
LM324 output circuit to op- 
erate strictly as a class-A 
amplifier. 

One design goal for this 
project was to have all un- 
desired frequency compo- 
nents at least 60 dB below 
the primary outputs. To 
achieve this, the oscillators 
are followed by low-pass 
active filters. Since the 
oscillator outputs are so 
clean, this goal can be 
reached with only a small 
amount of filtering. That's 
significant because it 
means the filter stages 
don't have to be held to 
tight frequency tolerance 
and so won't require preci- 
sion parts. The filters have a 



gain of one at dc and a peak 

ac gain of 2,25, 

The dc gain causes the 
filter output to copy the os- 
cillator biasing at half the 
supply voltage The ac gain 
ensures that with overdrive 
the filter output will begin 
clipping before the oscilla- 
tor output does. If the oscil- 
lator could somehow satu- 
rate first it might be possi- 
ble for the misadjustment 
to go unnoticed because 
the filter would tend to hide 
the evidence. Another ben 
ef it of having gain in the fil- 
ter stage is that the oscilla- 
tor output level can be low- 
ered- That reduces distortion 
because the feedback diodes 
don't get turned on as fully 
as they would at the higher 
signal level. 

The outputs of the two 
low-pass filters are com- 
bined in a 741 amplifier 
which in turn is ac-coupled 
to the output attenuator 
The 741 does not need the 
15k load resistor because 
its sophisticated output cir- 
cuit doesn't have the distor- 
tion problems of the sim- 
pler LM324, 

After passing through the 
output-level control, the 
audio leaves the box in a 
shielded cable it shares 
with the push-to-talk line. 
The microphone plug on 
the end of this short cable 
should match the transmit- 




-100 

9V IN 
-.02?- 



Fig. 2. PC pattern of audio circuits from the copper side of 

the board. This pattern can be used as an etching/drilling 
guide as explained in the text 

24 73 Magazine • August 1 1964 



Fig. 3. Component placement (from the top side of the 
board). 




HF tqwpfn^ni Regulir SAIE 

IC'7*0* 9 band 200w PEP xcvr w/micl 109S 00 859^^ 

♦FREE PS-740 Internal Power Supply & 

$50 Factory Rebate until g one! 



PS'740 Internal power supply.,..,, 159 00145 

•EX 241 Markef unit.... 2000 

•EX'242 FM untt..... ..,.,. 39 00 

•EX-243 Electronic keytr unit. 50 00 

•FMS 500 Hz Cvy filler (Isl IF),.,. 59.50 

*FL-54 270 Hi CW filler (1st !F).,., 47.50 

*FL-52A 500 Hz CW filter (2nd IF) 96.50 

•FL-53A 250 Hz CW filter t2nd IF] 96 50 

• FI-44A SS6 fiirer (2nd IF) , . 159 00 

SMS Spin eiectret desk mfcropfione 39 00 

HM-IO Scanning rriDbilemicfophorie 39 50 

HB- 12 Mobife mount .... ... 19.50 

•Optron^ a/*o for IC'745 tisied bpf ow 
IC-730 B'barjd 200w PEP xcvr w/mic$829 00 

FL'30 SSB filter (passband tunmg) 59 50 

FL-44A SSB filter (2nd IF] 159,00 

FL-45 500 H; CW lifter „ 59 50 



3i 



89" 

144" 



599" 
144" 



EX- 195 Marker unit ,.»..... 

EX^202 LOAmtefface:730/2ICL/AH-l 
EX.203 150 Hz CW audio filter,.... 
EX' 205 Trans verter swUctiini unit 
5 M ' 5 8- pi n el eclret desk mrc ro phone 
HM-10 Scanning mobile micmptione 

MB- 5 Mobile mount 

1C-720A 9 band xcvr/. 1-30 MHz rcvf $ 1349 00 

FL'3Z 500 Hz CW filter. 59 50 

FL 34 5.2 KHz AM filter 49 50 

SM-5 Spmeiectretdeskmicrftplione 39 00 
■5 Mobile mount 19 50 



3900 
27 50 
3900 
29 00 
39 00 
3950 
19.50 



ggt" 



I 



^:i' 



, - -n^j&po 






17*5 



— *^- 31 



— -1*^ 



IC'745 9 band xcvi w. 1 30 Mhz re wr 5999.00 709'^ 

PS- 35 Internal power supply 16000 144" 

CFJ-455K5 2.B kHz wide SSB filter 4.00 
HM-12 Hand microphone-..,.,..... 39 50 
511-6 Desk microphone 39.00 

•See tC*74Q tht above for other opUom (*) 

UpHom: 720/730/740/745 RefUfaf SAIE 

PS 15 20A CMternal power supply $149 00 134'^ 

IX' 144 Adaptor for CF l/PS-15 .... 6.50 

CC 1 Adapt cable; HF radio/PS-20 10.00 

CF'l Coolinetanlor PS-20,... 45.00 

EK-SIO Voice syntb: 745, 751. R'70A 39-95 

SP*3 External base stalion speaker ... 49 50 

Speaker /Pf^one patch specify ridio 139 00 129«* 

iC-lOA Memory back up „*.^,.,...„ 8 50 

ill Relay box witfi marker 34.00 

AMOO lOOw a band automatic ant iuner 349,00 314" 

AT-500 500w 9 band automatic ant tuner 449.00 399" 

MMOO Manual antenna tufier., 249 00 224" 

AH-1 5-band mobile anter^na w/tuner 289.00 259" 

PS- 30 Systems p/s w/cord. 6-pm plug 259,95 233" 




ICOM 



Opr/nm - continual Regular SALE 

CF-1 Cooling fan for PS- 15,.. ,- 45 00 

PS-20 20A swTlcliing ps w/spe^ker ,., 229 00 199*^ 

GC-4 WorW clock,.. .. 99.95 94" 

Hf linear amplifier Rfgolar SAlE 

IC 2K1 w/ps 160 15m solid state amp 1795.00 1299 

VHf/UHf base mutti-modes Regular SALE 
IC-251A* 2rT^FM/SSB/CW transceiver $749 00 549*^ 

*$50 Factory Rebate until gone! 




IC-5510 80 Watt 6m transceiver...... 

PS-20 20A switching ps w/speaker 

EX^ 106 f M option .....,..»,,,....,. 

BC'IOA Memory back-yp 

SM-2 Electret desk microphone , . ., 
IC-271H lOOw 2m FM/SSB/CW xcvr 
iC-471H 75w 430-450 SSS/CW/FM xcvr 

PS-3S fnternal {jower supply 

PS'15 20A power supply.. ...•.•.*. 
IC-271A 25w 2m FM/SSB/CWiCvr... 

AG-20/EX-338 2m preamplifier .... 
IC-471A 25w 430-450 SSB/CW/FM xcvr 

PS'25 Internal power supply 

EX-310 Voice synthesizer 

HH-12 Hand microphone *......,., 

SM-fi Desk microphone ,.„...*..,, 
VHF/UHf mobile muhi-modei 
[C-290H 25w2mSSB/FMicvt.TTPniH; 
IC-490A lOw 430-440 SSS/FI^/CWscvr 
\ Ui/UHF/1.2 GHz FM 
IC-2211 lOw 2ni FM non-digital xcvr 

EX- 199 Remote Irequency selector 



$699 00 

229.00 

125.00 

8.50 

39,00 

899.00 

1099 00 

IBOOO 

149.00 

699 00 

56 95 

79900 

99 00 

39.95 

3950 

39 00 

54900 
649.00 
Regular 
299.00 
35.00 



599" 

19S*' 
112*1 



799" 
Call 
144" 
134" 

619*^ 

699" 
89** 



489*^ 
579" 
SALE 
249" 



■COM 2m Closeout 




Closeout item Regular NOW 

IC-25A 25w,2m.gfnieds.up-£fnTTPfr*ic 359.00 26y> 
SU'l Memory back-up 38 5DtlO^^ 

fC 25H as above, but 45 watts ... 389 00 299" 

BU-IH Memory back-up ,. 38.50 tiff^° 

tBU 1/H tlO purchased w/IC 25A/H, otherwise $38,50 



(C-27A Compact 25w 2m FMw/TTPmic 
1C-27H Compact45w2mFMw/nPmjc 
RP-3010 lOw 440 Mhi FM repeater 
IC'37A Compact 25w 220 FM, HP mic 
IC-47A Comp3ct25w440FM, TTPmtc 

UT-16/E)(-3B8 Voice synthesizer,,. 
IC'120 Iw 1.2 GHz FM transceiver.,.. 
RP-1210 lOw 1.2 GHz FM rep^atef ... 

Cabinelfor RP-1210 Of RP'301O..,. 
Duplejtef 1210 lOw t.2 GHj duplejter 
bm ponabte 
IC-505 3/lOw 6m port SSB /CW xcvr 

BP-10 Internal Hkb6 battery pack 

BP-15 AC charger,..., 

EX-248 FM unit,.,, 

LC40 Leather case .. . 



, ■ ■» 1 1 . 



* *» ^ iH.^.l. 



369 00 

409 00 

999 00 

449 00 

469 00 

29.95 

499,00 

1199 00 

24900 

1199 00 

Ifegular 

S449 00 

79.50 

12.50 

4950 

34 95 



329^* 
36r^ 

ear- 

399" 
4!9" 

449*^ 
1089 

1089 
SALE 
399" 



Hsnd'held Transceivers 
Delure models R«ftiUr SAIE 

IC-02A tor 2 meters! 319 00 289" 
IC-02AT w/DTMF 349.00 314" 



IC-04A for 440 MHz 
IC-04AT w/DTMF 



TBA 
379 00 339" 



Standard modeli Ref ufar SAIE 
IC 2A lor 2 meters $ 239 50 214" 
IC'2AT mtti TIP 269.50 219" 

rC-3A for 220 mi... 26995 234" 
IC-3AT with TIP...... 299.95 239" 

IC-4A for 440 MHz.,. 269 95 234" 
IC'4AT withTTP 299.95 239" 

Accessories for Oe/tixe moc/efs Refular 

BP-7 aOOmah/ 13.2V Nicad Pak - use BC-35 6750 
BP-8 800m3h/8,4V Nicad Pak use BC-35... 6250 
BC-35 Drop in desk charger - ali balterres.,*, 69 00 

10 00 
Regular 
39.50 
29.50 
12 50 
49 50 
9 50 



BC-16A Wall charger - BP7/BP8 

Acce^f^rtrfeii for both models 

BP-2 425mah/I2V Nicad Pak - use BC35.... 

BP 3 Extra Std, 250 mah/8,4V Nicad Pak ,.,. 

BP-4 Alkaline battery case...„^*„.... 

BP'5 425mah/10.8V Nicad Pak use BC35 
CP-1 Cig lighter pluf/cord - BP3 or Dli ...... 

DC-1 DC operation pak for standard models 17.50 
LC-2AT Leather case for standard models,.,.. 34.95 

LC-14 Soft case for Deluxe models 17.95 

HM-9 Speaker microphone .,, 34.50 

HSIO Boom microphone/headset 19.50 

KS'lOSA Vox unat for HS-10 (dlx only)..... 19 50 



US 10S6 PTT gnu for HS-10 

ML-l 2m 2.3w in/lOw out amplifier.. 
ML-25 2m 2.3w in 20w out amplifier 
3A-nN Opiional TT Pad - 2A/3A/4A 
SS-32M Commspec 32'tone encoder 



19 50 

SALE 79. 9S 
SALE 179-95 

3950 

29.95 



**■»• »t t** 




S Hon wave receivers 

H-71A 100 Khz-30 Mhz digital receiver 

FL-32 500HzCWhller,.... 

EX-310 Voice synthesizer 

RC-1 1 Wireless remote controller.. . 

CR'64 High stability oscillator xtal 
R-70 100 Khz-30 Mhz dtgital receiver 

ea-lS/ riri umii^i4'i..4b «!*'. ...p*..., 

IC-7072 Transceive inlerface, 720A 
FL-44A SSB filter |2nd IF) 

FL-63 250 Hz CW filler (Isl IF). -^-■ 

SP-3 External speaker . .. 

CK-7D (EX.299) I2v DC option...,. 
MB- 12 Mobile mount _. 



Regular SALE 
$799 00 689'*'- 
59 50 
3995 
59.95 
56.00 

749 00 599" 

3S00 

112 50 

159 00 144" 

48 50 

4950 

9.95 

19.50 





Order Toll Free: 1-800-558-0411 



I 



HOURS: Mon. thru Fri. 9-5:30; Sat 9-3 

Milwaukee WATSfine 1-800- 558-041 1 answered 
evenrngs until 8:00 pm, Monday tfiru Thursday. 

Please use WATS line for Placing Orders. 

For other iiiformatJOfi, etc. please use Regular Ime 



In Wisconsin (outside Milwaukee Metro Attta^ 

1-800-242-5195 



dUJJI 



4828 W. Fond du Lac Avenue; Milwaukee. Wl 53216 - Phone (414) 442-4200 



Inc. 



WICKUFFE. Ohio 44032 ORLANDO, Fla. 32803 

28940 Euclid Avenue 621 Commonwealth Ave. 

Phone 1216) 585-7388 Phone (305) 894-3238 

Ohio WATS 1-800- 362-0290 Fla WATS 1-800-43Z-9424 

t'l"' 1-800-321-3594 ?,"'^^ 1-800-327-1917 



-AES BRANCH STORES 

ORLANDO, Fla. 32803 CLEARWATER. Fla. 33575 LAS VEGAS. Nev. 89106 



1898 Drew Street 

Phone (813) 461-4267 

No In State WATS 



Ohio 



No Nationwide WATS n^„;; 



1072 U. Rancha Drive 

Phone (702) 647-3114 

No In- State WATS 

2"!ll* 1-800-634-6227 



Associate Store 

CHICAGO. IIMnais 60630 

ERiCKSON C0UMUrilCATIO^S 

5456 N. Milwauliee Avenue 

Phone (312) 631-5181 

IS mtn. from O'Harel 



73 Magazine • August. 1984 25 



ON THE TRAIL OF THE WIEN BRIDGE 
Selecting a Good Oscillator 

There^s certainly no shortage of published audio-oscillator 
circuits, but finding the fight one for this two-tone tester 
wasn't easy. The requirements (low distortion, simplicity, low 
power consumption, and reliability) seem common enough, 
but the circuits usually recommended for the task all had 
flaws rarely mentioned in the literature. Mostly those flaws in- 
volved ttie means chosen to control ttie oscillator gain. 

An oscillator is really an amplifier around which has been 
placed some frequency-sensitive positive feedback. The 
combination of amplifier gain and feedback attenuation is 
called loop gain, and at the frequency of oscillation, the loop 
gain is exactiy one and has exactiy zero phase shift. That*s 
another way of saying that the signal presented to the input of 
the ampUf ter is precisely the one needed to produce an output 
which will come back through the feedback network to repro^ 
duce itself. The phase shift across the feedback circuit is 
frequency-sensitive, so any departure from zero loop phase 
can be corrected by a change in the oscillation frequency. Un- 
fortunately, any departure from the desired amplifier gain is a 
little harder to accommodate. 

Since reai-worid components are imperfect, we can*t sim- 
ply specify parts that give the magical gain of one, but we can 
design in circuit features which will automatically adjust the 
gain for us. The easiest thing to employ is the most widely 
used: saturation. Saturation, or peak clipping, is what hap- 
pens when an amplifier is asked to produce more output than 
it possibly can. Gain is defined as the ratio of output to input, 
and as saturation occurs, the effective gain must drop since 
the output amplitude remains nearly constant while the input 
drive increases. Saturation clearly introduces distortion and 
most simple sine-wave oscillators have distortion in the 
5-to>1S% range t)ecause they depend on saturation effects to 
maintain the loop gain at unity. 

Modern laboratory oscillators usually achieve low distor- 
tion by using sophisticated age circuits to regulate gain. Early 
equipment did the same thing by the clever use of a nonlinear 
component: the tungsten filament of a common panel lamp. 
The resistance of the buib filament goes up as the average 
current through the lamp Increases, and very good gain con- 
trol can be had by the proper application of that effect. The 
classic lamp-stabilized Wien Bridge oscillator is a very 
elegant circuit capable of producing extremely pure sine 
waves. It was devised tn the 1930s* In part by a young engineer 
named William Hewlett who later formed a company with his 
friend David Packard to manufacture the oscillator. 

The modem version of thai circuit, shown in Fig, A, is repro- 
duced in almost every text discussing audio oscillators. The 
light bulb is driven with a signal proportional to the 
osclllator*s output. The filament resistance averages that out- 
put over several tenths of a second and so controls the oscil- 
lator gain to exactly one. Oscillator distortion may be as low 

as ,01%. 

Unfortunately, the thermal properties of the lamp filament 
introduce a tendency for the output amplitude to ring at a fre- 
quency near 10 Hz. This secondary oscillation can be started 
by the slightest circuit disturbance and may take 10 or 15 



seconds to decay away. The commonly available lamps used 
in this circuit also require more drive voltage than a 9'volt bat- 
tery provides, f^oreover, the circuit needs 15 to 20 m A of sup- 
ply current per oscittator and that seems excessive for a bat- 
tery-powered unit which doesn't really have to deliver any out- 
put power. Together, these several considerations make the 
circuit of Fig. A undesirable for this proiect despite its excels 
lent output waveform. 

The next commonly recommended circuit, shown in Fig. B, 
is usually offered as a modem replacement for the classic 
arrangement because it uses a JFET as the variable resistor 
instead of a light bulb. Unfortunately, a JFET does not make a 
good resistor since its resistance varies with the drain-to- 
source voltage as well as the gate-to-source bias. TTiat means 
the resistance will be changing during each oscillation cycle, 
and the changing gain that causes leads to problems. Distor- 
tion was a terrible 5 to 10% with the severat circuits I tried. 
The variations published nnost often were the poorest per- 
formers t)ecause the zener diodes in the output*level detector 
guaranteed the FET would be operated outside its linear 
range! 

The circuit type finally selected is shown in Fig. C. Diodes 
are used in the feedback path to switch in a resistor and lower 
the gain as the output amplitude increases. This scheme will 
introduce some distortion tjecause the amplifier gain is 
changing during every oscillation cycle. Only a slight gain 
change is needed, however, and the overall distortion at the 
oscillator output can be kept well below 1 %. The final circuit 
design was optimized for the IC used and generates a sine 
wave having only 0.5% distortion. As a bonus, the unwanted 
energy Is primarily In the third harmonic where ft is relatively 
easy to filler out. 




*7on 





i- 



70* 



frW 



I 

Fig. B 



: 2 2#J : ; 



Itl 



m 



ftt 



fff frf 



Fig. C. 



ter's input jack. The stereo 
phone plug shown in the 
photographs fits many old- 
er pieces of gear (standard 
wiring; PTT line to tip, 
audio to ring, ground to 
sleeve), but newer equip- 
ment may require a differ- 
ent type of connector 

26 73 Magazine « August, 1984 



The two-section frequen- 
cy-select switch turns the 
oscillators on and off and 
also introduces a gain of Vi 
between the active filters 
and output amplifier during 
two-tone operation. This at- 
tenuator prevents the peak 
audio output from doubling 



when both oscillators are 
on. That convenient feature 
makes it unnecessary to ad- 
just the transmitter drive 
level when switching be- 
tween single- and two-tone 
tests. 

The power supply is a 
simple rectifier-fitter fol- 



lowed by an LM723 regula- 
tor set to hold the output at 
9 volts. Any dc output volt- 
age from 8 to 20 will power 
the oscillator; the 9-volt 
level was chosen to make 
sure the circuit would work 
with a battery supply. Two 
LEDs are used as front- 



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19128 INDUSTRIAL BOULEVARD 
ELK RIVER, MN 56330 



*,I?T» 




My PC pattern was painted on using nail polish as resist 
material. White not as pretty as the photographic copy you 
can make from Fig, 2, it works iust as welL 



panel status indicators 

One comes on with the dc 
power and the other lights 
when the PIT switch is in 
the transmit position Wired 
in series to conserve cur- 
rent, the LEDs at 10 mA still 
draw 4 times the current 
needed by the rest of the 
circuit! 

There are several reasons 
to consider using a battery 
instead of the ac supply. 
The transformer supply is 
convenient but bulky. My 
supply takes up more room 



than the rest of the circuit 

even though the transform- 
er is smaller than any avail* 
able from Radio Shack. Us- 
ing the smaller 9*volt radio 
battery will definitely 
widen the choice of enclo- 
sures suitable for housing 
the tester. The battery will 
last a long time since the 
circuit only draws about 
12,5 mA. If you do decide to 
build In an ac supply, try to 
get a shielded transformer 
like the one in the 
photographs. Failing that, 




Proof of the pudding! The f wo-^one output as seen on an HP 
3582A spectrum analyzer. Horizontal scale reaches from dc 
to 5 kHz, and at lOdB per vertical division, the largest spurs 
are 70 dB below the tone peaks. The "signar at dc is ^ner- 
ated inside the analyzer, 

28 73 Magazine • August, 1984 



be sure to mount the 
transformer further from 
the audio circuits than I did 
to keep 60-Hz hum off the 

audio signal. 

Another alternative is to 
build the ac supply with a 
surplus wall-mount trans- 
former of the type used to 
power calculators. Even a 
3- or B-volt transformer 
could be used with a volt- 
age-multiplying rectifier cir- 
cuit. The LM723 regulator 
will work with any dc input 
between 1 2 and 40 volts, so 
a suitable transformer 
shouldn't be hard to find, 

Parts 

The audio circuits and PC 
board were carefully de- 
signed to use component 
values available from Ra- 
dio Shack. Of course, a con- 
siderable savings can be re- 
alized by scrounging parts 
from old transistor radios. 
The capacitors in particular 
should be easy to locate. 
The four electrolytics on 
the PC board are quite com- 
mon values but could be 
replaced with units having 
from 1 to 4 times the capac- 
itance. The smaller capaci- 
tors used in the oscillators 
and filters must be the 
values specified but are still 
easy to find on old circuit 
boards. If you have a 
choice, stay away from or- 
dinary ceramic capacitors 
since they're often not as 
stable as other types The 
circuits are relatively insen- 
sitive to drift and the 
ceramic parts will work ac- 
ceptably, but they should 
not be your first pick if 
something else is available. 

The two trim resistors 
should probably be pur- 
chased since physical sizes 
vary widely and the PC 
layout is tailored to the 
Radio Shack parts. While 
not strictly necessary, the 
use of IC sockets is recom- 
mended as they greatly 
simplify amplifier replace- 
ment should the need arise. 
The switches can be of any 
size and type which fit the 
box used for the project. 



Construction 

The entire oscillator/am- 
plifier portion of this proj- 
ect is built on the single 2" 
by 2.7" circuit board shown 
in the photographs and Fig. 
2. The printed circuit makes 
it easy to pack a lot of com- 
ponents neatly into that 
small space. Point-to-point 
wiring on a slightly larger 
piece of prototype perf- 
board will work just as well 
if you're so inclined. 

My power supply was 
built on another bit of PC 
board. That board also pro- 
vides mounting space for 
the two indicator LEDs and 
the push-tchtalk switch. The 
power supply has so few 
components that designing 
your own layout shouldn't 
be a problem I haven't in- 
cluded the pattern for my 
board since you surely 
won't have the same size 
transformer or project case 

that I used. 

The cabinet itself is the 

steel transformer housing 
from a discarded high-in- 
tensity tamp. Recycling old 
enclosures from unusual 
sources adds an extra bit of 
fun to home-brew projects 
and can provide some real- 
ly custom-looking results as 
well. In this case, the old 
scratched-up paint was re- 
moved and replaced with a 
fresh coat of black wrinkle 
which was in turn over- 
sprayed With light blue. Le^ 
end plates of a contrasting 
color add to the nice ap- 
pearance, provide a flat sur- 
face for the transfer letter- 
ing, and also cover up the 
original holes. 

If you want to use a com- 
mercially available box. Ra- 
dio Shack sells several that 
are suitable. The choice is 
particularly wide if a bat- 
tery is used instead of the 
larger ac-operated supply. 
Be careful not to buy a plas- 
tic box as the lack of rf 
shielding is an invitation to 
trouble* 

The printed circuit board 
is a lot easier to make than 
you might think. If you have 
access to photographic 



equipment you can turn 
out a really professional 
board using the pattern of 
Fig. 2. Otherwise you can 
do what I did and get per- 
fectly acceptable results 
using fingernail polish as 
resist material. 

The pattern in Fig. 2 is 
full size and the holes are 
all on 0-1 -inch centers Drill- 
ing the holes is easy using a 
piece of 0.1 -inch-spaced 
perfboard as a template. 
Cut out the pattern (or a 
Xerox® copy of it) and care- 
fully glue it onto a piece of 
perfboard so the holes in 
the PC pattern align with 
those in the board. 

Now cut out an unetched 
blank of PC board and 
clamp the drilling template 
to the copper side. Drill the 
four mounting hofes first I 
used a #33 drill for 4^ 
screw clearance, a #28 drill 
is the one to use for 6-28 
hardware if you prefer that 
size. Loosen the clamps and 
bolt the boards together us- 
ing those four holes. 

Now you're alt set to drilt 
the 122 component holes. A 
#60 drill is necessary for this 
and a drill press helps a 
great deal. The holes in the 
perfboard force you to drill 
in the right place; when the 
boards are unbolted, there'll 
be an impressively neat ar- 
ray of property-spaced holes. 
Sand the copper lightly to 
remove any rough edges 
and you're all set to apply 
the resist pattern. 

The pattern of printed cir- 
cuft runs is simply painted 
onto the copper surface 
with nail polish using Fig. 2 
and the drilled holes in the 
board as a guide. Choose a 
bright red color so the resist 
will be easy to see against 
the copper surface. Apply- 
ing the nail polish with the 
brush attached to the lid of 
the jar is easier once about 
2/3 of the bristles have been 
trimnied away with a sharp 
pair of scissors. Small mis- 
takes with the polish can be 
scraped off with a pointed 
knife blade. Really big 
mistakes can be corrected 



by cleaning off the entire 
board with nail-polish re- 
mover or a solvent like ace- 
tone. Acetone is serious 
stuff, so use good ventila- 
tion, avoid excess skin con- 
tact, and don't work near 
open flames! 

After the resist is applied, 
the board can be processed 
using any of the standard 
techniques described in the 
ARRL Handbook and else- 
where. Check your work for 
stray resist material joining 
runs before dropping it into 
the bath- When it's done, 
wash the board with water 
and examine it for any 



traces of unetched copper 

before removing the resist 
As a final step after clean- 
ing off the nail polish, run 
over the board with fine 
sandpaper or a pencil eras- 
er to brighten up the copper 
in preparation for soldering. 

Mounting the compo- 
nents takes just a few min- 
utes once the PC board is 
ready. The holes for the two 
trim pots will have to be 
drilled out slightly to re- 
ceive the mounting pins, 
and that should be done be- 
fore anything is soldered 
down. Placement of the 
various parts is shown in 



Parts List 

*ttems so marked are used in the power supply and may be 
deleted if power is obtained from a 9-V battery. Suitable com- 
ponents are available from Radio Shack and elsewhere. Sev- 
eral parts are identified with Radio Shack part numbers to bet^ 
ter describe the components needed. 

Resistors 



Value 


# Needed 


* 33 Ohms 


1 


100 Ohms 


2 


270 Ohms 


3 


*i.8k 


t 


'6.8k 


1 


15k 


9 


22k 


5 


33k 


5 


47k 


2 


470k 


2 


10k trimpot 


2 RS #217-335 


5k pot + switch 


1 RS #271-214 


Capacitors 




• TOO pF 


1 


.001 uF 


1 


.005 uF 


4 


.01 uF 


2 


,022 uF 


2 


.1 uF 


1 


2.2 yF, 16 V 


3 


33uF.l6V 


1 


• 220 uF, 35 V 


1 



Semiconductors 

* LM723 voltage regulator 
LM324 quad op amp 
741 op amp 

* too PIV, 1 Amp or more bridge rectifier RS #276-1171 
LEOs (2 required) 

1N914 small signal diodes (4 requirecl) 

Miscellaneous 

* Power transformer 

DPDT (center-off) toggle switch RS #275-1545 

SPST switch 

IC sockets 

PC Of prototype board 

Cabinet 

Mikepiug 

* Line cord 



Fig. 3 arrd the photographs, 
but if there is any question, 
the PC patterns can always 
be checked against the 
schematic. 

The PC pattern in Fig. 2 
does not exactly match the 
board in the photographs. 
In my unit, the 100-Ohm re- 
sistor in series with the 741 
output is mounted on the 
output-level switch. With- 
out that resistor, the 741 
oscillates at 2 MHz when 
the controls are set for max- 
imum output That happens 
because the .005-uF bypass 
capacitor is then effec- 
tively connected directly 
across the op-amp output 
and it loads the output 
stage at high frequencies. 
The problem wasn't noted 
until after my board was 
etched, but the resistor cure 
is included in the Fig. 2 
layout 

Checkout 

The board should be 
checked before final as- 
sembly into the cabinet 
Temporarily solder on the 
switches with short lengths 
of wire and connect a scope 
or ac voltmeter to the out- 
put terminal. Hook a 9-volt 
supply to the power-input 
pad and ground and verify 
that the circuit draws about 
2.5 mA Now set the output 
attenuator to the high range 
(22k resistor shorted), flip 
the mode switch to the 
500-Hz position, and adjust 
RT1 until the output level is 
exactly 1 volt rms (2.8 volts 
p-p on the scope). Then 
switch the mode switch to 
the 1750 position and ac^ 
just RT2 to give the same 
reading. When both tones 
are on, the output will read 
QJ rms, but the peak-to- 
peak level will still be 2-8 
volts. 

If the circuit doesn't 
work straight away, check 
the mode-switch wiring and 
the amplifier dc output lev- 
els. Ifs unlikely that you 
made a major PC board er- 
ror, but solder splashes or 
stray whiskers of unetched 
copper are always a possi- 

73 Magazine > August, 1984 29 



bility. Several strategic 
voltage levets are shown on 
the schematic for help in 
troubleshooting. The ac 
levels will change with trim- 
pot settings and in any case 
must be measured with an 
aC'Coupled voltmeter. The 
ac-voitage ranges of most 
VOMs will respond to ei- 
ther ac or dc voltages. That 
problem is easily cured by 
placing a 2-to-3{>uF capaci- 
tor in series with the meter. 
The dc voltages noticed 
should be independent of 
switch or trrmpot settings, 
as the dc bias on the ampli- 
fiers is determined only by 
the power-supply level. 

Putting It All Together 

One disadvantage of 
working with high-purity 
signals is that they are so 
easily corrupted by poor as- 
sembly practices. Hum lev- 
els unobjectionable in oth- 
er applications can signifi- 
cantly compromise the 
quality so carefully designed 
into this circuit Because of 



that there are several 

things to watch out for 
when the board is mounted 
into its meta! enclosure 
The power transformer, es- 
pecially if it doesn't come 
completely encased in a 
metal shield, will be sur- 
rounded by 60-Hz magnetic 
fields Keep it as far as 
possible— preferably 2 or 3 
inches— from the oscillator 
circuit board. Arrange things 
so the various control leads 
leaving the board are short, 
direct ^nd away from the 
transformer and ac wiring. 

One particular problem 
is hum coupled from the ac 
switch leads running to the 
back of the output poten- 
tiometer Use relatively 
small wires for this purpose, 
tightly twisted to provide 
a measure of magnetic 
shielding. Notice in the pho- 
tograph that those wires ap- 
proach the potentiometer 
from the back while the au- 
dio connects to the front 
The ac leads are also dressed 
perpendicularly to the cir- 



cuit board instead of run- 
ning alongside it 

Despite these precau- 
tions, the wires in my unit 
couple a small 60Hz signal 
into the channel occupying 
one side of the circuit 
board. The hum is 70 dB 
below the oscillator tone 
and could probably be re- 
duced further by electrical- 
ly shielding the wires with 
some braid taken from a 
short length of RG-58 I 
didn't bother because the 
hum is no larger than some 
of the other spurious signals 
and few sideband rigs will 
respond to inputs at 60-Hz 
in any case. I had the means 
to measure that hum, how- 
ever, and you may not, so 
take some extra care when 
positioning things in your 
box. 

The metal case is con- 
nected to the circuit ground 
at only a single point: the 
hole where the shielded 
microphone cable leaves 
the boK This single-point 
grounding eliminates some 



potential sources of noise 
by separating signal cur- 
rents from whatever noise 
currents might be flowing in 
the shield wall. 

Test equipment is often 
seen as a corner that's all 
too easy to cut Perhaps 
infrequently used, often 
expensive, usually bulky, 
its just easier to put up with 
antiquated gear or do with- 
out altogether. The older 
equipment while better 
than nothing, is often 
basically unsuited to an 
amateur's needs. You'll find 
this two-tone tester, even if 
you only use it once or 
twice a year, a convenient 
gadget well worth having- 
Small and inexpensive, yet 
reliable and easy to use, it's 
a good solution to several 
transmitter testing prob- 
lems. The high-quality out- 
put also will put an end to 
any nagging concerns 
about the purity of the 
audio you've been getting 
from that old patched-up 
kit oscillator! ■ 



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SO 73 Magazine • August, 1984 




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Yaesu, Icom Graft Revealed 

Splice Icom's headset to Yaesu's talkie 
and discover handie happiness. 



One of Icom's accesso 
ries for their VHF han- 
die-talkies is the HS-10 head- 
set and its accompanying 
HS-IOSB switch box. Priced 
at just under $40.00, this 
headset with its attached 
boom mike is perfect for 
mobile use with a handie- 
talkie. Instead of holding 
the heavy transceiver up to 
your mouth to talk and up 
to your ear to hear, you sim- 
ply slip the headset over 
your head and ham it up 
in comfort. The HS^IOSB 
switch box is a necessary 
companion to the headset 
since it contains a small 
mike preamplifier (which 
boosts the audio so you 
don't have to talk directly 
into the boom mike) and a 
push-to-talk (PTT) switch 
which has both moment ary- 
on and locked-on positions. 



As soon as 1 saw this 
handy device, I decided that 
I had to make it work with 
my Yaesu FT-208R transceiv- 
er This article describes the 
modifications needed to 
make it work. 

The modifications consist 
of two parts: Cut off the 
Icom mike connector and 
substitute a Yaesu connec- 
tor, and make a few minor 
changes to the HS-IOSB 
switch box. 

Fig. 1 shows the diagram 
of the original switch box. 
The mike signal is applied to 
a 2k volume control, and its 
output is then amplified by 
a one-transistor amplifier. 
The output is then sent 
through the PTT switch, to 
the transceiver through the 
white wire in the coifed 
cord. The white wire actual- 
ly serves three purposes: 



(1) It carries amplified 
mike audio to the trans- 
ceiver 

(2) It provides several 
volts of dc to the mike am- 
plifier when the PTT switch 
is closed. This voltage pro- 
vides the Vcc (collector sup- 
ply voltage], base bias, and 
also a bias to the electret 
mike itself (through the 2k 
volume control). 

(3] It also keys the trans- 
ceiver when the PTT switch 
ts closed 

Speaker output coming in 
on the red wire is sent to the 
earphone in the headset 
through a 33-Ohm resistor to 
slightly reduce the volume 
level. In addition, a lOOhm 
resistor provides the load for 
the transceiver's audio am- 
plifier 

Finally, ground is con- 
nected through the shield in 



the coiled cable as well as 
through the blue wire. 

The PTT circuit in the 
Icom combines mike audio, 
PTT, and Vcc voltage on one 
wire. The transceiver's bat- 
tery connects to the white 
wire through a resistor 
When the PTT switch is 
closed the transceiver de- 
tects the slight voltage drop 
across that resistor and keys 
the transmitter. At the same 
time, this resistor also sup- 
plies the required voitage 
for the amplifier and elec- 
tret m ike. 

The mike interface in the 
Yaesu FT-20aR is completely 
different It uses a six-pin 
mike connector which pro- 
vides separate pins for audio 
in, PTT, and Vcc for a mike 
amplifier or for mike bias. 
An advantage of this 
scheme is that the Yaesu dis- 






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SPEAKER 
OUT 



Fig. 1. The original circuit of the fcom switch box. Asterisks 
show components to be removed or rewired^ see text 

32 73 Magazine • August J 984 



FROM V 



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2K 



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HtADSET 



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470 



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Ffg. 2, Modiiied Icom switch box for use with Yaesu f T-208/?. 
Asterisks show new or rewired components. 



ables the built'tn mike on 
the handie-talkie when the 
remote^mrke PTT switch is 
closed In addition, the 
speaker output from the 
Yaesu radio carries a dc volt- 
age, which requires a slight 
ly different earphone circuit 
as well. 

Fig. 2 shows the modified 
circuit of the switch box [as- 
terisks in Figs. 1 and 2 identh 
fy those components which 
have to be changed or add- 
ed). 

In Fig 2, a IhiF capacitor 
is used to isolate the ampli- 
fier output from the white 
wire. This prevents dc volt- 
age from being fed back 
into the transceivers mike 
circuit. Likewise, a 20-uF ca- 
pacitor couples speaker 
audio from the transceiver 
to the earphone and pre- 
vents dc from getting to the 
earphone. Both capacitors 
are electrolytics or tan- 
talums, and polarity must be 
as shown in the diagram, 

A 4 Jk, 1/4-Watt resistor is 



added to provide the re- 
quired dc voltage for the 
amplifier and mike circuit 
Although the Yaesu has a 
separate dc output on its 
connector, that output can- 
not be used because it 
would require one more 
wire in the coiled cable. 
Since the cable only has 
three feads plus a shield, I 
chose to get the dc voltage 
from the speaker output 

Finally, the PTT switch is 
wired directly between the 
PTT pin and ground. 

All of the added compo- 
nents and wires fit neatly in- 
to the HSrIOSB switch box as 
long as you use very small 
capacitors and are careful 
about component place- 
ment There are several ob- 
structions in the case, and 
you may have to bend the 
leads in several places to al- 
low the case to close As 
shown in Fig, 2, the original 
Icom cable Is also used, al- 
though the blue wire has to 
be unsoldered from the 



ground connection and re- 
used for its new purpose. 

On the transceiver end, 
you will have to cut off the 

original Icom connector and 
substitute the required 
Yaesu connector, t obtained 
mine by calling Yaesu (see 
their ad in this issue}. Al- 
though the connector is tiny 
and requires care in solder- 
ing, ft was not particularly 
difficult, It has six pins, 
though only pins 1 through 4 
are actually used in this 
modification. Fig. 3 shows 
the pin layout of that con- 
nector on the FT-208R. but 
note— it is possible that the 
orientation of the connector 
on your rig may be different 
from that on mine. Use an 
ohmmeter to identify pin 4. 
the ground pin, before you 
start to work, 

I took one shortcut in this 
design that you should be 
aware of. In the original 
Icom design, power is ap- 
plied to the microphone cir- 
cuit only when the PTT 



SACK EDGE OF 
WALK l£ -TALKIE 







T 



OUT 



t 



PTT 

m 



GROUND 



fiJ^^HT StPE OF 
WALKIE-TiVLltlE 



Fig. 3. Yaesu microphone cdn- 
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switch is closed during trans- 
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The PTT switch in the switch 
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By disconnecting one sec- 
tion of the switch and plac- 
ing it in series with the new 
4.7k resistor, you can ensure 
that the mike amplifier Is 
powered only when the PTT 
switch is pressed. ■ 



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73 Magazine • August, 1984 33 



Roald Steen Aim 
6217 Ridge Drive 
Woodbury MN 55U5 



Stare-Way to Heaven 

At the Arecibo observatory, the sk y's the limit 

Who said size doesn \ matter? 



The Arecibo observatory 
on Puerto Rico holds 
several records in the field 
of radio. Its antenna, with a 
diameter of 1000 feet is the 
largest antenna in the world. 
The 450-kW output of the 
S-band (2:400 MHz) trans- 
mitter together with the gain 
of the antenna, which at this 
frequency is estimated to be 
72 dB, make the signals from 
Arecibo the strongest sig- 



nals to leave Earth. Al- 
though higher resolution 
can be achieved by other ra- 
dio telescopes by coupling 
two or more of these togeth- 
er, the Arecibo observatory 
still has the highest sensjtivi- 
ty to weak signals from 
space. 

The observatory is lo- 
cated about 6 miles from 
the port city of Arecibo, 
near the north coast of Puer- 



to Rico. The landscape 
around the observatory is 
very beautiful and scenic, 
consisting mainly of lime- 
stone hills and valleys cov- 
ered with lush tropical vege- 
tation. 

The 1000-foot reflecting 
antenna makes the Arecibo 
observatory a very conspic- 
uous landmark when seen 
from the air. The reflecting 
dish was constructed in a 




The 1000-ioot reflecting dish at Afecibo was buift in a natural limestone sinkhole, 
34 73 Magazine • August, 1984 



natural limestone sinkhole, 
the shape of which was such 
that only small excavations 

were necessary to make 
room for the huge reflector, 
The surrounding limestone 
hills are helpful in shielding 
the observatory from man- 
made radio noise. The iso^ 
lated location of the facility 
adds to this protection. 

The reflector at the Areci- 
bo obsen/atory is mounted 
firmly in the ground, in con- 
trast to other radio tele- 
scopes which search the sky 
by moving the entire anten- 
na dish. Radio telescopes 
are usually constructed with 
a parabolic reflecting dish, 
but in order to be able to 
search the sky without mov- 
ing the entire reflecting dish, 
a different shape had to be 
chosen for the Arecibo re- 
flector (t has, therefore, 
been shaped like a section 
of a perfect sphere. With 
this construction, the obser- 
vatory can be steered by 
moving secondary antennas 
which are receiving the sig- 
nals that are being reflected 
from the dish. These secon- 
dary' antennas are mounted 
on a triangular platform 
about 450 feet above the 
reflecting dish, The platform 
is suspended by steel cables 
from three towers that have 
been buitt around the edge 
of the reflector. 



Radio telescopes with 
parabolic reflectors have a 
poin^Iike focus. The sec- 
ondary antenna or feedhom 
which receives the signals 
from parabolic reflectors 
has to be nrrounted at the fo- 
cal point in front of the dish. 
But the focus of the Arecibo 
observatory, with its spheri- 
cal reflector, is alorjg a line 
above the reflecting dish. 
The secondary antennas, 
therefore, have to be sus- 
pended above the reflector 
and must be able to pick up 
signals afong that line. 

The position of the plat- 
form and the secondary an- 
tennas must remain very sta* 
bte, even in strong winds. 
The necessary stability has 
been accomplished through 
a great deal of sophisticated 
engineering. The platform is 
triangular, and its weight is 
600 tons. A circular track, 
130 feet in diameter, has 
been mounted under the 
platform. The feed arm is a 
structure which can rotate 
under these tracks. The 
feed-arm structure itself has 
a pair of tracks on its under- 
side. These tracks are 
curved, so that all points 
along these tracks are an 
equal distance from the re- 
flecting dish underneath. 
The secondary antennas are 
mounted on two carriages 
which can move along the 
tracks under the feed-arm 
structufe* These two car- 
riages will normally be posi- 
tioned in such a way that 
they counterbalance each 
other. 

The antenna dish consists 
of almost 39,000 aluminum 



panels. These panels are per- 
forated so that about 44 per- 
cent of the sunlight can 
reach the ground under- 
neath the dish. The sunlight 
which passes through the 
dish allows vegetation to 
grow undemeath. Without 
this vegetation, rainfalls 
would cause severe erosion 
of the landscape under- 
neath the platfomi, 

A square of laser-reflect- 
ing material has been 
mounted on each aluminum 
panel. A laser system can 
check the shape of the re- 
flecting dish by bouncing 
light off each of these 
squares. A computer is then 
able to calculate the posi- 
tion of each panel to within 
1/8 of an inch. The position 
of each panel can be accu- 
rately adjusted from under- 
neath, and this is done 
whenever a sufficiently 
large deviation from the 
ideal shape of the dish has 
been detected. 

A laser system is also used 
to maintain the position of 
the platform within very nar- 
row tolerances, A laser re- 
flector is mounted at each 
of the three comers of the 
platform. Whenever a com- 
puter detects a significant 
change in the position of the 
platform through this sysr 
tem, it can regulate the ten- 
sion on tie-down wires that 
are connected to each cor- 
ner of the piatform. By cor^ 
trolling the tension of these 
wires, any change in the po- 
sition of the platform can be 
neutralized. 



The radio telescope re- 



1937 4 214 



14 NOV 82 



1412 MHz 



A 



3*. 






t 



i,V s^ vf^ 



ft 



1 • 

H m 



m 



\ 



? 



• 4 



92 f 6 fl 



sec 



Printout of the signal from the very fast puhar, 4C21S3, as 
this was detected at the Arecibo observatory on November 
14, 1982. This pulsar rotates 642 times each second and trans- 
mits one of the larger and one of the smaller pulses during 
each rotation. 




The aluminum panels are perforated so that much of the sun- 
light can pas5 through. Vegetation can therefore grow under 
the reflecting dish, preventing erosion of the landscape. 



ceivers are mounted inside 
the carriages that suspend 
the secondary antennas. All 
electronic components gen- 
erate small amounts of elec- 
trical noise which is propor- 
tional to the temperature of 
the components. If the re- 
ceivers were to work at 
room temperature, the inter- 
nal noise would be stronger 
than most of the weak sig- 
nals which the observatory 
is receiving from space. For 
this reason, the front end of 



the receivers is cooled by a 
refrigeration system using 
liquid hefium. The boiling 
point of liquid helium is 42^ 
Kelvin, and at this tempera- 
ture the receivers are capa- 
ble of detecting extremely 
weak signals from space. 

The transmitters at the 
Arecibo observatory are be- 
ing used for ionospheric re^ 
search and radar studies of 
the solar system. These trans- 
mitters also are mounted in 
the carriages in order to 



\ 




Workmen on the reflecting dish are using shoes which dis- 
tribute their weight over a large area, like snowshoes. Walk- 
ing on the reflecting dish is now being avoided, and almost 
all adjustments and repairs are being done from the under- 
side. 

73 Magazine • August, 1384 35 



■P 




The phtform structure weighs 600 tons. Most of the antennas 

which receive the signals that are reflected from the reitect- 
ing dish are mounted on two carriages which can move along 
the curved track on the underside of the platform. 



minimize losses in the trans- 
mission line. If coaxial trans- 
mission lines were to be used 
to carry the output from 
transmitters on the ground 
to the platform, the losses 
would be substantial at the 
high frequencies that are be- 
ing used. 

The power supply is often 
the heaviest part of a radio 
transmitter. Therefore, the 
power supplies for the trans- 
mitters are mounted in 
buildings at the edge of the 
reflector. Thick dc cables 
carry the voltages fronn 
these power supplies to the 
transmitters under the plat- 
form. When the radar trans- 



mitters are being used, a 

great deal of waste heat 
must be dissipated from the 
transmitting tubes. In order 
to cool these effectively, 
water circulates through 
them Water hoses connect 
the transmitters with the wa- 
ter supply on the ground. 

The observatory has been 
built so that a single observe 
er can control the entire fa- 
cility. The observer can steer 
the carriages under the plat- 
form with extreme accuracy 
from computers in the con- 
trol room. These can there- 
fore counter the rotation of 
Earth with a very high de- 
gree of exactness, 




The Arecibo observatory at sunset. 
36 73 Magazine • August, 1984 



All signals that are re- 
ceived at the Arecibo obser- 
vatory are processed by 
computers in the control 
building. The frequency of 
the received signals can be 
determined to a fraction of 
a cycle even at microwave 
frequencies. Doppler shifts 
and emission lines in the sig- 
nals from space can thus be 
determined The time of arri- 
val at the antenna for re- 
ceived radio signals can also 
be measured with an ex- 
treme accuracy. 

The Arecibo observatory 
can at any time study a cir- 
cular area of the sky about 
40 degrees in diameter This 
area is centered at local ze- 
nith. Due to the rotation of 
Earth, about 39 percent of 
the sky is available for obser- 
vation from the Arecibo ob- 
servatory. Unlike optical ob 
servatories, radio telescopes 
can observe the sky in day- 
light and during cloudy con- 
ditions. Only during strong 
electrical storms may a radio 
telescope be unable to ob- 
serve. 

Radar astronomy has re- 
cently contributed much to 
our knowledge of objects in 
the solar system. This tech- 
nique detects the reflection 
of man-made signals from 
objects in space. The Areci- 
bo observatory rs our most 
sensitive radar-astronomy 
instrument Through radar 
observations from Arecibo, 
the rotation period of Venus 
was determined for the first 
time. It also was determined 
that Venus rotates in the op- 
posite direction of other 
planets. Radar maps of 
Venus have been produced 
through radar observations 
from Arecibo. Radar obser- 
vations have also been 
made of the rings of Saturn, 
the asteroid belt, and the 
planet Mars, 

In mankind's first deliber- 
ate attempt to announce it- 
self to other civilizations, 
the enormous output power 
of the Arecibo radar trans- 
mitter at 2.400 MHz was 
used. A message was 
beamed to several segments 



of the sky in 1974. The mes- 
sage was coded in a binary 
code and contained infor- 

mation about mankind, 
Earth, and the solar system. 
The first quasar was dis- 
covered by the Arecibo ob- 
servatory in 1964. These re- 
markable objects, which are 
believed to be located at the 
center of extremely distant 
galaxies, emit enormous 
amounts of radio waves and 
other types of electromag- 
netic waves. 

Pulsars are objects that 
emit radio waves that turn 
on and off rapidly. These are 
believed to be rapidly-rotat- 
ing neutron stars that emit 
radio waves from the mag- 
netic poles. Each time a ro- 
tating magnetic pole sweeps 
past Earth, another pulse 
can be detected at Arecibo. 
Although the first pulsar was 
found by an English radio 
telescope, many of the nu- 
merous pulsars that since 
have been detected were 
found first by the Arecibo 
observatory. 

Galaxies are not distrib- 
uted evenly throughout the 
universe but seem to be con- 
centrated in clusters, super- 
clusters, and huge filaments 
in space. In between there 
are huge voids with few or 
no galaxies. The Arecibo ob- 
servatory has devoted much 
of its observing time to the 
mapping of galaxies and 
systems of galaxies. 

The Arecibo observatory, 
together with other radio 
observatories, has been able 
to identify a number of mol- 
ecules in the space between 
stars in the Milky Way. 
Clouds of interstellar mole- 
cules are believed to play an 
important role in the birth of 
new stars. Much of the ob- 
serving time at the Arecibo 
observatory is therefore also 
being devoted to the map- 
ping of molecular clouds in 
space. 

The US Congress has de- 
cided recently to fund a pro- 
gram which will search for 
radio signals from other civi- 
lizations in our galaxy. This 
program, which is being 



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MICROLOG 



51 



^ See Ust of Advertisers on page 96 



mHOVATORS IN DIGITAL COMMUNf CATION 

Norte: VtC-EO is a trademiirk of ComiiiacJbre EtetirumcSf Ltd. 
Ckipy right © 1984 Microlog Ck»rporatian 

73 Magazine • August, 1964 37 



^m 



managed by the National 
Aeronautics and Space Ad- 
ministration, will cost two 
million dollars each year A 
number of radio telescopes 
will be used in this program, 
including the Arecibo obser- 
vatory. In the next few years, 
between five and ten per- 
cent of the observing time at 
Arecibo will be used in the 
search of signals from other 
civilizations. 

During their journey out 
into space, the two Voyager 
space probes are making 
continuous observations of 
cosmic rays. magnetic 
fields, and the solar wind. As 
the most sensitive radio-re- 
ceiving instrument on Earth, 
the Arecibo observatory will 
be able to receive signals 
from these space probes 
long after they have become 
too faint for other radio tele- 
scopes. If no malfunction 
occurs in the radio transmit- 
ters aboard these space 
probes, their signals should 
be detectable at the Arecibo 



s 



ET ENCKE 

NOV, 1 9 SO 




.» 



tn.n 



^j» ^m ^,n oIdd vtcD K5i" 

RELflttVE RPDieFfCOEHCT OF ECW ma 



30.DI 



Radar echoes from the nucleus of the comet Encke were de- 
tected by the Arecibo observatory in November, 1980. This is 

the first detection of the nucleus of a comet The strength of 
the received echo indicates that the nucleus has a diameter 
of about 2 miles. The rotation and speed of the nucleus can 
be determined from the Doppler shifts in the echo. 



observatory for at least 30 
more years. 

The Arecibo observatory, 
which was completed in 
1%3, is being operated by 
the National Astronomy and 
Ionosphere Center at Cor- 



nell University. About 100 
persons are employed at the 
observatory in Arecibo, and 
another 40 persons are 
working at Comell Universi- 
ty's Astronomy Center in 
Ithaca, New York. Observ- 



ing time at the observatory 
is available to astronomers 
from all countries. 

The Arecibo observatory 
is being improved constant- 
ly as new equipment and 
technologies become avail- 
able. The observatory has 
contributed much to our 
knowledge and understand- 
ing of the universe during 
the past 20 years It is likely 
that the Arecibo telescope 
will remain one of mankind's 
most sensitive and versatile 
astronomical observatories 
for many years to come.H 

References 

1, The National AstTonomy and 
Ionosphere Center: Arecibo Ob- 
servBtory, Office of the Unlver- 
sity Publications, Ithaca, 1981. 

2, L M, LaLonde: "The Upgraded 
Arecibo Observatory," Science^ 
October 1S. 1974, pages 213-218. 

3. James C. G, Walker: "Radar 
Measurement of the Upper At- 
mosphere/' Sctence, October 
12* 1979, pages 180-189. 

4. William E. Shawcross: "Areci- 
bo Observatory Today," Sky and 
Tefescope. April and May, 1972. 



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3B 73 Magazine • August, 1984 



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mercial service shops of 
that era used heterodyne 
frequency meters, not count- 
ers. 

tn the early seventies, 
however costs started fall- 
ing. The 5-kilobuck 500- 
MHz counter dropped in 
cost to about 2 kilobucks. 
During that same period, the 



first amateur-grade counters 
were on the market Heath- 
kit^^^ offered their IBrlOI. 
That counter sold for around 
$200 in kit form and operat- 
ed to 15 MHz (my sample 
actually worked well to 23 
MHz). Today, amateur-grade 
counters can be bought for 
less than $100 and operate 
to frequencies up near 600 
MHz. 

The photographs show 
three different models 
which represent the types 
used by amateurs. The 
Heath IM-2410 (Photo A) op- 
erates on frequencies up to 
225 MHz. This is a basic 
counter with the minimum 
features needed. The Heath 




i 



Photo A. The Heathkit IM-2410 portable frequency counter 
40 73 Magazine • August, 1984 



tM-2400 shown in Photo B is 
also a basic counter but is 
hand-held and portable The 

IM^IIO shown in Photo C is 
more than a basic counter; it 
contains a number of inter- 
esting features. It is a fre- 
quency counter (to T10 
MHz) and also wilt measure 
events and period. The peri- 
od-measurement function al- 
so measures period average, 
which is the period measured 
over 10 seconds. 

The advances in digital 
electronics over the past 
decade coupled with rapid- 
ly falling IC prices have 
made amateur use of count- 
ers possible. Even though 
counters are low cost now, 
they are not foolproof. 
There are problems in oper- 
ation that cause erroneous 
readings — or no readings at 
alL 

In this part of my two-part 
series, I will discuss the ba- 
sic theory behind digital 
counters. In part II, I will dis- 
cuss some of the nuances 
of digital frequency-counter 
(DFC) operation. 

Digital Counter Basics 

A single article cannot 



fully discuss enough digital 
electronics unless a few as- 
sumptions are made For 
those who want more de- 
tailed treatment I recom- 
mend my digital electronic 
series in 73 for September 
through November, 1982. In 
this article, 1 will reiterate 
only a small amount of the 
digital-basics series. 

A flip-flop (F-F) is essential- 
ly a l-bit memory element 
There are several different 
types of flip-flops, but the 
type which concerns us here 
is the )-K flip-flop shown in 
Fig. 1[a). There are two com- 
plementarY outputs on the 
F-F, labelled Q and Q (i.e,, 
"not<J'l Since these out- 
puts are complementary, 
one will be HiCH when the 
other is LOW; these outputs 
will never be at the same 
level. 

There are five inputs on 
the J-K F-F, These inputs are: 
J, K, clock, set ^nd clear. 
The J and K inputs are es- 
sentially control inputs; their 
use will be explained short- 
ly. The clock input synchro- 
nizes the F-F operation and 
usually has a square wave 
applied. The set input is 



used to force the F-F to the 
state where Q = HJCH and 
^ = LOW, Clear is just the 
opposite; it forces the out- 
puts to the state where Q — 
LOW and Q = HICH The 
usual circuit symbol is that 
of Fig 1(a| This example, irv 
cidentally, uses active-LOW 
set and clear inputs> which is 
the usual case in TTL de- 
vices. We do, however, 
sometimes see active-HICH 
inputs. 

Fig. 1(b] shows the truth 
table for the unc locked (or 
direct mode) operation. In 
this mode, the J-K F-F 
doesn't care what the sig- 
nals at the clock or \-K in- 
puts are doing Only the set 
and clear inputs are used. 
Since our example uses ac- 
tive-LOW inputs, the state in 
which both set and clear are 
LOW is disallowed. In that 
case, the poor flip-flop 
won't know what to do. If 
the set is made LOW, the Q 
output goes HIGH and not- 
Q goes LOW. If set is HIGH, 
and clear is LOW, we see ex- 
actly the opposite situation: 
Q is LOW and not-Q is 
HIGH, If both set and clear 
are HIGH, then the F-F will 
be in the clocked mode of 
operation. 

The truth table for clocked 
operation of the J-K flip-flop 
is shown in Fig, l{c). The 
clock synchronizes the oper- 
ation of the ]-K F-F; all ac- 
tion takes place on the nega- 
tive-going [i,e„ HIGH-to- 
LOW) transition of the clock 
signal In all cases of 
clocked operation, the set 
and clear inputs must re- 
main HIGH, The program- 
ming of the F-F takes place 
on the J and K inputs. 

If both J and K are LOW, 

then there will be no change 
on the Q and not-Q outputs 
regardless of cfock-input 



+ SVDC 






1 






FT! 


i 




J 










«. 




Q OUtPUT 



«OT-0 OUTPUT 



fig. Ifa). A l-K flip-flop. 

transitions. In this condition, 
the IK F-F is locked. 

If I is LOW and K is HIGH, 
the Q output will be LOW 
and not-Q is HIGH. Action 
takes place on the negative 
transition of the clock line. 

If J is HIGH and K is LOW, 
then the Q goes HIGH and 
not-Q is LOW„ As in the pre- 
vious case, the transition oc- 
curs on the negative transi- 
tion of the clock line. 

If both J and K are HICK 
then the outputs will go to 
the opposite state. If, for ex- 
ample, Q = H!CH, then on 
the negative transition of 
the clock line the Q output 
will go LOW. Similarly, if Q 
had been LOW, the clock 
transition would have made 
it go HIGH This is the condi- 
tion used in digital-counter 
circuits and results in binary 
frequency division. 

Fig, 2(a) shows a two-stage 

binary divider based on J-K 
flip-flops, while Fig. 2(b) 
shows the timing wave- 
forms. Note that on both 
flip-flops the J and K inputs 
are tied HIGH. The outputs 
are Q of F-F 1 (i.e., Q1}, and 
Q of F-F 2 (i.e., Q2), The in^ 
put signal is applied to the 
clock of F-F 1, while the 
clock of F-F 2 uses the Q1 
signal as its input 

In the timing diagram, the 
negative-going transitions 
are labelled T1, T2, T3, and 
T4. At time T1, the input sig- 
nal makes a negative transi- 
tion, so Q1 snaps HIGH, Q2 
remains LOW. The Q1 out- 




Fig, 2(al Two-stage binary divider based on f-K flip-flops. 



J 1 


K 


SET 


eLEAR 


cuoot 


Q 


^ 


* 


Jf 








M 

i 

1 ' 


OlSALLOWtD 


}£ 


% 





1 


1 





K 


K 


1 








1 


K 1 


X 


1 


1 


. _ -i ED 

3PE SAT FON 



* LO^ 

*■ ■ DOESN'T CAfiE 



f '& ^(bl Truth table for the undocked mode of operation. 



4 


K 


STT 


CLtAn 


CLOCK 


1 . 


i i 1 






i i ■ 





a 


1 


1 




1^0 CHftMCC 





1 


I 1 


1 


1 ' 


Q 


< 


1 





1 


1 


1 





t 


1 


r 


t 






©PPOSITE 



NOTE I • HJGH 
• LDW 
* » 0O€.SH'7 CASE 



Fig. 7fcjt Truth table for the docked mode of operation. 



put remains HIGH until the 
next negative-going transi- 
tion of the input signal, at 
time T2- At this time, the 
clock input of F-F 2 sees Q1 
drop LOW, so it will cause 
Q2 to snap HIGH. At time 
T3, another input negative- 
going transition occurs, so 
Q1 goes HIGH again; it will 
remain HIGH until the next 
negative-going transition at 
time T4. At T4, both the 
clock inputs of F-F 1 and F-F 
2 see negative-going transi- 
tions, so both Q1 and Q2 go 
LOW 

Note what has happened 

in Figs. 2(a) and 2(b). There 
are four input pulses, yet Q1 
produced only two output 
pulses; F-F 1 acted as a bina- 
ry divider (i.e., divide-by-2). 
Similarly, the input of F-F 2 
sees the two pulses at Q1 
and produces one output 
pulse; F-F 2 also acted as a 
binary divider Thus, the out- 
put of F'F 2 is one-fourth the 



input frequency. In a cas- 
cade chain of J-K F-Fs the 
binary division will be 1 (i,e., 
the input frequency), 2, 4, 8, 
16, 32. and so forth. 

A decade counter is a 
divide-by-10 (i.e., base-10) 
counter Such a counter cir- 
cuit is needed in decimal- 
counting systems used in 
our digital frequency count- 
ers. Unfortunately, there is 
no 10 in the 2, 4, 8, 16 se- 
quence of a four-stage bina- 
ry counter. We can, how- 
ever, make a decade count- 
er from a four-stage binary 
(i.e., base-16) counter by 
causing it to reset to 0000 af- 
ter the tenth input pulse. 
Such a circuit is shown in 
Fig. X^l while its timing is 
shown in Fig. 3(b). 

The decade counter is a 
base-16 binary counter mod- 
ified by the addition of a 
NAND gate (CI) The timing 
diagram shows the circuit 
action The output of G1 is 



IMPUT 



r 



I 



Tl 



Tl 



TS 



T4 



Ql 






/ 




02 



I 

il 



1 



fig. 2(b). Timing waveforms for Fig 2(a). 

73 Magazine • August, 1984 41 



mnij > J 




IMPUT 



-TTJ 



ig 



ri 



tl 



L... 



¥i ft T3 T* 



r5;;T$ it 



71 



rio 



fi 



1 * 



Jl 



L... 



\ I 



I I 



fig, 3(al Four-stage binafy<:ounter circuit. 



J 



» 
I 



I • 
I i 

I i 
I . 



connected to a common 
clear line. When this line 
drops LOW, the outputs of 
the counter go to OOOO2. The 
inputs of G1 are connected 
to the B (i e,. Q2) and D (i.e., 
Q4) flip-flop outputs If B 
and D go HIGH simultane- 
ously, then the output of G1 
goes LOW and all four flip- 
flops will be reset The only 
time these conditions are 
met is at 15— see Fig. 3(b), 




Pfioto S. The Heathkit /M- 
2400 hand-held frequency 
counter. 

42 73 Magazine * August, 19S4 



Following T5. the counter is 
OOOO2 and begins all over 
again. 

The A, B, C and D out- 
puts form a four-bit binary- 
coded decimal (BCD) "word" 
that denotes the ten digits of 
the decimal numbers sys- 
tem. This code results in ten 
unique binary codes. These 
EICD codes are shown below: 



CLR 



^^ 



cleahs to 0000 



Fig, 3(bl Timing waveforms for Fig. 3{al 



D 


c 


B 


A 


Decimal 


























^ 


1 








1 





2 








1 


1 


3 





1 








4 





1 





1 


5 





1 


1 





6 





1 


1 


1 


7 


1 











8 


1 








1 


9 



There are a number of IC 
digital counters on the mar- 
ket. One of the oldest is the 
7490 TTL device. The 7490 is 
a biquinary counter, i.e., it 
contains one divide^by-2 
counter stage and one di- 
vide-by-S counter stage. 
When the output of the bi- 
nary stage is connected to 
the input of the quinary 
stage (i.e., pins 1 and 12 are 
shorted together), the 7490 
becomes the decade count- 
er of Fig. 3(a). 

Most modem frequency 
counters made today do not 
use the 7490 but rather will 





+ 5V0C 



I 



X 



js h^ Ml i igj* ji^ j* 



7447 
DECODER 








CAftHT 



tNfsuT 



H 



74i0 

DECADE COUNTER 



T 



I 



10 



/fjf 



R£SCT 
<M«t5£T 0= COUNT* 



1 1 



STPrOa£ RBO RSI TEST 



Fig, 4. A decimal counting unit. 



use MSI or LSI multi-stage 
counters We wilL however, 
use the old-fashioned 7490 
device here to illustrate a 
principle that would be lost 
in the maze of an MSI de- 
vice. Fig. 4 shows a decimal 
counting unit (DCU) based 
on the 7490 and certain 
companion chips, the 7475 
quadTatch, and 7447 BCD- 
to-seven-segment decoder. 

A DCU will count by tens 
and produce a decimal out- 
put In the case of Fig. 4, the 
display device is the familiar 
severvsegment LED decimal 
display. This form of display 
uses seven lighted bars [des- 
ignated a, b, c, d e, f, and g] 
to represent the ten digits of 
the decimal system. 

The 7447 receives a BCD 
4-bit word at its inputs and 
causes the appropriate out- 
puts (a-g) to drop LOW. 
When an output is LOW, the 
corresponding segments of 
the display turn on Besides 
the BCD inputs, there are al- 
so a test input a ripple 
blanking input [RBI), and 
a ripple blanking output 

mnoi 

The test input is some- 
times called LT, for "lamp 
test" When the test input is 
brought LOW, all 7447 out- 
puts go LOW This situation 
forces the seven-segment 
display to show an 8. This in- 
put allows us to test the dis- 
play decoder device. 

The RBI and RBO termi- 
nals are for ripple blanking. 
La, the suppression of lead- 
ifig zeros. Let's consider a 



IMSPiJIV 




213904 



Photo C The Heathkit tMAIIO frequency counter 



situation Suppose our eight- 
decade counter measures a 
frequency of 21390 kHz. 
Without ripple blanking, 
the reading would be 
"00021390/' If we provide 
blanking, however, we can 
turn off those leading zeros 
and display 21390. If a LOW 
is placed on RBI, the display 
will turn off if the applied 
BCD word is OOOO2. The R BO 
output goes LOW if the BCD 
input is OOOO2. Thus, by 
daisy-chaining the RBO out- 
puts in the next least-signifi- 
cant RBI inputs, the leading 
zeros are suppressed. 

The 7475 is quad-tatch, 
i.e., a four-bit memory. In- 
side the 7475 are four type-D 
flip-flops. These F-Fs are ar- 
ranged in two groups of two 
each. Each group of two has 
a common clock line. In Fig, 
4, the clock lines are tied to- 
gether to form a common 
strobe line. When this line Is 
made HIGH, the BCD word 
at the 7475 inputs is trans- 
ferred to the outputs Thus, 
we can use the strobe line to 
update the display only af* 
ter the decade counter has 
finished counting, 

A decimal counting as- 
sembly (DC A) is made by 
cascading two or more 



DC Us. The D output of less 
significant DCUs is con- 
nected to the input terminal 
of the next significant DCU. 
We require one DCU in the 
DCA for each decimal digit 
of the DCA. 

Frequency Counters 

A digital frequency count- 
er measures events per unit 
of time (EPUT) to form a DFC; 
we arrange a DCA so that in- 
put pulses are counted for a 
specific period of time (e.g., 
1 second, or subdivision 
thereof). 

Fig. 5{a) shows the basic 

block diagram for a frequen* 
cy counter The sections in- 
clude the DCA, main gate, 
trigger, input amplifier, main- 
gate flip-flop, timebase, and 
a display clock. 

The DCA is a totalizer 
counter as shown in Fig. 4. 
The overflow stage is a flip- 
flop that is SET when the 
MSD carry output goes 
HIGH. The overflow flip- 
flop tums on a lamp to 
make the operator aware of 
the overflow condition so 
that the data can be disre- 
garded. 

Since a frequency count- 
er measures events per unit 
of time, i,e., cycles per sec- 







UAth oate - 



rRlGGER 



ittAMi ^ 

GATE J * 



StCHAL 




scHMirr 



SEHSTTlVITr 




<^1 






THIGCER 



ASSEiiBLT 



MAIN CATE 
FLIP-FLOP 



CONtHQL 
LOGIC 



I 



fic&rr 



-O 



ovnrFLOw 



S^TROGE 






MAs-ren 

OStlLi-ftTO*? 



Fig. 5(al Frequency-counter block diagram. 



Ti«eBAS€ 
OUTfUT 



RESET 



STROeE 



MAIN @AT£ 
FLIP -FLO? 




COUf^T I COUNT 



COUNT 
TAK£I4 



counteh 

tOQM 
INPUT 



Fig. 5{bl Wavefofm for Fig. 5(a). 



ond, the DCA must be turned 
on only for a given period of 
time (e.g.. 01, 1, or 10 sec- 
onds). The main gate, main- 
gate flip-flop, and timebase 
sections are used to allow 
input pulses into the DCA 
for the designated period of 
time. 

The timebase section con- 
sists of a crystal oscillator 
that produces pulses at a 
precise rate such as 1CX) 
kHz, 1 MHz, 4 MHz^ etc. A 
chain of decade dividers 
such as the 7490 is used to 
reduce the crystal-oscillator 
frequency to a lower frequen- 
cy. The timebase-output fre- 



[JhSPLAY 



139456 




OVEnFljQW 



Tr«EBASE 
SECTION 



MASTER 
OSCtLLATOn 



Fig, 6. Period-counter block diagram. 



quency will be 10 Hz for 
0.1 -second 1 Hz for 1 -sec- 
ond, and 0,1 Hz for 10-sec- 
ond measuring periods. 

The timing diagram for 
one complete interval of an 
EPUT counter is shown in 
Fig. 5(b). Pulses tl, t2, and t3 
are output from the time- 
base section. When t1 goes 
HIGH, the control-logic sec- 
tion generates a short pulse 
to reset the DCA to zero 
When t1 goes LOW again, 
the Q output of the j-K main- 
gate flip-flop will go HIGH, 
The main (AND] gate has 
one input tied to the Q out- 
put of the flop-flop, and the 
other input is tied to the 
signal being counted. As a 
result the main gate passes 
input pulses to the DCA only 
when the Q terminal of the 
flip-flop is high. 

The flip-flop remains set 
until the negative of t2 oc- 
CUI3, At that time, the Q out- 
put of the flip-flop drops 
LOW, turning off the flow of 
pulses into the DCA, and 
causes the control-logic sec- 

73 Magazine • August, 1984 43 




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44 73 Magazine • August. 1984 



tion to generate a strobe 
pulse. This pulse tells the 
DCU latches to transfer 
data from the counter to 
the decoders. The display, 
then, shows only completed 
count cycles and will hold 
the previous count until the 
end of the next interval. [The 
trigger and input amplifier 
circuits will be discussed in 
part II of this article.) 

The frequency counter of 
Fig. 5(a) counts frequency^ 
i.e., events per unit of time, 
because the DCA is enabled 
only for a specific unit of 
time. The frequency of the 
input signal is the number of 
counts accumulated on the 
DCA divided by the time- 
base period in seconds. The 
basic formula, with P = time 
in seconds and f = frequen- 
cy in Hertz, is f = counts on 
DCA/P. Therefore, P^DCA 
count/f. For example, if the 
DCA count is 8026 and the 
timebase frequency is 10 
kHz, then P = 8026/1ff* = 
0.8026 seconds. 



The resolution is the small- 
est time interval that can be 
measured on the counter 
and is defined as the recip^c^ 
cal of the timebase frequen- 
cy In this example, it would 
be 1/10^^0.1 ms. 

Period Counters 

Period is the reciprocal of 

the frequency being mea- 
sured: P = l/fH2. We can 
use the digital counter to 
measure period by reversing 
the roles of the timebase 
and input amplifier trigger. 
In Fig. 6 we see the block 
diagram of a period counter; 
compare with Fig, 5(a) Note 
that the main-gate flip-flop 
is tumed on and off by the 
output of the input-signal 
trigger The DCA is actually 
counting the number of 
timebase pulses between 
successive input pulses. 

In part 11, I will discuss 
DFC applications and some 
of the problems that arise 
in less-than-ideal practical 

situations.! 



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Messing with Heath 

This 101 control mod proves fun and easy with frequency. 

Your rig deserves it 



A remote vfo is useful for 
a lot more than just 
chasing DX. You can search 
for a clear frequency (and 

sometimes find one) without 
giving up the original, or 
stay with a net while moving 
off frequency to pick up 
Side traffic and intercept 
QRM, In a contest, you 
might leave the main vfo on 
a pileup and tune the re- 



mote down the band for a 
few points. By switching 
back and forth, you can 
keep track of the ptieup 

without sacrificing other 
contacts. 



A second vfo will also 
serve as an RIT if your rig 
doesn't have one and could 
even be set up to monitor 
two frequencies at once. Of 




i 



Photo A. A duplication of the HW-WVs internal vfo h in- 
stalled in a recycled Heath VF-7 cabinet The original vfo in 
this IS-year-old box could drift through most of a band in one 
evening. Perfect for gradual QSY in a contest 

46 73 Magazine * August, 1984 



course, when you aren't do- 
ing any of these, you can use 
it to work DX stations on 
split frequencies. 

Even though Heath didn't 
offer a matching remote for 
the HW'101, ifs neither ex- 
pensive nor difficult to add 
this versatile accessory to 
your HF lineup. The HW-IOI 
will work with a variety of 
vfo circuits, and interfacing 
one to your rig is a simple 
procedure. 



Suitable Donors 

The search for a compati- 
ble unit is made easier by re- 
alizing that several Heath 
products were designed 
around the same vfo param- 
eters. This means that an 
LMO (linear master oscilla- 
tor) taken from a wornH:^ut 
SB-101 transceiver or SB-400 
transmitter for example, 
will perform as well as a vfo 
retrieved from a 
HW-100orHW-101. 



\ 



> 



^ 




/A 




Photo B. A prototype remote using an SB-102 LMO. This ver- 
sion i$ self-powered by an on- board 10-V<lc supply. 



Old, abused, and just 
plain broken ' Heathkit/HF 
products are often available 
at bargain prices. Aside from 
providing the vfo you want, 
these castoffs wiff give up a 
wealth of good reusable 
parts and a cabinet for your 
next project 

If you don't turn one up 
that way, consider building 
a clone of the HW-lOTs in- 
ternal vfo Obtain the enclo- 
sure, variable capacitor, and 
other critical components 
from Heath. The tube and 
hardware are commonly 
available. You might devise 
your own dial assembly, or 
buy those parts from Heath, 
too. Consult the owner's 
manual for Heath part num- 
bers. 

Duplicating the internal 
vfo costs more than building 
a generic S-MHz circuit, but 
it does have the advantage 

of guaranteed compatibili- 
ty. Also, having step-by-step 
instructions in the manual 

eliminates all the guesswork 
and simplifies alignment 

A Heath SB-640, although 
rare, is a prize find. This is a 
remote LMO once sold as a 
companion to the SB-101, 
but it makes an excellent re- 
mote for the HW-101. Lo- 
cating one of these also 
saves the trouble of install- 
ing an unattached vfo into a 
new cabinet 

If you're willing to experi- 
ment, you might find a us- 
able vfo in a discarded piece 
of non-Heath equipment. 
Any "backwards-tuning" 5.5- 
5.0-MHz unit capable of 
1.5 volts rms across 50 
Ohms should have poten- 
tial. 

Finally, some commer- 
cially-made auxiliary vfo's 
are compatible with the 
HW-n01. Buy-and-try is the 
method here, but the Ken- 
wood 520 and 820 products 
should be safe bets. For the 
ded ica ted bu i Id-it-yoursel f - 
er, some other sources are 
mentioned later. The instal- 
lation/interface tips de- 
scribed in this article are 
generally applicable to al- 



most any combination you 
decide to try. 

The Basic Remote 

Fig. 1 shows the setup 
used with a duplicate 
HW-101 vfo, whether sal- 
vaged or built from scratch. 
This arrangement also cov- 
ers home-built or other tube- 
type vfo's requiring 150 
volts. A small 12-volt-dc sup- 
ply is built into the trans- 
ceiver to power the new 
relay, K1, and an RIT relay (if 
used) in the new vfo. This dc 
source is usable with other 
modificatiortSv too. Spare 
contacts on the antenna re- 
lay provide 12 V dc at sepa- 
rate points in both receive 
and transmit modes. Through 
switch SI. this control 
voltage determines when re- 
lay K1 is activated, placing 
the outboard vfo into oper- 
ation. 

The relay can be mounted 

in any convenient location; I 
attached it with an L-bracket 
to the rf cage. The rectangu- 
lar cutout in the rear panel is 
an almost perfect fit for a 
nine-pin molex®-type fe- 
male connector (Radio Shack 
#274-239). Either a new 
phono socket or the spare 
on the rear apron becomes 
the "vfo in" connector. 

As indicated in Fig. 1, 
some minor rewiring of the 
regulated 150-V-dc line and 
vfo input is needed. This rs 
done to route them through 



the new relay instead of di- 
rect *to the internal vfo. 
These changes are straight- 
forward and easily reversi- 
ble. 

Fig. 1 also shows the con- 
trol switch and "on-site" wir- 
ing of the remote unit. With 
SI in its first position, the 
main vfo is always used. In 
the next position, control is 
split with the main unit re- 
ceiving and the remote 
transmitting. The third posi- 
tion is just the opposite, and 
the fourth pKDsttion puts the 
remote unit in complete 
transceiving control Diodes 
D1 and D2 are "one-way 
signs." They prevent the 
control voltage from run- 
ning backwards down the 
wrong line when the switch 
is set for remote transceive. 
For example, the RIT relay 
would be useless without 
Dl. 



The Better Remote 

Aside from the benefits of 
dual-frequency control, an 
LMO offers dial accuracy 
approaching the level of dig- 
ital readout The circular 
dial reads 0-100 kHz rather 
than 0-500 and rotates five 
times per band segment in- 
stead of once. The 1-kHz 
markings can be visually in- 
terpolated to 200 Hz 

Another advantage is that 
warm-up drift is almost elim- 
inated. The LMOs stabilize 
much faster than the origi- 
nal vfo and the solid-state 
version operates at room 
temperature in its own cabi- 
net This limits warm-up 
drift to the hfo circuit in the 
transceiver, which is mini- 
mal With all this in mind, 
you may find yourself using 
the remote LMO most of the 
time. It's worth a little effort 
to find one. 




SI- RS #275-1306 
Or.Dl' IM400I OR E0U1V 



REMOTE 
VFO 



fol RF OUTPUT 



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Fig. 1, Relay and 9-pin socket connections inside the HW-Wh The 12'VoIt supply can be buik 
on a terminal strip. Also shown is the remote-unit wiring. P7 is at the end of a 7-wire cable and 
mates with }1 on the transceiver rear panel, 

73 Magazine * August, 1934 47 



Depending on how old it is, 
an LMOequipped Heathkit 
will contain either a tube-type 
or solid-state unit. The older 
ones (and the S&640 remote) 
require 150 V dc and should 
be set up the same way as the 
vfo in Fig. 1 . 

The later LMOs do with- 
out the tube and operate on 
+ 10 V dc regulated. Fig. 2 
shows the changes in the in- 
terfacing arrangement and a 
power supply for the LMO= 
You could get by with a ten- 
volt zener on the relay sup- 
ply, but the circuit shown is 
sturdier safer, and more reli- 
able. Be sure to adjust the 
regulator for ten volts out- 
put before connecting it to 
the LMO. The Fig. 2 method 
Is readily adaptable to other 
solid-state remote units re- 
quiring 9 to 13 volts. 

You may want RIT in the 
remote, especially if you 
plan to use it very often for 
transceiver control. Any cir- 
cuit that works in the HW- 
Id's internal vfo should be 
usable. The RIT is connect- 
ed to the stator [stationary) 
plates of the main tuning 
capacitor, which in the 
Heath LMO is impossible to 
reach. Look for a tinned bar 
with several components 
soldered to it, just below the 
air variable, and make the 
connection there. 

Once RIT is installed, the 
LMO will need realignment 





Photo C Chse-up of the HW-101 showing suggested loca- 
tions for relay K1, the 9-pin socket, and remote-input phono 
soc/cet 



Even without this modifica- 
tion, some of the more bat- 
tered LMOs IVe used re- 
quired touching up. These 
units came from the factory 
pre-assembled, aligned, and 
sealed. No information was 
given on the circuit or its ad- 
justment, so I tried and 
erred until the secret was re- 
vealed. 

Calibration is done from 
the front of the enclosure 
with insulated tools. At 0.0 
(shaft fully counterclock- 
wise, then up 10 kHz), set 
the coil for 5.5 MHz. Co 
clockwise five turns and set 
the trimmer for 5.0 MHz. 
Repeat this procedure until 



4£ VAC e- 



LAMPS 



LM317T= fl.S. #£76H7Ta 




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= + !0 VDC 

(ALTERNATIVE) 
lOV 



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(NTERNAL VFO ^ 
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X REMOTE 
^ VFO fiF 



TRANSCEIVER 



\ TRANSCEIV 

^ VFO \HPUT 

Fig. 2. An adjustabte^output power supply and the third pole 
of relay K1 are used for solid-state remote units. 

48 73 Magazine • August, 1984 



one turn of the shaft changes 
the frequency exactly 100 
kHz. Take some time doing 
this, and you'll end up with 
an exceptionally accurate 
and linear readout. 

The Over-Achiever's Remote 

Occasionally the need 
may arise to monitor two 
frequencies at once. This 
usually means trying to im- 
press a visitor with your sta- 
tion's versatility, but there 
are more legitimate uses. If 
youVe always envied the 
guys who call CQ DX and 
casually add, ''Listening on 
this frequency and 7090 
kHz/' then this extra step is 
for you. 

Fig, 3 shows one method 
of activating two vfos at the 
same time. The second new 



relay (K2) is drawn in squares 
to distinguish it from control 
relay K1. Whichever vfo is 
not being used will be turned 
on and connected to the 
mixer inputs by closing K2. 
This results in both units 
controlling a received fre- 
quency independently but 
simultaneously. 

This system is foolproofed 
against transmitting on two 
frequencies by powering K2 
from the receive-only 12-V- 
dc source. The relay auto- 
matically opens when the 
rig is in transmit mode. Nev- 
ertheless, a prominent warn- 
ing light should be included 
as a reminder that the 
transmitted signal may not 
be in the same place as the 
one you're listening to. 

The circuit in Fig. 3 is lim- 
ited to remote vfo's that do 
not take their B+ voltage 
from the 150-V-dc line in the 
HW-101. The OA2 regulator 
tube can't handle two vfo's 
at the same time. If this fea- 
ture is important to you, 
either a solid-state remote 
unit or a separate 150-volt 
supply will be needed. 

Mount the second relay 
next to K1 and keep rf leads 
short and direct. Some sol- 
der-and-try with the .005 
discs may be necessary if 
unwanted oscillation oc- 
curs. 

Some Other Appf oaches 

You may find, or already 
own, another Heath rig with 
the right vfo/LMO. If it's not 
ready to retire for parts, it 




RECEIVE 
-a ONLY 
12 VDC 



TRANSCEIVER 

VFO 

INPUT 



REMOTE 
VFO 



Fig. 3. A second relay (K2) is used for receiving two frequen- 
cies at the same time. 



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can be set up easily to func- 
tion either normal ly or as a 
remote vfo. 

For example, an SB-303 
receiver's LMO can be used 
exactly as shown in Fig. 2. 
Mount the control switch in 
a separate box or in place of 
an expendable receiver con- 
trol such as the rf attenuator, 
LMO output is available on 
the rear panel. If operating 
voltage is brought to the 
LMO through spare phono 
sockets, the receiver itself 
need not even be turned on. 
In the same way, an SH10 
six-meter transceiver could 
'loan out" its LMO when 
not otherwise occupied. 

If by choice or necessity 
you build an outboard vfo, 
you would probably save 
some time by referring to 
previous articles on Heath 

BUFFER CIRCUIT 



companions. In "An Exter- 
nal Vfo for the Heathkit SB- 
101" (CQ, September, 1972i 
K4TP described a tube-type 
unit His circuit uses com- 
monly-available parts and a 
simple dial mechanism. 

VK5JZ/SK built a two^ 
transistor version which is 
described on page 23 of the 
ARRL's Weekend Projects 
for the Radio Amateur. Look 
through back issues of 73 for 
other articles that may in- 
clude a 5-MHz circuit One 
in particular which has 
potential is VESPZ's '^An 
8205 Remote Vfo;" in 73 for 
June, 198r 

These circuits should be 
"laundered" through a buff- 
er The triode section of 
tube V5 is not used in the 
HW-101 but functions as a 
buffer in the SB-series trans- 



ceivers. By adding a few 
parts, V5B can be put back 
to work. See Fig, 4. The new 
components will fit into va- 
cant holes surrounding V5 
since the same circuit board 
was used in both transceiver 
types. 

Refer to Fig 1 and treat 
the buffer as though it were 
the remote unit The actual 
outboard can be left on con- 
tinuously or switched along 
with the buffer. But remem* 
ber the limitations on the 
built-in 150volt regulator; it 
won't run two of anything at 

once. 
The V5B buffer should 

also benefit some other vfo's 
you might build or buy that 
don't perform properly with 
the HW-101 , Low power out- 
put is one symptom, oscilla- 
tion in the mixer is another 



mpuT 







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fig. 5. Three steps to a chassis ior Heath vfo/LMOs. One— cut out 5" of chassis front 
Two—niake V cuts on top, score between them, and bend down. Three — drill mounting 
holes as shown. Use the front pane! from an HW-IOI or donor equipment as a template for 
the dial mounting. 

50 73 Magazine • August, 1 984 



The buffer is more forgiving 
of impedance mismatch and 
too-high vfo output than the 
mixer stage. 

Another step thafs likely 
to improve compatibilttv is 
also shown in Fig. 4 The 
SB-100 series had more so- 
phisticated mixer input cir- 
cuits which can be added to 
the HW-101. Again, vacant 
holes are available on the 
bandpass board. 

The SSB bias line shown 
with the Heath remotes is 
used to offset the vfo fre- 
quency when changing from 
LSB to USB or CW. Recali- 
bration of the dial is then un- 
necessary. This feature could 
be included in home-built or 
other circuits, but probably 
is not worth the trouble. 

Summifig Up 

Length of connecting coax 
cable and terminating resis- 
tance is considered critical 
with many vfo designs. In 
fact. Heath specifies 24 inch- 
es of RG^2 [930hm coax) 
for interconnecting their 
LMOs. 

At different times I've 
used an HW-101 vfo, several 
LMOs, and a few workbench 
contrivances, In no case was 
anything more than a conve- 
nient length of RG-58 need- 
ed for good performance. 
But don't overlook the 
47-68-Ohm resistor at the 
mixer input and careful vfo 
alignment. 

There's no disputing that 
the HW-101 is an economy 
radio, but you're in the conrv 
pany of many loyal and sat- 
isfied owners. A remote vfo 
will open the door to more 
enjoyable HF operating with 
a small investment of money 
and time. Ifs a very effec- 
tive way to make the most 
of hamming on a budget. 

Let me know if you en- 
counter any problems, and 
I'll help if I can.B 

References 

Malin, 'Increasing the Operating 
Capability of the Heathkit SSB 
Transceivers," CQ, August, 1972, 
Heathkit Owners' Manuals for 
models S&640, SB-102, and 
S&401. 





COULD 




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73 Magazme • August, 1984 S3 




international] 



Each month, 73 brings you 
ham-fadiO news from around the 
world, in this coflectmn of re- 
ports from our foreign corre- 
spondents, we present the lat- 
est news in DX, contests, and 
events, as well bs keep you 
abreast of the technical 
achievements of hams in other 
countries. 

if you would like to contribute 
to your country's column, write 
to your country's correspondent 
Of to 73: Amateur Radio's 
Technical Journal, Pine Street, 
Peterborough NH 03458, USA, 
Attn: Perry Donham KK2Y. 




AUSTRALIA 

J. £ Jo^^c^ VKSYJ 
44 Wren SUeet 

Anorta30W 
Victoiia 

VK9V— COCOS KEELING 

Firsi discovered in t609 by Williajn 
Kaaling of th€ East Indii Compafiy; the^e 
islands are located 27^ km northwest ot 
Perlh, West Au&traEia. 

Ttre Cocos Keetifig graup consiists of 
two fnatn atolls plus a^weral smarter 
Islands. The macn Islands are West Island, 
Home Island, and DirecHqn Islands with 
the other larger ones being Prison, Hors- 
burgh, and North Keeling. On these Is- 
lands, the highest potni above sea level is 
onli^ Biv. meters, which poses some prot> 
I ems annually durtng cyclone season. 

Except for the odd silling ship stopping 
lltere briefly avm the centuries, the 
is lands r^na^ndd uninhabited unfit 1025 
when Alexarvlcf Hare sell ted there, fot- 
towed two years later by the ftrst of Ihe 
Glunles tamily. 

In 1606, Quecifi Victoria grarvted all of 
the i stands' larwis at>Qve high watef majlc 
to I be Clunies-Ross family, theretiy start- 
ing! a family tradHJon where the beacf of 
the family was called "Klr^g. of ttie Cocos." 

When Qunies first settled on these 
Islands, he bought w4th him several 
Malaya as workers on the Inlands' only 
commodity, copra. There are now 370 di- 
rect descendants of these original Ma- 
lays, a very famlty-consctous and happy 
people who call them selves 'Cocos Ma- 
lays," They speak both Malayan ar%d En- 
glish and follow the Muslim religloru 

The rest of the islands' population con- 
si sis mainly of Australians o^ a two- yea/ 
tour of duty with one of our government 
departrri^tts. 

Radio was first intfoduced to ttiese 
ittar^s in 1914. vthetx there was a cable 
and wirefess station located on Direction 
island. In the 1940s, an airstrip was t>ulll 
on West Island which has since t»een up- 
graded to rake large jet aircraft, one of 
which is the fortnfghtty commercial flight 
from Australia. 

In 197B, the Australian government 

54 7$h4agazine • August, 1984 



bought most of the i stands from the Ctu- 
nIes-Ross f amity fof $6^ million, and at 
presenc, it is trying to buy what is left of 
the famiiy estate. 

This year, the Cocos Malays are to be 
glven^ under United Nations supervision, 
a free choice as to whether they wish to 
have Independence, free association 
with, or integration with Australia. As 
there ia mucfi travelling by the islanders 
betwdiOn Qocos Keeling and Ausirali^a and 
they come under the West Austraiian 
Health, Oer^tal, and SchooLtfig System, 
the feeting is that soon we will have arboltv 
er 370 Ausstes arKt permanent jurisdiction 
over the Ck»cos Keeilng tsiar^ds. 

Amateur radio is a late comer to ttrose 
islands, wiih VK3AJ, as far as records 
show, betng in !956 ttie first to activate 
amateur fadio from fDirecilon Island. 
Since then, there have been many opefa- 
lions by outsiders since none of the local 
Malay population has taken up amateur 
radlo^ although several do operate CB 
equipment. The operation of arriatBUr 
radio has become extremely d Iff icy It of 
late, however, due mainly to there being 
no tourist facLlllies on the island, and the 
only way to stay for a short period is to be 
invited (o live at someone's house. This 
poses some problems as all the Cocos 
Malays' homes are closely grouped fo- 
get her , with a large number of TVs, broad^ 
cast receivefs.. cassette recorders, arwl 
VCRs (tr»e amateur's niQhlmar^ 

1 quote part of a letter io me from Neil 
VK6(4EJVK9VE: 'To op^erate and not 
create TVIJBQ, or tfcad neiglitjor refatiorv 
ships, is vefy dtfficult in the living area To 
use over 25 Watts wiil get you into some 
appliances. TOO Watts is OK if you tee it up 
with Ihe neightKirs beforehand, for a few 
hours operation only. AQO Watts and you 
will be put away. No way will the island's 
Administrator allow you to stay If you 
don't Stop making the appliances emit 
strange sounds, and the Administrator's 
word Is law on these Islands," 

Two of the most active operalors of lale 
were Paul VK9Va and Aleic VK9VA, due to 
jobs wilh orie of our government serv+ces 
which took tbem through there on a fairly 
regular t>asis- itiey have been reassigned 
now ar^f are inactive from this spot, but 
even th»ey co^jid get into troyfele* 

One ffitample of tfie problems in oper- 
ating amateur radfo from ttere happened 
to Alex VK3YA. [deciding to gel on the air 
from the slr^gle-men's quarters during one 
of his many stopovers, he fired up his rig 
late at night, only to find an irate neighbor 
at his door. It seems thai as the Island's 
own 50-Watt broadcast transmitter goes 
off air during the night and starts up first 
thing In the morning, this chap was leav- 
ing his dock radio switched on, with the 
volume turned up full as a wake-up alarm. 
You can imagine what happened when 
Atex fired up his HF gear from Iwo rooms 
away; Ifve rkeightXNr, not being interested 
In amateur radio, was turning very nasty 
and made Alex shut down his opetation. 

Cre&S VKBYC, whose home callsig n is 
G5HDS, did nol have these problems , as 
he is a soiviT>4aw of tbeClunJes-Ross farrv 
liy and operated from its castte-ilke hflme 
on Home Island. However, with the nego- 
tiations by the Australian government try- 
ing to buy this property » you may no I hear 
Cress from there again. 




Mtke fieaW VK9ZYX^ a Simited Uc^me hofdee, in his sfmck on Cocos HeeHtig. Umiteft to^ 
MHz snd stiave. Mike stiit g9iiw<i many ^w^rtSs on the 6m fi^nd 




Frank VK&NYG at Ns oper&tfng desk on Cocos Keeifng. 



A DX Qxpedftlpn, even if allowed to op- 
erate (which I doubt K would not be war- 
ranted, going by the figures given to me by 
Paul VK^VB. Out of 2500 contacts during 
his last stay, only 125 sent cards direct, 
some wHh rKi return posiage included and 
some with only one IBC. It is worih men- 
tiofiing fwre tfvat we have one of tfie high- 
est postage costs in the world, with air 
mail to the States now 75 cents and 
Europe &5 cents. Of the rest of his eon- 
tacts, t\e is now getting 400 cards per 
month by the bureau, with a large numtier 
of SWl^ cards. 

Perhaps the above is due to Frank 
VK9NYG, a Novice operator who, al- 
though limited In power and bands Of op* 
eration, had, durir^g his twcnyear tour of 
duty on the Islands^ 22,iD00 contacts 
{some duplicates, of course). Of these, 
Neil VKSNE, Frank's QSL manager, says 
that 6,500 cards were sent back direct, re- 
gardless of whether or no^ sufficient re* 
turn posiage was included^ and 7.flO0 
cards vtrere sent by the bureau. Not a bad 
tally for a hiovice operator, mainly oper- 
ating on 26 MHz with SO^Watt PEP output. 
21 MHz was there as a backup but seldom 
used 

Frank enjoyed a unique letailonship 
with the islanders, as the radio telephone 
on the islands shut down at night and 
sometimes was not at alt reliable during 
the day. The Islanders found that they 



could use Fran It to get info for them from 
tt>e mainland, and he was able to be of as- 
sistance to yachts In trouble in the area of 
the Cocos Keelings. Tliis gained him 
some acceptrance for amateur-radio oper" 
at ion not granted to ot^r amateurs. 
Frank and hts wife Ann are back in Austra- 
lia, and Frank tvas upgrac^ed to a full cati, 
now being Vt'iSACC- 

Incrdentally. Neil VKSNE is also tlw 
WiA's FeOeraJ QSL Manager, and he spent 
Iwo weeks as VK9YE, operating from 
Frank's shack, before Frank left the 
islands. 

With the Australian government just lin^ 
jshing building a s|x-mll|ion-dollar hl^h^ 
security quarantine etation out there, cas- 
ual visits by amateurs or anybody else wi IE 
be even harder in future, and unless we 
get an active arriaieur posted to one of the 
government departments on the islands, i 
feet VK9Y witi Slowly start to creep up the 
most-wanted lisl again. 

As MeltXKime Is a long way from Cocoe 
Keeling, t must thank f^eii VK6NE/VK9YE. 
Paul VK5CGR/VK9YB, and Ken VK3AH, 
wfio togeihef gave me most of the infor- 
mation for tJtis artici#- 

P.S. I tiave just received word ti^at the 
Cocos Malays just voted on titeir future 
and ttfe vote was overwhelmir>g in favor of 
Integration with Australia. To use a typi- 
cal AustraHan expression. "Bewdy mate, 
she's a bottler decision!" 




BRAZIL 

Gar son Rissln FY 1 APS 
PO Box 12178 €of>ac»bana 
20000 mo de Janeiro, RJ 

RECrpnOCAL AQREEilENT 

Orm day before my last iHp lo the 
United States, which ^a^ ori April 7, I re- 
Oilved a teleptione call from Ricardo A. A. 
da Sifva PT2HS, one Qt I he members oMrie 
Brazilian Amateur Radio Les^Lte (LABRE) 
$tarr He lives In BraBllta, the capital city, 
but he was in Rici de Janeiro tor a tew days 
due to hjs job. 

FirsE of alL he passed on the message 
from Valmir Jacinto P^fieira PT2FA, presi- 
dim of LABBE, conQratulatiTig 73 for the 
opporfunJty it gave us. through our C£»fumn, 
(o make krvown a imt things about BraziJian 
amatsiir-radio activities. 

The presfdefit also wishes to extend an 
invitation to all toreign authorjtl^es of the 
countries with which Brazil doe^ not have 
yet a reciprocal agreemer^t to get in touch 
wllti the Brazilian League in order lo work 
on this agreement. Up to now, Brazil ha£ 
reciprocal agreements witli West Ger- 
many. Bolivia. Canada. Cblle, Colombia. 
Costa Rica. Denmark, ihe LtS, Gieat BriE- 
ain, Northern Ireland, Panama, Paraguay^ 
Portugal Dominican Republic, Sweden, 
Sw^t2ef?and, Lfruguay, and V^iezuela. 

According to Brazilian law, it fs not al- 
lowed for a foreign citizen, while in Bra^ll^ 
to have or use any communication equip- 
ment it the country of which he Is a citizen 
does not have a reciprocal agreement 
with Brazil. Transgressing this law will 
result in (tve confiscation of the equ^p' 
ment, the detraitton of Itie violator for one 
to three years, or his tTanishment from the 
country. Atl irK|uirtes and general corre^ 
spondence to ttie League stiould be ad- 
dressed to the administrative headquar- 
ters at SGE SuL Trecho 4, Lote 1-A, 70000 
Braailia. OF. Brazil, or to PO Box 07.0004, 
70000 Brasilia, DF. Brazil Tefephone: (061) 
223-1 157 or (061 } 2284)504, 

EUGENIO S FIRST CRY 

TWs happened in ttw city of Fortafeza 
BAd was refx>rted tsy America PV7VBG; 
WIten itttle batvy Eugenie was tM»n on De- 
cember 6, I98i2, nobody couM imagine 
that his first cry would be transmitted on 
the air on a frequency full of friends of his 
mother, Maria PT7LB, When Maria arrived 
at the hospital to have her baby, at at>out 
4:00 am, the only room available did not 
tuve a telept^one, so stie decided to keep 
with hex thie 2'meter tiand^ield equipment 
to get In to^fch with tier hust^and; he had 
had lo return to ttieir home to stay with ttw 
other childsren, who tied remaJned sleeping. 

According to her doctors. Braga 
PT7WFB and Lazaro PT7HP, the baby 
would be bom at about noon. However, at 
about eight o'clock In the morning, while 
speaking with her friends on the frequen- 
cy, atie felt the first hurt, and a few min- 
utes^ later the first cry of Eugenic was 
transmitted on the air and heard by all 
friends who were on the frequency. 

Without a license. Eugenio hax^ to finish 
hla first transmission a tew secoods after 
lt»e beginning. ar>d tt^en t^ went to his 
birthplace for sleeping. 

CWP AWARD 

Issued by CW PetropoMs, the CWP 
award may be obtained In three different 
classes. Contacts eligible; only two-way 
CW mode, after December 1, 1983. 



C^ass I—Work 10 Brazilian cities plus 2 
contacts wrth CWP members or de*e- 
gales. 

Class II— Work 20 Brazilian cities plus 4 
contacts with CWP members or dete- 
eateo. 

Class III— Work 30 Brazilian cities plus 
6 contacts with CWP members or dele- 
gates. 

One CWP memtier or delegate may be 
logged more than once, but only if worked 
on differefit diates or bands, 

SWL Sanne rutes. 

No OSL only GCft. Fee: 7 IRCs. Mailing 
addfttss: CWP. PO Box 90415, 25600 Pe- 
tropoHs. RJ. Brazil. 

CWP members: KA9KUH. PPaADV, 
PP7JC0, PT2ACZ, PT2GK, PT7WA; PYls; 
AFA^ APS. AYE, AZG, BPR, BVY, CC. DFF, 
DK, DMX, DRW, OWM. DYO, ESK, EBN. 
ECU EWN, JF. KT. MIT. OB, PL. QN. QO. 
RO, TBW, TG, UBS, URO. (JTZ, UUW. LTWt, 
VEC, VMV, WXU, YOG. YOV. ZFF: PY2s: 
AC. fL, KQ. MC, Ml. ORW. RLQ. RRG: 
PY3CJI. PY3Ma, PY6AMJ. 




FEDERAL REPUBLIC 

OF GERMANY 

Hans J Sch^ik 0J$8T 
Hammsrikfotd-Ring r74 
D 6000 Frankfurt 50 
Ped&mf Refiubtt'c of Germany 

lARU REGION 1 CONFERENCE, 1984 

The lARU Region 1 Conference, 1984, 
tooJ< place from AprK 7th to I3lh, in 
Cefalu, Sicily. Back in 1981, the Fast Re^ 
gion 1 Conference, in Brighton. UK, had 
voted for Itaty by a plurality. 

Oiifing siM^ meetir^gs, whrch are held 
every three years, ttie rnemt>er national so- 
cieties agree democratically to important 
decisions and suggestions for the future. 
That means thai single-nation interests 
have to be combined on a level which Is 
acceptable for every member. In the vot- 
ing, each nation ties one vote whether it 
has 50,000 members (as for example, the 
DARC— Deutscher Amateur Radio Cfubl 
or only 40, 

Very olter^ the negotiations are ejc- 
tremely dif ficuJt and many result in a eonv 
promise. So not seldom discussions last 
until the late night. The official language 
of the conferences is English, and proce- 
dures are parliamentary proce<Jures ac- 
cording to Roberts RuJes. 

Three committees were set up In 1981 
to report this year. Committee A is dealing 
with Shortwave and administratiion suts- 
jecia. Committee B with subjects con- 
cerning VHFrtJ HF, and Committee C with 
financial sublects. 

As already mentioned, some smair 
teams had to be founded ft)esides the 
three committeesf to handle negotiallons 
successfully. That means that a national 
society wanting to bring its interests Into 
several subjects has had to have number 
of delegates to spread around. 

A great dea3 of preparational worit Is 
done by these teams— HF WG (High Fre- 
q4>ency Working Group). VHFAiHF WG, 
and other teams— in the time between 
conferences. But their suggestions are 
not binding because not every nation's ir^ 
lerests ttave l^een represented. For 
suggestions to come into force, the who^e 
conference has to agree. 

The executive committee has sug- 
gested changing this procedure to Intro- 
duce written voting so thai decisions also 
could be made during the three-year peri- 



od t^etween conferences. DARC supports 
this proposal. 

tn a firture column I wilt report on re- 
sults, but you may be interested in otfier 
matters under discussion. 

Because of the increasing numbers of 
OSL cards, we think it advisable to pro- 
pose a standardization regarding card 
size and address field. (Naturally it will 
take several years until the standards 
have become common use.) Similar ef- 
forts towards standardization tiave been 
made within ttie two other regions. Ac- 
cording to our experiences, we tnmk a 
possible compromise would be: size 9 x 
14 cm. weight 190-250 grams/sqm, ad- 
dress in the i2-mm leftover space at the 
end of the OSL (for an automatic handling 
of the cards). 

In addllton, vyre want considered addi- 
tional regional subsidies to our local AM- 
SAT organizations. We also suggest stop- 
ping unnecessary use of special prefixes 
for each and every thing, Furthper. we ap- 
peal for reflection upon the existing RST 
system for an easier way of evaluation, 
QRK expressed "R 1 -5 " seems to be suffi- 
cient. 

ft Is already known that RSOB (UK) 
wants a change of the bandplan within the 
28 MHz band, RSGB intends the integra- 
tion of an FM repeater range. SSA f Swe- 
den} proposes producing and publishing a 
communication manual to imprc^ve radi-o 
discipline. Also tttey suggest a coordina- 
tion of the intruder monitonng service 
within Region 1. 

According to resotutions of Region 2 
(America) ar>d Region 3 {Asia} confer- 
ences, a uniform QTH- locator system 
seems lo be possible now. Also, tnare are 
suggestions to reduce Ihe 24-hour con- 
tests to 12 hours and eventually to hold 
two contests on the same weekend. 



to be operaiional. T^ call si gn^ location, 
and channel number of each Is as follows: 
GB3GV tLeicester) arvJ GB3UT (Bath^- 
RMT1; GB3rrv (Luton). GB3UD (Stoke^Jfh 
Trent), and GB3VH (WonhingJ: RMT2. 

The frequency allocations (in Mega 
hertz) for the two channeia in use are as 
shown here: 




;^p^ 



GREAT BRiTAfN 

Jeff Maynard G4EJA 
10 Churchffeids 
Wfdnes WA8 9RP 
Ctiesfiife 
England 

THE UK SCENE 

BarKi occupar>cy is a problem to wtilch I 
have referred in previous columns in cQfV 
nection with the ne^ to continue to use 
the lO-meler band during periods when 
propagation is poor. Most peopie seem to 
accept the possibility ot such bands be- 
ing lost to broadcasting or to CB if used 
only orvce every 1 1 years or so. 

However, thte need to demonstrate that 
amateur allocations are rnot a waste of vat- 
uabte spectrum ts not confined to HF. Ir^ 
deed, the pressures from me flkes of lar^ 
mobile PMR (private rT>obife radio) and mil- 
itary users in the VHf and UHF bands are 
probably much greater than those experi- 
enced in the lower frequencies. At least 
this seems to be the case in the UK. 

The need to occupy the 1.2-GHz band to 
ensure that it remains in the amateur ser- 
vice was a major motivating factor in re^ 
cent appliications for air^teyr-teJevision 
fepeaters in this barwi Licenses were duly 
granted by the Department of Trade and 
Industry (the government department re- 
sponsible for the Amateur Service) in early 
1984. 

These are the first such licenses to be 
issued In the UK and it Is hoped that they 
will have a signlticani impact on amateur- 
television activities. By the lime you read 
ttiis, the initial five rei>eBters are expected 





Vision in 


Vision out 


RMT1 


^276.5 


1311-5 


RMT2 


t249.0 


1318^ 




Sound in 


Sound out 


RMT1 


1262^ 


t3t7.S 


RMTa 


1255.0 


1324.5 



The repeaters operating on channel 
RMTt will receive both AM and FM signals 
bu( will reradlate in AM. Repeaters oper- 
ating on RMT2 will receive and transmit in 
FM only (the sound frequencies shown 
are for AM; FM systems will utilize a 
6-MHz sound subcarrier). 

Vision signals are to be 625-rfne, nega- 
live-go^og wtlh posit ive-gotng synchs All 
FM signals are limited to a deviation of 6.5 
MHz With CClR pre^mphasis (and there^ 
fore similar to UK PAL broadcast stan- 
dards). With horizontal I y-polari zed anten- 
nas, repeaters will be activated by the 
presence Of a valid video signai at the re- 
ceiver inpuL 

The Bhtisti Amateur Television Club op* 
erates a recordeO-announcemeni service 
giving detaiils of all aspects of the duty's 
television acttviti^ From the US, this can 
be cat fed on 44 (533) 600103. Ptease note 
itiat I am not a TV enthusiast and iheie- 
fore cannot oblige with any more mforma- 
tcon if anyone is thinking of wrfting to me 
on the sub|eci! 

BARTG 

1984 is the Silver Jubilee of the British 
Amateur Radio Teleprinter Group (BARTQ) 
wtiose quarterly newsletter provides a 
wealth of information for RTTV enthu- 
siasts (arHl tfK]>se interested in FAX, AM- 
TOR. and data transmission^ Details of 
BARTG m^emt>ersiiip. publications (in- 
cfuding RTTy The Easy Way), and prod- 
ucts (including PCBs. etc.) can be ob- 
tained from John Breedie G6MOK, 161 Tu* 
dor Road, Hayes, Middlesex UB3 2O0, 
England, Please enclose an jRC or two for 
return postage. 

BREAKTHROUGH 

Fotlowing my previous comments on 
breakthrougtt in the a-meter amateur tiand 
from the newly-legalized cab^e TV in the 
UK, it seems that problems may aiso oc- 
cur with plans for Direct Broadcasting by 
Satellite ^DBS). The BBC has been given 
government permission to tiegin transmit 
ting DBS signals in 1985/06, and manufac* 
turers already are iooiting a1 domestic re- 
ceiving equipment requirements. 

The European DBS bands will be 
around 11.7 GHz and designed for recep- 
tion witti a l-meter-diam«ter disti. Such 
high frequencies require two l-fs^ ttie first 
at the dish itself and tt^ second on the set 
top. TT>e equipment manufacturer's conv 
mittee. BREMA EBr rtish Radio and Electri- 
cal Manufacturers Association), has se- 
lected Initial intermediate frequencies 
around 1.2 GHz and 144 MHz. Onecan}ust 
imagine the problems for the average 
punter trying to receive very low levet DBS 
signals in the preser>ce of higtHK>wer am- 
ateur statior^ operating (quite legally) at 
the receivmg system's i-fs. 

These problems have been put to 
BREMA not only by the RSGB but also by 
the IBA (Independent Broadcasting Au- 
thority—the UK commercial TV operators) 
and the DTI (Department ot Trade and ln» 
dustry). Some sense has prevailed at 1.2 
GHz at least, with a promise of a rethink. 
However, BREMA does not accepi, per se^ 

W Magazine * August, 1984 5S 



a prob^etn at 144 MHz and Inelats on niore 
^nformatimi: before making any cli-aJiges 
to Hs pfoposals. A working party has 
thfrfefore been set up (typically British ap- 
pfoach} to measure tile leiiels of ^cree^ 
Ifig that can be actiiev«d in practice and. 
presumably, it^eretore decide tf break- 
(hroLtgh might occyr. 

Amateur signals are likely to be the only 
source of strong rl signals In the cksmestlc 
environrnent. and f1 seem$ to me. and I 
suspecl to the RSGB. Ihal BHEMA's atti- 
tude is somewhat negative. Rather than 
seeking to screen agalnsl signals that will 
be a problem, v/hy not abrnply choose an 
intermediate frequency In another part of 
the spec! rum where strong rt is not llkefy 
around the horrre? As It amateur stations 
do not have enough prctjEema. 






Msnos Darkadakis SVttW 

Box23Q5l 

Athsfts 11210 

(j^eece 

Starting with this column, I would like 
to present to ycsu some of the SV hams of 
whom you may have heard or even talked 
10 on the bands. As I have already men- 



tioned, DXing was something unknown a 
few yearm ago with the evcep^tiiori ol one or 
two people, but over Ihe last four years 
mot^e and mofe new amateurs hav^e joirwd 
a smaU teanv seriously involved with ttie 
HF tsarMts. Nowadays the<e are more than 
15 SV amateurs who are active atrmist 
dally. 

SOi i"m starting the presentation with 
Cliff SVTJG, who is likely to be one DXev 
well4{r^wn woridwiE$e and probably the 
most active SV amateur during (he last 
and the present year. You may atso have 
heard him transmitting from Mt, Athos 
oack in 1979 and 1980 and irom SV5 and 
3V9 quite a few times during the last B 
years. 

Cliff, wlio Js now 32 years old. i^ living in 
EkafK some 15 mHes north of Athens, in a 
place which was chosen very carefully 
wllh antenna installation in mind! He has 
already 6-feand OXCC. WA2, WAC. and a 
very good score m phor« and CW DXCC. 
He prefers to work SSB arxi CW. and in 
a few days tie will try the challenge of 
a new mgde {frmo with his Commodore 64 
i»mpufer. 

Of course, things were not so easy 
mtkCfi Cliff started out. In 1978 he was us^ 
ing a TS'520 and d^pdles on all t»afvds and 
he niana^ed to work more thar> 200 coun- 
tries in less than a year and a half. Cliff 
also takes part in a iot ol conteats like the 
CQ Worldwide Contest, ihe WPX, the 
Scandinavian, the All Asian Contest, and 
many others. When 160 meters became 
avaiiabie lo Greek amateurs, he was one 




« 




of (he f irsi to work there with a full si;!e In- 
verted vee, with very need lesulta. As he is 
able lo tranamll 300 PEP Inpiit (6 class Ik 
censei« he gave a lot of people a new one 
on ttie top band. 

Today, the station in SV1 JG's QTH tion- 
sistsof a Yae^y FT-t02 HF reoeivef . a Oen- 
Tron hilLA«2500 B ampv and a Heat hk it* 
luner, Ttw antenna is a 4-elerT>ent Cuah- 
crail ior 10- 15-20 meters: di poles and vor- 
llcals are used on the low lDar>ds. For VHF 
and UHF, Cliff is usir^ a Vaesu FT-4aOR 
and FT7B0R. and the antennas are a 14-el' 
emenl KLI^ VHF ai\d a l9-element F9FT 
UHF. 

Cliff vkraa al the Dayton Hamfe&t In 1 dS1 , 
and I hope that i wl]] be able to foin him for 
3 planned trip in the near future. 



SVtJG's anttnnas 



^l^ 

^r?^ 



HONG KONG 

p. i. Weaver VS6CT 
10 A Bonsvenwre House 
91 Leigh fQft fioad 
Hong Kong 

St nee the advent of the class B (no- 
code) license Jn Hong Kong^ we now have 
ever 100 enthusiastic VHF operators. A 
few are operating on six meters and one, 
VSexU^. Js now on satellite. The HF licen- 
sees don't seem to change loo much; as 
fast as new arrivals get on the air, old ones 
leave By the very nature oJ Hong Kong, 
we do gel quite a lew expatriates who 
come for two or more years onty. HF HoeiH 
sees also numl>0r atxiut 100. alt though 
there are very tew active. 

One of the ma|or prQb4ems is finding 
suitahle accommcxlatton in Hong Kong, 
wfiere high-rise apaftmeni blocks fi^olifer- 
ate, each building nonna^ty topped tyf a 
crown of thorns of TV antennas, each with 
its own broadbanded ampll fieri 

Sociaiiy. the locals and expatriates 
meet each Tuesday evening at the Cable fi. 
Wireless Sports Club. Caroline Hills ^^ob4. 
In the district of Causeway Bay on Hong 
Kong Island. This fs very close lo my 
home, and tiny visiting amateurs are wel- 
come lo visit me first (telephone 5-- 
7723111, tietween 5:30 and S:30) before go- 
ing on to the club. 

Visitors lo Hor^J Kcmg who wish to op- 
erate can obtain a license lo do so ^n 30 
minutes upon app4icalion at the PosI Of- 
fice! AM (fiat Is required ^s to sfxjw your 
originaJ license and passport and have a 



photocopy of Ihese for their files. In the 
event that you would he a resident for 
more than 90 days, then a full locaJ VS6 11- 
cense would be lastjed. Tfvese privileges 
are granted to all license holders from 
counlnes with which the Umted Kjngdonn 
has reciprocal agroenieni, 

Du^fig ttie first week of February, I had 
(tie privile^ of operating orwe mofe *n 
Macao^ and in four days of opefating I 
made 3360 QSOs. all on sideband. With 
the he^p of my host, iose Sousa {now 
XX9WW], we put up di poles on 40 and BO 
meters, and from the pileups on these 
bands there is plenty of scope for more 
operating from Macaol Look out for a Jap- 
anese expedition to Macao for August 
lOih to 20lh approximately. 

Interestingly enough, at this writing, 
nearly two months aftef the event, I have 
received only just over 700 QSLs- From 
this I ain afraid that a tot of people wiEi be 
sending their cards to a nonexistent OSL 
twreaa As ts usual, they probably will end 
up in the Hong Kong Bureau. Ai though I 
am a rT>efnt>er of HAHTS, 1 can hardly In- 
flict my outgoing CR9 cards on if^enu 
What It really amounts to is that educa- 
tion Is neeided by amateurs wofkino E?K- 
pedi lions, All have e^epenses such as 
transportation, hotels. QSi cards, and tfr 
pairs to any eQUlpment, in my case, to the 
borrowed Linear. 

So there are considerable outgoings 
which hopefully can be partly offset by In- 
ccmmg QSL cards with return envelopes 
and postage. Thanks to American ama- 
teurs who normally enclose a "green 
stamp'"^ and Australians a "brown stamp/' 
I shall fust about break even, but what do I 
do with all those cards sent vta the 
bureau? Tvwo i>ercen1 of the cards re- 
ceived direct have rko envelope or return 
postage. I have actually spoken since to 
several of these latter stations, and willv 
out exception they have subeequentty sent 
envelopes and postage Tt^ey had in every 
case jusi r>ol itioughl ai»ut the problems at 
the otf^er end. 

I have, working as V&6CT over tf>e I as I 
three years, made over 40,000 QSQs, and 
because of the problems with QGLing, es- 
tablished [wo QSL Managers— one In 
Japan (JA4ENL) and the other In England 
If I had not done so, It would have brought 
into play the law of diminishing returns, 
for as tho cards rolled in I would have 
spent Fess time on the air whilsl filling 
them in. So w^at do you, the reader, want? 
If you want that VS6 or, for ttiat maiief, 
any rare card tor your DXCC. ptease ex- 
pect any rare DX statton totin^ managers 
and always send a self-addressed enve^ 





cm SV1JG St f}is QTH. 

56 73 Magazine • August, 1984 



Phmp WG&v&f VS6CJ. 





4\^ 



tV 



*\% 



- m 




Stuck with a problem? 

OurTE-12P Encoder might be just the solution to pull 
you out of a sticky situation. Need a different CTCSS 
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any of the twelve tones for EMS use. Also, it can be used 
to access Amateur repeaters or just as a piece of ver- 
satile test equipment. Any of the CTCSS tones may be 
accessed with the TE-12PA, any of the audible frequen- 
cies with the TE-12PB, Just set a dip switch, no test 
equipment is required. As usual, we're a stickler for 
Iday delivery with a full 1 year warranty. 

• Output level flat to within 1.5db over entire range selected, 

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• Low impedance, low distortion, adjustable sinewave output, 
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• Instant starl-up. 



TE'12PA 




er.oxz 


86.4 YA 


toast A 


127.3 3 A 


156.7 5A 


192.8 7A 


71.9 X A 


SB-5YB 


107^ 1B 


131.e3B 


162.2 5B 


203.5 Ml 


74.4 WA 


91522 


110.9 22 


136,542 


167.9 6Z 




77.0 XB 


94.8 2A 


114.B2A 


141.3 4A 


173.8 6 A 




79,7 SP 


97.4 28 


118.6 2B 


146,24B 


179.968 




82.5 YZ 


T00.0 12 


123,0 32 


151,4 52 


186.272 





• Frequency accuracy, ±.1 H2 maximum -40**Cto +85*C 

• Frequencies to 250 Hz available on speciai order 
•Continuous tone 

TE12PB 



TEST-TONES; 


TOUCH-TONES: 


BURSTTONES: 


600 


697 1209 


1600 1850 2150 2400 


1000 


770 1336 


1650 1900 2200 2450 


1500 


852 1477 


1700 1950 2250 2500 


2175 


941 1633 


1750 2000 2300 2550 


2805 




1800 2100 2350 



♦ Frequency accuracy, ±1 Hz maximum -40*Cto +85*C 

• Tone length approximately 300 ms. May be lengthened, 
shortened or eliminated by changing value of resistor 



$89J5 



^15 




COMMUMCAT/Om SPECIAUSTS 



426 West Taft Avenue, Orange, California 92667 
(800) 854^547/CaNfornia: (714) 998-3021 




lopd wtth either 2 or 3 IRCs or a "gre&n 

One other aspect of opemtinff^ from a 
rmlrly rare om \% the different way one has 
10 daai wiih the plleups. Tt>e Japanese aie 
&up«rb; you rtave to call only one or two 
fettera or woilt &y prefixes and aJI oiners 
HMfKluiet ufitu you h^ve wdfX^d mat sta- 
llon; fhay 4M«n (o know instirkctively ttiat 
mota |»aGf>l« cat\ artd witr be worked that 
way. Wfien working Japanese by pceiives I 
fiave worked 5 a minute, but ttiat's quite 
hard going. Europeans never &eem lo 
loam, and the only way i havie found lo 
ukm1( Ihsm ia by call areas, but still youfiirt 
the breakers: 'QRZ,;' "how about a,'* 
"wha('$ your OSL mformation;' etc., in- 
stead Of spending five or ten minutes 
hsiening. 

Americans now seefn very happy lo 
work the fast letter of their call, which I ba- 
llevQ was inlrodijced by "Uncle Biir 
W7PH0 on the tan^ily hour. This works ajs- 
trerrtely well, and I have found a very sails^ 
factory rate of QSOs achievable this way. 

73 and good hunting. 




INDIA 

Jimmy H. Ui^trf VU2U 
"Harmur'—Gth ffoar 
76. Fwry Cross Hoad 

ACTIVE AIIATEUliS OF IHUIX 

tnpdian amaieurs have been fSoing lots 
of active work, like providing eimergency 
cofninunioation at Morvi where a dam 
gaM way killing lots of people, helping 
every yaar the Himalayan motor-car faUy 
which starts from New De^hl and goes up 
to 16,000 feet on the Himalayan Moun- 
tains, and providing the only line of com- 
munication In Gujarat and Andhra Pra- 
desh which gets hit very often by cyclones 
and very heavy rains and floods. 

After watching what the amateur-radio 
operators of India are doing for the public, 
our government started taking In teres I In 
our world-famous hobby and has taken a 
very bold step i think no government m 
this woftd ever has. 

On March t7, 1984, when Indians cele- 
brate me Holi festival days by throwing 
dMIiafent cotor dyes on each olher. our 
government matie amateur-radio oper- 
ators' Itves more cotodul by waiving cus- 
tom duty tor wireless apparatus, accesso- 
ries, and components, when imponed by a 
li^^Hised radio-amaleur operator, up to a 
value limit o4 RsJO,DOD (USSIOOQ) tn a 
lioarvcial yeai. per license, subtecl to cer- 
tain cofKlitions. A red-latter day not only In 
the history ol Indian amaieufs btJt also tor 
hams 'round the world- 

We IrKfian hams do know Ihal we are 
stkort of foreign excnange, (kjI still our 
government values services given by us, 1 
hope I hat ail my brotne^ and sister hams 
w^ll keep up the good standard of ham- 
ming in Iniitia and will not act In any way 
which will make our govern me n| think of 
us in a different way neirt year when the 
new Import policy J a made. 

Amateur radio Is coming up very rapidly 
In India due lo the hard work of our aduca- 
tionaJ groups which are sparing no effort 
In running classes free of any charges for 
amateur radio. In India we have a science 
center in most of the states which have 
enough space ami means to run such 
classes. 

in Bombay we have the well-known 
Neluu Scter%ce Cenler which has run ham 



Classes since April, 1978, and lots of stu- 
dents from tocal schools as well as work^ 
ing and elder people from all classes of 
life have taken advantage ol it. Om of 
them was Commanrder Mody who is 7& 
yeais old and nas just 90tten his license. 
The classes are hetd in Bombay twice a 
tirwk, where I take Morse code and 
VU2MPN taJices ttieofy. II taK«s about 20 
weeks to gei one ready for a Grade 2 axam 
(which is a Novica exam) where the stu- 
dent has to copy Morse code at 5 wpm and 
have a Rtlle knowledge of electronics. 
Once the student gets his Grade 2 license, 
he goes on th« air on CW on all the bands 
and gets some good hams who help him 
to mcrease his Morse spe€fl up to 12 wpm. 
Ttien with a little more theory, he goes for 
his Grade 7 exam. 

There are many active clubs In India 
I ha I take keen interest l:n getting students 
ready for ham exams. To name a few: the 
Amateur Radio Society of India In Delhi, 
the Hadio Electronic Society of lne;lia 
(Bombay), the Bangalore Amateur Radio 
Club, and the Andhra Pradesh Amateur 
Radio Society, 

Indian hams are made up not only of 
OMs. but YLs and XYLs also. They are do- 
ing quite a lot of D)Cinganditbringsa little 
ORM Into the OM life as some OMs have 
to cook their own breakfasts when the 
XVL is having hef shed with another OM. 
iTs also inier^ting' when an OM has a 
bedroom shack and has a OSO with some 
VL aTKf has to answer a question like, 
"WT^l Is this woman doir^9 on ihe air so 
tale in the night? " Ht. The poor XYL mayf 
not be knowirtg Jhiai tlw YL w^th whom her 
OM fs talking is tar away kn W4and and it 
is Oe^C local time! Hi. 

it would be a grand iciea it the YL$/XYL$ 
woutd start a "kitctien nat" and Start 
exchanging good recipes. After the n$i^ 
ttk& YUXYL cou^d run into the kitcfwn to 
iry the new dish and the OM could ofieraie 
on the b^nd without any XYL ORM, 

There are many XYUOM teams oomlng 
up here and some of the famous are 
VU2FC/CP. VU2KT/WW, VU2GI/UGI, 
VU2NNNiN¥U VU2MWMYLp VU2GDGfhiS 
XYUhis daughter, and VU2DVP^CVP. 
These are iust a few, as every day new 
ones are coming up. 

Now slowly our hams are getting mari- 
time mobile licenses, and there are a few 
operating from shipsr VU2K2, VU2UDD, 
VU2HSL VU2LNN, and VU2FMB, and it is 
tunlalking to our own boys from DX land. 

There are very few hams on RTTV — at 
the moment, just two: VU2VIM (OM Vimat) 
and myself. Now that the import is al^ 
lowed, we may find more hams coming up 
on this mode. 

Orf OSCAR there is some work dorw tiy 
one. VU2RM. and he put IrMJia on lt>e map 
of satellite communication. I was also dc^ 
mg my tsesi as AMSAT area coordinator, 
tjut we are rwt able to work OSCAR 10 as 
we are rwt atknved to transmit on 70 ^m, 
but we are now awaiting the license and I 
am sure very soon lr>dlan liams wiiJ be on 
OSCAR tO- 

iasl but not leas I. the permissioti lo ofk- 
erate the VU7 from Lakshdeep came as a 
surprise to all the hams over the world. 
arKi three groups operated for V5 days at a 
lime. The last group led by VU2GDQ did a 
wonderful job and I think now hams 
'round the world have worked VU? on all 
the five bands. 

I am sure with all the encouragement 
given by our government now, India will 
not be a rare station In the world and there 
will not be more complaints that Indian 
hams are bad QSLers as now we have 
another OSL bureau wNch Is run by me on 
behalf of the Federation of Amateur Radio 
Social ies of fndra via Post Box 6$3fi. Borrv 
bay 400026, India. This bureau is giving 
service to each and every ham 'round tfio 



world free of any charges. All expanses 
for running the bureau have twcn covered 
by the Federation for the last 15 years. I 
am real happy when I hear that now hams 
ail over are having no pfodlems In gettirtg 
Indian QSLs; it gives me real pleasure thai 
my wofk tor the last 1 5 years was useful to 
everybody, l am very ttvarikful my Federa^ 
tion has given me cooperation in running 
ir* t^ureau- 




ISRAEL 

Ran Gang 414 MK 

Kitbuti Urim 

N&QBV Mobile Post Office 8$^3Q 

israei 

THEASEHETHAMFiST 

For the past 35 years of Its history, the 
Israel Amateur Radio Club has held only 
one national get-together a year — the an- 
nuaJ general membership assembly of the 
association. Israeli law stipulates that all 
registered nonprofit organizations must 
have one such meeting a year to elect offK 
cers, and the declared purpose of the 
lARC annual assembly was to fulfill the 
letter of the law. 

Over the years, out natiortal association 
has grown from a handful of ttams lo over 
700 membefs. In fact, ihe yearly meetrng 
grew into a tuti-fledged convent ion 
squasf>ed into one evening, h was no 
secret that nvost harr^s came prlmarlfy for 
the social gei-togelher and the raffte of 
donated equipmont, with tfte mrming of 
our organisation l^^ing only an after* 
thought. 

Last year it was decided to delete the 
raffle in order to give more lime to ttve 
open '*politicar' discussion and etaciion 
of the executl!v«. I^Jeedless to say, aiierv 
dance dropped, and a past treasurer pro- 
tested that the c3ub's coffers h&^ lost im- 
portant revenue. Tihe special -even Is con> 
mlttee met, and it was decided to try 
something new— a totally social event, a 
ham lest devoid of club politics, devoted 
entirely to enjoyment! 

Thus, on Tuesday evening^ March 27th, 
we gathered together at the community 
center of Aserei, a rural community hall- 
arvhour's drive south from Tel Aviv, Ama- 
teurs came from as far away as Eilat on 
the Red Sea and the northern Galilee. 
The^e were visjt04's Irom the States, and 
IfK most ex oil c DX was a coy pie Irom Ihe 
Phiti^ipiin^f For us ail it was a great op- 
portunity lo make eyeball contact with 
those wtK) up till then had t»een only 
voices coming forth from the loud- 
speaker. 

Here in Israel no event 1$ complete with- 
out openinrg speeches, but thankfully tfiey 
were short and to the point. Aharon 
4X4 AT, I ARC president. Ofwnetf the pro- 
gram and thanked the various firnrs and 
individuals who donated pnzes for tfve 
draw 4X4GE of Motorola announced that 
his company was giving us space in one 
of their sites for our two-meter RTTY re- 
peater. And the chief officer of the Israel 
Defense Forces' Signal Corps praised the 
lechnical perfectionism of the radio ama- 
teurs and hinted that surplus gear would 
continue to come our way. 

A fine and ample buffet, prepared by 
some of the amateurs and members of 
their families, ensured that no one went 
hungry and left early in search of a restau- 
rant, indeed, of ali the lARC affairs I ever 
aiiended, Ihia one had the best food! A 
prograjm of entertainment with audience 
partici|ration took placfi. allftough youf 



scribe must confess that he took advan- 
tage of this time to meet with more hams. 

ITie closing event was Ihe long -awaited 
raffle During the course of the evening, 
several volunteers had been going around 
hawliing ilcKets at the shekel equivaiefit 
of a dollaF fifty each. Our treasurer an- 
nounced that we were now approximately 
two rtXKJsand dollars richw (or pQOim, 4q- 
pending on how you loolc at it>. 

Prizes ranged from swr and power me- 
ters, mobile antennas, surplus "junk,^ 
And lest equipment to a brand-new iyrut 
personal compuier. Thefe also were pack- 
ages of cosmetics and artistic items for 
the ladies, and one gaudy statuette of a 
mermarid which was dut^bed by Yankeie 
4X4 AH, presiding over the draw^ as an 
original microphone standi Tickets con- 
tinued to be pulled out ot the bin, and a 
few "winners ■ tailed lo come forward to 
claim their t>oat'anchor Motorola D43GGV 
VHF transceivers which tesa than a de- 
cade ago were the mainstay of two meters 
In Israel. 

The tension rose lo lis peak as ihe win- 
ning ticket was drawn for the microcom- 
puter I later learned that our lucky winner 
had bought no fewer than twenty-five tick- 
ets and had picked up a few other prizes in 
the process! 

After saying good night to ea<:h otfier 
and thanking the organizers of tfie eve- 
ning, we headed for the parking lot and be- 
gan making our way bacii; to our respec- 
tive locations. No doul^t, the Aseret 
hartifest had been an ovefwhelming suc- 
cess. Vi dually all agreed thai thefe's no 
need to wait a whole yeat before doirvg it 
a^aln. Now, what remains to be seen* 
after all this, is what wtll tie the nature of 
the upcoming general assembly of tho 
lAftC membership! 




ITALY 

Gianc^rfo Msnetti l&XKR 
i/ia Bevigfrani, 18 
00 1 62 Rome 
itaty 

One of the most enchanting tourist re- 
sorts in Sicily, the small town ol Cefalu lo- 
cated near Palermo, hosted this year, 
April B-13, the International Art^teur 
Radio Region I Conference. 

The honorary and practical task of orga- 
nizing the event was undertaKen by Asso- 
ciazione Radloamalori tialiani (ABI), and 
m^any important administraiive and gov- 
emmeni agencies, recognizir^ the impor- 
tance of amateur radio, save their effec- 
tive aid. Amon^ them were (tie Sicily re- 
gior^l gavefmT>enl, ifbe official tourist 
ag^wies of PaierriKj. Trapani, iDef alu, Ter- 
mm» Imeresa. and Castefvef rarx), and the 
Bank of Sicily arxJ Fiat- 

Tfie special pre! i* IT84 was issued lo aff 
Sicilian tiam stations. 3r>d during tfie corv 
ference the ARI oflicial station worKed 
from Cefalu with iha call iPaiARU 

The meetings were held at the Hotel 
Club Costa Verde, a big and fulurlstic holi- 
day center which hosted aiso the dele- 
gates of the Region t associations and all 
Ihe guests attending the conference. 

It Is very important 10 note that such an 
important conference look piece In itaiy, a 
country where amateur radio recently suf- 
fered heavy attacks, as the readers al- 
ready know. ARI and the ass^oclated 
groups promoted widespread publicity 
Istate television, RAi, transmitted a spot 
on the event m the Telegiornale, the most 
popular news transmission) ar>d obtained 
attendance by the Republic President^ 



S8 73 Magazine • August, 1984 









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73 Magazine • August, 1964 59 



Pert mi. and by the Mtnt^tero Fo^te e Tels- 
comunicuioni (IMFf). th<e very same icrile- 
cofTimunicaMon^ ad mi fi is t rat ion whic^ 
had boen accused of b^lfyg an enemy of 
amatmjT radUo! 

Mofieovier. ttie Highest officials of (tie 
MPTh In thre persoris of the General Man- 
ager, Or. Monaco, and I he Central Dii'ecior 
of the Radio Services, Dr. D'Amore^ a,t- 
ti^nded the opening and declared official- 
ly the Italian govern n;ent's goodwill (o- 
ward the Amateur Radio Sefvice. 

At iht conference was an important 
group of observers including tt% lARU 
presibetit, WIRO, tfie ARRL presLdent. 
W4RA. and ttte JARL pr&sident arvd secre- 
tary who represented lARU Region 3. Fof 
tfie first time in amateur-radio history, 
three European Ministries of Teiecommu- 
J nicatlona, West Germany, the Nether- 
lands, and Italy, had their technical ob* 
server? oftJcially attend tng the con- 
ference 

All I his represents a further step atieftd 
ifi the itampaign of the amateur commyn^ 
ty to support the lARU witH the pnmafy 
intent of prornoiing our acttvtties and de- 
lending our interests against tfw ir^reas- 
ing appetites of othar services. The pres- 
ence o! three official itate observers, 
moreover, Is evidence of an increased 
concern of the states as tar as the cuttur- 
al, tectinical, and social Importance of our 
service is concerned, 

BeyofKt the technical conctusions of 
thie conference. It ts parajnount to Xifvjm* 
line ttu potitical importance pf the atxive- 
noted presences of of f ictats. it means that 
radio amateurs have obtair>ed respect 
ability and fair contractual power for dis- 
cussing problems and needs end sustain- 
ing their rights and privileges. This power 
shall be enhanced with the good behavior 
of every one of us. operating our own 
radios, working for technical progress 
and for the social weKaret and suppoftin§ 
OUT associations. In lact, "association" 
meajts union of e^orts arx) ttius m^nB 
power. 

At the conference *ere present 32 asso- 
ciations— Atgeria, Andorra, Austria, Bel- 
gium. Czechoslovakia. Denmark. Finland, 
France. West Germany, East Germany , 
Jordan, United Kingdom, Ireland, Israel, 
Italy, Liberia, Luxemburg, Malta, Monaco, 
Nigeria. Norway, the Netherlands. Oman, 
Poland. S, Manno, Sierra Leone, Spain, 
South Africa, Sweden, Sv'itzerland, 
Hur^ary. and the USSR- Bahrain^ Zlm- 
bh^^iwe. and DjitK>uti sent prpitles. 

The tecnnicai work was carried out by 
three committees , A, B, And C, whi^cti 
issued at the end their recommendations, 
which will become official law for tt>e self- 
governing amaleicrs In the lARU Region 1, 
Argumenta with fhese recommendations 
are many^ and I wiH try to recall only some 
of them. 

Among the mc^t important are the in- 
ternational l:keacon proiect. radio direc- 
tiorvfinding actrw4ly, the promotion of ama- 
teif rado m t te B ic | i fcig oourtrioSv a oomm o n 
tioense pfojeci, piracy on amateur tsand^, 
standardizing of QSL cards, special call- 
Bsgns and fecommendation to limJl their 
use, FHTY, AMTOR, and ASCII, tiandplans, 
satellites, arvd 432-MHz repeaters' standard 
frequencies, 

At the time of writing these lines, the sil- 
uatkxi tmsn't dianged much recently. The 
MPT has released tfie IGOhmefer band frorri 
1.^0 (o 1.^0 kHz (100 W out maximums 
wnd the li«o hioher new WARC bar^ds and 
has g#v«n authorization lo use 10 Watts on 
t44 MHz af¥J up for mobile use No roaolU' 
lion yet of the oltier controversial points: 
3.5'MHz band, 10-MHz band, and the 
repeaters. Ail hough ihe Post and Telecom- 
municatlons Ministry has clearly 
demonstrated a much softer position 
toward amateurs' problems. It S6eni>s at 




Some conference otservers: from the rights the JARL pFesidenf, the AR^L pfesident, the 
setrBfary, R&gion 2 {Cofombia}. th& JARL secmtdfy. an^ th^ ARi presfdenl 



present lo be unable to move further. 
Sureaucratic obstacles seem to t>e strong- 
er than the poitlticai will It should also be 
coTisidered thiat when the old taw ruling 
rac^ a^nateurs was i&sued. thai taw ruled 
tightty many tedmjcai areas wtitch, wti^ 
updated, become quickly "illegal." So. as a 
taw can t:>e fnodifjed only tyy anottier law 
and due lo the fact ttiat in Italy a law often 
takes twenty or thirty years lo be issued^ 
the IVTPT Is faced with the problem of satis- 
fying the needs of amateurs by twisting 
amendments between the law lines. 

In particular, as far as the repeater oper- 
ation is concerned, the MPT cKHJefStarxIs 
that it is foolish to tort^d a hind of operation 
wtiic^ is of paramount impoftance in c^m 
of emergency, but bureaucracy says tttat 
any fcrnd of repeater should pay a con- 
siderable annual tax (as a substitute for a 
land line}; tt>e tax amounts to some ttiou 
sandfi of buckfi per year— well beyond the 
ham's possibilities. 

On the 3.S-MHZ band problem. It appears 
clear that the MFT has already assigned 
parts arKl chanr^s to other govefnment 
agencies and &eems ur^ab^e to cancel 
th@e allocations without loslrtg face; it bf^ 
fers to amateurs only 100 kHz. The 
amatftfTS oppose that mutilation of a band 
assigned to their service by rru. On the 
same principles, fhre MPT offefs amateurs 
only 10 kHz of the new 10-MKz WARC band, 
stating ihet on that band our sendee is only 
secondary and that In any case they should 
have the OK from the Defense Ministry. 
This reinforces ttw opinion I hat In the 
period when amateurs were negiectedr the 
MPT let tt^ milita/y take the lion's part on 
iNs t»nd and now tt^ey are tmabfie to turn 
bade 




UBERIA 

Brothef Donate Stettes, CS,a 

£l2AUWBaHfY 

Brothers of the Holy Cross 

Sf, Pafrick High Schooi 

PO Box "iOQS 

Monrovia 

HepubUc of Uberfs 

Two hundred twenty-five Inches of rain! 
That is a lot of rain for one year. 



It does not rain In January or February, 
but It gets very hot and then there Is the 
Harmatan. The Harmatan is an atrno- 
sphere of fine dust that blows across U- 
beria from tl^ Satmra (3eserL It clouds the 
sky to an altityde of over forty thOiJsand 
leet« and here on Earth It cowms evefy- 
thing inside the house and out, I draped a 
heavy cfolh over my radio equiprnent, but 
It did not escape. The dust did lis |ob^ It 
got into evBfylhlng. 

Here along the ocean (Monrovia Is situ- 
ated right on the shore of the Atlantic), we 
have salt spray all the time, but dunng the 
Harmatan season, the salt spiay mixes 
with the dust and makes a grimy coating 
Ifiat covers a^ antennas, ground tiroes. 
coajt cables, arid anything «dse tfiat is ex- 
posed to Ihe Oulsid<e air. Wtien you turn cm 
your radio, yoii find that the swr is up ar?d 
Ihe tine noises are at a level that will curl 
/our hair. I have a fourteen thousand-volt 
power line passing about a hundred yards 
behind my TA-33 when it Is pointed toward 
the States. The line noises go up to S8 and 
S9. i am not completety sure whether the 
blame should go to ttie salt spray-Hajma- 
tan combination or to ttie powef line- 
Chances are that i\ is a combination of 
tx>th. In any case, I do know (hat in Marcti. 
when ftie rains begin, ttie trying^ crackling 
noises go to zero- 

Here In this part of Liberia we are de- 
pendent on hydroelectric generators for a 
great part of our power. As the dry season 
gets under way, the first thing we know 
the gates have to be closed to conserve 
water for the city sup|>ly; then the electri- 
cal power has to be ratior^ed We can use 
candles for li(^t, Iwit they will not powef 
the radio, so we ghef-stricken amateurs 
have another headaot^e, A few of thie sta- 
tions operate on tialtery power, but that is 
another area that tias its troubles. 

The ionosphere has to get Into the act, 
toe. At least so it seems. During February I 
missed all my scheduEes. When there was 
power, the bands were so dead that one 
was lucky if he heard even one Brazilian 
statioriL Brazil has a direct line into West 
Africa. They are always tf>ere with signal 
strength that can ovetilde anything. Once 
in a while a siat^ort from Engtand or Swe^ 
den will squeak througti, but ttve United 
States rnight just as watt not exist. I 
seldom operate at night, which here in U^ 
beria would mean after seventeen or eigh- 
teen hundred Zulu, It may tie that the night 
people working twenty meters fare better. 
Really, I don't think they fare much bettef. 



Socneiimes we get one or two tveavy 
rains In March The antennas get washed, 
the air becomes ctear {one can actually 
see the shape of the sun), and If ttie iono- 
sphere is there, the radio cofnos to life and 
one can communicate, tn March, however, 
the respite is brief. The month Is dry for 
Ihe most part, in April it rains a little more. 
There will t>e an average accumulation of 
eleven inches. The electric company turns 
on one of its turbines and the antennas 
Stay clean a bit lor>gef . tn May it gets down 
to serious raining and will run an averSigQ 
ol twerrty-fhrtt Inches. 

Ptease umlefstand that all this is hap- 
pening tn Monrovia. Twenty ^five mites out 
of the city in any direction, or even less 
than that, this whole situation would 
change. There would be no salt spray, the 
rainfall could be drastically different, and 
there might be no electric power at all. 

In the data that t have gathered over a 
bit more ttian three years, June takes the 
cake. My records show an average of fifty 
inches for the month of June! July, 
August^ and Septemtier will run ftt)Out thir« 
ty trtcttes each, and then the rains drop off 
with October (twenty Inctiesl and Septem- 
ber ^fifteen). December is dry. It might ac- 
cidentally rain in December, but It must be 
listed as a dry month- 

i have found It very interesting Lo oth 
serve these happenings. White this can In 
no way pretend to t>e sctentific. it has 
tieen fun to compile data, make charts, 
and compare records, i have no natabte 
observations CDnC€Hm^r>g radio communi- 
cation durir^ the times thai the rains are 
very heavy, tt is true that there are fre- 
quent periods of cle^r air and sunshine. It 
seldom rains continuously for more than a 
day. For the most part, radio Communica- 
tion is good and the amateurs walk 
around with smiles on their faces. Even 
people who are not amateurs smile. They 
like the rainy s^ison, too. It is cooler. 



^t^ 



NEW ZEALAND 

D. J. {Des} Chapman ZL2VR 
459 Kennedy Road 

NmrZo^and 

SCHIfKLAND FLOOD OlSASTEfl 

January In ZL-fand is tt>e middle of sunv- 
mer, Wednesday, Januai^ 25, was a fine 
hPt day In Invercargill, the southernmost 
city In New Zealand, and all was well In 
the first week back at work after the sum- 
mer holidays. The rain started at mid- 
night, and on Thursday nwrnlng it was 
stilt raininf^ Notfiing very unusual about 



What was unusual was lhii( the rain 
was to continue without slac^Kening 
throughout the day. By 2100 hours NZST 
Thursday night, the Fire Service was in- 
votved In pumping water from flooded 
buildings and streets were being dosed 
because of rising water levels, but so far 
the creeks and rivers were still within their 
banks. The flooding at that time was 
caused by an overloaded stormwater 
system. At 2315 it was still rainir^. and it 
seemed likely that those involved with Irv 
vercargHI's Emergency Services would 
not get a full night's steep. 

At about 0315 flours, Friday tf»e 27th, 
the AREC (Amateur Radio Emergency 
Corps} and Civil Defense Communica- 
lions Leeder, Neville Ghee Rett s ZL40K, 
was summoned to CD HQ because a dec- 

Corrf rnoed on pag» t06 



00 73 Magazine • August. 1964 




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73 Magazine • August, 1 984 61 



Norman I Sternberg WliUP 
279 Ad'tmndack Drive 
farmingvilh NY 11738 



AMTOR How-To 

FEC?ARQ? Don \ panic. Timely advice from the 
father of AMTOR takes the confusion out of our newest mode. 



The following text k from 
a fetter to W2fUP from Peter 
Martinez C3PLX, dated 
9/24/83, on the subject of 
AMTOR operating practices. 
This information is repro- 
duced by express permission 
of the author and is offered 
as a guide to AMTOR oper- 
ating rules, as suggested by 
the one man most responsi- 
ble for bringing AMTOR into 
the amateur-fadio fraternfty. 
Newcomers to the AMTOR 
mode are invited to give se- 
rious consideration to the 
ideas presented here and to 
add these sections to what- 
ever AMTOR equipment op^ 
erating manuals they may 
have. 



Here are some thoughts 
on the subject of oper- 
ating rules, etc, for AMTOR. 
They are in no particular 
order and are written down 
exactly as they occurred to 
me as I sat in front of the 
typewriter. They represent 
aspects of AMTOR operat- 
ing that have given rise to 
problems so far over here 
and some {the hot QSY tech- 
nique) which have been in= 
vented to complement the 
advantages of AMTOR, 

1. Legalities 

Establish before operat- 
ing whether you are autho- 
rized to do so. Most countries 

62 73 Magazine • August, 1984 



where there is currently 

AMTOR activity permit it by 
general license regulations. 
Some countries require the 
licensee to apply for a spe- 
cial permit. Some countries 
do not permit AMTOR In 
others, stations are active. 

2, Getting Started 

The most popufar AMTOR 
mode is ARQ, since it is the 
most effective. However, do 
not attempt to make the first 
QSOs on ARQ until FEC has 
been tested and is known to 
be working. If there is a fault 
in part of the system, no 
contact will result on ARQ 
at alL whereas at least if one 
direction (transmit or re- 
ceive) is working, faults can 
be identified and cured with 
contact in FEC. The follow- 
ing step-by-step procedure 
will assist in finding faults 
during commission of a new 
AMTOR station. 
21. Check FEC receive first, 
with a known distant station 
sending in the correct shift- 
polarity. This will confirm 
that the station receiver is 
working and in the correct 
shift-polarity. 

2.2. Check FEC transmit 
next asking a distant receiv- 
ing station to confirm that 
the transmit shift-polarity is 
correct 

23. Make a short transmis^ 
sion with an ARQ call, ask- 
ing the distant station to use 



"listen'' or "monitor" mode 
to check that the transmitter 
keying is functioning cor- 
rectly. The most common 
fault at this stage is a too^ 
slow changeover from re- 
ceive to transmit resulting 
in missing transmitted data 
at the start of the burst. 
Some AMTOR units have a 
delay adjust which may al- 
low slow transmitters to be 
used successfully except for 
very long distance contacts. 
Some remedial work may be 
required on the radio if this 
test fails. 

2.4. If 23 is successful, ask 

the distant station to make 
an ARQ call to your selcal. 

Your station should respond 
and an ARQ contact should 
result. 

2.5. Finally, make an ARQ 
call to the distant station 
and attempt an ARQ contact 
with your station as master 
rather than, as in 2.1, as a 
slave. 

If no contact results yet 
the distant station indicates 
that he was replying to the 
call, then the problem is that 
the radio is too slow to 
change from transmit to re- 
ceive. Remedial work may 
be required to correct this: 
No adjustment to the "delay" 
preset in the AMTOR unit, if 
fitted, will cure this prob- 
lem Consult the supplier of 
your radio if remedial work 



is needed. It is important to 
follow these steps in order. 
Unnecessary confusion, 
frustration, and interference 
can result from a premature 
attempt to start an ARQ 
contact where the complete 
contact cannot be made un- 
til al! the component parts 
are working correctly. 

3. Operating Techniques 

AMTOR is sufficiently dif- 
ferent from other modes 
that some of the operating 
practices traditionally used 
on the air are no longer a|> 
propriate, and some new 
techniques peculiar to ! 
AMTOR need explaining. 
3.1 FEC and ARQ. When to' , 
use them. ARQ is well 
known to be the better of \ 
the two, but there are sev- 
eral situations where FEC 
has its advantages and some 
where its use is essential 

3.1.1. Use ARQ for all two- 
way contacts. 

3.1.2. Use FEC for all multi- 
way contacts. 

3.1.3. Do not use ARQ for 
CQ calls. There are several 
reasons for this: 

3.13.1. Listeners cannot 
identify the calling station in 
an ARQ CQ call. Thus, they 
either must risk replying to a 
station with whom contact 
was not desirable or suffer 
the embarrassment of hav- 
ing to terminate a contact if, 
for example, it turns out to 



be the station you have just 
worked. 

3.1 3.2, If a contact which re^ 
suited from a CQ call on 
ARQ subsequently runs into 
a rephrase attempt, the re- 
sultant CQ call from the 
master station may attract a 
completely new reply from 
a third station, thus resulting 
in this new station "stealing" 
the contact 

3,1.4, FEC will have to be 
used if the distance between 
the two stations is longer 
than about 22,000 miles, 
such as in "long-path" con- 
tacts which travel more than 
halfway round the globe or 
some high-orbit satellite 
contacts. Make sure you 
know in advance if the path 
you are attempting is in this 
category, and do not at- 
tempt ARQ under these corv 
ditions; It is very frustrating 
to be called on ARQ when it 
is known that the path is too 
long and very difficult to at- 
tract the attention of the 
caller to the problem. 
3.2, Starting an AMTOR 
QSO, 

There is no need to ex- 
plain how to start an FEC 
QSO since the technique is 
identical to that of other 
modes. However, since in 
ARQ mode it is necessary to 
know the other station's 
selcal code before calling 
him, a new technique must 
sometimes be required 
321 If the other station's 
selcal code is already 
known, as in the case of a 
''sked/' then there is no 
problem. Simply enter the 
required selcal code to the 
AMTOR unit and if /when 
the desired station is on fre- 
quency, he will reply and 
the contact can proceed. 
3.2.2. If tail-ending on a pre- 
vious contact and the inten- 
tion is to call one station on 
ARQ and his selcal code is 
not known, then there are 
two ways to proceed: 

3.2.2,1. There is a converr- 
tion in operating amongst 

AMTOR operators with re- 
spect to the way to choose 
the station selcal code from 
the station callsign This is to 



choose the first tetter of the 
callsign followed by the last 
three letters, ignoring com- 
pletely any figures. In the 
case of a callsign with only 
three letters altogether, the 
first letter is repeated twice. 
This ruse breaks down for 
callsigns in which the prefbc 
contains figures. However, if 
the callsign of the desired 
station can be translated 
into a selcal code in this 
way, then use the selcal 
code to call hrm after he 
signs off with the station he 
is working. 

3.2,2.2. tf his callsign cannot 
be encoded in the above 
way or his callsign is now 
known or he does not re- 
spond to the expected selcal 
code, then call him in FEC 
mode, giving him the choice 
of calling you back on your 
selcal code or asking him to 
tell you what selcal code he 
is using. Note that some sta- 
tions who may be using 
commercial SITOR-type 
units may not always be 
able to make ARQ calls to 
all possible combinations of 
letters in a selcal and thus 
may require that you call 
them, often with a selcal 
code that beards no relation- 
ship to their callsign, being 
in fact a translation from a 
telex number associated 
with the commercial equips 

ment, 

3,2J, To make a CQ call to 

start an AMTOR QSO, do so 
on FEC mode, mentioning 
your own selcal code so that 
at the end of your call, a pro- 
spective QSO partner can 
call you back directly with 
your selcal. If you are ex- 
pecting replies only on FEC 
[for example, for contacts 
via a long path), mention 
this fact in the CQ call 
33. Operating techniques 
whilst in contact in FEC. 

Whilst operation in FEC is 
very similar indeed to that 
of conventional RTTY, there 
are two points to note, how- 
ever, both related to the 
method by which the FEC re- 
ceiver synchronizes the dis- 
tant transmitter: 
33.1. Since the receiver can 
only synchronize to the tran^ 



mitter when it is not sending 
traffic (that is, idling), each 
transmission must start with 
a period of idling Most 
AMTOR units will ensure 
that a short period of idle 
precedes the typed mes- 
sage, but under poor condi- 
tions or where it may help 
the distant receiving station 
to tune in, extra periods of 
idle will help, both at the 
beginning of the transmis- 
sion and also at periods dur- 
ing the transmission, in case 
interference may have re- 
sulted in the distant receiver 
losing synchronization. 

Note that the practice 

common on conventional 
RTTY of transmitting a line 
of test message or RYRYRY 
to allow the distant station 
to tune in is actually coun- 
terproductive on FEC, since 
the distant receiver wilt not 
synchronize until the end of 
this test sequence and the 
idle signal itself is quite suit- 
able for tuning purposes. 
33.2. Some commercial 
SiTOR-type units require a 
received FEC transmission 
to start with a carriage re- 
turn and/or a line-feed sig- 
nal For this reason, and also 
to aid the formatting of any 
distant printer copy, always 
start an FEC transmission on 
a new line, 

3.4. Operating techniques 
on ARQ mode. 
3.4.1. Transmitter and re- 
ceiver tuning. 

An ARQ contact always 
starts with the master sta- 
tion making the initial call 
and the slave replying. Thus 
the frequency will have 
been chosen by the master 
station, and the slave station 
will have "netted" onto that 
It often happens that an off- 
set at either station wilt then 
result in the signal from the 
slave received at the master 
being a bit off tune. If the 
master station then read- 
justs his transceiver's main 
tuning dial to remedy this er- 
ror, he will also offset his 
transmitter, probably put- 
ting his signal off tune in the 
distant slave's receiver. A 
never-ending series of read- 



justments can then take 
place. 

The equivalent problem 
on other modes rarely 
causes trouble since the re- 
tune operations only take 
place each time the trans- 
mission is passed from one 
station to the other. How- 
ever, with the ''quick- 
break" operation of ARQ, 
such offsets can cause 
trouble. Thus a convention 
has been adopted among 
AMTOR operators to pre- 
vent this situation arising. 
This convention is that the 
master station must at all 
times keep his transmitter 
frequency constant Thus if 
the master finds that the 
slave signal is not correctly 
tuned, he must adjust only 
his receiver frequency to 
remove the error, leaving 
hts transmitter frequency 
untouched, by the use of 
the RIT control on the 
transceiver The slave sta- 
tion, on the other hand, 
may, if he finds his receiver 
off tune, make a correction 
by adjusting both receiver 
and transmitter frequen- 
cies together by means of 
the main tuning dial. This 
convention prevents any 
offset from accumulating 
and is the frequency-do- 
main analogue to the time- 
domain synchronization in 
which the master-station 
clock determines the phas- 
ing for the contact 
3.4.2. Changing frequency 
during an ARQ QSO. 

Since both stations are 
"listening through/' if there 
is some interference on the 
frequency or if a change of 
frequency is desirable for 
some other reason (for ex- 
ample, to clear a calling fre- 
quency), then both stations 
may wish to move together 
to another frequency. Whilst 
at first there may seem to be 
no reason to discuss such a 
simple operation, which is 
very common and easy to 
perform on any other mode, 
there are problems if a QSY 
is made in some ways in 
ARQ, and there are advan- 
tages in adopting a specific 
technique. 

73 Magazine • August, 1984 63 



3.4 2.1. The easiest way of 

QSYing an ARQ QSO is to 
close down and restart it 
again on a new frequency, 
with the master station 
choosing the new frequen- 
cy. This is referred to in 
AMTOR circles as a '^cofd" 
QSY This technique is the 
preferred one when moving 
off a calling frequency and 
in other conditions where 
there is good copy between 
stations, so that an orderly 
close-down and start-up is 
anticipated 

34.2.2. If, however, the QSY 
is desired because of inter* 
ference, then another tech- 
nique is possible; if can"ied 
out in the right way, it can 
have decided advantages, 
but if carried out wrongly, it 
can cause problems and of- 
fense to other band users. 
This is referred to as the 
"hot" QSY technique. 

In this, the master station, 
while in the rephasing mode, 
moves off the old frequency 
to the new one, and the 
slave then follows. 

It is important while the 
master station is doing this, 
for him to prevent his trans- 
mitter from radiating in or- 
der to prevent unintentional 
interference to other band 
users and also to disable the 
connection between the re* 
ceiver and the AMTOR (in 
order to prevent uninten- 
tional "phantom sync" to 
any other ARQ signals 
which may be audible dur- 
ing the search for a new fre- 
quency). Such phantom 
sync will result in spillage of 
traffic from the QSO in pro- 
gress, from the other QSO, 
or both. It can only be the 
master station that leads in 
a hot QSY If the slave sta- 
tion were to attempt to lead 
a QSY, then, in the event 
that it was not successfully 
completed before the con- 
tact timed-out into a re- 
phase operation, the slave 
would no longer be trans- 
mitting, and there would be 
no way for the slave to 
establish a new frequency 
without restarting as a 
master and thus losing some 
traffic. 

64 73 Magazine * August, 1984 



3.43, Fixed-channel work- 
ing. 

Since it is possible to 
leave an AMTOR station in 
"standby" mode on a chan- 
nel and for any other station 
to make a specific call to 
that station, a common 
practice in AMTOR is to 
monitor such a specific fre- 
quency The question arises 
as to what exactly is the "f re- 
quency" of an AMTOR 
emission. There are, unfor- 
tunately, two different con- 
ventions in use; one more 
commonly used in amateur 
circles, and the other used 
universally by all non-ama- 
teur users. 

3.43.1. The "amateur" con- 
vention says that an AMTOR 
signal (and indeed any FSK 
signal) is specified with 
reference to the frequency 
of the higher frequency tone 
in the pair Thus, if a sked, 
for example, is prearranged 
to occur on 14,075 kHz, this 
is taken to mean that the 
two transmitted tones are 
on 14,075.00 and 14,074.83 
kHz, 

3 A3, 2. The "commerciar' 
convention, also used in- 
creasingly by amateurs, says 
that the signal is specified 
with respect to the frequency 
of the imaginary center 
channel. Thus a signal said 
to be on 21,100 kHz will have 
one tone on 21,099.915 kHz 
and the other on 21,100.085 
kHZp that is, 85 Hz either 
side of the nominal, rather 
than with one tone on and 
the other tone 170 Hz below 
the nominal. Note that it is 
assumed that the frequency 
shift is universally accepted 
to be 170 Hz, 

Thus, in any specification 
of a "frequency" in connec- 
tion with AMTOR working, 
due regard must be taken of 
the convention intended, at 
least until such time as one of 
these conventions is dropped 
fn favor of the other. 

Another factor is signifi- 
cant with respect to setting 
frequencies on the dials of 
SSB transceivers used on 
AMTOR with audio-freqency 
shift tones used. Since the 
tones will result in transmis- 



sions offset from the sup- 
pressed carrier frequency, 

the dial, which nomially ir^ 
dicates the suppressed car- 
rier frequency, will not read 
correctly. It will be neces- 
sary to add or subtract a fixed 
amount to the dial fre- 
quency in order to establish 
the actual frequency in use- 
For example, if the trans- 
ceiver is in use on lower 
sideband, with audio-tone 
frequencies of 2125 and 
2295 Hz, then, to operate on 
an "amateur" frequency of 
14,075, the transceiver dial 
must be set to 14,077.125, 
that is, 2,125 kHz higher 
than the desired freqency. 
The two radiated tones will 
then be on 14,077.125- 
2.125 (14.075) and 14,077.125 
-2J95 (14,074.83). Other 
offsets must be used if a 
"commercial" channel is to 
be set up {2.210 kHz), and 
the offset will be in the other 
direction if upper sideband 
is to be used in the trans- 
ceiver. The offset must be 
recalculated if the tone fre- 
quencies are different from 
those quoted. 

Users of transceivers with 
an FSK connection must 
consult the transceiver 
handbook or supplier to es- 
tablish if an offset has to be 
applied to the dial frequency. 
Even if the transceiver sup- 
plier indicates that no offset 
is needed, it will be neces- 
sary to establish if the "ama- 
teur^' or "commercial" con- 
vention is implied or some 
other convention, 
3.4.4. Use of the "over^' or 
"break-tn'' facility. 

In ARQ mode, it is possi- 
ble, by use of the "over'' or 
"break-in" facility, to inter- 
rupt the sending of the other 
station. This facility should 
be used with care and only 
in situations where it is es- 
sential to do so The reason 
is that there are inherent 
reasons why recovery from 
such an interruption can 
result in garbled copy at one 
end of the contact, in parti- 
cular in "figs" garble. If pos- 
sible, wait until the other 
station is idling before 
breaking in, and if the other 



station breaks into your 

transmission, it will prob- 
ably help to use the 'clear 
buffer" facility: if such ex- 
ists, to abort the later trans- 
mission of any unsent text 
which would he inappropri- 
ate to the new context of the 
break in. 

3.4.5, The AMTOR alphabet 
like the RTTY alphabet, con- 
sists of two sets of 30 char* 
acters, with a switch made 
between them by two "shift" 
or ''case" codes. One inher- 
ent result of this technique 
is that it is often not known 
which shift the distant re- 
ceiving station is in at the 
commencement of the con- 
tact For this reason, it is 
always good practice to 
send the appropriate shift 
code at the start of each 
contact, and indeed, at the 
start of each message and 
perhaps at more frequent in- 
tervals. With terminals en- 
coded in teleprinter code, 
there are always two keys, 
labeled "letter" and "fig- 
ures/' and so it is simply 
necessary to hit the appro- 
priate one of these keys a^ 
required. 

However, on more mod- 
ern terminals, these two 
keys may not exist, and the 
sending of the shift code 
may be hidden from the 
user. However, since the dis- 
tant terminal could still 
nevertheless be in the wrong 
shift, there wilt always be 
the requirement to send the 
shift code at the start to pre- 
vent the distant receiver 
copying the first part of the 
text in the wrong shift Co^^ 
suit the documentation with 
your AMTOR unit or ter- 
minal in order to establish 
how to do this if there is no 
"letter" or ^'figures" key. 

4. Formal of Selcal Code 

Although the convention 
is to form the selcal from the 
callsjgn, some AMTOR units 
have the possibility to in- 
clude any AMTOR charac* 
ter in the selcal. It is strongly 
recommended, however, 
that only the 26 letters A-Z 
are used in selcal codes. ■ 



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Se& List of Adv^ftfs^fs on p^ge 98 



73 Magazine • August, 19S4 65 



Bill Smnh K3LF 

RD 2, Cold Spring O^mery Rd 

Doyiestown PA 18901 



Picture-Perfect Audio Filters 

Throw away that antique breadboard and scope. 
Let your Apple II peak and tweak a soft circuit instead. 



Active audio filters are 
amazing devices. They 
seem to be incredibly pow- 
erful yet wonderfully sinv 
pfe. I have marveled often 
at the way a handful of com- 
ponents can seemingly work 
magic on audio signals. Best 
of all, they can be an easy 
home-brew project 

Anyone who decides to 
design and build one of 
these gems will find a major 



stumbling block, however. It 
is very difficult to determine 
the taie frequency response 
of the filters. In the past, I 
have used two methods to 
plot the response curve for 
my designs. One method 
was to use a calculator to 
work my way through some 
horrendous transfer func- 
tions and then graph the re- 
sults. In order to get a useful 
graph, you must do the cal- 



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BhND PASS - 4TH ORDER 



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culations for twenty or thirty 
frequency values. This meth- 
od is an excellent way to 
wipe out several evenings or 
a weekend. 

A second method is to 
breadboard the design and 
then go to work wfth a signal 
generator, oscilloscope, and 
graph paper While this 
method is less tedious, it has 
many of its own problems, 
such as the accuracy of the 



test equipment and compo- 
nents used in the circuit 
Now there is a third alterna- 
tive for finding the frequen- 
cy response of active filters. 
If you have access to an Ap- 
ple II computer, you can use 
the program described in 
this article- 

The program I wrote gen- 
erates a graph of the fre- 
quency response of your 
own custom filter designs. 



-^lUDE 



6 DE 

-10DB 



"20DB 



-30DB 



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Fig, 1. Typical curve generated by the program. This is a twch 
section bandpass filter. The graph center frequency is 800 Hz 
and this was plotted in the wide mode. 

i6 73 Magazine • August, 1984 



Fig, 2. The same graph as Fig. I but plotted in the narrow 
mode so that the central area can be examined. Note the 
horizontal frequency scale as compared to Fig. 1. 



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EhND PASS - 4TH ORDER 



Shapefile. 



You input the cutoff fre- 
quency and Q of your de- 
sign, and within seconds you 
get a graph for that exact fil- 
ter. The graph shows the 
decibels of rejection as a 
function of frequency. The 
program can combine up to 
four cascaded filters and 
may be used for low-pass, 
bandpass, and high-pass de- 
signs. There are several 
other options that help 
make this a very powerful 



tool for those who enjoy 
tinkering with active fitters. 

The program uses the two 
HIRES screens in the Apple 
for the actual graphs. When 
you mn the program, you will 
be presented with a menu 
where you select the type 
of filter in which you are 
interested (low-pass, band- 
pass, or high-pass) Next, you 
select the number of sec- 
tions in your filter and then 
proceed to a data-input 



DB 



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fig J. The same graph as Fig. 1 but with a second filter curve 
plotted over the first using the overlay feature. The second 
^aph is the same as the first with an additional section added 
to steepen the skirts and smooth the passband. 



screen. This data-input screen 
is where you enter the vari- 
ous filter parameters for 
your filter and also select 
several graphing options. 
First you enter the center 
frequency, which ts the 
frequency on which you 
want the graph centered. 
Next you enter your filter's 
cutoff or center frequency 
and then its Q factor. If you 
are using a three-section fil- 
ter, you enter the cutoff fre- 
quency and Q for each filter 
section. 

After the filter informa- 
tion is entered, you are given 
several graphing options. 
First you select either a wide- 
or a narrow-frequency scale 



for the graph. The wide 
scale will generate a graph 
starting at 1/5th of the cen- 
ter frequency and ending at 
5 times the center frequen- 
cy. The narrow scale runs 
from half the center fre- 
quency to double the center 
frequency. As an example, if 
you select a center frequen- 
cy of 1,000 Hz, then the fre- 
quency axis on the graph 
will go from 200 Hz to 5. MX) 
Hz in wide mode and 500 Hz 
to 2000 Hz in the narrow 
mode. In both cases the 
graph will be centered on 
1,000 Hz and wilf be loga- 
rithmic (see Figs, 1 and 2), 

The second option is to 
sefect either HIRES page 1 



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73 MagazirtB • August, 1984 67 



J 



or page 2, The last option 
available is the overlav 
mcxle By selecting the over- 
lay feature, you can have 

your graph plotted over a 
graph already in memory. 
This feature is especially 
useful for comparing two 
different filters (see Fig. 3). 
The third option also allows 
you to review any graphs al- 
ready in memory. Using the 
review function also puts 
you back at the point where 
you select the three graph- 
ing options so that you can 
edit them before plotting 
the graph. 

If you do use the review 
feature, you are presented 
with a new menu which lets 
you choose page 1 or page 2 
simpiy by pushing the 1 or 2 
key. You may toggle back 
and forth between the two 
in order to compare two 
graphs in memory Pushing 
any other key will return you 
to the original menu. The re- 
view feature also is avail- 
able from either of the first 
two menus- 

Once you have opted for 
a new graph or an overlay, 
the program takes over and 
begins the plotting proce- 
dure. If you selected "new 
graph/' then everything on 
the HIRES page you se- 
lected is erased and a new 
coordinate grid is calcu- 
lated and drawn, tf you se- 
lected "'overlay/' then the 
graph will be plotted over 
whatever graph and coordi- 
nate grid that is already in 
memory. 

Next the graph coordi- 
nates are calculated and plot- 
ted, and after the graph is 
drawn, you can return to the 
main menu by pressing any 
key. If you want to change 
the number of points that 
are plotted, then increase 
or decrease the STEP values 
in lines 1010 through 1090. I 
chose values which seem 
to give good tradeoff be- 
tween resolution of the 
graph and amount of time 
to plot the graph. 

A few comments are in 
order concerning the graphs 
that are plotted. The equa- 

60 73 Magazine • August, 19S4 



trons in the program give the 
filter response as a ratio of 
voltages as opposed to cur- 
rent or power. The equa- 
tions also give the theoreti- 
cal response and do not 
allow for errors introduced 
by variations in component 
values or op amp limita- 
tions. As you increase the Q 
and number of sections in a 
filter, these items become 
more critical. 



All of the coordinate grids 
display a range of 80 dB 
which converts to .5 dB for 
each screen pixel which 
seems to be a reasonable 
resolution. You will find that 

the dB scale for the band- 
pass filters is different from 
the low-pass and high-pass. 
This was done to try to fit 
the maximum amount of in- 
formation in the allotted 
room. The bandpass curves 



are set up so that the center 
frequency will always be 
dB and all other points will 
be relative to it 

The low-pass is such that 
frequencies well below the 
cutoff frequency will be at 
dB, High-pass is similar to 
low-pass, only it is fre- 
quencies above the cutoff 
frequency that are at dB. 
This has been done by ad- 



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VI - 0: rm J - I TO QIF 
^ = 40 * i LOG n F 4 + 

+ V: NE)(T 
t - L.O© (I * 501 / A0 * 
IF VI ' 97 THEN Yl » 97 
IF Yl - 59 THEN Yl »= 

MPLOT X , ( Y I + 6S J : »: » 
IF VI a 97 THEN Yl « 0: 
Yj = 0; FOR J = 1 TO 0;F 
V = #0 • { LOG itil / F 

;vj - VI ♦ v: NEJCT 

t - LOG rl » ^0J / ftii ♦ 
97 THEN VI = 97 

- 59 THEN VI =^ - 59 
fVl + 681 :> ^ PEEK < ' 
I3e THEN VI - 0: RETURN 

• i; FDR J * I TO o:f * 
Y • < HUF " 2 - n 
i LOS fVi I / fliS: IF ¥X 
<1 • 30» / A0 • 150 - 

- i^ new VI = - 19 

13B THEN VI = l^Q 

tVl + ZB>:K - PEEK « - IA?3^J 



TO L: E>RAU AST ( HID* IP't,-Kni - 31 AT t^^l\ * 



POKE 
RETURN 



- l*t?97*0: 

- L*»30;j,0: 



poi^e - 1&30 



RETURN 



F * 2) 



I / 
1) 



DCJl 
' -5> ^ 



/ A0: V I ^ V t 



^ - 59 
PEEK I 
I RETURN 

= FF • r 

41 + r to 



PEEK I - l*:^l*?i RETURN 



hi 



F«J>;0 = 

2\ f CF 



2n * n 



5>) / A0 



150 



110 



IF VI 

IF VI 

HP LOT 

IF VI 

VI = 0:v • 

Q ^ OUJJV 

VI = 40 • 

% = LOG 

IF VI ^ 

IF VI 

HPLOT K, 

P = PEEK 



1633A) XV * PEEff f 



16336i: RE TURN 



T 



U 



■I • 



FF • 
/ F» 

fe THEN S - 
J 10:V1 = VI ' 



/ F<JHD 
D 2 + 
vi: 

e 



n 

REFURW 



/ QUI 
,5»: NEXT 



W ' 



PEEK C - t633&J: RETURN 
i: HCOLORa 3: SCAi E« l:PS 



210 
221?' 
?4tH 

270 
260 



y. = t; 
PRINT 
::!32.0j 
HoriE : 



DIM OC5UFf5>; IF F - 96 THEN 22M 

CHR* (4>S"BLaAD FILTER SHAFEF ILE» A»6ii»Ki0'^ 

FOHE 23-3 » 96 

PRINT *'■"■'•■•-' '. #-f-*»#*^iir*+*4nni#»*#-nt 



HRR 



HGR2 



TE)<T 



POKE 



ki 



■ ACTIVE AUDID FIlTEPfSn HTAf* 

PASS — — !•! PRINT 



HTAE U; PRIMT 
VTAB *»: PRINT ' 
VTAB 10; PRINT "LOW 

PRINT -^ftANQ PASS 2": PRlWt 

PRINT *-Mj©H ' " --^^^ 3-: PRINT 

PRINT ^E^tAHlJ^E ^jPrAPHS ^ *": PRINT 

PRINT "END -'— ^ ~ 5** 



16; PRINT '^MAIN MENU" 



310 
320 

340 

zm 

37l?i 

39# 
4<l0 

4 re 

430 
441 1^ 



47l?» 
49iir 



^n^ 



52^ 
S31P 



VTAB 
IF T 
IF 

TF 
IF 
IF 



• t 



4 



•'fcTM 



MTAB 
THETy 

THEN 
THEN 

THBM 
THEN 



rWPUT DESIftED RESPONSE 

QfiDER CI SECTIONT 

ORDER (2 SECT IONS P - 
OROEI* iZ SECTIONS) - 
ORDER (4 SECTIO^fSt 



T i 

T ^ 

T '■ 

T 
GOTO 
PRINT 
PRINT 
PRINT 
PRINT 
PRINT 
PRINT 
PRINT 
MDHE 

"PAGE 1 — 

: HTAB 6: PRINT '^RETURN - 
VTAF 12: NTAP ^Mt U%^ E* 
IF E« = "R" THEN PGKE 
IF E* - "1 " THEM POI-'E 

- li.2<?7 3: eOTO 450 
IF E* - *2" THEN POKE 

- 1&297,01 POTO ^5if> 
POfrE - I63<W,0: P€l^¥ 
HPLOT 4«,«ie TD 2?»««#B; 
4^,63 TO 250. «>e: HPLOT 



21; GET T«:T « maL <T«i 
T* « -LOMi PASS -^'t GOTO ^fill 
T* - "BAND PASS**: GOTO SBa 
T« = "HIGH PASS": GOTO 580 
GO^LIP 44i?3: QDTQ 220 



VTAEf 21: HTAIJ 



PRINT ^% 



•*E)CA«INE CUffRENT 6RAPHS - 

•^RETuma TO MErJlJ ^ 

VTAB 4: HTAB S: PPtNT "CMAhrNE 




PRINT : PRINT 
PRINT 

PRINT 

PRINT 

PRfjNf 
m Nt T LfftN 
GRAPHS'*; 



- I 



PRINT 
ANV 



OTHER LEV" 



\ 2 



^TA© B: PRINT 
— 2^! VTn& lA 



- l63Ut2.^(: PO^E 






RETURN 

PO+E -- |6304.(if: 



POKE 



- 16lB2t»: POKE - 16299^ 0- PQ* E - i&3l!W,0: PD%E 



- I63f**3,€(; RETUf^N 

HFLOr 411,^8 TO 2S^.2e: frffLOT 40, 4B TO 2S*, 40: HPlOT 
4tfl*B9 10 2:5i*,88; HPLOT 4i^, |#g TO 254*. 1^6: ^**LOT 
4Pt. I2B to rSl3,12aj HPLOT 41*, 14S TD 250*14^1: HPLOT 4t^, J 67 TO 250,167 
HPLOT 4«l,ielS TO 4|», 166: HPLOT I(»i3,l?8 TO UH^» 166; HFLtTT l4S,k*B TO t45,l 
6A: HPLOT l*?*?,€»a TO 190. 16#»; HPLOT 216.06 TD 2l6*16fe: (-ff'LOT 23a,i(*R TH 
23*i. 166; HPLOT 250, (nB TO 23l?<, 166 
IF T = 2 THEN 54(?( 

¥ * ii'arpt -- "+:3«iDEi'*: ggsub 6:y = 28; P* - "'^2(fiD&": ^n?x\\^ hzY = 48: P* = 

" + lStiD&"l BOSUB 6:v = 6e:P« p '■ Pf DB'^: BOSIJEi ht V = BE;p* = "'l^DB*^; 

6:y - t09:p* ^ ""20Dt>": GDSuB 6;y = i2e'p* = "-r-k^DB": gosue* hzv 



eosui* 

i4« 



^'f' 



justing the gain in the calcu- 
lations to place the curve on 
the graph where it provides 
the maximum amount of in- 
fomnation. In real life if you 
build a filter, you can select 
whatever gain you like and 
rt will have the effect of 
moving the entire curve up 
or down the vertical axis, 

The program is in two 
parts, an Applesoft program 
and a shapetable file. The 



Basic program is entered in 
the normal fashion with 
the exception of lines 500 
through 550 which must be 
entered without any spaces 
in order for them to fit into 
the Apple's input buffer. The 
program is heavily depen- 
dent uF>on subroutines, and 
care should be taken when 
entering line numbers to 
avoid branching errors. The 
shapetable is entered as de- 



scribed in the Apple Refer- 
ence MBnaal, Chapter 3. The 
shapetable should begin at 
$6000, and it has a length of 
$304. After it ts entered, 
BSAVE it using the filename 
FILTER SHAPEFILE. 

If you have a graphics 
printer, you can easily add a 
routine to print the graphs. 
Add a line 295 to put the 
printer selection on the 
main menu. Add line 355 to 



S40 



:p» = **~^0DB"z BQSUB 6;y ^ 147; p* = "-saoB'^: BOSUB &: goto 550 
y = 8:p« 51 "+10DE**: BOSUe 6;V " 2e;F* ^ *' DB"l OOSUB 6:V = 46: P« = " 
-10DB": GQSUB 6!Y = 69: P* s --^©DB'^: GOSUB 6: X • 5; V - Be:p* = '--IPUB 

"; BOSUB 6:y = i^aiPs = "-4mOB": bosub tsiv - i2s;Pi ~ "-sj^ob**: GQSue 

hlY = |49:P» = '■-6til>&*: GOSUfi 6:Y = 167:P* :~ "-70DB*': GOSUB h 

f*OT= 16: FF* is STft* CFF • .2 W>:X1 - 42: GOSUB !i6et;FF« "^ STRm tWW * 

,5 ^ mmi * 1001 BDSUB 5^0;FF« = STR* (FFi:Xl = t45: GOSuB 5fci»:FF» - 

STR» (FF ♦ 2 ' mizni - 1¥^* GOSUB 56^; F0#* J2 ■ 3 TO 5:FF» - STR* t 
FF • J2 " ftfVtXl - XI *- (B * J2i • 5: GOSUB 5i>l5: NElfT : ROT= 0: RETUf^J 



Ui0 
57tf 

610 

630 
640 
650 
66P 
67» 
660 



69^ 

710 

7rtf» 

730 
T4i!) 

76^J^ 
771S 

79 p 
90fl 

810 

620 

640 



IF LEN <FF»* ^ 4 ThCW FOR Jl - 

MID* (FF«,JKt>: GOSUB 2: NEKT ; 
FOR Jl = I TO LEN (FFSJ:X = Xl:V 
J: SOSUB 2: NEIT : RETURKf 
HOME : PRINT *'========='■: IIWERSE 

=-'*: VTAB 7: SOSUB 370; VTAS 22 
VTAB 22; HTAS 50: GET 0*:Q - VAL 
« 
IF 



1 TO 4;X = 
RETURN 
- Jl * 6 ^ 



xi:y 



165: Pt 



: PRINT T*: 

(0*) / 2: 



Ji * 6 
l65:Pf = 
NORMAL 
VTAB 22: HTAB 3B: PRINT 



niD* <FF»,JI,1 

PRINT '*=m = ^m^m 



IF 

IF 

IF 

IF 

IF 

GOTO 

TEXT 

HOME 



G* = 



"R" 

■ i f ■■ 



THEN 

THEtM 



Q 
O 
O 
O 



^ 1 



OS 



THEN 
THEN 
THEN 0» 
THEN 0« 



220 
GOSUB 

= "2ND 
= "4TH 



= 3 

= 4 

; HOME :PS = 
: PRINT *■ 



440: GOTO 
ORDERS' 
ORDER" 
"aJH ORDER" 
"BTH ORDER-* 



590 
GDTD 
GOTO 
BOTG 
GOTO 



670 
670 
670 
670 



T* + 



O*: REM GRAPH ROUTlNF 

: INVEFrSE : PRINT P* : NQRnAU 
VTAB 5; PRINT "CURRENT FILTER PARArCTERS 



PRINT 
ARC 



VTAB 7; PRINT "CENTER FT^EQUENCv "^SFF: VTAB 9 
PRINT TAB* 13>I" '0'"i TAB f 30> r'SECTIOW" ; PRINT 
TAB( 29JI "FREOUENCY": VTAB Ll: PRIITT "IST SlCTIPhJ* 



IF > 1 
IF O 2 
IF -- 3 
VTAB 16: 
GET Yl*: 
VTAB 16: 
VTAB 19.- 
19: INPUT 



THEN 

THEN 

THEN 

PRINT 

VTAB 



TAB< 15>; "FACTOR"! 



PRlhrr "2ND SECTION'*,Q(2),Ft2J 

Pt^INT -3R0 SECTION", DC3) ,F<3> 
PRINT *^4TH Se£:TI0N*%0f4) ,Kf4) 
^' CHANGE VALUES (V/NJ "i 
16: HTAB 21: PRINT VI*: IF Y!» 



THEN B20 



HTAB 1; INPUT "CENTER FREDUENCV iUlr " ! FF 

PRINT "1ST SEETION;'*! VTAB 19: HTAB 16: INPUT P2*: HTAB 32: VTAB 
F2*;0(n - VAL (□2«>;F<n = VAL <F2*i 



IF O 

D4s: 
IF O 

Oh%: 
If o 
De«: 
GOTO 
VTAB 



' 1 THEN 
HTAB 32: 
2 THEN 
HTAB 32; 
Z THEM 
HTAB 32: 



VTAB 20: 
VTAB ^0: 

VTAB 21: 
VTAB 21: 

VTAB 22: 
VTAB 22: 



PRINT ''2ND SECTIGN:^': VTAB 
INPUT F4*:0f2) = VAL (Oi\*r 

PRINT "tJiRD SECTION:"'; VTAB 
INPUT FA*: 0(3) =^ VAL (06* J 

F-RINT "4TH section;-; VTAB 
INPUT Fa*:Qi4) = VAL toe»*; 



20i HTAB 16; 
F(2J = VAL 
21: HTAB 16: 
F(3j = VAL 
22: HTAB 16: 
F(4f = VAL 



INPUT 

{F4*i 
INPUT 

( F6ft > 
I NPUT 

4 Fa* J 



860 
670 



890 
900 
910 
920 

9m 

961JI 

970 

980 

990 
1000 

1010 

1020 
1030 
1040 

10S0 

10&0 
1070 



670 

IB; PRINT "FREOUENCV SCALE - MIDE/WARROW 
EFT W»: HTAB 37; VTAB IS; PRINT ¥t% 
M = 1: IF W« = "N^ THEN N = .430*76559: GOTO &6d 
IF M« • -W* THEN B20 

VTAB 20: PRINT "PAGE 1 OR PAGE 2 n/2> "S 
GET PG*;P©?C « VAL (PG*? + It HTAB 25: VTAB 20: 
IF PBZ <^ 2 Of* PSY. 3 THEN S60 
VTAB 22:' PRINT "GRAPH - NEW/OVERLAV /REVIEW 
GET Y»: HTAB 37: VTAB 22; PRINT V* 
"N'^ THEN 940 
"Q" THEN 940 
*'R" THEN GOSUB 440; GOTO 670 



rw/N> *■( 



PRINT PG* 



(N/a/R> ■** 



Y* = 

¥* - 
Y* = 



IF 

IF 

IF 
PG*^ 

IF ¥* 
Yl ^ 0: 

pd^:e 

IF PQT4 
IF PG"^ 
00: Yl 
IF PGX 



= VAL CPG*J + l: IF 
"0" THEN B90 
POKE - 16302,0: 
- 16300,0; POKE 
= 3 THEN POKE 
=p 2 THEN HER : 


= 3 THEN HGR2 



¥* 



*'N" THEISf 9B0 



POKE - 16304,0: PO^E - 1(^29 7,0; IF PGX - 2 THEN 
230,32: GOTO 1000 

' 16299,0: FOKE 230^64: BOTO 1^00 
POKE ' 16302,0; X = 70;Y - 3: GOSUB 2; GOSUB 5 



X = 70: y 



3: GOSUB 22 GOSUB 500: Yl - 



T = 2 THEN 
T ^ 3 THEN 



I = 
I = 

I - 
0: I 



> fc,0fl 

2 TO 
3.25 
= 1: 



1050 
1070 

TO 1*96 
3 STEP . 
TO 4,75 



STEP -04: BOSUB 2 0: 
1: GOSUB 10; NEXT 
STEP -25: BOSUB 10: 



GOSUB e5:F7- ^ l: FOft I = 4.95 TO 2 



1090 
1100 



IF 

IF 

FQfk 

FOR 

Ftm 

Ft. = 
0t NEXT 

roR I 

FOf^ I 
FOR I 
FOR T 
POKE - 16360.0; GET P*: GOSUB 5; ODTO 220 



NEXT 



NEKT 



GOTO 
STEP 



1100 

- -25: 



GQSyB B 



TO 
TO 



1 .96 
4,75 

2,9 TO 2 
1,9& TO 



_204 STEP 
3 STEP - 

STEP - , 
.204 STEP 



- .04: 60SUB B0: NEXT 
.25: GOSOB 45: NEXT 
l: GOSUB 45: NEXT 

- .04; GOSUB 45: NEXT 



GOTO ^100 



Program listing. 



read "IF T = 6 THEN 1200'; 
Starting at line 1200 you 

would add the printer rou- 
tines used by your printer to 
output graphics. After the 
printing is conipfete, have 
the program return to line 
220, the beginning of the 
main-menu sequence. I have 
used this method with the 
Epson MX-SO, and it works. 

1 have included error trap- 
ping for most of the input 
for this program so that it 
usually will ignore an incor- 
rect entry. However, you 
may run into a situation 
where you have managed to 
sneak some illogical charac- 
ter into a calculation which 
causes the program to error. 
If this happens, enter ''RE- 
SET" and "RUN". You will 
be back at the main menu 
and any graphs in memory 
will be maintained intact. If 
you do not want to enter the 
program by hand, it is avail- 
able from me on diskette 
(DOS 33) for $1 2.00. 

If you have an interest in 
active audio filters and have 
access to an Apple comput- 
er, I am certain that you will 
find this program fascinating. 
The graphing routine gives 
you a very powerful tool to 
assist in designing filters. 
With the touch of a few 
keys, you can see exactly 
what response you can ex- 
pect from a given design 
and a totally new filter may 
be evaluated in seconds 
rather than hours. This is the 
type of application where 
you can get some real utility 
from your micro. Good luck 
and happy filtering B 

Rdfenances 

Manual of Active filter Design, 

Hllburn & Johnson, McGraw-Hill 

Book Co., 1973. 

ActfvB Filter Design Haridbook, 

Maschytz & Horn, John Wiley & 

Sons, 1981. 

Active Filter Cookbook, Don 

Lancaster, Howard W- Sams & 

Co., 1975, 

**Deslgn Your Own Active 

Filters," H. M. Berlin, OSL June, 

1977, 

"Active Bandpass Fillers," T. A. 
Contx>y, Ham Radio, December, 
1977. 

73 Magazine • August, 1984 69 



Robert W: Schmidi WA^VNY 
J317 m 22nd Sum 

Moom OK 71160 



Top- Band Power Punch 

Sick of S-2 reports on 160? Build this 
knockout kilowatt amp and make it 59 every time. 




Front view of amplifier, 



The addition of the 160- 
meter band to most am* 
ateur transceivers since the 
60s has steadily increased 
interest in the "top band" to 
the point that it sounds like 
75 phone during periods of 
good propagation. Often 
plagued by noisy atmo- 
spheric conditions and mar* 
ginal antenna systems, this 
band is a prime candidate 
for an amplifier that will al- 
low consistent communica- 
tions 

With these considerations 
in mind, the AKF 160/1000 
came about (Its name is de- 
rived from the fact that it 



was built for my father. 
W<JAKF. The "160/1000" is 
self-explanatory.) 

Primary design considera- 
tions for the construction of 
the 1 60n 000 were: 

• single band— 160 meters 
only 

• low cost, using on-hand or 
readily available surplus 
parts 

• must be ''desk-top'' and 
capable of 1 kW dc input 

• tube(s) must be readily 
available and inexpensive 

The final choice of tubes 
[811 As) was primarily dic- 
tated by the above consider- 







^^^^m^^i 




9 

••• 

• « 




• ■ • 



K^m view of ampHfier showing intake and exhaust ports, 
7Q 73 Magazine • August, 19B4 




lop view of ampliiief with tube chamber covered. 




Top view of amplifier with tube chamber exposed. Note ZD1 
in front of the filament transformer. 



ations. Also, suitable fila- 
ment and plate transformers 
were on hand. The vener- 
able 811 A triode has been 
used in many proven com- 
mercial and home-brew am- 
plifier designs over the years 
and is still available — both 
new and used —for less than 
$15 00- 

The circuit is a straightfor- 
ward grounded-grid design 
using six ffllAs in parallel I 
found that the input and 
ptatHoad impedances for a 
single 811 A were 300 and 5k 
Ohms, respectively. This is 
equal to SO and 833 Ohms, 
respectively, when six tubes 
are used in parallel I found 
this to be desirable for sever- 
al reasons: 



• The 50-Ohm input Z 
would make it easy to drive 
With a solid-state transceiv- 
er, even with no tuned input 
circuit (A 1:1 pi-net fnput 
was used anyway.) 

• Although the 833-Ohm 
plate Z will result in high 
values of plate-tune and 
plate-load capacitances 
when looking into a stan- 
dard pi-net, smaller variable 
capacrtors are easily pad- 
ded into the approximate 
tuning range by fixed values. 

• The low plate Z also al- 
lows use of a smaller value 
of inductance which in turn 
saves space. (I tried several 
toroidal inductors but had 
difficulty with core heat- 




Side view of amplifier showing the plate tune and pi-net coil. 
Note the P/ex/g/as sheet forming the near chamber wall, and 
also the surplus mica capackors. 



ing — probably due to high 
current flow.] 

A single dual-movement 
meter with appropriate 
shunts was used for monitor- 



ing the three standard cir- 
cuit functions. They are: 

• plate current (0-1.5 
Amps) 

• grid current (0-1 Amps) 






nov^ 



a-3 



I lOVflC 



CT-IO S7-I0 ;|^500vf 





■^< • — wv — * 



J3 
< 



53i3 







mrc% 



Fig. t Schematic. 



73 Magazine • August, 1964 7% 




fl.F. OUT to MlT0llilr *■ 



y 



^fWm&O-i^m UTTER 4WP OUIP^T 



: I 



■*fmm fco/vooo amp output 



ar OUT nmu rRihfsctiviF' *- 



y 

^ 



— TO BO-O/iO Uf TCi AMP INPUT 



! I 



■* TO lEO/lOOO AMP INPUT 



AWTENNA flELflV CONTROL ^ 
FftOM TRANSCENER 



J^ 



■♦TO ao-l^^fO ftMP AtyTENNA RELAY 
CONTROL 



IKTvaC COHTffiOL FROM — — 
1^0/1 OOO rtLAUCNT 



■* \&:>/\QClO. AUf* ANTCNMA ftEE^AY CDHTRCC 



SVTCM*" 



] 



Fig. 2. Amplifier switching circuit for using two station ampli- 
fiers witb a common antenna switching system. Alleviates 
cable swapping when going from one amp to anottier. 



Under-cbassis view of the amplifier. Left: power-supply com- 
ponents and HV-meter multiplier resistors. Center: tube sock- 
ets^ filament c/ioke, and input pi-net mounted on a standofi 
Center bottom: ac power relay and 24-V-dc power supply. 
Right input loading capacitor, antenna relay, and safety rf 
choke. 



• high voltage (0-2 kV dc) 

The metering can be mod- 
ified to allow use of just 
about any low-cost or sur- 
plus instrument. In fact sep- 
arate meters for each func- 
tion may be desirable. 

Bias is developed in the 
center-tap return of the fila- 
ment transformer by using a 
6 2-V, SOWatt zener diode. 
Zero signal plate 1 was 
found to be about 100 mA 
Plate I is cut off during re- 
ceive by resistor R1 7, 



The power supply is a 
standard full-wave design 
and uses a surplus plate 
transformer rated at 500 mA 
CCS (available from Fair Ra- 
dio Sales) Though it looks 
small, the transformer is 
very heavy and no excessive 
heating will occur. 

Many component changes 
can be made to suit parts on 

hand as long as voltage rat- 
ings and values are ob- 
served. The main point is to 



not be afraid to experiment 
with different parts and 
layouts. 

If your station already has 
an 80-1 5/1 0-meter amplifier, 
the circuit in Fig. 2 will allow 
automatic switching of rf 
and control functions be- 
tween the two amps. This of 
course alleviates the cable- 
swapping behind the operat- 
ing desk. It uses surplus 
DPDT power relays with 
110-V-ac coils and is activat- 
ed when the 160/1000 fila- 
ments are turned on. It was 
constructed in an aluminum 
minjbox and placed near the 
station antenna switch. 

Construction 

The general layout and 
construction techniques I 



used should be evident from 
the photos. 

Due to the low frequency, 
lead lengths are not as criti- 
cal as they would be in the 
upper HF spectrum. Howev- 
er, your final layout should 
be such that leads are 
heavy, direct and as short as 
possible. 

I prefer using a commer- 
cial chassis as the amp foun- 
dation, then surrounding it 
with ^^"-thick aluminum 
sheet held together with ¥* " 
aluminum angle and #8 or 
#10 hardware. Scrap alumi- 
num sheet is fairly inexpen- 
sive, and when only straight 
cuts are required, the total 
cost of a heavy-duty rf-tight 
cabinet can be quite low. 

Of special interest is the 







Parts List 




B 


4" muffin fan, 115 Vac 


MS 


meter stiunt to match M above 


CI -6, 13- 


-14,20-21 .01 tiP, 1 kV disc 


PC 


parasitic choke- two 100-Ohm, 2- Watt 


C7-10 


100 ptf, 450 V dc 




cartxin resistors to parallel with 4 


Ct1-12 


3330 pF silver mica (three 1000s and 




turns #14, Yi " diameter 




one 330 in parallel) 


R1-6 


470k, 1 Watt 


CIS 


.001 fiF, 5 kV mica 


R7-10 


470k, 2 Watts 


C16 


1000pF,2kVdc 


R11 


50 Ohms, 12 Watts 


C17 


2000 pF, 1 kV dc (receiver-type spacing) 


R12-16 


50k, 10 Watts 


C18 


.005 ^F, 2.5 kV dc 


RFC1 


plate choke (370 turns #24 enamel on 


C19 


lOOO^F, 50 Vdc 




1 "-diameter hardwood dowel) 


C22-23 


.002 pF, 5 kV mica block capacitors 


RFC2 


bthlar-wound filament choke (#10 


DS1-2 


115-V-ac pilot-lamp assembly 




enamel lo fill 7V2 " x Va ' fenite 


F1-2 


15 Amps 




rod— Amidon Assoc.) 


F3 


2 Amps 


SI -2 


SPST 


F4 


V2 Amp 


S3 


3-pole/3-pos(tion rotary switch 


J1-2 


S0239 coax jack 


T1 


115/115-V-ac primary; 2250-V-ac c-t, 


J3 


RCA ctiassis jack 




SOO-mA secondary (surplus Collins 


K1 


DPST or DPDT 25-Amp contact s/24-V^ic 




Radio transformer from Fair Radio 




coil (surplus relay) 




Sales #TF1UX02YY) 


K2 


3PDT 1Q-Amp contacts/24-V-dc coll 


T2 


115-V-ac primary; 24-V-ac c-t second- 




(surplus relay) 




ary (Radio Shack) 


LI 


17Vz turns. #6, 2" diameter 


T3 


115-V-ac primary; a3-V*ac c-t second- 


12 


17 turns, 1 " diameter, 2" long 




ary, 24 Amps (Fair Radio Sales) 


M 


surplus meter (0-200 and O-lO-mA 


2D 


zener diode, 6.2 V dc, 50 W. TO-3 case 




movements) 




or stud mount 



72 73 Magazirm • August, 1984 



amplifier cooling. The six 
tubes are enclosed in a 
chamber fomied of alumi- 
num sheet and Plexiglas^'^ 
(the wall between the tubes 
and the pi-net is V4 " Plexi- 
glas). Air is forced through 
the chamber using a stan- 
dard muffin fan. A 1 " gap in 
the front of the chamber top 
plate allows the air to move 
into the power-supply area. 
Four hoies behind the plate 
transformer allow the air to 
exit the cabinet This has the 
added effect of providing air 
circulation around the plate 
transformer. 

Operation 

This amplifier has room 
to spare when it comes to 
power output. Since the 
number of tubes and plate 
voltage may var>^ from amp 
to amp, no discrete tuning 
information is given. How- 
ever, outputs in excess of 
1100 Watts have been 
achieved when operating in- 
to a dummy load. I have 
found that tuning for maxi- 



mum power output and 
then decreasing the drive 
level to the legal limit seems 
to give the best linearity. 
Check your metering and 
watch your signal on a moni- 
tor scope (the best piece of 
equipment a ham can have 
in his station). No evidence 
of flat- topping has been no- 
ticed, and the output ap- 
pears to be a linear repro- 
duction of the input when 
driven by a TS*30S at full 
power and viewed on the 
station monitor. 

On-the-air comments 
have been excellent with 
much interest expressed in 
the number and type of 
tubes. It is hoped that the 
811 A fanatics among you 
will add two more tubes and 
try construction of this amp. 
Good luck. 

Special thanks go to my 
father, W(JAKF, for his pa- 
tience while I built this amp. 
The greatest reward is to 
hear him using it during our 
twice-weeklv schedule ■ 



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Q-hf Ws^ Vdmt %a^to CFEguf 

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t^ Se0 Uat of Advertf^&fs on page B8 



73 Magazine • August, 1964 73 



W2NSD/( 

KEVER SAY DIE 

ec//tor/a/ by Wayne Green 



from page 6 

situation by Tim- He*s been mak' 
Ing considerable progress, with 
several more licensed hams in 
immediate prospect* , ,and 
more to come. Perhaps my talks 
are having some results? Old 
E3oc Green gave the Computex 
opening-ceremonies address to 
a good-sized audience of Chi* 
nese businessmen. 

My message for them is the 
same as for America — If Taiwan 
wants to be able to cope with 
the electronics revolution, it has 
to have engrneers, technicians, 
and scientists to develop new 
products, to help make, sell, op- 
erate, and service them. Lacking 
technical people, Taiwan will 
have to just make do by copying 
the designs of others; they will 
always be two or three years be- 
hind. 

And how does a country de- 
velop the needed technical peo- 
ple? Simple, really, just make 
sure that you expose kids 14 and 
15 years old to high-tech hob- 
bfes such as amateur radio. It's 
no coincidence that Japan has 
ham-radio clubs in every high 
school in their country. They are, 
as a result, graduating seven 
times as many electronics engi- 
neers as the US, and with half 
our population! Thus, Japan has 



been able to take away virtually 

every consumer electronics irv 
dustry from the entire world, irv 
eluding the US* 

The electronics revolution 
has a lofig way to go, so there's 
still time for countries like 
Taiwan to develop the needed 
technical people and get in 
there and compete with Japan 
, , . designing state-of-the-art 
technical products and thus get* 
ting a good piece of the action. 
But without getting ham radio 
clubs into every school on 
Taiwan^ the country will be sen- 
tenced to copying — to stealing 
the ideas of others — as they 
have with thdr Chinese copies 
of the Apple and IBM computers 
and Roiex and Tiffany watches* 

I've been giving this message 
in my talks to business groups 
in Taiwan for several years and I 
think the message is t»eglnning 
to lake. Now if 1 could only get 
some attention here in the US! 

From Taiwan I went on to 
Hong Kong to see some more 
potential manufacturers and 
buy some goodies. The prices 
are t>est there for Sony, Seiko, 
and so on. The whole tour to four 
countries took just two weeks 
and got me back just in time for 
the Chicago Summer Consumer 
Electronics Show and then my 





r.^^m^-'-J^' . s 


^1 



$$ HOME-BREW III $$ 

Turn your hot solder into cold cash! Once again, 73 is search- 
ing for the greatest home-brewer in the land. All projects have 
a chance to appear in 73, and the best of the t>est will be show- 
ered with fame and fortune. 

Top prize is $250. Second place is worth $100, and three 
runners-up will each earn $50. Of course, this is In addition to 
the payment every author receives for publishing in 73. 

Contest Rules 

1. Entries must be received by Novemi^er 1, 1964. 

2. To enter, write an article describing your tiest home-brew 
construction project and submit it to 73. If you havenH written 
for 73 before, please send an SASE for a copy of our author's 
guide. 

3. Here's the catch: The total cost of your project must be $73 
or less, even if all parts were bought new. Be sure to Include a 
detailed parts list with prices and sources. 

4. Our technical staff will evaluate each project on the basts 
of originality, usefulness, reproducibllty, economy of design, 
and clarity of presentation. The decision of the judges is final. 

5. All projects must be original, that is, rKit previously published 
elsewhere. There *s no limit to the number of projects you may 
enter, 

6. All rights to articles purchased tor publication become the 
property of 73. 

7. Mail your entries to: 

73 Magazine 

Editorial Offices 
80 Pine Street 
Petert>ofough NH 03458 
Attn: Home-Brew III 



yearly USS Drum submarine re- 
union. 

Sherry was with me on the 
tour, going on to Manila from 
Hong Kong to see her suppliers. 
She imports some clever cloth 
and wire butterflies which she 
sells through gift shops and flo- 
rists. She then met me in Mobile 
for the reunion, missing CES. 

Now, about Taiwan and that 
DXpedition. My first thought 
was that it might be possibie to 
work out something which 
would coincide with the Octot>er 
tour of Asian consumer elec- 



tronics shows, rve been on that 
tour many times and will be go- 
ing again this year. In two 
weeks, this gets you to electron- 
ics shows in Tokyo, Taiwan, 
Hong Kong, and Seoul,., nine 
different shows in two weeks! 

There are usually 200 to 300 
on this tour, a good percentage 
of whom are hams, so It would 
be a natural if the DXpedition 
could be tied in with the tour. Un- 
fortunately, with magazine 
deadlines taking so much time, 
there just wasn't enough time to 
get the word out, make all the ar- 



Dr. Green shaking a hAo6el 100 computer at the Central New England 
Coltege graduating ctasSf threatening them with the coming need 
for a massive increase In communications in order to cope with the 
computer revolution. 

74 73 Magazine • August, 1984 




Tim Chen BV2A wanfs yotr to come and DXpedition from Taiwan, 
How about it? 




M 



Some of the 1984 Computer Show Tour Group vmfing a Korean com- 
puter factory. 



rangementSp and have things in 
order by October first. 

I talked with Tim about the 
possibility of my bringing a re- 
peater over and setting it up so 
that the American operator 
team coutd tiave good personal 
communications. Possible, but 
this will take some education of 
those in charge and some dick- 
eriog. I talked wHh Bob Chang, 
who runs Commerce Tours, and 
he said he could arrange with 
the Ambassador Hotel for a safe 
place to set up the repeater* 

We* re going to have quite a 
ham contingent on the 'B4 Octo- 
ber show tour, so Vd tieert think- 
ing in terms of arranging lor us 
to get HTs in Japan which we 
could use in Hong Kong and Ko- 
rea. . .and perhaps even Taiwan, 
The turmoil of my merger with 
CW Communications and start- 
ing several new magazines and 
businesses scotched ttie HI 
plan for this year. Maybe in "85, 

If about ten of you would be 



interested in getting over to see 
Tim and operating for about five 
or six days from Taipei nexl spring, 
drop me a line. I would estimate 
ttiat the whole trip would cost 
about S3*CXX> which would in^ 
elude transportation, hotels, a 
week in Taiwan, plus a few days 
in Tokyo and Hong Kong. By 
then we may t>e able to work out 
the two^meter repeater and NT 
situation. 

tf I can get ten positive and a 
few more possible candidates 
for the DXpedition, I'll start 
Commerce on setting up the ar- 
rangements and start working 
with Tim to cover the legal for- 
malities. 

Have you ever wondered what 
it's like to operate from the heart 
of Asia? To get on from a rare 
spot and have the whole world 
beating your brains out for a 
contact? It's heady stuff. Tve op- 
erated from some pretty rare 
spots and it's really addictive. 




Akihabara, made into a pedestrian malt on Sundays, is an electron- 
ics Mecca. There are hundreds of electronics, radio, and computer 
stores Bff in one part of Tokyo. Several American hams visiting here 
have tried to defect. 




Tokyo Disney fand is an immaculate must. A kid spitted some pop- 
corn and within seconds three people appeared from nowhere and 
cteaned it up. 



Why leave all the real DXIng to 
Uoyd and Iris? 

Computer nuts w\U go right 
out of ttieir minds wtien they see 

the prices for Apple- and IB1VI- 
compatible boards in Taipei, 
And almost every American 
computer book is available tor a 
couple bucks, reprinted ttiere. 

TTie food js supert) and the 
sights incredible, from their 
museums to Snake Alley. Your 
camera wiJ) be snapping day 
and night. So, are you game for a 
Mttle DXpedUion to the Republic 
Of China next May, njnning from 
about May 15th to 30th? 

Who knows, between the 
Computex computer show in 
Taiwan and the products made 
in ttie Peopie's Republic of 
China — whfch you can visit on 
the same trip, gomg up for a one- 
day visit from Hong Kong— you 
might find a product to Import 
and distribute. That would make 
this a business trip, right? 



Your wife? Why not? There's 
no shortage of things for her to 
see while you are busy filling 
your log with contacts. And a 
businessman really needs some 
sort of assistant on a trip like 
this. . Ao get details and prices 
from manufacturers while you 
are DXing. 

If you can get away for more 
ttian two weeks, for a few bucks 
extra you can return via some in- 
teresting places and maybe get 
In a few more days DXing. A little 
over a year ago t made the trip 
back from Hong Kong^ stopping 
off to work DX from Bangkok, 
Singapore, Kuching (Sarawak), 
Bandar Seri Begawam (Brunei), 
Kota Kinabalu (Sabah), and 
Manila If youVe interested in 
operating from any of these 
places. I can put you in touch 
with a local ham who will help 
you and pert^aps even let you 
use his station for a couple of 
days. Brunei is a new country 
now, , .how about It? 




Some Chinese dinners are memorabie! You wonl forget your 
Taiwan visit 

73 Magazine • August, 1984 75 



BmER'N'BUY 



n CLASSfRED AOVERTlSiNG 

RATIS 

15«pef wofd 

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Prepaymeni by check Of money ortfef is requtred with your ad, No discourtts Of 
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Inserlkons are aval fable on rsqyesL 



Individual tnon<ofnmerciali' 
Commercial . 



ADVERTISING CQPY 

Advert isin^g musi pertain to amateur radio products or semces^. No special 
layouts or positions are possibte All advertising copy must be submitted type- 
wriifen (double-spaced) and must include full name and address. Copy limited lo 
100 wonls, maximum CkHint only woftls m tesl. Maitm^, free. 

73 cannot ¥ef ity adv^tisino claims an^ cannot tw he4d responsibde for claims 
made bv ttic advertise* LfatMlity will ije limited to making any necessary corfec- 
tton in the nent avtiiaMe iasue, 73 res«n«m Uie fl/gf^l lo re^t any cofry deemed 
unsuitable. 

DEADUNES 

Copy must be received in Peiaftkorough by llw 5ih of ihe second month pre- 
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Seftd lo AclveflisinQ Depart men!, 73, Elm Street. Pelerbofoygh NH 0346B. 



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STATE'OF'THE*ART, mgged, low-profile 
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REPAIR, alignment, calibration, Coltins 
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C-64 AND V}C<2fl ham softwarei new Cotk 
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disk witli rurMlme package, sample tiles, 
cal iterated speed ffle Written instructions 
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to John W. Meacham K6SUF. 19303 
AQuiro St^ RowlATMl Heiglits CA 91748, 
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76 73 Magsztne * August, 19B4 



SOCML EVENTS 



Listings in this coiumn ar^pmvid^ fr&e of 
charge on a space-^vBihbie bBSis. Tha fol- 
lowing information ^hout^i be included in 
&V9rf Mnnouncem^nt: sponsor, event, date, 
time, place, city, state, admtsston charge (if 
anpK features, taik-in frequences, and the 
/M/Tw o( wtiom to contact tor furtheF tn forma- 
aort AnrHjunesmefrts must be mce'ived by 73 
llBQazine by the iirst o/ ffw moniti. two 
months ptior to the rm>nfh m which theev^nt 
taties piace. Mail to Editonat Offices. 73 Mag^ 
azlna. Pine St^ Paterbowi/gft Nh 03458^ 

POMONA CA 
AUa4 

The Trj 'County Amataur Radio Associa- 
tion will hold its annual hamfest on Satur- 
day, AuyusI 4. 1984, *rom 8:00 am to 4:00 
pm, at Palomares Park Recreation Hall, 
4^1 L Affo* Highway <lhe north Side of Af- 
TQw Highway at Oranfl« Grove, between 
Tm^r^ Af>d Garey), Pomona CA. Admis- 
aloniaafl.OOdonaiiofi. Swap tables (21i%'' 
X ftl tre a $5.CM) donation per table and 
the hall wt If Oi>en at 7:00 am for setup only. 
Tablet afe limited and must be reserved in 
acfvaf^ca (no personal tables will be ai 
lowed I reside or outside the hall}. Food, 
drink, and free parking will be available. 
Features will Include awa^dd, programs, 
and VCR tapes: and examinations will be 
given. If posalble, for Novice, Tech n id an ^ 
General, and Advance cJasa licenses. 
Tatk4n ofi 1*6 025 + , Fof advance regis- 
tralloo. make checks payable to TCARA 
artd send with an SASE to Joe Lyddon 
WB6UFX €079 Sard Street. AJta Loma CA 
91701. 

TttAJL BC CAN 

AUG 4 

The Beaver Valley Amateur Radio Club 
wtfl hold a swapfeat on August 4, 19B4, 
beginning at 10:00 am. at the Cominco 
Arena, Trail BC Talk^ln on 14684/^4. For 
further Infonnation and resetvatlons for 
teble space, please contact BVARC^ cJo 
370© Woodland Drtve. Trail BC V1R 2V7. 

JACKSOffVAiJiFL 

AUG4-S 

Six amateur radio clubs of the greater 
JackaonviHe area will sponsor tf>e eleventh 
annual Greater Jacksonville Ham f est on 
August 4-S, f9S4. at the Orange Park Kan* 
nel Club, US 17 South near 1-295. Reg Is Ira- 
tlon la 14.00; swap tables are $9.00 for ona 
day or $15,00 tor the weekend. (All proceeds 
go to the promotion of amateur radio.) Sat- 
urday hKHjrs are 6:00 am to 5,1X3 pm and Sun- 
day fvours are 9iOO am to 3110 pm. Features 
will include a iarge swap-tab4e area, forums 
BTKt programs, exhibitors, arxJ plenty of free 
parking SpeciaJ discounts and promotions 
are available to exhibitors contracting fo# 
apace before July lSth- For registrations, 
swap tabtes. special hotel rates, and more 
Information, write Mike Pamin N4EPO,6716 
Diane Road, JscKsonviile FL 3221 1. 

LEVELLANDTX 
AUG 5 

The Northwest Teseas Emefgency t^et 
and ttie Hockley County Amateur Radio 
Clul> will sponsor the Iftlti annual North- 
west Texas Emergency Nei Swapf^t arxj 
Ptonic on Sund^, August 5. 1984. begin- 
ning at 8:00 am, in Itie City ParK Levetland 
TX. A $3vO0 registration fee is requested but 

^ See Ust of Adve-rttsms off page 98 



not required. This la a family event, so bring 
your own picnic basket. Tables will be pro- 
vided for the all-day swapping. Talk-in on 
,£8^.a8. For mora intofmation, contact John 
R Sell W5NGX, 20fl Pat Street, Levolland 
TX7933S. 

PfTTSBURGH PA 
AUG 5 

The 47th annual South Hfils Brass pound- 
ers and friodulators Hamfest wilt be heid on 
August 5^ 1904, from 9:00 am to 4:00 pm, at 
the south campus of the Community Col- 
lege of Allegheny County, Pittsburgh PA. 
Tickets are $3.00 each or 2 for $5.00. There 
will be indoor and outdoor flea-market 
space, food, refreshments, and -free parking 
will tje available. Talk-In on 146.13/.73 and 
146-52 simplex. For further information, 
contact Jach B Wood. 44€ Jenne Drive, 
Pittsburgti PA 15236. 

ANGOU^ FN 
AUG 5 

The Steuben County Radio Amaleur^ 
will present the 26th annual FM Picnic 
and H^mfest on Sunday, August 5, 1964. 
at Crooked Lake, Angola IN. Admission is 
S2.50. Features will Include picnto-style 
BBQ chicken, inside tables for exhibitors 
and vendors, a large electronics flea 
market, and overnight camping (f6« 
charged by County Pajicj. Ta}k-*n on 
146.52 and 147.81/.2I, 

MfSTtMTX 
Alio 10-12 

The Austin Amateur Radio Club and the 
Austm Repeater Organization will sponsor 
Austin Summerfeet 84 on August 10-12. 
1964, at the Austin Marriott Hotels In- 
terstate 35 at Highway 290. Admission Is 
£5.00 in advance (deadline; July 31 at) and 
$7.00 at the door. Swapfest tables are 
available on a first -come, first-served basis, 
but each seller may reserve tables In ad- 
vance (limit 2) for S1-00 each and ctalm 
them by 10:00 am Saturday. Acllvilties will 
include a 2^Hi 2-fneter bar>d^lan fonL^n, a 



packet-radto discussion and demonstra- 
tion, a tran$.mittisr hunt, a/id a full sctieduie 
of ladies' programs. Admission to tt>e 
ladies* events ts S4.00. Tafk-in on 146.34/34. 
For more information, write Austin Stim^ 
merfesi 84. PC Bon 13^73, Austin TX 7S711. 

TACOMA WA 
AUG 11-12 

The Radio Club of Tacoma (W70K) will 
present Hamfair 19B4 on Augu$l 11-12, 
19&4, at Oisen Auditorium on the campus 
of Pacific Lutheran Uniiversity. Registra- 
tion Is $5.00 and trailer and dormitory 
space will be available on campus at rea- 
sonable rates. Advance registration Is 
available lor i\m Saturday-night banquet 
commercial apace, and flea-marfcet 
tabfes. Talk-in on 147.BS/-28 (VV70K|. For 
additional Information and advance regis- 
tration, please contact Grace Teltzel 
AD7Si 701 South 120th, Tacoma WA 
98444. 

CHARLOTTE VT 
' AUG 11-12 

The annual BARC International Ham- 
fest will be held on Satun:lay and SiBiday. Au- 
gust 11-12, 1984. af the Did lantern Camp- 
grounds, Charlotte VT. Tickets are $4.00 
for both days and lTetefodyr>ea under 12 
will be admitted free. Flea-marltet space 
is S2.0Q and indoor space is $5.00. Over- 
night earn ping will t»e available and 
features will include the Can^Am tug-of^ 
war. Talk-In on .34/.94, .Oli.61, and .52 slm- 
ploK. For addltlcnal Information, contact 
Roger Farley WAIOZE, President, Burling- 
ton ARC, PO BoK 312. Burlington VT 
05402. 

CANYON TX 
AUG 11-12 

TT>e Panhandle Amateuf Radio Club, 
fnc.^ will tKHd its annual hamfest on Sat- 
urday and Surtday. August 11-12, 1984, 
in the Student Activities Cenier, West 
Texas State University, Canyon TX, 
Doors will open at B:00 am each day with 
plenty of free tables and space for alL 
Registratlon per person Is $5.00 in ad- 
vance and $6,00 at the door. Features 
will include a swapfest, commercial dis- 
tributors, meetings, and & ladles pro- 
gram. Talk-in on 146.94 and 3.933 MHz, 
For mote infomiation on pre-regist ra- 
tion, motel St and RV camps, contact the 



PARC. PO Box 10221, Amartllo TX 79116, 
Of Jim Ogfe W^UDX ai i8O6)-359-lO02. 

. ^MWIRINGTON PA 
^^- AUG 12 

The Mid-Atlantic Amateur Radio Club 
will hold its annual hamfest on Sunday. 
August 12. 1984, from 9:00 am to 4:00 pm, 
rain or shine, at the Bucks County Drlve- 
In, Route 611, Warrington PA ^5 miles 
north of the Willow Grove exit of Ihe Penn- 
.a^ania Turnpike). Admission is S3.00 with 
t;$2,tj0 additional for each lailgate space 
(bring your own table). Ample parking and 
refreshments will t^ available, Ta!it4n on 
147,66/.06 {WB3J0E/RJ or 146.52- For fur- 
Iher information, write MARC. PO Box 
352, Viflanova PA 19086, or call Bob J<^u- 
welt WA3PZ0 at ai5H49^727. 

WILLOW SPRINGS IL 
AUG 12 

The 50th annual Ham festers' Hamfest 
will be held on Sunday, August 1 2, 1&84, at 
Santa Fe Park. 91st and Woit Road. Wil- 
low Springs IL {southwest of Chicago). 
Tickets are $3,00 in advance and $4.00 at 
the gate. There will be an exiiibitors' 
pavilion and the famous $wap|^rs* row 
Talk-in on 146^2. For advance tickets, 
serid a checN or mor^ey order to Hamfest- 
ers, PO Bo% 42792, Chicago IL 60642. 

GEORGETOWN KY 
AUG 12 

This Qluegrass Amateur Radio Society 
will sponsor the Central Kentucky ARRL 
Hamfest on Sunday, August 12, 1984, from 
0:00 am to 5:00 pm, at ScotI County High 
School, Lonilck Road and US Roiite 25. 
Georgetown KY (off 1 75/64). Tickets are 
S3.50 in advartce and S4.(X) at the gate. 
There ts no charge for outside ftea-market 
Features will ericlude technical fo- 
awards, and exhtt>its in a/c facilities, 
'more Information or tickets, write Ed- 
ward B. Bono WA40NE. PO Box 4411. Leam- 
ington KY 405O4, 






ST CLOUD MN 
AUG 12 

The St, Cloud Amateur Radio Club will 
hold its annual hamfest on Sunday, August 
12, 1984. from 8:00 am to 4:00 pm, at the 
Sauk Rapids Municipal Park. Sauk Rapids 
MM Talk-in on 146.34^.04, For further infor- 
mation, contact ttie St. Cloud Amateur Ra- 
dio Cl^, PO 3oH 141, St Ctoud MN 563Q2L 



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■224 



73 Magazine • August, t9S4 77 



AUG 17*19 

The Morth^cfitral Mofitana Homfest wiir 
be tma &ei AyguS! 17- It. Ii964, in 8e3V$f 
Oeeic Parte mi Marden's Campground, 28 
miles SOulh of Havre MT. 

OAKLAND NJ 
AUG 18 

Ttte f^arriapo Mouniam ARC ^WA2SNA) 
will NHd lis &tti annual flea markei pn 
August I3v 1&S4. at theOaittand Americsn 
LegJon Mali. 05 Oak Str^t, QaKland NJ 
(Just 20 miles trpTTi llie GW Bridge). Admit- 
slen i$ S1.00 and rvorv4iam family mem- 
tiers witj be udmitted fre«. Indoor tables 
am S6.50 and tallgating Is $3.00, Talk-iri on 
1^7,49/146.49 and .52, For more Intofma 
llon^ contact Tom Rtsseouw N2AAZ, 63 
Page Drive, Oakfand NJ 07435, or call 
t20l>-337-e389 after 6:00 pm. 

HUNTSV?LLE AL 
AUG ia-19 

The Hunts vi1l« Hamfesi iirill tie held ort 
Saiurday and Sunday. August 18-19, 1964. 
at the Von Braun Qlvic Center^ Huntsvill^ 
AJ_ There la no admlsSkOn charge. Flea- 
markel li^btes are S4.0Q p0r d% and shqLj3d 
he resenncid In advance. There will be exhib- 
its, forums, an airHconditioned indoof Mea 
market, and non^iam acllvities. Tours of 
tile Ala£}ama Space and Rocket Cetiter are 
available fdr tha family. A timiied rninnber 
of camping sit^ wittt hookyps ane avail- 
aibm al the V^X on a rirsi-come, nrst- 
sefved basis, TaH^-in on ,Z*f.^ Fix more irv 
fofmaitlori^ uwfife Huntsvflle Hamfe^. 2804 
S. M^fiDnal Parkway. Huntsvyie AL 35801. 

LAFAYETTE IN 
AUG 19 

Tlie Tippecanoe Amateur Radio Assocl^ 
allon will hold its t3tfi annual hamfest on 
Suriday. August 19, 19S4, beginning at 
7:00 am. at the Tippecar»0& County Fair- 
grourMis, Teal Road an6 18th Street, La^ 
fayette IN Tickets are 13 00. Features win 
Include a large flea markef, dealers, arKJ 
reffeshments, Talk-fn on .13/73 and 52. 
For advance tickets and more infqrma^ 
tlon, write Lafayette Hamtest, Route 1, 
Box 63. West Point IN 47S02. 

TIUIMANSBURG HY 
AUG 25 

the Finger Lakes Karnfest will be t>ekj on 
August 2^. 1964, at trie Trufi^nsburg 
Fairgrounds. 12 miles NW ol Itliaca NY, 
Th^re Will be exhibit s, a flea market, 
retreshments, and overnight camping. For 
more Intormatton, ccrttact Wanida Lovejoy 
K02X, 443 Jerry Smith Road. Unslng NY 
14882 

eiOSSSURG PA 
AUG 25 

The Tioga County Amateur Radio Club 
witr nold its 81 h annual namfest on Satur- 
day. August 25. 1984, trorti 9;00 am lo 5:00 
pm^ at Island Park, Btossburg PA. just off 
Route 15. Admission Is S3.D0 and XYLs 
and children will be admitted free. Fea^ 
Lures will Include a flea market, dealers » 
traders, demonstrations of computers 
and 2-wav ATV. a QSL contest, an on- 
premise transmitter hunt, programs for 
XYLs and harmonicSs and radir^controtled 
airptaries. A snack bar wilt be avaKable. 
Ta!k-in on 146.lSf.79. 146^2^.52. and C8 
For more inlofmation, contact Carl E- Kinv 
bfe WB3EUE. PO Box 37. Cowancsqi*© PA 
16918, or pfione tB 14)^7*5345. 

HERSHEY PA 
AUG 26 

The Central Pennsylvania Repeater As- 



sociation, Inc., will hold hs nth annual 
KamfesilCompulerfe^t On August 26. 
1904, adiaoent to Hersh^ypprii, Hershey 
PA Registration Is $3.00 and wiv^ and 
ctiildren wilt be admined fraeu Ttiere wHI 
be a special reduced admission to Her- 
sheypark tor families of refllst rants. At the 
large indoor dealer and Ilea market area, 
lO^foot spaces are SB.OO each. B-foot 
tables are $4.00 each, and single efectric 
plugs are Sl.OO each. A large outdoor 
Ealigating area and tood and refreshments 
will be av<inable a^so, Talk -In on 145.47, 
14a.7€. and ^46 52 Ml-fcr. Foe tun her fnfof- 
mation, ccmtact TImottty R. Fan us 
WB3DNA. ei40 Chambers Hill Road. Har- 
Hstjurg PA 17111, Or phone t717>-564.O807 
between 12:00 noon and 8:00 pm, or con- 
tact Barrle L. Schwartz W3ENL. Hamtest 
Secret a ry^ 3&45 September Drive, Camp 
Hill PA 17011, or phone (71 7)-763-8728. 

MARYSVILLEOK 

AUG 26 

The Uruofi County Amateur Radio Club 
wtlt liotd tis Bth annual htamfest on Sunday. 
August 28. 1984. beginning at 6,DG am, at 
■he fairgrounds in Marytvllle OH. Tickets 
are S2.50 in advance and S3.00 a I the gale; 
XYLs and children will ba admitted free A 
ID-foot flea-market space Is $1.00 {no elec- 
tricity available). There will be food. For fur* 
ther information and tickets, contact Gene 
Kirtiy WBB^N. 13613 US 36, Marysville OH 
43040. or pttom (SlS^&H^Mee 

CHEROKEE OK 
AUG2fl 

The 2nd annuat Great Salt Ptams Ham- 
test will be held on August 26, 1984. From 
S:00 am to 5^00 pm. at the Community 
Building on the south side of the Great 
SaU Plains Lake In nortti^entral Okla^ 
homa. Features will include technical fo- 
rums^ organizaiiioaal nneetings, free swap 
taMes. re*feshfn«?nis. Noniioe exams, and 
a noon poMuck dinner, Ovuml^hl campr 
ing arvd RV h(x>ktjps are available at the 
Lakes State f^rk. Talk-tn on the U7MtJ30 
SaJt Plains repeater. For more infofirta* 
tion. write Steven Wall WASUTO. Box 222, 
Cherokee OK 73728, or phone {405)-598- 
3467. 

MARSHALL Ml 
AUG 26 

Tlie fifth annual Trunk 'n' Trailer Bash 
will be held on Saturday. August 2a 19B4, 
from 7:00 am to 3.-00 pm. at tt>e Calhoun 
County FairgTOunds, Michigan A^^enue |l- 
94 and 1^69), Marshall Mi Donations are 
SI. SO in advance (until August t5th) and 
$2.00 at the gate: ten^pack tickets in ad- 
vance are $iO.0O. Trunk sales spaces are 
S3.00 each, tO-foot booths are $5.00 each 
tllmited tables available for $5.00 each), 
and on-site overnight camping ts S500. 
Slacks and free parking will be available 
Talk-in on the 145.35 repeater (down 6001 
and 146-52 5im|i4ex- For mdf^ information^ 
send an SASE to Earl Goodrich K8UCQ, 
117 East MicTiigan Avefiue. Marshall Ml 
49068, Of phone {616^781-5555. 

SEWELL NJ 
AUG 26 

The Gloucester County ARC will sponsor 
the DC ARC 251 h ArvnJvefsary HanVComp 
F^ on August 26. T984, from 8i]0 am to 
4:00 pm^ at the Gloucester County CotJege, 
Sewell NJ. Admission is S2J0O in advance 
arvJ $2.50 al the 6oot. laitgating is $3.00 per 
space. Food, facilities, and a shuttle biA 
from the parking area to the hamfest will be 
available, features will Include seminars, 
contests^ computer demonstrations, a flea 
market, and commercial displays. This will 
be the official VEC testing center for test- 
ing Novice through Extra. There will be 810 



forms available for momtn§ Bfid aftenrtoon 
testing and no pre-regtst ration is neces- 
sary. Talk-in ofi 14&52. I47.7&ia and 
223^36/224^8. For further information and 
reservalipns. contact Mill Goldman K3W1L 
801 Crown Point Road, West vi lie fvij Oao93, 
(QOgHSS-OSOO, or John M Fisher K2JF, PO 
Box 37a Pllman NJ 08071, 1609)^589^2318 

HAMPTON lA 
AUG 26 

The Iowa TSMeter Net will spor^sot a 
hamfest and ptonii: on AuQimt 26, t3B4. kn 
lf» WKW PaiK one mile twrlft ol Hampton, 
off Higfiway 55. Thei^ will t>e a poitud^ din- 
ner at noon, Talk^n on 147.15^65 {Ma^on 
City repeater ^. For more info<rmation, con- 
tact Philip D, Brown WDiJFWB. 1459 3rd 
Street SE, Mason City lA 50401, or Lovelle 
Pedersen WBOJFF, 2327 W. Relnbeck 
Road, Hudson lA 50643. 

LEBANON TN 
AUG 2g 

T?ie Short Mountam Repealer Club will 
sponsor th« Lebanon Ham^ffi^t on Suixlay. 
August 26. 1984. at Cedars ol Lebanon 
Slate Park, US Highway 231. Lebanon TN. 
There will t>e outdoor facilities only and 
eKhibitofs musi bring their own tables. 
Food and drink wilf t>e available. Talk-in 
on 146.31/14691. For further Information, 
contact Morris Duke W4WXa 210 Diss- 
payr^ Drive Oone^son TN 37214. 

DANVILLE IL 
AUG 26 

The Vermilion County Amateur Rad^u As- 
sociation win hold Its annual hamfest ar^l 
flea markei on Sunday. August 26, 1984, 
from 6:00 am to 3:00 pm, at the clubhouse In 
Harrison Park Wesi, Danville IL. Tickets are 
$1,00 m advance end $1,50 at the gate. Talk- 
in on 146,22/^2 an6 JS2 (KB9GS repealer). 
For nxire inlormatiorv. contact John Curi- 
ningham WA9WJCu Box RY, Perrysvilie IN 
47974, ai7>7«M444, or Joe Mayer KB9GS. 
613 £ Kelly Avertue. Box 356 Westvilfe IL 
6IBS3, {217^287'2946. 

ST. CHARLES MQ 
AUG 26 

The St. Charles Amateur Radio Club will 
hold Hamfest 64 on August 26. 1^84, at 
the SL Charles City Hall Complejic. Qen- 
erai admission is $1.00. The Harvester 
Uons witl provide the bart>eque River- 
front Park and the historic south Main 
Street area are [ust a few btocks away. 
Talk-in on 146.07/. 67 and .52 simplex. For 
more information, coniaci Ron Ochu KO0Z. 
1914 VVest 5th Street, St. Charles MO 
63301. 

LARAMIE WY 
SEP 7-9 

The Northern Colorado A^. the Univer- 
sity of Wyomtr^g ARC, and tf»i S*iy-Wy ARC 
will iointly sponsor tf>e fifth annua] High 
Plains Ham Flaur^dup on Septemter 7-9. 
1984, at the Veitlow Pine Campground tn the 
Medicine B<5w Natiortai Forest |35 mtles 
urest of Cheyoniii^. Tliere are no registra- 
tion fees except for a n'KXieat Forest Ser- 
vice charge for campers. Saturday's sche»d- 
ure will include a campfire cookout and 
brIng-your-Dwn covered-dish extravaganza 
(barbecued harriburgers and liquid refreshr 
mei>is provided), with sir%g-afof^ music and 
entertarnmeit by regional talent. Also on 
Saturday will be a giant taiigale swapfesL a 
Transmitter hunt, and tecttnlcal displays, 
TaIMn on j22iS2 and ,25fB5 For further ir^ 
formation, write Jack Hayes V/7COIt I32l 
E. 22 Street, Cheyenne WY fi200L 

UNIONTOWN PA 
SEP 8 

The Unlontown Amateur Radio Club 



wiri bold its 35th annual Gacfest on tite 
Saturday after Latxif Day, September B, 
1984. on the club grounds located on the 
Old RItsthJfg Road, just oil Rmite 51 and 
the 119 tjypass, Uniontown PA^ Regis tra* 
lion is $3.00 each or 2 for $5,00 There 
win be free parking, free coffee, and a 
tree swap and shop with registration. Re- 
freshments will be avaf table. Talk-in on 
147.645/045 and 144.57/17 For fu^her 
information, contact UARC Gables! Com- 
mittee. C/O Jo^m T Cefmak WB3D0D. PO 
Box 4^. Republic PA 15475, or phone 
{4t2)-246^2870 

WINDSOR ME 
SEP 6 

The Augusta Emergency Amateur Radio 
Unit will sponaor the 1964 ARRL-sanc- 
tioned Windsor Hamfesi on Saturday, Sep- 
tember 8. 1984, at the Windsor Fairgrounds, 
Windsor ME The gate donation is still $1 00 
and campirvg will tie available on Friday and 
Saturday nighta. Features vrill Indude a 
Ilea mar^t, programs, speakers, oocrvner- 
clal distribuiors. light rneaJs, ami the tradi 
tional Saturday bean and casserole supper. 
Talk-in on the \AB2SiM repeater. For fur- 
ther information, contact Don Hanson 
NIAZH, RFO #2, Box 3678, Greene ME 
04236, or phone f207)-946-7557, 

SAN ANGELO TX 
SEP 8-8 

The San Ang^p Amateur RadJO G3ut> w>ll 
nciid CFN TEX HAMFEST ^ on September 
8-9, 1934, in the San Angeio Conventfoa 
Center. TicHeis are S5i30 im advance and 
SeOO at the door, Hours for Saturday are 
noon to 6;00 pm and tor Sunday, 8:00 am to 
2:00 pm. Special events for th# ladles in- 
clude a Saturday afternoon tour of Fort 
Concho and Old San Angeto, There wiEl do 
semirvars and group meetings Saturday 
afternoon and Sunday momirif^ and a re- 
ception for beaters folEowod by a social 
hour for amateurs on Saturday n^ght. Talk- 
in on 146J)4^.94. For pre-registraiion or no- 
letiTnote} accammodalrons, write CEN TEX 
HAMFEST 84, PO Box 3751, San Ar^oTX 
76802. 

MELBOURNE PL 
SEP 8-9 

Ttie Platinum Coast Amate-ur Radio Soci- 
ety will hold lis 1 9th annual hamfest and In^ 
door swap-and shop tiea market on Sep- 
tember 8-9. 19$4, al the MelbourT^e Audilo^ 
num. A(^nls9ion is SSJOO in advance and 
54iX) at the door. Swap tables are £1000. 
There wilt be food and plenty of free parking 
available, as well as awards, forums, and 
meetings, Tatk4n on .25A65 and .52/.52, For 
reservations, tables, and more Information, 
write PCARS. PO Boje 10O4, Melbourne FL 
32901. 

TORRINGTON CT 
SEP 9 

CO Radio Club wilt rK>id its tiamfest 
or^ Sunday, Seplemtier 9. 1964, from 8:00 
am to 4:00 pm, at the Torrington Retirees 
Drop^ln Center, East Altierl Street, Admis- 
sion IS £2.00, tables are S7.00, and the fee 
for lailgaling la %5W. Talk-in on 146,05 
and 147.24. For more Information, write 
Donald D. Taylor KA1GKJ. PO Box 455, 
Watertown CT 067^. 

MONETTHO 
SEP 9 

The Ozailu Amateur Radio Society wifl 
tiold the 3rd annual Ozafks Amateur Radio 
Club Congress and Swapfest on Sunday, 
Septembers. 1984. bBginnlng eII 11:00 am, 
at the Monotl City Park, Junction ot high- 
ways US 60 and MO 37, Moneli MO (bfr 
tween SpringfieEd and Joplin) There is no 




n 73 Magazine • August, 1984 



admission ct^arge and no Chaf-ge tor svtap 
$pace (av3Jl9Dl^B Q^ ^ first-come, firat- 
9«rve basia). The buffet dinner t>egms at 
IlOO pm (brtng a single covered dhsli and 
3 hare In I he feaai), Tafk-in on Ihfi 
14€37L97 repeater and 7_250 MHz. For 
more infoffnatkon, contact the Ozark s A rn- 
af&ur Rddio Society. Box 327. Aurofa MO 

CABTEnViLLE IL 
SEP» 

The Shawnee Amateur Radio Assoc Ga- 
llon wW tK>ld i\s 2Sth annual hamfest on 
September 9, 19S4, at Ihe John A Logan 
Juniof College Campus. Route 13 west. 
CortefviUe It t$ miles east ot Carbondalef. 
AdiTil^siOii k$ $3.00 and flea-market tables 
are free. Activities will Include forums ^ 
ladies events, and lunch served on the 
campus- There wIM be campmg available 
across the road, motels nearby, and p\en- 
tf of free parhiftg. Talk in on 3.925 iwm 
8:00 am to 9:00 am and an 146-25/^6. Fof 
more infofmation. phooe Bill Johnson 
WSERI at {6iaH57-75eS. 

GRAND RAPIDS Mt 
SEP 16 

The Grand Rapids Amateur Radio As- 
sociation, fnc.. MfiH hold Ms annual Swap 
and Shop on Saturday, Septemt>ef 15, 
tdS4^ beginning at 8:00 am, at (he Kiid- 
sonvllle Fairgrounds. There will be deal- 
era, a concession, an Indoor sales area, 
and an OLildoor trunk-swap area. Talk-in 
on 146.16^76. For more information, 
write Grand Rapids Amateur Radio Asso^ 
elation. Inc. PO Box t248. Grafl^J Rapids 
Ml 49601. 

PEORIA IL 

SEP ts^ie 

The Peoria Area Amateur Radio Club 
win hold its Peoffa Superfest 'B4 on Sep- 
iemt»er 1^-16. 1da4. ai (he Exposition Gar- 
dens. W. No^thmoof Road, Peofia IL- The 
gate opens at 6rO0 am and the Commer- 
cial Building at 9:00 am- Admis^ron is 
S3,C}0 in advance and S4.D0 at ttie gatei 
Children under 12 will be admitted free. 
Activities will include amateyr-radlo and 
computer displays, a nuge fFea market, a 
free bus to Nprthwoods Malt on Sunday; 
and a Saturday-nighl mformat g^t-to- 
geltief at Hen t age House Smorgasbord. 
S209 H. Ml. Hawley Road, Peorta II- There 
are full campmg facilities ofi the grourtds- 
Talk'in on 146,16^.76 {W9UVil For reserva- 
tions and more information, send an 
SASE to Superfest "84, PO Box 3461. 
Peoria IL 61614. 

IfT- CLEMENS Ml 
SEP 16 

The L'Anse Creuse Amateur Ra<fio Ctub 
mn nold their 12th ainnual swap and shop 
on Sunday, September 16, 1984. Irom 3:00 
am to 3:00 pm. at the L'Anse Creuae High 
School. Mt Ctem&ns ML Take 1-94 east- 
Imund to the Metropolitan Parkway exit; 
tl^eit take the Metropolitan Parkway to 
Crocker^ turn left on Crocker to Reimold 
and then right on Reimold to the last 
school. L'Anse Creuse High School. Ad- 
mission is Si. 00 in advance and $2.00 at 
the door. FCC representatives will be 
there, as well as plenty ot new and used 
goaf. There will be ^ots of food and park- 
ing. Tam-^n Ofi 147.69/.09 and 146.52. For 
more infoitnation, send an SASE to Mau- 
rice Sch*eiecaiie NSCEU. 15835 Touraine 
Court, Mt. Clemens Ml 4BC44, or phone 
(313}-2aai84l 

NEW KENSINGTON PA 
5EPI» 

Ttie Skyvpew RaddO Society v^H ^)Old its 



annual hamf«st ori Sunctey, Septemt»r 16, 
T964. from noon until 4:00 ptn, at the club 
grounds on Turkey RJdge Road. New Kefh 
sington PA. RegistratEcn tee is $2,00 and 
vendors' fees are $4.00. Awards will be 
presented. Talk-m on ,04/.64 and .52 
simplex, 

JUIGUSTA GA 
SEP 16 

The Amaleur Radio Club of Augusta wtll 
hold Its annual hamfest on September 16, 
1964. at Julian Smith Casino Park. Tickets 
are SI .00 each. 6 tor $500, or 13 lor St 0.00. 
Features will Include a flea rrkar^iet in the 
paffclng lol^ a bartiscue:, refreshments, 
(Iaal0^ enteriainment, and on Saturday 
evening^ a hospitality room at Ramada Inn 
West, Washington Road, rooms lOS-liO* 
Taik-m on 145.49 - 600, For more Informa- 
tion, send an SASE to D. F. MMIer WB4rHT. 
Hamfest Chairman, 4505 Shawnee Road, 
Maf1ir>ez GA 30907. or call 1h(4O4>«6O^70Q. 

GRAY SLAKE IL 
SEP 22-23 

The Chicago FM Club will sponsor Ra- 
dio Expo 'B4 on Saturday and Sunday, Sep- 
tember 22-23. 19&4. at the Lake County 
Fairgrounds. R!es. 120 and 45, 6ray slake 
IL Tickets, good for both days, aie S3.00 
in advance arKJ $4.00 at tt^ gate The flea 
marlEet will open at 6:00 am and the exhilt> 
its will open at 9:00 am There will be a 
giant outdoor flea-market afea. Reserved 
Indoor flea-market tables are available for 
$5.00 per day, Other features will include 
seminars, technical taf*(s, iadles' pro- 
grains. ar*d free parking arKJ owemighl 
cairfping. Talk tn on 146.16/.7B. For move 
Intormatiion. s£fid an SASE to Radio Expo 
84. Box 1532, Evanston I L 60204^ or phone 
(3i2h5B2-6923. 

VIRGINIA BEACH VA 
SEP 22*23 

The 1984 ARRL Roarwike Division Con- 
vention and 9th annual Arrmtear Radio/ 
Computer Fair will be hield on Saturday and 
Sunday, September 22-23, T984, from 9;fl0 
am to 5:00 pm both days, at Ihe Virginia 
Beach VA Pavflion. Admission for both 
days is £4.00 in advance and $5,00 at the 
door. Flca-market tables ase £5.00 for one 
day arKJ SSOO for boifi days. Features irv 
elude dealers, special displays, forums, 
computer equipment, a gtajit Ilea rf^rket, 
[reeXYL bingo, and movies for the kids. For 
tickets and more Information, write Jim 
Harrison N4NV, 1234 Little Bay Avenue, 
Norfolk VA 23503. or call (804)-567.16g5. 

WICHtTA FALLS TX 
SEP 22-23 

The ajinuat Wichita Amateur Radio 
Society Tornado Allay Hamtest wfff be 
held on Saturday and Sunday, September 
22-23, 1984. at the National Guard 
ArrriiOry, Wichita Falls TX. The hours on 
Saturday will be 9:00 am lo 5:00 pm and on 
Sunday. 9:00 am to 2:00 pm. Begisi ration 
will tsegm at g::00 am both days and is 
S4.00 per person In advance and $5-00 at 
the door. Pre-reglsiratlon doses Wednes- 
day, September 19th. There will lae a large 
Indoor flea mafket and tables are $3.00 
eachr Features will include commercial 
dealers' displays, computer dealers and 
demonstfations. tadies' activities, and 
special events, tt you wish fo take an 
amateur e^am, send FCC form 810 lo the 
hamfest address prior to August t7, 1984. 
A concession stand will he open both 
days. Talk-in on 148,34^94, V47.75/.15, 
449.30/444.30, and 449-20^444.20. For more 
Infonnation or preHregistratiOh, contact 
WARS Hamtest. PO Box 4383, Wicrnta 
FaJis TX 7630B. 




GAiNESVILLE GA 

SEP 23 

the 11th annual Lanlerland ARC Mani- 
fest will be held on September 23, 1984, 
t:»eginning at 9:00 am, in the Holiday Hall 
at Holiday Inn, Gainesville GA. There wiJI 
be free tabl^ and an inside display area 
lor dealers rescfving in advance, A large 
parting lot will be available For the frae 
flea market. Othef features will ir^lude a 
f eft-foot CW contest, a ladies' country 
store, and many activities. Talk-in on 
146-07/.67. For moi'e information and 
reservailons. contact PhlJ Loveless 
KC4UC, 3694 Thompson Bend. Gaines- 
vitle OA 30506^ or call (404^532^160. 

WICHITA KS 
SEP 23 

The Wichita Hamfest will be held on 
September 23. 1964, at Camp Hiawatha, 
1701 West 5lst Street North, Wichita KS 
67204. Features will incitxle a flea marKet, 
programs, and cormT>erc4al exhibits. For 
mofE tnformatkMi, contact NofTtt Trairriui 
WAOHWH. 340 S. ist,^ Clearwater KS 67026. 
or phone {316)^584-6425. 

WILLIMANTIC CT 
S£P23 

The Natchaug Amateut Radio Associa- 
tion will hold its annual giant f tea marKelort 
Sunday. September 23. 1984, from 9:00 am 
(o 4:00 pm, at the Elks Hooie, 198 Pleasant 
Street [oft Route 32), Wlllimanllc CT Ad- 
mission Is $2.00 and children under 16 will 
be admitted free- Tables are $500 In ad* 
vance and $700 ai the door (dealers will 
be admtlted at S^OO am^ Food, drinks, arid 
free parkir>g will be avaHabie Talk-in on 
the 147.3Cjr> 47.90 repeater and .52 direct 
For more information, contact Ed Sade^ki 
KA1HR, 49 Circle Drive, WiMlmantlc CT 
06226, or phone {203H56'7029. 

ADRIAN III 
SEP 23 

The Adrian Amateur Radio Club will 
hold its I2tti annual hamfest on Survday, 
Septemtwr 23, 1984, at ITie Lenawee Coun- 
ty Fairgrounds, Adrian Ml. Because tables 
are limited, reservations (by check or 
cash) must be made no later than 
September 15, 1964, for more intofma* 
tioa tickets, or tables, contact Adrian Am- 
ateur Radio Cfub, PC Bosf 26, Adrian Ml 
49221 . 

HAMILTON ONT CAN 

OCT e 

T?ie HamHton Amateur Radio Cfub. Inc.. 
will hold its ^id annual flea market on Sat^ 
urday. (^totief 6, 1964, beginning at 8:30 
am^ at Mamtt Hall, Ancaster Fairgrounds, 
62B Highway 53 East. Admission is $2.00, 
FEea-market vendors' S-foot tables &re $4.00 




plus admission and comfnerclal vendors' 
S-foot tables are $10-00 with admission irh 
eluded- There wNI be room for 150 vendors 
and setup will be from 7:00 am to Q:30 am. 
Coffee, soft drlni<s, and sandwiches will be 
available. Talknn on 146.1&146.m (VE3NCFJ, 
For space reservations, contact HARC 
Fiea^Market Coffmittee, PO Bok 253, t4an> 
lit on ONT LSN 3C8 For more infomTatkm, 
contact Stan VE3GFE on VE3NCF. 



SANTA FE NM 
OCT 7 

Tha Northern New Mexico Hamfest will 
be held on October 7. t9B4. from 3:00 am 
to 3:00 pm, at the Terrero Oioup Sheltef, 
along the Pecos River, east of Santa Fe. 
Admission is $3.00 for aduJta and $1,50 for 
children. Activities will include a tailgate 
flea market, group meetings, family 
games, fishing, and picnlcking^ There will 
be hot dogs, chips, soft drinks, and coffee 
available, as well as Iree Saturday^ight 
camping. Talk-in on local repealers and 
.52 simplex. For furtticf information 
pfease send an SASE to Northern New 
Mexico ARC, c/o Bob Norton N5EPA, 
Route 3, Box 95-15. Santa Fe NM 87501. or 
call on 3,939 MHa al 01 00 UTC. 

VONKERS NY 
OCT? 

Th« Yonkers Amateur Radio Club will 
sponsor the Yonkers Electronics Fair and 
Giant Flea Market on Sunday, October 7, 
1934, from 9:00 am lo 4:00 pm, rain or 
shine, ai the Yonkers Municipal Parking 
Garage, Corner of Neppefhan Avenue and 
New Mam Street. Yonkers NV. Admission 
fs $2.00 each and children under 12 will be 
admitted free. Gates wiil tx open to sell- 
ers at 8:00 am and there will be a $8,00 ad- 
mission per parking space which will also 
admit one (bring your own tables). Refresh* 
ments, free parking, and sanitary facilities 
will be available, as well as unlimited tree 
coffee. There will t>e live demonstrations 
all day and a giant auction at 2:00 pm. 
Talk'in on t46_265Tn46.865R or .52 direct 
For more I nf or mat ton. write YARC, 53 Hay- 
ward Street. YonKers NY 10704, or phone 
O14}-9e9l053. 

PARAMUSNJ 
OCT 1 4 

The Bergen ARA will hold a Ham Swa^^ 
*n' Sell on Octot^r 14, 1984, from a.i)0 am 
to 4:00 pm, at Bergen Community College, 
400 Pa ramus Road, Pa ramus NJ. There 
will be taiigating only; bring your own ta- 
ble. Admission for sellers is $4.00; buyers 
will be admitted free. Thousands of 
spaces writ be avaitable. TaJk-in on .79/. 19 
arvd 52 For more infofrnation. write Jim 
Greer KK2U. 444 Berkshire Road. Ridge- 
wood NJ 0745O» Of phone (201H^5'2855, 
evenings only^ 



H/IM HELP 



Tornado and/or thundersiorm-detec- 
lion anicle from very early 7$ magazine 
needed- Will be happy to f>ay any reason- 
able copy costs. Will atso pay copy costs 
for any other electronics articles on Ihe 
same subfeci. 

Jlm Weir WB6BHI 

132B1 Grass Valley Ave. 

Grass Valley CA 9594 S 

I am kKiktng fof the servk^ manual fof 



Ihe NCX*3. or schematics for the power 
supply tof the NCX-3 (by National). 

OmrfsBoftteyWAtURS 

186 HIckam DrWe 

loringAFB ME 04751 

{207>32B-4432 

Wanted: At water Kent speaker. 

a a Galbraiih K5TVC 

4303 Kings way Drive 

FafTfungton NM 87401 



I 



73 Magazine * August, 1984 79 



FUN! 



John Edwards Ki2U 

PO Box 73 

Middte Vii f age NY 11379 

THE POSTMAN 
GETS RELIEF 

Th33 y^r'9 FUN1 Poll, Ihe fourtti annual 
rnst ailment saw our postman get aoma 
much neodfld rest. The aCquisliFon of PO 
Box 73 and ih& use of aloctronic mall 
meant that my friendJy mail carrier didn't 
have 10 suller this year with S heavy m^all 
sack and key ^rdewalks. 

Response (ftveia w«re down trus tfrne. in 
1963, 1,190 hams wmte in to express their 
views. Tills year, 987 of you mailed or dec* 
tronicallr tfansmltted yoyr responses. 
Stifl, that's a sigr^if leant amount of tnall to 
open, read, and tabulate. It took four peo- 
ple to accomplish the manual work and 
five cqmpulers (a TRS-SO Model IN, an Ap- 
ple lie. an Atari 40O, and a TR&-&D Model 
TOO) to manipujate the numbers. Main- 
frame computers m Coiumbua. Ohio, and 
McLean, Virginia^ transmitted lite elac- 
iTOfiic responses to FUN! HQ- 

H»e'5 what yoy ha^f to say. 

ELEMENT 1 
BACKGROUND 

i}Sex: 

A) [Wale— Q7Vo 
B^ Female— 3% 

Wo surprise rtere. 

3 Age: 

A} 1& or b«4ow— 3% 
B)1&-21— 5% 
Q 22-39-27% 

D) 40-59— 38"^^ 

E) 60 or alxive^27V* 

The graying of Bmaieur r9</io^ These num- 
bers are headirtg upward witt} each poll. 

3) License class; 
A J Movice— fi% 

B) Technician^ 12% 
QGeneiaE— 31% 

0) AdvarKfid— 3§V* 

Ej Ej(tm— ta% 
Som&fiQw. f expected more Extras to re- 
spond: 

4) Mumbor at years Hcensod: 

A) 1 year or less— 2% 

B) 1-5 years— 31% 
Q6-10 years— 13% 
D)1 1-20 years— 32% 

E) 21 years and up — £2% 
Jtisr about ttw same statistics as tasr 
teaf. 

5) Do you have a rvew {posi-March TS) 

Ay Yea— 52% 

a) No— 48% 
Th& 'yesses'' break the 50% mark for the 
first time, 

6) IHow many hours a we«h do you dovote 
to amateur radio? 

A) 0- ^ hour— B% 

B) 2-5 hours— 35% 
Oe- to hours— 33% 
D) 11-20 r>ours— 19% 
EJ21 hours or n>ore— 5% 

Acthfity somms down a ttit twm test year. 

7) Which HF band do you use most? 

A) flO-75 meters— 17% 

B) 40 meiers— 25% 
C)2Q metefs— 21% 

D) 15 and/or ID meters— 24% 



E) Don't operate HF— 13% 
About the same numtets as fast year. 
Hexi lime, wa'tt inctude the yvAftC tmnds. 

SjWhicn VHF4JHF band do yo*i use 
most^ 

A) & metaf a— 2% 

B) 2 meJets— 74% 

C) 220 MH£-6% 

D) 420 MHz and/or up— 4% 

EJ Don"! operate VHF'UKF-14% 
Aiso about the same, 

9) Which mode do you use most? 
AJ SSB-42% 

B) CW— 16% 
O FM-31% 
DJ RTfY— 5% 

E) Other —4% 
Same again. 

101 How much rrw^ney have you spent on 
amateur radio within the past year? (In- 
dude 05L eKpenses, magazine subscript 
tlons. club dues, and other incidental ex- 
penses.) 

A) 0-S2S0— 51 % 

BJ S251-$500— 30% 

C>$5i0l-t1,0i»— 13% 

O>St.00t'$a.500^-4% 

E>S2,5C1 and up— 2% 
The economy is up. bat ham sates are stiii 
down. 

ELEMENT 2 
SOCIAL CHARACTERISTICS 

11} Has amateur radio influenced your 
career choice? 

A) Greatly— 24% 

B} Somewhat— 52% 

C) Not at an— 54V* 

Less of an intiuence than tast year. 

t2) Should the ARBL get rid of the OXCC 
Honor Roll? 
AJYe3-6l% 

B) No-3G% 

Sending a message lo Newington. 

13} Politically, how would you define 
yourseif? 

A) Coftservati^ve^Sl % 

Bj Middle^MhehToad— 4e% 
QUberal— 3% 
We're getfirfg more conserrati^e, 

14) Should the AfTRL get rid of the DX Cen^ 
tury Club? 
A)Ya9— 51% 

B) No— 49% 
We Ve spfit. 

t6)How old were you when you first be- 
came a ham? 

AJ 15 or b^low— 13% 

B) 16-21—50% 

Q 22-39-21% 

DJ 40-59-11% 

E) 60 or atxTVB- 5% 
Wo significant change trom iast year. 

16)ShDurd tha FCC mcrease (he speeds 
on amateur CW exarrinatlons? 

A) Yes- 13% 

Bl No— 87% 
Shaky tisii. 

17J Do you own a fKsrrve compute*? 

A) Yes-5S% 

B) No— 45% 

WeWe ttroken the SO-pefce^t barrier f Who 
wouid have thought it. oniy a few years 
ago? 

18) Do you lb Ink hams. compAftid to com- 
puter hobbyists, are: 

A) More technicalEy Inclined In their hot> 

by— 26% 



B| Less tflCtini<:aHy iiicUn^ in tfveN' hob^ 
by— 38% 

Q About equally sliiOed In ttieir tiob- 
by— 36% 
Not much change here. 

t9) Do yoy Itiink that home computing is 
siphonlr^g people (including youngsters) 
away from amateur radio? 

A) Yes— 60% 

B) No— 40% 

if you don't beHeve this, you're kidding 

fOUfSStt 

201 Will ttie volunteer wtam system In- 
crease cheafir^? 

A} Yes-45% 

B^ No— 55% 
Not exact iy a vote of confidence. 

21) Should volunteer examiners be al- 
lowed to collect a fee to help defray ex- 
penses? 

A) Yes— 71% 

B) No— 29% 

A/rd rite fCC agrees. 

22^ Has ham radio hieJped to maKA you a 
better person? 

A) Yes— 75% 
8) No— 25% 

That*s rtice. 

23) Should ham licenses have a minimum 
age requirement? 

AjYes— 45% 

B) No— 55% 

Oh, pooh to Y^ti 45 percenters. You want 
to fiiiJ the hobby ^ Of what? 

24) Should hiams be subject lo periodic re- 
lesting? 

A) Yets— 6% 

B) No-94% 

Ah. we sif remain confident in our skills^ 



ELEMENTS 
OPERATING HABITS 

25) It The users wete restricted to r£at« 
communication only (no phiorw or CW op- 
eration}, would you be in favor of a no- 
code 220-Mliz, digitaf-cfass license? 

A) Yes-43% 

B) No— 57% 

I guess 220 ts too busy as i J is. 

26) Would you be in favor of a no-codg 
220-MHz. digital -class ticket if H pefmil- 
ted phone opefaflon In addition to data 
tra^smissiort? 

A) Yes-6% 

B) No-'94% 

/ he^f you, / A«a/ yotil 

27) Have you ewer used a personal com- 
puter In connection with your amateur- 
radio activities? 

A) Yes— 70% 

B) No— 30% 

Up}f percefit from tast year A v&ry good 
sign. 

26) Is it tirne to comptete^y dereguiate am- 
ateur radio by having the FCC turn ovef af( 
responsibility tor liam operation to ttK 
amateur community? 

A)Ye3-6S% 

B) No— 45% 
Exactty the same numtsers as iast year, i 
guess we stiti dott't totaffy trust ourselves. 

29) What do you think of peopFe who view 
pay-television services with MOS convert- 
ers and satellite dishes that are not ap^ 
proved by t^oddcastej^s? 

A) Tt>ey're skunks --37% 

B\ They're within their flgtits- 63% 
Okay. 

301 Should we get nd of, or roduce in size, 
the CW subbands? 

A) Yes— 61% 

B) No— 39% 

No big change here. 

31} Do you think DX nets have a place in 
ham radio? 



A) Yes— 34% 
B)Nd— 66% 
Ler's dump 'em 

32) Do you think nets in §er»efal have a 
p1ac« in tiam radio. 

A) Yes -70% 

B) No— 30% 

A tiberaf attitude. 

33) The next time a ham operates from 
space, which band should he/she use? 

A) 2 meters- 12% 
e) 220 MHz— 4% 
O 450 MHz— 36% 

D) An even h+gner tsaiKl— 12% 

E) Sbouldnl bottler to operate— 36% 
Says a iot about the state 0t 2 meters and 
amateur radm rn generat. 

34] If, while tuning across a band, you 
heard a net called "Jammers Interna- 
llonal" Jn progress, ivould you; 
A} Jam It— 8% 

B) Ignore It— 13% 

C> GofTiplam to the FCC of $omo ottier 
or ga nization —S3 % 
D) Usten— T5% 
EjJoinM— 1% 
A serjsfbfe attftiide.t t think. 

35) If required, could you solidly copy CW 
at me speed ai which you were licensed? 

A) Yes-70% 

B) No— 30% 
Yeafj, sure, 

36) If r^uired, could you paa$ the FCC 
Itraory test lor your license class? 

A) Yes- 72% 

B) No— 28% 
Uh. huh. 

37) Have you ever purposely operated in 
an amateur subband you weren't licensed 
tb uae? 

A) Yes— 10% 
B^ No— 90% 

Whew. 

38) Do you think the ARRL attacts ama- 
teur radio in a positive mannef? 

A\ Yes— 3T% 

B) No— ^% 

Those figures need some work. 

39} Do you ever speak to foreign, non En- 
gllsn speaking hams In their own \ax> 
guage? 

A) Always— 2% 

B) Some times— 16% 
Ql attempUi-'25% 

D) flarely- 5^ « 

E) Never— 52% 

No maior change from fast rime. 

409 E^ you leal yourself competent to re- 
place 1f% finals in a tut>e-type rig? 

A) Yes— 90% 

BJNo- 10% 

You puii on the gtass part. 

41) Do you feel yourself competent to re- 
place the finals Ln a transistor type rig? 

AJ Yes— 74% 
6) No— 26% 
A handy taient, to be sure. 

42) Do you solfler (ogeihef your own c^sax 
conr>eetor3? 

A) Yes— 95% 

B) No -5% 
Good. 

43) Is your antenna system mounted on 
your house or a lower? 

A) House— 93% 

B) Tower— 7% 

I don't have room tor a rower. eiih&. 

44) Have you evflf designed yoyr own an- 
tenna? 

A} Yes— 4% 

B) No— 96% 
The gremtins crept into this question, i 
don't know who was responsible for iwav- 
ing it off the response form^ but whoever 
you are, t sentence thee to two-dozen 
fashes witti a section of HQ-bdiu (better 



80 73 Magazine • August, 1984 



m^ke tftst RG-B/VX By ttt9 way, fve never 
dmignsds tkyhook, 0ith^t. 

45) What do you think ol conlestfng? 

A) Great — 10% 

B) Good— 25% 
QOkay— 11% 

D^ DonH like ir— 23% 

Nq signtticAnt cftange /WNr*. 

46) What do you ihinN of DKing? 
A} ereal— 35Ve 

e) Good-27% 

C) Okay— 12% 

D^ Don t like it— 12% 
E^Desprsen— 14% 

47) WTiat do you think ot repeaters? 
A) Grear— 3S% 



BjGood— 1Q% 
O Okay— 36% 

D) Don^t UH^ them''ia:% 

E] Despise them— 6% 
Of here. 

46) Whal do you think of t raff re hamjling? 

A) Great— 10% 

B) Good- 29% 

C) CHtay— 29% 
D)Don'i like Jt— 11% 
E) Despise ft— 21% 

Of h&fe, &Hher (ho-humj. 

49} Ef you heard an emergency n9t In prc^g* 
ress, would yonj iimmadiately jfotn In and 
Offec your services? 

A) Yes— 64% 

B)No— 36% 
/ say. sray Away until you*re catfad ftw. 



SOfStiOiild all hani5 te reqjiired to loin 
tome type ol nalior^al amateur-#adici orga- 
nization? 

A) Yes— 11% 

B) No-e©% 

The indepentfent spirit ffv&s. 

SELECTED COMMENTS 

I ttope they d^rt't get a minimum ag^ re- 
quirem^nt or Hf probab/y be off the air for 
a few yearn (^ge T4J.— KC9XK 

Tfiis is tfta first tima I fi^ve parficip&ted (n 
a survey tike tfiis, Tnx. — K9QWJ 

Heyf Wtty no provocative Questions tfii9 
year? Re question 23. tftere sfiould be a 
maximum a£|e— AF2M 



Mos! CW operators on a DXpetHtiort oper- 
ate at a htgh rate ot speed— 35 to 40 wptn, 
i think this adds ro The contusion. People 
"tf^ini(" they wori^ed him instead of know- 
ing they did. It aiso makes it hard for the 
^wpm-and-under peopfe to work the sla* 
tion—H*TL 



rm sorry to see very tew questions aboi/t 
the ARRL. . . fAor^ attention sttOiJfd tie giv- 
en [by the Leagu&J to young people; teas 
money wasted by Ihe big shots in Newlng- 
ton and less control ot power by the old, 
tfiased Board of Directors.— H4C%¥ 



At age 74 f^m now art SWL of ham bsmfs^ 
Do have gear for two compfete stations, 
but ttie persoftaf thrift is gone.— WfiKBH 



RTTY LOOP 



MafcL Leavey, M.D. WA3AJR 
6 Jenny Lane 
Pikesvifte MD 21208 

You kr^ow, sometimes the weather can 
tae viciau&j I mean, here I am in May, writ- 
irig a column for August, and the Balti- 
more weather is as hot and muggy as any 
summer day. Oh well, my sinuses do r>ot 
appreciate ihail 

I brmg this up 1o tell the tale ot how 1 es- 
caped the heat by retreating to my base- 
mentp an unfinished subterranean recess 
which is naturally cool and contains 
boxes and t>o?(es of material yet iinpacked 
from our move last year. In one of them I 
found a whole t>uru:h of letters from sorne 
of yt>u, many of which remain unan- 
swered. I shall share some of them, along 
with some recent arrivals* with you alt 
todiay. 

An article in a recent issoe of Scatter, 
I he Journal of the Southern Counties (CA> 
Arrtateuf TeJeprinte^ Society, raises an irv 
lerestin^ poinl. Wtih all of Xhe discussion 
abotit video and compuier RTTY setups, 
im tend to overlook the many amateurs 
who continue to use mechanical teleprint 
ers. Ye^ra ago, we used to termmaieeach 
line with two carriage returns^ one line 
feed, and two letters characters^ La.^ CR- 
CR-LF'LTRS-LTRS- While this may be 
ovefkill and may double-space for l\m sta- 
tion that inserts a line feed fof each car- 
ttane return, a truncated CR-LF LTRS- 
LTRS would St HI be very appropriate and 
allow those with mechani^caMype baskets 
the luxury of copying the befiinning of 
each line. 

Let's go a $tep further and look at the 
variety of ways m whkh RTTY stations 
can communicaie, from direct to through 
a repeater. We recognize that transmis- 
sion de^^ys through a repeater may chot> a 
second or two off the front of a transmis- 
sion end that mechanFcal clutches may 
need a character or two to come up to 
speed, Furttier, gart^age may have crept in 
and (eft the carriage ^n the middle of the 
current line. What is needed is a protocol 
lo ensure that Itie beglnnins of ^ach 
transmission is received and thai each 
fine is received as well. 

One such procedure would be to ac- 
tivate the transmitter, I hen either pause 
with a blank carrier for a few seconds or 
Mnd a liming sigr^l composed of eith^ 
BLANKS [Murray code OOOOOl or LETTERS 
(Murray code 11111). Follow this with orre 



carriage return, one line feed, two LET-^ 
TERS, and then send each line of lt>e 
transmission Follow e^ch lir>e with tt>e 
same CR-LF LTHS-LTRS sequence. When 
you are through, send anottief endof-ime 
sequence to place the printer on a blank 
line so that garbage will not cause the 
printer to overtype your just-sent data, 
and turn off the transmit tef. 

Now, moving rlgllil akmg, regards to 
Tom Otancy NSRC. Tom rs living up fn 
Frederick, Maryland, quite a ways From 
here, and in looking to return to RTTY after 
years away. Come on In, Tom, the tech- 
niques may have changed, but it's more 
fun than ©verl Let me know how you do. 

Tlieodore £. Deusner of Kennewick. 
Washington,, astcs at>Put receivers for 
RTTY reo^tion. Onne of t^te ones he asks 
about is the venerable Hammarlund 
HQ-TBO- This receiver, or any other one 
which Is stable enough to receive SSB, 
should be fine tor RTTY, If the receiver has 
a bandpass which prevents generation of 
the "common" RTTY audio tones, in the 
200O-H2 raitge, tt is possit>le to use alier- 
nate tones thai would still work but would 
fall within the "standard" SSB iiandpass. 
Good luck with the effects. 

Another note here Is from Bill Pascale 
W6JED of QrovilIeK California. Bill has 
been a tan of the column si nee his interest 
peaked on RTTY, and he states that he erv 
joys the column. So do I. EiU, and I espe- 
cially en^oy hearing from yqu ^It; thanks 
for the le»ter. 

A letter from Dick Chambers WA4GKR 
in Wilmington, North CaroHna, asks a 
question that Is on many an amateur's 
mind. He wants to know which features of 
modern RTTY terminals are desirable, and 
which of a series ol najt^ed units is the 
"t>eafi" in sevetat of ir^ese areas. Some of 
the features Dick mentkKis are the ability 
to send arid receive CW, ASCII, and vari- 
ous speeds of Murray, as well as split 
screen, butters, automatic screen format- 
ling with word wrap and editing, and the 
like. Well, Dick, my llrst response is to 
state that RTTY is a mode that is Jo me, as 
captivating rurming an old Teletype* Mod- 
eM5 as it is Wfth a video terminal. So. I am 
not realty sure which of tfiese^ or other, 
features will be Important to youl I would 
advise you to just try to get onto RTTY with 
as little outlay as possible, enjoy the 
mode for a while, and then upgrade your 
station with those features that you have 
heard atxiul and seem important to you. 

The problem with ratir>g \\m various ter- 



minaJs. Dick, is that I have little more rn- 
formaiion than you do. Like you. t read Ihe 
ads and tfie press releases pubi^shed in 
the various fournats. I have also writ Ten to 
most of the manufacturers for specific in* 
formation ar>d. almost without exception, 
have received little In the way of concrete 
Information. If I have been given access to 
a piece ot equipmenL you can be sure I 
have wriiien all I could tind out atXMJt it 
while runniriig it through its paces. But 
thiose events tiave been few and far txe- 
tween. Most manufaclurers have not even 
supplied inforrrtatlon over that in the ads: 
some have promised material and never 
come through. If t could build some sort 
of compansoa I would, but I heshate to 
tHJild It or^ only the claims gEeaned from 
advertisements. l-4ope th«s helps. 

How. Edward Stet^er K2ZBA writes a 
note asking about one ot the units t <li<i re- 
vtew, the Mlcrolog 6S00, Edward, \ had 
that unll up end operating through the 
courtesy ot Sterol og for about a week and 
was thoroughly impressed. I reviewed the 
iefminal in the February ar»d March, 1981, 
RTTY Loop columns in 7^. I am sending 
Edward some of that information; others 
who are mterested are invited to look at 
those issues of the column. I have not had 
Ihe opportunity to see any of the more re- 
cent stuff coming out of Microlog, but 
with the soHd base of the original 6600. I 
fee] sure they are moving onward and up- 
ward. 

Years ago. I tyad an old tube-type, rack- 
mounted, and very heavy demodulator 
made by the Northern Radio Corporation. 
This came to mind wllh the receipt of a let- 
ter from Joe Sabo K87NLI of BotheJI, 
Washington. Joe writes that he is the ser- 
vice manager at Northern Radio, In Red- 



mond, Washingion, manufaciurers of 
marine SSB equipment The Northern Ra- 
dio ^xnparry that manufactured the RTTY 
eQuipment. much ot it for the military, was 
a different company. Nonetheless. Joes 
company receives about five to ten calls a 
month asking for parts or service for that 
old, but venerable, equipment. Joe points 
out that the RTTY manufacturer Northern 
Radio was sold to RF Harris,^ wffO later 
sold the parts inventory to OEI. They rrvay 
still have a Ifmited supply of parts for otd 
Northern RTTY equipment. You might ad- 
dress any questions to QEt, Inc.. 60 Faden 
Road, Springfield, New Jersey 078Q4. 
Thanks for the Information, Joe, 

Jim Pruitt WA7DUY from Lewiston. 
fdaho, is arwther ham interested in put- 
liftg Ilia CoCo onto HTTY, Once again. 
Jim, the best source lor CoQo software 
that I have seen (s Clay Abrams, 1758 
Comstock Lane, San Jose. California 
95124, Clay features a variety of CoCo- 
compatlble RTTY software and should 
have a disk version available soon. Right, 
Clay? 

The third issue of basic RTTY lips *s 
now available and may be obtained by 
sending S2.00 to nre al the address at the 
top of this column, Of course, Ihe first two 
Issues remain available, and I shall be In* 
eluding a listing of what Is available for 
those who missed previous issues. For 
those who came in late, much of this infor- 
mation was coveted here in RTTY Loop 
during ttte first few years of the column 
and is tieing ottered as a service to those 
newcomers who may have missed it. 

Some hardware Is on the books for next 
month— that and more, you never can telJ. 
here in RTTY Loop. 



Hm HELP 




An American priest whko has been a mis- 
sionary In India for many decades wishes 
to set up a ham-radio station In a boys' or- 
phanage. It would be used for educational 
purposes and so thai he can contact his 
many ber^ factors in the United States. 
Canada, and England. Donations of work- 
ing harTH'adio equipment or donations of 
funds to ptjfchase such equipment are be- 
ing requested on his behalf. Please ac^ 
dress: 

Rev. Father A. Seetwr S.D^B. 

The CHadet 

1B Landon's Rd 

Madras S0QI>10 

Indili 



Wanted at a reasonable price: two i-t 
transformers for an R-392 receiver and the 
following tubes; Iwelve &AJ5s. four 2&A6s, 
two 26CBb, two SfiDBs, and two 26A7s. 

Johnny E. Carr WA4FCC 

Route 2 
RcKltinart (jA 301S3 

1 am hoping to yet In touch with some- 
one regarding programming an EPROM 
for a paging encoder manufactured by 
Zetron In Qellevue, Washington. 

Chiries L Ketsey WB2EDV 

flD #2, BoK S3, Elmwood Avenue 

Mayvti^ NY 14757 

73 Magazine • August, 1934 81 



SATELLITES 



AEnateur Satellite Reference Orbits 



ES-5 RS-6 RS-7 RS-8 
UTC EQX UTC EQX UTC EQX UTC EQX 



Date 



HAM IN SPACE, TAKE 2 

Tofiy Engtam] WiORE may tmcome the secofid astronaul to cany amateur radio m\o 
space. A |oini AMSAT/ARRL proposal to NASA asks that Tony be allowed to operate on 
tiis upcomlTiig &1F/Sp3celab-2 mission, scheduled to fly durlog March of 19S5. The pro- 
posat calls for more equipmant to t)e carried aloft than was present ori Owen GarrioU 
WSLFL's ground-braaKing flight. Including automatic systems that wltl provlda unat- 
tended operation. 

UOSAT-2 RESPONDS 

Attef mofe Itvan ten wee^s o^ silence, the sweet sound o^ telenietry greetect woi^e^s at 
the Uni^rsjty of Surrey command station. After numerous attempts, tfie 2^nieier 
telemetry beacofi (U5B25 MHz) sprang to life tm May 7, providing valuable insight into 
the spacecraft's conditiofi. 

Thanks to Amateur SateiHt@ Report for this month's net^s- 



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HyiM HELP 



I am looking for a manual and^or a sche- 
ma I tc for a Drake TR-3 

C. H. Camidge 

8-C Ftoslin St. Soutfi 

Wiierloo. Oni. N2L 2G5 

Canada 

I am looking Tor a schematic tor a Hall i- 
crafters "Sky Buddy" receiver. Any heip 
would be greatly appreciated^ 

Tom Kennedy K8TK 

PO Sox «7 

Clark Lake Ml 49234 

t need a schematic tor a model €A-^510 
signal i^nerator, It was made by Munston 
Manufacluring, tsllp NY, for civil aero- 
naiitiCS use. I will gladly pay copy costs. 

John Mock WA4LKW 

2860 Gosprel Peace Rd. 

Hopkinsvill« Ky 42240 

I am looking tor a schematic for a power 
sypply to operate an old war-surplus 
BG-348^ receiver. I also need schemalics 
for 1- or 2^transl3tor QRP rigs and some 
FT-'243 crystals for 40-meter CW, 

Billy Suit K4BUF 

Route 1 Boi 1B4-1C 

RsndJeman HC 27317 

1 rmed a schematic and manual fc^ an 
Eico^KII rTKictel 430 oscilloscope I will glad- 
ly pay for ar\y copying ar>d mailing costs. 

tarry S. Brooks WBOECV 

3165 Bunting Ave. 

Orand Junction CO 81504 



( am looking tor informallon on windmill 
manutaclurers- 

Edwaid W, Dirltsen 

106S5 Curtis St 

Loma Urxto CA S23S4 

Can anyone help with coils and 
technical m an uati'sc hematic for a Central 
Electronics exelter CE-10? I will conaidfif 
your old unit from the |unk box as spares 
for a price, too, 

nagnaf Otters I ad 

Voldammfen S 

DK 2S40 Holtft 

Derunarte 

Looking tor Modem Radar Theoty, Op- 
eralion. and Maintenance, distributed in 
past by TAB Books. Please state condi- 
tion and asking price in letter. 

Edmund L Melan&on AAtH 

Rte tZ Box S10 

TYiomdike ME 049^ 

Looking tot a Lafayette Radio six-chan- 
nel crystal-controlled feceiver which cov- 
ers 30-50 MHz FM. in segments of 4 MH^, 
Would like manuat for same. also. 

Chartes L. Kelsey WB2EDy 

RD t2. Box 63, Elmwocxi Ave. 

Mayvllle NY 14767 

I am in need of a Swan transceivef. mod^ 
«l 2)C I also need manuals an<i sctiematlcs 
lor the Swan 2X. 

John Jackaon N3C0O 

71 Regent SI, 

Wilkes Burre PA 16702 

(717^233590 




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82 73 Magazine • August, 1984 





C/TO€f Hams VP2ML 

Box 4887 

Santa Rosa CA 95402 

THE END OF THE IRC? 

ts the lfitefr\atiOnai Repty Coypon on the 
W9f ool? D« Vicent? TijaLSon, Ihe DifectOif 
erf Posis ai Bem^. Switzeflsiid. recom 
mends luat that tn his a<rticle m Umoo Post 
Bie iUrnon Postate \^ the official pubUca- 
tion of tha Universaf Postal Union, which 
idminisEers the IHC.| Of. Tuason dtes ihe 
complex jt^t^ of accoynllng for Ihe Jnrerna^ 
Itonal Reply Coupons (IRCs^ and the m 
craastrig "atHtses" in the form of cuirency 
Sfiecufatjori m iRCs 

The problem ihal Or Tuason wants lo 
eliminate is exacriy the featore of iRCs 
which mak^s them so uselul in amateur ra- 
dio and especially DX. IRCs are ihe best 
available approximation of a universally-ac- 
cepted intefnatKina) ctmtsnpf. Since 3i\ IRCs 
are equiirateait and can t^uppo^edly) be re- 
deemed m any country m ihe world, one 
can transter Igncb irom one ooumiv to ^nottv 
er in the form ot Intemai^onat Reply Coupor^ 

It seems Ihai a few entrepreneurs are 
doJng exactly (tiat, tn n country wUh rapid 
in Ha) ion, speculators are buying huge 
quantities of jBCs at a relalivi&ly low cosi. 
TTtey ȴ these IRGs lo Switzefiand. with its 
¥ery stable cun^ency, and, i* their tirnirtg is 
right, can setl thefn to itie Suriss Post Office 
for moie Ihan they ori^ginaJiy paid! SwiC^er- 
tand, w^th Its Ifheral banking laws and rock^ 
steady currency, is taking the bruni uf the 
3{)eculahng. ard hence Dr. Tu a son's rec- 
ommendation Ihai the Jniemational Reply 
Coupons be abolislied. 

Don't slay awalie at nfgftt wondannig tiqw 
you're go^ng lo get ttiat XUISS card back 
wirhoul IRCs. however Dr Tucson's article 
recommending the abolition o! the IRC ap- 
peared in April, 1957. The IRC has survived 
Ihis and othef challenges m the past 30 
years, and rnost likety, wJII continue to do 
90 tor anottiet 30 

Good ihing, too. as (he IRC pLays a mator 
rote m DX and would be wery difticuti to re- 
ptace On the other harKj, Xhs IRC is one of 
the least urrderstood aspects ot the fine art 
ol OS Ling. 

i^niversat Postal Union 
To undersland ttw IRC ajid tis rt^e. we 



mysl iuf n to one of ihe rrkost basic tenets of 
international mails. When you buy a stamp 
for an overseas letter, ait of the money for 
postage goes lo Itie country sending, or orig- 
inating, the letter. In this case, the United 
States Postal Service ke^s the dough. The 
pfKtai service rn the desttntiliion countfy 
whict^ still has to deliver ihte letter gets 
nothing T)l$ varnXfS postal services argue 
that every letter will ehcrt a reply, so tfie ffr 
ciprenl wilf pturchase the stamp for the re- 
iLirn letter, that country will get the funds, 
and the USRS delivers the letter lo you lor 
nothing. 

This syslem requires rno !xK>hkeep»rtg, 
leaves each couritry's postal service to s^ 
prices as ii sees tit and eliminates delays 
whjie countries argue over wtKi pays for 
what. 

Such was the most fundamenlal concept 
of the Universal Postal Union fUPU), which 
was lournted m 1fi74 (Incidentally, tf« UFO 
was founded some years aft^ the InterTia- 
thonai Te4eco«TununicatiOfis Unton, and. in 
tact was closely paitefTied after that orga- 
nization ) 

This syBteri of letting each countfy keep 
ils own international postal receipts worked 
fine except for one flaw, which was evident 
from itMi start Some writers want to p/^pay 
the letum postage to increase the chames 
of a reply U the sender country keeps aJI 
ihe money tot both directions, the postat 
service m the destination countfy gets noth- 
ing But If you tried to send half of round 
trip money to that country^ you would have 
a bookkeeping nightmare 

So al>out 30 years after tfie UPU started, 
a soluliofi to this dilemma was proposed 
the tnternatiofial RepJy Coupon. Apfwoved 
by the 64 men^^er coonfr4es in !t)e UPU 
Congress o* 1906. the IRC is now pushing 
BO years old, Arri the concept of and need 
for the IRC remain unchanged. 

The way the International Reply Coupon 
works fesiliciattyt is very simple At any post 
office (weli almost any post otiicej you can 
purchase an Intefnatior^al Reply Coupon 
for 50.6S You can send thai IRG to soififr 
orw in any member countfy of tite Unlversaf 
Post at Union, which Includes |ust about ev- 
ery counlry In the world The recipient can 
(supposedJy) cash Ih© IRC in at his post of- 
fice lor one or more postal stamps repifr 
seniing ifie mirurmim posta-ge for an urveg- 



^^ \ UNION POSTALE COUPOW- REPONSE 
" ''T3y UNIVERSELLE INTERNATIONAL 



C22 



Ce coupon est echangeabledans to us les paysde TUnioii po stale 
yniverselle contfe yn ou ptusteurs timbres- posie repre^cntant 
rdnranchissement minimal d'yrie lettre ordinaire, ^xpsdi^e a 
r^tranger par vore de surface. 



du &9vi 




Ptik de venifl 
(indicar4i)>n fAtuii^ihve) 



BB cents 



Tim brer du burci^u qui 
(:1lcCl!Lj4; I whangc 



bteted letter ssit t^ sirface io a foreign 
coontry'* 

In othe/ words, 1f>e IRC is good far 
stamps to man one letter fay surface trans- 
portation back to yog. If you receive an IRC, 
you can cash it »n at {almosiiany post office 
for tti« postal^ startips lo siend a surface 
lette* OMTSeas: say S0.30 for a letter to Eu^ 
rope, for ei ample 

pQ&tBi autttoriiies irt the various coon 
tries may, at their option, exchiange rrkore 
than one IRC for airmail postage overseas, 
This gives rise to the lists in the Radio Ama^ 
few Csttbook and other places for the num 
t^er of IRCs rteeded to get an airmail letter 
tiack to you. This can range from as little as 
two IRCs to as many as sue! 

istote I hat the poet office doesh'l fiaw to 
pay cash for the IRCs. only postage 
stamps. And the post office can require 
Ihat you present the letter at the same lime 
as the IRCs so that you can't even take the 
stamps and sell tt^em for cash 

At least that s ihe way the system *s sup 
posed to grark In practice, of course^ ims 
Sefddm happens Instead, Interniat^onal Re^ 
ply Coupons are a means of iranstefring 
small amounts of money from one country 
to another. IRCs are seldom cashed in be- 
cause of the un1avorat>le exchange rate 
(Who wants to lose half the morwy every 
lime one exctianfies an IRC iot stamps'') 
The DKer rtangs on to arry IK^ tie receives 
and uses (hem the ne^i lime he needs IRCs 
to get a card back„ rather tfian running 
down to me post office and laying out SO 66 
each lor new IRCs. 

After all. the IRCs are good "indetiniie- 
ly." so why cash ihem m? Apparenliy oiher 
users tt\&n amateur rad)^ DXers f<^ that 
way. as onJy aixxrl tialf ot trie IRCs issued 
each year are redeemed Arv) iriat tnciudes 
Itte considerable number invo>lved m cur 
rency specuiatcon. a probtam that conim 
ues 30 years after Dr. Tuason'a article 

This "extra'postal" use of Ihe Imerna 
tional Reply Coupon will not be eliminated 
In fact, or^e of the ortgmal! luslificat^ons for 
ttie IRC, dadt in t906. was just Ih^s serv>ce. 
Stnce small surras of monev are frequently 
exchanged within a couniry in the fomi of 
postal stamps, the IRC could si mi Early sup^ 
piemen t ine inter national money order sys- 
tem for very small amounts of money. 

Since the IRC is supposed to be a limited 
Jorm of inlemational currency, it is not sur 
pr«S4rkg tfiai it plays that rote in amateur ra 
dio. Jrkde^ most intetnational amateur-ra- 
dio debts can be settled m IRCs; reiiirn 
pc^tage. award costs, etc To keep the IRCs 
cifcuiatiog. there is a "gray market" tor cho 
coupons Most larger DX clubs and many 
active OSL rr^anagers and DXers collect 
hundreds ar>d ttioy sands of IRCs as tfiey 
pcMir In from QSLsflekers. These IRCs are 
Ireqyenily sold tor less than face value tkji 



more man their value at triie jxist office. 
Tvp4caf for IfCs In bulk tOd«y would be 
aroui>d $0.40 to .45 each (watch the DX But 
letms for even better values, as big DXpedi 
tions unload thousands of IRCs). 

The resale market in IRCs benefits taolh 
buyer iind seUer. Ihe purcliaser saves ogn- 
siderat^ funds on the exchange, as 0|> 
posed to txiymg new IRCs at Ihe post of- 
free The sefler gets more money than the 
post office wtll give him, and this money is 
in the form of cash without res tnct ions. 
This eKChange can be so advantageous 
that an active DX station, receiving lots of 
iflCs, can tinarice ttis entire QSL op^aiion 
off the -pfofils" For example. VP2UI 
tiasnt n^d foctsip m a dirne tor QSLfHintirtg 
Of postage in five years 

This particular "e^ira-postal" use of Itw 
11^ is so well accepted In amateur radio 
that even valueless IRCs are accepted and 
exchanged amoi^g amateurs. I still receive 
considerable numtje's of "otd" (and now 
worthN^s. at least at Itie post ofiice^ to^rns 
of IRCs 

"P1ann«| OiKOlesceiKe" 

"Whaf?" I hear you say. IflCs are good 
'indetUirtety''" Indeed, UPU regulationa 
state I ha I the IRCs have no expiration dale. 
In the fine print mi hie regulaiiuns. howevef. 
one finds the ktcker Only itK»se IRCs 
whose lents agree with Ihe official te*l 
have ejicnange value, Tliose with ottier 
lArording cannot tie exchtanged at the post 
office. And the UPU changes the wording 
on the iRCs every tew years' So despite Ihe 
"mdehniie" lifelime of the IRC, they do iosa 
their oH icial value occasionally. 

The pcesent tRC is version 15 and ttas 
t>een m circuialion (with mtnor dhas^geaii 
since t974 (see Fig. 1) The previous version 
(see Fig 2) circulated tsetween 1964 and 
1974 and tias not t>een accepted by the 
post off tee Since 1979. Going still furttier 
back, we II nd an earlier version which cirnu 
lated, with frequeni minor changes, tse- 
tween 19?9 amJ 1964 (see Ftg 3) This slyte 
was selected in a design competition in 
\^Q to replace the original IRC from ^&0^ 
tsee Fig 4). 

I Ve never recetved one of the 1906 ver 
sion, but I have a handlui of the 1929-design 
IRCs, all received long after their "expira- 
tion ' date Since the IRC is seldom cashed 
in Ihe poit oft ice. if«e official expiraiion of 
the IRC is rK>i mat imponani to me radio 
amateur Since he is mot goirtg to cash it in 
bot ralfier sett it to amther arrtateur. or use 
el iof an amateur radio purchase, the ofll- 
cial value of the IRC loses significance As 
long as it is accepted by the amateur corn- 
munity. the IRC retains value. 

Ili#v0fsal? 

Another anomaly m the amaieuz-radio 



* UNION 



m 
111 



UJ 



VI 

o 

Ok 



POSTALE UNiVER3£LLE 

1 



BRESIL ^ BHASIL 

CrS t.0& 

Coupon- refill rtse interr»diton>i 

Ctr coupon est #cndngi?dbl« danii tmis les 

Payi dtf I'Ufirori (Kir^lQltg univ^ ■ 

un DU irvl<uSitQ'Ui& timliie^-pQ^tii ^ i < : ^ i 

i"attrani:Ki*iiam&nt d yrve Eetua Qiiimmt& du 
pruriiuT ectielort cIhj pcids. i - ' ■ .< ^ 
I f irari-Q'ir pai voit- dc- &l 

Cupaa-reapatlB internum-. ionff I 

EsEi* ■ MiMiQtep^rmuiJidii Fin rod i - 
<14 Uiiito |x»3di urtrvMS^ por um oy nuif. 
nekn tm vwIkm ila trMUqiKi dv itr*^ j^artj 
ord'iiMlrui da p4tiii'i*fra escal« tim pesa. 
«nder«Ci»ilj) 4fli€Jil<iiiOr por via Hv lupurilcic 



« coupi:m4-r^pqnse international 




iFip. I, 7f>e eun-enf vei'Stort of the ftftemalkm&f Repfy Cot/pon, vrtth the gftceprepeinted in the 
cmtter Only IRCs witn a s/amp of the tssutng country on the lett dfe va/id at the post oiftce 



fig. 2. This type ot tRC ciwui&ted untti 1974 end ha& been otsi^ete since i979. Htmevtr, 
many $UU cirm/fate through the amateur-radto commuftttY 

73 Magazine • August, 1984 83 



en 



COUPON-REPOIVSE INTERNATIONAL 



• 
I 




^wAii 



Ifiternaiioncll siiirskiipofig 

n-TCMinBen hSriindc: I'milcr uibylas jnoielt clEef 
^fltTii L'rimiirkci ilIJi cee btkipp, niotsvuitindc 
« -fa^r^rdrineiavpRcn pjr <tt Vitnligt brev *v 
enltei Vlkiuti till utluidcL 



.....■■.^f JJ ■JTfVTTf Fi ■ i-a-CT 



7€ Ore 



11 



ittii lt£ Pays lie fUnim f"*^** unttcndle 

I [VfiTcwnUnt k montiiril d* faffraniE-ti r»,itef ntni I 

1 tl'ufw kiitE Qfilfnjii]^ d$ purl ^tipk j dai.u^ i 

■- • 



SUEDE -8VER1GE 






-r-*^ 







w^ w ^ V 9 w 



Ffg. 3, Pre- 7364 iRCs fooi(0d tike this satrnpi^^ A tmtr of tttese stiti tmvei from -atnatetjif to a/na- 
t&if although they hBve haii tto official vattm for 2G y^sr^ 



use ol Ihe IPC is in the Soviet-bloc courv 
Jnes. DXers Ifequenriy hear thai IRCs are 
■'not accetJted" in Soviel countries, even 
though these count rfes are members of the 
Union, Accordino lo the Universal Postal 
Union, a counlry may decline to seii iRCs 
but is require lo exchange them. However, 
the UPU has tittle 'e^forcefnent power, and 
Ihe Unj-on has survived as long as it tias by 
staying oift of pditics. So, many Soviet 
countries letusa to accept IflCs (m least al 
tnosi local postal oTfic^ss}. Nevertheless, 
amateufs in Ihese countries cun and do use 
IRGs as int#rTiationa1 currency. 

The "unlvHraallty"' of the IRC is not the 
only aspect of Itiose con pons thai local post- 
al officials ignore. Many of the sm^jler post 
offices \f\ Ihis counliy do nol slock IFICs, 
and tbe postmiaster may never have heard! 
of tlieni. E^efi aj lai^gef post ofticss wtiefe 
0^ ksvam what or IBC is, one oan buy irv 
vatkf mc^ 

Officialty, Ihe tRC must be ol Itie current 
lotm, with Ihe conttnuouB UPU watermarK 
(Hold your !RC up to tt>e llghl to &ee the wa- 
lemiark.) Tbe current version ol Ihe IRC has 
the official lex I In ae^ien languages: French » 
German. English. Arabic, Chinese, Spanish, 
and flussiajn. Each IRC mu&t tse stamped 
with tt*e country of sale on the left side, as 
sfiQwn in F^. 1. Urtstamped IRCs or those 
stamped on the righi are no good, and ttw 
post of ttce can leftise lo accept ttveni [see 

Fortunatety, enough postnnasters are 
sutfciontly ignorani of the rules lo take 



enoogh bad IRCs in eKchange for stamps to 
make up for the postmasters who issue tsad 
ones. Hovfever, to be sure you're getting 
your money's worth, make certain the IRCs 
are properly stamped. 

All EF!Cs are basically identical, as they 
are still printed tiy the s^me firm in Switzer- 
larvd tndiviflual countries may ask to have a 
sales denomination printed in the center, 
as shown in Fi^. 1- Otherwise, the center 
mi^ tie blank. Ttie IRC is stamped on ttie 
ilgh! when it i$i cashed tn lo the post office. 
Used If^s are destroyed after a complex 
accounting system balances purchases 
and sales between the member countries 
of the UPU. 

Meanwhite, international speculation fn 
LRCs continues. One needs only to glance 
down the list oi sales and exc^tanges of 
IRCs to see the probtem countries. Most 
countries have about the same ruimber of 
sales and exchar^ges ol IRCs. For ewery one 
sold, one ts cashed «a A tew countries 
stand out with enormous sales and few re- 
demptrons— especially the US and Japan. 
This is to bG expected, of course, as the 
more a^f fluent and more internationally. ori- 
ented countries buy and send out the most 
IRCs (especially hamsllf. 

But countries such as Al^ria., Ivory 
Coast tndia. Morocco, and Libya sell hun- 
dreds of itiousands of IRCs: these coun- 
tries accounted for dose to 20% ot all IRC 
sates "m igSt -2, twt tcrtaJ redemptions wi^ 
less than 1% of ttie bier^ial accounting! 
Why? Here ts where speculators take ad- 
vantage of itre difference in exchange rale. 




V\^^ ' Ce LQU p &fi pe uti ire i « taosi oonfr* an ii\nVn -p &ite de Li vdeu t de 25 cent li%jZ 




fig, 4. A copy o^ f'>e firsi ve^io^ oi ttie IRC, ftom t906. The form andce^no^t ot itm iBC have 
cttanged iittfe itt 30 years. 



^^ H U N tON POSTALE 



COUPOW-RePONSE 

INTERNATIOWAL 



C22 



V - ^^\ 



Ce coupon est echangeabtedans tous lespaysde TUnion posiafe 
univarselie conire un Oii plusieurs timbres-poste repr^serttant 
raffianchi cement minima) d'une lettre ordmatre, expedite h 
Tetranger par vole d^ surface. 



En^pti-inie df conirdi« 
dii pavt d'orieine 
id ate fficulidiiive) 



pus de iiente 
fmdication facutiativt!) 



65 cents 







fig, 5 An inv^litt tRC: it was stamped on the wfOftg side tsy the tsswng USPS emptoyee'. 



They fly their thousands of IRCs elsewhere, 
say, France, making a reasonable profit on 
the transaction. Since the profit on each 
IRC is small, Ihe^e operators must deal with 
huge quantities of the coupons. 

Most countries have estabiis^ted internal 
systems lo etiminate this speculation. A 
loophole in the URJ regitlalions permits 
any member country to limit the sale oi 
IRCs. Most coutvtries simpiy wonl seil you 
100,0CX^ ir^s at a crack! So the speculators 
need a sympathetic postal admi nisi rat ton 



in the country of purchase, 

Forlunalely, this iimjts the abuse of Ihe 
iRC system, Or. Tuason's concerns nol- 
withgtanding, the IRC looks as If it win be 
around tor another TS-t- fear^. provrding 
DXers with a much-needed international exr 
chariQe medium, 

(Special thanlLs to L Rubens of the Intema- 
Uonat Bureau of the Universal Postal Unkm 
lor his Ir^aluable assistance In preparirfg 
this column.) 



DR. DIGITAL 



Robert Swtrsky AF2M 
PO Box 122 
CedafhurstNY 11516 

PUBLIC DISSERVICE 

Not too lonfl la^ I was In Camegte HaH to 
see Peter Schjchale and his orchestra, 'The 
Mew York Pici(4J^ Ensemble-** I had pur^ 
d'kased tti^ tickets at ttm last minute arid 
had to choose among seats In \tm balcony, 
where the ^iew leaves something to be de^ 
sired. 

Just as the perforrriahCD was a boat lo 
start, I was shocked to hear the loud hlgh^ 
pitched t>eeps of a 2-meter repeater's iDer. I 
looked around to see where this wretched 



nofse was coming from and was able to lo- 
cate its source! It came from a hand-held 
radio clipped to thid belt of Eho aentiemsin 
seated t>ehind me. 

"Please turn your CB radto off," I said lo 
hfm, in as mce a tone as I ooold muster. I 
carefiUly worded this statement, catling his 
2-fTieter radio a CB, to infuriate him, which it 
(M. 

I was nol, howeiver. expecting the lecture 
that followed. He told me thai he was per^ 
formtr>g a public service by providing a me- 
dium for emergency communication^ care- 
lutiy wording his siatemen! so aa to make 
one thcnk that he was an undercover peace 
officer. I informed hfm that I had stopped 
'playing policeman" well before I ent^ed 



kindergarten, and perhaps it was time for 
him to do Ihe same, especially at his ad- 
vanced! age. 

After his radio ti^ared off about three 
more times, tfie usher came along and or- 
dered him \o turn the radio off or leave. He 
chose the option of leaving, arid the remain- 
der of the audience was able to enjoy the 
show without the nuisance of some mis- 
guided ham performing a "piiblic service," 

What reminded me of this story was that 
recently I was asked to operate a "spectai- 
ized-mode" station for a li^al radio club 
duhrtg Field Day I had to c^cline tfve invita- 
tion because I had tickets to see the come- 
dian P^ Wee Herman at Carr^ie ffan that 
same weekand. Or>e lias to keep orve^s pri- 
orities straight, I am only hoping that, be- 
cause of Field Pay. there will t>e less of a 
Chance of my encounlering another ill-man- 
nered amateur-radio operator. 

COMPUTER INTERFACING 

Last month we examined one Implemen- 
tation of "memory-mapped" I/O conirof. 



Now we will examine another method, em- 
ployed In the Atari arxi VIC computers as 
well as many othiers^ 

There are a number of Integj^ated circuits 
known as mput/output chi(is, or stipport 
chips, tfiat are <tesmned to work fn cion|unc^ 
tk)n wrth \he 6602 mcroprocessor, fTbie 
6502 is the microprocessor ihal both the 
Atari and V!C computers use.) These chips 
Simplify I/O Interlacing: and eli'minate ttie 
confusing conventions that other manufac- 
turers, such as Apple, chose Lo employ. 

The device vm will look at is the 6520 pe- 
ripheral interface adapter, or PIA. This cir- 
cuit incorporates ihe circuitry for two IjO 
ports, each 8 bits wide. For each port ttiere 
is a "data register" that contains the in- 
Coming or outgoing data arvf a "direction 
register" that controls wtiether correspond- 
ing Signal lines are inputs or outputs. A zero 
Is used to represent an input line and one Is 
used to represent (hav^ you guessed yet?) 
an output line. The programmer can control 
which Irnes are to be used for i^nput or out- 
put simply by placir^ the proper combtna- 



M 7$ Magazine • August, 1984 



tions <ji zeroes and ones m the cnrect4on 
liglsier. Data ajre tt>en read by exa/ntnir>g 
the data feg^ster and are setit to another de- 
vice by wdiing to Ihe da^a regisier. It Is real- 
\y a fairly sample procedufe. The 6520 PI A 
chip also contains a conlroi register thai 
contains various status slgnalE needed for 
handshaking, and oth&r bits to con if a! the 
Inlorrtat logic configuration. 

On the Atari 400 and 300 con^iputers, the 
data lines from tt>e PI A chip are pfeser>tfld 
to the outside morid via the lour 'Player 
Poets" on the front panel See Ftg. 1 for a 
pirtout diagrarn of each of these ports, 
Cornmodore's VIC computers have a sJrni- 
lar arrafipement. Consult rhe ViC Reference 
Manusi for complete detaNs. 

As the 6502 micfoprocessor has no spo- 
cific ir^put afid output oommands in its in- 
^tyctidn set, all I/O is 'rrwmdry mapped," 
that i^. certain memory addresses are set 
asiiie tor I/O u3^ tf a PtA chip is used m 
con|ijr>cllon with a 6502 to control li/O, il too 
must occupy merrrorv addresses. The 6520 
PI A requires four rrtemory addressee; the 
exact locations of these depend on how the 
computer system was designed (n the 
Atari computers, Ihe ^20 PI A ts located at 
mmory kications 540t6 to 54019 rnclusive 
itiejt locations D30D to 0303^ 

IniemaMy, the PitA has siii registers. l^iQ 
data registers. !«o direction regtstefs. and 
two control ;egia[efs. Because the Pi A uses 
only fouf memory locatlorts, it Is necessary 
to have one extra bit to address the proper 
register. Sit 2 of the controf registers serves 
this purpose. If this bit contains ^ Q, ttten 
the oorn»|»oding register is a data r^ts- 
t& tf the t^t Js a 1, then the correspondlr^ 
register \% a pe^ipt^eral reikis ter. 

Programming the PtA ch«p la often com- 



FAO 'At W*2 P4J 



Y o o o o o / 

V A f ft • / 

Y o o o o / 



PLATin I 
COMNECTOff 



+aV CND 



PA4 PAd PAS PAT 

V o o o o o y 

Y 5 Q & 6 y 



COMNECTDfi 



S¥ (MD 



li'eO Ptl PB£ P93 




PL AYE F* 3 
CONNECTOR 



^V GMD 



wm* **ia I'Bfi p%r 

I o o o o o / 
V • ^ ■ • / 

\ O O O Q / 



PLAYER 4 
C0«4tf£CTOfl 



*^)l CHO 



Fig. L The tonf Atari pisyer connectors 

sn(f the pins thaf correspond to PtA 6B20 

canfi0i;ffons. Th^ PAfJ series stantfs tor 

port A, Bftti tfie P8o series is for port & Uff- 

m&rked cof}ttection& are used tor padtfte 

a/f<f such trigger connechons, afid are not 
connm^ted to the PtA citip. 

plicate because the computer uses this 
chip for Its own internal purposes; reconfig- 
uring It may cause the computer to do 
strange things (ail vvJil ctear up when the 
Gompytef k& reeei. or powered oil and oni). 
For ftKAftiple, Atari uses the RA to control 
Ihe joy^ticfc and sticK tri^p^s. ttie cassette 
recor^^ motor (on or offj, and wrwther or 
not the voice channel of the cassette le^ 



FROM 

TTL CIRCUIT 



— V-v— 



OAOUHD 




Fl§. Z Conrwcting a device to a TTL circuit 
vstrtg a PNP transistor. 



*aVDC FROM 

TTL FKJWER SUPPLY 






FOR LOAD 



FW0» ^. 

ITL CiRCUlT '^ 







OlTOUtlD /^ 



Fig. 3. Connecting a device to a TTL circuit 
using an NPN transistor. 

colder is sant to tt% television set. TT^e abili- 
ty lo control a cassette feoorttef makje$ it 
possible to have compgt^ -control hed in- 
struct ional m^iefial supplemented «ith re- 
corded voice or music. COflnmands to corv 
ttoi a cassette recofdet are as Fotlows: 
POKE 54018,60 Turn cassette motor off 
POKE 54018,52 Turn cassette motor on 

The music, voice^ Morse code. noisCn or 
any material you have ret^orded on tape wiil 
ptay thriibjgAi the television set speaJ^et, 
This lechfitque might be u$ed for a Mcrs^ 
code or radio-theory computer-assisted 
leartiir>g program 



Lcxi^tion 54018 is the Port A eonlrol loca- 
tion for the Atari's P1A The POKE com- 
mancte specitied a£>ove change bf| 3 of thts 
registef, which corresponds to control line 
#2, which is used to switch the recorder's 
power on or off. 

This brief introduction to the 6520 PtA 
was mearti to eirptaln how memory-mapped 
I/O is aided with peripheral control chips. 
For a complete guide to config irhn^ Ihe 
6520, I recommend the book. 6502 Assem- 
tly Language Programming, by Lance 
Levefilhal (Osttomei^cGraw Hill. \%7^ Mr 
Leveniriaii explains clearly the internal 
structure of the chip and provides numer- 
ous programming eicamples of reahllfe in- 
tertace problems. 

CONf^lECTING TTL 
TO THE OUTSIDE WORLD 

The output of a TTL chip tsiKih as the 
6520 PI A) canrKtt be connected directly to 
another device: it simpty doesn't have the 
current-carrying abilitlss. However, small 
loads can be conlroJIed with the aid of a 
PNP or NPN trans is lor. Choose a transistor 
with enough current -carrying capabiltty to 
drive your load. For conttoiling very targe 
loads, it IS recommended that you use ei- 
ther a transistor or an optDisolator. When 
using A relay, mmember to connect a diode 
In parallel with the reJay coll lo prevent 
voltage spiKes from ruining the transistor, 

Figs. 2 and 3 contain the circuit diagrarns 
for using a PNP and an NPN transistor, re- 
spectively. Notice that when usirvgan NPN 
tran^^Stor. a "puIIh4>" connect ton Is iteed- 
ed. This ts ba:ause the TTL output must be 
provided with a current source in order to 
furtct ion correctly. 



coHims 



Robert Baker WB2GFE 
15 Windsor Dr. 
Atco NJ 08004 

THE WELDBUNCH 
160 SSB CONTEST 

Starts: 0000 GMT August 4 
Ends: 2359 GMT August 5 

This contest Is for single operators only. 

BiiCHAHGE: 

RST aT>d state. provirtcQ, or country. 
Charlef members mtist also give ttwif 
membership number with the aHcfiarhpa. 

SCOHiNQ 

Count 10 points per QSO and multiply by 
the total number of stales, countries, and 
VE provinces Work any charter member 
of the Wildbunch tor a special multiptiet 
of 1 poini each Work T5 charter membefs 
and get a special twrius ot 20 pomis Work 
the VE7WCB club statKm and add 10 
points. 

AWARDS: 

Plaque to the winner and certFf Lcates to 
v^jnners in each state, country, and VE 
province. Special cert lit icate for wpfking 
all 30 charter memt>B'rs 

tNTHiES: 

E^eadtine for logs is September 6th, wilh 
entries addressed to: ft J KoztomkowsNi 
KAtSR, 5 Watson Drive. Pons mouth ft I 
02871. To become a member of the 160- 



meter Wiidisunch between June Ist and 
September 1st. Us i itions work 10 char- 
lei memtn5rs, DX work 5, From September 
tst to June l5t, double the number of 
QSQs require Ip 20 and 10. Serid log «nfo 
and LISS2.00 for meN'nt>ership certificate 
and WiJdbunch number to Bob LeBtanc 
KAIFOS. Unity Ro^d. Senton. RFD 1. Bo* 
eOO, QHnton ME D4927. 



ILLINOIS QSO PARTY 

Starts: 1700 GMT August 5 

Ends: 0500 GMT August 6 

Sponsofed by BAMS. Itke Radio Ama- 
teur Megacycle Society Use all bands. 
CW and phone. TTie same statton may t>e 
worked on each band and mode No r^ 
peater contacts are allowed 

OCWAWGE- 

RS(1> and slate, province, country, or U- 
linois county. 

FRBQUtNCiES: 

Any frequency, but took for most activi- 
ty: about 40 kHz from tow end on CW, arKi 
atJOut 3890. r230. 14260. 2137^5, ar>d 28675 

on phone. 

SCOBtNQ: 

One QSO point per contact or two 
points If ttie oiher station is a Novice oi 
Technicran m a Novice band lllmots sta- 
tions muitipty QSO point total &y the total 
number ot slates (50 ma^^. VE/VO call 
areas ftO msx}, and no n>ore than 6 non- 
WYJ^ENQ DX countries worked tor a 



maKirnum of 65 multipliers. Additional OX 
contacts count for QSO points but not for 
additional multipliefs. Illinois portables or 
n5ot»les away from normal OTH may add 
200 to final score for each county of oper- 
ation from wttictt 10 of r^iofe cofttacts 
were made. 

Non-Illinois stations multiply QSO 
points by the number of Illinois counties 
worked. Only Illinois stations may be 
counted for QSO points. Non Illinois sta- 



tions may also take extra bonus muith 
pliors for each group of 8 QSOs with the 
same county, 

AWARDS: 

Ceftificates to the top 3 Ulitwis ^rorers 
'm Single op, Muttt-op. po^taibie out-of- 
home^ounty^ mobile. Novice, and CW 
Technician categories. Por out-of-staters, 
awards go to top scorers in similar cate- 
gories In each slate, province, or country 



c/ 

AUG 4-5 


UENMR 

ARRLUHFContesI 


AUG < 5 


Wildbunch 160 SSB Contest 


AUG S^e 


lUtnots QSO Parly 


AUG It -13 


New Jersey QSO Party 


AUGie-l9 


SARTO Worldwide RTTV Gontm 


AUG 24-27 


A5 Noffh Amefic«n UHF FSTV DX Contest 


AUG 2S'2€ 


Occupation Conteal 


SEP1 


DARC Corona tO- Meter RTTV Contest #^3 


SEP B-9 


ARRL VHP QSO Party 


S€P1S-10 


Ohio QSO Party 


SEP 15-17 


Washington State QSO Party 


SEP 21*23 


Maine QSO Party 


SEP 22-23 


Ute- Summer ORP CW Activity Weekend 


OCT 6-7 


ARRL QSO Pariy-CW 


OCT 13-1* 


ARAt QSO Party— Phone 


0CT13~14 


Rio CW DX Party 


OCT 13-14 


Columbus Day Intsmational DX Contest 


OCT13-IS 


Oregon QSO Party 


OCT 20-21 


Jamboree on the Air 


OCT 20-21 


Worked'AII Y2 Contest 


NOV 3 


DARC Corona 10- Meter RTTY Contest #4 


NOV 3-4 


ARRL Sweepstakes-CW 


NOV 17-1fl 


ARRL Sweepstakes— Phone 


DEC 1-2 


ARRL 1&0-M€t«t Contest 


DEC 8-9 


ARRL 10-Metet Cornell 


DEC 2*-JAN 1 


ORP Winter Sporti-CW 


DEC 30 


Caiiida Contest 



73 Magazine * August, 1984 85 




NEWSLETTER OF THE MONTH 

Ttris monih the layreli qo (o Editof Al Bmg W57SIC ami OTVARC, lournst of 
tbe Orsgofi Tualatin Valtey ARC. Al tries very hard t^ include ilems of Interest tor 
evefyore— a touQfi lob m a dijt> with 230 -t- meiTit>ersf The resijit is a collection 
of neuvs and views presented in a friendly, easygoing style w(th eyecatching 
graphics that grah a feaCNsf'? attention, 

OTVARC i& £}bviDu$ly a dynamic group of people who thrive on a steady diet of 
ham rad^o, social events, and put^lic service. Congratulations to Presidenl Dave 
Parker W7LJN, Vtce-Presldenl John Ha I do WA?C2A, arid their faltow OTVARCs 
for doing It better than anyone else. 

To entifr your clyb's newsletter in 73*s hfewslelleror Ihe Month Contest, send 
it to 73, Pine Street. PelertHDrough HH 03456. Attn: Kewslellef of the Monltt, 



from wliici^ 2 vstUd entne$ are received. 
Please s&rwi in even lowscoring logs lo 
he^p another meel the two^log rule. Deck 
Sions of itie cor^test commiliea are final. 

ENTRtES: 

Logs must be legJbfe and be submitted 
along with a gummary Sheet Ihting all 
claims multiplierB and calcu^alions of 
scofe. Operaiori£| name, address, call, 
ajKt operation eaiegoiry must t>e typed of 
printed clearly Include a busirtes^sije 
SASE lor return of results 

£r>tries must be postmatkecr m> fater 
I ham September tsi and sent to 
RAMS/KdCJU, 3820 N. Oleander Aver^ue, 
Chicago I L 60(334. 



NEW JERSEY QSO PARTY 

2000 GMT August 11 

to 0700 GMT August 12 

1300 GMT August 12 

to 0200 GMT August 13 

Ttie Engl e wood ARA invites atl ama- 
teurs worLdwide lo participate in the £Sth! 
annual New Jersey QSO Parlv^. Phone and 
CW are considered the same contest. A 
statmn may be contacted once on each 
band; phone and CW are considered sepa^ 
fate "bancfs" but CW corf tacts may not be 
made in piKineliand segmenis^, NJ sta- 
tions may worH other H4 stations. 

EXCHANGE 

QSO number. RS{T}, and AflRL section, 
country, or NJ county. 



fBEQUENCtES: 

1810. 3535. 3900. 7035, 7135. 7235, 
14035, 14230, 21100. 21355, 28100. 23610, 
50-50.5. and 14^-146. Suggest phone ac* 
tivJty Oh the even hours; 16 meters, on the 

odd hours (ISOO lo 2100 QUI)] 160 meters 
at 0500 QIWIT. 

SCOmNG 

Out-of-state stations multiply the nunv 
ber ot complete contacts with NJ ilaiior^ 
tirfies ttw number of NJ counties worked 
(21 nnaximuni). NJ stations count t point 
per WtK/VtNO QSO and 3 points per OX 
QSO- MuttipTy total QSO points tiy the 
number of ARRL sections (Inciuding NNJ 
end SNJ-maKlmum 74). KP4, KH6. KL7, 
etc., count afi 3' point DX contacts and as 
aaction mullipllers. 

AWARDS: 

Certificates will be awarded to the fiist- 
place station m each NJ coiinty, ARRL 
aecikjrt, and oouniry. In addilion, a sec- 
ond place cerHflcate wilt be awarded 
wtien 4 or more logs are received. Novice, 
Technician, and mobile-operator eertifi- 
caies will elS'O be awarded. 

ENTRIES: 

l-ogs must stiow da*e^1ime in GMT. 
barKl, aniil emission. Ijogs must be received 
not later than September &th. Ttie first 
contact lor each claimed multiplier must 
be irujicated and numbered and a check- 
list of contacts and muilipliers should l>e 
Included. Mulli -operator stations should 
be noted and calls of participating oper- 



REmi^ 



1984 VIRGINIA QSO PARTY 



Wi niters of major award plaques; 

Virginia fixed station— WA4NTP (78,9211 Vlfginia mobile station— WA4PGMiM 
163,800). Virginia CW oniy-KORi (42.02&K Virflinla QRP station— KW4i (13,808). 
Ouc-ot state siaiion— NC2V (7,590). 



AL— WA4VEK 
AZ— W7YS 
CA^W6NNY 
CT— K1BV 
FL—WK4F 
lA— KEBHQE 



State winners (24 stAfes) 
ID— KA7T MI-WBWVU 



IL— KY9f 
t_A— WSWG 
MA-WA1REI 
lyiD-K^LK 
ME— KA1ZV 



MX— KA/PMU 
NC— K4JEX 
Ni-NC2V 
NM-AI9X 
NV-KA7GX0 



OK— tM9R 
PA-^W3ZX 
TX— W5PWG 
WA— W7DRA 
WV— W3IJT 
WV-NC70 



DX winners: Canada— VE3KK^ Spain— EA2IA. 



aiors listed- Logs and commenia sticiuld 
be sent to Er^glewood Amateur Radio As- 
sociation, IrK.. PO Box 528, Englewood NJ 
07631, 

A f 10 (business) size SASE stioufd be 
inciuded for results. Stations planning ac- 
tive participation in NJ are requested to 
advise the EARA by August ist of their In- 
tentions so that they can plan for (ull ggv- 
efage from ail counties. Portable and mo^ 
bile operation is encouraged 



SARTG WORLDWIDE 

RTTY CONTEST 

Contest Periods: 

0000 to 0800 GMT August 18 

1600 to 2400 GMT August 18 

080Q to 1600 GMT August 19 

This is the 14th annual contest spon- 
sored by tfte Scandinavian Amateur Radio 
Teletype Groui> {SARTG). Opeiating 
classes include la) single operator, (b] 
multi-operatorfstngle transrrMtt^, and {c} 
SWl^ Piease rwte the logs ftom multi-op- 
erator stations must contain the names 
and callsigns of all operators invotved. 
The same station may be worked once on 
each bahd for QSO and miiltipllor credits. 
Only 2' way I^TTY QSOs wlH count. 

EXCHAWQf; 
RST arwJ OSO numl»f- 

SCORfNG: 

QSOs wilt^ your own country co^jnl 5 
points. Qlt>ef countries in the same conti* 
nent are 10 points. Other comments are 15 
points. In USA, Canada, and Australia, 
each call district will be considered as a 
separate country. Use Lhe PXCC list and 
the above-mentioned call areas for muili- 
pliers. Note that contacts with a station 
which would count as a muMiplier must be 
found in at least 5 logs or a contest log 
must tie received from tiie multipllef star 
Iron in order to be valid. Rnal score is the 
sum of QSO points lin>e& the sum of the 
multipliers SWLs use tt)e sanne rules for 
scoring, but based on stations and mes- 
sages copied. 



AWARDS: 

Top stations In each class, couitliy. WIK 
VE/VO. and VK call drstricf il ttie mjmber 
ol QSDs IS reasonable. 

ENTRiES: 

Logs musi be received by Ocioher iDth 
and should contain: band, dale^lme In 
GMT. callsign, eKchanges sen I and fe- 
ceived, points, mutlipliers, and final 
score. Use a separate sheet for each band 
and endose a summary sti<eet aliowir^ 
Itie scoHng. c^assiTicalion^ callsign, 
narrie, and address In Itie case of multt* 
opera tor stations^ irtclude the names and 
call signs ol all operators involved. Corr^ 
ments witi t^ very much appreciated by 
the contest committee. Send logs to: 
SARTG Goniesi & Award f^anagen C J. 
Jensen 0Z2CJ, PO Box 71 7, 8600 Silke 
borg. Denmark, 



OCCUPATION CONTEST 

Starts: 1800 GMT August 25 

Ends: 2400 GMT August 26 

The Radio Association oT Erie, Pennsyl- 
vania, ts sponsoring its annual contest 
open to all amateur radio operators. 

EXCHANGE: 

R5(T](; occupation: and state, province^ 
or country. 

FREQUENCiES: 

CW— 40 kHz from the bottom of the 
ham bands: phone— 3920, 7250, 14300, 
21400, and 26600. 

SCOniNG: 

Sgofe 3 points tor each new occupation 
worked, one point for ail slmltaf occupa- 
tions wo^ed, and 2 points for all retirees 
worked. Ttier e are no multipliers 

ENTRfES: 

Mailing deadline for logs is October Ist, 
and they are to tie sent to Harry Arsenault 
KlPURra, 603 Powetl Avenue, Erie PA 16505. 
Enclose an SASE for a copy of the results. 



CORRECT/ONS 



Re: "Painless Op-Amp Filter Design," to the gain characteristics of the bl-quad 
Aprir, 1934: The article contains a major filter should be Ignored, The erroneous in- 
technical error. Ali ciaims with reference terpretatton q\ data acquired from bread- 



board models of the bi-quad resulted from 
roo literaHy interpreting sources that list 
the gain ot the bi-guad titter as its O- This 
is true only lor the design center irequen- 
cy fof normalifed modeis. Examination ol 
the trans fet function for the bi-quad 
shows a relatively Hat gain even lor wide- 
Irequencyrange filters, such as those 
shown in the ofiglnai article. Greater 
ranges of gain may be e^tpected for vari- 
able-O modeFs. The measured results for 
breadboard mode is are in close agree- 



meni with or greater (ttar^ predictions 
from the transfef function. TTie remaining 
design techniques, especially tor deter- 
mining the tuning range, still apply. Fo4 
variable-ciiUtput level filtef^. an output- 
levetir^ tectimque is useful in rnany appt^ 
cations. I sincerely regret the error and offer 
my thanks to FranH W. Heemsha for point- 
ing It out 

L S. Cebik W4RNL 
KnoMVltte TI4 



86 73 Magazine • August, 1964 




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73 Magazine • August, 1984 87 













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GENEVA CALCULATOR WATCH 

This attractlva waCcH ha^ the following modes 

Normal Tlioe S^rclng, 

Calendar Setting, 

Daily Alarm Time Setting, 

Weekly Alarm Time Sett lag » 

Chronograph, 

Calculator. 





Featured in Black Plastic 



SIS.99 



or Ff^tured In Stainlftss Steel 



$29.99 



SILICON DIODES 


r 
h 








J-EED THRU SOLDER RF CAP ACTORS 


MR751 




lOOvdc 


6ABps 


10/S5.00 


1O0/S38.00 


470pf +-201 




MRS 10 




lOOOvdc 


BiAmps 


lO/$3,75 


10O/S24.OO 






HEPiyo 




lOOOvdc 


2 Amps 


20/$2.00 


100/$ 15, 00 


5/$1.00 or 1OO/S15-0O or 


imzm 




lOOvdc 


1 5 Amps 


$2,00 


10/ $15.00 


1000/$ 100* 00 




BVX2 1/200 




200^dc 


2 5 Amps 


S2 , 00 


10/ $15.00 






iN2l3aA 




600 vdc 


&OAmps 


$3,00 


10/ $40.00 


lOOOpf/.OOluf 


+-10X 


DS85-OAC 




400vdc 


SOAmps 


$10.00 


10/ $80.00 






tH3269 




600vdc 


160Araps 


$13.00 


10/$ 120. 00 


4/$ I. 00 or 100/$ 20, 00 or 


275Z41 




300vdc 


25QAmps 


$20.00 


10/$ 175* 00 


1000/$ 1 50,00 




7-575^ 




300vdc 
15KV0C 


4Q0lAtaps 
20nia. 


$30.00 
S3. 00 


10/$2S0.O0 
10/ $20.00 






RCO-15 


E PROMS 




SMFR20K 




ZOKVDC 


20nia. 


$4.00 


10/ $30.00 




1N4US 




signal 




30/$ 1.00 


100/ $3.00 


2708 1024itl 
27 I 6 204Sx8 
27L32/25L32 


$2*00 each 


FATRilHlLD 


41 H 


> IhK DYNAMIC RAMS 200ns . Part # 


16K75 


$4.00 each 


25 For $25 


,00 


or 100 For 


$90. OD or 


1000 For S750.00 


$10.00 each 


HEWU-IT PACEURD MICROWAVE DIODES 











lK57n 

1N5712 

m6263 

50B2-283S 

5062-2305 



(5082-2800) 
(5082-2810) 
(HSCH-iOOl) 

Quad Matched 



Schottky Barrier Diodes 



If 



II 



II 



11 



II 



It 


It 


It 


11 


(t 


tt 



$1,00 or 10 for $ 8,50 

$1.50 or 10 for $10.00 

i .75 or 10 for $ 5.00 

$1.50 or 10 for $10.00 

per set $5.00 or 10 for $40.00 



For information calf: (602) 242-3037 



Toll Fre« Number 

SOO-528-01BO 
(For orders onty) 

PRICES SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE 



(fH^i|^ electroi|iCi 



"^AU purH may be new or 
syrp]u5, and paris may be 
subsiituted wilh corriparabte parts 
if we ar€ oul ot stock of an iteni. ' 



88 7$ Magazine • August, 1984 



"MIXERS" 



WATKINS JOHNSON WJ-H6 Double Balanced Mixer 



LO and RF 0.2 to 300HH2 
Conversion Loss {SSB) 

Noise Figure (SSB) 

Conversion Compression 



IF DC to 300MHz 
6.5dB Max. 1 to 50MHz 
8.5dB Max. .2 to 300MHz 
same as above 
8.5dB Max. 50 to 300MHz 
.3dB Typ. 



S21,00 

WITH DATA SHEET 



KEC (NIPPON ELECTRIC CO. LTD. 
NF Min F=26Hz dB 2.4 Typ. 



F=36Hz 
F=4GHz 



dB 3.4 Typ. 
dB 4.3 Typ. 



NE57835/2SC215 Microwave Transistor 

MAG F=2GHz dB 12 Typ. 
F=3GHz dB 9 Typ. 
F=4GHz dB 6, 5 Typ 



$5.30 



Ft Gain Bandwidth Product at Vce=8v, Ic=10ma. GHz 4 Min. 6 Typ. 
Vcbo 25v Vceo 11 v Vebo 3v Ic 50ma. Pt. 250mw 



UNELCO RF Power and Linear Amplifier Capacitors 

These are the famous capacitors used by all the RF Power and Linear Anplifier 
nianuf acturers , and described in the RF Data Book. 



5pf 

5.1pf 
6.8pf 

7pf 
8,2pf 



lOpf 
12pf 
13pf 

14pf 
15pf 



ISpf 
22pf 
25p£ 
27pf 
27 . 5pf 



30p£ 
32pf 
33pf 

34pf 
40pf 



43pf 
51pf 
60pf 
80pf 
82pf 



lOOpf 
llOpf 
L20pf 

130pf 
140p£ 



1 to 
220pf 11 to 
470pf 51 up 
500pf 
lOObpf 



lOpcs . 

50pcs. 

pes. 



SI. 00 ea 
$ .90 ea 
$ .80 ea 



NIPPON ELECTRIC COMPANY TUNNEL DIODES 



Peak Pt. Current ma. 

Valley Pt. Current ma. 
Peak Pt. Voltage iiiv. 
Projected Peak Pt. Voltage mv. 
Series Res. Ohms 
Terminal Cap. pf. 
Valley Pt. Voltage mv. 



Iv 

Vp 

Vpp Vf 
rS 
Ct 

vv 



MODEL 1S2199 
9inin. lOTyp. Umax. 
1.2Typ. l.Smax. 
95Typ. I20ntax. 
=Ip 480min. 550Typ. 630max 
2.5Typ. 4max. 
1.7Typ. 2max. 
370Typ. 



1S2200 57.50 
9min. lOTyp. Umax, 
1.2Typ. l.Bmax. 
75Typ. 90raax. 
440min. 520Typ. 600max 
2Typ. 3max. 
5Typ. 8max. 
350Typ. 



FAIRCHILD / DUMONT Oscilloscope Probes Model 4290B 

Input Impedance 10 meg., Input Capacity 6.5 to 12pf . , Division Ratio (Volts/Div Factor) 

10; 1, Cable Length 4Ft. , Frequency Range Over lOOMHz. 

These Probes will work on all Tektronix, Hewlett Packard, and other Oscilloscopes. 

PRICE $45.00 



MOTOROLA RF DATA BOOK 

Listsall Motorola RF Transistors / RF Power Amplifiers, Varactor Diodes and much much 
more. 



PRICE $7.50 



FDf information call: (602) 242-3037 



Toll Free Number 
800-528-0180 

(For orders only) 



c^*^^ electroqics 



''All parts may be new or 
sufplus. and parts may be 
substituted ^itn comparable parts 
if we are out ot atocK of an item." 



PRICES SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE 



73 Magazine • August, 1904 89 



RF TRANSISTORS, MICROWAVE DIODES 



I > 



PRICE 



Toll Free Number 
800-528-01 80 

(For orders only) 



TVPE 



PRICE 



lYPE 



PRICE 



TYPE 



PRICE 



2N1561 


$ 25.00 


ii**.iti7a ¥ 


2.00 


111134 $ 16.90 


SISC1821-3 


$125.00 


2N1563 


25.00 


n..v (v-iq 


20.00 


16579 


7.95 


ien82i-io 


225.00 


mnmt 


25.00 


_.. ,;50 


1.50 


t@5d8 


7.50 


sew^sxa 


46.00 


mS3&7 


1.55 
4-10 


29C1316 


4.00 

rw.oo 


ID623 


7.9S 
9.95 


II3C2223-10 


200.00 


2NZB&7JAKDC 


IGC3G0D 


50.00 


2?SiRrt7JAJfrXV 


4,10 


2aCl94GA 


40.00 


}&b:24 


11.95 


iHciorn 


50.00 


2N2876 


t3,SO 


2!?C1970 


2.50 


M9625 


17.95 


M9G73001 


BO.OO 


2N2947 


18.35 


2SC1S74 


4.00 


M£Ji63Q 


18.00 


jaau*2txji 


40.00 


2mms 


i:*,oo 


2SC3ie6 


5.50 


Ht3740 


29.90 


1ASrH2QU 


40.00 


aee2949 


15.50 


2SC223V 


32.00 


U9741 


29.90 


Msni:^f)20 


40.00 


1M3373 


11.10 


aaC2695 


47.00 


yms& 


Id. 50 


MSC8a)30 


40.00 


2N3^3 


1.53 


A50-12 


25.00 


lilB43 


37.00 


HS0i3O01 


50.00 


2K3632 


15*50 


ii2m 


10,00 


119850 


IG.90 


IBC83006 


100.00 


2N37n3 


11.00 


A2S3 


5.00 


ir^ril 


20.00 


1114150 


14.40 


21«3&ia 


5.00 


iQ83B 


6.00 


HB8tf7 


5. a 


1115126 


Rii 


^438^ 


I.JO 


HFliM 


2.50 


lfFI»0091 


25.00 


ln^^/2N5396 


99.00 


2N386GJAF{ 


2,20 


AfY12 


2.50 


HM1550 


10.00 


hfr576«/ri^5768 


95.00 


£Naa24 


3.:Vi 


Br*>72A 


2.50 


mi^^2 


50.00 


^flB762 


POi 


2N3y;^7 


17,25 


HFH21 


2.50 


MM1,^53 


SO.CX) 


fitXJ2l38 


2.50 


2H3950 


25.00 


BFR90 


1.00 


Wfl614 


10,00 


MlLi:*78a 


PUR 


mmi2 


11.00 


BFRdI 


1.65 


lltlM3/2N4072 


l.SO 


HfE^lBBB 


POR 


3N4041 


14.00 


HPR99 


2.50 


liiseoe 


5,00 


N^7135 


5,70 


2N|UiU 


l.W) 


ittTl2 


2.50 


lli3375A 


17, lO 


^^73436 


2.50 


2FttORn 


4,53 


wmm 


2.50 


IIM429 


10.00 


TRl 




2N4127 


21.00 


Btytii 


2.50 


NiSOOO 


1,15 


PKim37 


pen 


2m427 


1.30 


fiF192 


1.50 


MM8006 


2.30 


praiso 


PCR 


2N442B 


1.S5 


liFX44 


2.50 


Mfiteoii 


25.00 


Fm94 


HJH 


2K4430 


nsQ 


m-ME 


2,50 


MI>F102 


.45 


Frjiya 


PCS 


2M957 


3.45 


lOBS 


2.50 


MPSU31 


1.01 


PHiSS? 


7.80 


^HS59 


2,30 


3^X84 


2.50 


IIBA2023-1*3 


42.50 


PT4166E 


yiM 


aeo9o 


13.80 


EF3£B5 


2.50 


M^^^OB 


10. 10 


PT417a) 


KK 


^©loe 


3.45 


BRcse 


2.50 


11^212 


16.10 


Fi4iaflB 


PCR 


2^109 


I, TO 


WXBB 


1*00 


ieF223 


13.25 


Fr4209 


POR 


ar^ieo 


3.43 


wni 


2.,10 


liRFW4 


15.50 


PT4209C/5643 


PQR 


2N5177 


21.62 


imm 


2.50 


1WI^31 


10.£££ 


FT455e 


24.60 


2N5179 


1.04 


Bi'Tig 


2.50 


mFZ32 


12,07 


Ff457n 


7.50 


2^J^10 


se.oo 


BFY3© 


2.50 


MR>'23L] 


12.65 


FH577 


FOR 


2N55S3 


3.45 


BFV90 


1.00 


MBP237 


3.15 


Pr450O 


POR 


2Sfi5Rf> 


9.77 


tii.xr>7 


15.24 


ymvvH 


13.80 


PT4612 


KH 


23!&aSO 


10.££E 


BLffi«C:i 


15.24 


lAy-'Zjy 


17.25 


P1>l€28 


FIK 


2W5581 


13.80 


gUfifnCTi 


22.21 


Hy^245 


3S.S5 


PF4640 


PClt 


36637 


15.50 


BI.VR7A 


8.9^1 


WI1*247 


35.65 


FP^12 


KJK 


2«?"/rll 


12.42 


I3U88C3 


13.06 


l&i-lJOl 


43.45 


FS5632 


4.70 


21«6'12 


14,03 


BLV94C 


21.30 


MHK309 


33. SI 


PIS749 


KJK 


2K5643 


15.50 


BLvasi 


10. oo 


MRF314 


7H.52 


P^B629 


FCR 


2mm5 


13. eo 


HLY56&C/CF 


30.00 


MRF315 


2«.a6 


r^TC709 


POR 


2N5646 


20.70 


04aa-6i7 


25.00 


i*m3W 


POR 


I^ib72n 


PQR 


2N56SI 


U.05 


OlOOft 


20.00 


MRF317 


m,m 


PTRfvlO 


PCK 


2?<5691 


18.00 


a>is99 


20,00 


l«E430 


20.00 


in»524 


PCR 


'j^Tm 


27.00 


CDElSg 


13.00 


WF421 


36.80 


pm&OB 


PUK 


2J5836 


3.45 


CU£^45 


25.00 


lftr422A 


41.40 


PX8633 


PQG 


2!^d42/lilI6C7 


8.43 


OC3006 


100.00 


111^27 


17.25 


Pr863B 


P(Jtt 


2N5849 


20.00 


DeMcel QaAs FET 




IKF428 


4^,00 


piTitaae 


PCfi 


2N5dl3 


3.25 


moascaA-PiooF 


49,30 


MHF4T^ 


12.07 


PI8679 


PUK 


2N5916 


36.00 


f\iJil^iJ GaAs IKT 




MKF443/A 


12. 05 


n«7oe 


POR 


2N5622 


10.00 


EaXSSWF 


58.00 


M}tF43Q/A 


14.37 


pi^rn*^ 


PCR 


2,N5923 


25.00 


c»r£^£Mm 


2.50 


MRF453/A 


ia.40 


PT8727 


29.00 


2f6^1 


23.00 


HE^^ 


4.95 


MBF454/A 


20.12 


m^7:n 


VCSL 


2N5S42 


40. OD 


HEFf^VXe 


11.40 


imF455/A 


16.00 


PT&742 


' L9.t0 


2ICS944 


10.35 


BEPS3003 


30.00 


litt-45B 


20.70 


Fre787 


pat 


2»^&15 


11,50 


Ii33«j3005 


10.00 


imF4^3 


25.00 


FI9'/1*3 


16.50 


2N5&I6 


14.40 


HKPS3006 


1B.90 


IRF472 


1,00 


PT9T&I 


32,70 


2N5nno 


10,3fV 


^Pii3G01 


25.00 


IIBF4/a 


3.10 


PI9790 


iVi 00 


2N60S1 


12.07 


liW'S3010 


11*34 


MRF476 


a. 00 


P'rjl9(32 


I^OH 


2m082 


12.65 


Ikni'Seit Piickard 




MRF477 


14.95 


t*r:^i9fj:^ 


PUR 


2NeOB3 


13.25 


\mur22Q4 


112.00 


MKt492 


23.00 


TTJIOBII 


POR 


2N60&4 


15.00 


35e21F. 


3B.00 


MKF5nEt 


1.04 


Hmi680 


PUK 


aH60&4 


U.OO 


3582^ 


32.00 


IIBF5U3 


6.00 


RCA 






12.00 


X)826£ 


32.00 


IHf50t 


7.00 


4UUB1 


5.00 


S9fT(K«i 


16.10 


:i5lt31£-B31 


30.00 


1IBF509 


5,00 


4JJir?9 


10.00 


m&mi 


20.70 


358:211: 


30.00 


]«n»u 


lO.tiB 


40280 


4.fi? 


2M&MJ^ 


21.00 


35832E 


50.00 


IBF515 


2.00 


40281 


10.00 


2^6136 


21.85 


3583^ 


50.00 


MKF517 


2.00 


40282 


20.00 


2mi6G 


40.24 


358S3E 


71.50 


mJth^9 


2.05 


40290 


2.80 


2Na20l 


BO. 00 


3&854E 


70.00 


J.IRP605 


20,00 


40292 


13. OS 


2t«5301 


1.50 


35866E 


44.00 


MRFB18 


25.00 


402iM 


2.30 


2NB459 


l&.OO 


HX'lUltlOl 


7.00 


lftF€2d 


8.65 


40341 


21.00 


211^67 


10.06 


U9eiB3102 


8.75 


IIIF«S9 


3.43 


40606 


2.48 


2»6680 


SO. 00 


ii;nit5ic>i 


30.00 


HiH>44 


^.60 


40094 


1.00 


2SC?03 


3.00 


HK^HblOi 


68.00 


imeifi 


2B.S0 


40£r77 


10.00 


23L'73GA 


7.50 


JBOTeiOft 


31.00 


lit^lB 


15.00 


4i2800A 


60.00 


29C:?51 


2.80 


HK1TO106 


33.00 


IIKFFS23 


20.00 


1^3754 


25.00 


23C1018 


l.OO 


J310 


.70 


MHraOl (3) Lf^ad 


l.UJ 


HhTV/8& 


25.00 


a3Cl042 


12.00 


urn 




MIlP^Ol (4} l£ad 


3.00 


RFllO 


25.00 


2kSC1070 


2,50 


joeooa 


10.00 


MRF9D4 


2,30 


5l^iO-12 


25.00 


23n?:i!^ 


2.50 


JfKOOl 


25.00 


Mttl^ll 


3.00 


S-VI06 


5.00 


2Sa2Sl 


12.00 


JOMHS 


2S.00 


IQIF961 


2,30 


153031 


5.00 


23C1306 


2.90 


Uatorola Qxn. 




IIRFS004 


2.10 


3:A^22 


5„00 


aanaoT 


5.50 


M1131 


8.50 


leasLF 


IXJR 


9c:a^£3 


3.00 


2i0424 


2*80 


111132 


11.95 


ysa72o-i2 


225.00 


PRJO; ON HSQUEST - POR 



"All parts may be new of 
surplus, and parts may be 
substituLed with comparablie parts 
it we AW QUI of stock of an Item." 



For information call: (602) 242*3037 



PRICES SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE 

(f\I^^E|z electroi|ic§ 



90 73 Magazine • August, 1984 



GaAs, TUNNEL DIODES, ETC. 



Ttft 


fKio; 


HUJSK GSF 




SIKM5 


S ^-00 


a«i:. 


b.ua 


3>U)C>1 


l3,00 


-■,-<» 


15,00 


^di>"J?>-L* 


IjJX* 


sa)Xoi2 


9.90 


ia>icji2-:t 


a, 90 


aDiuiii-:. 


P,90 


5imji3^;i 


13.50 


SI 110 1> 7 


13,,=XT 


siJinH 


11. oo 


3DH)M-ti 


11.00 


SUWU? 


1&,00 


sjunG-r* 


15.00 


suhaa-i 


15.00 


suiuxa-a 


Ij.OO 


auuuj-7 


15,00 


S>1(J1S-I& 


15*00 


^llCiO-i 


10.00 


a»iu^ 


IS-OO 


SJiQat-^ 


12.00 


J 


12,00 


c^-iL_-*:i-l 


10.00 


SLniMh 


3.75 


a^im^i 


2,00 


sinuaa 


4.00 


anc«ia 


4.7^ 


SDitjiia 


1^.00 


SD It 17-1-2 


1ft- 00 


sm/ii-A 


2ft, 00 


ano74-rj 


28.00 


isliUJTtJ 


20,00 


a^^^l77-^ 


4,00 


a:>ii)77~fi 


4.00 


SD1C)78-G 


24*00 


SDlfMHU 


6,00 


aiirifto-y 


3.00 


ia.jKJH'i 


8,00 


a^liiiU 


15,00 


Sr, 


15.00 


ajiui^j 


15,00 


a>iim 


5,00 


ajiioe 


ia,oo 


SP1U5-2 


«.oo 


SUllt>-3 


8.00 


3nii5-7 


2,50 


^1116 


5.00 


^LllS 


22.00 


Me- Qui Crrn^ Ibefc^refso^ Ifci^ 


• 


issn 


$ :i.4o 


ii^ii- 


4,00 


l^iWt 


5. an 


iwa:!a 


3.W) 


iN2:im 


4,00 


imium 


lO.OfJ 


mia 


26.00 


]mm 


26.00 


IN 14 9 


6.00 


LN415G 


15. OO 


1>N831 


10. 00 


UC^JO 


15.00 


LV3713 


18.00 


i:;:i7i7 


14.00 


LVJ71? 


21.00 


I.*;4K12& 


a.oo 


1«6142A/B 


4.25 


Jiei4fWIB 


4,25 


JIJ&I33 


3,75 


12S70 


5.00 


1^300 


15.U0 


^tjxi trai Apri^vJi 


30.00 


bUia ijLjnar 


5.00 


l.H2;i:tH Alp^ta 


PlH 


D60I7C MiAm 


POH 


IJQetii:jM-'kH At^jiia 


n:R 


aiEi*n-s^> (;ip'. 


31. 3S 


tx^^>t2-lt^ tiitii 


37,40 


Hl^*S.t.>H2-rJll2 


14.30 


HP6f>H2-ci:i7,'i 


post 


H]|f)tttiLJ-K>24 


I«H 


JOfi^W:^ ■_' ^''1 


5.ii0 


WKliK 


t.™ 


m-^^^m 


G.TTJ 


lOKiCih 


1.50 


m^rfjwii -yjiti 


iXM 


tt/tji:* 


KM 


IU4I70(5 


lUK 


uitaeaG 


rcK 


S1A17^'X1 


3.iJ6 


)^I7M^ 


It It 



Jini24 

I'll --.l 

srai:Mi-i 
aiii:j5 

.Sti 113*5 
iSL>3 1.^-2 
3> II '1:5-1 

HDl 144^1 

(.77,11 17 

^{3)1-2 

SUli£l2-ll 
SJ12 12-12 
SUI212-1G 
SDt214-7 
3>i:i 14-11 

aJl219-4 

:aji2i3-5 

^»t£20 

Sf) 1224-1 'J 

SD.122S-S 
SI3l22y-7 

SU1232 

Sl)1240-S 

iaJ]244-l 

ia>i27:i 

iSJ 1272-2 

i5r^ia72-4 
aji27fi 

;ail278-l 



$ 5.00 

fiO.OO 

1L!*(W 
17,00 

15.00 

ir>,cK) 

1P,UU 

24.00 

l.SO 

10.0(1 

lU.OO 

4.00 

4.00 

i.no' 
^.uo 

5^00 
12.00 
1.^00 
15.01) 
ir>.Do 

H.uO 

b.OO 

UnOO 

7,5*J 

iH,ati 

18,00 

i:i,0(j 

■LOO 
15,00 
14,00 
12.00 
15,00 
15.00 
0.00 
15,00 
1&,00 
30.00 
18.00 



3ir^7B-S 

aiJi2»i-2 

£liJ283 

aDl2H0-l 

a.il:i9D-4 

ajl2!J0-7 

i2>13(X) 

aii:iin-7 

SL)i:*(JFi 
SLJt:JU7 

51)1365-1 
SDl.l&VS 
SP1375 
ail375-fl 

^»1380-1 

^}1380^3 

3*13^0^7 

a>140S 

Sll4a9 

:£i'no 
ia/iiio-3 

SDH 111 

3Ji4:^ 
soi4iay-2 

Sr.P 1421^-3 
si;: 42^-5 
SUl4:Ki 

sDi4:«>~a 

SD14M-5 
331434-0 
SD1438 

a:ii44i 

SDl+42 

ail444 

3>1444-8 

SFl45a-^t 

Sll4^ 

3>145t-2 

HK452-2 



51B.0O 

10."- 

15jj(« 

I5.*KI 

1S^,(H» 

xm 

St. 00 
3.00 
^.00 
.1,00 

10. OD 

5*00 
2.50 
2.M 
7.5LI 
7,50 
15.00 
1^00 
1.00 

i.(m 

1B,0D 

21. ()0 
tK,00 
SO. 00 
24, m 

Ifj.UO 
L5.00 
15.00 
12. Ui 
IK. 00 

3f>. OO 
26.00 
SLOO 
l.=i.(SO 
6.41) 

28.i*J 

tK.Otl 

1J1,0U 

^.00 

ao^oo 



mi. 

a*i45*i-i 
sm4.M - 1 

iini77 
.^>II7H 
SEU IHt> 
a^imi 



SD148'1-7 

HlJl-tHrt 

SI114KR-1 

S1>11KR"7 

a>15234-!? 

Sil ' 

■^ ■ ■ .- 1 

i_M. ' L ' -r 4 -iJ' 

a . i It . 

^*m77 HLA 
J^fi77L4 kt^i. 

ishnoiH n>t. 

sura 147 s*.t . 
giKI37W Mit. 

T^y4J!liVl \{{-!\ 
'lino 14 IW 

ui ?su/tj;ni.n/ 

T3CIT22U1 lij', 
03803 BDV 
Vk72£Ji^fJ!QmX 
TAT4ti7/2!ea» 
TA79HG/:ffaGaG7 

UHr47^ 



[RIL]^ 

1**.IM* 

21,i¥l 

eo.oo 

i.50 

l,fjO 

►.SI 1 1 M I 

27.00 

IB. INI 
33.0tJ 
24,00 
34.00 
38.UJ 
41.U0 

31. ai 

TO,tt> 



aa.oo 

5,€MI 
15_iiJ 

2.50 
36,00 

5.00 

1*5. E30 

4n.r.)o 

1 ft. LIP 

3.55 
5. no 

15,00 

vrm. 65.00 

450.00 

lOO.tJO 

BO.tXJ 

75,00 

JaO^OO 

18.00 

|j,05 



aF TnutKistors, Diixk^, Hxtsrid Ifcjduie^; And Afiy Otrit^r Tyi^p Of SodcuAilui'trir, 






IKilB % 3.40 

1N21DR 4,00 

iN2iw} 5.ao 

1N2:jC 3.40 

]?^z:\m 5,00 

1N29 10<C}0 

l.N7fiH 2«.tX) 

INTSD 2S,00 

1M50MR 13.00 

iN<nBl^ S^OO 

Dims 10.00 

]\'29S^ 15,00 

::,:i7i4 ii.oo 

LV471S 10.00 

iM3a& ao.oQ 

LN51J9A/B 4,25 

i:i514aA^^ 4.2S 

ViDl47&/n 4.25 

L*^46S 7.65 

C^TST 2*00 

lS22C»y9 1 00 

BB105e 100 

OAJ614ABC.4I nJH 
m^auo Alphu . JUl 

£J&147D Aliia J Mi 

UfcUkje:^ Alpha ilJK 

a. IfcK&l"*^ GHZ 31.35 

Cf"J20&-40 cm 37.40 

H]TjiJH2-ae4l 75.00 

|fl'&i>a2-03Hi"; 1KB 

ni-^i'iOH2-i:i3ii IX Jit 

lU^^>H2^2fi05 4.4 a 

iIf»liOa2-30'10 JIJ.OCJ 

iDwiS2-i>i5y |f«t 

iir»rjOH2-ti3:^3 im 

UA40UUij lUi 

M4t3001 IK. 00 

Ul45iai 27.00 

iajbt72lj^ 3U.ZI0 

liA4!JlOS 37. a5 



LS2tKH &.Q0 

LN^ 5.0U 

imjCR 3.40 

LN25 7.50 

LN7tt 26, OC 

liWeUR 2S.0t> 

L^15 4.00 

1M16E 6.00 

LN3.''>40 15.00 

1KJ715 IR.OO 

JJ0721 14,00 

lipase 15.00 

D&14QA/B 4.25 

LN5l-NA/|$ 4,25 

lIt&i4aA/B 4.a5 

UBTll 1,00 

WB£SS3 l.QO 
a&10S7/4fflaraQ58 65.00 

BBlii^ 1 t)0 

EHOliO M(^m K£ 

04959 Alplm 1U< 

0^03 Alpha V(M 

iMJb^mOk Alpna PGR 

Gcieo7-4o mu 3 1 . as 

GL17[>1^1 lilK 50.00 

Ht^)S2-02ri3 ifjs.on 

JJP5l3B2-2H:i'i 1,00 

lfl>Ly^^J82-at)8fJ 2.00 

OA l^«n»v>t) 7.CK) 

U^I14M7 KJl 

ll4j:iSa<> 1U4 

UAj7t>M Ptfl 

it' l^l{ 



• an ^nix ci»?«j£!^ tMiu ao cau. if if tml pakt vol .sni> is htt usiup *»*--*^*p*-*»^ 



I O-Aai *« ' 



L^IC 

lN2thF 
tN2:iA 

1N2MH 

1N7HA 
INTSR 

tN'iirTt: 

tNl 

1K3733 

ll«&141A/B 

1I&1B7 
tf&Tll JAN 

1^1^ 
SD9QGS> 

BDt/4JT-HH G,L. 
iMt50 Alpna 
i>l£M7U Atpr» 
IJ&50S Aiiihtt 
FJP200&t Cr\r^tt 
t3t:(L'^3l-HW iiU 
tiK*3lfl4A-HDl 

iff':,i>H2*o:i2a 
m'tJtJK^-iM:?H 

fu>rj^)B2-:tJris 
lii'.^miij-itwia 

MAIiiOA 
UA4:*122 

WAirit'ii 
kiA4 mm* 
yAHi?7:n 



$ 3.40 

5 I If) 

10. iXJ 

4 . 95 

184,00 

55.50 

1,00 

10.00 

3,00 
11.00 

loajo 

10,00 
II.UO 
4,25 
4,25 
5.50 
2,00 
15.00 
ft5,00 
15,00 
POR 
PUB 

tai 

PCR 

i^^,^i> 

10. 7n 

lAJft 
1.00 
WH 
KI) 

PQH 

25.3*i 

HJR 

12^.111 r 



F(K information call: (602> 242-3037 



Toll Free Number 
600-528-0180 
(For orders only) 



"Alt part^ may Oe new or 
Surplus, and partE^ may be 
subsiituted wtih comparable pari a 
if we are oul of &1deK of an ttem," 



JVI<^|z elcctroi|ic$ 

PRICES SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE 



73 Magazine • August, 1984 91 



COAKtAL RELAY SWITCHES SPDT 



Electronic Specialty Co. /Raven Electronics 
Part il a5N2a Part // SU-01 

26Vdc Type N Connector, DC to 1 GHz. 



FSN 5985-55&-9683 



$49.00 





NC 



COM 



NO 



UN S9§S 5 J)# «»& J 



SC ^4^ $ '-iHi M ^> iCf HO. 



J r J L I ^- fir.- 



-^•ONICS JilTi i^N ilJ lOi 



^ A 



Arnplieciol 

Part iff 3J6-I0102'e 

il5Vac Type BNC DC to 3 GKa 



$29,99 



FXS 

Part it 300-11182 

120Vac Type BMC DC to ^ TiHz. 

FSN 5965^343-1225 

$39.99 



FXR 

Part ^ 300-11173 
llOVac Type BNC Same 
PSH 5985-5^3-1850 

$39.99 








I < 



'Tj^^^'' 



1 





HNG To Banana Plug Ccnx Cable RG-58 36 inch or mv to N Coax Cable HC-S8 36 Inch. 



S7,99 or 2 For $13.99 or 10 For $50.00 



$8.99 or 2 For $15-99 or 10 For $60.00 




SOLID STATE RELAYS 

P6.E Model ECT1DB72 
PRICE EACH S5.00 

Digisig* Inc. Model ECS-215 
PRICE EACH $7-50 

Grigsby/Barton Model GB740O 
PRICE EACH $7*50 



5vdc Lurn on 



5vdc turn on 



Svdc cum on 




120vac contact at 7aiiips or 20aiiips on a 
10"x 10'*K .124 fll.iiTOlnum. Hjeataink with 
silicon grease. 

240vac contact li^imps or 40aFtips on d 
\Q"k 10"x .124 ^lumlnun. tteatslnk wltlt 
silicon grease. 

240vac contacn at 1 Samps or 40ainps on a 
I0"x 10"k .124 aluminum, Keatsink with 
silicon grease* 



NOTE: *** Items may te substituted with other brands or equivalent model numbers. *** 



oM'ifc 



For information call: (602) 242-3037 



electroi\iciii 



"All parts may be new or 
surplus, and parts may be 
sutistiiuied witti comparaJD^e parts 
it we are oul of stock of an item;' 



Toll Free Nymb«r 

aoo*&2s 01 ao 

(For order* only) 

PRICES SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE 



i 



92 73 Magazine * August. 1984 



RECALL PHONE MEMORY TELEPHQME WITH 24 SUH&KR AUTO DIALER 

The Recall Phone Telephone employs Che latest state of art 
comtnunlcatiGna technology. It is a combination telephone 
and automatic di^er that us^s premluiti-quality, sol id estate 
circuiLr-y to as^itrc hifih-rellabii Ity perforinance in personal 
or business applications. $49.99 




f^ 



4Ll^ 






ARON ALPHA RAPID B O^*^ |^fG GLUE 

Super Glue //CE-4a6 high strength 
rapid boridlng adheialve. Alpha 
Cyanoacrylate>S£t-Time 20 to 40 
s^c^ «0. 7fl.oz. (20gjai.) 

$2.00 



tt 




TOUCH TONE PAD 

■ -^ ^ ■ ' 

This pad contains all the electronics to 
produce standard touch- cone tones. Hev 
with data. 




* 1 11% 



I 




$9.99 or I0/$89>99 



MITSUMI UHF/VHF VARACTOR TUNER MODEL UVElA 

Perfect for those unscraiiibler projects. 
Hew with data. 




$19.99 or 10/SU9,^9 



INTEGRATED CIRCLFIT. 



MCJ372P 

MC1358P 

HC1150P 

MC1330A1P 

MCntOP 

MCI496P 

LM5655^ 

LMJBQNi4 

LJiJfiii9N 

NE564N 

NE561K 



Color TV Video Modulator Circuit. 

IF Aiap, ^Liffilter^FH DeteirCorfAudio Driver .Electronic Attenuator. 

IF Aapllf ter 

Low Level Video Detector 

FM Stereo Demodulator 

balanced Modulator/Demoduliitor 

Phase Locked Loop 

2Watt Audio Power Amplifier 

TV Video Modulator 

Phase Locked Loop 

Phase Locked Loop 



1 to 10 


Uup 


4.4Z 


$2.95 


5.00 


4.00 


I. SO 


1.25 


U50 


1.15 


4, 29 


3.30 


K50 


1.25 


2.50 


2.00 


1,56 


U25 


5.00 


4.00 


10.00 


8.00 


10.00 


8>00 



FEKRAHTl ELECTR0KIC5 AM RADIO RECEIVER MODEL 2M414 INTEGRATED CIRCUIT. 
Features; 

L.2 to 1.6 volt operating ranget^Less than 0* 5ma current consumption* ISOtCHsi co 3MHz 
Frequency range. ^Easy to assemble, no alignment neceasary. Effective and variable AGC action., 
Will drive an earphone direct. Excellent audio quality. ^Typical power gain of 72dB.,TO-18 
package. Vith data. S2.99 or 10 For S24.99 



HI CAD RECHARGEABLE BATTERIES 

AA Battery Pack of 6 These are Factory 
Hew, $5.00 

SUB C Pack of 10 2. 5Ainp/Hr, $10*00 

Gat^s Rechargeable Battery Packs 



12vdc St 2.5Aap/Hr. 
IZvdc At SAmp/Hr. 



Sli.99 

$15.99 




(fVI^TIz elect rof||C§ 



"All patts may be new or 
surplus and parts may be 
substituted Attn comp^raljle parts 
It vtre 3^m OUt of ^\ock af an item." 



MOTOROLA MRF559 RF TRANSISTOR 

hfe 3aiiin 90typ 2aQiiax. 

ft 3000fitiz 

gain 8db min 9.5typ at 87Clnhz 

I3db typ at 5l2ntiz 
output power .Swotts at 12.5v± 
at 87QTtiz. 

$2.05 or 10/$15.00 



For information calf: (602) 242-3037 

Toll Free Number 
e00-52&4)180 
(For orders only) 

PRICES SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE 



I 






73 Magazine • August, 1904 93 



fit 



SOCKETS AND CHIMNEYS" 



EIMAC TUBE SOCKETS AND CHIHKEYS 



SKI 10 

SK3aOA 

Slt^lOO 

SK406 

SK416 

SK500 

SK6Q0 

5K602 

SK606 

SK607 

SK610 

SK62D 

SK62 6 

SK630 

SK616B 

5K640 

SIC646 

SK7D0 

SKZIIA 

SK740 

SK770 

SK800A 

SKdO& 

SKSIO 

SK900 

SK906 

SK1420 

SKU90 



Socket 

Socket For 4CX5000A,R, J, 4CX10,0OOD, 4CX15,000A,J 

Socket For 4''125Ap25OA,iO0A,4OOC,4Pai25A,40aA,i!i-5OOA,5-5OOA 

Chiinney For 4-2 5OAp4OOAt40OC,4PR4OOA 

Chltaney For 3*4002 

Socket Tot 4-1000A/4PR100OA/B 

Socket For 4CX2 5OB,BC,FC,R,4CX350A,F,FJ 

Socket For 4CX25O0,BC,FG,R,4CX35OA,F,FJ 

Chimney For 4CX250B,BC,FC,R,4CX350A,F.FJ 

Socket For 4GX60OJ,JA 

Socket For 4CX600J.JA 

Socket For 4CX600J,JA 

Chimney Fur 4CX600J,JA 

Socket For 4CX60OJ ,JA 

Chtnmey For 4CX600J,JA 

Socket For 4CX600J,JA 

Cblniney For 4CX600J , JA 

Soc ket For 4CX300A, Y , 4CX i 2 SC, F 

Socket For 4CX300A,Y,4CX125C,F 

Socket For 4CX300A,Y.4CX12 5C,F 

Socket For 4CX300A,Y ,4CX125C,F 

Suckec For 4CXm00A,4CXl500B 

Chlnmey For 4CX1QOOA,4CX1500B 

Socket For 4CXlOOOA,4CXl500B 

Socket For 4X500A 

Chinuie}? F«r 4X500A 

Socket* For 5CX30O0A 

Socket For ^CVBOOOA 



S520,OQ 

260,00 

74,00 

36,00 

390. 00 

51.00 

73*00 

11. 00 

60«0D 

60,00 

66,00 

I a, 00 

&6.00 

34.00 

36-00 

11-00 

225.00 

22 5.00 

86,00 

8fi.O0 

225,00 

40,00 

225,00 

300, 00 

57,00 

650.00 

585-00 



JOHNSON TUBE SOCKETS AND CHIMKEYS 



124-111/SK606 
122-0275-001 
124-0113-00 
124-1 16/SK630A 
124-1 15*2/SK620A 



Chimney For 4CX250B,BC,FG,R, 4CX350A,F,TJ 
Socket For 3-SOOZ, 4-125A, 250A, 400A, 4-5O0A, 
Capacitor Ring 

Socket For 4CX2 50B,BC,FG ,R, /4CX350A,F,FJ 
Socket For 4CX2 50B,BC.FG,R, /4CX350A,F,FJ 
ai3 Tube Socket 



S-500A 



$ 10,00 

(pair) 15,00 
15.00 
SS,00 
55.00 
20,00 



CHIP CAPACITORS 

.8pf 

Ipf 

J,lpf 

l.4pf 

l.Spf 

1.8pf 

2,2pf 

2,7pf 

3.3pf 

3.6pf 

3.9pf 

4.7pf 

S.6pf 

6 # 8pf 

8.2pf 



PRICES 



I to 10 - 

II to 50 ' 
51 to lOO 



lOpf 
12pf 
15pf 
18pf 
20pf 
22pf 
24pf 
27pf 
33pf 
39pf 
47 pf 
5lpf 
56pf 

6apf 

82pf 

,99c 
,90^ 
.80c 



XOOpf* 

llOpf 

I20pf 

I30pf 

150pf 

l&Opf 

IBOpf 

200pf 

220pf* 

240pf 

270pf 

300pf 

330pf 

360pf 

390pf 



430pf 
470pf 
SlOpf 
56Qpf 
S20pf 
680pf 



lQ00pf/,001uf* 

ia0Opf/.0018Lrf 

Z700pf/,00Z7uf 

lO,OOOpf/.01uf 

lZ,0O0pf/.012uf 

l5»OOOpf/-01Buf 

18,000pf/.018uf 



101 to 

1001 & 



1000 
UP 



,60e 
,35<t 



* IS A SPECIAL PRICE: 



10 for $7.50 
100 for $65.00 
1000 for $350,00 



i<ATKlNS JOHNSON WJ-V9Q7: Voltage Controlled Microwave Oscillator 



$110. GO 



Frequency range 3.6 to 4,2GH2, Power oupyt, Hin* lOdBm typical, 8d8m Guaranteed, 
Spurious output suppression Harmonic (nfo)i ^^n. 20dB typical, In-Band Non-Hanncinic, min. 
&0d6 typical, Residual FM, pk to pk. Max, 5KHz, pushing factor, Max. 8KHz/V. Pulling figure 
(1.5:1 VSWR), Max. 60MHz, Tuning voltage range +1 to +15volts. Tuning current, Wax, -0,1mA, 
modulation sensitivity range* Hax, 120 to 30HH2/Vt Input capacitance. Max, lOOpf, Oscillator 
Bias +15 +-0.0S volts § 56mA, Hax. 



TUBE CAPS (Flate) 


$11,00 


HRl, 4 


HR2,3, 6^7 


13.00 


HH5, 8 


14,00 


I1R9 


17.00 


BRIO 


20.00 



Ton Free Number 
800-528-01 80 
(For orders only) 



"All parifi may be hew or 

surpFus, and parts may be 
substii jEgd with comparable parts 
W we are out ot stock of an item." 



(f|\l*^l^ elect roi|ics 

For informatton call: (602) 242-3037 
PRICES SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE 



94 73 Magazine • August^ 1984 



TUBES 



TYPE 



PRICE 



TYPE 



PRICE 



TYPE 



PRICE 



2C39/7289 


$ 34.00 


1 182/4600A 


S 500. 00 


ML7815AL 


S 60.00 


2E26 


7.95 


4600A 


500.00 


7843 


107 . 00 


2K28 


200.00 


4624 


310.00 


7854 


130.00 


3-500Z 


102 . 00 


4657 


84.00 


ML7855KAL 


125.00 


3-1000Z/8164 


400.00 


4662 


100.00 


7984 


14.95 


3B28/866A 


9.50 


4665 


500.00 


8072 


84.00 


3CX400U7/8961 


255.00 


4687 


P. O.K. 


8106 


5.00 


3CX1000A7/8283 


526.00 


5675 


42.00 


8117A 


225.00 


3CX300OF1/8239 


567.00 


5721 


250.00 


8121 


110.00 


3CW3O0O0H7 


1700.00 


5768 


125.00 


8122 


110.00 


3XZ500A3 


473.00 


5819 


119.00 


8134 


470.00 


3X30Q0F1 


567.00 


5836 


232.50 


8156 


12.00 


A-esA/tiies 


69.00 


5837 


232.50 


8233 


60.00 


4-125A/4D21 


79.00 


5861 


140.00 


8235 


35.00 


4-250A/5D22 


98 . 00 


5867A 


185.00 


8295/PL172 


500,00 


4-400A/843S 


98.00 


5868/AX9902 


270.00 


8458 


35.00 


4-400677527 


110.00 


5876/A 


42.00 


8462 


130.00 


4-400C/6775 


110.00 


5881/6L6 


8.00 


8505A 


95.00 


4-1000A/8166 


444 . 00 


5893 


60,00 


8533M 


136.00 


4CX250B/7203 


54.00 


5894/A 


54.00 


8560/A 


75.00 


4CX250FG/8621 


75.00 


5894E/8737 


54.00 


8 5 60 AS 


100.00 


4CX250K/8245 


125.00 


5946 


395.00 


8608 


38.00 


4CX250R/7580W 


90.00 


6083/AZ9909 


95.00 


8624 


100.00 


4CX300A/8167 


170.00 


6146/6146A 


8.50 


8637 


70.00 


4CX350A/8321 


110.00 


6146B/8298 


10.50 


8643 


83.00 


4CX350F/8322 


115.00 


6146W/7212 


17.95 - 


8647 


168.00 


4CX350FJ/8904 


140.00 


6155 


110.00 


8683 


95.00 


4CX60OJ/a8O9 


835,00 


6159 


13.85 


8877 


465.00 


4CX1000A/8153 


242.50* 


6159B 


23.50 


8908 


13.00 


4CX1000A/8168 


485.00 


6161 


325.00 


8950 


13.00 


4CX1500B/8650 


555.00 


6280 


42.50 


8930 


137.00 


4CX5OO0A/8170 


1100.00 


5291 


180.00 


6L6 Metal 


25.00 


4CX10OO0O/8171 


1255.00 


6293 


24.00 


6L6GC 


5.03 


4CX15000A/8281 


1500.00 


6326 


P.O.R. 


6CA7/EL34 


5.38 


4CW800F 


710.00 


6360/A 


5.75 


6CL6 


3.50 


4D32 


240.00 


6399 


540.00 


6DJ3 


2.50 


4E27A/5-125B 


240.00 


6550A 


10.00 


6DQ5 


6.58 


4PR60A 


200.00 


6883B/8032A/8552 


10.00 


6GF5 


5.85 


4PR50B 


345.00 


6897 


160.00 


6GJ5A 


6.20 


4PR55A/8187 


175.00 


6907 


79.00 


6GKe 


6.00 


4PR1000A/8189 


590.00 


6922/6DJ8 


5.00 


eHB5 


6.00 


4X1 50A/ 7034 


60.00 


6939 


22.00 


6HF5 


8.73 


4X150D/7609 


95.00 


7094 


250.00 


6JG6A 


6.28 


4X250B 


45.00 


7117 


38.50 


6JM6 


6.00 


4X250F 


45.00 


7203 


P.O.R. 


6JN6 


6.00 


4X500 A 


412.00 


7211 


100.00 


6JS6C 


7.25 


5CX1500A 


560.00 


7213 


300.00* 


6KN6 


5.05 


KT88 


27.50 


7214 


300. 00* 


6KD6 


8.25 


4168 


45.00 


7271 


135.00 


6LF6 


7.00 


416C 


62.50 


7289/ 2C3 9 


34.00 


6LQ6 G.E. 


7.00 


572B/T160L 


49.95 


7325 


P.O.R. 


6LQ6/6MJ6 Sylvania 


9.00 


592/3-200A3 


211.00 


7360 


13.50 


6ME6 


8.90 


807 


8.50 


7377 


85.00 


12AT7 


3.50 


81 lA 


15.00 


7408 


2.50 


12AX7 


3.00 


812A 


29.00 


7609 


95.00 


IZBY7 


5.00 


813 


50.00 


7735 


36.00 


12JB6A 


6.50 



NOTE * = USED TUBE 



NOTE P.O.R. = PRICE OH REQUEST 



"ALL PARTS HAY BE NEW, USED, OR SURPLUS. PARTS HAY BE SUBSTITUTED WITH COMPARABLE PARTS IF WE 
ARE OUT OF STOCK OF AH ITEM. 



NOTICE: ALL PRICES ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE. 



For information call: (602) 242-3037 



Toll Free Number 
800-528-01 80 

(For orders only) 



"AM parts may be riew or 
strrpfus. and parts fna^r be 
substhiutHJ with compa/atjie perts 
If we are Qut of stoch of an iTem.^' 



(^^^1^ elect rof|ic$ 



PRICES SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE 



73 Magazine • August. 1984 95 






"FILTERS" 

COLLINS nechontcol Filter #526-9724-010 MODEL F455Z32F 

455KHZ at 3,2KH2 wide. May be other models but equivalent, toy be used or i^w, S15.99 

ftTLAS Crystal Filters 

5,595-2.7/8/LSB, 5.595-2,7/i:SB 

8 pole 2-7iaiz wide Upp&c sidebarai, InpederK:^ SOOcrftns ISpf In/SOOolins Opf out, 19.99 

5. 595-2. 7/8 AJt 5-595-2.7AJSB 

8 pole 2»7Kh5E wide Upper sideband, Htpedence SOOolms 15pf In/800ohms Opf out, 19.99 

5, 595-, 500/4, 5, 595-.500/4/CW 

4 pole 500 cycles wide CW, In^)edance SOOofins 15pf ln/800ohms Opf out, 19.99 

9,0l^B/CW 

6 pole 2,7KHz wide at 6dB, litpedance 680ohns ?pf In/300o!tTis 8pf out. CW-1599Hz 19,99 

KOKUSAI ELECTRIC CO / Mechanical Filter #nF-ii55-ZL/ZU-21H 

455KH2 at Center Frequency of 453. 5KC. Carrier Frequency of 455KHz 2.36KG Bardwidth, 
l^iper sideband. (2U) 
lower sideband. (EL) 



«««ii'i-«#*« •««#•««*•• *«fr««««tt««««»«<««ii«ii •«■#**«#«-#* ##«##*#•• 



19*99 
19*99 



«««--»#* 



CRYSTAL FILTERS 



TEW 
SDK 

lYCO/CD 

MororoiA 

PTI 
PTI 

pn 

Fivmni 



FX-07a00C 

FBC-103-2 

SCH-113A 

1F-31H250 

001019880 

4884863B01 

5350C 

5426C 

1479 

A10300 

ERXF-15700 

2131 



7,8MH2 

10.6935WH2 

ll,2735mz 

CF 3179, 3KH2 

10,7MHz 2pole 15KHz bandwidth 

11,7MH2 2pole 15KHZ bandwidth 

12MHz 2pole ISKHz baraawidth 

21.4M12 2pole 15KHZ bandwidth 

10.7MIZ Spole bardwidth 7.5KHZ at 3aB, Skhz at 6dB 

45MH2 2pole 15KHZ bandwidth 

20.6MIIZ 36KIIZ wide 

CF 7, 825MHz 



$10.00 

10,00 

10,00 

19 , 99 

5.00 

5,00 

5,00 

5.00 

20,00 

6.00 

10,00 

10,00 



* 9 #»-»««**-il-»«tt»«S »>*««««« 1l'#««*»ttttt*tt»»«#*#»# ###»«»*»*• *•«««« »«*»••###•«#« *>####' 



CERAMIC FIL TERS 

AXEL 
CLEVTTE 



NIPPON 



TOKTN 

miSUSHIR^ 



4F449 

TO-OIA 

1CF4-12D36A 

BFB455B 

BFB455L 

CFM455E 

CT>W55D 

CFR455E 

CFU455B 

CFU455C 

CFtJ455G 

CrU455H 

CFU455I 

CFW455D 

CPW455H 

SFB455D 

SFD455D 

SFE10,7m 

SFE10.7JNS 

SFG10,7MA 

IP-B4/CFU455I 

ir-B6/CFU455H 

LF-B8 
IF-C18 

CF455A/BFU455K 
EFC-L455K 



12*6KC Bardpass Filter 3dB bandwidth 1.6KHz fron 11.8-13,4Kriz 

4B5KIiz4*2KHz bandwidth 4-7% at BdB 

455KI1Z+-IKIIZ bandwidth 6dB min 12!aiz, 60dB imx 36KHz 

455KII2 

455KHZ 

455KH2 +-5,5KHz at 3dB t 4-8KHz at 6dB , -I-16KH2 at 50dB 

455KH2 ■I-7KHZ at 3dB , +*10KHz at 6dB , 'i-2DKHz at 50dB 

455KHZ i-5,5KHz at 3dB , 4-8KHZ at 6dB , +-16KHZ at 60dB 

455KI1Z -I-2KHZ bandwidth 4-15KHz at 6dB, -i-30KHz at 40dB 

455KIIZ 'i-2KHz bandwidth +--l2,5KHz at €dB , ^-24KH2 at 40dB 

455KHZ +-1KH2 bajf^3width -i-4,5KHz at 6dB , +-10KHZ at 40dB 

455KH3 4-lfa4z bandwidth 4-3Kliz at 6dB , -t-9KHz at 40dB 

455KHZ H-lKHz bandwidth -i-2KHz at 6dB , 4-6KHz at 40dB 

455KHZ -i-lOKHz at 6dB , +^20KHz at 40dB 

455KHZ -I-3KH2 at 6dB , 4-9KHZ at 40dB 

455KHZ 

455KIiz -I-2KH2 , 3dB bandwidth 4,5KFlz +-llKz 



10-7MH2 280KHZ 4-50KU2 at 3dB 

10,7Mltz 230KHZ ^50KH2 at 3dB 

10,7Mlz 

455KHZ +-lKliz 

455KHZ +-11013 

455KHZ 

455KIiz 

455KHZ ^-2KIIz 

455iaiz 



650KHZ at 20dB 
570KMZ at 20dB 



10,00 
5.00 

10,00 
2,50 
3,50 
6,65 
6,65 
8.00 
2-90 
2,90 
2.90 
2,90 
2.90 
2,90 
2,90 
2.50 
5,00 
2.50 
2.50 

10.00 
2,90 
2,90 
2,90 

10.00 
5,00 
7,00 



#<I4**»*#*««* «#»#»»»#*»•*** «•«««»•»#«•'«««#«•«•»««»»«« 



#»««»«-■--»•«««'•*# 



• » »» « 



Pa^JER OUTPUT i.e*f, 
68K OHM IWATT BALLAST 



SPECTRA PHYSICS INC. Model 088 HeNe LASER TUBES 

BEAM DIA, ,75MM BEAM DIR. 2.7MR 

lOOOVDC 4-lOOVDC At 3.7MA 

ROTRON MUFFIN FANS Node I HARKa/riU2Al 

115 \WC 14ViftTrS 50/60CPS IMPEDEMCE PRCfrECr£I>-F 

105CFW at 60CPS THESE ARE NEW 

Toll Free Number 
eOO'528-0180 
(For orders only) 



SKV STSiRTING VOLTAGE DC 

$59.99 



88Cm at 50CPS 



(f|\l^l^ electroqics 



PRICES SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE 



$ 7,99 

"All parts may t^ new or 

surplus, and parls may be 
substituted wit^i comparable parts 
If we are oul of ^tock of an mmr 



For information call: (602) 242 3037 



96 73 Magazine * August. 1984 



EWLETT PACKARD SIGNAL GENERATORS 



606A 

fi08C 

6QSD/ 

TSSIO 

&12A 

§14A 



6J6A/ 



5(MM2 £0 eSflMz kn 5 bonds +-U*Ptitpiit level odjustmile 0,lii(V 
to 5V Into 5a ohnis,Hullt-ln crystol caJlbrator.'+OO -lOOOHi 

ntoduiatlon. 

Sow 05 o&ove but MQS frequencv cmtroi fee lure to 01 low 
OperoTtOrt null W 87EJ8A Sviidironizer. 

Umz to 480KiZ/D-liiV'iv Irtto 50 ohns.AM^CH^or oulK wod- 

lOMHi to 4ZQHHI. O.luV-O^bV intD 50 cHims. t-0, 5X accuracy, 
built-in crystal col ibramr, Art-cw or du]5& Dutout. 

iRDTOved versLfMi af populor fiO&C.UD to IV output, Imraved 

10»*l to aS'^mz in 5 oonds *-i: frequency Gccuroc/ mIW 
butlt-m crystal coliDfotor.Can- be used wHh HP a?08A 

Synchronizer, Outout conttnuou&tv odJustutile frDm ,luV co 
.5v Into 5)0 Dhfns. 





6lBa 


1 650,00 


eaaa 


moo. DO 


6l8t 


* soo.oo 


fi2(M 


$ 5?S.Dn 


620B 



il^SO.OO 



SHOD. 00 



tt50-i23Gmi *oauV-0.5V into 50 tfas^callbrdted ouUJut* 4 750*00 

SQShlltKM^i Mitt] Bunx f«2iure£ inctudlftg callDraicfl o^iDut 

tmd OIL woQulatim cnardcterUtlcs. t SOO.OO 

Direct repding and direct control from l.s ta ^rl^Hi. The 
H.Ph616A features *'L5dB calibrated output accuracy fran 
'5p?dM to -dBifl.The outout is dJrecUy calibrated In mjc re- 
volts Old dta tilth continuous nonkormg. Simple ooerotlon 
freauencv diod octurocy is +-15 and sto&ilHy exceeds 0.0051- 
/ C €iaiw In orient tanefattire. Col ibroted pttefiuatar Is 
«ithin *-1.5da over entire output twd, 50 om iioedoFicc uilt 
ties internol pu1« ni^ulaiton with rcu rote variable from ilO 
Hz to '^KMj* variable pulssHiachtl to IQusec)or^d vorloble ouUe 
deloY[5 to 5oausec3,Externql niodulotln? inpyt$ incteos ver- 

utility. S 17^.00 



HO LJBOMTCRJB Tf€-2 RfXIGEH ICADSET. 

mese neciisets cam itim {joto id hocic ld to a ICtK ndios crvi niry other caiio^ert. 
Perfect for Airplmes i Helicopters . nodi le Radios , qf Just the Telephone, 
Fhese Ane R]ctor^ l^eM In Seoled Bom^s. Limlijed Supply dily s^.9^ 



qM*^ 



'4e 



electroqic;t» 



Sane os above but later inDdeK 



t 600,00 



5. a to 7,&GHz rflnge.wiih coljbrated output and selecT]or> of 
DUlse-FM or sauQre wove modulation, J &OD,DD 

12200.00 

I 750.00 
»22QO,00 



OS oDove CHft later model. 

7 10 umz range, wtih caHbroied output or$d seleciton of 
pglse-FH or sauare wove ■odulotfon. 

SoiDe OS Dbove but loter model. 

10 to iSChfz.iaw output power «lth callbrotKl output m4 
Puise-souare wove or Pn isiduIotLpn. 



iJ4200.00 



STDSA 



SifTichron uer me^ with 606B,608F.The synch rotilief »s d 
pnose-lock frequency stobilizer which provides crystoi- 
oscillofor freduency stobllliv to **30«H? in the 608F slQnol 

oeoera tor, Phase locking enminotes mlcroptipnlcs and drift 
resulting in excellent frequency stQbinty.Ttie 37CeA includes 
d vernier nfhicn con tune the reference osctllator over o r^nge 
of *-0*25S pemijtting frequency settobJlliy to 2 ports \n lU 
to tfte sei^nth, Provides a yery stoDle simaX ttxst satisfies 
Ronv critical ODfrl lost ions. 

(With HP 606B or 60SF) t 3SO.00 

(Without) t itSO.OO 



I 



EHC-IO 



ELECTROMETniCS EilC-lO RFt/EMl RECElVEft 

Low frequency onalvzer covering mat tcj 50KHz freouency 

range. El tefidofile to SCO KHz In ifldebond jnode, 

Ovlre Devices FleM Jftteinslty neter. 

Mas HF-l05/TA.1lf*105/TX.HF-ld5/Tl/llF-lDS/T2.llF'l05/T3. 

Covers KiKhi to IQOOHN;. 

ALL EQUIPMENT CARfiV A JO DAY GUARANTEE. 
EOUlPHEiTT IS HOT CALtBDATED. 






12500.00 



(2100,00 



' CMW, W C^M*r» CMC* ^CMi^ 

CQ4}h' Act'flpUtilfl bY tsiflphcif™ dc mill Paynwnl fraHi ciAlonw *l|l tK tnr Oktti. Mofwy Ordif, or C*ihb«r'a Chsc* Wh if* Ktni 
but w* Tinned PH-^cflpfl psrurul chBcki (or CO.D.'i, C.O-Q-> Jir» iNM»d by wi tifi\f mnd IKfu UfHIhJ P»«*I Saf¥lc» 




ft* tant iftw ■ iel^NMw ixdw Km, baw. {iiaQ«d If GdnwHiy 



COMFPIWHa OADEAS: Wi imuU pnfw nm oonfti 

'OV dM to Kx Oram mfmdh m rat tJi i Ln>w i ^ 

i;«CPIT CAHa& W* ■> npw «ee«^inQ HArr^A&MVv VIM. Al«0 AUEPKVUV EXPRESS 

MtA BHEEink Whim wb h«v« HmjLb «l«ii)i Fn stocl! on d«¥taN W« MiM lupptv irwn 4n1h ma onAr, 

MEFEjCUVE llAtElVM.& All <:iapma tof derscliw mBle4'lali nuisl ba niwM vrilhln 30 OAVS ■Her CK^Jpl ol th« $«rce^. Alk ^talms 
RUMl include \^ delBC1i#v matHiiJ {Jof Molir^ pi^HMa^ « apy ol »i^ InHvOt, kftd ■ r«4um authorUilioh (utibw wtudl itiu*! bn 
AUmad pt\Ot Utt tMnilii« im i wUhwiA i a ^mh W w. TMi un b* OUWfAd tijr cattm Wm M^-flSIB dt iadH w ■ tMHWd. 



DEUVERf : OnJm im ukually i^ififM4 Ih* umfl (Hir 'NlV W^ ^aC4a i9t n^ F«rl Dusinni idvr. unrfBart w» an Mil M itash «» M 
■(vrn Tim cualomar will tw rr^tin^ bjr po«l cvd IF tn 4r» OMng to bttCKnrdeir tn* iEbfti Our ncmul: flUippIng msthod \m UPS n UjS. 
M&ll dflEWDdlng cin alzp or ehc> wgighl «f tr» pschl^ TmI EqulpntME la Kh^ppw] onl^ by ik And ii fr wight collKt unlni prior 
BlT«nQHni9nft« Fiiva bsofi m«i3i ind iifipfOvnA 



NMedii DADBtti AH fomgn 
■any ^< CO-D- B not 




ttihiMv 



iBd In us RJHDSOHtV. 

A • taiiii of ; 




INSUnAHCt PtiHwt knclUEM ,2St for i#C<ti addiiiontl HOQ QO Qvnr 3tl» OD, UPS OMCT. All krMUfwf pKhmsfi an antpfwd ma UPS 
amy II yau wiih la Haw LI ihlppvd tt^fOuflf) ffitpMI DfMu tTiwa ie ■ l&JU Pn mtibeh la KkjItkHul to |ht tTuppmiSj, handing arid Vn- 



OKH JU:COu*(Tt: W« mgnt lti«l H* ds itf Mut Opvi ■en^^ 

Itarw HB lmcJiak4 «tt^ ••£» ^ad^ lof ymir 



ordv hnm 



PARTS: Wa re««nrd the rfght to substitute Of rtiplBce any tt«m wbth a pan Qt «qu«l Qr comparatriQ 

spociricailon 

POSTAGE: MinliiTium sftippiAg ail4 hftndi^ng In tn« US,, Canada HTkd MexiiOO is S3.00 fw ground sfdp' 
ments, all other cojttrt— tefeJO. Air raTes a^c avBiEat>J« ■.! Ite il;n#{»f your md«r All loreign orftm 
plau* inciud* 25% of the aHered amount lor sNiipino and' ti&ncnifig. C^O^D.'s are shipfiad AIR 

PREPAID ORDERS: Onl^rs mual tte accompan[«d by a ch«Gk- 

PRICES: Prices are subject ta change wlltiout n«T4c:&, 

PtiRCHASE OHDEftS.^ yVe accept pipchcw onton only «4iBfi ttwy are »ororrt»nj«d by a c^wclc 

RESTOCK CHAftd£&. If parLt Are rettimed to MMl EL£CTM:>NICS. 11^. due ta customer vror, the 
cmlQpmef will tn hi«(d respontJUe for all fe«a inourred aiid wriEi t» crkarQtt] a iSH i^ESTOCK 
CHARGE wllh ttw fieiTiaFFider in CREDIT ONLY, Th# foUowfng rmnn accompany any ratum: A copy of 
our JfivclC6, t^\um auihtirizdliort nuinbtif vMch must t>Q obtained jpriEK lo Bti<fppingi Ihe merchandiaa 
bdCK. Hetufnt must be don-s witt^in ID DAYS of rDc^ipt of parcs4r PMituni aulhori^ation rtumtMrs c^n 
bo Obtained by calUrvQ f&D2) 242^16 Qf rvotjtyin^ ls t^ poet card. Relum autlKXlzaf ions ^H not be 
glvan ou4 on our WD number. 

SALES TAX: ARIZONA rsskiaiTU mual ecjd 6% i«les tu. urd«n3 • «lgnod AFtlZONA r^teJa Ux can] 
i» currenijy on file i4fitn us, All ordersi (Hacfld tiy persona outsida of ARtZONA. but dotivafwl Id par- 
sofift in A^tZOMA are aubjoot to tfie 6% a«}^ tax. 

^OUTAGE OR DAMAGE: All r.lfLlmg Tor S^iodiaes or damafl^fr must t» made wUhln 5 DAYS O^ 
recmript of parcel Claims must include a copy of our invopce, aiang wi^h a reTum autt^arizat^or 
nufnber wttwcis can t» otttunad by coniactFrrg un at ()&02) 242-691 & or aandjna a poai card. AiirhcHtza- 
tjons Cannot tia d«t our iOp nufnber. AJt ^tema must be property' packed, n items are ncii prof}ei% 
p«c*t«d maiie sure to contact Ii4 can-ief so Ibat they can corns out and Inapad ttia pai^tage tHfon 
it Is returned to tis. Cuatomers which do nd noii^ us wilfiin tbia timfl per i>od wfil bo h«fd rosponsibb 
ftn the vuira order aa we wtU consider the ofdef comptate. 



OUR 800 NUMBER IS STRICTLY FOR ORDERS ONLY fflOO) 526-0180. 
TAKEN ON 1^02} 242^B16 or {602) 242^3037. 



ll^fORMATlON CALLS ARE 



ni95^ dui^ 




2111 W, CAMELBACK ROAD 
PHOENIX, AHIZONA 85015 



''All parts may t>e new or 
surplus^ and parts rriay bo 
substituted with comparable parts 
tr we are out of stock of ^n item.*' 



Toll Fr»« Numb«r 
600-5200180 
(For orders only) 

For informatJon call: (602) 242-3037 



PRICES SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE. 



t 



^ Sec U%t of Advertisers on page 98 



73 Magazine • August^ 19S4 &7 



mK 



ADVERTI 




*Ptaa»« tiontaci II>#h «d>w1lt*ri <|lfi«clly. 

To receive full information from our advertis- 
ers please complete the postage^patd card. 



n-S.No. 



P«g* fl.5.ti(L 



ft. S. No. 



Paga FL S. Ho. 



127 Advanced Compute Controls 

Mm v m w m m ii..iv«-l ^ m l-f-^^ri-A'14-l-4-<f-9-9-|l Iflp 

AEArA(tvanc€d Electronic 

Applications .20, 1Q0 

20 All ilectronJct . .... .39 

Amateur Gommunlcafloha, Etc, 

f ■ V ■ PHI p4+q 1.4 w%*i**ti*m i^ * * * « t- m * ^m 

Amateur Electronic Suppfy 2S 

334 Anijdao Associates .49 

7t Applied Imentiofl , , » , , ,^ . . , . , ,^ 
202 B & L Engineering .../.,,. 101 

Barkei & WflHamson ......... ,19 

305 Barry Electronics 31 

■ Bill Ashby 4 Son , „ .e§ 

477 Bird Electronic Corp. .*.,,.... 1CW 

289 B) ue Hi 1 1 Obs«rvato<y 103 

Bylteff^ut Electronics. .,., «6l 

285 GESjfW. .,._•! 

290 CMC CommtrnicationSf Inc. , . . . .fli 
1t1 CeCoCommynJcations ........44 

2«4 Clalfemom Ind.. Inc. . 107 

287 Co^lco Elect., inc. ............ .33 

15 GgmmunicailOftS Speclat^Sts. Inc, 



tea Cctfnmu meat Inns Specialisls. inc 

279 Continenlal Sal el lite Systems ...5 

• Connect Systems, Inc ,45 

' Grumtronics B7 

346 DalaServlce , 103 

478 Design Etectronics/Otiio ... 106 

276 Dtgitdt Audi& . . . . . . _ 1S 

425 Dopp*er Systems * .99 

283 Dynetic Systems ,,....,....*. 27 
99 FaKScan , .49 

• Fox River Radio League ........ 73 

147 Fojt Tango Corporation 103 

269 GLB Electronics 19 

2B1 Glen Martin Er^[ne«fing 65 

352 Grove EntefpfiS€S .99 

31 Nal-Tf oni> ,_. , 73 

Ham Radio Outlet 3 

288 Hamtrontcs, NY , . . 112 

33 Hamtronics, NY 1 13 

479 HeathCo. ^^ . 104 

• lioriZDn Printing Co 103 

123 Hustler, Inc ...,. « .,,.... fiS 

274 ICOM Cov.ir 



• Kantfontcs.^^,..,,... 17,100 

• Kenwood 7^Co¥. rV 

4^ MCM EJectn^nks 104 

9 MFJ Enterprises 52» 53 

48 MHz Electronics ...,83-97 

282 Madison Electronics 109 

54 Magnum Distributors, Inc. , . . 23 

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73 Magazine • August, 1934 99 



RE\^IEIV 



AMTORSOFT 
FROM KANTRONICS 

All the talk Qv«r the pa$t y««r or Mt about 
AI^OR l«ft fTte a little tiewiKMfdd. 1 &/&% 
did mf hiynsmifk and looked up severe af > 
Mdes on Hit BUb^ect to »« ^M could teac^ 
my Camfno6ort compulfln rnw to speak 
AMTOR Atx>u1 all I accomplished was to 
g«t myself iDtally confu^edT Modes of 
transmlsston Ihai I can'l decode bug m& 
until I understand th^m. AMTOH is no ex^ 
oeptlckn. 

I wa^ ne4 loved when Kantronie^ agreed to 
let m^ take ^ look at the^r AMTORSOFT pro- 
gram Fi natty, I w^pufd hnd <Mt what all that 
''chjfptffcg" is about! 

The AI*rrQRSOFT padta^e worths m con- 
|unciior> with your home oomputef aiid a 
t^fminal unii or comptitdr iniarFace. The 
pafticuiar package I reviewed was de^ 
signed for the VlC-20 and the Kanlronics In- 
lerface II, 

Throwing caution to the wind* I did what 
sty »elf-r^p^tlir>g amateur would diX 1 
hooked op the Irtterface, did a sysfem call 
to activate the software, aitd threw the in- 
struction book on the befich! T9mt was nol 
a good tdea* 

Ttie Kanlroni.cs follts h^ erwugh inslghl 
to include f>ol onl^ a very thOfOugfi instruc- 
lian manuab tor the software, but also an 
Qvemew Dl AMTOR itself for the yninitiatad 
like me. Unless you have actually seen 
AMTOR work, please read the t>ook fJrsL 

My previous reading atKKjt AMTOR had 
(aught nrve that {I'^e are I wo fofnis of trans- 
n^sSfOn: Mode B (the broadcast rmxie} is 
ttie fqrm deveiDped for transmission o< gen- 
lva^4nteTe9t bulletins and SJjch In Mode B, 
the signal sounds very simitar lo ASCII 
transmifisions No chirping takes place. 
What I hadn't read was \hA\ other tftan for 
ARRL huifetlns, airnost re one ever uses itf 

i mistakenly selected rnode B from Ihe 
software menu and was disappointed that I 
could neve^ soem to make anything print. 
That was my first hint that I should read Xt\e 
inslftictions 

1 finally f^red out that I needed to t>e 
in the L w tisiener mode if I warned to 
eavesdrop on AMTOR conversaifor^ The 
AMTORSOFT package prt^ides yoii with 
several sotrware LEDs, as I choose to call 
them, to let you know when you are suc- 
cessfully locked to an AMTOR signaL 
These Indicators are labeled U V, X, and L A 
sotid tstock displayed below trie I indicates 
that you are locked or In synch with an 
AMTOH signal The battte is half won! Tbe 
V indicates that you are receiving valid AM- 
TOR d%aracters The bfock below the X only 
coines on wr>wi you ar^ (ran^mltting. and 
trie I block flickers on frwn t*me to lime to 
incilicate thai the sTatipn you are rece^rir>g Is 
ssndjng idle characters^somathing like 
RTTY diddle. 

After some patience and learning the 
herd way tt^t it may take ten or more sec- 
onds for even a pcoperly-tuned sigtial to 
lock, I started seeing my first AMTOR copy. 

for ttiose ol you totally unf ami iter with 
AMTOR (qr wtia are tike me and forget &t- 
erything you read), suffice it to Say Ihat the 
transmissions occur In three-character 
bFocks It a bloc^ ts ra^elved OK, the ne^t 
ttireencharacter block is sent. It the receiv* 
IhQ station doesn't acknowledge that a vah 
Id block haa been received, then the trans^ 
mittjng station keeps sending It until It is 
acknowledged. With that in mtnd, consider 

100 73 Magazine • August, 19B4 



what happens when you eavesdrop on a 
conversation4 

Since you are riOt an actfve participafit In 
thB QSO. you fiave no way of tellfng the 
trafisniiltir>g station whether you ha¥e re- 
oeived the tnforrnattoin ov noi. This can re- 
SLtlt in some strange copy at yout er^ Let's 
say ttte transmitting station Is ending: 
K9EI K9E1 OE W&SyjC waSVJO Suppose 
that just as the iransrnlssion t>eglr}s, a bad 
static crash wipes out the 11 rat Ihree char- 
acters for the intended station, but doesn't 
affect your reception. If it takes three tries 
tiefore the iniertded station acknowledge^ 
ihose first three dtaracters. and itwn every- 
thirkQ goes smooHyy. your aereert might 
took Ikke this: KS£K5EK3EI K9EI [>E WB9YJC 
WSSYJC. 

H during the transmission you receive irv 
valid or no Information, yOuf screen will 
aimply remain blank until ihe next valid set 
of characters Is received. 

The next problem I encountered was that 
of stations calling CO. To put It simply, they 
don't! Noi In the traditional way, at any rale. 

OkHime RTTY people may t>e familiar 
with seica) or seiecttve calling. On mecharv 
i<cal rrtachlnes, U iS possitsie to prografn an 
on^oft sequetKe thai will respond to a cer- 
tain fourlettet codfiL For general purposes, 
NNNN ts frequently used. On AMTOR a 
similar system Is used. A station wishing to 
call CO will continually transmit a four- 
letter block which Sometimes consists of 
COCQ or perhaps a shortened form of the 
OrtQinating station's call sign. Foe examp^e,^ 
t migtrt use KKEt oc VtfYJC. A receiving sta- 
tion can lock to this setcel and respond orv 
ly wfien this particular code *s se^i. The 
AMTORSOFT package will display this sei- 
cal for you so ttiat if you desire, you t^n 
locN to the transmitting station, Entering a 
null character group will lock to any re- 
ceived selcal. 

In fairness, I must say that on my second 
day of operallon, I did find that some sta- 
tions use the B mode and actually do send 
CO. but the meiority simply start up with 
the COOO selcal. In such a ca»e. ttie locked 



and vaJld Indicators wit! come on, tut your 
screen w^li prim nothing. A word to those 
operators calling CQ in this maruwr |wtio I 
heard go on for 30 iT^nutes or more wthoui 
ever sending an ID). You twtter watch out. 
Though CW ID is no longer reouired, you do 
have to jdentlfy, and your tout-character 
selcal won't meet the requirement. 

Actual two-way QSOs wilh AMTORSOFT 
can be a ioy orlce the initial contact Is es- 
tdl^ishned. Due to requests for repeats on 
character groups, a normal AMTOR OSQ 
speeds a^dng ftl about It^ same rate as 
eo-wpm RTTY. If a lot of repeats are neces- 
sary, ttie O&O can go stowty, txjt ^uite ac- 
curately. 

Something that must be contemplated 
when setting up your station for AMTOR is 
the switching lime of youf transceiver be- 
tween transmit and receive, Most modern 
transceivers will work well, tiut If you are 
not sure, ctieck before you buy. 

Anoth^ problem I had not ^sideied is 
tiial most power amplifiers cannot respond 
4loickly ^notj^ to meet Ihe AMTOR tim- 
ir%Q requirements. The instructions with 
AMTORSOFT stale boldly that operation 
Wfth a linear st>outd rxit be attempted 

That certainly explains that while I could 
find some very strong RTTY signals on 20 
meters, all of the AMTOR iranamlsslons 
were down 12 d6 or more. Every orw is run- 
ning in the SO-Watt or so rartgel 

A beauti'tul example of how effective 
AMTOR can be is a QSO I monitored be- 
t ween an east'Coasi station and a mant^me 
mobife station off ttie coaat of South 
America. Both were using the AMTORSOFT 
package. The QSO tiegan with both star 
tlons at abkout 50 Watts. Both stations kept 
reducing power until each was running 
under five Watts. From my llsteningjt was 
apparent that the QSO was solid with a 
minimum of repeats. Anybody want to trv 
for an AMTOR QSO using an HW^-J 

I finally did get to copy the W1AW bulle- 
tlrts on mode B. Of course ttiere ^s no aJlow- 
arice for feecS^iaCk to ttie transmlltiirig sta- 
tion, so each group of characters ts sent 
twice. The software determines wt^tier 
qrke of the ctiaracter blocks received is valid 
and prints only the valid one. If invalid data 
Is received both times, garbage is not print- 
ed—rather blank spaces are sen! to the 
screen or printer Durlr>g an approaching 
thunderstorm, my copy of the bulletins was 
nearly letter perfect, with only three blank 
spots during the whole ^^mirujte transmis- 




Th^ AMTORSOFT screen as genersted by a VIO30. Note in partivuiar the dark rectangle 
in the upper fetf hand corner for di&fil&fing sefcai. The &aUwsre LEDs {LVXi} ere treated 
fust aDove and to the nght af Ihe seicsf biock. 



sioft The Tetetype* builetiris at Itie same 
lime were a disaster, 

AMTORSOFT has aJl of the texl-^KJtding 
and editing features of IHAMTHXT. the CW/ 
RTTY/ASCII package available from Karv 
tronics. Those features have been detailed 
In sev&r^l reviews elsewhere, so I won't go 
Into them here, The software contains the 
equivalent of a mini word processor arid 
will allow you to store recerved messages 
in a buffer, save Ihem to disk or to tape, 
tdit. and resend them. 

Ihe AlfTORSOFT paoka^ receives arid 
sertds AMTOfi only, tfiough Kantronics has 
a special version of HAMTHXT with AMIOR 
that combiries both packages 

It seems to rrw that AMTOR is a god- 
send for the serious QRP entfiuslaat who js 
Interested \n doing RTTY-type things. 
AMTORSOFT Is )uat another In a string of 
excellent software packages from Kantrotv 
Ics, priced at $89,05 list If is higWy recom- 
rwmded- 

Fof furtfier details, contact Kamronics, 
1202 fasf 2^d Stf^er. Lawrence KS 66044. 

Jim Grubte KSe 
Springflem IL 62708 



AEA MBATEXT SOFTWARE 

The power of computer world processing 
has come to amateur radio! The AEA soft- 
ware packages tor the VIC-20 and Commo 
dore 64 computers offer a very versatile ap- 
proach to several modes of amaieur trans- 
mission, 

Krmwn as M&ATEXT for McMse. Baudot, 
ASCII, these software packages transtorm 
your Commodore computer Into a state-of- 
Iheart communications terminal. There are 
so many features Incfuded m MBATEXT 
thai It Is difficult to find a starting point. 

MBATEXT comes as a piLtg-ln cartrld^ 
much like trie ones used lor computer 
games. In order to acG&s ttie program, a 
SYS isystem^ command is used. Ttits al- 
tows you to call ttie pnigram from your own 
Basic program. II. tor example, you wish to 
use other than the default screefi and text 
colors, you can write a brief program to set 
them to your own choices and ihen caM 
M6ATEKT. 

Or^ce you have entered Ihe program, overy- 
thln^g Is menu-driven. You are presented 
with several ctioices from ihe main menu. 
As you make set eel ions, you may encourv 
tar additional detailed menus at any time. 
Before concentrating on the operation ot 
MBATEXT (Or transmfssjon and reception, 
let's look at the common tex tilting 
system. 

Those of you familiar with regular word 
processing would expect a program to pro- 
vide several different functions. First, you 
should be able to enter text on the screen 
and edit it to correct mistakes. Second, you 
should be al3<e to save and load text files to 
and from cassette and dtek. Rnally, you 
should tiave the ability to priot your file 

MBATEXT does all of this ar^ much 
more? Tt>e text storage area has been de- 
signed with several different tHj Iters. The 
size of these buffers is user -selectable up 

to Ihe limit of available memory. 

Ten buffers are avaiilable for programmed 
messages of your choice. These messages 
can tie saved to tape or disk so that you can 
retoad them when you first slarf the pro- 
granv Incornjftg text, whettier It be CW, 
RTTY. or ASCH can tie saved in a receive 
buffer. It is possible to use the text editor to 
revise the text so Ihai you can print or save 
lust exactly the parts you warn. Someone 
active In traffic handling can use this fea- 
ture to great advantage, eliminating the 
need to manually transcritse arkd resertd 
messages. 

An audit>le "keyclick" ts avaifabte If de- 



slrvd to gh« you an indication that you ac- 
tual^ tiave hii s. Iiay on the toytoartl Many 
operators find itvat ttiis impniwea Itte accu- 
racy ol the^r typing. 

Regardless of the mode you are operat- 
ing, a transmit buffer is available so that 
you can compo&e an outgoing mesiaage 
whhe you are recetving messagee. Even 
wt)pn yoii are pn line and sending, you can 
type ahead of ttie teiri being sent. That's a 
real advantage wnen you are sending at 
slo^raf CWspasds. 

In the ON mode; you can select speeds 
uixo ^ words per minuie. il is realty ofUy 
necessary to set ttie transmitting speed; 
the receive speed wM track the Incoming 
aignaj automatically. M Is really something 
to watch the speed indicator track the 
WlAW Gode-practtcQ tranami salons. 

The screen Is split into three sections: re- 
ceived text transmit buHer, a^d a singte 
line of outgoing text. 

W?>eft MQATEXT is fed a signal from a 
cortifkaiib^e interfaoe such as the A£A CP-1, 
H does an excellent job of reoeivfng. ON 
trantmission is very cfean M^th perfect ma^ 
chineNgefiefated code. At speeds between 5 
and 14 words per minute, Fams worth spac- 
ing is used^ Individual characters are sent 
at about 1 5 words per minute with the spac- 
ing between characters increased to slow 
down tt>e overall rale. 

Several abdtlional options are available. 
YcMi have the ctKStee of character or «vord 
mods art transn^it. By select! ng tf^ word 
mode, transmission is hekj up until a space 
Is mcountered, and ttien the wt>ole woRl is 
sent, Ttiat's parlicuiariy helpful for Two-finr 
ger typists wtio make a lot o^ mistakes. 
Your errors can tw corrected before they 
are sent! 

You also have the option of selecting the 
break-in mode. The program automat teal ly 
toggles between send and receive. What 
you lose is ttte use of tf>B transmit holding 
t>utfer. 

A Mofse-code liil option can be selected. 
Jt IS the Mofs»oode equivalent ol RTTY did- 
(fte Csindmg null chararCtefSlt. 11 selected, 
the program will automatically ^nd BT 
white you try to think of something to say. I 
didn't find that option very woflhwhiie. 

Most of the features tor RTTTY and ASCII 
are similar since I hey are similar modes of 
transmission. Standard RTTY speeds of 60, 
67, TSi too, a.nd 132 words per minute are in- 
ducted i^ith ASCii speeds of t ID and 300 
Iwud. 

Aa unshifl on apaoe (tJS06| option is 
available and can t>e handy when copying 
weak signais. One particularly n«ce touch is 
the RTTY 'Speed guess" mode. If you arenl 
sure a( what speed lt>e RTTY is tteing sent, 
this can be used to get you in the ball park. 
It Isn't fooiproof. Lisually the average of sev- 
eral guesses gets you close. 



A£A ttts ifK^uded several keytxtard over* 
lays to r>ejp you keep track of what the func- 
tion keys do» wtiat yOu have stored In your 
message buffers^ aa wetl as wftere to find 
the speciaj characters. It sure tieais check- 
ing the instruction manual every time you 
forget. 

MBATEXT will support printing to either 
a ViC-type printer (1525. 1526. MPS SOI, 
etc.) or a C^tronics-type parallel printer. A 
lime-OfH[lay clocic at (he top of tt^ screen 
keeps you on »^>6duie 

Operation with MBATDCT is a pleasure. 
Old-time FTTTY tape splk%f^ wiil find it to tie 
itie greetesi thing since the spark gap. 

AEA otters one-year support on the soft- 
ware that is even transferable should you 
decide to sell IVIBATEXT before the warran- 
ty Is expired. MBATEXT is state-of-the-art 
software that would be a welcon>e addition 
tn any hamshack. 

Fof AMTOR enthusiasts, AEA offers 
UBATOfl— wttich includes ail the features 
of MBATEXT plus AMTOR along wilh some 
additional lulBA features. 

For more information, contact Adyanced 
Efsctfonic AppiiCAihns, PO Box O2T60, 
Lynnwo€fd WA 98036, 

Mm Grubbs K9EI 
Springf^yiLS£70a 



riMEX/SmCLAm lOOO: 

ASTRONOMY 
ON YOUR COMPUTER 

This book (by Burgess and Burgesst 
might, on thte surface, seem like a pretty 
strange topic for an amateur-radio publica- 
tion. However, the com put ef programs pre- 
sented in the 17 chapters of this liltle text 
have a lot to of far amateurs. Bui first things 
first. The book is published by Sytwx. Inc., 
2344 Sixtti St^ BesTtteley DA 94710. and Is 
176 pag^ (You can cfiedc on thte current 
priot with Syt»x<-lt is modesty Sytwx of- 
fers a companion text tt^t presents a co4- 
iectlon of astronomtcal programs in Basic 
which are adaptable to a wide range of 
computers. It is Cetestial Basic, by Eric Bur- 
gess {300 pages}. The latter may interest 
hams with computers other than the Tlmex/ 
Sinclair models. 

Several chapters In this Timaxf^inciair 



Aifrooomf text are sure to interest am>a- 
teurs. Chapter 2 presents a program that 
corwerts kxai time to sidereal or sidereal to 
local mean time. Ctiapter 7 has a program 
for the rigttt ascension and dec 1 1 nation of 
the moon. Chapter B computes the lime of 
rising, transit, and setting of the moon. All 
of these programs are sure to interest 
moonbounce fans. A nice touch found in 
every program is the ability to set the lati- 
tude and longitude for your own QTH or lor 
any other location on Eanti. This would be a 
b^ help m coofd<r\ating schedules Mrith 
ottier tMims, since you can use ihe comput- 
er to search hx common windows. 

Chapter tS has an inter^ting program 
for DX fans. It provides a rT>ethod of com- 
puting the time of rising, transit, and set- 
ting of I he sun. This wHI heip in the identifi- 
cation of local conditions as well B% those 
Of a DK location on any selected dale. Us- 
ing the program^ you can identify sunrise and 
surtset peoocte in the search far openings^ 

Tlie rest of tfie text ties a lot to offer for 
non-ham applications as weii. There are 
programs to help identify constellations^ 
One shows the location of the sun, nxx^n, 
and planets at any time on any date. 
Another helps seiect tfw exposure for pho- 
tographing astronomical objects. All In all, 
this is a very useful text. 

Ttie authors have dorte a very good |oh in 
presenting ttietr programs in a clear and 
raadaijie fashion. Ttke output from sample 
mns is presented to dartfy Uie goats of 
each prograiTx Surpdse — tt>ere is eyen an 
index— soniething that Is left out of far too 
many lowKXist computer txxMs^ (and some 
no-so-iow-cost books, too). 

My overall evaluation of the text Is highly 
complimentary^ The book should appeal to 
hams wilh a genera i interest in relating as- 
tronomy to their ham activities. Tt>e text will 
l3e fascinetir^ to I hose of us who find as- 
tronomy interesting In Its owm rlghl. One 
caution— the programs aie k>ng and you 
must tiave at least 16K of nnemory to make 
them fil. There shoufd be no problem in the 
conversion to other machines, for those in- 
terested 

Finally^ there Js one minor feature that I 
v^ould like to have seen in the Sybex text, as 
Weil as in other books. I vt/ish that the pub- 
lishers had used a spirat binding. I have to 



WHAT DO you THINK? 

Have you recently purchased a new product (hat has been reviewed in 73? If 
you have, write and tell us whai ^ou think about «l. 73 wiil put>lish your comments 
so you can snare them w^lh other hams, as part of our continuing effort to bring 
you the best in new product information^ and reviews. Send your thoughts tO 
Review Editor. 73i Amateur Radio's Jachfficai Jpvrna/, Peterborough l^iH 03459. 



f>old one side down with my D-lOi and the 
cutset with my Ten-Tec keyer. Otherwise I 
lose the pa^. Come on Sytsex— let's be 
more considerate of the poor computer 
owner who has to hunt and peck as well as 
hold the book down with both eibows. 

For more information, contact SyibaXt 
Im., 2344 Sixth Srreer, Bmketey CA 94710. 
Reader Service isiumber 462. 

Thomas M. Hail AOlB 
Wesvwood MA (k»» 



WHAT DO YOy THINK? 

ICOM 751 AND 

KENWOOD TR-2500 

In December, 1983. you printed a very 
brief review on the loom 751. 1 bought mine 
in March, 1984^ after looking at aJI the com- 
petition. Ttie r^ew was very conservative 
at best. The iradlo Is Itie greatest Hf hg for 
ttie money thai 1 have seen In years. By re- 
moving T wire (mute}, Jt oov^^ MARS arvt 
CAP use also. It took me two days of reed- 
ing the nrtanual to realiy become proficient 
with all its capabilities. 1 worked UU5AMF 
on 20 barefoot from my QTH in northern Ja- 
pan—that's 17,000 km and pretty good con- 
sidering my antenna is a ttyGain 16AVT/ 
WB vertical. Criiical notes: S1 and S2 on the 
n^ln board are for RTTY polarity and shift, 
respectively, txrt are inside ttie rfgf I hope 
)com wiil correct that and put them wtiere 
ttiey are re^lily available. 1 use the PS3S in- 
ternal suppty ar)d SOO-Hz FL-52 filtef with il. 
II works great on RTTY aJso. if you need a 
good, small, neat HF radio 'or amateur 
iVJAftS, mobile, and RTTY, I think the 751 is 
just the rig. 

In June. 1982, you reviewed the Kenwood 
TR 2500 and 3 months later I bought one. I 
have used mfne in all kinds of weather {^ots 
of snow and ice) and it wodts like a cham|». 
tt has been dfopped on ice and concrete 
and It keeps right on wofSdng. I wrote to 
Xenwood and purchased trie service manu- 
al at a reasonable price. To my surprise. tt>e 
manual covers all the accessories, too. Ch!:>- 
cai comment: Ttie speaker mike oonnecior 
easily works loose and you have to keep 
pushing in the plug (which was not appreci- 
ated when I was hanging from a 60-ft. pole 
working on the repeater antenna). The 
TR^asOO wiH be a hard MT to beal for the 
money witli the versatiitty trial it has. 

The above are the onfy two new radios 
tttat I fiave bought in over 17 years. J am very 
picky about what ham radios I buy, f4ow If I 
could only decide about what computer to 
buy. 

MSgt J^obeil 5. 8urch WA2ILU 
AFO SF ie519 



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^ S&e Ust of AifmrUseFs tm page 9B 



73 Magazine * August, 1964 101 



LETTERS 



OLYMPrC TRIUMPH 



Wh^n the US Olympic Committee se- 
lected Qlympia, Was?ilnglon, lo be trie 
3H© o! me US OJympJc Women's Mara- 
thon Trials Ofi May 12th, 19S4, the iocai 
amateur radFo ciub, the Oiympia Amateur 
Rfidia Sociaty (OARS), created a commit* 
tee to Interface wHh the task force run- 
ning the mafattiofi. As chairman of (his 
committee, t found this assignmervt quite 
(Slff ici^lt lor sevwal reasons Our job wa^ 
to teac^ the marathofi tasK fofce about 
amateur radio's utility in this kind of etv 
(Aaavor, find out wtist $tiey v^ouid need, 
create a structure to provide Itm services 
required, and direct whatever communica- 
tioo* etion *as needed. Uie Women's 
Marathon Taisk Force waA divided Into 
atXHJl Nfteen committees, and getting 
them lo uhdefstand our unique communis 
calions capabilities was vary difficult: 

The laaK force's assessment was that 
there might be 1 00,000 people trying to 
view Ihe event, and they did their planning 
on thai basis. Otympia \b a relatively small 
town and there was no way 100k people 
could see Ihe finish or even see the last 
few mfles of the race. The (ash force a^so 
did not know wtiat events It^ would host 
for the runners prior to and a^ier the race 
Itself^ what d^nand^ I tie medJa would 
make of them, tiow mucti support th^ 
could get from ttie communiiy. how they 
wo^Ed harvd^e traffic, , .Itwir aastgnment 
was ir>eredii3le- 

After a great deat of study, the n^ra- 
thon tasK force difectors deiafmined that 
their greatest need tor our aarvtees would 
be during the race itell, to provide to the 
race arinouncer and to the various media 
the position and Ume informal I on on the 
progress of the race, (We might else have 
been assigned course security duty, but 
Ihe US Olympic Committee was sending a 
500-MHz Motorola system with 40 hand- 
helds and a base station of the type to be 
used during the summer Olympics. Tfiis 
Motorola system and the State Patrol, 
Shenft, and City Police syeterv>s v^uld be 
lt>e t^achtJOfie of their security system.) 

Initially, we planned lo provide position 
and "splits" (lime since the race beganji 
for ttie race anrkouncer and records peo- 
ple at each mllepost o4 trie 20J?-mile 
eourfte. Thai would have meant 2& hams 
ai>d limefs on tf>e courso, plus net con- 
trols at the finish line. Thar was easy. 
However, a few weeks before ihe event we 
were asked if we could enlarge the system 
to also provide information from l/2-mile 
points, from the the mid-race point, from 



the t-mife^to-tifie-end point, and coutd we 
put sQmeor>e in the pace car and on the 
ABC-TV truck? Also, could we pul oper- 
ators in ihe ABC-TV vans at the starling 
Une (to remotely start Z5 timers' watches 
at all of the 25 mile-markers), and In the 
Thurston County Communications Center 
(Medic t, 911, etc^), and "there rnay be a 
taw last-minute additions . . "I 

The OARS Committee designed the 
system we would use. taking input trom 
everygrw we could find. We would have 
two nets, one on two meters and or\e on 
220. tioth on svaiial^te county-wlde-cover- 
sge repealers . and we wcKJld alternate as- 
signments. Thus, the one-milepost oper- 
ator wms Ofi two meters, tfie two-mi I epost 
operator was on 220. etc. There were rkOt 
enough operators in the Otympia area, for 
ouf o>pierator rweds were now around 60, 
with each operator asked to supply a tim* 
ing help>ef. 

We called the nearby clubs, the Mason 
County Amateur Radio Society and the 
Radio Club of Tacama, 1nc.^ and got the 
needed addlllonal people. UVe tried to be 
fair. While none of the tasks was "dirty," 
some might be construed to be more "glan> 
orous" Ihan others, and we assigned the 
"glamorous' tasks eveniy between the 
three ciubS- 

We fo^jnd that the volume of dAla we 
woufd t» collecting was too large to han- 
dle and compile using a paperwork sys- 
tem, so we developed a computer system 
to collate and distribute the data. This 
system evolved *nto a set of Radio Shack 
modet 4s acting as dumb terminals driven 
by one rTK>del 4. We eroded up with a 700- 
foot RS-^S? run at 1200 baud, working pef- 
fectty. although we had fuM-dupieji mo- 
dems If we rteec^Bd them. 

The marathon task force wanted the po- 
sitions and tirnas on the first eight run- 
ners and selected "ones to watch/' This 
meant about a dozen positions and times 
coming to the computer typist from the 
two nets. The net format was carefully de- 
signed lo minimise repeating data and 
was a near-copy of the ^favy MABS for- 
mat. It demanded rh-at after each position 
and time was reportM„ the r^( control ac- 
knowledged that piece of tnformatton. it 
worked perfectly; 

ABC-Ty was having a considerable ifTV 
pact on Ifie information the marati^on task 
force wanted us to provicte and I was hav- 
ing 5om« reservations atxsut the l^galHy 
of our plans Would we t)& de facto news 
reporters? I ca^^ed the Engineer-inCharge 
of the SeattJe FCC Held office who re- 
ferred the question to an attorney In the 
Personat Radio Section in Washington^ 
DhC, and we had a 3-way conference Oall. 



The attorney was nKist helpful, obsen/fng 
that our prime objective was to provide 
Ihe course announcer wtth inforrrration artd 
that no remuneration was comirtg lor our 
servk^ea. He contended that we were OK as 
tong as no amaieurs were t>faced on the 
air tvoadcasting race information direct- 
ly. Our data was gotng into a ci^inputer 
wtiich was creating a detay. albeit small, 
and we were "grindir^" on the data. ae>if' 
ing to the number we put In from the 
racer's shirt, her name, creating a split 
time and ''elapaed-llme-to-flnish-at-lhis- 
pace" time, for display to the announcers. 
The two operators assigned the ABC-TV 
traElers were not to transmit information 
requests. 

The weekend tiefore tfie race we held a 
meeting for ali the amateurs wf>o would 
be participating We handed out a coufse- 
operator location sfieet, a map showing 
ttie precise location of each miFepost. an 
Instruction siMpet, and a timer sf^eet with 
the r>et format. We went over the timing 
process and the net reporting proceiSS. 
Then each operator went to his/her tcKa- 
tion to make sure h«/she knew wtiere it 
was and checked the radios through the 
repeater at that location for any dead 
spots. We let the assembled multitude 
know of a possibie major change: The 
FCC Special Temporary Authority {ST A J 
requested by the marathon task force al- 
lowing use of the 500-MH2 radios for the 
security team had been disapproved - it 
seemed that Ihe system might cause In^ 
terference with a low-power religious TV 
station 40 miles away! The mardthon task 
force tvad Washington Slate Senator 
Slade Gorton trying to reverse ttie FCC 
and was scrambling tor unused Depart- 
ment of Natural R«SOcirc«s (flro-fighting) 
radios as a backup >n tfte meantime. But — 
if worse came to worst — one of our neis 
woukd become the security system f As it 
turned out, the securtly t^m borrowed 
enough DNR radios to do the job, but they 
{jid not gel about 6 of them back. They 
were left on the sidewalk by ttie "security" 
people, or "lost. , ," 

The amateur we had assigned the task 
of riding with the ABC-TV camera I ruck re- 
ported that rf from ABC TV's own radio 
system and its CB radio, In the vicinity of 
the truck, would make Ihe special gyro- 
stabilized camera mount go bonkers. The 
camera cmw had been working two days 
to try to RFt-proof the mount, and when I 
weni to check they looked a little bedrag- 
gled. We found that the 220 icom 3AT 
didn't upset the mount, and the Icom iAT 
did, onJy slightly, when on high power and 
rigm next to the nrount. Eventually tfw 
camera crew mojnaged to seat ttie mcftunt 
from the RFi effects, and we mounted our 
mag-mounts on the other ertd of Ihe tfucK 
and hoped for the best 

We borrowed a new 29-foot travel trailer 
from a iocal dealer and got it into position 
two days before the event, with 200-Amp 
SBfvice, We installed a copiec borrowed 
from another dealer as a backup in case 



the computer system we'd developed dtdn't 
wofk. The copier was never turned Ofi! The 
day before the event we installed tr>e coov 
pute^s and radios and did a trial of the 
system tfie night before the event. 

Rac« day came. As Ifm position oper- 
atofS cfiecked in. It becaime appar^it thai 
everyof>e had showed up--all 60 oper- 
ators were in position! IhB town lined 
with spectators. Eight helicopters and 
several fi)(ed-wln@ planes C'ifcled over- 
bead at the start, The ham at the start 
transmitted the starting gun on both Z 
and 220, and the 25 tlminfi watches were 
started. 

The runners set a blistering pace — five 
and half minutes a mite or better, and aa 
I hay went by the first mitepost they were 
reported to t»e chatting with each other. , ^ 
lor tftem it was a Saturday 23.2-mJie Cake- 
walk! Our data began coming Jn and went 
into the computer and out to ifie course 
announcer 300 feei one way. to ABO-TV 
700 feet another way. lo KOMO-radio 700 
feet another way, and to the pfe:ss area 
near us (we were 140 feet from Ihe finish 
Iin4, 

The race took two hoarst thirty one min- 
utea. Itiree seconds, for Its winner, Joan 
BoHnoit, buf much tonger for its tast-place 
runner, who was about halfway around as 
Joan finished. As runners dropped out, 
they came lo our operators with requests 
for aid or for trainers to pick them up. 
These requests we relayed to the medical 
communily or the racers' support areas. 

After the race we held a brief evaluation 
meeting with the race directors—who 
were uniformly overjoyed with our opera- 
tion. ABC-TVs comments were that they 
had never seen such a volume of data. 
Whjie tfwy had about 17 cameras and 
mostly operated real-time, they were imi- 
pressed with our computers and wfth thie 
smoothness of our system. As a result of 
this and other equal iy tine efforts by the 
2600 volunteers from all over the state, wa 
may get to do It again. , Jn four years* 

My suggestions for anyone planning 
such an event are that you try to conceive 
Ihe eventual system months ahead. Sit 
around and brainstorm, Plan for a worst- 
case set of circumstances. If you do an 
event like this, create a notebook with a 
page for every milepoat and position, 
where every change can be noted. Have 
permission from the repeater owners in 
writing, in advance of the operation, and 
have backups for everything, including 
people, equipment, and systems. Overdo 
M if possible. Give several pecpte the task 
of docurDenting your efforts. Assign a 
cleanup commrttec to t»elp tear down your 
system after ii is over. Give ciedll to every- 
one—write let I era of Oj^Heciatton to any- 
one you borrow from on tfie most offtcial 
stationary you can get' Take all credit and 
all criticism with a grain of salt. Have fun, 
and good luck! 

Lee Chambers WB7UED 

111 1 Arch wood, #296 

Oiympia WA 9S502 



mAROS 



MT. OAVtS DXPEDttlON 

The Somerset Coimty Amttaur RadUo 
Qub will sponsor its third annual DXpedi- 
tlon to the highest point in Pennayivania, 
Mt. Davis, from August 4th at 1400 EO&T to 
August 5th at 1400 EDST. 



Frvquencl^ are the upper 25 kH2 on the 
Qerwrat portion of the bands and CW In the 
Novice portion, with 30 meters being used 
after nIghlfaM ar>d 40 meters during the day. 
Each contact wishing to receive a beaut tluf 
certificate must send a 4^>^"x9" or larger 



envelope, Ser>d toe Bok 46S, Somerset PA 
1^01. 

JERSEY SHORE ARS 

The Jersey Sliote Amateur Radio Sooety 
will operate KFZ? at the Oyster Cnoek (NJ) 
f^uciear General ir>g Statkin tietween 14001^ 
Saturday. August 4, and 18Q0Z Sunday, Au- 
gust 5k Pfione operBli<ons will be near 3930, 
7270, 14270, 2127D, and 285T0 kHz: ONfNp^ 
k^Tech 30 kHz from lower band edges, VHF 
on 14a5a RITY on 3S40. 7060, and 14080, A 
special photo QSL Is available for an BASE to 

JSAF©, 619 17th Avenue, South Belrrrar NJ 
07719. 



THE BIRTHDAY BEAR 

The Bemk^i Amateur ftadio Club, using 
the call KO0I4I, will ix oom me m or a ting 
Smoki^ tf« Sear's birthday at the home of 
J^iUl BiMtyan and Babe ttw Slue Ox on Au^ 
gust 1im and I2tfi, from 140QZ tQ220(F. Op^ 
Wtting fi«quenc4es wilt be 10 kHz i^ from 
the lower edge of the General-class phorie 
bftrids on 20. 40. and 80 meters. To receive a 
spQCial tri-oolor certificate, send an BASE, 
size 9 ' X 12", to Bemidji Amateur Radio Qub, 
PQ Box 524, Bemidji MM 56601. 

PARAMUS NJ 

The Bergen Amateur Radio Association 



102 73 Magazine • August, 1984 



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73 Magazine • August, 1984 103 



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dudes cities In the Santa Dara, San Benito, 
Sa/ita Cruz, and Monterey County areas such 
asSalinaa, Holitster, Morgan Kill. Castroville, 
and San Juan Baulisia Tbe area lies on ttie 
frtnge of Silicon Vaihey, souin of the San 
Francisco Bay. but Its primal indusUy is 
agrlcuUufe. irK:ludlng tt>e growl ng and pro- 
cesaing of garlic. The city of Gilroy sponsors 
an annual Garlic Festival, and this award Is In 
keeping with that spirit. 

Award submissions should be sent to the 
GARC Secretary. PO Box 21 7B, Gllroy CA 
96(^1 -21 m QSL csds wilt be retun^ed only 
if accompanied t3y sufficiertt fetum postage. 
For a curreni roatv of GARC mem toea . ^eod 
an SA^ to ttw GARC Secretary at the &^ 
dfBss grfflfii above. To be valid iof ihia awanl 
siatlcos m^m be members ot GARC at ttie 
time ol the contact, but n&&d rm be mem- 
bers at the ilrrte of the award submission. 



ABC RADIO CLUB 

Hie An>asfeufs for Better Communications 
{ASQ BmkQ C^ub o( ncrthetn liHnots will op- 
erate fOI^KOL on Augvtat lS^t9. 1964, frwn 
171D0Z 1o 2300Z at the site of Undenf^ 84. 
UndenhursL a rvxlhem nilnojs community 
ami pan of the gateway to the lakes region, 
will celebrate its second annual communlly 
festival, tjook for KA9K0L on 7.240 to 7245 
and/or 14.280 to 14.2&5. QSL SASE to Terry 
Orewi KA9K0L, 37323 N, Fsirview W Lane, 
Lake Villa 11 6DD47. 

SPACE DAY W 

Tlw Cascades Amateur Ratio Society 
fCAaSk in conjunction with tt« Mlcti^oBn 
Sottee Center in Jackson, MicNgafV is offer- 
ing a Space Day c«ftiflcata to alt stations 
who work W88CSQ durinQ Space Day aclM- 
ties. Uxk for WBdCSO on SJSQO. 7235, 
14285, 21.360, and 2a5lO starling at 0000 



GMT August 18 ^hroug^ 17tX) August 19. A 
onedoltar contritHitton is a^Red to oover coel 
of postage and materials, iylaii your log ^nfor* 
mation and SIJOO to CARS, Space Day B4, 
PO Box 51 2. Jackson Ml 48204 



FOX RIVER RADIO LEAGUE 

The Fox flJvef Radio League will t>e operai* 
Ing a ^pecial-evani station to celebrate the 
FRRUs 60th year of contlnuojs operation. 
The FRRL will be operating ffom the Kane 
County Falrgrourtde. St, Charles, IlirtoiS, on 
August 26, 1384, from 8 am until 4 pm (CDT^ 
t«lng th» FRRL caiittiofi W9CEa Sogoosted 
frequencies are !0 NHz up horn tfie lower por- 
tions of the Generaiclass phone banot on 
40, 3D, and 15 metera. 

For a oanificBTe or Q5U sand your OSL 
and an SASE to: Fox Rivw Ratio L^gtW, PO 
Box 443. Aufora \l 60507. 



WEiy PRODUCTS 



FIELD'STRENGTH PLUG^IN 

ELEMENT FROM BIRD 

ELECTRONIC CORPORATION 

The latest addition to the assortment of 
plug-In elamenia for Bird Electronic Cor- 
poration directional wattmeters is an eX* 
tremely sensitive relative fleid-atrengih 
element. Model 4030 expands the useful- 
ness of Thrylliw wattmeiers by helping 
optimize the radiated sJgtuU of any trans- 
mitter from 2 to 1000 MHz. 

It is easy te increase the reach of but I* 
ness or personai transceivers ar^ to 
•xtend the range of NTs by (uning, adjust* 

I. and posittooing antennas for maith 



mum meter indication on the host wait- 
meter. 

Model 403D employs modern broad- 
band circuitry instead of the highly reac- 
tive resonant networks of rrtost field- 
strength meters. The element corialsta of 
a fleiclbje receiving antenna, a single high* 
pasa network and a variabie-gain rf ampli- 
fler^detectof. A battery-saving fealure turns 
wtfything off wnen the elerrvent is removed 
frvn tr«a wattmeter. 

Typically full-scale defiecllon Is ob- 
tatcwd from a oneWatt CW source at ISO 
MHz throiigh a ouarter-wave anienna 3 
feel distant. Dynamic range Is at least 30 
dB. and battery life ts 100 hours or more. 




For further inforrnatlon, contact Bird 
E{»crrantc C&rporBtion, 3030$ Aurprs 
Road, Ctwefafid (Sofi>n} OH 44t39. Reader 
Service numt>er 477. 



MCM ELECTRONfCS 
1984 CATALOG 

MCM Beclronics. Centervflle. Ohio, a 
porta and accessories distrlt^utor to the 
electronics mduetiyt haa published their 
1984 catalog. 

The 120-page catalog co retains nnora 
than 4,500 parts and accessories. Fea- 
tured are over 500 new Items, including an 
expanded JIne of computer parts, new 
stytl, and video parts. Alao Included are a 
new line Of magnetrons for microwave^ 
Oven repair, new test equipment such as 
the Taiim« 20-MHz dual trace osclMo- 
acope. ar^ a larf^ selection of Japaneaa 
semlcorvductors. 

For ft free &opy of ih« i984 MCM Cata^ 
log, call toli free i8QQh543^330 (In Ohio, 
caH (800)-762-4375}. For more informatioht 
contact MCM BiBCtr&nfss. 358 F, Can- 
gmss Park Dr., OontBrviifB OH 45459; 
(51 3H 34-0031. Reader Service rtumbar 
400. 



HD<8999 ULTRAPRO 
CW KEYBOARD 

The HO-8999 UliraPro CW Keytoard. rt- 
oentiy tleve^oped by Heeth Company, is a 
third generation of code computers. A 
64<haracter type-ahead buffer permits 
typing faster than The key^^oard i^ i&end> 
ing. Tan var^abSe-lenglh buffers etimlnate 
waste when storing leKl. ^^essages stored 
in the buffers can be compiled, corrected^ 
or iranamltted with no more than three 



Neyatrokes. A large, four-digil LED display 
Indicates many functions: spead, spac* 
Ing. weighting, serial number, remaining 
messageH:haracter space, input error, 
tun« n^ode, sidetone on/off, keycfick, and 
individual buffer protection. An S-seg- 
ment b>ar grapli Indicate tultness of the 
type-afiead buffer. UJtraFro paramelefB 
can be set from the Neyboard, and battery 
backup of the CMOS memory ratal rks buff* 
er contents and ^aat-used pafameters 
ahould power fall or the keyt^oard be turned 
off, Throe different four4evet code-prac- 
tice modes are built in, as are turn-on clr^ 
cult diagnostics, a sidetone oscillator, 
and a speaker. 

For more details on Heath's HD-S999 Uh 
traPro CW Keyboard, send far I he laiesi, 
free l$4-page Heathkit Catalog. Write to 
Heam Com^iry, Otpf. f 5^355, B^mon 
H9fi>ar Ml 49^2, tn Canada, write lo 
H9§th Company. tQ20 Isiifjgmn Avenue. 
Ofpf. 3100, Toponfo. Onfar^o MBZ 523. 
Reader Service numtier 479. 



TELEX/HYGAIN ANNOUNCES 

HOT LINE 

Minneapolia— Telex/Hy-Gain has In- 
staiied a loll- free customer-service hot 
II r^ for amateur radio products. In I he 
continental tIS. tfie number is i90Q^2B- 
S652. In Minnesota, trm num&er lo dial is 
(812^887^5528 Calls will be accepted 
during nwmaf business rtours, Monday 
through Friday, 8:00 am to 5:00 pm. caritral 
time. 

The company stated that the toll -free 
number \& good only for calls concerning 
amateur-radio products. The purpose of 
the service is to assist amateura wlih 
product selections and Lo help answer 




Modei 4030 from Bini Elsclrontc Corpotatton. 

104 73 Magazine * August, 1984 



Tfm a^BSh HB-^99 UttfttPm CW Kmybemni 



questions about applications or Installa- 
Horia. The tolt-frea service is eftective im- 
mediately. 

for more Information^ contact Tef&x 
Communications, fnc, 9600 Aldftch Ave. 
Sa, Mmneapotis MW 65420; (6121^84^051: 
telex, Z9'7QS3. 

CENTURY/22 
CW TRANSCEIVER 

ten-Tec has announced the Century ^22; 
a 6-band CW transceiver. Premiered at 
Dayton, the new rig was scheduEed for 
production in July. A worthy successor to 
the popular Gentury/21, the Gentury/22 
fills the need for a reliable, low- power, no- 
frjlls yet effective HF CW transcei^^er. 

For more Information, contact Ten Tea, 
inc., Highway 411 E, Sevf^rvftie TN 37362: 
i6l5H53'?172. 

DESIGN ELECTRONICS OHIO 
T/R SWITCH 

Design Electronics Ohio has announced 
the Introduction of the QSK 15D0, an all- 
£OJIcf-state, American-made T/fi switch 
which u&ea state-of-the^art hfgh power pfn 
dtodes for ultra^fast silent switching. The 
InstalCptfon of the QSK 1500 between a 
QSK (full break-in) transceiver and any lin- 
ear amplifier (Includinp home-brew) al- 
lows fuil break-in QSK CW operation at 
the 1500-Watt power levei. In addition, It 
also ailows the operation of high-pcwer 
AMTOR wllh any amplifier. 

Since the OSK 1500 uses pin diodes En- 
stead of vacuum relays, Its operation is to- 
tally silent. Installation requires no modi- 
fications to either your QSK transceiver or 
your amplifier. Because of its broadband 
design, the 1300 will operate from l.fi MHz 
to 30 MH^ without any additional sw I tehee 
or controls to adjust. 

Tne external QSK TIB switch has vlrtu- 
aMy no tnaertlon loss on receive snd does 
not degrade the front-end performance of 
any transceiver Guaranteed insertion 
loss la less than 0.6 dB and typical inser- 
tion loss Is D.25dB. 

The QSK 1500 includes Bi no extra cost 
a custom-designed power supply and con- 



jf - 



i'Vmoi 4' « ?■?? V iK^P 'h i'lh^" U^'<i)i'^'m^u 




Ten-Tec's Cenwry/22 CW irenscei^er. 




The TTC30Q touchtone remote-Qontrot board from SpBCtrurrt Communications Corp. 



trol panel plus a fecelver-ltne protection 
circuit which prevents damage to the 
front end of solid-state QSK transceivers 
due to the presence of high-power rf fields 
(such as multi'Contest operations or near- 
by amateurs running high power). 
Installation of the 1500 does not change 



the pattern or character of the transmitted 
waveform^ nor does it produce any TV I or 
electronic garbage over the rest of the 
spectrum, it will not change the quailty of 
the signal that your OSK transceiver and 
linear amplifier produce; It only switches 
your rf and does not alter It. 



The QSK 150C comes as a 2-unit set, 
color coordinated to match most popular 
QSK transceivers. The two units furnished 
are the rf -switching unit which mourrts out 
of sight behind your operating desk, and 
the power supply /control unit which Is 
placed at your operating position. After In- 
stallation, there is only one control asso- 
ciated with the 1500— tf^e on/off switch, 

For further in format lon^ contact Design 
Bectronias Ohio, 4925 South Hammon 
floadr Qroveport OH 43125, or caii miph 
Ric^etf at (614^866-4267. Reader Service 
number 4?8. 

TTC300 TOUCHTONE™ 
REMOTE-CONTROL BOARD 

The Spectrum Communications Gorpo- 
ration TTC300 is a new DTMF ftouchtone) 
controller board which provides remote 
DTMF control of virtually any on/off func- 
tion via a radio or any type of lini^ with au- 
dio output (such as wire line or phone line). 
Typical applications include remote con- 
trol of functions at a repeater site or any 
Eocation with a radio Fine, and industrial 
controls at plants, pipelines, and con- 
struction sites, etc. 

The controller includes the following 
features: 

• new high-quality crystal-controlled de- 
coder iC. with high immunity to falsing 

■ decodes ail 16 digits 

• 3 on/off functions per main card; ex- 
pands to any number of functions with ex- 
pansion cards 

• field programmable via plug-in ooded 
cards 

• 3 latched onfoff outputs, 4 pulsed out- 
puts, or a combination thereof 

• transistor switch outputs can directly 
trigger solid-state circuitry or relays, etc., 
for any type of controf function 

• can be interfaced to microprocessor 
controllers 

• low-power-consumption CMOS tech- 
nology; S-V-dc input 

For more information, contact Spec- 
trum Communications Corp., 7Q55 W, Ger- 
mantown Pk,, Norristown PA 7 940 i 9616; 
msyeSPirW: teiex S4&211. Reader Ser- 
vice number 481, 



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12240 NE 14th Ave.. Dept, 73 , No. Miami, F L 33161 Call (305) 853-3924 

73 Magazine ■ August, 1984 105 



11 INTERNATIONAL 






laration of 9 Cjvil Emergency was iitimi- 
nent. At 0345 the CD warning siren system 
began sounding, but even this system 
was affected by flooding; only four of the 
seven sirens were opefationaL Added to 
that, oni^ one of the three local radio sta- 
tions remained on the air after the decla- 
ration ot the emergency, the other two a jf- 
fering water damage to studio transmitter 
cables. 

The telephone call -out of AflEG person- 
nel to man CD HQ was thwarted because 
the flooding also had affected some of the 
telephone circuits. Only two operators 
were contacted by telephone. After the 
warning sirens had sounded, some A REG 
operators came up on the Invercarglll 660 
repeater and were directed to CD HQ for 
<iutles. Around 0415, several AREC oper- 
ators had arrived at CD headquarters, and 
all reported having to take numerous de- 
tours to get to the headquarters bulEdtng 
\n the center of the city. Fteports were be- 
Ing received through the 680 repeater of 
operators available but unable to cross 
the flood waters to get to the central city, 
so the communications center had to 
make the best use of the five operators 
available and hope ttiat others would 
eventually somehow find a way to head- 
quarters. 

By around 0430^ a small number of the 
GO HQ operations staff and emergency 
liaison officers had arrived and the opera- 
tion of CD HQ was under way. A Civil De- 
fense vehicle with a radio operator was 
dispatched to oheok the extent of the 
flooding, and information from this recon- 
naissance and the Emergency Service re- 
ports indicated a very senous Hooding slt- 
uetion throughout the entire city area. 

People evacuated so tar were located 
and cared for in a welfare center opposite 
CO HQ, so no communications were re- 
quired to that post. Regular situation 
reports were be^ng received over the CO 
communications net on 149 lAHz. and a 
steady flow of reports continued until 
about 1Q0O hours when It was reported 
that an evacuation was to take place In 
the suburban area of Grasmere. A radio 
link was set up with the welfare center at 
CoJ! ing wood Scho<3l, vifhere the evacuees 
from Grasmere would be taken. 

While all this activity was continuing In 
InvercargllE, the surrounding towns and 
areas in western Southland were e>(perj- 
enclng severe flooding and residents 
were being evacuated. The Invercargill 
680 repeater was used as a link between 
these areas and CD regional HQ, and Ihe 
AREC communications vehicle was set up 
at CD HQ to provide groundto-alf com mu- 
ni cat tons for the two Air Force Iroquois 
helicopters being sent by the Air Force to 
participate in rescue operations with the 
two civilian helicopters already operatmg. 
About 1400 hours, all hell broke loose 
as the flood banks on the Waihopai River 
broke and torrents of water engulfed the 
northern part of the city, the North Road 
Industrial area, and the South Grasmere 
residential area. Within 30 minutes the 
water was six to eight feet deep, covering 
this large area of the city, and the Colling- 
wood School welfare center was now cut 
off from the rest of the city. 

Because of Increased radEo traffic, a 
spare portable VHF set was dispatched to 
the Col I ing wood center by 4 WD vehicle, 
and a CD rescue squad was sent to assist 



in the Grasmere-Coilingwood area- The 
4WD vehicle and operator arrived at Col ling- 
wood almost an hour later, after detour ing 
through Otatara, West Plains, and across 
country, after many extra miles, when In 
normal circumstances the journey would 
have only been about 15 minutes. Shortly 
after the arrival of the operator at Colling- 
wood, the number of evacuees exceeded 
300 and a decision was made to try to 
move these people to a welfare center es- 
tablished at the Hostel of the Boys High 
School A convoy of Army trucks was to be 
used for this transport task, as the only 
BuitabJe route was by North Road and this 
was covered by four to five feet of water. 

A cWHian radio operator and a VHF set 
were supplied to the Boys High School 
welfare center, as there was still a short- 
age of AREC operators at HQ and by now 
(1530 hours) the entire city was cut off by 
flood water from the rest of the country. 
Radio messages from the two welfare 
centers, from the rescue squads, and from 
a rescue Jet boat kept the HQ operators 
extremely busy. Messages were tseing 
written on any piece of paper as the sup- 
ply of message pads had run out and there 
was no time to go looking for more. About 
this time^ the radio log became the com- 
muni cat Ions center's record of many of 
the messages sent and received. All mes- 
sages were unregistered because of the 
staff shortage, and as most messages re- 
quired life-saving action, prompt handling 
was essentlaL For many of the messages, 
it was quicker for the operator to get the 
addressee of the message to the radio^ 
then Immediate action and reply followed, 
with only brief details being recorded In 
the log,. 

Around 1600 hours, the Iroquois heli- 
copters arrived and became operational 
and Joined the two commercial helicop- 
ters in rescues at Grasmere Communtca- 
tion with these aircraft was on 11 9.1 UHt^ 
and this operation fully occupied one HQ 
AREC operator. 

At 1700 hours, flood waters En the south 
of the city had dropped enough to allow 
some replacement AREC operators to re- 
port to HQ, and these operators were used 
to relieve some of the HQ operators who 
had been on duty for over 12 hours. The 
emergency operations continued Into Fri- 
day night, it being necessary for an Iro- 
quois rescue even at OO&B Saturday morn- 
ing. The four aircraft returned to full ak 
operations again at 0600 hours. 

While the south city flood waters were 
subsiding during Friday evening, those in 
the north and west were still rising. Evac- 
uations continued in these areas through- 
out the night and Into the early hours of 
Saturday morning, At 0600 hours, Satur- 
dayi 26 January r a volunteer Army-trained 
radio operator, now a civilian, arrived to 
operate the ground-to-air communica- 
tions. He remained at this set until the 
next Tuesday, January 31, and did an ex- 
eel lent job. At 0700 hours, a request was 
received from the airport control tower to 
change frequency to 113.1 MHz^ and as 
well as ground to-air communications, CD 
HQ kept In touch with the airport as the 
water level rose there until eventually the 
tower operator had to be evacuated, the 
airport now t>eing completely flooded. 

Communications continued along 
these lines for the next few days, still with 
24-hour operation. Operators were now 
more plentiful, with the return of AREC 
members from holiday,, and a more civi- 



lized shift system could be Introduced. 
Messages had now changed from rescue- 
to welfare-type communications, but the 
volume had reduced only slightly. 

Tuesday, January 31, at OSOO hours^ 
after 100 hours of continuous operation, 
the emergency was over and It seemed as 
though we could pack up, when the con- 
troller requested 10 hand-he Ids and oper- 
ators to accompany the City Health, Elec^ 
trlcai, and Building Inspection teams who 
were examining the evacuated homes to 
declare them fit for habitation again. 
These teams had a vital need for commu- 
ni cat ions to coordinate their activities 
and to provide the Information Center 
with details so the residents concerned 
could be kept Informed. Most of the 
evacuated homes had been under six to 
eight feet of water and, to complicate mat- 
ters, nearly all had been fouled by sewage 
due to the breakdown of the sewage 
system. Most could not be reoccupied un- 
til some remedial action was taken. 

As many of the InverGargili operators 
were now back at their own work, it was 
difficult to see how this request could be 
filled, so an urgent call to Ounedin AREC 
for 10 operators with hand-helds and a 
portable repeater was made. The Dunedln 
team took over on Wednesday and con- 
tinued until Sunday, February 4, A mas- 
sive clean-up was scheduled in the Grass- 
mere area on that Saturday, when 25 
trucks, each with an operator with a hand- 
held controlled by a coordinating center, 
were arranged, As well as the operators 
with the trucks, a further 11 operators 
were assisting with the inspection and 
welfare operations between the hours of 
OBOO and I8D0. communications being on 
the two CD VHF frequencies and two 2m 
frequencies. 

Operations were now scaling down un- 
til eventually, on Sunday, February 12, all 
AREC and CD equipment was dismantled, 
and any communications then necessary 
continued by telephone. 

The sl2:e of the flooding disaster was 
enormous. The amount of damages was 
several million dollars, and at the peak of 
the emergency over 3000 people from 
about 1000 homes were evacuated and 
housed in welfare centers or with friends 
and/or relatives. It was to be some time be- 
fore all those evacuated were able to re- 
turn to their homes and return to a normal 
life again. Invercarglll Is a city of about 
5S,000 people, and from the statistics, 
about 5% of the population had to be 
evacuated from houses inundated by 
more than four feet ot water during the 
height of the flooding. Other areas In the 
Southland district were also affected, and 
also most of the city of Invercargiii. 

The summary of the radio communica- 
tions system indicated that it would be ad- 
vantageous for all Civil Defense head- 
quarters communications centers to have 
equipment available to operate on the 
amateur frequencies, so as to allow the 
large pool ol hand -held amateur trans- 
ceivers and portable equipment to be 
available for CP communications, since 
no local CD organization will ever have 
sufficient equipment of their own to cope 
with a similar extensive situation. The 
communications system must be por- 
table and flexible to allow sets to be in- 
stalled where you least expect It, and a 
total commitment to type-approved equip- 
ment on 14S to 150 MHz will not allow this 
to happen. 

Once again, the Amateur Service has 
been able to put Its expertise to good use 
in an emergency situation, and although 
Civil Defense has Its own special frequen- 
cies, most of the operators in the CD com- 
munications system areZL amateurs. But 
In this instance^ also, because of the ex- 
tensive nature of the disaster, additional 



radio assistance was made available 
through the Amateur Radio Emergency 

Corps, with additional ope raters ^ portable 
equipment^ and the amateuf-^radlo repeat- 
er systems within the area of the disaster. 

2L9-AUCKLAMD AND 
CAMPBELL ISLANDS 

Last month I told you a bit about the 
Kermadecs, ZL8. This month I shall try to 
provide you with a picture of the Campbell 
Islands. 

The Auckland islands are about 500 km 
south of the southernmost part of ZL and 
are uninhabited, except maybe for lots of 
penguins and seals. So there Is not very 
much chance of a contact with the Auck- 
land Islands unless some amateur visits 
the islands for some obscure reason. 
HoweveTf the Campbell Islands are a dif- 
ferent kettle of fish, Campbell Island, situ- 
ated 52* 33' S. 169* S^ E in the South Pacif- 
ic Ocean, covers an area of 114 square km 
and Is about 48 km In circumference. The 
island is semicircular, has good harbors, 
and is now a manned weather station, 
playing an Important part In the 
forecasting of New Zealand weather. 

Prior to this, It was used as a coast-; 
watching station during World War Hi and 
the history books tell us Campbell 
Island's first settlers arrived In the early 
1800s. Activities on the island included 
.sealing and whaling, and in later years a 
sheep station was established. 

As a weather station, there normally are 
about 1 people there at any one time, and 
the normal stay Is 12 months ^from No- 
vember to November}. A typical island 
crew is an officer In charge, a cook, a me- 
chanic, four Met personnel, and three 
technicians^ 

Besides three hourly weather observa- 
tions and two radiosonde balloon filghta 
each day. Department of 3c lent it ic and In- 
dustrial Research observations of a more 
technical nature are made. These consist 
of a close examination, at 15-minute Inter- 
vals, of the ionosphere's layers, rlometer 
recordings (relative Ionospheric opacity 
receivers) observing Ionospheric noise at 
30 MHz^ variations In the magnetic field 
^whlch Is quite considerable at this 
latitude), and VLF recordings using a 
delta loop made for Otago University, 

Auroral displays are quite common at 
Campbell, and a 16mm all-sky camera op- 
erates every night taking one exposure 
every five minutes to record the events 
though on many nights an abundance of 
clouds makes it difficult even for an ama- 
teur photographer. Continuous selsmo- 
logical recordings also are made at Camp- 
bell. 

The technicians process the magnetic 
and seismo records once each week, and 
the results are then sent t»y radiotelephone 
to Chrlstchurch. 

From time to time, amateur-radio oper- 
ators are amongst the technicians who 
are down at Campbell Island for their 
year's term, the last one being John Hoi- 
turn ZL3HI/A, a Grade II operator, who was 
active on BO-meter phone and CW as well 
as 2 meters. John was at Campbell during 
1982/83. 




POLAND 

Jerzy Szymczak 
73-200 Bi3iogar<t 
Buozka 2/3 
Pofand 

The SP DX Club in Poland celebrates 25 



106 73 Magazine • August, 1984 




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Fact #2: There is a direct correlation between 
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coming through your door and you'll fncrease sales. 
Fact #3: Fact #1 + Fact #2 = INCREASED SALES, 
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*^ Sem Usi of Adverthers on page 93 



73 Magazine • August, 19S4 107 



years Df activity. Afier one yesr of stagna- 
tion, the SP DX Contest took place in 1983. 
The best foreign radio siatJons: 
MQMB CategQry 

UK&LAZ S0.022 points 

UK4FAV 49,938 

UK5IBB 39.975 

SOMB Category 
UA1ZDW 28^0 
ilAeOHP 25.194 
UDfiCN 25.080 

Monotyand Category 
UBSBBT 3 6 MHz 

SM9NBQ 7 MHz 

UF6FF 14 MHz 

UA9AHS Z1 MHz 

UL7BBW 26 MHz 
The best foolish stations: 
MOUB C4t9ffOfY 
SP3KFf 189.334 poif^ta 

SP2PDJ iao.960 

SP7KTt 105.360 

SOMB Calw^ory 

SPaECV 111324 

SP9EVP 77^05 

SP9ADV e5.591 

Pahsh Mt>noband Category 

5P1ADM 3.&MHZ 

SP9EWN 7 MHz 

SP2AyC 14 MHz 

SP9CDA ai MHz 

SP6FBK 28 MHz 

The Ini&naUorvA Commission ol PRAA 
fPollsti Radio An^ateurs Associaliofi) has 
Its hands full. TT>e congress of the Fust 
Region of JAFUJ took place in Sicily this 
year Many documents and suggestions 
have b&&(^ pf^ared lof the Executive 
Committee of lARU. the Ministry ot Com- 
muntcatiofis, and Keadquanei^ of PRAAu 
As del^ates to (he congress of EARU 
w^re appointed SPSLVV. SP5HS, 
SP5BFW. and SPfiARE, The chairman ot 
the EMC team is to be SP920 As a can- 
didate for Executive Committee of the 
Fjrsi Beg ton of lARU. Wojciach NletyKs^a 
SP5FM haa been prq posed In connecilon 
wclh the World Year of Telscommunlca- 
tlon^ Ifie Stale R&dio Surveniiince gave its 
qonseni to heve 10 Polish radio stations 
under the WCV banner, 

The following contests era Included 
among "Inlercontest KF 198^" in Poland 
this year: 

• SP DX Contest fSSBl- April 7-8, 
m WPX Com est {CW)— May 26-27. 

• CQM!R-IVIay&-9. 

• Alf Asian Contest {SSB|— June \6'%J. 

• iARU Hadlo^port— Jyly 14-15. 

• WAE DX Contest |CW>- August 11-12, 

• All Asian Contest (CW)— Augusl 25-2§, 

• WAE DX Contest (SSBJ— September 

• CO WW DX Contwt ISSB)— October 
27^28- 



• CO WW DX Ckjntest {GW}— November 

24-25. 

The Pfesidenl of PRAA, Prof. A. Zielin- 
skt, sent a telegram ol condolence to the 
ARRL because of the death of the Presi- 
dent of tne APRL Vie Clark W4KFC. a 
well known in Poland American sender. 

Lately it was announced that District 
Verification Boards had b rough t 2.SG0 in- 
dividual and 1^ ctub licenses up to date 
by the end of November. 19ft3, This is not 
many in comparison with the atx^iit 12,000 
Polish radio amateurs. 




PORTUGAL 

Lufz Miguet tfe Sousa CT4UE 

POBoM 32 

S Joao ck> Esiorif 

2765 Foriugal 

We st>ouldn't have ariy doubts that 73 is 
a magaizirve fea<l ail ovec the world, ac- 
cording to ttie letters kindfy sent io me in 
the past weeks hy CTlAGO'Panama, 
CTtONCRS. DL2MCM, G4VyB, PT22AI 
(who came tast Mafch|, PY4LF. N90ZD 
{who caff^ m^ from REP HeaiSquarteiSj^ 
WlBFA, W4DGA. KAIEWT. WiTiV, and 
others. For alt ot them, my sJfic^e thanlts, 

IFACTA84 PORTUGAL 

L^st March, cki ttie 25th, for a period of 



one week, a very Important meeting was 
held in the Estoril Sol Hotel {Estoril) Ernie 
Bracy W1BFA. who came for the con- 
ferer>ce< too, left us a report concerning 
that event, as follows. 
" Rede dos Emissores Portagueses {REP> 
was host amateur-^adto station for the an- 
nual conference of the Internalionat Fed- 
eration of Air Traffic Control Associations 
and took its place amonji others m wei- 
comtng the air-traflic-contfol people lo 
Portugal. Other participants included the 
President of Portugal, the Minister of So 
cial Equipmeni, the Mayor oi Cascais, (he 
General Tourist Office, and the pybMc cor- 
poral lOh, AefO|}ortos e Navagacao Aeria 
(ANAj 

Each year WTBFA of}erates an amaieur- 
radio si at ion in confunction with ttw cofv- 
terence. (Last year's ofieration was in 
Yugoslavia and the callsign was 4l^ATC- 
WiBFArrU2) 

Ernie art lv«t in Portugal on March 241 h. 
11 was a windy, snoweiy day. However, 
amid hi^ gusts of wirtd and downpours 
of rain^ he and I installed a mint* 
beam (HQI) on a superstructure on the top 
o1 the Hotel Sot Estoril, the equivalent ot 
20 sionea in ttte air. A top^Ooor room rtad 
been FBaerved, but at the last minute it 
became unavailable. On Sunday, the 25th. 
Ernie ran the cables down to the l2lh floor 
and put the FT-flOJOM T^ Joaned by REP 
on the air. It was Just in time tomaJte a few 
WPX Contest OSOs and check out the 
cqvsrago. 

Daily, during the confefer>ce. station 
CTlR£PW1fiFA mas utilized as the Net 
Control Station for tfie Jnler national Air- 




Traffic-Control Net which operates on 
14^77 kHz 10:30-12:30 LTTC. (Last year the 
net had 900 stations check In; It supports 
a regular membership of over 100 sta- 
tiona.) The net is made up of air-traffic 
controllers, pilots, aviation technicians of 
various categories, and aviallon-intereal- 
ed people. Additlor^l information can be 
obtained from W1BFA, rtet controller 

Contacts during the we«k were mairv 
tained with some 30 countrtes in spite of 
(he poor propagation. Th« IFATCA Con- 
Terence was at t eroded by people from 
nearly 50 countries. In addition to WtBFA, 
EWBK, a G operator, and TF3MXK were in 
attendance. 

Ernie WIBFA expressed his warn), 
heartfelt appreciation lo REP fo< the loan 
of thie ec^uipment and for igivrng permis- 
ston for f f)e operation in Portugal. 

ELECTIONS IN HEP 

On trie 3?st of March, the annual Gener- 
at Assefnt>ty was field in Listxpn to ap- 
prove itte aiOcfMints and to elect a rMow 
board of directors for 1384/85 Due to trw 
alisence of candidate lists, tf>e Assembly 
e^ecied an administrative commisskon of 
5 members who stK>uld prepare for new 
eieciions in a year's time. We are sure that 
Ihte new members will continue the hard 
and exhaustive work that is involved in an 
association such as REP and alt the 
important affaifs. like reciprocal foreign U- 
certses, info for new hams. QSL bureau* 
periolica! information sheets, etc. 

That*s all from thi$ sunny and warm 
country. 73 until next time 



Hl^ 



WIBFA opera fiftg crtREP from hfs tstorfl howt {Photo ty CJ4UE} 



TAIWAN 

Tim Chen BV2A/3V23 
FO Box 30-547 
TaipeK Taiwan 
Republic of CNf}3 

A group of European hams consisting 
of PA/OH/SM was scheduled to arrive in 
Taipei for 7 days of operating from April 16 
through 23, 19B4. The group was granted 
the Special caiJstgn BVOAA Instead of 
BVfflOX as previously reported. 

Gerben PA9GAM< who initiated the DX^ 
peditFon application, arrived in Taipei on 
April 16 with his iC-740, amplifier 
|GLA10Q0)^ and a tribander verlical. 
Gerben advised us that SMOGMG had not 
embarked on the airplane because of hia 
father's illr\ess. Poor Lars! He missed the 
trip and so did not come up in the BVilAA's 
lo§s; we are greatly distressed that thtS 



1 



BVOAA 






QH2BH mn and PA9GAM at &V»AA 

108 73 Magazine • August, 1984 



Left to rtght: L C. Mmftg (CRA Deputy Secr0tarYK Matti OH2&H, Gerben PAOGAM. 
MiGitio J A 1 Mm, and me frim B VSAm V2Bi 




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^ See tisf of Advertisers on page 98 



73 Magazine • August, 1964 109 



happened to him, Matti 0H2BH arrived 
two days later, bringing along with him 
two transcervers (FT-757GX), amplifier 
(FL200t), and a Hy-Galn 2-etement beam, 
Matti picked up IMiclilo JAIiMIN to replace 
SMfflGMG in the group. 

Under the bright moon, the group 
started prorrplly to erect the beam anten- 
na tor the betterment of DX QSOs. The job 
was completed very quickly as the mast 
pipes and gi^y wires had been ready for 
use. Everyone showed enthusiasm and 
close cooperation to commemorate the 
special day~WoHd Amateur Day— En ad- 
dition to their DXpedition activity. Inciden- 
tally, QM Barry Goldwater K7UGA, visiting 
here^ had been Informed of thie DXpeditfon 
so he could en|oy some relaxing atong 
with Ws busy official duties. 

Last year, I reported in detail the expe- 
dition of the iSalian Blue Team, and follow- 
ing that many are stiM questioning me 
about the possibility of visitors operating 
in this country and how to get the permis- 
sion. Yes, It was a problem with us, but 
now Ghmese authorities in Taiwan have 
granted three permits to three different 
groups. Indivlduai visitors can be permit- 
ted to work as "secorid operator" at 
BV2A/BV2B. It indicates that we are 
agreeing to the ham's activities. 

What wiil be next? The Chinese authori- 
ties have gradually granted more privi- 
leges to group visitors; they are avowed to 
use 7 MHz besides the 10-, IS-, and 20-me- 
ter bands. 144 and 430 MHz: will be al- 
lowed for the next DXpedition group, then 
scheduled to arrive in TafpeJ on June 8th. 
The PA/OH/JA operators of BVCAA had a 
nice score ot approximately 12,100 QSOs 
covering 77 countries during the week of 
operation on the frequencies mentioned 
above. The outcome was considered good 
as propagation was FS. 

As before, alt visitors relaxed after their 
task was over and were entertained with 
sightseemg and a dmner party given by 
the Chma Radio Association (CRA)h v/here 
they were met by many VI Ps and old old- 
timers, 

Representing NCOXF. 0H2BH pre- 
sented to CRA a 2-eiement beam antenna 
to foster goodwill and to promote more 
ham activities in Ihis country. We thank 
the NCDXF for its thoughtful planl Also, 
we are happy to own an FT-757GX and 
FL2001 amplifier left behind by the ex- 
pedition group at our request. Together 
with the beam antenna, we have pledged 
to establish a Ihird BV station in this city. I 
am happily accepting a membership in 
NCDXF, by the recommendations of 
PA0GAMandOH2BR 



The last two expedition groups have 
shown us something different in radionop- 
erattng technique; all visitors are very 
skillful and weil -disciplined. Also they 
brought in new amateur-radio equipment, 
synthesized, compact, and efficient, and 
often gave surprises to other users who 
also are quite interested in etectronic 
technology. 

A local newspaper reported on this 
friendliness, saying that It made the pub- 
fie more informed of the unique quality of 
wortd amateurs, China Radio had a 
l5-minute program introducing amateur 
radio through its nationwide net. One of 
the tocal TV stations approached us for an 
interview, but a little too late. 

Another DXpedition, from Japan, is {as I 
write) arrtvmg soon; the call sign will be 
BVaABorBVffiJA. 

FLASH! The Chinese authorities have de^ 
cided to grant 10-12 ham station licenses 
\n the near future! I will report the dotails 
fater. 




TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO 

John L W^tjster9Y4JW 

cfo Department of Soff Science 

Unfv&rsity of the West fndles 

St, Augustine 

Trinidad 

Wesf indies 

THE 9V 8P UNK REPEATER PROJECT 

Thfs month we will look at an experi- 
mental project in which the TTARS and 
the Amateur Radio Society of Barbados 
(ARSB) have been Jointly pafticlpat- 
ing— the 9Y-SPLInk Repeater Project. 

During the first haff of 1983, this pfol- 
eot, which had been in the planning stage 
for several years, finally became a reailty, 
and the islands of Barbados and Trinidad 
were linked v^a the two- meter band. 

This VHF repeater system is the first 
stage in a plan to link all of the Caribbean 
islands on 2m and is being used as the 
proving ground for the plan. Such a VHF 
linK Is desirable between the islands esp^e- 
Oialiy in times of emergency and disaster. 
Many of the Caribbean islands are 
vulnerable to the hurricanes that can, and 
Often do, appear in this area during the 
period June to October. During these 
times, the islanders often have to rely on 



MM HELP 



I need an SM51 1 1 A chtp for my TFi-7600. 

Bill Fletcher AF96 

3302 Leopold Way, #111 

Madison Wl 53713 

Wanted: Data information on a modei 
TVC-600 Jerroid TV camera; also a ser- 
viceable ysed 8758 Vidicon. 

Tad Drogoskt 

507 Coal Valley Rd. 

aairtonPA15Q2S 

I am looking for a copy of Rldlrtg theAir- 
wAves by Eric Paimeri Jr. 

Stephen J. Sierzega WA9MEK 

3407 N. NormarKty Ave. 

Chicago IL G0G34 



I am looking for a copy of the Wayne 
Gre^n book How to Build a Microcom- 
puter and Reaiiy Understand ft by Sam 
Creason. Will buy or put down deposit to 

look at it. 

Harold May 

428 Philllppa 

Hinsdale IL 6U521 

1 am looking for a service manual and a 
s<;hematic tor a VHF Engineering VHF 
amplifier model PA-1501H serial number 
11 02. t am willing to pay copying and post- 
age costs. 

Jdft Barrett KAIPH 

112 Sunny Cove Drive 

Wanwick Rl 02^86 



amateur radio as their only means of relia- 
ble communications. 

The importance of having weli- 
equlpped and organized amateur-radio 
operators may easiCy be seen If you were 
to review the disaster that engulfed the is- 
land of Dominica when hurricane David 
wreaked havoc there for 8 hours on Au- 
gust 30, 1979. The tol towing year it was St. 
Ljcia's turn to suffer a similar fate with 
the passage of hurricane Allen, in both 
cases, amateur radio played leading roles 
rn bringing relief to the affected communis 
ties^ and they have been reported in the 
pages of 7^— the Domtnica disaster in the 
May, 19S0, issue by myself, under the tItJe 
"Hurricane." The planned fink repeater 
system is part of the ongoing effort to im- 
prove emergency communications through- 
out the region while at the same time en- 
hancfng our day-lchday contact with our 
neighbors. In the following paragraphs, I 
shall give a description of the system as it 
currently is [May, 1984) and comment on 
its success to date. 

On the Barbados end of the link, the re- 
peater site is located at Mount Misery; at 
329 meters above sea levei {ASL), it is the 
second highest point on the i si and, Mount 
Misery is actually the location for one of 
the communjcatton centers of Barbados 
External Telecommunications, Ltd,, (BETIJ— 
formerly Cable & Wireless— the company 
tfiat handles international communica- 
tions for the island. 8ETL kindty allowed 
the ARSB the use of the site and space on 
one of their 62m towers. 

Thti repeater is a Yaesu FTR'2410 with 
an input on 144.710 MHz and output on 
I45v310 MHz, The antennas used are a 
pair oi Ringo Ranger& with a vertical sepa- 
ration of 22 meters. The receive antenna i& 
located at 54 meters atsove ground level 
(AGL) and the transmit antenna at 32 
rt^eters AGL In addition to being the link 
repeater, ft also serves as a secondary (or 
backup) repeater for the island, should the 
primary system on 146.310^.910 MHz faiL 

The link to the Trinidad repeater is ef- 
fected with an Icom IC-290. This transceiv- 
er drives an BO-Watt amplifier Into a 
IS-element vert leal ly-potarized yagi 20 
meters AGL, pointed at Trinidad. The 
IC-590 transmits on 14/330 MHz and re- 
ceives on 147.Q30 MHz— the frequencies 
used by the 9Y repeater. The IC-290 is in- 
terfaced to the SP repeater via a home- 
brew interface designed and constructed 
by Ron Armstrong BPSBN. 

On the Trinidad end of the link^ a Vaesu 
FTR'2410 repeater also Is in use, driving a 
100 Watt ampilfler into a 4 x 4 element 
yagi array. The site is on Cumberland Hill 
in the northwestern part of the island. The 
location is 548 meters ASL and we have 
been provided space on a 62-meter tower 
through the l^ind courtesy of the local TV 
station. The antennas are located at the 
46-meter level. 

The system operates as lollows When 
a signai is received by the Barbados re- 
peater on 144.710 MH^f it keys up that re- 
peater and the signal is broartcast iocally 
on 14S-310 MHz. The interface intercon- 
necting the BP repeater and the !C-230 
also senses this signal and puts the 
iC-290 Into the transmit mode, sending 
this signal' across the Caribbean Sea to 
Trinidad on 147.330 MHz. The transmis- 
sion Is received by the 9Y repeater and si- 
myltaneousiy rehroadcast on 147.S30 
MHz for the reception of Trlnidadian 
hams. When the signai being receiived by 
the 8P repeater on U4.7i0 MHz ceases, 
the interface unit returns the 10-290 to re- 
ceive mode, and the 9V repeater also re- 
turns to the standby mode. 

When a signal from the 9Y end keys up 
the 9Y machine, the 147-930-MHz output 
signal is received by the lC-290 in Bar- 
bados. This triggers the Interface unit 



which switches on the BP machine^ and 
the original transmission is then simulta^ 
neously rehroadcast in Barbados on 
145.310 MHz, 

The distance between the two repeater 
sites is about 338 km, and with the anten- 
nas at each end being bss than 600 me- 
ters ASL, it can be seen that this is a very 
long path for reliable VHF commyni ca- 
tions. This fact has made Itself evident 
over I he past 10 months or so, and the re- 
liability of communication via the system 
has often left much to be desired. There Is 
much multi-path fading which, after the 
original novelty had worn off, has ren- 
dered operation through the system a 
frustrating experience, Many OSOs were 
had on the "ups " in the pathway, but only 
the patient operator waited through the 
"downs" to continue the QSO on the next 
"up'M 

The system as originally set up has 
proven unsuiitablie in its original ob}ective 
and an alternative plan has been pressed 
Into operation. On March 10, ig&4, the 
technical officers of the ARSB (8P6BN 
and SPOFV) changed the link transceiver 
over to the J 3 repeater on the island of 
Grenada. This repeater operates on 
146 160/,760 MHz. Grenada ^ due to its geo- 
graphical tocation, forms a most suitable 
stepping stone to break the lengthy path 
between Barbados and Trinidad. 

As 1 write this, the new system has been 
in use for about six weeks and has met 
with very good success. IX has allowed re- 
liable communications between hams lo- 
cated on the isEands of Barbados, Grena- 
da» St. Vincent snd the Grenadines, Trini- 
dad^ St. Lucia, and even some of the is- 
lands further north. In order to access this 
new system then, which is now a J3BP 
link, stations must access either the J3 or 
the 8P repeater as the 9Y repeater is no 
tonger a part of the system. On the Trini- 
dad end, therefore, this has resulted in 
very restricted access to the system, 
mainly on account of the i^orthern Range, 
a mountain range with highest pealts of 
just over 1000 meters, that is along the en- 
tire northern coast of the island. As a 
result, only a few stations in Ideal loca- 
tions on Trinidad, running higher power 
(100 W and upl into multi-eJement direc- 
tional antenna systems, are able to ac- 
cess the J 3 repeater and get into the new 
link. Later this year it is hoped to install an 
interface unit similar to the one used In 
Barbados to lfnJ< the J3 and 9¥ repeaters. It 
is expected that when this is compteted, 
al I 9Y stations wl 1 1 have access to the link. 
The ARSB has plans to Improve the in- 
stallation by the acquisition of a set of du- 
piexers to relieve some desensing and in- 
termodulation problems that have 
plagued their end from time to time. It is 
interesting to note that since the change 
has been made linking the J3 and SP re- 
peaters, the amplifier on the Barbados end 
has been cut oft and the repeater run 
barefoot— Just 10 W or approximately 500 
W erp— and reliable two-way communica- 
tmns have been maintained. 

PUBUC SERVICE ASSISTANCE 

On March 25, 1984, the TTARS provided 
the communications necessary for an In- 
ternational Go-Kart Race Meeting. The 
meeting was sponsored by the local Kart- 
Jng Club at the Qo-tCart track at Chagua- 
ramas on the northwestern peninsula of 
the FSland. This sport has recently been 
revived in Trinidad, and the organ Izers^ 
seeking a reliable communication net- 
work, approached the TTARS for assis- 
tance. The TTARS members who volun- 
teered their services were treated to a day 
of thriils but few spills, while at the same 
time assisting with the smooth running of 
the event. The 9Y participants included 
^M, -HM, ^WG, -VAN, and SR, 



110 73 Magazine • August, 1984 




THE FIRST NAME IN 
ELECTRONIC TEST GEAR 




NEW FROM RAMSEY-20 MHz 
DUAL TRACE OSCILLOSCOPE 

Unsurpassed qualrty at an unbestable price, ihe Ramsey oscifloscope 
compares to others costing hundreds more Features include a compo- 
neni te&img circuit that will allow you to easily test resistors, capacitors, 
digital circuits and diodes * TV video sync fitter » wide bandwidth ^ 
high sensitivity • inlemat graticule • high quadty rectangular CRT 

• ffoni panel trace rotator • Za^iis • high sensitivity x-y mode • very 
low power consumption • regulated power supply • built-m calibrator 

• rock solid triggering * high quality hook-on probes 



$39995 



high quality 

hook-on probes Included 




RAMSEY D-nOO 
VOM-MULTITESTER 

Compact and fetume. de- 
signed to serviet a wide van- 
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c^ude * tTiiftor back scale 
• dQuble-jewvled precision 
moving tOit • tfoutiie ovef- 
loati protection * an ideal Fow 
cost uriit for the beginner or 
as a spare bacK-up urMt 

$1995 

lett leads Afitfbatt*ry 
Included 




RAMSEY D-2100 

DIGITAL MULTtTESTER 

A compact easy to use und 
designed to operate hke a p^o 
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8 AT ifKti>ca:ior * aii range o-ver- 
load protection * overrange indi- 
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tian • vinyt carrying case 



$5495 



hp^ ie»t iead», baitery & vinyl 
carrying case Included 




RAMSEY 0-3100 
DIGITAL MULTIMETER 

R€habie. accurate d^g^ai 
rneasufefnerrts at an amoz- 
jngiy row cost * (n*lrr>e color 
coded pusrt buttons, speeos 
rang^selectmn ■ abf piastic 
Mr»mnd • recessed <ri put 
jacks * Dverloaa protect ion 
on «ll ranges * 3'o digit LCD 
3'JSpfay with auto zaro. auto 
polarity & low BAT indicator 




tesi leads and battery 
Included 




CT-70 7 DIGIT 
525 MHz COUNTER 

Lab qualtly at a breakthrough price 
Feaigres * 3 frequency ranges each 
min pre amp • dual selectable gate 
tFmes • gate activity indicator 

• SOmV (?D ISO MHz typical sensitivity 

• Wide frequency range * 1 ppm 
accuracy 

«11995 

mir^ iiteludei AC adaptef 

QJ-7Q^\i ,,,. $95.95 

9^-4 nica^ pecte *=95 




CT-90 9 

600 MHz COUNTER 

The most varsati le for less than $300, 
Features 3 selectable gate timea ■ 9 
digits • gate l^^d^caEor • display hold 

* 2SmV fs^ 150 MM; lypjcai sensilnriti^ 

• 10 h^Hztimebasa for WWV calibra- 
tion • T ppm accuracy 

$14995 

wfred lncliud#t AC adaf^ter 

CT-^ Kit .,-....... il2d.9S 

DV-1 Q.1 PRiyiavefittmebse ..,59.9S 
aP-4 nicad pacfc fl.§5 




CT<12S9 0IGtT 
1 .2 GHz COUNTER 

A 9 dtgii counter that will outpertorm 

units C03tniiQ hundreds more. • gate 
indicator • 24mV @ 150 MHi typical 
sensltivUv < 9 digit display • 1 ppm 
accuracy • display hotd * duaj mputa 
with preamps 

$16995 

wired inctudet AC adapler 

0P-4 nicad pack ft,95 




CT-50 8 DIGIT 
600 MHz COUNTER 

A veraatiie fab bench counter with 
optional reoeive frequency adapter, 
which turns the CT-SO jnto a digital 
raadoul for most any receiver • 25 mV 
@ 150 MHj typical sensifiviiy • S digit 
diipiay * 1 ppm accuracy 



* 169^5 



CT^SOM ..- 

^A^^ recaiirer adapter lilt 



.,-,14,95 




DM-700 DIGITAL 
MULTIMETER 

Proie!^^^oiniat quality it a hobbyist 
pr^ce Features t nc\ ude 26 d 1 ff ereni 
ranges and 5 functjons • 3 ^ d«git, 'ir 
mcii LEOdispi^y • a utu mat ic decimal 
piacemeni • a uiomatic polarity 

$i1995 

wiifad incJudet AC adapter 

DM 700 kit S99.9S 

MP-1 probe sei .4.95 








imiltm. 4l*lirNri» 




PS-2 AUDIO 
MULTIPLIER 



The PS-2 It handy *of hfgh fesoJution 
aiifiio reSOlutJdfi meas^jrements. myl- 
(iplies UP in frequency * great for PL 
tone measuremer^ti « muiti plies by 10 
orlOO ■ D OtH; re^Qiut^ori B. lHjilt*in 
Brgnai pfeamp/cor^diitiarvef 



$4g95 



wired 

PS-2 kit 



PR -2 COUNTER 
PREAMP 

The Pf^-2 li »deai for measuring weak 
Shgnais from 10 to i 000 MHz • flat 25 
CJb ga-n • B1MC conneclors • great for 
sniffing ftf • ide*J receivef^TV 
presn^p 

$4495 

wlr«4 Inctydei AC adapter 

PR-2Kit S34,9& 



PS- 1 600 MHz 
PRESCALER 

£ A ten as thie f o'-gr of your pj'eseni 
CPunler to ioQQ Mr-tz • 2 staf p preamp 

• divide t>y tOcircuiiry • >ensiti¥«iy 
25m V (a 150 MHz • BfVC COf^nectOfS 

• dnva^ any counter 




wirt4 include* AC adapter 
PS'ia^tt 



S49.9S 



$3S.95 



ACCESSORIES FOR RAMSEY COUNTERS 

Telescopic whip anlenna— BNC plug . . S 8.95 
High Impedance probe, light to a ding .. . 16.dS 
low pass probe, audio yse ........... 16,95 

Direct probe, general purpose use ..... t3.95 

TiJt bail lor CT-70, 90, 125 3.95 



B4MiA«t NK^*bi 



itLSsier cihaf Qt ] 



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716-586-3950 

TOEX 46fi735 RAMSEY CI 



TEFIIVI^ * ^atisl^ninn t]iii^rant€Ed • 0)(aminrtfnr 10 days: il lalpkiiSEMl. relurn 11 
ftriqinal JDfm lur ftilund • adEt B^l lor shtpjJinq *hi(3 msuraote In ^ mAKimuin a| 
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^26a 



w^ SifB Us! Of Advertisers on page 93 



TSMBgazIne • August, 1984 111 



THE MOST AFFORDABLE 

REPEATER 

ALSO HAS THE MOST IMPRESSIVE 
PERFORMANCE FEATURES 

(AND GfVES TH£M TO YOU AS STANOARO EQUIPMENT!) 



JUST LOOK AT THESE PRICES! 



Band 



440 



$680 
S780 



W1 red/Teatod 

ssao 

S98a 



Bom kit And mmd unnjs um cotap^ttt wih aii pmta, fmxkM&s. ha nk mi tk and €0«M/& 

CALL OR WRITE FOR COMPLETE DETAILS- 

Aiso amfisbls ior /wnofe aite imtiiftQ. cfosaimtxi and mFnots £»se 




FEATURES: 



SENSITIVITY SECOND TO NONS WPICALLY 
0.15 uV ON VHF, 0.3 yV ON UHF. 

SELEGTlVriY THAT CANT BE BEAT! BOTH 
@ POLE CRYSTAL FILTER & CERAMIC FILTER FOR 
GREATER THAN 100 dB AT ± 1 2KHZ, HELtCAL 
RESONATOR FRONT ENDS. SEE R144, R220, 
AND R451 SPECS IN RECEIVER AD BELOW. 

OTHER GREAT RECEIVER FEATURES: FLUTTER* 
PROOF SQUELCH, AFC TO COMPENSATE FOR 
GFF-FPIEO TRANSMITTERS. SEPARATE LOCAL 
SPEAKER AMPLIFIER & CONTROL- 
CLEAN. EASY TUNE TRANSMITTER; UP TO 20 WATTS OUT 
{UP TO SOW WITH OPTIONAL PA). 



HIGH QUALITY MODULES FOR 
REPEATERS, LINKS, TELEMETRY, ETC, 



HIGH-PERFORMANCE 
RECEIVER MODULES 



TRANSMITTERS 




R144yR220FMRCVR3for2Mor220MHz. 
0.1 SuVsens,; 8 pole xtaJ fitter & ceramic filter 
in K helical resonator front end for exceptional 
selectivityp more than -100 dB at ±12 kHz, 
best available today. Ffutter-proof squelch. 
AFC tracks drifting xmtrs. XtaJ oven avalL 
Kit only $138- 

R451 FM RCVR Same but for uhf, Tuned line 
front end, 0,3 uV sens. Kit onty $138. 

R76 FM RCVR for 10M. 6M. 2M, 220. or 
commerciaf bands> As above* but w/o AFC or 
heL res. Kits only SI Id. 
Also avail w/4 pole fitter, only $9&/Klt. 

R1 10 VHF AM RECEIVER kit f of VHF aircraft 
band or ham bands. Only S9S, 

Rl 10-259 SPACE SHUTTLE RECEIVER, 
kit only $98, 



151 VHF FM EXCITER for 10M, 6M, 2M. 
220 MHz or adjacent bands. 2 Watts contin* 
uous, up to 2^/! W intefmittent. $68/kft. 




amironics 



t<f;,^^ 



T451 UHFFM EXCITE H 2 to 3 Watts on 450 

hajTt band or adjacent fraq. Kit only $73. 

VKF& UHF LINEAR AMPLfFTERS. Use on 

either FM Of SSB. Power levels from 1 to 45 
Watts to go with exciters & xmtg convefters. 
Several models. Kits from $78, 



A1 6 RFTIG HT SOX Deep dr^wn alum, case 
with tight cove rand no seams. 7x3x2 inches. 
Designed especially for repeaters, S20. 



ACCESSORIES 



t^2aa 




mm^T\ 



HELICAL RESONATOR FILTERS available 
separatety on pcb w/connectors. 

HRF-144 fof 143-150 MHz S38 
HRF~220 for 213-233 MHz S38 
HRF-432 for 420-450 MHz $48 

COR -2 KIT With audio mixer, local speaker 
amplifier, tail & time-out timers. Only $33, 

CQR-3 KIT as above, but with "courtesy 
beep". Only S58. 

CWID KITS 158 bits, field programmable, 
clean audio, rugged TTL logic Kit only S68. 

DTMF DECODERyCQNTROLLER KITS, 
Control 2 separate on/off functions with 
touchtones*, e,g., repeater and autopatch. 
Use with main or aux. receiver or with Au£o* 
patch. Only S90 

AOTOPATCH KITS. Provide repeater auto- 
patch, reverse patch, phone line remote 
control of repeater, secor^dary control via 
repeater receiver. Mar^y other features 
Only $90. Requires DTMF Module. 



NEW- SIMPLEX AUTOPATCH 

Use with any transceiver System includes 
DTMF & Auto patch modules above and new 
Ti m i ng m od lile to provide si m pie x aut opatc h 
and reverse autopatch. Complete patch 
system only S200/kiL Call orwritefordetails, 



112 73 Magazine • August, 1984 



NEW LOW-NOISE PREAMPS RECEIVING CONVERTERS TRANSMIT CONVERTERS 




f!| Hamtfonics Breaks 
'^.m thm Price Barrier! 

No Need to Pay SdO to 51 25 
-=s^ for d GaAs FET Preamp. 

FEATURES: 

• Very Low Noisa: 0.7 dB VHF. 0.0 dB UHF 

• High Gain: 1 8 to 28 dB. Depending on Freq, 

• Wide Dynamic flange tor Overload Resistance 

• Latest Duai-gate GaAs FET. StatJie Over Wide 
Range of Condi I ions 

• Rugged, Diode* protected Transistors 

• Easy to Tune 

• Operates on Standard 1 2 to 14 Vdc Supply 

• Can be Tower Mounted 



MODEL 

LNG-28 

LNG'50 

LNG-144 

LNG-220 

LNG-432 

LNG'40 

LNGrieO 



TUNES RANGE 



26-30 

46-56 

137-150 

210-230 

400*470 

30-46 
160-172 



MHz 
MHz 
MHz 
MHz 
MHz 
MHz 
MHz 



PRICE 

i4S 
S49 

$49 
S49 
S49 

S64 
$64 



ECONOMY PREAMPS 






Our traditional preamps^ pi^.sj^ . 
service. Over 20,000 in use throughout the 
world. Tuneable over narrow range. Specify 
exact freq. band needed. Gain 1 6-20 dB. NF = 
2 dB or less. VHF untts available 27 to 300 MHz. 
UHF units available 300 to 650 MHz. 



• P30Kp VHF Kit l6S£ ease 

• P30W, VHF Wired/Tested 

• P432K. UHF Kit less case 

• P432W, UHF Wired/Tested 



$18 
S33 
$21 
$36 



HELICAL RESONATOR 
PREAMPS 



''J^M 




Our lab has developed a new line of fow^noise 
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buitt in. The combination of a low noise ampHfter 
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while reducing intermod and cross- band inter- 
ference in critical applications. See selectivity 
curves at right. Gain = approx. 1 2 dB. 



Model 

HRA-144 
HRA-220 
HRA-432 
HRAi ) 
HRA-( } 



Tuning Range 

143-150 MHz 
213*233 MHz 
420-450 MHz 
150-174MHZ 
450-470 MHz 



Price 

$49 
S49 

S59 
$69 
$79 




Models to cover every practical rf & if range to 
listen to SSB. FM, ATV, etc NF = 2 dBor less. 



VHF MODELS 

Kit witfi Case S49 
Less Case S3 9 
Wired S69 



Antenna 
Input Range 

5052 

50-54 
144-146 
145-147 
144-144.4 
146-148 
144-148 
220-222 
220*224 

2 22 -aw 

£20-224 
222-224 



Receiver 
Output 

144*148 

23*30 

144*148 

28-30 

27^27.4 
25-30 
60-54 
28-30 
t44*143 
144-146 
60-54 
26-30 



UHF MODELS 

Kit wtlh Case $59 
Less Case $49 
Wired S75 



432-434 
435-437 
432-436 
432^36 
439.25 



26-30 
28-30 
1 44- 1 48 
50^54 
61.25 



SCANNER CONVERTERS Copy 72-76. 135* 
1 44^ 240-270, 400-420. or 806-894 MHz bands 
on any scanner. Wired/tested Only $88. 



SAVE A BUNDLE ON 
VHF FM TRANSCEIVERS! 



FM-5 PC Board Kit - ONLY $178 

complete with controls, heatsInK, etc. 

10 Watts, 5 Channels, for 2M or 220 MHz. 



White supply 
lasts, get $60 
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you buy an FM*5 Transceiver kit 
Where else can you get a complete transceiver 
for only SI 78 




For SSB. CW. ATV. FM, etc. Why pay big 
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be tinked with receive convertersfortransceive. 
2 Watts output vhf, 1 Watt uhf. 



For VHF, 
Model XV2 
KjtS79 
Wired SI 49 
(Specify band) 



Exciter 
input Range 

26-30 

28-29 

28-30 
27-27.4 

26-30 

50-54 
144-146 

50-54 
144-146 



Antenna 
Output 

144-146 
145^146 

50-52 
144*144,4 
220-222* 
220-224 

50-52 
144-148 

26-31 



For UHF. 
Model XV4 
Kit 399 
Wired $169 



28*30 
26-30 
50-54 
61^5 
144^148 



432-4^ 

435-437 

432-436 

439-25 

432-436* 



•Add S20 for 2M Input 




^P, 



f 



VHF a^ UHF LINEAR AMPLIFIERS. Use with 
above. Power levels from 10 to 45 Watts. 
Severai models, kits from $73. 



LOOK AT THESE 
ATTRACTIVE CURVES! 




Tyfttcaf S&fectivity Curves 

of Recemi^ and 

Hnilcai ResonBtors. 



IMPORTANT REASONS WHY 
YOU SHOULD BUY FROM THE 
VALUE LEADER: 

f, LafQ0Sf s&iection of vhf and uhf kits 
In tf?e worid, 

2^ Exceptional Quaiity and low prices due 
io large volume. 

3. Fasldefivery: mosffdts shipped same day. 

4. Compete, professionai mstmction 
manuals. 

5. Prompt factory service avaitabfe and 
tree phone consuitBtton. 

6. tn busirmss 21 y^ars. 

7. Seit more repealBf modufes Ihan aU 
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quaiity teetures tor much tower cost 



I 

p 



Call or Write for FREE CATALOG 

(Send $1.00 or 4 IRC*c for overseas mailing) 
Order by phone or mail • Add S3 S & H per order 
(Electronic answering service evenings & weekends) 
Use VISA, MASTERCARD. Check, or UPS COD. 



amironics, inc. 

Q5D MOUL RD. • HiLTON NY 14468 
Phone: 716-392-9430 

Hamtronics ' is a registered trademark 



See Ust of Ad^rtis^rs on p&0« 93 



73 Magazine • August, 1984 113 



■«P^BP«9^BB«m 



DEALER 
DIRECTORY 



Culver City CA 

Jim's Electronics, 3919 Sepulveda Blvd., Culver 
City CA 00230, 390-8003. Trades 463- id8^ San 
Diego, a27-57^S {Bmm NV), 

Fontana CA 

Complete line* ICOM. DenTrflTi, Ten -Tec, 
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82315, fi22-77 10, 

S&n Jose CA 

Bay ATetrs newest amateur fadio store. New 
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featute Kenwood* ICOM, Azden, Yaesti. Ten- 
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9S00fl^ a70-fififi5, 

New Castle DE 

Factory AutbfiriTKf] De-alerf Yaesu^ iCOM, Ten- 
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imile off 1-95. DvhwAzi: Amnteur Supply, 71 
Nfwidovr Road, New CisdeDE 19730, 328-7728. 

Boise ID 

Rocky Mouiilajn ar^'s newest ham dealer. Call 
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Rcffis WII7BYZ lia.>i tin: Largi^ stttcfc <jf arrjatEjur 
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Littleton MA 

Thv f pliable ham store serving NE. Full Eine of 
I COM fir Keruood. Y^vaa HTs. Drake. Daiwa, 
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Hu.stli'T, TeleKyHy-Cain products. Mirage 
umps., i\5ijroii P.S., Alpha Delta pT!>lectt>r3, 
AHHl. Cr Kantronics instruction aids. Whistler 
radat deiccton. Full lint; uf coas fittings. 
TEL— COM Electronie r:oinmiinic^iKi>n$, $75 
Great Rd. (Rt. llH), Littleton MA 01460, 
43«'3400/3D4a, 



Livonia Ml 

Complete photovolt&ig systems. Amateur radio. 
fe|;>t!Stfj", satellite, and computer applieations! 
Call Paul WpeAHO. Encon Fbotovoltaics, 
S7600 Schoolcraft Road, Livonifl Ml 44150, 
5234850. 

Hudson NH 

Loo k1 — hams, SWLs^ and e3£pefim«|ftt«rs: 

part?i. IxKtks, gear, antennas, towers. Call for 
quotes. Poles riV ELECTRONICS CENTER, 
ei Lowell Road (R&ytc 3A), Hiwlson NH 0305 L 

Albany, New York 
UPSTATE NKW YORK 

Ktinwtxfd, ICOM. Ten-Tee, Belden, dushcfafi. 
Larsen, Hustler. ARBL. Hy Gain. B&W, MF), 
Mirage. New and used equipment. Servtng the 
amateur community- since 1942. AdirarKisck 
Electronles, Ini:., l^Ul Central Avenue, Albany 
NY J 2205, 456-0203 (one mile west of Nortbwiiy 
exit 2W). 



Columbus OH 

The bij^ge${ and liest ham store in the Midwest 
JtiiturinR Kenwood and other quality pifodiU--lv 
with wofkitifl:fli!qj]a>'^. Wp seU rmly the best. Au- 
ihi:jrt?s^i;t K^nvcjod fucrvicf. . Universal Amatifur 
Radia, Ene., i^m Aida Dr., Reynoldsburg {Co- 
I lunbui} OH 4306S . S&f^im . 



DaUas TX 

IBM PCt/XT kitjii. :^uppli*!5, expansion prod- 
iiiiLs; video restorer kits for pay TV. CATV, 
Ekatellite hobbyist.^" dttrtronic project klLs.^app- 
tititts. Mo-re than 90EXJ parti in stock: .mpniic<.m- 
ductors, ICi, discrt^tes, video accessories. 
hKji%_ uudio, automotive, cabinet^., e^i'tiYipuler 
peripherals. Pleau: write frar yowr free 60 -page 
catalog: Sabcl E;^«ctFmiiG;s, 13650 Fltiyd Hd., 
Ste. 104, Daliai TX 75241^ 7g.1-«950 (formerly 
I.E.), 



DEALERS 

Your company name and intssage 
can contain up to 25 words for as 
little as $150 yearly (prepaid), or 
$15 pel month (prepaid quarterly), 
Nt:f mentioTi of mail-order busings 
or areaeode permitttxl. Directory' text 
and payment must reach us 60 days in 
advance of publicatiofi* For example, 
advertising for the Novtsmber *B4 issue 
must be in our hands by September 
i,9t. Mail to 73 Magazine, Peterborough 
NH 0345B. ATTNe Nancy Ciampa. 



114 73 Magazine • August, 1984 




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VAEBU 







fftMITCHIMCa fi'CWi.M S^MfW^T 



of paying too much for your Ham gear? The new generation of Yaesu high-technoioj 
equipment is designed with you in mind! New advances in computer-aided design and 
robotics manufacture help you save money while being assured of the best. . . from Yaesu!!! 



Affordable Excellence 

GENERAL COVERAGE 

Continuous coveroge on RX trom 500 kHz to 20 99 MHz in 10 Hz 
5t@p5. with eosy modiricoHon for MAI^S TX outaid© me Ham 
bands WARC bonds factory insiolted 



ACCESSORIES FACTORY PACKED 

Electronic keyer, dOO H^ CW fitter, speech processor. AlVI and 
FM units, oit-mode squelch. Woodpecker noise bionker. and 
receiver preomp all included m tfie bose pnce, not 



FULL PERFORMANCE 

Full CW QSK. full 100 watts output of 100% duty cycl© 
{SSB C W FMy and full microproc essor control wrlh duol VFOi 
eight memories wilh bilaterol memory VfO swop, ond 
personol computer (CAT System) compafibJirty moke the 
FT-7&7GX a wrnner, ot horns of oway 



FT 757GX ACCESSOPiFS 

FP- 7 5 7 G X S wtfchmg Pow0f Suppfy. FP' 7 5 7 H D Heavy D uty Po we r 
Supply ('or 100% duly cycie operation), FC'757AT Automatic 
Anfenno Tuner with Memory, FAS'1-4R Remote Antenna 
Selector, SP'102 Speoker wilti Audio Fiiteis. MD-lSfl Desk Mic. 
MH-IBd Hand Mic Rf-232C Compotei tn^rlac^ Moaule 



time you're in the mark©! for a better rl 
your Yaesu will get you througtil . 



The Compact Companion 



ULTRA-COMPACT DESIGN 

Chip components instolled Pv Yaesu s assembly robots signrfi- 
contty reduce circuil boord size, resutting m a rugged, 
reliable transceiver with a weight of only 450g, including the 
standord FNB-3 battery 



HANDS- FREE VOX 

A VOX (volce-actuoted tronsmit) unit is bullMa allowing 
honds^free operation when the optional YH-2 Heodsef Is used. 
kfaol tor tower work, public sotety. ot other opplicotions 
where manual PTI control is modvisoble level control 
provided 



FULL FLEXIBILITY 

Built-in S- meter, thumbfliiftieel frequency programming. Hi LOW 
power switch, busy channel ond transmit indicators ore 
stondoid DTMF Encoder versJons. as weli os220 MHz and 440 
MH? lines, are coming soon! 



FT-203R ACCESSORIES 

FTS-7 CTCSS Module. FBA^S AA CeH Cose. YH*2 Headset, MH 12 
Speaker. Mic, FNB-4 High Capacity Battery, PA*3 Mobile 
Adapter, MMB-21 Mobile Hanger, N0 15 Quick Chorgef, AC 
Adopter. FH-J DIMF Keypad 



wifh 




f>T)ce« and specifications subject to change withoul notice or obHgatlon. 



V4fSU I 



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AESU ELECTROKICS CORPORATION aasi Walthori Wcsy, Paramounl. CA 90723 (213) 633-4007 
YAESU CINCINNATI SERVICE CENTER 9070 Gold Park Drive, Hamilton. OH 45011 (513) 674-3100 



^^ceseft&rm ^maH 



Uo 



TS-430S "Digital DX-terity!" 



I 
I 



Digital DX-terity... that outstanding 
altribute built into every KENWOO 
TS-430S thai lets you QSY from 
band to band, frequency to fre- 
quency, and from mode to mode 
with the speed and ease that will 
give you a dominant position in DX 
operations. 

KENWOOD'S TS^430S. a revo- 
lutionary, ultra-compact, HF trans- 
has already won the hearts 
0! 10 Amateurs the world over 
it uuvers 160-10 meters, including 
the new WARC bands (easily modi- 

I fied for HF MARS). Its high dynamic 

■ range receiver tunes from 150 kHz- 
30 MH^, It utilizes an innovative UP 
conversion PLL circurl for superior 
frequency stability and accuracy 
Two digital VFO's allow fast sp,.. 
frequency operations. A choice of 
USB, LSB, GW. or AfVI. with FM 
optional, are at the operators finger 
tips. All Solid-state technology per ^ 

I mits inputs of 250 watts PEP on /^ 
SSB, 200 watts DC on CW, 120 

, watts on FM (optional), or 60 
watts on AM. Final amplifier 
protection circuits and a 

I cooling fan are built-in 



Eight memories store frequency, 
mode, and band data, with Lithiu 
battery memory back-up. Memory 
scan and programmable automatic 
band scan help d up opera- 

tions. An IF shift circurl, a tuneable 
notch filter, and a Nanow-Wide 
switch for IF filter selection help 
eliminate QRM, It has a built-in 
speech processor. A fluorescent 
tube digital display makes tuning 
easy and fast, An all-mode squelch 
Ifcircurt. a noise blanker, and an RF 
attenuator control help clean up the 
signal. And there*s a VOX circuit 
plus semi-break-in, with side-lone 
AiMn-all it just could be that the 
expression "^Digital DX-terity* is a bit 
of an understatement 
TS-430S Optional Accessories: 
In typical KENWOOD iashion. there 
are plenty of optional accessories 
for this great HF transceiver. There 
is a special power supply, the 
PS-430. An external speaker, the 
SP-430p is also available. And the 
MB -4 30 mounting bracket is avail- 
able for mobile operation. The 







AT* 250 automatic antenna tuner was 
esigned primarily with theTS-430S 
in mind, and (or those who prefer to 
roll their own: the AT-130 antenna 
uner is available. The FM-430 FM 
unit is available for FM operations 
t The YK-88C (500 Hz) or YK-88CN 
P{270 Hz) CW filters, the YK^88SN 

SSB filter, and the YK-88A AM filter 
I may be easily installed for serious 
■ DX-ing. An MC-60A deluxe desk 
microphone, MC-SO and MC-85 
communications microphones, an 
MC-42S mobile hand miu,. and an 
y MC-55 8-pin mobile microphone, 
are available, depending on your 
requirements, TL-922A linear ampli- 
fier (not for CW QSK). SM-220 sta- 
tion monitor. PC-I A phone patch. 
SW-20D0 SWR/power meter 160-6 
meter. SWtOOA SWR /power/volt 
meter 160-2m, HS-4, HS-5. HS-6, 

IHS-;7 headphones, are also available. 
More information on theTS-430S 
IS available from authorized dealers 
of Trio-Kenwood Communications, 
1111 West Walnut Street, 
Compton. California 90220, 




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